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Sample records for aerobic walking program

  1. Aerobic resistance, functional autonomy and quality of life (QoL) of elderly women impacted by a recreation and walking program.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Maria José; Cader, Samária Ali; Ferreira, Márcia A; Giani, Tania S; Dantas, Estélio H M

    2011-01-01

    The present study had as a goal to analyze the impact of a physical activity program (recreation and walking) over the aerobic resistance, the functional autonomy and the quality of life of elderly women. To this experimental study the elderly women (65±6.40 years old) were randomly separated in experimental group (EG, n=31) and a control group (CG, n=28). A 6-min-walking test (aerobic resistance); a protocol of autonomy evaluation of the Latin-American Group for Maturity Development (functional autonomy), and the WHO QoL-old tests were utilized. The intervention happened with classes of recreation and walking practice, three times a week, for 1h, during 4 months. The results found revealed significant improvement for the EG at the aerobic resistance (Δ%=29.06%, p=0.0001), functional autonomy (Δ%=-27.15%, p=0.0001) and QoL (Δ%=15.47%, p=0.0001). It was concluded that the systematic physical exercise interferes in a positive way at the autonomy, aerobic resistance and QoL of the elderly women.

  2. The implementation of a community-based aerobic walking program for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis: A knowledge translation randomized controlled trial: Part II: Clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder in the world, as it is appears to be prevalent among 80% of individuals over the age of 75. Although physical activities such as walking have been scientifically proven to improve physical function and arthritic symptoms, individuals with OA tend to adopt a sedentary lifestyle. There is therefore a need to improve knowledge translation in order to influence individuals to adopt effective self-management interventions, such as an adapted walking program. Methods A single-blind, randomized control trial was conducted. Subjects (n = 222) were randomized to one of three knowledge translation groups: 1) Walking and Behavioural intervention (WB) (18 males, 57 females) which included the supervised community-based aerobic walking program combined with a behavioural intervention and an educational pamphlet on the benefits of walking; 2) Walking intervention (W) (24 males, 57 females) wherein participants only received the supervised community-based aerobic walking program intervention and the educational pamphlet; 3) Self-directed control (C) (32 males, 52 females) wherein participants only received the educational pamphlet. One-way analyses of variance were used to test for differences in quality of life, adherence, confidence, and clinical outcomes among the study groups at each 3 month assessment during the 12-month intervention period and 6-month follow-up period. Results The clinical and quality of life outcomes improved among participants in each of the three comparative groups. However, there were few statistically significant differences observed for quality of life and clinical outcomes at long-term measurements at 12-months end of intervention and at 6- months post intervention (18-month follow-up). Outcome results varied among the three groups. Conclusion The three groups were equivalent when determining the effectiveness of knowledge uptake and improvements in quality of life and other

  3. Implementation of Aerobic Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD).

    This information is intended for health professionals interested in implementing aerobic exercise programs in public schools, institutions of higher learning, and business and industry workplaces. The papers are divided into three general sections. The introductory section presents a basis for adhering to a health fitness lifestyle, using…

  4. Walking Advisement: Program Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byram Hills School District, Armonk, NY.

    The Walking Advisement program at Crittenden Middle School in Armonk, New York was started during the 1984-1985 school year. It was based on the work of Alfred Arth, a middle school specialist at the University of Wyoming. Essentially, the program attempts to expand the guidance function of the school by bringing faculty and students together to…

  5. Effects of Ballates, Step Aerobics, and Walking on Balance in Women Aged 50–75 Years

    PubMed Central

    Clary, Sarah; Barnes, Cathleen; Bemben, Debra; Knehans, Allen; Bemben, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of Ballates training (strengthening of the central core musculature by the inception of balance techniques) compared to more traditional exercise programs, such as step aerobics and walking, on balance in women aged 50- 75 years. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three supervised training groups (1 hour/day, 3 days/week, 13 weeks), Ballates (n = 12), step aerobics (n = 17), or walking (n =15). Balance was measured by four different methods (modified Clinical Test for the Sensory Interaction on Balance - mCTSIB; Unilateral Stance with Eyes Open - US-EO or Eyes Closed - US-EC; Tandem Walk - TW; Step Quick Turn - SQT) using the NeuroCom Balance Master. A 2-way (Group and Trial) repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc Bonferroni Pair-wise Comparisons were used to evaluate changes in the dependent variables used to describe stability and balance (sway velocity, turn sway, speed, and turn time). Measures of static postural stability and dynamic balance were similar for the three groups prior to training. Following the different exercise interventions, sway velocity on firm and foam surfaces (mCTSIB) with eyes closed (p < 0.05) increased for the Ballates group while the other two exercise groups either maintained or decreased their sway velocity following the training, therefore suggesting that these two groups either maintained or improved their balance. There were significant improvements in speed during the TW test (p < 0.01), and turn time (p < 0.01) and sway (p < 0.05) during the SQT test for each of the three groups. In general, all three training programs improved dynamic balance, however, step aerobics and walking programs resulted in be better improvements in postural stability or static balance when compared to the Ballates program. Key Points Exercise training can improve balance Need to consider both static and dynamic aspects of balance individually Improved balance can reduce the risk of fall PMID:24353456

  6. Aerobic Requirements for Moving Handweights through Various Ranges of Motion While Walking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auble, Thomas E.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of the aerobic metabolic requirements of normal walking with and without 1-, 2-, and 3-pound handweights among nine adult males indicated that walking while moving handweights through large ranges of motion provides a combined upper and lower body aerobic stimulus that is sufficient for endurance training for persons with poor to…

  7. D.U.C.K. Walking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steller, Jenifer J.

    This manual presents a schoolwide walking program that includes aerobic fitness information, curriculum integration, and walking tours. "Discover and Understand Carolina Kids by Walking" is D.U.C.K. Walking. An aerobic walking activity, D.U.C.K. Walking has two major goals: (1) to promote regular walking as a way to exercise at any age;…

  8. Successful Statewide Walking Program Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teran, Bianca Maria; Hongu, Nobuko

    2012-01-01

    Statewide Extension walking programs are making an effort to increase physical activity levels in America. An investigation of all 20 of these programs revealed that 14 use websites as marketing and educational tools, which could prove useful as the popularity of Internet communities continues to grow. Website usability information and an analysis…

  9. Walking Machine Control Programming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-31

    difficulty. 21 \\W;dkitiI M.’h 1 .(otri rot I’rogr ii ini g S A #2054 iI.Ld T’dl itdt Itort OWL WALKING ALGORITHMS The structure of the nervous system of...the nervous system . For this reason the cell it is usually attached to the ad- perpendicular axes and about acoustic the hair cell is sometimes...to drive air from the hydraulic system is to drive the compensator in while the ma- chine is tucked. The knee centering routine simply positions the

  10. Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Energetics Are Associated With Maximal Aerobic Capacity and Walking Speed in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background. Lower ambulatory performance with aging may be related to a reduced oxidative capacity within skeletal muscle. This study examined the associations between skeletal muscle mitochondrial capacity and efficiency with walking performance in a group of older adults. Methods. Thirty-seven older adults (mean age 78 years; 21 men and 16 women) completed an aerobic capacity (VO2 peak) test and measurement of preferred walking speed over 400 m. Maximal coupled (State 3; St3) mitochondrial respiration was determined by high-resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized myofibers obtained from percutanous biopsies of vastus lateralis (n = 22). Maximal phosphorylation capacity (ATPmax) of vastus lateralis was determined in vivo by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (n = 30). Quadriceps contractile volume was determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Mitochondrial efficiency (max ATP production/max O2 consumption) was characterized using ATPmax per St3 respiration (ATPmax/St3). Results. In vitro St3 respiration was significantly correlated with in vivo ATPmax (r 2 = .47, p = .004). Total oxidative capacity of the quadriceps (St3*quadriceps contractile volume) was a determinant of VO2 peak (r 2 = .33, p = .006). ATPmax (r 2 = .158, p = .03) and VO2 peak (r 2 = .475, p < .0001) were correlated with preferred walking speed. Inclusion of both ATPmax/St3 and VO2 peak in a multiple linear regression model improved the prediction of preferred walking speed (r 2 = .647, p < .0001), suggesting that mitochondrial efficiency is an important determinant for preferred walking speed. Conclusions. Lower mitochondrial capacity and efficiency were both associated with slower walking speed within a group of older participants with a wide range of function. In addition to aerobic capacity, lower mitochondrial capacity and efficiency likely play roles in slowing gait speed with age. PMID:23051977

  11. Effects of muscle strengthening versus aerobic exercise program in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Bircan, Ciğdem; Karasel, Seide Alev; Akgün, Berrin; El, Ozlem; Alper, Serap

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of aerobic training with a muscle-strengthening program in patients with fibromyalgia. Thirty women with fibromyalgia were randomized to either an aerobic exercise (AE) program or a strengthening exercise (SE) program for 8 weeks. Outcome measures included the intensity of fibromyalgia-related symptoms, tender point count, fitness (6-min walk distance), hospital anxiety and depression (HAD) scale, and short-form health survey (SF-36). There were significant improvements in both groups regarding pain, sleep, fatigue, tender point count, and fitness after treatment. HAD-depression scores improved significantly in both groups while no significant change occurred in HAD-anxiety scores. Bodily pain subscale of SF-36 and physical component summary improved significantly in the AE group, whereas seven subscales of SF-36, physical component summary, and mental component summary improved significantly in the SE group. When the groups were compared after treatment, there were no significant differences in pain, sleep, fatigue, tender point count, fitness, HAD scores, and SF-36 scores. AE and SE are similarly effective at improving symptoms, tender point count, fitness, depression, and quality of life in fibromyalgia.

  12. Effect of an aerobic training program as complementary therapy in patients with moderate depression.

    PubMed

    de la Cerda, Pablo; Cervelló, Eduardo; Cocca, Armando; Viciana, Jesús

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of an aerobic training program as complementary therapy in patients suffering from moderate depression. 82 female patients weredivided into a group that received traditional pharmacotherapy (Fluoxetine 20 mg) and a group that received pharmacotherapy plus an aerobic training program. This program was carried out for eight consecutive weeks, three days per week, and included gymnastics, dancing, and walking. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Beck Depression Inventory and the ICD-10 Guide for Depression Diagnosis, both administered before and after treatments. The results confirm the effectiveness of the aerobic training program as a complementary therapy to diminish depressive symptoms in patients suffering from moderate depression.

  13. The weighted walking test as an alternative method of assessing aerobic power.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Andrzej T; Klimek, Adam

    2007-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) directly during uphill walking exercise and to compare these values with those achieved during running and cycling exercise. Forty untrained students (20 males and 20 females) took part in three exercise tests. The running test was performed on a horizontal treadmill and the speed was gradually increased by 0.3 m . s(-1) every 3 min. The walking test was conducted on a treadmill inclined at 12% (speed of 1.8 m . s(-1)). The load was further increased every 3 min by the addition of a mass of one-twentieth of the body mass of the participant (plastic containers filled with water and added to a backpack carried by the participant). During the bicycle ergometry test, the workload was increased by 20 W every 2 min. All tests were performed until volitional exhaustion. During all tests, oxygen uptake, minute ventilation, tidal volume, respiratory frequency, heart rate, hydrogen ion concentration, base excess, and blood lactate concentration were analysed. The Pearson correlation coefficients between the weighted walking test and the commonly applied running and bicycle ergometry tests indicate a strong association with the new test in evaluating maximal oxygen uptake. The negligible differences in VO2max between the three tests for the male participants (running: 61.0 ml . kg(-1) . min(-1); walking: 60.4 ml . kg(-1) . min(-1); cycling: 60.2 ml . kg(-1) . min(-1)), and the fact that the females achieved better results on the walking test than the cycle ergometer test (running: 45.0 ml . kg(-1) . min(-1); walking: 42.6 ml . kg(-1) . min(-1); cycling: 40.1 ml . kg(-1) . min(-1)), confirm the suitability of the new method for evaluating aerobic power. The weighted walking test could be useful in the assessment of aerobic power in individuals for whom running is not advised or is difficult. In addition, the new test allows for determination of VO2max on small treadmills with a limited speed regulator

  14. Effect of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability with chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Dae-Hyouk; Son, Young-Lan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received intensive aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, 10-meter walking test, and six-minute walking test over the baseline results. The comparison of the two groups after the intervention revealed that the experimental group showed more significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and six-minute walking test. There was no significant difference in saturation pulse oximetry oxygen and 10-meter walking test between the groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that intensive aerobic exercise has a positive effect on respiratory capacity and walking endurance in patients with chronic stroke. PMID:27630438

  15. Aerobic Activity--Do Physical Education Programs Provide Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGing, Eileen

    1989-01-01

    High school physical education curricula should concentrate less on sport skill development and competition, and more on health-related fitness and aerobic activity. Results are reported from a study of the type and amount of aerobic exercise provided in 29 high school physical education programs in a large metropolitan area. (IAH)

  16. Community walking programs for treatment of peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Ryan J.; Rogers, R. Kevin; Hiatt, William R.; Regensteiner, Judith G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Supervised walking programs offered at medical facilities for patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and intermittent claudication (IC), while effective, are often not utilized due to barriers including lack of reimbursement and the need to travel to specialized locations for the training intervention. Walking programs for PAD patients that occur in community settings, such as those outside of supervised settings, may be a viable treatment option, as they are convenient and potentially bypass the need for supervised walking. This review evaluated the various methodologies and outcomes of community walking programs for PAD. Methods A literature review using appropriate search terms was conducted within PubMed/Medline and the Cochrane databases to identify studies in the English language employing community walking programs to treat PAD patients with IC. Search results were reviewed, and relevant articles were identified that form the basis of this review. The primary outcome was peak walking performance on the treadmill. Results Randomized controlled trials (n=10) examining peak walking outcomes in 558 PAD patients demonstrated that supervised exercise programs were more effective than community walking studies that consisted of general recommendations for patients with IC to walk at home. Recent community trials that incorporated more advice and feedback for PAD patients in general resulted in similar outcomes with no differences in peak walking time compared to supervised walking exercise groups. Conclusions Unstructured recommendations for patients with symptomatic PAD to exercise in the community are not efficacious. Community walking programs with more feedback and monitoring offer improvements in walking performance for patients with claudication and may bypass some obstacles associated with facility-based exercise programs. PMID:24103409

  17. Mall Walking Program Environments, Features, and Participants: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Belza, Basia; Allen, Peg; Brolliar, Sarah; Brown, David R.; Cormier, Marc L.; Janicek, Sarah; Jones, Dina L.; King, Diane K.; Marquez, David X.; Rosenberg, Dori E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Walking is a preferred and recommended physical activity for middle-aged and older adults, but many barriers exist, including concerns about safety (ie, personal security), falling, and inclement weather. Mall walking programs may overcome these barriers. The purpose of this study was to summarize the evidence on the health-related value of mall walking and mall walking programs. Methods We conducted a scoping review of the literature to determine the features, environments, and benefits of mall walking programs using the RE-AIM framework (reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance). The inclusion criteria were articles that involved adults aged 45 years or older who walked in indoor or outdoor shopping malls. Exclusion criteria were articles that used malls as laboratory settings or focused on the mechanics of walking. We included published research studies, dissertations, theses, conference abstracts, syntheses, nonresearch articles, theoretical papers, editorials, reports, policy briefs, standards and guidelines, and nonresearch conference abstracts and proposals. Websites and articles written in a language other than English were excluded. Results We located 254 articles on mall walking; 32 articles met our inclusion criteria. We found that malls provided safe, accessible, and affordable exercise environments for middle-aged and older adults. Programmatic features such as program leaders, blood pressure checks, and warm-up exercises facilitated participation. Individual benefits of mall walking programs included improvements in physical, social, and emotional well-being. Limited transportation to the mall was a barrier to participation. Conclusion We found the potential for mall walking programs to be implemented in various communities as a health promotion measure. However, the research on mall walking programs is limited and has weak study designs. More rigorous research is needed to define best practices for mall walking

  18. Exercise, Animal Aerobics, and Interpretation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    Describes an aerobic activity set to music for children that mimics animal movements. Example exercises include walking like a penguin or jumping like a cricket. Stresses basic aerobic principles and designing the program at the level of children's motor skills. Benefits include reaching people who normally don't visit nature centers, and bridging…

  19. Effects of a Rebound Exercise Training Program on Aerobic Capacity and Body Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomassoni, Teresa L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if aerobic dancing on rebound exercise equipment (minitrampolines) is an effective way to improve aerobic capacity and body composition. Although aerobic capacity improved, percent body fat did not change. Results were similar to those produced by conventional aerobic dance programs of like intensity. (MT)

  20. Aerobic exercise in adolescents with obesity: preliminary evaluation of a modular training program and the modified shuttle test

    PubMed Central

    Klijn, Peter HC; van der Baan-Slootweg, Olga H; van Stel, Henk F

    2007-01-01

    Background Increasing activity levels in adolescents with obesity requires the development of exercise programs that are both attractive to adolescents and easily reproducible. The aim of this study was to develop a modular aerobic training program for adolescents with severe obesity, with a focus on variety, individual targets and acquiring physical skills. We report here the effects on aerobic fitness from a pilot study. Furthermore, we examined the feasibility of the modified shuttle test (MST) as an outcome parameter for aerobic fitness in adolescents with severe obesity. Methods Fifteen adolescents from an inpatient body weight management program participated in the aerobic training study (age 14.7 ± 2.1 yrs, body mass index 37.4 ± 3.5). The subjects trained three days per week for 12 weeks, with each session lasting 30–60 minutes. The modular training program consisted of indoor, outdoor and swimming activities. Feasibility of the MST was studied by assessing construct validity, test-retest reliability and sensitivity to change. Results Comparing pretraining and end of training period showed large clinically relevant and significant improvements for all aerobic indices: e.g. VO2 peak 17.5%, effect size (ES) 2.4; Wmax 8%, ES 0.8. In addition, a significant improvement was found for the efficiency of the cardiovascular system as assessed by the oxygen pulse (15.8%, ES 1.6). Construct validity, test-retest reliability and sensitivity to change of the MST were very good. MST was significantly correlated with VO2 peak (r = 0.79) and Wmax (r = 0.84) but not with anthropometric measures. The MST walking distance improved significantly by 32.5%, ES 2.5. The attendance rate at the exercise sessions was excellent. Conclusion This modular, varied aerobic training program has clinically relevant effects on aerobic performance in adolescents with severe obesity. The added value of our aerobic training program for body weight management programs for adolescents with

  1. Grand Canyon Trekkers: School-Based Lunchtime Walking Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawthorne, Alisa; Shaibi, Gabriel; Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie; McFall, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of childhood overweight is especially troubling among low income Latino youth. Grand Canyon Trekkers (GCT) was implemented as a quasi-experimental study in 10 Title 1 elementary schools with a large Latino population to examine the effects of a 16-week structured walking program on components of health-related physical fitness: Body…

  2. The Effects of a 12-Week Walking Program on Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Shun-Ping; Tsai, Tzu-I; Lii, Yun-Kung; Yu, Shu; Chou, Chen-Liang; Chen, I-Ju

    2009-01-01

    Walking is a popular and easily accessible form of physical activity. However, walking instruction for older adults is based on the evidence gathered from younger populations. This study evaluated walking conditions, strength, balance, and subjective health status after a 12-week walking-training program in community-dwelling adults greater than…

  3. Vaccination response following aerobic exercise: can a brisk walk enhance antibody response to pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations?

    PubMed

    Long, Joanna E; Ring, Christopher; Drayson, Mark; Bosch, Jos; Campbell, John P; Bhabra, Jagraj; Browne, David; Dawson, Joel; Harding, Sarah; Lau, Jamie; Burns, Victoria E

    2012-05-01

    High intensity acute exercise at the time of vaccination has been shown to enhance the subsequent antibody response. This study examines whether an acute moderate intensity aerobic intervention prior to vaccination can enhance antibody response to pneumonia and half dose influenza vaccination. Sixty young (age (SD)=22.0 (6.1) years) and 60 older (age (SD)=57.5 (6.5) years) adults attended the laboratory on two separate occasions. At the first session, baseline antibody titres were determined, before participants completed either a brisk walk around campus at >55% of their age-predicted heart rate maximum, or a resting control condition, for 45 min. After the intervention, all participants received a full-dose pneumococcal vaccination and a half-dose influenza vaccination. Four weeks later, participants returned for a follow up blood sample. Multivariate ANOVA revealed an increase in total antibody titres against the influenza vaccine (F((12,106))=25.76, p<.001, η(2)=.75) and both the IgM (F((12,106))=17.10, p<.001, η(2)=.66) and IgG (F((12,106))=25.76, p<.001, η(2)=.75) antibody titres against the pneumococcal vaccine. However, there were no significant Time×Group interactions (p's all >.15), indicating that a 45 min brisk walk prior to vaccination did not affect antibody response to either the influenza or pneumonia vaccine. The results suggest that higher intensity exercise is necessary to augment antibody response to vaccination.

  4. Walking in the high-rise city: a Health Enhancement and Pedometer-determined Ambulatory (HEPA) program in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Leung, Angela Y M; Cheung, Mike K T; Tse, Michael A; Shum, Wai Chuen; Lancaster, B J; Lam, Cindy L K

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of good infrastructure in the public estates, many older adults in urban areas are sedentary. The Health Enhancement and Pedometer-Determined Ambulatory (HEPA) program was developed to assist older adults with diabetes and/or hypertension to acquire walking exercise habits and to build social support, while engaged in regular physical activity. This study aimed to describe the HEPA program and to report changes in participants' walking capacity and body strength after 10-week walking sessions. A pre- and postintervention design was used. Pedometers were used to measure the number of steps taken per day before and after the 10-week intervention. Upper and lower body strength, lower body flexibility, and quality of life were assessed. A total of 205 older adults completed the program and all health assessments. After the 10-week intervention, the average number of steps per day increased by 36%, from 6,591 to 8,934. Lower body strength, upper body strength, and aerobic fitness increased significantly after 10 weeks, along with improvement in the 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF™-12) physical and mental health component summary scores. A social support network was built in the neighborhood, and the local environment was utilized to make walking possible and enjoyable.

  5. Walking in the high-rise city: a Health Enhancement and Pedometer-determined Ambulatory (HEPA) program in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela YM; Cheung, Mike KT; Tse, Michael A; Shum, Wai Chuen; Lancaster, BJ; Lam, Cindy LK

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of good infrastructure in the public estates, many older adults in urban areas are sedentary. The Health Enhancement and Pedometer-Determined Ambulatory (HEPA) program was developed to assist older adults with diabetes and/or hypertension to acquire walking exercise habits and to build social support, while engaged in regular physical activity. This study aimed to describe the HEPA program and to report changes in participants’ walking capacity and body strength after 10-week walking sessions. A pre- and postintervention design was used. Pedometers were used to measure the number of steps taken per day before and after the 10-week intervention. Upper and lower body strength, lower body flexibility, and quality of life were assessed. A total of 205 older adults completed the program and all health assessments. After the 10-week intervention, the average number of steps per day increased by 36%, from 6,591 to 8,934. Lower body strength, upper body strength, and aerobic fitness increased significantly after 10 weeks, along with improvement in the 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF™-12) physical and mental health component summary scores. A social support network was built in the neighborhood, and the local environment was utilized to make walking possible and enjoyable. PMID:25170259

  6. Technology-Based Programs to Promote Walking Fluency or Improve Foot-Ground Contact during Walking: Two Case Studies of Adults with Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; La Martire, Maria L.; Oliva, Doretta; Groeneweg, Jop

    2012-01-01

    These two case studies assessed technology-based programs for promoting walking fluency and improving foot-ground contact during walking with a man and a woman with multiple disabilities, respectively. The man showed breaks during walking and the woman presented with toe walking. The technology used in the studies included a microprocessor with…

  7. Grand Canyon Trekkers: school-based lunchtime walking program.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Alisa; Shaibi, Gabriel; Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie; McFall, Sarah

    2011-02-01

    The incidence of childhood overweight is especially troubling among low income Latino youth. Grand Canyon Trekkers (GCT) was implemented as a quasi-experimental study in 10 Title 1 elementary schools with a large Latino population to examine the effects of a 16-week structured walking program on components of health-related physical fitness: Body Mass Index (BMI), waist circumference, and cardio-respiratory. Data on 1,074 research participants revealed no significance changes in BMI or waist circumference (p > .05); however, cardio-respiratory fitness increased by 37.1% over baseline. Cardiovascular fitness is an independent determinant of long-term health; therefore, the GCT program may have significantly improved the future health profile of the participants and decreased their risk of metabolic diseases.

  8. 75 FR 41103 - Energy Conservation Program: Re-Opening of the Public Comment Period for Walk-In Coolers and Walk...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... Part 431 RIN 1904-AB86 Energy Conservation Program: Re-Opening of the Public Comment Period for Walk-In... Energy. ACTION: Proposed Rule: re-opening of public comment period. SUMMARY: On April 5, 2010, the U. S... document for walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers is to be re-opened from July 15, 2010 to July 30,...

  9. SAWdoubler: A program for counting self-avoiding walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schram, Raoul D.; Barkema, Gerard T.; Bisseling, Rob H.

    2013-03-01

    This article presents SAWdoubler, a package for counting the total number ZN of self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on a regular lattice by the length-doubling method, of which the basic concept has been published previously by us. We discuss an algorithm for the creation of all SAWs of length N, efficient storage of these SAWs in a tree data structure, and an algorithm for the computation of correction terms to the count Z2N for SAWs of double length, removing all combinations of two intersecting single-length SAWs. We present an efficient numbering of the lattice sites that enables exploitation of symmetry and leads to a smaller tree data structure; this numbering is by increasing Euclidean distance from the origin of the lattice. Furthermore, we show how the computation can be parallelised by distributing the iterations of the main loop of the algorithm over the cores of a multicore architecture. Experimental results on the 3D cubic lattice demonstrate that Z28 can be computed on a dual-core PC in only 1 h and 40 min, with a speedup of 1.56 compared to the single-core computation and with a gain by using symmetry of a factor of 26. We present results for memory use and show how the computation is made to fit in 4 GB RAM. It is easy to extend the SAWdoubler software to other lattices; it is publicly available under the GNU LGPL license. Catalogue identifier: AEOB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU Lesser General Public Licence No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2101 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 19816 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C. Computer: Any computer with a UNIX-like operating system and a C compiler. For large problems, use is made of specific 128-bit integer arithmetic provided by the gcc compiler. Operating system: Any UNIX

  10. Sense of Well-Being in Patients with Fibromyalgia: Aerobic Exercise Program in a Mature Forest—A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    López-Pousa, Secundino; Bassets Pagès, Glòria; Monserrat-Vila, Sílvia; de Gracia Blanco, Manuel; Hidalgo Colomé, Jaume; Garre-Olmo, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective. Most patients with fibromyalgia benefit from different forms of physical exercise. Studies show that exercise can help restore the body's neurochemical balance and that it triggers a positive emotional state. So, regular exercise can help reduce anxiety, stress, and depression. The aim of this study was to analyze the benefits of moderate aerobic exercise when walking in two types of forests, young and mature, and to assess anxiety, sleep, pain, and well-being in patients with fibromyalgia. Secondary objectives included assessing (i) whether there were differences in temperature, sound, and moisture, (ii) whether there was an improvement in emotional control, and (iii) whether there was an improvement in health (reduction in pain) and in physical and mental relaxation. Patients and Methods. A study involving walking through two types of forests (mature and young) was performed. A total of 30 patients were randomly assigned to two groups, mature and young forests. The participants were administered the following tests: the Spanish version of the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR) at baseline and the end-point of the study, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) after each walk, and a series of questions regarding symptomatic evolution. Several physiological parameters were registered. Results. FIQR baseline and end-point scores indicated a significant decrease in the symptomatic subscale of the FIQ (SD = 21.7; z = −2.4; p = 0.041). The within-group analysis revealed that differences were significant with respect to days of intense pain, insomnia, and days of well-being only in the group assigned to the mature forest, not in the group assigned to the young forest. No differences were found with respect to anxiety. Conclusions. Although the main aim of this research was not achieved, as the results revealed no differences between the groups in the two forest types, authors could confirm that an aerobic exercise program

  11. Impact of a walking school bus program on children's active commuting to school and physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Walking School Buses (WSB) are groups of students, led to and from school by adults, in which students are picked up at designated "bus stops". The impact of WSB programs on students' active commuting to school (walking/cycling to school, ACS), and moderate-to vigorous-physical activity (MVPA) has n...

  12. Pilot Evaluation of a Walking School Bus Program in a Low-Income Urban Community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the impact of a walking school bus (WSB) program on the proportion of students walking to school in a low-income, urban neighborhood, we conducted a controlled, quasi-experimental trial in urban, socioeconomically disadvantaged, public elementary schools (one intervention and two control...

  13. Predictors of Improved Walking after a Supervised Walking Exercise Program in Men and Women with Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Polly S.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the changes in ambulatory outcomes between men and women with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) following completion of a supervised, on-site, treadmill exercise program, and we determined whether exercise training variables and baseline clinical characteristics were predictive of changes in ambulatory outcomes in men and women. Twenty-three men and 25 women completed the supervised exercise program, consisting of intermittent walking to mild-to-moderate claudication pain for three months. Men and women significantly increased claudication onset time (COT) (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, resp.) and peak walking time (PWT) (p < 0.001 for each group). However, change in PWT was less in women (54%) than in men (77%) (p < 0.05). Neither group significantly changed 6-minute walk distance (6MWD). In women, baseline COT was the only predictor for the change in COT (p = 0.007) and the change in PWT (p = 0.094). In men, baseline COT (p < 0.01) and obesity (p < 0.10) were predictors for the change in COT, and obesity was the only predictor for the change in PWT (p = 0.002). Following a supervised, on-site, treadmill exercise program, women had less improvement in PWT than men, and neither men nor women improved submaximal, overground 6MWD. Furthermore, obese men and patients with lower baseline COT were least responsive to supervised exercise. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrial.gov, unique identifier: NCT00618670. PMID:28116164

  14. Change in energy expenditure and physical activity in response to aerobic and resistance exercise programs.

    PubMed

    Drenowatz, Clemens; Grieve, George L; DeMello, Madison M

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is considered an important component of a healthy lifestyle but there remains controversy on effects of exercise on non-exercise physical activity (PA). The present study examined the prospective association of aerobic and resistance exercise with total daily energy expenditure and PA in previously sedentary, young men. Nine men (27.0 ± 3.3 years) completed two 16-week exercise programs (3 exercise sessions per week) of aerobic and resistance exercise separated by a minimum of 6 weeks in random order. Energy expenditure and PA were measured with the SenseWear Mini Armband prior to each intervention as well as during week 1, week 8 and week 16 of the aerobic and resistance exercise program. Body composition was measured via dual x-ray absorptiometry. Body composition did not change in response to either exercise intervention. Total daily energy expenditure on exercise days increased by 443 ± 126 kcal/d and 239 ± 152 kcal/d for aerobic and resistance exercise, respectively (p < 0.01). Non-exercise moderate-to-vigorous PA, however, decreased on aerobic exercise days (-148 ± 161 kcal/d; p = 0.03). There was no change in total daily energy expenditure and PA on non-exercise days with aerobic exercise while resistance exercise was associated with an increase in moderate-to-vigorous PA during non-exercise days (216 ± 178 kcal/d, p = 0.01). Results of the present study suggest a compensatory reduction in PA in response to aerobic exercise. Resistance exercise, on the other hand, appears to facilitate non-exercise PA, particularly on non-exercise days, which may lead to more sustainable adaptations in response to an exercise program.

  15. Beneficial effects of exercise on aerobic capacity and body composition in adults with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, K H; Hornak, J E

    1993-05-01

    Adults with Prader Willi syndrome were subdivided into an experimental group (n = 6) and a control group (n = 5) to determine the effects of an aerobic exercise program. Their resting heart rate, aerobic capacity, body fat percentage, body weight, and somatotype were determined. Participants in a 6-month walking program showed statistically significant differences in all variables measuring aerobic capacity and a significant variation in weight loss over the 6-month program compared to the control group.

  16. The Effects of an Aerobic Exercise Program on Psychological Variables in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perri, Samuel, II; Templer, Donald I.

    1985-01-01

    In a study assessing the psychological effects of exercise in the elderly, a 14-week aerobic program for older adults (N=23) produced a significant increase in self-concept and a significantly greater perceived internal locus of control. Improvement in memory was not found. (Author)

  17. Effects of an Aerobic Activity Program on the Cholesterol Levels of Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Marilyn A.; Rimmer, James H.

    1997-01-01

    Reports a study that examined the effects of a 15-week aerobic activity program on high school students' cholesterol levels. Analysis of control and participating students indicated that there were significant reductions in total cholesterol in the training group. There were no significant differences between groups in high density lipoprotein…

  18. Effects of an Aerobic Exercise Program on Community-Based Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pommering, Thomas L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Evaluation of a 10-week aerobic exercise program on 14 community-based adults with mental retardation found a 91.3% attendance rate and significant increases in maximal oxygen consumption, oxygen pulse, maximum ventilation, exercise stress test duration, and flexibility. However, no significant changes were observed in weight or body composition.…

  19. Walking Wellness. Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetgall, Robert; Neeves, Robert

    This comprehensive student text and workbook, for grades four through eight, contains 16 workshop units focusing on walking field trips, aerobic pacing concepts, walking techniques, nutrition, weight control and healthy life-style planning. Co-ordinated homework assignments are included. The appendixes include 10 tips for walking, a calorie chart,…

  20. The effects of a progressive resistance training program on walking ability in patients after stroke: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a progressive resistance training (PRT) program on the walking ability of chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis following chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] The participants of this study were fifteen hemiplegic patients. The main outcomes measured for this study were the peak torque of the knee extensor; the gait ability as measured by electric gait analysis of walking speed, walking cycle, affected side stance phase, affected side stride length, symmetry index of stance phase, and symmetry index of stride length; and 10-m walking speed; and the Berg balance scale test. [Results] Walking speed and affected side stride length significantly increased after the PRT program, and 10-m walking time significantly decreased after RPT in stroke patients. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the progressive resistance training program may, in part, improve the stride of the affected side leg of stroke patients after stroke and also positively impact walking speed. PMID:26504305

  1. Enhancing the Efficacy of Behavior Therapy for Obesity: Effects of Aerobic Exercise and a Multicomponent Maintenance Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perri, Michael G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Moderately obese volunteers were randomly assigned to two treatment conditions (behavior therapy or behavior therapy plus aerobic exercise) and two posttreatment conditions (no further contact or a multicomponent maintenance program). Clients in the aerobic exercise condition lost significantly more weight than those who received behavior therapy…

  2. Best Practices in the Design of Aerobic Training Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-02

    or entirely of women. Some studies consisted of samples of both sexes , and a few provided no definite information regarding gender. To represent...2004). Physiological changes following a 12-week gym -based stair- climbing, elliptical trainer and treadmill running program in females. J Sports

  3. The effect of 4-week aerobic exercise program on postural balance in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Gunendi, Zafer; Ozyemisci-Taskiran, Ozden; Demirsoy, Nesrin

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of submaximal aerobic exercise program on postural balance in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Twenty-five postmenopausal women without osteoporosis and 28 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis enrolled in this study. Balance ability of all subjects was measured by timed up and go test (TUG), four square step test (FSS), Berg balance scale (BBS) and Kinesthetic ability trainer 3000. After completion of initial measurements of balance, postmenopausal women with osteoporosis attended the submaximal aerobic exercise program on treadmill. At the end of the exercise program, balance tests were repeated. Balance tests of postmenopausal women without osteoporosis were repeated approximately 4-weeks after the initial measurement. There was statistically significant improvement in all balance scores in the postmenopausal women with osteoporosis after exercise training whereas there were no statistically significant differences in the scores of postmenopausal women without osteoporosis who did not exercise. This study showed that a 4-week submaximal aerobic exercise program provided significant improvements in static and dynamic balances in postmenopausal osteoporotic women.

  4. Work out by Walking: A Pilot Exercise Program for Individuals With Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Browne, Julia; Penn, David L; Battaglini, Claudio L; Ludwig, Kelsey

    2016-09-01

    The health benefits of exercise are well documented, yet annual health care costs related to physical inactivity are well within the billions. Furthermore, individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs) are more likely to lead sedentary lives, exercise less than the general population, and die prematurely from preventable causes. Previous research examining the effects of exercise on individuals with SSDs has been encouraging yet limited in creating accessible and sustainable interventions. The current pilot study developed and evaluated the impact of Work out by Walking (WOW), a multicomponent group walking intervention on the health of 16 individuals with SSDs. Results indicated improvements in indicators of physical health, activity level, social support, and mental health and a high level of program satisfaction. Future research should examine multicomponent group walking programs for individuals with SSDs in larger samples and with the inclusion of a comparison condition.

  5. WALK Community Grants Scheme: lessons learned in developing and administering a health promotion microgrants program.

    PubMed

    Caperchione, Cristina; Mummery, W Kerry; Joyner, Kelly

    2010-09-01

    The Women's Active Living Kits (WALK) Community Grant Scheme was a key component of a federally funded Australian initiative aimed at increasing local capacity to promote and engage priority women's groups in health-related physical activity. Under the program, community groups and organizations were provided with the opportunity to apply and receive small grants to support the development of women's walking groups with the aim of increasing physical activity participation levels in women, supporting innovative community ideas for increasing women's physical activity by improving social structures and environments, or both. This article describes the development and administration of the WALK Community Grant Scheme, outlines challenges and barriers encountered throughout the grant program process, and provides practical insights for replicating this initiative.

  6. Early mobility and walking program for patients in intensive care units: creating a standard of care.

    PubMed

    Perme, Christiane; Chandrashekar, Rohini

    2009-05-01

    New technologies in critical care and mechanical ventilation have led to long-term survival of critically ill patients. An early mobility and walking program was developed to provide guidelines for early mobility that would assist clinicians working in intensive care units, especially clinicians working with patients who are receiving mechanical ventilation. Prolonged stays in the intensive care unit and mechanical ventilation are associated with functional decline and increased morbidity, mortality, cost of care, and length of hospital stay. Implementation of an early mobility and walking program could have a beneficial effect on all of these factors. The program encompasses progressive mobilization and walking, with the progression based on a patient's functional capability and ability to tolerate the prescribed activity. The program is divided into 4 phases. Each phase includes guidelines on positioning, therapeutic exercises, transfers, walking reeducation, and duration and frequency of mobility sessions. Additionally, the criteria for progressing to the next phase are provided. Use of this program demands a collaborative effort among members of the multidisciplinary team in order to coordinate care for and provide safe mobilization of patients in the intensive care unit.

  7. Development of an aerobic capacity prediction model from one-mile run/walk performance in adolescents aged 13-16 years.

    PubMed

    Burns, Ryan D; Hannon, James C; Brusseau, Timothy A; Eisenman, Patricia A; Shultz, Barry B; Saint-Maurice, Pedro F; Welk, Gregory J; Mahar, Matthew T

    2016-01-01

    A popular algorithm to predict VO2Peak from the one-mile run/walk test (1MRW) includes body mass index (BMI), which manifests practical issues in school settings. The purpose of this study was to develop an aerobic capacity model from 1MRW in adolescents independent of BMI. Cardiorespiratory endurance data were collected on 90 adolescents aged 13-16 years. The 1MRW was administered on an outside track and a laboratory VO2Peak test was conducted using a maximal treadmill protocol. Multiple linear regression was employed to develop the prediction model. Results yielded the following algorithm: VO2Peak = 7.34 × (1MRW speed in m s(-1)) + 0.23 × (age × sex) + 17.75. The New Model displayed a multiple correlation and prediction error of R = 0.81, standard error of the estimate = 4.78 ml kg(-1) · min(-1), with measured VO2Peak and good criterion-referenced (CR) agreement into FITNESSGRAM's Healthy Fitness Zone (Kappa = 0.62; percentage agreement = 84.4%; Φ = 0.62). The New Model was validated using k-fold cross-validation and showed homoscedastic residuals across the range of predicted scores. The omission of BMI did not compromise accuracy of the model. In conclusion, the New Model displayed good predictive accuracy and good CR agreement with measured VO2Peak in adolescents aged 13-16 years.

  8. Exercise intensity of robot-assisted walking versus overground walking in nonambulatory stroke patients.

    PubMed

    van Nunen, Michiel P M; Gerrits, Karin H L; de Haan, Arnold; Janssen, Thomas W J

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that aerobic training should be considered in stroke rehabilitation programs to counteract detrimental health effects and decrease cardiovascular risk caused by inactivity. Robot-assisted treadmill exercise (using a Lokomat device) has the potential to increase the duration of walking therapy relative to conventional overground therapy. We investigated whether exercise intensity during Lokomat therapy is adequate to elicit a training effect and how assistance during walking in the Lokomat affects this exercise intensity. Ten patients with stroke (age 54 +/- 9 yr) walked in both the Lokomat and in a hallway. Furthermore, 10 nondisabled subjects (age 43 +/- 14 yr) walked in the Lokomat at various settings and on a treadmill at various speeds. During walking, oxygen consumption and heart rate were monitored. Results showed that for patients with stroke, exercise intensity did not reach recommended levels (30% heart rate reserve) for aerobic training during Lokomat walking. Furthermore, exercise intensity during walking in the Lokomat (9.3 +/- 1.6 mL/min/kg) was lower than during overground walking (10.4 +/- 1.3 mL/min/kg). Also, different settings of the Lokomat only had small effects on exercise intensity in nondisabled subjects.

  9. Pilot evaluation of a walking school bus program in a low-income, urban community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to evaluate the impact of a walking school bus (WSB) program on student transport in a low-income, urban neighborhood. The design was a controlled, quasi-experimental trial with consecutive cross-sectional assessments. The setting was three urban, socioeconomically disadvantaged, p...

  10. Six-month walking program changes cognitive and ADL performance in patients with Alzheimer.

    PubMed

    Venturelli, Massimo; Scarsini, Renato; Schena, Federico

    2011-08-01

    Motor inactivity is typical in the later stages of Alzheimer's disease although there is evidence that physical exercise can reduce depression and enhance performance of daily activities. The aim of this study was to determine whether a walking program could reduce the functional and cognitive decline of elderly nursing home residents in the later stages of Alzheimer's disease. A total of 21 patients (84 ± 5 years) were randomly assigned to a walking program (WG) or to a control group (CG). A 6-minute walking test (6WT), the Barthel index of activities of daily living (ADLs), and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) tests were performed before and after 24 weeks of the program. The WG showed significant improvement in the 6WT (20%) and ADLs (23%), while the CG decreased in MMSE (-47%), the WG had a slower decline (-13%). This study indicates that it is possible to stabilize the progressive cognitive dysfunctions in nursing home residents with Alzheimer's disease through a specific walking program.

  11. A Walking Education Program for Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Theory and Intervention Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegrante, John P.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A walking program for osteoarthritis patients promoted adoption by guided practice, reinforcement, and stimulus control; facilitated compliance by behavioral contracting; maintained behavior change through generalization and self-control strategies; and prevented relapse by realignment of normative beliefs and planned relapse techniques. (SK)

  12. Effects of a combined aerobic and strength training program in youth patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Perondi, Maria Beatriz; Gualano, Bruno; Artioli, Guilherme Gianini; de Salles Painelli, Vítor; Filho, Vicente Odone; Netto, Gabrieli; Muratt, Mavi; Roschel, Hamilton; de Sá Pinto, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    Cure rates of youth with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) have increased in the past decades, but survivor's quality of life and physical fitness has become a growing concern. Although previous reports showed that resistance training is feasible and effective, we hypothesized that a more intense exercise program would also be feasible, but more beneficial than low- to moderate-intensity training programs. We aimed to examine the effects of an exercise program combining high-intensity resistance exercises and moderate-intensity aerobic exercises in young patients undergoing treatment for ALL. A quasi-experimental study was conducted. The patients (n = 6; 5-16 years of age) underwent a 12-week intra-hospital training program involving high-intensity strength exercises and aerobic exercise at 70% of the peak oxygen consumption. At baseline and after 12 weeks, we assessed sub-maximal strength (10 repetition-maximum), quality of life and possible adverse effects. A significant improvement was observed in the sub maximal strength for bench press (71%), lat pull down (50%), leg press (73%) and leg extension (64%) as a result of the training (p < 0.01). The parents' evaluations of their children's quality of life revealed an improvement in fatigue and general quality of life, but the children's self-reported quality of life was not changed. No adverse effects occurred. A 12-week in-hospital training program including high-intensity resistance exercises promotes marked strength improvements in patients during the maintenance phase of the treatment for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia without side-effects. Parents' evaluations of their children revealed an improvement in the quality of life. Key pointsPatients with ALL present low muscle strength and poor quality of life.High-intensity resistance exercises combined with moderate-intensity aerobic exercise improved muscle strength and quality of life during the maintenance phase of ALL treatment.The exercise training program

  13. The effect of an aerobic interval training program on intermittent anaerobic performance.

    PubMed

    Gaiga, M C; Docherty, D

    1995-12-01

    The effects of a 9-week aerobic interval training program on anaerobic intermittent performance were investigated. Intermittent work consisted of four repeat 30-sec maximal efforts on a cycle ergometer (Wingate test) with 3-min recovery intervals. Thirteen men trained 3 days a week on the cycle ergometer, completing 3-min work-to-rest intervals and progressing from 5 to 10 reps. Relative and absolute values of aerobic power increased significantly for the training group (p < .05). No significant change was observed for the control group (n = 11). The training group demonstrated significant increases in the four anaerobic variables of short-term peak power (SPP), short-term anaerobic capacity (SAC), intermediate-term peak power (IPP), and total work (TW), and across the four 30-sec maximal repeats for anaerobic performance (T1-T4) (p < .05). Greater percentages of increase occurred for IPP and TW, especially during Repeats 3 and 4. The control group only demonstrated a significant increase in SPP for Repeat 3. These data suggest that the type of interval training program used in the study increased aerobic power and also enhanced performance in repeated high intensity, short duration work.

  14. Self-efficacy, physical activity, and aerobic fitness in middle school children: examination of a pedometer intervention program.

    PubMed

    Manley, Dana; Cowan, Patricia; Graff, Carolyn; Perlow, Michael; Rice, Pamela; Richey, Phyllis; Sanchez, Zoila

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity in children has been associated with a number of health benefits. Unfortunately, physical inactivity continues to increase. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among self-efficacy levels, physical activity, aerobic fitness, and body composition (relative body mass index [RBMI]) and to determine whether a school-based pedometer intervention program would improve those variables. The sample consisted of 116 rural 11- to 13-year-old students. Weakly positive correlations between self-efficacy, physical activity, and aerobic fitness and weakly correlated inverse relationships between self-efficacy, physical activity, aerobic fitness and RBMI were found. There was no statistical significance between the intervention and control group when analyzing outcome variables. These findings suggest that those with optimal RBMI levels have higher self-efficacy, physical activity and aerobic fitness levels. Although not statistically significant, the intervention group had greater improvements in mean self-efficacy scores, aerobic fitness levels, and RBMI.

  15. Walking the Talk of Racial Equity. SDS Report. Program Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Paul Foundation, St. Paul, MN.

    This newsletter describes the 6-year Supporting Diversity in Schools (SDS) project that seeks to create school environments free of racial prejudice and privilege. It briefly describes the program's working themes: (1) giving a voice to people who have traditionally been silent in the shaping of classroom practices; (2) developing pride in…

  16. Implementation of a 12-month community-based walking program to promote health in a rural, high risk, minority population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of implementing a rural walking program led by local community members, who served as walking group leaders. For the study, 39 participants (98% female; 54% elderly; community population 1,395) were recruited. Measurements included height, w...

  17. Overweight and Obesity among Children: An Evaluation of a Walking Program.

    PubMed

    Zuraikat, Nashat; Dugan, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of overweight and obesity among 5,158 school-age children and to evaluate the effectiveness of a walking program to encourage physical activity among children in Western Pennsylvania. According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), obesity in school-age children affects approximately 19% of children 6-11 years old in the United States (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2010c ). Data were collected over six years. The results of the study revealed the prevalence of obesity and overweight was higher than the national averages: 36% versus 20%. The results also revealed the walking program to be beneficial in reducing students' prevalence of obesity and overweight and keeping them moving.

  18. 75 FR 55067 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Walk-In Coolers and Walk-In Freezers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ...The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) previously published a notice of proposed rulemaking to adopt test procedures for measuring the energy consumption of walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers, pursuant to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), as amended. DOE is continuing to consider those proposals, but is now soliciting comments on several alternative proposed options. Once any final......

  19. Pilot evaluation of a walking school bus program in a low-income, urban community

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Jason A; Levinger, David D; Johnston, Brian D

    2009-01-01

    Background To evaluate the impact of a walking school bus (WSB) program on student transport in a low-income, urban neighborhood. Methods The design was a controlled, quasi-experimental trial with consecutive cross-sectional assessments. The setting was three urban, socioeconomically disadvantaged, public elementary schools (1 intervention vs. 2 controls) in Seattle, Washington, USA. Participants were ethnically diverse students in kindergarten-5th grade (aged 5–11 years). The intervention was a WSB program consisting of a part-time WSB coordinator and parent volunteers. Students' method of transportation to school was assessed by a classroom survey at baseline and one-year follow-up. The Pearson Chi-squared test compared students transported to school at the intervention versus control schools at each time point. Due to multiple testing, we calculated adjusted p-values using the Ryan-Holm stepdown Bonferroni procedure. McNemar's test was used to examine the change from baseline to 12-month follow-up for walking versus all other forms of school transport at the intervention or control schools. Results At baseline, the proportions of students (n = 653) walking to the intervention (20% +/- 2%) or control schools (15% +/- 2%) did not differ (p = 0.39). At 12-month follow up, higher proportions of students (n = 643, p = 0.001)) walked to the intervention (25% +/- 2%) versus the control schools (7% +/- 1%). No significant changes were noted in the proportion of students riding in a car or taking the school bus at baseline or 12-month follow up (all p > 0.05). Comparing baseline to 12-month follow up, the numbers of students who walked to the intervention school increased while the numbers of students who used the other forms of transport did not change (p < 0.0001). In contrast, the numbers of students who walked to the control schools decreased while the numbers of students who used the other forms of transport did not change (p < 0.0001). Conclusion A WSB program is

  20. A 12 week aerobic exercise program improves fitness, hepatic insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in obese Hispanic adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rise in obesity related morbidity in children and adolescents requires urgent prevention and treatment strategies. Strictly controlled exercise programs might be useful tools to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose kinetics. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that a 12-wk aerobic exerci...

  1. Effects of an aerobic exercise program on driving performance in adults with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Jeffrey; Mekary, Saïd; Bélanger, Mathieu; Johnson, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been linked to decreases in driving performance and an increased crash risk. Regular exercise has been linked to improved driving performance among healthy adults. The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between a 12-week cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program and driving performance among individuals with CVD. Twenty-five individuals, including 12 cardiac adults and 13 healthy adults, took part in this study. Simulated driving performance was assessed using a standardized demerit-based scoring system at 0 and 12 weeks. Cardiac participants completed a 12-week CR program between evaluations. At baseline, cardiac participants had a higher number of demerit points than healthy adults (120.9±38.1 vs. 94.7±28.3, P=0.04). At follow-up, there was an improvement in both groups' driving evaluations, but the improvement was greater among the cardiac group such that there was no longer a difference in driving performance between both groups (94.6±30 vs. 86.9±34.8, P=0.51). Participation in an aerobic exercise-based CR program appears to lead to improvements in simulated driving performances of individuals with CVD.

  2. We Huff and Puff: The Parameters and the Program of Aerobics for Children under Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastman, Wayne

    In today's society, young children have few experiences with aerobic activities, a pattern of exercise traditionally reserved for adults. This paper discusses how aerobic exercises can be used in a preschool environment, arguing that such activities are best presented using a thematic approach so that young children can form impressions about…

  3. In Hispanic, obese adolescents, a controlled aerobic exercise program teduced visceral and hepatic fat and improved insulin sensitivity, while resistance training only increased lean body mass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adolescent obesity is a serious public health concern. Aerobic and/or resistance exercise are potential strategies to improve metabolism, but data are scarce on the effects of well-controlled exercise programs in adolescents. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that a 12-wk controlled aerobic o...

  4. Factors associated with children being driven to school: implications for walk to school programs.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li Ming; Fry, Denise; Rissel, Chris; Dirkis, Helen; Balafas, Angela; Merom, Dafna

    2008-04-01

    In this study, we examined factors associated with children being driven to school. Participants were 1603 students (aged 9-11 years) and their parents from 24 public primary schools in inner western Sydney, Australia. Students recorded their modes of travel to and from school for 5 days in a student survey. Parents recorded their demographic data, their attitudes to travel, and their modes of travel to work, using a self-administered survey. An analysis of the two linked data sets found that 41% of students travelled by car to or from school for more than 5 trips per week. Almost a third (32%) of students walked all the way. Only 1% of students rode a bike and 22% used more than one mode of travel. Of those who were driven, 29% lived less than 1 km and a further 18% lived between 1 and 1.5 km from school. Factors associated with car travel (after adjusting for other potential confounders) were mode of parents' travel to work, parent attitudes, number of cars in the household, and distance from home to school. To be effective, walk to school programs need to address the link between parent journey to work and student journey to school.

  5. Home-based functional walking program for advanced cancer patients receiving palliative care: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although meta-analyses have demonstrated that physical activity can positively impact quality of life outcomes in early stage cancer patients, it is not yet known whether these benefits can be extended to patients with advanced cancer. In a previous pilot survey of patients with advanced cancer with a median survival of 104 days, participants felt willing and able to participate in a physical activity intervention, and reported a strong preference for walking and home-based programming. Here, we report on the initial development and feasibility of a home-based functional walking program in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care. Methods Nine adult patients were recruited from outpatient palliative care clinics and palliative home care. A pilot intervention trial was conducted over a 6-week period. The McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire (MQOL), Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI), Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), Seniors Fitness Test, four-test balance scale, and grip strength, were performed pre- and post-intervention. Participants wore activPAL™ accelerometers to monitor ambulatory activity levels. Results Of the nine recruited participants, three participants dropped out prior to baseline testing due to hospital admission and feeling overwhelmed, and three participants dropped out during the intervention due to severe symptoms. Only three participants completed the intervention program, pre- and post-intervention assessments: two reported improvements in total MQOL scores, yet all three shared an overall trend towards worsening symptom and total fatigue scores post-intervention. Two participants passed away within 90 days of completing the intervention. Conclusions This case series demonstrates the challenges of a physical activity intervention in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care. Further feasibility research is required in this patient population. Trial registration This study is

  6. Effect of a 12-week aerobic training program on perceptual and affective responses in obese women

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Luís Alberto Garcia; Ferreira, Sandro dos Santos; Freitas, Rosemari Queiroz; Henrique de Souza, Carlos; Garcia, Erick Doner Santos de Abreu; Gregorio da Silva, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to observe the effect of self-selected intensity or imposed intensity during aerobic training on perceptual and affective responses in obese women. [Subjects] The study included 26 obese women aged 30–60 years. [Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into two groups, with 13 subjects in each group: self-selected intensity and imposed intensity (10% above ventilatory threshold) groups. All subjects completed an intervention program that lasted 12 weeks, with three exercise sessions a week. The rating of perceived exertion and affective responses (Feeling Scale and Felt Arousal Scale) were monitored in the first, sixth, and twelfth weeks. [Results] Significant differences were observed between groups in heart rate and rating of perceived exertion. The affective responses during exercise were more negative in the imposed intensity group. [Conclusion] Use of a self-selected exercise intensity can promote smaller negative affective responses during exercise and provide a sufficient stimulus for improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness. PMID:26311958

  7. An Evaluation of the Canadian Forces Two-Mile Walk as a Test of Aerobic Fitness in Males over 45 Years of Age

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-01

    individuals have a rather sedentary lifestyle and do not realize the benefits of regular exercise. Since, for a variety of reasons, they are often...categories of "good" and "excellent" indicated by the walk test were high in view of the mainly sedentary lifestyle of the twelve subjects. These

  8. The Effects of 8-Weeks Aerobic Exercise Program on Blood Lipids and Cholesterol Profile of Smokers vs. Non Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taifour, Akef; AL-Shishani, Ahmad; Khasawneh, Aman; AL-Nawaiseh, Ali; Bakeer, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 8-week aerobic exercise program on blood lipids and cholesterol profile of smoker's vs. non-smokers. A total of 34 male subjects (18 non-smokers and 16 smokers) took part in this study. Both groups were pre- and post tested in their blood-lipids and cholesterol profile before and after the 8-week…

  9. Impact of a walking school bus program on children’s active commuting to school and physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Walking School Bus (WSB) pilot program was evaluated to determine the impact on student’s Active Commuting to School (ACS) and moderate-to vigorous- physical activity (MVPA). We conducted a randomized controlled trial in 8 low income, elementary schools in Houston, TX, USA. Students (n=149) wer...

  10. Comparison of aerobic fitness and space motion sickness during the Shuttle program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Richard T.; Davis, Jeffrey R.; Santy, Patricia A.

    1988-01-01

    Space motion sickness (SMS) is an important problem for short-duration space flight; 71 percent of STS crewmembers develop SMS symptoms. The search for effective countermeasures and factors that correlate with sensitivity has been extensive. Recently, several investigators have linked aerobic fitness with motion sickness sensitivity in the 1-G or high-G environment. This paper compares the aerobic fitness of 125 Shuttle crewmembers with their SMS symptom category. Aerobic fitness data were obtained from the exercise tolerance test conducted nearest the time of launch. SMS data were derived from the medical debrief summaries. Mean maximum oxygen consumption values for crewmembers in four SMS categories (none, mild, moderate, severe) were 44.55, 44.08, 46.5, and 44.24 ml/kg per min, respectively. Scattergrams with linear regression analysis, comparing aerobic fitness and SMS symptom classification are presented. Correlation coefficients comparing SMS categories vs. aerobic fitness for men and women reveal no definite relationship between the two factors.

  11. The effect of walking on cardiorespiratory fitness in adults with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Larose, Joanie; King, Judy; Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A; Reid, Robert; Maetzel, Andreas; Tugwell, Peter; Huijbregts, Maria; McCullough, Carolyn; Loew, Laurianne; Kenny, Glen P

    2013-08-01

    Walking programs alone or in combination with behavioral interventions have proven effective at improving quality of life among older adults with osteoarthritis (OA). It is unclear, however, whether the combination of both of these treatments is more effective at improving cardiorespiratory fitness in older adults with knee OA than a walking program alone or than unsupervised self-directed walking. In this study, we assessed cardiorespiratory fitness with 3 programs: a structured supervised community-based aerobic walking program with a behavioral intervention (WB; n = 41); a supervised program of walking only (W; n = 42); and an unsupervised self-directed walking program (n = 32). We measured maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2peak), exercise test duration, and workload, heart rate, and ventilation at maximum aerobic capacity in older adults with knee OA after 6 months of WB, W, or self-directed walking. Overall, V̇O2peak improved by 4% in female walkers (+0.9 ± 2.5 mL O2·kg(-1)·min(-1); p < 0.001) and 5% in male walkers (+1.3 ± 2.7 mL O2·kg(-1)·min(-1); p < 0.001), and the change in fitness was similar with all 3 walking interventions. In conclusion, low- to moderate-intensity walking may improve and (or) prevent decrements in cardiorespiratory fitness in older adults with OA. This response was comparable in supervised walkers with and without a behavioral intervention and in unsupervised self-directed walkers.

  12. 75 FR 186 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Walk-In Coolers and Walk-In Freezers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... free-standing structure, testing it as a whole building would not be practical. (Kason, No. 16 at pp. 1... calculation methodology or software program as an AEDM could be problematic. Owens Corning questioned whether... software as an AEDM could be unfair to manufacturers with fewer resources, because the software...

  13. Beneficial Effects of Exercise on Aerobic Capacity and Body Composition in Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Kathryn H.; Hornak, James E.

    1993-01-01

    Six adults with Prader Willi syndrome who participated in a six-month walking program showed significant differences in resting heart rate, aerobic capacity, body fat percentage, and weight loss, compared to a control group of five nonparticipants. (Author/JDD)

  14. The Efficacy of a 9-Month Treadmill Walking Program on the Exercise Capacity and Weight Reduction for Adolescents with Severe Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitetti, Kenneth H.; Rendoff, Andrew D.; Grover, Travis; Beets, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a 9-month treadmill walking (TW) program on exercise capacity and body mass index (BMI) for adolescents with severe autism. Ten youth residing in a residential/school treatment facility were assigned to either a supplemental treadmill walking (TW) or control group. Both groups continued to participate in their…

  15. Directed random walks and constraint programming reveal active pathways in hepatocyte growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Kittas, Aristotelis; Delobelle, Aurélien; Schmitt, Sabrina; Breuhahn, Kai; Guziolowski, Carito; Grabe, Niels

    2016-01-01

    An effective means to analyze mRNA expression data is to take advantage of established knowledge from pathway databases, using methods such as pathway-enrichment analyses. However, pathway databases are not case-specific and expression data could be used to infer gene-regulation patterns in the context of specific pathways. In addition, canonical pathways may not always describe the signaling mechanisms properly, because interactions can frequently occur between genes in different pathways. Relatively few methods have been proposed to date for generating and analyzing such networks, preserving the causality between gene interactions and reasoning over the qualitative logic of regulatory effects. We present an algorithm (MCWalk) integrated with a logic programming approach, to discover subgraphs in large-scale signaling networks by random walks in a fully automated pipeline. As an exemplary application, we uncover the signal transduction mechanisms in a gene interaction network describing hepatocyte growth factor-stimulated cell migration and proliferation from gene-expression measured with microarray and RT-qPCR using in-house perturbation experiments in a keratinocyte-fibroblast co-culture. The resulting subgraphs illustrate possible associations of hepatocyte growth factor receptor c-Met nodes, differentially expressed genes and cellular states. Using perturbation experiments and Answer Set programming, we are able to select those which are more consistent with the experimental data. We discover key regulator nodes by measuring the frequency with which they are traversed when connecting signaling between receptors and significantly regulated genes and predict their expression-shift consistently with the measured data. The Java implementation of MCWalk is publicly available under the MIT license at: https://bitbucket.org/akittas/biosubg.

  16. Association between respiratory muscle strength and reduction of arterial blood pressure levels after aerobic training in hypertensive subjects

    PubMed Central

    Galdino, Giovane; Silva, Andreia Maria; Bogão, José Angelo; Braz de Oliveira, Marcos Paulo; Araújo, Hayslenne Andressa Gonçalves de Oliveira; Oliveira, Maísa Sodoco; Maldonado, Ana Clara Desiderio; Ulisses de Oliveira, Herick; Borges, Juliana Bassalobre Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of present study was associate the increase of respiratory muscle strength with blood pressure levels in hypertensive subjects who underwent an aerobic exercise program. [Subjects and Methods] 90 hypertensive subjects were divided in two groups: intervention and control. All participants had an interview with a physiotherapist and were evaluated by 6-minute walk test, maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure, heart rate, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, before and after the 8 weeks. In the intervention group, the subjects underwent aerobic exercise program, 2 times a week for 8 weeks [Results] After the program, the levels of blood pressure were significantly reduced and the distance walked in the 6-minute walk test and the respiratory muscle strength were increased, compared to pre intervention and control group values. However, there was no correlation between the results provided by 6-minute walk test, maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure with systolic arterial blood pressure levels. Nonetheless, the distance walked correlated with respiratory muscle strength values, in the intervention group. [Conclusion] The present study demonstrated that the aerobic training was effective in reducing the arterial blood pressure in hypertensive subjects associated with an improvement of physical conditioning and respiratory muscle strength. PMID:28174465

  17. Effects on Balance and Walking with the CoDuSe Balance Exercise Program in People with Multiple Sclerosis: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    von Koch, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Background. Balance and walking impairments are frequent in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective. The aim was to investigate the effects of a group-based balance exercise program targeting core stability, dual tasking, and sensory strategies (CoDuSe) on balance, postural sway, walking, perceived walking limitations, and balance confidence. Design. A single-blinded randomized multicenter trial. No intervention was given to controls. Participants. People with MS able to walk 100 meters but unable to maintain tandem stance ≥30 seconds. Eighty-seven participants were randomized to intervention or control. Intervention. The 60-minute CoDuSe group program, twice weekly for seven weeks, supervised by physical therapists. Measurements. Primary outcome was dynamic balance (Berg Balance Scale (BBS)). Secondary outcomes were postural sway, walking (Timed-Up and Go test; Functional Gait Assessment (FGA)), MS Walking Scale, and Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale. Assessments were performed before and after (week 8) the intervention. Results. 73 participants fulfilled the study. There were significant differences between the intervention and the control groups in change in the BBS and in the secondary measures: postural sway with eyes open, FGA, MS Walking Scale, and ABC scale in favor of the intervention. Conclusions. The seven-week CoDuSe program improved dynamic balance more than no intervention. PMID:28042485

  18. Effects of a high-intensity intermittent training program on aerobic capacity and lipid profile in trained subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ouerghi, Nejmeddine; Khammassi, Marwa; Boukorraa, Sami; Feki, Moncef; Kaabachi, Naziha; Bouassida, Anissa

    2014-01-01

    Background Data regarding the effect of training on plasma lipids are controversial. Most studies have addressed continuous or long intermittent training programs. The present study evaluated the effect of short-short high-intensity intermittent training (HIIT) on aerobic capacity and plasma lipids in soccer players. Methods The study included 24 male subjects aged 21–26 years, divided into three groups: experimental group 1 (EG1, n=8) comprising soccer players who exercised in addition to regular short-short HIIT twice a week for 12 weeks; experimental group 2 (EG2, n=8) comprising soccer players who exercised in a regular football training program; and a control group (CG, n=8) comprising untrained subjects who did not practice regular physical activity. Maximal aerobic velocity and maximal oxygen uptake along with plasma lipids were measured before and after 6 weeks and 12 weeks of the respective training program. Results Compared with basal values, maximal oxygen uptake had significantly increased in EG1 (from 53.3±4.0 mL/min/kg to 54.8±3.0 mL/min/kg at 6 weeks [P<0.05] and to 57.0±3.2 mL/min/kg at 12 weeks [P<0.001]). Maximal oxygen uptake was increased only after 12 weeks in EG2 (from 52.8±2.7 mL/min/kg to 54.2±2.6 mL/min/kg, [P<0.05]), but remain unchanged in CG. After 12 weeks of training, maximal oxygen uptake was significantly higher in EG1 than in EG2 (P<0.05). During training, no significant changes in plasma lipids occurred. However, after 12 weeks, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels had decreased (by about 2%) in EG1 but increased in CG. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels increased in EG1 and EG2, but decreased in CG. Plasma triglycerides decreased by 8% in EG1 and increased by about 4% in CG. Conclusion Twelve weeks of short-short HIIT improves aerobic capacity. Although changes in the lipid profile were not significant after this training program, they may have a beneficial impact on health. PMID:25378960

  19. Effects of a walking exercise program for obese individuals with intellectual disability staying in a residential care facility

    PubMed Central

    Son, Sungmin; Jeon, Byoungjin; Kim, Heejung

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to confirm the critical importance of active obesity management through a fitness program, and to provide foundational data required for effective obesity management of disabled persons residing in residential carse facilities. [Subjects and Methods] The study period lasted 16 weeks, from August 1 to November 30, 2014. The study participants comprised 9 individuals and they participated in a walking exercise program. An occupational therapist assessed each participant’s body weight, body composition (body mass index [BMI], body fat, and abdominal fat), basic fitness (muscle strength and flexibility), and waist circumference. Collected data were encoded by items and analyzed with SPSS ver.18.0. [Results] It was found that the body weight, body composition (BMI, body fat, and abdominal fat), and waist circumference decreased significantly, while baseline fitness (muscle strength and flexibility) improved significantly. [Conclusion] Obesity management is critically important for intellectually disabled persons residing in residential care facilities. Active care through continuous program implementation is needed. Accordingly, walking exercise programs should be offered to obese intellectually disabled persons residing in residential care facilities. PMID:27134359

  20. 76 FR 31795 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Walk-In Coolers and Freezers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... erroneous temperature condition for walk-in freezers. DATES: Effective Date: June 2, 2011. FOR FURTHER... freezer container, uses, incorrectly and inconsistent with the statute, a prescribed test temperature of 35 F 1 F for freezers. The temperature that should have been inserted in that provision is 20 F 1...

  1. Decreasing Problem Behavior Associated with a Walking Program for an Individual with Developmental and Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roane, Henry S.; Kelley, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    In the current investigation, a functional analysis suggested that positive reinforcement in the form of physical contact maintained the self-injurious behavior of a girl with developmental and physical disabilities. We used the information obtained from the functional analysis to develop a treatment for noncompliance with walking in which a…

  2. Bilingual Text Messaging Translation: Translating Text Messages From English Into Spanish for the Text4Walking Program

    PubMed Central

    Sandi, Giselle; Ingram, Diana; Welch, Mary Jane; Ocampo, Edith V

    2015-01-01

    Background Hispanic adults in the United States are at particular risk for diabetes and inadequate blood pressure control. Physical activity improves these health problems; however Hispanic adults also have a low rate of recommended aerobic physical activity. To address improving physical inactivity, one area of rapidly growing technology that can be utilized is text messaging (short message service, SMS). A physical activity research team, Text4Walking, had previously developed an initial database of motivational physical activity text messages in English that could be used for physical activity text messaging interventions. However, the team needed to translate these existing English physical activity text messages into Spanish in order to have culturally meaningful and useful text messages for those adults within the Hispanic population who would prefer to receive text messages in Spanish. Objective The aim of this study was to translate a database of English motivational physical activity messages into Spanish and review these text messages with a group of Spanish speaking adults to inform the use of these text messages in an intervention study. Methods The consent form and study documents, including the existing English physical activity text messages, were translated from English into Spanish, and received translation certification as well as Institutional Review Board approval. The translated text messages were placed into PowerPoint, accompanied by a set of culturally appropriate photos depicting barriers to walking, as well as walking scenarios. At the focus group, eligibility criteria for this study included being an adult between 30 to 65 years old who spoke Spanish as their primary language. After a general group introduction, participants were placed into smaller groups of two or three. Each small group was asked to review a segment of the translated text messages for accuracy and meaningfulness. After the break out, the group was brought back together

  3. A two-year program of aerobics and weight training enhances bone mineral density of young women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedlander, A. L.; Genant, H. K.; Sadowsky, S.; Byl, N. N.; Gluer, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    Previous research suggests that physical activity may have a beneficial effect on bone mineral density (BMD) in women. This relationship was explored in a 2-year, randomized, intervention trial investigating the efficacy of exercise and calcium supplementation on increasing peak bone mass in young women. One hundred and twenty-seven subjects (ages of 20-35 years) were randomly assigned either to an exercise program that contained both aerobics and weight training components or to a stretching program. Calcium supplementation (up to 1500 mg/day including dietary intake) or placebo was given in a double-blinded design to all subjects. Spinal trabecular BMD was determined using quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Spinal integral, femoral neck, and trochanteric BMD were measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and calcaneal BMD by single photon absorptiometry (SPA). Fitness variables included maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max), and isokinetic muscle performance of the trunk and thigh. Measurements were made at baseline, 1 year, and 2 years. Sixty-three subjects (32 exercise, 31 stretching) completed the study, and all the measured bone parameters indicated a positive influence of the exercise intervention. There were significant positive differences in BMD between the exercise and stretching groups for spinal trabecular (2.5%), femoral neck (2.4%), femoral trochanteric (2.3%), and calcaneal (6.4%) measurements. The exercise group demonstrated a significant gain in BMD for spinal integral (1.3 +/- 2.8%, p < 0.02), femoral trochanteric (2.6 +/- 6.1%, p < 0.05), and calcaneal (5.6 +/- 5.1, p < 0.01) measurements. In contrast to exercise, the calcium intervention had no positive effect on any of the bone parameters. In regard to fitness parameters, the exercise group completed the study with significant gains in VO2max and isokinetic (peak torque) values for the knee flexion and extension and trunk extension. This study indicates that over a 2-year period, a combined

  4. Impact of a 12-week aerobic exercise training program on anthropometric and metabolic parameters of a group of type 2 diabetes Cameroonian women aged ≥50 years

    PubMed Central

    Dahjio, Yves; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N.; Azabji-Kenfack, Marcel; Essouma, Mickael; Loni, Gabriel Ekali; Onana, Arnold Ewane; Dehayem, Mesmin; Mvom, Angeline; Tadjore, Maurice Njock

    2016-01-01

    Background We examined whether aerobic exercise could have an impact on anthropometric and metabolic parameters of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) Cameroonian women aged ≥50 years. Methods We enrolled 23 T2DM Cameroonian women aged ≥50 years regularly followed at the National Obesity Center of Yaounde, Cameroon, in a 12-week aerobic exercise program monitored by a pedometer. Exercise intensity was progressively set between 55% and 75% of maximum heart rate. We measured weight, body mass index (BMI), fat, lean mass, visceral fat, maximum oxygen uptake, glycaemia and insulin tolerance index at baseline, after six and twelve weeks. A mixed ANOVA model was used to evaluate changes of outcome measures over time. Results Total body weight was significantly reduced after 12 weeks (P<0.05), waist circumference after 6 and 12 weeks (P<0.05). There was an increase of the lean mass from 6 weeks (P<0.001) and a reduction of the mean visceral fat at 12 weeks (P<0.001). At the end of the program, the mean glycaemia was significantly decreased (P<0.05), and the maximum oxygen uptake was enhanced (P<0.05). Conclusions The 12-week aerobic exercise program improved the anthropometric and metabolic parameters as well as the aerobic capacity of T2DM Cameroonian women aged ≥50 years. PMID:27826567

  5. Group aquatic aerobic exercise for children with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Fragala-Pinkham, Maria; Haley, Stephen M; O'Neil, Margaret E

    2008-11-01

    The effectiveness and safety of a group aquatic aerobic exercise program on cardiorespiratory endurance for children with disabilities was examined using an A-B study design. Sixteen children (11 males, five females) age range 6 to 11 years (mean age 9y 7mo [SD 1y 4mo]) participated in this twice-per-week program lasting 14 weeks. The children's diagnoses included autism spectrum disorder, myelomeningocele, cerebral palsy, or other developmental disability. More than half of the children ambulated independently without aids. Children swam laps and participated in relay races and games with a focus of maintaining a defined target heart rate zone. The strengthening component consisted of exercises using bar bells, aquatic noodles, and water resistance. The following outcomes were measured: half-mile walk/run, isometric muscle strength, timed floor to stand 3-meter test, and motor skills. Complaints of pain or injury were systematically collected. Significant improvements in the half-mile walk/run were observed, but not for secondary outcomes of strength or motor skills. The mean program attendance was 80%, and no injury was reported. Children with disabilities may improve their cardiorespiratory endurance after a group aquatic aerobic exercise program with a high adult:child ratio and specific goals to maintain training heart rates.

  6. Adding an online community to an internet-mediated walking program. Part 2: strategies for encouraging community participation.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Paul J; Janney, Adrienne W; Buis, Lorraine R; Richardson, Caroline R

    2010-12-17

    Starting a new online community with a limited number of members who have not self-selected for participation in the community is challenging. The space must appear active to lure visitors to return; when the pool of participants is small, a large fraction must be converted from lurkers to contributors, and contributors must receive responses quickly to encourage continued participation. We report on strategies for overcoming these challenges and our experience implementing them within an online community add-on to an existing Internet-mediated walking program. Concentrated study recruitment increased the effective membership size. Having few conversation spaces rather than many specialized ones, staff seeding of the forums before members were invited to visit, and staff posting of new topics when there were conversation lulls, all helped to make the forums appear active. In retrospect, using even fewer separate spaces and displaying a flat rather than nested reply structure would have made the forums appear even more active. Contests with small prizes around participation in the forums and around meeting walking goals generated a lot of discussion; a contest for first-time posters was especially effective at moving lurkers to post. Staff efforts to elicit participation by asking questions had mixed success. Staff replies to posts that had not received member replies created a feeling of responsiveness despite limited membership.

  7. Effect of a nonsurgical treatment program on the gait pattern of idiopathic toe walking: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Szopa, Andrzej; Domagalska-Szopa, Małgorzata; Gallert-Kopyto, Weronika; Kiebzak, Wojciech; Plinta, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have reported many possibilities for the treatment of idiopathic toe walking (ITW); however, none of them have been sufficiently documented. The purpose of this case study was to document the evolution of the gait pattern of a child with severe ITW using the Gillette Gait Index before and after the third and sixth weeks, a nonsurgical treatment program and then every 3 months to 1 year from the start of the treatment. This is significant because the case study shows that a nonsurgical treatment program can be an alternative treatment method for children with severe ITW. Case description The case study involved a 5-year-old boy diagnosed with severe ITW. An orthopedist recommended a surgical treatment, but his parents refused to provide consent. Intervention The subject participated in a 12-week nonsurgical treatment program that used tone-inhibiting casts (TICs) combined with physiotherapy based on neurodevelopmental treatment principles. The treatment protocol included the following: 1) precast preparation; 2) TICs with treatment; and 3) post-cast treatment to improve the gait pattern. Outcomes After treatment with TICs, the range of motion of ankle dorsiflexion during stance had increased, resulting in an almost normalized gait. The patient stopped toe walking for at least 1 year. Discussion This study demonstrates that nonsurgical treatment should be considered first, with surgical options reserved for resistant cases; however, further research is required given the current lack of knowledge about treatment outcomes using TICs and the wide use of this treatment modality in children with ITW. PMID:26937193

  8. Can a Single Session of a Community-Based Group Exercise Program Combining Step Aerobics and Bodyweight Resistance Exercise Acutely Reduce Blood Pressure?

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Romeu; Sousa, Nelson; Garrido, Nuno; Cavaco, Braulio; Quaresma, Luís; Reis, Victor Machado

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the acute effects of a single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise on blood pressure in healthy young adult women. Twenty-three healthy young adult women (aged 31.57 ± 7.87 years) participated in two experimental sessions (exercise and control) in a crossover study design. Blood pressure was monitored before, immediately after and at 10, 20 and 30 min of recovery. The exercise session consisted of four phases: 1) a warm-up (5 min of dance aerobics); 2) aerobic exercise training (30 min of step aerobics); 3) resistance exercise training (six sets of 12 repetitions of three bodyweight exercises in a circuit mode, 10 min); and 4) a cool-down (5 min of breathing and flexibility exercises); totaling 50 min of duration. Systolic blood pressure after exercise was significantly lower compared to control at the 10th min (−10.83 ± 2.13 vs. −2.6 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009), 20th min (−11.26 ± 2.13 vs. −3.04 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009) and 30th min of recovery (−10.87 ± 2.39 vs. −0.48 ± 2.39 mmHg; p = 0.004). A single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise was effective in inducing significant post-exercise hypotension in healthy young adult women. This type of low-cost exercise interventions may have an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and in community health promotion. PMID:25713644

  9. Predictors of improvement in the 12-minute walking distance following a six-week outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Zu Wallack, R L; Patel, K; Reardon, J Z; Clark, B A; Normandin, E A

    1991-04-01

    We evaluated the relationship of clinical characteristics, pulmonary function, and exercise test data to the degree of improvement in the 12-minute walking distance (12MD) in 50 ambulatory outpatients completing a six-week pulmonary rehabilitation program. The 12MD increased by 27.7 +/- 32.5 percent, or 462 +/- 427 ft, by the end of the program. There were no significant relationships between improvement in the 12MD and age, sex, oxygen requirement, arterial blood gas levels, and pulmonary function; however, patients with a greater ventilatory reserve (1-[VEmax/MVV] x 100) had more improvement in their 12MD, both with respect to distance and percentage of increase over baseline. Additionally, patients with a lower peak oxygen consumption (VO2) and peak oxygen pulse (O2P) showed greater percentage of improvement in their 12MD. The magnitude of the initial 12MD was inversely related to its improvement, both with regard to distance (r = -0.43; r2 = 0.18; p less than 0.003) and percentage of increase (r = -0.71; r2 = 0.51; p less than 0.0001). Using stepwise regression, the combination of smaller initial 12MD and greater FEV1 was significantly predictive of improvement in the 12MD. Patients with poor performance on either a 12MD or maximal exercise test are not necessarily poor candidates for a pulmonary rehabilitation program.

  10. The Effects of a Complex Exercise Program with the Visual Block on the Walking and Balance Abilities of Elderly People

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Park, Seong Doo; Song, Hyun Seung

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a complex exercise program for elderly people who had experienced a fall on their balance, gait, vestibular senses, and proprioceptive senses when their visual sense was blocked. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 healthy elderly people aged 65 or older. They were equally and randomly divided into a visual block (VB) group (those whose eyes were covered) and a visual permission (VP) group. The subjects performed the complex exercise program for 30 minutes, twice a day, five day a week for 4 weeks a total of 20 times. Outcome measures were the10 meter walking test (10MWT), stair up/down test (SUDT), Berg balance scale (BBS), vestibular stepping test (VST), proprioception test (PT). [Results] After the intervention, the VB group showed improvements in 10MWT, VST, and PT. The VP group showed improvements in 10MWT and PT. The significant improvement in VST observed in the VB group was significantly greater than that in the VP group. [Conclusion] The complex exercise program for elderly people helped enhance their balance ability and gait, and improved their vestibular sense. PMID:25540519

  11. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of an Aerobic Exercise Program and the Personality Characteristics of Patients with Fibromyalgia Syndrome: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Vural, Meltem; Berkol, Tonguc Demir; Erdogdu, Zeynep; Pekedis, Keramettin; Kuçukserat, Batuhan; Aksoy, Cihan

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a 6-week aerobic exercise program on pain, physical function, and psychological status, and to evaluate the personality characteristics of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen women with FMS were enrolled. They were trained for a 6-week home-based aerobic exercise program. The Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, the visual analog scale of pain and sleep quality were measured at baseline and at the end of week 6. The personality profiles were evaluated using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). [Results] After the exercise program, significant improvements were determined in pain, sleep quality, physical function, depression and FMS symptoms compared to baseline. In addition, the hysteria item (71.21±8.84) of the MMPI was significantly higher in FMS. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that home-based aerobic exercise may be a useful treatment in the management of FMS. Personality characteristics should be considered during the planning process of the treatment of FMS. Personality is a filter between life events and psychological responses. It is defined to be the integration of effective and behavioral patterns. Long-term studies involving larger clinical samples are needed to define the role of personality characteristics in FMS. PMID:25364113

  12. Students' Attitudes towards Programming: The Effects of Structured Walk-Throughs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemos, Ronald S.

    1978-01-01

    Assessed effectiveness of classroom team activities in eliciting more favorable attitudinal outcomes with a sample of 215 undergraduate business administration majors enrolled in an introductory COBOL programing course. The findings provide support for incorporating team activities into the programing learning process to develop positive…

  13. Aerobic Tennis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Michael J.; Ahlschwede, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Increasing the aerobic nature of tennis drills in the physical education class may be necessary if tennis is to remain a part of the public school curriculum. This article gives two examples of drills that can be modified by teachers to increase activity level. (IAH)

  14. Short-term inspiratory muscle training potentiates the benefits of aerobic and resistance training in patients undergoing CABG in phase II cardiac rehabilitation program

    PubMed Central

    Hermes, Bárbara Maria; Cardoso, Dannuey Machado; Gomes, Tiago José Nardi; dos Santos, Tamires Daros; Vicente, Marília Severo; Pereira, Sérgio Nunes; Barbosa, Viviane Acunha; de Albuquerque, Isabella Martins

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficiency of short-term inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined aerobic and resistance exercise on respiratory muscle strength, functional capacity and quality of life in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in the phase II cardiac rehabilitation program. Methods A prospective, quasi-experimental study with 24 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and were randomly assigned to two groups in the Phase II cardiac rehabilitation program: inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined training (aerobic and resistance) group (GCR + IMT, n=12) and combined training with respiratory exercises group (GCR, n=12), over a period of 12 weeks, with two sessions per week. Before and after intervention, the following measurements were obtained: maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (PImax and PEmax), peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) and quality of life scores. Data were compared between pre- and post-intervention at baseline and the variation between the pre- and post-phase II cardiac rehabilitation program using the Student's t-test, except the categorical variables, which were compared using the Chi-square test. Values of P<0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Compared to GCR, the GCR + IMT group showed larger increments in PImax (P<0.001), PEmax (P<0.001), peak VO2 (P<0.001) and quality of life scores (P<0.001). Conclusion The present study demonstrated that the addition of inspiratory muscle training, even when applied for a short period, may potentiate the effects of combined aerobic and resistance training, becoming a simple and inexpensive strategy for patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in phase II cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:27163422

  15. A Well Walked Path to Program Efficacy: The Details Tell the Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruder, Mary Beth

    2011-01-01

    When the author attended an Individualized Education Program (IEP) meeting for the 3-year-old son of a friend, she met a preschool service delivery team that was struggling to design interventions for a growing population of children being diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). It is within the context of this struggle that she was so…

  16. Change in body composition following a 15-week, heart rate monitored aerobic exercise program: The TIGER study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The joint goals of the Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) study are to introduce sedentary college-age individuals to regular exercise and identify genetic factors that influence physiologic response to aerobic exercise training. The purpose of the study was to examine ...

  17. Walking Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parkinson's disease Diseases such as arthritis or multiple sclerosis Vision or balance problems Treatment of walking problems depends on the cause. Physical therapy, surgery, or mobility aids may help.

  18. The use of aerobic exercise training in improving aerobic capacity in individuals with stroke: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Marco YC; Eng, Janice J; Dawson, Andrew S; Gylfadóttir, Sif

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether aerobic exercise improves aerobic capacity in individuals with stroke. Design A systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Databases searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Physiotherapy Evidence Database were searched. Inclusion criteria Design: randomized controlled trials; Participants: individuals with stroke; Interventions: aerobic exercise training aimed at improving aerobic capacity; Outcomes Primary outcomes: aerobic capacity [peak oxygen consumption (VO2), peak workload); Secondary outcomes: walking velocity, walking endurance. Data Analysis The methodological quality was assessed by the PEDro scale. Meta-analyses were performed for all primary and secondary outcomes. Results Nine articles (seven RCTs) were identified. The exercise intensity ranged from 50% to 80% heart rate reserve. Exercise duration was 20–40 minutes for 3–5 days a week. The total number of subjects included in the studies was 480. All studies reported positive effects on aerobic capacity, regardless of the stage of stroke recovery. Meta-analysis revealed a significant homogeneous standardized effect size (SES) in favour of aerobic exercise to improve peak VO2 (SES, 0.42; 95%CI, 0.15 to 0.69; p=0.001) and peak workload (SES, 0.50; 95%CI, 0.26 to 0.73; p<0.001). There was also a significant homogeneous SES in favour of aerobic training to improve walking velocity (SES, 0.26; 95%CI, 0.05 to 0.48; p=0.008) and walking endurance (SES, 0.30; 95%CI, 0.06to 0.55; p=0.008). Conclusions There is good evidence that aerobic exercise is beneficial for improving aerobic capacity in people with mild and moderate stroke. Aerobic exercise should be an important component of stroke rehabilitation. PMID:16541930

  19. Effects of an 8-Week Outdoor Brisk Walking Program on Fatigue in Hi-Tech Industry Employees: A Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Ling; Wang, Kuo-Ming; Liao, Po-I; Kao, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Yi-Ching

    2015-10-01

    Over 73% of hi-tech industry employees in Taiwan lack regular exercise. They are exposed to a highly variable and stressful work environment for extended periods of time, and may subsequently experience depression, detrimental to workers' physiological and mental health. In this cross-sectional survey, the authors explored the effect of an 8-week brisk walking program on the fatigue of employees in the hi-tech industry. The participants, from a hi-tech company in northern Taiwan, were randomly assigned to an experimental group (EG; 41 subjects, Mage = 33.34 ± 6.40) or control group (CG; 45 subjects, Mage = 29.40 ± 3.60). Following the 8-week brisk walking program, the EG showed significantly lower scores for subjective fatigue, working motivation, attention, and overall fatigue. The authors confirmed that the 8-week outdoor brisk walking program significantly improved the level of fatigue among employees of the hi-tech industry. The finding serves as an important reference for health authorities in Taiwan and provides awareness of workplace health promotion in the hi-tech industry.

  20. Aerobic Fitness for the Moderately Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Dan

    1981-01-01

    Intended for physical education teachers, the booklet offers ideas for incorporating aerobic conditioning into programs for moderately mentally retarded students. An explanation of aerobic fitness and its benefits is followed by information on initiating a fitness program with evaluation of height, weight, body fat, resting heart rate, and…

  1. Aerobic Dancing--A Rhythmic Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Jacki

    Fitness programs now and in the future must offer built-in cardiovascular conditioning, variety, novelty, and change to meet the physical, mental, and emotional needs of our society. Aerobic dancing (dancing designed to train and strengthen the heart, lungs, and vascular system) is one of the first indoor group Aerobic exercise programs designed…

  2. Effect of Eight Weekly Aerobic Training Program on Auditory Reaction Time and MaxVO[subscript 2] in Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taskin, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of study was to examine the effect of eight weekly aerobic exercises on auditory reaction time and MaxVO[subscript 2] in visual impairments. Forty visual impairment children that have blind 3 classification from the Turkey, experimental group; (age = 15.60 ± 1.10 years; height = 164.15 ± 4.88 cm; weight = 66.60 ± 4.77 kg) for twenty…

  3. The impact of electronic mail versus print delivery of an exercise program on muscular strength and aerobic capacity in people with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J David

    2008-09-01

    Previous research indicates that the Internet, electronic mail (e-mail), and printed materials can be used to deliver interventions to improve physical activity in people with type 2 diabetes. However, no studies have been conducted investigating the effect of e-mail or print delivery of an exercise program on muscular strength and aerobic capacity in people with type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this clinical trial was to investigate the impact of e-mail vs. print delivery of an exercise program on muscular strength and aerobic capacity in people with type 2 diabetes. Nineteen participants with type 2 diabetes were allocated to either a group that was delivered a prescribed exercise program using e-mail (e-mail group, n = 10) or a group that was delivered the same prescribed exercise program in print form (print group, n = 9). Chest press and leg press estimated one-repetition maximum (1-RM) scores as well as estimated peak oxygen uptake ([latin capital V with dot above]O2peak) were measured at baseline and follow-up. Intention-to-treat analysis indicated significant improvements in chest press (mean = 7.00 kg, p = 0.001, effect size = 2.22) and leg press (mean = 19.32 kg, p = 0.002, effect size = 1.98) 1-RM scores and [latin capital V with dot above]O2peak (mean = 9.38 mL of oxygen uptake per kilogram of body mass per minute, p = 0.01, effect size = 1.45) within the e-mail group. Within the print group, significant improvements in chest press (mean = 9.13 kg, p = 0.01, effect size = 1.49) and leg press (mean = 16.68 kg, p = 0.01, effect size = 1.31) 1-RM scores and [latin capital V with dot above]O2peak (mean = 5.14 ml of oxygen uptake per kilogram of body mass per minute, p = 0.03, effect size = 1.14) were found. No significant between-group differences in improvements were found. Clinicians can deliver a prescribed exercise program, either by e-mail or in print form, to significantly improve muscular strength and aerobic capacity in people with type 2 diabetes

  4. Effects of aerobic and anaerobic training programs together with omega-3 supplement on interleukin-17 and CRP plasma levels in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Hamid; Daryanoosh, Farhad; Moatari, Maryam; Hoseinzadeh, Khadijeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Herein, we studied the effects of two different exercise protocols on IL-17 and CRP plasma levels along with the anti-inflammatory effects of fish oil. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) consumption along with two different types of physical activities on IL-17 and CRP plasma levels in trained male mice. Methods: A total of 130 adult male mice of Syrian race with the age of 2 months and the weight of 35±1 grams were selected. At the beginning, 10 mice were killed in order to determine the amounts of pre-test variables. The rest of the mice were randomly divided into 6 groups including control group (n=20), supplement (n=20), aerobic exercise (n=20), anaerobic exercise (n=20), supplementaerobic exercise (n=20), and supplement-anaerobic exercise (n=20). Blood samples were withdrawn from the tail under intraperitoneal ketamine and xylasine anaesthesia. The anaerobic training program included 8 weeks of running on treadmill, 3 sessions per week; the aerobic training program included 8 weeks of running on treadmill, 5 sessions per week. At the end of the training program, the blood sample from each group was taken in order to measure the CRP and IL-17 levels. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the differences among the groups. Results: The results showed that there was a significant difference in IL-17 and CRP plasma levels between the groups after 8 weeks (P<0.05). Conclusion: Following the two different training programs, both IL-17 and CRP plasma levels increased, although these observed increases were not same for two measured variables. The results might also show that the effect of the supplement depends on the type of training. PMID:26793627

  5. Toe Walking in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... generalized disease of nerve and muscle. Children with autism also may walk on their toes or the ... initially walked normally before starting to toe walk. Autism. Toe walking has also been linked to autism, ...

  6. Quantum random walks without walking

    SciTech Connect

    Manouchehri, K.; Wang, J. B.

    2009-12-15

    Quantum random walks have received much interest due to their nonintuitive dynamics, which may hold the key to a new generation of quantum algorithms. What remains a major challenge is a physical realization that is experimentally viable and not limited to special connectivity criteria. We present a scheme for walking on arbitrarily complex graphs, which can be realized using a variety of quantum systems such as a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped inside an optical lattice. This scheme is particularly elegant since the walker is not required to physically step between the nodes; only flipping coins is sufficient.

  7. The effects of complex exercise on walking ability during direction change and falls efficacy in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Seung; Kim, Jin Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was to assessed the efficacy of a complex exercise program for the elderly, with respect to the effects on walking ability during direction change and on falls efficacy. [Subjects] In total, 40 subjects were selected for this study and assigned randomly to either a complex exercise (n = 20) or a general exercise (n = 20) group. [Methods] The complex exercise consisted of resistance and aerobic exercises. The exercise program was conducted three times a week for eight weeks. We assessed outcome measures of the four square step test, the figure-of-8 walk test, and the falls efficacy scale. [Results] After the intervention, the four step square test, figure-of-8 walk test, and falls efficacy scale values increased significantly in both the complex exercise program and general exercise groups. The complex exercise group showed a more significant improvement than the general exercise group in the figure-of-8 walk test step and falls efficacy scale scores. [Conclusion] Complex exercise improved walking ability during direction change and falls efficacy in elderly individuals. PMID:26157220

  8. Low-intensity daily walking activity is associated with hippocampal volume in older adults.

    PubMed

    Varma, Vijay R; Chuang, Yi-Fang; Harris, Gregory C; Tan, Erwin J; Carlson, Michelle C

    2015-05-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is associated with memory impairment and dementia and serves as a key biomarker in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease. Physical activity, one of the most promising behavioral interventions to prevent or delay cognitive decline, has been shown to be associated with hippocampal volume; specifically increased aerobic activity and fitness may have a positive effect on the size of the hippocampus. The majority of older adults, however, are sedentary and have difficulty initiating and maintaining exercise programs. A modestly more active lifestyle may nonetheless be beneficial. This study explored whether greater objectively measured daily walking activity was associated with larger hippocampal volume. We additionally explored whether greater low-intensity walking activity, which may be related to leisure-time physical, functional, and social activities, was associated with larger hippocampal volume independent of exercise and higher-intensity walking activity. Segmentation of hippocampal volumes was performed using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain's Software Library (FSL), and daily walking activity was assessed using a step activity monitor on 92, nondemented, older adult participants. After controlling for age, education, body mass index, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and the Mini Mental State Exam, we found that a greater amount, duration, and frequency of total daily walking activity were each associated with larger hippocampal volume among older women, but not among men. These relationships were specific to hippocampal volume, compared with the thalamus, used as a control brain region, and remained significant for low-intensity walking activity, independent of moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity and self-reported exercise. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to explore the relationship between objectively measured daily walking activity and hippocampal volume in an older adult population. Findings

  9. The effects of aerobic training on children's creativity, self-perception, and aerobic power.

    PubMed

    Herman-Tofler, L R; Tuckman, B W

    1998-10-01

    The article examines whether participation in an aerobic exercise program (AE), as compared with a traditional physical education class (PE), significantly increased children's perceived athletic competence, physical appearance, social acceptance, behavioral conduct, and global self-worth; increased their figural creativity; and improved aerobic power as measured by an 800-meter run around a track. Further research on the effects of different types of AE is discussed, as well as the need for aerobic conditioning in the elementary school.

  10. Effects of a Combined Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Program on C1q/TNF-Related Protein-3 (CTRP-3) and CTRP-5 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hae Yoon; Park, Ji Woo; Lee, Namseok; Hwang, Soon Young; Cho, Geum Ju; Hong, Ho Cheol; Yoo, Hye Jin; Hwang, Taek Geun; Kim, Seon Mi; Baik, Sei Hyun; Park, Kyong Soo; Youn, Byung-Soo; Choi, Kyung Mook

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the effect of a combined exercise program on C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein (CTRP) 3 and CTRP-5 levels and novel adiponectin paralogs suggested to be links between metabolism and inflammation and to evaluate sex differences and association with cardiometabolic risk factors in humans with use of a newly developed ELISA. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This cross-sectional study explored the implications of CTRP-3 and CTRP-5 on cardiometabolic parameters in 453 nondiabetic Korean adults. In addition, we evaluated the impact of a 3-month combined exercise program on CTRP-3 and CTRP-5 levels in 76 obese women. The exercise program consisted of 45 min of aerobic exercise at an intensity of 60–75% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate (300 kcal/session) and 20 min of resistance training (100 kcal/session) five times per week. RESULTS Both CTRP-3 and CTRP-5 concentrations were significantly higher in women (P < 0.001) than in men (P = 0.030). In a multiple stepwise regression analysis, CTRP-3 levels were independently associated with age, sex, and triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, adiponectin, and retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) levels (R2 = 0.182). After 3 months of a combined exercise program, cardiometabolic risk factors, including components of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and RBP4 levels, decreased significantly. In particular, CTRP-3 levels decreased significantly (median [interquartile range] 444.3 [373.8–535.0] to 374.4 [297.2–435.9], P < 0.001), whereas CTRP-5 levels were slightly increased (34.1 [28.6–44.3] to 38.4 [29.8–55.1], P = 0.048). CONCLUSIONS A 3-month combined exercise program significantly decreased CTRP-3 levels and modestly increased CTRP-5 levels in obese Korean women. PMID:23780948

  11. Peer mentoring is associated with positive change in physical activity and aerobic fitness of grades 4, 5, and 6 students in the heart healthy kids program.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Rebecca A; Bower, Jenna; Kirk, Sara F L; Hancock Friesen, Camille

    2014-11-01

    Only 7% of Canadian children achieve activity recommendations, contributing to obesity and preventable disease. The Heart Healthy Kids (H2K) program was designed to test the relationship between peer mentoring, physical activity, and cardiovascular fitness. Participants from 10 schools (5 control, 5 intervention) were enrolled in the program. In control schools, H2K included a physical activity challenge and education sessions. Intervention schools included the addition of a peer-mentoring component. Physical activity was measured through daily pedometer recording. Cardiovascular fitness was evaluated using the PACER (Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run) protocol to calculate maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max). Participants included 808 children (average age 9.9 ± 1.0 years). Although control and intervention schools did not differ at baseline, participants with peer mentoring logged significantly more steps per school day, on average, than those in control schools (6,785 ± 3,011 vs. 5,630 ± 2,586; p < .001). Male participants logged significantly more steps per school day than female participants. A significant improvement in VO2 max was also noted in intervention schools, with an average increase of 1.72 ml/mg/min. H2K was associated with positive change in physical activity and cardiovascular fitness, suggesting that peer mentoring shows promise for application in health promotion interventions.

  12. Cardiovascular Responses Associated with Daily Walking in Subacute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Sanjay K.; Gage, William H.; McIlroy, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of regaining independent ambulation after stroke, the amount of daily walking completed during in-patient rehabilitation is low. The purpose of this study is to determine if (1) walking-related heart rate responses reached the minimum intensity necessary for therapeutic aerobic exercise (40%–60% heart rate reserve) or (2) heart rate responses during bouts of walking revealed excessive workload that may limit walking (>80% heart rate reserve). Eight individuals with subacute stroke attending in-patient rehabilitation were recruited. Participants wore heart rate monitors and accelerometers during a typical rehabilitation day. Walking-related changes in heart rate and walking bout duration were determined. Patients did not meet the minimum cumulative requirements of walking intensity (>40% heart rate reserve) and duration (>10 minutes continuously) necessary for cardiorespiratory benefit. Only one patient exceeded 80% heart rate reserve. The absence of significant increases in heart rate associated with walking reveals that patients chose to walk at speeds well below a level that has meaningful cardiorespiratory health benefits. Additionally, cardiorespiratory workload is unlikely to limit participation in walking. Measurement of heart rate and walking during in-patient rehabilitation may be a useful approach to encourage patients to increase the overall physical activity and to help facilitate recovery. PMID:23476892

  13. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  14. Aerobic Excercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children. (Project AEROBIC). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho Univ., Moscow.

    The final report summarizes accomplishments of Project AEROBIC (Aerobic Exercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children), which provided a physical education exercise program for severely, profoundly, and multiply handicapped children aged 10-21. Activities are outlined for the 3 year period and include modification of exercise…

  15. Effects of combined exercise on changes of lower extremity muscle activation during walking in older women

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaehyun; Lee, Joongsook; Yang, Jeongok; Lee, Bomjin; Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the effects of combined exercise for a period of 12 weeks on the changes in lower extremity muscle activation during walking in older women. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 22 elderly women who were 65 years of age or older and living in B-City. The subjects had no nervous system or muscular system diseases that might affect walking in the previous two years. [Methods] Muscle activation was measured by using surface EMG (QEMG-8, Laxtha, Daejeon, Republic of Korea). The subjects were asked to walk on an 8 m of footpath at a natural speed. In order to minimize the noise from the cable connecting the EMG measuring instrument to the electrodes, tape was used to affix the electrodes so that they would not fall off the subjects. The EMG data were analyzed by using the RMS. [Results] Muscle activation of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius was increased significantly after combined exercise for 12 weeks. However, no increase was observed in the left biceps femoris. [Conclusion] It was demonstrated that our exercise program, which includes aerobic walking exercises, senior-robics, and muscle strengthening exercises using elastic bands, is very effective for reorganizing the normal gait pattern in the cerebral cortex and improving muscle strength. PMID:26157253

  16. Helping Adults to Stay Physically Fit: Preventing Relapse Following Aerobic Exercise Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrick, G. Ken; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Long-term adherence to an aerobic exercise regime is a major problem among exercise program graduates. This article discusses the steps involved in developing relapse prevention treatment strategies for aerobic exercise programs. (JMK)

  17. Effect of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory capacity and walking ability with subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyeong-Man; Bang, Dae-Hyouk

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory capacity and walking ability in subacute stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received inspiratory muscle training for 30 minutes (six sets of five-minutes) and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, 10-meter walking test, and six-minute walking test over the baseline results. There were significant between-group differences for the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and six-minute walking test. No statistically significant differences were observed for measures of saturation pulse oximetry oxygen and 10-meter walking test between the groups. [Conclusion] These findings gave some indications that inspiratory muscle training may benefit in patients with subacute stroke, and it is feasible to be included in rehabilitation program with this population.

  18. Effect of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory capacity and walking ability with subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyeong-Man; Bang, Dae-Hyouk

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory capacity and walking ability in subacute stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received inspiratory muscle training for 30 minutes (six sets of five-minutes) and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, 10-meter walking test, and six-minute walking test over the baseline results. There were significant between-group differences for the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and six-minute walking test. No statistically significant differences were observed for measures of saturation pulse oximetry oxygen and 10-meter walking test between the groups. [Conclusion] These findings gave some indications that inspiratory muscle training may benefit in patients with subacute stroke, and it is feasible to be included in rehabilitation program with this population. PMID:28265169

  19. Injuries presenting to a walk-in clinic at a summer dance intensive program: a three-year retrospective data analysis.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Jessica; Burgi, Ciara; Canizares, Rosalinda C; Sheets, Charles; Butler, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Summer dance intensive programs are an integral part of many serious dancers' training. The risk and rate of injury in this setting have not been well studied. The goal of this data analysis is to detail the epidemiology of dance injuries reported during a summer dance intensive over a consecutive 3 year period. Data collection included information regarding the number of evaluation and treatment sessions conducted at the program's walk-in clinic, body regions injured, whether the injuries were recurrences of pre-existing conditions or newly sustained during the intensive, and at what point in the program they were recorded. Overall, more of the clinic's clientele presented with multiple injuries than with single discrete injuries. The anatomic distribution of injuries appears to be consistent with previously reported data, with the four most commonly injured body regions being ankle, pelvis and hip, knee, and lumbar spine. Injuries sustained during the intensive (IR) occurred at a 2:1 ratio to pre-intensive injuries (PR). Relative to those with PR injuries, dancers with IR injuries were far more likely to present during the first half of the program. This study is a first step toward filling a gap in the literature by describing injury incidence in a specific population within the dance community.

  20. Effect of a Nutrition Supplement and Physical Activity Program on Pneumonia and Walking Capacity in Chilean Older People: A Factorial Cluster Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dangour, Alan D.; Albala, Cecilia; Allen, Elizabeth; Grundy, Emily; Walker, Damian G.; Aedo, Cristian; Sanchez, Hugo; Fletcher, Olivia; Elbourne, Diana; Uauy, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Background Ageing is associated with increased risk of poor health and functional decline. Uncertainties about the health-related benefits of nutrition and physical activity for older people have precluded their widespread implementation. We investigated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a national nutritional supplementation program and/or a physical activity intervention among older people in Chile. Methods and Findings We conducted a cluster randomized factorial trial among low to middle socioeconomic status adults aged 65–67.9 years living in Santiago, Chile. We randomized 28 clusters (health centers) into the study and recruited 2,799 individuals in 2005 (∼100 per cluster). The interventions were a daily micronutrient-rich nutritional supplement, or two 1-hour physical activity classes per week, or both interventions, or neither, for 24 months. The primary outcomes, assessed blind to allocation, were incidence of pneumonia over 24 months, and physical function assessed by walking capacity 24 months after enrolment. Adherence was good for the nutritional supplement (∼75%), and moderate for the physical activity intervention (∼43%). Over 24 months the incidence rate of pneumonia did not differ between intervention and control clusters (32.5 versus 32.6 per 1,000 person years respectively; risk ratio = 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.61–1.63; p = 0.99). In intention-to-treat analysis, after 24 months there was a significant difference in walking capacity between the intervention and control clusters (mean difference 33.8 meters; 95% confidence interval 13.9–53.8; p = 0.001). The overall cost of the physical activity intervention over 24 months was US$164/participant; equivalent to US$4.84/extra meter walked. The number of falls and fractures was balanced across physical activity intervention arms and no serious adverse events were reported for either intervention. Conclusions Chile's nutritional supplementation program for older

  1. A 12-week aerobic exercise program reduces hepatic fat accumulation and insulin resistance in obese, Hispanic adolescents.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rise in obesity-related morbidity in children and adolescents requires urgent prevention and treatment strategies. Currently, only limited data are available on the effects of exercise programs on insulin resistance, and visceral, hepatic, and intramyocellular fat accumulation. We hypothesized t...

  2. The Walk Poem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padgett, Ron

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the long history of writing poems about a walk, noting many titles. Notes four basic types of walk poems and includes one by American poet Bill Zavatksy, called "Class Walk With Notebooks After Storm." Offers numerous brief ideas for both the writing and the form of walk poems. (SR)

  3. Safety management by walking around (SMBWA): a safety intervention program based on both peer and manager participation.

    PubMed

    Luria, Gil; Morag, Ido

    2012-03-01

    "Management by walking around" (MBWA) is a practice that has aroused much interest in management science and practice. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate adaptation of this practice to safety management. We describe a three-year long case study that collected empirical data in which a modified MBWA was practiced in order to improve safety in a semiconductor fabrication facility. The main modification involved integrating an information system with the MBWA in order to create a practice that would generate safety leadership development and an organizational safety learning mechanism, while promoting employee safety participation. The results of the case study demonstrate that the SMBWA practice facilitated thousands of tours in which safety leadership behaviors were practiced by managers and by employees (employees performed five times as many tours as managers). The information system collected information about safety behaviors and safety conditions that could not otherwise be obtained. Thus, this study presents a new organizational safety practice SMBWA, and demonstrates the ways in which SMBWA may improve safety in organizations.

  4. Walking the Line: Navigating Market and Gift Economies of Care in a Consumer-Directed Home-Based Care Program for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Jacqueline M; Kietzman, Kathryn G; Wallace, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    Context Paid caregivers of low-income older adults navigate their role at what Hochschild calls the “market frontier”: the fuzzy line between the “world of the market,” in which services are exchanged for monetary compensation, and the “world of the gift,” in which caregiving is uncompensated and motivated by emotional attachment. We examine how political and economic forces, including the reduction of long-term services and supports, shape the practice of “walking the line” among caregivers of older adults. Methods We used data from a longitudinal qualitative study with related and nonrelated caregivers (n = 33) paid through California’s In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) program and consumers of IHSS care (n = 49). We analyzed the semistructured interviews (n = 330), completed between 2010 and 2014, using a constructivist grounded theory approach. Findings Related and nonrelated caregivers are often expected to “gift” hours of care above and beyond what is compensated by formal services. Cuts in formal services and lapses in pay push caregivers to further “walk the line” between market and gift economies of care. Both related and nonrelated caregivers who choose to stay on and provide more care without pay often face adverse economic and health consequences. Some, including related caregivers, opt out of caregiving altogether. While some consumers expect that caregivers would be willing to “walk the line” in order to meet their needs, most expressed sympathy for them and tried to alter their schedules or go without care in order to limit the caregivers’ burden. Conclusions Given economic and health constraints, caregivers cannot always compensate for cuts in formal supports by providing uncompensated time and resources. Similarly, low-income older adults are not competitive in the caregiving marketplace and, given the inadequacy of compensated hours, often depend on unpaid care. Policies that restrict formal long-term services and

  5. Fire-Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  6. The influence of aerobic fitness on cerebral white matter integrity and cognitive function in older adults: results of a one-year exercise intervention.

    PubMed

    Voss, Michelle W; Heo, Susie; Prakash, Ruchika S; Erickson, Kirk I; Alves, Heloisa; Chaddock, Laura; Szabo, Amanda N; Mailey, Emily L; Wójcicki, Thomas R; White, Siobhan M; Gothe, Neha; McAuley, Edward; Sutton, Bradley P; Kramer, Arthur F

    2013-11-01

    Cerebral white matter (WM) degeneration occurs with increasing age and is associated with declining cognitive function. Research has shown that cardiorespiratory fitness and exercise are effective as protective, even restorative, agents against cognitive and neurobiological impairments in older adults. In this study, we investigated whether the beneficial impact of aerobic fitness would extend to WM integrity in the context of a one-year exercise intervention. Further, we examined the pattern of diffusivity changes to better understand the underlying biological mechanisms. Finally, we assessed whether training-induced changes in WM integrity would be associated with improvements in cognitive performance independent of aerobic fitness gains. Results showed that aerobic fitness training did not affect group-level change in WM integrity, executive function, or short-term memory, but that greater aerobic fitness derived from the walking program was associated with greater change in WM integrity in the frontal and temporal lobes, and greater improvement in short-term memory. Increases in WM integrity, however, were not associated with short-term memory improvement, independent of fitness improvements. Therefore, while not all findings are consistent with previous research, we provide novel evidence for correlated change in training-induced aerobic fitness, WM integrity, and cognition among healthy older adults.

  7. Why older people engage in physical activity: an exploratory study of participants in a community-based walking program.

    PubMed

    Capalb, Darren J; O'Halloran, Paul; Liamputtong, Pranee

    2014-01-01

    While older people experience substantial physical and mental health benefits from regular physical activity, participation rates among older people are low. There is a need to gather more information about why older people do and do not engage in physical activity. This paper aims to examine the reasons why older men and women chose to engage in a community-based physical activity program. Specific issues that were examined included reasons why older people who had been involved in a community-based program on a regular basis: commenced the program; continued with the program; and recommenced the program after they had dropped out. Ten participants (eight females and two males) aged between 62 and 75 years, who had been participating in a community-based physical activity program for a minimum of 6 months, were individually interviewed. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Three major themes emerged, including 'time to bond: social interaction' with sub-themes 'bona fide friendships' and 'freedom from being isolated'; 'I want to be healthy: chronic disease management'; and 'new lease on life'. Two of the primary reasons why older people both commenced and recommenced the program were the promise of social interaction and to be able to better manage their chronic conditions.

  8. The Walking Classroom: Active Learning Is Just Steps Away!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Kelly Mancini

    2016-01-01

    Walking is a viable and valuable form of exercise for young children that has both physical and mental health benefits. There is much evidence showing that school-age children are not getting the recommended 60 minutes of daily exercise. A school-wide walking program can be a great way to encourage walking in and out of school, can be aligned with…

  9. Accumulating Brisk Walking for Fitness, Cardiovascular Risk, and Psychological Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Marie; Nevill, Alan; Neville, Charlotte; Biddle, Stuart; Hardman, Adrianne

    2002-01-01

    Compared the effects of different patterns of regular brisk walking on fitness, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and psychological well-being in previously sedentary adults. Data on adults who completed either short-bout or long-bout walking programs found that three short bouts of brisk walking accumulated throughout the day were as effective…

  10. A Single Bout of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Improves Motor Skill Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Statton, Matthew A; Encarnacion, Marysol; Celnik, Pablo; Bastian, Amy J

    2015-01-01

    Long-term exercise is associated with improved performance on a variety of cognitive tasks including attention, executive function, and long-term memory. Remarkably, recent studies have shown that even a single bout of aerobic exercise can lead to immediate improvements in declarative learning and memory, but less is known about the effect of exercise on motor learning. Here we sought to determine the effect of a single bout of moderate intensity aerobic exercise on motor skill learning. In experiment 1, we investigated the effect of moderate aerobic exercise on motor acquisition. 24 young, healthy adults performed a motor learning task either immediately after 30 minutes of moderate intensity running, after running followed by a long rest period, or after slow walking. Motor skill was assessed via a speed-accuracy tradeoff function to determine how exercise might differentially affect two distinct components of motor learning performance: movement speed and accuracy. In experiment 2, we investigated both acquisition and retention of motor skill across multiple days of training. 20 additional participants performed either a bout of running or slow walking immediately before motor learning on three consecutive days, and only motor learning (no exercise) on a fourth day. We found that moderate intensity running led to an immediate improvement in motor acquisition for both a single session and on multiple sessions across subsequent days, but had no effect on between-day retention. This effect was driven by improved movement accuracy, as opposed to speed. However, the benefit of exercise was dependent upon motor learning occurring immediately after exercise-resting for a period of one hour after exercise diminished the effect. These results demonstrate that moderate intensity exercise can prime the nervous system for the acquisition of new motor skills, and suggest that similar exercise protocols may be effective in improving the outcomes of movement rehabilitation

  11. A Prospective Randomized Trial of Moderately Strenuous Aerobic Exercise After an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD)

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Cynthia M.; Glenny, Robb W.; Burr, Robert L.; Flo ARNP, Gayle L.; Kudenchuk, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite its salutary effects on health, aerobic exercise is often avoided after receipt of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) because of fears that exercise may provoke acute arrhythmias. We prospectively evaluated the effects of a home aerobic exercise training and maintenance program (EX) on aerobic performance, ICD shocks and hospitalizations exclusively in ICD recipients. Methods and Results One hundred sixty (124 men, 36 women) were randomized who had an ICD for primary (43%) or secondary (57%) prevention to EX or usual care (UC). The primary outcome was peak oxygen consumption (peakVO2), measured with cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline, 8 and 24 weeks. EX consisted of 8 weeks of home walking 1 hour/day, 5 days/week at 60-80% of heart rate reserve, followed by 16 weeks of maintenance home walking for 150 minutes/week. Adherence to EX was determined from exercise logs, ambulatory HR recordings of exercise, and weekly telephone contacts. UC received no exercise directives and were monitored by monthly telephone contact. Adverse events were identified by ICD interrogations, patient reports and medical records. ICD recipients averaged 55±12 years and mean ejection fraction of 40.6±15.7, all were taking beta blocker medications. EX significantly increased peakVO2 ml/kg/min (EX 26.7±7.0; UC 23.9±6.6, p=0.002) at 8 weeks, which persisted during maintenance exercise at 24 weeks (EX 26.9±7,7; UC 23.4±6.0, p<0.001). ICD shocks were infrequent (EX=4 vs UC=8), with no differences in hospitalizations or deaths between groups. Conclusions Prescribed home exercise is safe and significantly improves cardiovascular performance in ICD recipients without causing shocks or hospitalizations. PMID:25792557

  12. 10 CFR 431.304 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy consumption of walk-in coolers and walk-in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... consumption of walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers. 431.304 Section 431.304 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Walk-in Coolers and Walk-in Freezers Test Procedures § 431.304 Uniform test method for the measurement of...

  13. 10 CFR 431.304 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy consumption of walk-in coolers and walk-in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... consumption of walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers. 431.304 Section 431.304 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Walk-in Coolers and Walk-in Freezers Test Procedures § 431.304 Uniform test method for the measurement of...

  14. 10 CFR 431.304 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy consumption of walk-in coolers and walk-in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... consumption of walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers. 431.304 Section 431.304 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Walk-in Coolers and Walk-in Freezers Test Procedures § 431.304 Uniform test method for the measurement of...

  15. 10 CFR 431.304 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy consumption of walk-in coolers and walk-in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of energy consumption of walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers. 431.304 Section 431.304 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Walk-in Coolers and Walk-in Freezers Test Procedures...

  16. Not just a walk in the park: efficacy to effectiveness for after school programs in communities of concentrated urban poverty.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Stacy L; Mehta, Tara G; Atkins, Marc S; Hur, Kwan; Rusch, Dana

    2013-09-01

    This study examined a model for mental health consultation, training and support designed to enhance the benefits of publicly-funded recreational after-school programs in communities of concentrated urban poverty for children's academic, social, and behavioral functioning. We assessed children's mental health needs and examined the feasibility and impact of intervention on program quality and children's psychosocial outcomes in three after-school sites (n = 15 staff, 89 children), compared to three demographically-matched sites that received no intervention (n = 12 staff, 38 children). Findings revealed high staff satisfaction and feasibility of intervention, and modest improvements in observed program quality and staff-reported children's outcomes. Data are considered with a public health lens of mental health promotion for children in urban poverty.

  17. Impact Forces of Walking and Running at the Same Intensity.

    PubMed

    Swain, David P; Kelleran, Kyle J; Graves, Melani S; Morrison, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Moderate-intensity walking (horizontal, WH), vigorous-intensity walking (incline, WI), and vigorous-intensity running (horizontal, R) were compared. The hypothesis is that running creates greater loading forces than walking even at the same aerobic intensity. Young adults (10 M and 10 F; age, 22.8 ± 0.5 years) performed 3 exercise trials in a counter-balanced order: walking 5.5 kph at 0% grade (WH); walking 5.5 kph at 11% (WI); and running at 8.0 kph at 0% (R). Oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2), step frequency, peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF), and vertical force loading rate were recorded during the last 5 minutes of each trial. Results are mean ± SE. Net V[Combining Dot Above]O2 during WH (10.5 ± 0.3 ml·min·kg) was significantly less than WI (26.3 ± 0.3) and R (25.1 ± 0.7 ml·min·kg). Step frequency was significantly greater during R (163 ± 1.5 steps per minute) than both walking conditions (WH, 128 ± 1.0 steps per minute; WI, 126 ± 1.2 steps per minute). Peak VGRF was significantly greater during running (844 ± 47 N) than both walking conditions (WH, 581 ± 27 N; WI, 565 ± 28 N). Force loading rate was significantly greater with R (8,214 ± 26 N·s) than WH (6,497 ± 15 N·s ) and WI (5,699 ± 16 N·s ), with WH > WI. Vigorous-intensity walking produced no greater loading forces than moderate-intensity walking. However, running at a vigorous intensity produced substantially greater loading forces than walking of the same intensity. These findings suggest that vigorous aerobic exercise may be performed without elevated orthopedic stress, depending on the mode prescribed.

  18. 76 FR 65362 - Energy Conservation Program: Compliance Date Regarding the Test Procedures for Walk-In Coolers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... test procedures will be mandatory for making representations of energy usage or energy efficiency... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Parts 429 and 431 RIN 1904-AC58 Energy Conservation Program: Compliance Date Regarding the...

  19. 76 FR 48745 - Energy Conservation Program: Compliance Date Regarding the Test Procedures for Walk-In Coolers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... final rule stated that the test procedures will be mandatory for making representations of energy usage... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Parts 429 and 431 RIN 1904-AC58 Energy Conservation Program: Compliance Date Regarding the...

  20. Neuromodulation of Aerobic Exercise—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Heijnen, Saskia; Hommel, Bernhard; Kibele, Armin; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2016-01-01

    Running, and aerobic exercise in general, is a physical activity that increasingly many people engage in but that also has become popular as a topic for scientific research. Here we review the available studies investigating whether and to which degree aerobic exercise modulates hormones, amino acids, and neurotransmitters levels. In general, it seems that factors such as genes, gender, training status, and hormonal status need to be taken into account to gain a better understanding of the neuromodular underpinnings of aerobic exercise. More research using longitudinal studies and considering individual differences is necessary to determine actual benefits. We suggest that, in order to succeed, aerobic exercise programs should include optimal periodization, prevent overtraining and be tailored to interindividual differences, including neuro-developmental and genetically-based factors. PMID:26779053

  1. Stop walking through the maintenance mine field with your eyes closed. The financial justification for a CM/PDM program

    SciTech Connect

    Harold Van de Ven

    2006-12-15

    Before getting started on what a well thought-out condition monitoring/predictive maintenance (CM/PDM) program for any coal company should look like, it is important to try and justify it financially. To make an educated decision on an expected return on investment (RoI) a mine or plant manager should break the problem down to its simplest form. By employing predictive technologies the effect of any failures to equipment will be minimised. 4 figs.

  2. On alternating quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseva, Jenia; Kovchegov, Yevgeniy

    2017-03-01

    We study an inhomogeneous quantum walk on a line that evolves according to alternating coins, each a rotation matrix. For the quantum walk with the coin alternating between clockwise and counterclockwise rotations by the same angle, we derive a closed form solution for the propagation of probabilities, and provide its asymptotic approximation via the method of stationary phase. Finally, we observe that for a x03c0;/4 angle, this alternating rotation walk will replicate the renown Hadamard walk.

  3. Walk This Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Nick

    2007-01-01

    A generation ago, it was part of growing up for all kids when they biked or walked to school. But in the last 30 years, heavier traffic, wider roads and more dangerous intersections have made it riskier for students walking or pedaling. Today, fewer than 15 percent of kids bike or walk to school compared with more than 50 percent in 1969. In the…

  4. Quantum walk computation

    SciTech Connect

    Kendon, Viv

    2014-12-04

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer.

  5. Effects of supervised structured aerobic exercise training program on high and low density lipoprotein in patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shakil-ur-Rehman, Syed; Karimi, Hossein; Gillani, Syed Amir

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Hyperlipidemia and dyslipidemia are very common conditions among patients with Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and associated with increased risk of coronary heart diseases. Physical activity and exercises along with medical management and dietary plan are common strategies to use for the management of deranged lipid profile in patients with T2DM. We aimed to determine the effects of supervised structured aerobic exercise training (SSAET) program on high and low density lipoprotein in patients with T2DM. Methods: This randomized control trial study was conducted at Riphah Rehabilitation Research Centre (RRRC), Pakistan Railway General Hospital (PRGH) Rawalpindi from 1st January 2015 to 30th March 2016. The inclusion criteria was Type-2 diabetes patients of both gender aged between 40 to 70 years. Patients with severe complications like coronary artery diseases (CAD), and other serious complications like diabetic foot, and severe knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) were excluded from the study. A total of 195 patients diagnosed with T2DM were screened out and 102 were selected for the study as per the inclusion criteria. All participants were randomly assigned into two groups, experimental ‘A’ (n=51) and control ‘B’ (n=51). Patients in group A were treated with SSAET program of 25 weeks at 3 days a week in addition to routine medical management, while patients in Group-B were on their routine medications and dietary plan. Serum LDL, and HDL were tested at baseline and after 25 weeks. The data was analysed through SPSS 20. Results: Mean and standard deviation of LDL in group A (n=51) was 118.56±19.17 (pre) and 102.64±13.33 (post), while the mean and standard deviation for Group-B (n=51) was 116.50±18.45 (Pre) and 109.88±17.13 (post). Both groups showed improvement but, Group-A treated with SSAET along with RMM showed significantly higher (P Value ≤ 0.05) improvement as compared with group B treated with RMM alone. Mean and

  6. Diffraction of walking droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel M.; Pucci, Giuseppe; Bush, John W. M.

    2014-11-01

    We present results from our revisitation of the experiment of a walking droplet passing through a single slit, originally investigated by Couder & Fort (PRL, 2006). On each passage, the walker's trajectory is deviated as a result of the spatial confinement of its guiding wave. We explore the role of the droplet size and the bath's vibration amplitude on both the dynamics and statistics. We find the behavior to be remarkably sensitive to these control parameters. A complex physical picture emerges. The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant CMMI-1333242, DMH through the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program, and GP through the Programma Operativo Regionale (POR) Calabria - FSE 2007/2013.

  7. Walk Score®

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Scott C.; Pantin, Hilda; Lombard, Joanna; Toro, Matthew; Huang, Shi; Plater-Zyberk, Elizabeth; Perrino, Tatiana; Perez-Gomez, Gianna; Barrera-Allen, Lloyd; Szapocznik, José

    2013-01-01

    Background Walk Score® is a nationally and publicly available metric of neighborhood walkability based on proximity to amenities (e.g., retail, food, schools). However, few studies have examined the relationship of Walk Score to walking behavior. Purpose To examine the relationship of Walk Score to walking behavior in a sample of recent Cuban immigrants, who overwhelmingly report little choice in their selection of neighborhood built environments when they arrive in the U.S. Methods Participants were 391 recent healthy Cuban immigrants (M age=37.1 years) recruited within 90 days of arrival in the U.S., and assessed within 4 months of arrival (M=41.0 days in the U.S.), who resided throughout Miami-Dade County FL. Data on participants’ addresses, walking and sociodemographics were collected prospectively from 2008 to 2010. Analyses conducted in 2011 examined the relationship of Walk Score for each participant’s residential address in the U.S. to purposive walking, controlling for age, gender, education, BMI, days in the U.S., and habitual physical activity level in Cuba. Results For each 10-point increase in Walk Score, adjusting for covariates, there was a significant 19% increase in the likelihood of purposive walking, a 26% increase in the likelihood of meeting physical activity recommendations by walking, and 27% more minutes walked in the previous week. Conclusions Results suggest that Walk Score is associated with walking in a sample of recent immigrants who initially had little choice in where they lived in the U.S. These results support existing guidelines indicating that mixed land use (such as parks and restaurants near homes) should be included when designing walkable communities. PMID:23867028

  8. Aerobic exercise training in modulation of aerobic physical fitness and balance of burned patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zizi M Ibrahim; El-Refay, Basant H; Ali, Rania Reffat

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the impact of aerobic exercise on aerobic capacity, balance, and treadmill time in patients with thermal burn injury. [Subjects and Methods] Burned adult patients, aged 20-40 years (n=30), from both sexes, with second degree thermal burn injuries covering 20-40% of the total body surface area (TBSA), were enrolled in this trial for 3 months. Patients were randomly divided into; group A (n=15), which performed an aerobic exercise program 3 days/week for 60 min and participated in a traditional physical therapy program, and group B (n=15), which only participated in a traditional exercise program 3 days/week. Maximal aerobic capacity, treadmill time, and Berg balance scale were measured before and after the study. [Results] In both groups, the results revealed significant improvements after treatment in all measurements; however, the improvement in group A was superior to that in group B. [Conclusion] The results provide evidence that aerobic exercises for adults with healed burn injuries improve aerobic physical fitness and balance.

  9. Effects of long-term aerobic exercise on EPOC.

    PubMed

    LeCheminant, J D; Jacobsen, D J; Bailey, B W; Mayo, M S; Hill, J O; Smith, B K; Donnelly, J E

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to determine the influence of 16 months of progressive aerobic exercise on excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) and the extent EPOC contributed to weight management. Twenty-five overweight/obese women and 16 overweight/obese men participated in a 16-month exercise program (moderate-intensity treadmill walking) that progressed across the first 26 weeks to 5 days.wk(-1), 45 min.session(-1), and 75% HRR. Three-hour EPOC was measured at baseline, 9 months, and 16 months by indirect calorimetry in response to an exercise session (treadmill walking), in which energy expenditure (EE) was estimated from the participant's previous 10 exercise sessions. For women, EPOC was 7.5 +/- 4.9, 9.6 +/- 7.6, and 6.5 +/- 6.5 L at baseline, 9 months, and 16 months, respectively (p > 0.05). For men, EPOC increased from baseline (11.8 +/- 6.8 L) to 9 months (13.5 +/- 8.6 L) (p < 0.05) with no further increase at 16 months (13.5 +/- 11.0 L). Change in EPOC was correlated with change in EE at 9 months (r = 0.65; p < 0.05) and 16 months (r = 0.58; p < 0.05) for men but not women. Progressive long-term exercise significantly influenced EPOC in overweight/obese men but not women. Change in volume of exercise likely explained the increase in energy expenditure during EPOC in men. EPOC contributed modestly to EE compared to the exercise itself.

  10. What Is Aerobic Dancing?

    MedlinePlus

    ... aerobics can reach up to six times the force of gravity, which is transmitted to each of the 26 bones in the foot. Because of the many side-to-side motions, shoes need an arch design that will compensate ...

  11. Effects of short-term aerobic exercise with and without external loading on bone metabolism and balance in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Roghani, Tayebeh; Torkaman, Giti; Movasseghe, Shafieh; Hedayati, Mehdi; Goosheh, Babak; Bayat, Noushin

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of submaximal aerobic exercise with and without external loading on bone metabolism and balance in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (OP). Thirty-six volunteer, sedentary postmenopausal women with OP were randomly divided into three groups: aerobic, weighted vest, and control. Exercise for the aerobic group consisted of 18 sessions of submaximal treadmill walking, 30 min daily, 3 times a week. The exercise program for the weighted-vest group was identical to that of the aerobic group except that the subjects wore a weighted vest (4-8 % of body weight). Body composition, bone biomarkers, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP) and N-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (NTX), and balance (near tandem stand, NTS, and star-excursion, SE) were measured before and after the 6-week exercise program. Fat decreased (p = 0.01) and fat-free mass increased (p = 0.005) significantly in the weighted-vest group. BALP increased and NTX decreased significantly in both exercise groups (p ≤ 0.05). After 6 weeks of exercise, NTS score increased in the exercise groups and decreased in the control group (aerobic: +49.68 %, weighted vest: +104.66 %, and control: -28.96 %). SE values for all directions increased significantly in the weighted-vest group. Results showed that the two exercise programs stimulate bone synthesis and decrease bone resorption in postmenopausal women with OP, but that exercise while wearing a weighted vest is better for improving balance.

  12. Comparison of bioenergetics of walking during a multistage incremental shuttle walk test and a 6-min walk test in active older adults.

    PubMed

    Leone, Mario; Duvergé, Sébastien; Kalinova, Émilia; Bui, Hung Tien; Comtois, Alain S

    2017-04-01

    The goal of the present research was to compare the bioenergetics variability of walking, during the 6-min walk test (6-MWT) and a multistage incremental shuttle walk test (MISWT) in an active older population. Twenty-two healthy physically active older adults with a group mean age of 70.4 ± 5.8 years completed the 6-MWT and the MISWT. Heart rate (HR), walking speed and walking [Formula: see text]O2 were measured throughout each test with a portable metabolic cart. Strong correlations were found for the [Formula: see text]O2 peak and the walking speed (r = 0.91 and r = 0.89 respectively for 6-MWT and MISWT). Differences in [Formula: see text]O2 peak values were analysed with a paired Student's t test. Repeated measures ANOVA were conducted to detect differences between tests. The Bland and Altman plot indicates that the average difference between both tests was 2.5 ml kg(-1) min(-1). MISWT [Formula: see text]O2 peak means were significantly greater than the 6-MWT [Formula: see text]O2 peak mean values (21.6 ± 5.3 vs. 18.9 ± 4.5 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) which indicate bioenergetics differences between the two walking tests. Thus, the MISWT and 6-MWT elicited different walking [Formula: see text]O2 peak and HR suggesting that the MISWT field test challenge the participants to a higher level of cardiovascular and respiratory stress. The walking [Formula: see text]O2 peak recorded for the MISWT was significantly greater than the 6-MWT. Consequently, both tests seem to measure different facets of the aerobic capacity. MISWT seems to be a better indicator of maximal aerobic power whereas the 6-MWT provides more relevant information regarding aerobic endurance in aging population.

  13. Walking on music.

    PubMed

    Styns, Frederik; van Noorden, Leon; Moelants, Dirk; Leman, Marc

    2007-10-01

    The present study focuses on the intricate relationship between human body movement and music, in particular on how music may influence the way humans walk. In an experiment, participants were asked to synchronize their walking tempo with the tempo of musical and metronome stimuli. The walking tempo and walking speed were measured. The tempi of the stimuli varied between 50 and 190 beats per minute. The data revealed that people walk faster on music than on metronome stimuli and that walking on music can be modeled as a resonance phenomenon that is related to the perceptual resonance phenomenon as described by Van Noorden and Moelants (Van Noorden, L., & Moelants, D. (1999). Resonance in the perception of musical pulse. Journal of New Music Research, 28, 43-66).

  14. Virtually Abelian quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro D'Ariano, Giacomo; Erba, Marco; Perinotti, Paolo; Tosini, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    We study discrete-time quantum walks on Cayley graphs of non-Abelian groups, focusing on the easiest case of virtually Abelian groups. We present a technique to reduce the quantum walk to an equivalent one on an Abelian group with coin system having larger dimension. This method allows one to extend the notion of wave-vector to the virtually Abelian case and study analytically the walk dynamics. We apply the technique in the case of two quantum walks on virtually Abelian groups with planar Cayley graphs, finding the exact solution in terms of dispersion relation.

  15. Treadmill training improves overground walking economy in Parkinson's disease: a randomized, controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Del-Olmo, Miguel Angel; Sanchez, Jose Andres; Bello, Olalla; Lopez-Alonso, Virginia; Márquez, Gonzalo; Morenilla, Luis; Castro, Xabier; Giraldez, Manolo; Santos-García, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Gait disturbances are one of the principal and most incapacitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition, walking economy is impaired in PD patients and could contribute to excess fatigue in this population. An important number of studies have shown that treadmill training can improve kinematic parameters in PD patients. However, the effects of treadmill and overground walking on the walking economy remain unknown. The goal of this study was to explore the walking economy changes in response to a treadmill and an overground training program, as well as the differences in the walking economy during treadmill and overground walking. Twenty-two mild PD patients were randomly assigned to a treadmill or overground training group. The training program consisted of 5 weeks (3 sessions/week). We evaluated the energy expenditure of overground walking, before and after each of the training programs. The energy expenditure of treadmill walking (before the program) was also evaluated. The treadmill, but not the overground training program, lead to an improvement in the walking economy (the rate of oxygen consumed per distance during overground walking at a preferred speed) in PD patients. In addition, walking on a treadmill required more energy expenditure compared with overground walking at the same speed. This study provides evidence that in mild PD patients, treadmill training is more beneficial compared with that of walking overground, leading to a greater improvement in the walking economy. This finding is of clinical importance for the therapeutic administration of exercise in PD.

  16. Factors Influencing Whether Children Walk to School

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jason G.; Jerrett, Michael; Mcconnell, Rob; Berhane, Kiros; Dunton, Genevieve; Shankardass, Ketan; Reynolds, Kim; Chang, Roger; Wolch, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated multiple levels of influence simultaneously on whether children walk to school. A large cohort of 4,338 subjects from ten communities was used to identify the determinants of walking through (1) a one-level logistic regression model for individual-level variables and (2) a two-level mixed regression model for individual and school-level variables. Walking rates were positively associated with home-to-school proximity, greater age, and living in neighborhoods characterized by lower traffic density. Greater land use mix around the home was, however, associated with lower rates of walking. Rates of walking to school were also higher amongst recipients of the Free and Reduced Price Meals Program and attendees of schools with higher percentage of English language learners. Designing schools in the same neighborhood as residential districts should be an essential urban planning strategy to reduce walking distance to school. Policy interventions are needed to encourage children from higher socioeconomic status families to participate in active travel to school and to develop walking infrastructures and other measures that protect disadvantaged children. PMID:23707968

  17. Walking dreams in congenital and acquired paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Saurat, Marie-Thérèse; Agbakou, Maité; Attigui, Patricia; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2011-12-01

    To test if dreams contain remote or never-experienced motor skills, we collected during 6 weeks dream reports from 15 paraplegics and 15 healthy subjects. In 9/10 subjects with spinal cord injury and in 5/5 with congenital paraplegia, voluntary leg movements were reported during dream, including feelings of walking (46%), running (8.6%), dancing (8%), standing up (6.3%), bicycling (6.3%), and practicing sports (skiing, playing basketball, swimming). Paraplegia patients experienced walking dreams (38.2%) just as often as controls (28.7%). There was no correlation between the frequency of walking dreams and the duration of paraplegia. In contrast, patients were rarely paraplegic in dreams. Subjects who had never walked or stopped walking 4-64 years prior to this study still experience walking in their dreams, suggesting that a cerebral walking program, either genetic or more probably developed via mirror neurons (activated when observing others performing an action) is reactivated during sleep.

  18. Intradialytic aerobic cycling exercise alleviates inflammation and improves endothelial progenitor cell count and bone density in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Min-Tser; Liu, Wen-Chih; Lin, Fu-Huang; Huang, Ching-Feng; Chen, Shao-Yuan; Liu, Chuan-Chieh; Lin, Shih-Hua; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Wu, Chia-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and mineral bone disease are critical factors contributing to morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Physical exercise alleviates inflammation and increases bone density. Here, we investigated the effects of intradialytic aerobic cycling exercise on HD patients. Forty end-stage renal disease patients undergoing HD were randomly assigned to either an exercise or control group. The patients in the exercise group performed a cycling program consisting of a 5-minute warm-up, 20 minutes of cycling at the desired workload, and a 5-minute cool down during 3 HD sessions per week for 3 months. Biochemical markers, inflammatory cytokines, nutritional status, the serum endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) count, bone mineral density, and functional capacity were analyzed. After 3 months of exercise, the patients in the exercise group showed significant improvements in serum albumin levels, the body mass index, inflammatory cytokine levels, and the number of cells positive for CD133, CD34, and kinase insert domain-conjugating receptor. Compared with the exercise group, the patients in the control group showed a loss of bone density at the femoral neck and no increases in EPCs. The patients in the exercise group also had a significantly greater 6-minute walk distance after completing the exercise program. Furthermore, the number of EPCs significantly correlated with the 6-minute walk distance both before and after the 3-month program. Intradialytic aerobic cycling exercise programs can effectively alleviate inflammation and improve nutrition, bone mineral density, and exercise tolerance in HD patients. PMID:27399127

  19. Walking cavity solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Skryabin, Dmitry V.; Champneys, Alan R.

    2001-06-01

    A family of walking solitons is obtained for the degenerate optical parametric oscillator below threshold. The loss-driven mechanism of velocity selection for these structures is described analytically and numerically. Our approach is based on understanding the role played by the field momentum and generic symmetry properties and, therefore, it can be easily generalized to other dissipative multicomponent models with walk off.

  20. Walking boot assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.; Chambers, A. B.; Stjohn, R. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A walking boot assembly particularly suited for use with a positively pressurized spacesuit is presented. A bootie adapted to be secured to the foot of a wearer, an hermetically sealed boot for receiving the bootie having a walking sole, an inner sole, and an upper portion adapted to be attached to an ankle joint of a spacesuit, are also described.

  1. Effects of aerobic exercise during hemodialysis on physical functional performance and depression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yueh-Min; Chung, Yu-Chu; Chang, Jung-San; Yeh, Mei-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have concluded that exercise training is beneficial to patients on hemodialysis (HD). Results, however, have shown that differences in the type, intensity, and frequency of physical exercise lead to variability in its effects on physical functional performance and depression. Further research is thus warranted. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of aerobic exercise on physical functional performance and depression during HD. Using a pretest-posttest control group design, we recruited HD patients and nonrandomly assigned them to an exercise group (n = 13) that completed a 12-week aerobic exercise program during HD or a control group (n = 11) that did no exercise during HD. The primary outcome measures were physical functional performance, as evaluated by the 6-min walk test and the sit-to-stand test, and depression, as evaluated by the Beck Depression Inventory II. The secondary outcome measures were albumin and triglyceride levels and hematocrit. Results revealed significant between-group differences in physical functional performance and depression but not in albumin level, hematocrit, or triglyceride level. Findings suggest that exercise may play a critical role in physical functional performance and may decrease depression. Exercise should be encouraged and performed during HD in HD centers.

  2. Lévy walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaburdaev, V.; Denisov, S.; Klafter, J.

    2015-04-01

    Random walk is a fundamental concept with applications ranging from quantum physics to econometrics. Remarkably, one specific model of random walks appears to be ubiquitous across many fields as a tool to analyze transport phenomena in which the dispersal process is faster than dictated by Brownian diffusion. The Lévy-walk model combines two key features, the ability to generate anomalously fast diffusion and a finite velocity of a random walker. Recent results in optics, Hamiltonian chaos, cold atom dynamics, biophysics, and behavioral science demonstrate that this particular type of random walk provides significant insight into complex transport phenomena. This review gives a self-consistent introduction to Lévy walks, surveys their existing applications, including latest advances, and outlines further perspectives.

  3. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  4. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are classified in two marine (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter) and six freshwater (Acidiphilium, Erythromicrobium, Erythromonas, Porphyrobacter, Roseococcus, and Sandaracinobacter) genera, which phylogenetically belong to the α-1, α-3, and α-4 subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Despite this phylogenetic information, the evolution and ancestry of their photosynthetic properties are unclear. We discuss several current proposals for the evolutionary origin of aerobic phototrophic bacteria. The closest phylogenetic relatives of aerobic phototrophic bacteria include facultatively anaerobic purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacteria. Since these two bacterial groups share many properties, yet have significant differences, we compare and contrast their physiology, with an emphasis on morphology and photosynthetic and other metabolic processes. PMID:9729607

  5. Aerobic Dance in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiles, Barbara Ann; Moore, Suzanne

    1981-01-01

    Aerobic dance offers a challenging workout in a social atmosphere. Though some physical education instructors tend to exclude dance units from the curriculum, most could teach aerobic dance if they had a basic knowledge of aerobic routines. The outline for a unit to be used in the class is presented. (JN)

  6. Crossover from random walk to self-avoiding walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Jens

    1988-11-01

    A one-dimensional n-step random walk on openZ1 which must not visit a vertex more than k times is studied via Monte Carlo methods. The dependences of the mean-square end-to-end distance of the walk and of the fraction of trapped walks on λ=(k-1)/n will be given for the range from λ=0 (self-avoiding walk) to λ=1 (unrestricted random walk). From the results it is conjectured that in the limit n-->∞ the walk obeys simple random walk statistics with respect to its static properties for all λ>0.

  7. When Human Walking is a Random Walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausdorff, J. M.

    1998-03-01

    The complex, hierarchical locomotor system normally does a remarkable job of controlling an inherently unstable, multi-joint system. Nevertheless, the stride interval --- the duration of a gait cycle --- fluctuates from one stride to the next, even under stationary conditions. We used random walk analysis to study the dynamical properties of these fluctuations under normal conditions and how they change with disease and aging. Random walk analysis of the stride-to-stride fluctuations of healthy, young adult men surprisingly reveals a self-similar pattern: fluctuations at one time scale are statistically similar to those at multiple other time scales (Hausdorff et al, J Appl Phsyiol, 1995). To study the stability of this fractal property, we analyzed data obtained from healthy subjects who walked for 1 hour at their usual pace, as well as at slower and faster speeds. The stride interval fluctuations exhibited long-range correlations with power-law decay for up to a thousand strides at all three walking rates. In contrast, during metronomically-paced walking, these long-range correlations disappeared; variations in the stride interval were uncorrelated and non-fractal (Hausdorff et al, J Appl Phsyiol, 1996). To gain insight into the mechanism(s) responsible for this fractal property, we examined the effects of aging and neurological impairment. Using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), we computed α, a measure of the degree to which one stride interval is correlated with previous and subsequent intervals over different time scales. α was significantly lower in healthy elderly subjects compared to young adults (p < .003) and in subjects with Huntington's disease, a neuro-degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, compared to disease-free controls (p < 0.005) (Hausdorff et al, J Appl Phsyiol, 1997). α was also significantly related to degree of functional impairment in subjects with Huntington's disease (r=0.78). Recently, we have observed that just as

  8. Walking On Air

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video features a series of time lapse sequences photographed by the Expedition 30 crew aboard the International Space Station. Set to the song "€œWalking in the Air,"€ by Howard Blake, the v...

  9. Gait or Walking Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... a device is justified,” says Dr. Aisen. Gait Research & Technology At present, people with walking limitations related to ... independent through physical therapy, exercise, medication, and assistive ... is optimistic that research being done in other conditions, such as spinal ...

  10. Multiple roads lead to Rome: combined high-intensity aerobic and strength training vs. gross motor activities leads to equivalent improvement in executive functions in a cohort of healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Berryman, Nicolas; Bherer, Louis; Nadeau, Sylvie; Lauzière, Séléna; Lehr, Lora; Bobeuf, Florian; Lussier, Maxime; Kergoat, Marie Jeanne; Vu, Thien Tuong Minh; Bosquet, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The effects of physical activity on cognition in older adults have been extensively investigated in the last decade. Different interventions such as aerobic, strength, and gross motor training programs have resulted in improvements in cognitive functions. However, the mechanisms underlying the relationship between physical activity and cognition are still poorly understood. Recently, it was shown that acute bouts of exercise resulted in reduced executive control at higher relative exercise intensities. Considering that aging is characterized by a reduction in potential energy ([Formula: see text] max - energy cost of walking), which leads to higher relative walking intensity for the same absolute speed, it could be argued that any intervention aimed at reducing the relative intensity of the locomotive task would improve executive control while walking. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of a short-term (8 weeks) high-intensity strength and aerobic training program on executive functions (single and dual task) in a cohort of healthy older adults. Fifty-one participants were included and 47 (age, 70.7 ± 5.6) completed the study which compared the effects of three interventions: lower body strength + aerobic training (LBS-A), upper body strength + aerobic training (UBS-A), and gross motor activities (GMA). Training sessions were held 3 times every week. Both physical fitness (aerobic, neuromuscular, and body composition) and cognitive functions (RNG) during a dual task were assessed before and after the intervention. Even though the LBS-A and UBS-A interventions increased potential energy to a higher level (Effect size: LBS-A-moderate, UBS-A-small, GMA-trivial), all groups showed equivalent improvement in cognitive function, with inhibition being more sensitive to the intervention. These findings suggest that different exercise programs targeting physical fitness and/or gross motor skills may lead to equivalent improvement in

  11. Cross Sectional Association between Spatially Measured Walking Bouts and Neighborhood Walkability.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Liang-Dar; Hurvitz, Philip M; Duncan, Glen E

    2016-04-08

    Walking is the most popular choice of aerobic physical activity to improve health among U.S. adults. Physical characteristics of the home neighborhood can facilitate or hinder walking. The purpose of this study was to quantify neighborhood walking, using objective methods and to examine the association between counts of walking bouts in the home neighborhood and neighborhood walkability. This was a cross-sectional study of 106 adults who wore accelerometers and GPS devices for two weeks. Walking was quantified within 1, 2, and 3 km Euclidean (straight-line) and network buffers around the geocoded home location. Walkability was estimated using a commercially available index. Walking bout counts increased with buffer size and were associated with walkability, regardless of buffer type or size (p < 0.001). Quantification of walking bouts within (and outside) of pre-defined neighborhood buffers of different sizes and types allowed for the specification of walking locations to better describe and elucidate walking behaviors. These data support the concept that neighborhood characteristics can influence walking among adults.

  12. Cross Sectional Association between Spatially Measured Walking Bouts and Neighborhood Walkability

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Liang-Dar; Hurvitz, Philip M.; Duncan, Glen E.

    2016-01-01

    Walking is the most popular choice of aerobic physical activity to improve health among U.S. adults. Physical characteristics of the home neighborhood can facilitate or hinder walking. The purpose of this study was to quantify neighborhood walking, using objective methods and to examine the association between counts of walking bouts in the home neighborhood and neighborhood walkability. This was a cross-sectional study of 106 adults who wore accelerometers and GPS devices for two weeks. Walking was quantified within 1, 2, and 3 km Euclidean (straight-line) and network buffers around the geocoded home location. Walkability was estimated using a commercially available index. Walking bout counts increased with buffer size and were associated with walkability, regardless of buffer type or size (p < 0.001). Quantification of walking bouts within (and outside) of pre-defined neighborhood buffers of different sizes and types allowed for the specification of walking locations to better describe and elucidate walking behaviors. These data support the concept that neighborhood characteristics can influence walking among adults. PMID:27070633

  13. Quantum walk and potential application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. B.; Douglas, B. L.

    2010-06-01

    Quantum walk represents a generalised version of the well-known classical random walk. Regardless of their apparent connection, the dynamics of quantum walk is often non-intuitive and far deviate from its classical counterpart. However, despite such potentially superior efficiency in quantum walks, it has yet to be applied to problems of practical importance. In this paper, we will give a brief introduction to quantum walks and discuss potential applications.

  14. Aerobic exercise in fibromyalgia: a practical review.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Eric N; Blotman, Francis

    2010-07-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the current evidence to support guidelines for aerobic exercise (AE) and fibromyalgia (FM) in practice, and to outline specific research needs in these areas. Data sources consisted of a PubMed search, 2007 Cochrane Data Base Systematic review, 2008 Ottawa panel evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, as well as additional references found from the initial search. Study selection included randomized clinical trials that compared an aerobic-only exercise intervention (land or pool based) with an untreated control, a non-exercise intervention or other exercise programs in patients responding to the 1990 American College of Rheumatology criteria for FM. The following outcome data were obtained: pain, tender points, perceived improvement in FM symptoms such as the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire total score (FIQ), physical function, depression (e.g., Beck Depression Inventory, FIQ subscale for depression), fatigue and sleep were extracted from 19 clinical trials that considered the effects of aerobic-only exercise in FM patients. Data synthesis shows that there is moderate evidence of important benefit of aerobic-only exercise in FM on physical function and possibly on tender points and pain. It appears to be sufficient evidence to support the practice of AE as a part of the multidisciplinary management of FM. However, future studies must be more adequately sized, homogeneously assessed, and monitored for adherence, to draw definitive conclusions.

  15. Elementary Education: Elementary Students Simulate Moon Walk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes the project of a fourth- and fifth-grade class in simulating a moon walk. Teams consisted of the astronauts, the life support team, the flight program team, the communications team, the scientific team, and the construction team. Their visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center is also described. (SA)

  16. Walking to School: Taking Research to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heelan, Kate A.; Unruh, Scott A.; Combs, H. Jason; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Sutton, Sarah; Abbey, Bryce M.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the results of a study that helped determine common barriers to active commuting to and from school, as well as the results of a Walking School Bus program that was implemented at two neighborhood elementary schools in Nebraska. While parental perceived barriers to active commuting may influence the travel choices of…

  17. Declining physical capacity but maintained aerobic activity in early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cedervall, Ylva; Kilander, Lena; Aberg, Anna Cristina

    2012-05-01

    The longitudinal influences on physical capacity and habitual aerobic activity level in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are unclear. Therefore, changes in physical capacity and aerobic activity level were evaluated. Twenty-five individuals with AD were assessed annually for 2 years, by 10-m walk test, 6-minute walk test, and timed up-and-go (TUG) single/dual tasks. Habitual aerobic activity was assessed by diary registrations. The AD group showed a lower physical capacity than controls at baseline but comparable levels of aerobic activity. During the follow-up period, physical capacity declined in the AD group, but the aerobic activity levels changed only marginally. Our results show that in the early stages of AD, people are capable of maintaining health-promoting aerobic activity levels, despite a decline in their physical capacity. Additionally, it appears that cognitive dysfunction contributes to an impaired physical capacity. The TUG tasks might, therefore, be useful for detecting early signs of cognitive impairment.

  18. Aerobic exercise increases peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity in sedentary adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data are limited on the effects of controlled aerobic exercise programs (without weight loss) on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in children and adolescents. To determine whether a controlled aerobic exercise program (without weight loss) improves peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivi...

  19. Staggered quantum walks with Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portugal, R.; de Oliveira, M. C.; Moqadam, J. K.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum walks are recognizably useful for the development of new quantum algorithms, as well as for the investigation of several physical phenomena in quantum systems. Actual implementations of quantum walks face technological difficulties similar to the ones for quantum computers, though. Therefore, there is a strong motivation to develop new quantum-walk models which might be easier to implement. In this work we present an extension of the staggered quantum walk model that is fitted for physical implementations in terms of time-independent Hamiltonians. We demonstrate that this class of quantum walk includes the entire class of staggered quantum walk model, Szegedy's model, and an important subset of the coined model.

  20. Assessment of Aerobic Exercise Adverse Effects during COPD Exacerbation Hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Carolina Bonfanti; Caram, Laura M. O.; Dourado, Victor Zuniga; de Godoy, Irma; Tanni, Suzana Erico

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Aerobic exercise performed after hospital discharge for exacerbated COPD patients is already recommended to improve respiratory and skeletal muscle strength, increase tolerance to activity, and reduce the sensation of dyspnea. Previous studies have shown that anaerobic activity can clinically benefit patients hospitalized with exacerbated COPD. However, there is little information on the feasibility and safety of aerobic physical activity performed by patients with exacerbated COPD during hospitalization. Objective. To evaluate the effects of aerobic exercise on vital signs in hospitalized patients with exacerbated COPD. Patients and Methods. Eleven COPD patients (63% female, FEV1: 34.2 ± 13.9% and age: 65 ± 11 years) agreed to participate. Aerobic exercise was initiated 72 hours after admission on a treadmill; speed was obtained from the distance covered in a 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Vital signs were assessed before and after exercise. Results. During the activity systolic blood pressure increased from 125.2 ± 13.6 to 135.8 ± 15.0 mmHg (p = 0.004) and respiratory rate from 20.9 ± 4.4 to 24.2 ± 4.5 rpm (p = 0.008) and pulse oximetry (SpO2) decreased from 93.8 ± 2.3 to 88.5 ± 5.7% (p < 0.001). Aerobic activity was considered intense, heart rate ranged from 99.2 ± 11.5 to 119.1 ± 11.1 bpm at the end of exercise (p = 0.092), and patients reached on average 76% of maximum heart rate. Conclusion. Aerobic exercise conducted after 72 hours of hospitalization in patients with exacerbated COPD appears to be safe. PMID:28265180

  1. Humanoid robot Lola: design and walking control.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Thomas; Lohmeier, Sebastian; Ulbrich, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present the humanoid robot LOLA, its mechatronic hardware design, simulation and real-time walking control. The goal of the LOLA-project is to build a machine capable of stable, autonomous, fast and human-like walking. LOLA is characterized by a redundant kinematic configuration with 7-DoF legs, an extremely lightweight design, joint actuators with brushless motors and an electronics architecture using decentralized joint control. Special emphasis was put on an improved mass distribution of the legs to achieve good dynamic performance. Trajectory generation and control aim at faster, more flexible and robust walking. Center of mass trajectories are calculated in real-time from footstep locations using quadratic programming and spline collocation methods. Stabilizing control uses hybrid position/force control in task space with an inner joint position control loop. Inertial stabilization is achieved by modifying the contact force trajectories.

  2. Walks on SPR neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Alan Joseph J; Castillo, Juan; Lee, Jinnie; St John, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    A nearest-neighbor-interchange (NNI)-walk is a sequence of unrooted phylogenetic trees, T1, T2, . . . , T(k) where each consecutive pair of trees differs by a single NNI move. We give tight bounds on the length of the shortest NNI-walks that visit all trees in a subtree-prune-and-regraft (SPR) neighborhood of a given tree. For any unrooted, binary tree, T, on n leaves, the shortest walk takes Θ(n²) additional steps more than the number of trees in the SPR neighborhood. This answers Bryant’s Second Combinatorial Challenge from the Phylogenetics Challenges List, the Isaac Newton Institute, 2011, and the Penny Ante Problem List, 2009.

  3. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John; McComb, Scott T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  4. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John C; McComb, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  5. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, M.P.; Bessette, B.J.; March, J.; McComb, S.T.

    2000-02-15

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120 F and 140 F in steady state.

  6. 10 CFR 431.302 - Definitions concerning walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions concerning walk-in coolers and walk-in... FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Walk-in Coolers and Walk-in Freezers § 431.302 Definitions concerning walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers. Walk-in cooler and walk-in freezer mean...

  7. Locomotion: Why We Walk the Way We Walk.

    PubMed

    Bertram, John E A

    2015-09-21

    The way we walk determines the energetic investment needed. Humans spontaneously alter their walking style to exploit energetic opportunities. New research demonstrates the sensitivity and timing of this optimization and opens the door to discovering the underlying mechanisms.

  8. Walking Shoes: Features and Fit

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Fitness Walking shoes have some features other shoes don't. Here's what to look for and ... 04, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/walking/art-20043897 . Mayo Clinic ...

  9. Walking with a Slower Friend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Herb; Kalman, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Fay and Sam go for a walk. Sam walks along the left side of the street while Fay, who walks faster, starts with Sam but walks to a point on the right side of the street and then returns to meet Sam to complete one segment of their journey. We determine Fay's optimal path minimizing segment length, and thus maximizing the number of times they meet…

  10. How to walk a conveyor

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-15

    The article gives a check list of what one should know before walking a belt conveyor, and what to do during the walk. It then presents a list of what to look at on a walk along the conveyor system (excluding related equipment which could be inspected or maintained during the walk). It gives advice on when to stop the conveyor, on testing the emergency stop system, on recording problems and on acting on things noted. 1 tab.

  11. Thirty-Three Years of Aerobic Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasch, Frederick W.

    2001-01-01

    Followed 15 middle-aged men for 25-33 years while they participated in an aerobic exercise program. Adherence in the sample was 100 percent. Possible explanations for the adherence include program leadership, peer support, written evaluations and progress reports, emphasis on health, early and continued interest in sport and exercise, recognition…

  12. Group Aquatic Aerobic Exercise for Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fragala-Pinkham, Maria; Haley, Stephen M.; O'Neill, Margaret E.

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness and safety of a group aquatic aerobic exercise program on cardiorespiratory endurance for children with disabilities was examined using an A-B study design. Sixteen children (11 males, five females) age range 6 to 11 years (mean age 9y 7mo [SD 1y 4mo]) participated in this twice-per-week program lasting 14 weeks. The children's …

  13. Take a Planet Walk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Dwight

    2008-01-01

    Physical models in the classroom "cannot be expected to represent the full-scale phenomenon with complete accuracy, not even in the limited set of characteristics being studied" (AAAS 1990). Therefore, by modifying a popular classroom activity called a "planet walk," teachers can explore upper elementary students' current understandings; create an…

  14. A Walk Back.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Cleo B.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses a walking trip through Elfers, Florida, which gives intermediate level students a basis for a real understanding of the state's history, climate, economy, and natural resources. Describes how students prepare for the outing by examining maps and interviewing their parents and grandparents about life when they were in school. (GEA)

  15. Walking Out Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Ji

    2009-01-01

    In the Walking Out Graphs Lesson described here, students experience several types of representations used to describe motion, including words, sentences, equations, graphs, data tables, and actions. The most important theme of this lesson is that students have to understand the consistency among these representations and form the habit of…

  16. Deterministic Walks with Choice

    SciTech Connect

    Beeler, Katy E.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Cooper, Joshua N.; Hunter, Meagan N.; Barr, Peter S.

    2014-01-10

    This paper studies deterministic movement over toroidal grids, integrating local information, bounded memory and choice at individual nodes. The research is motivated by recent work on deterministic random walks, and applications in multi-agent systems. Several results regarding passing tokens through toroidal grids are discussed, as well as some open questions.

  17. Walking in My Shoes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salia, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    The Walking in My Shoes curriculum at St. Thomas School in Medina, Washington, has been developed to deepen students' understanding of their own heritage and the cultural similarities and differences among their global peers. Exploring the rich diversity of the world's cultural heritage and the interactions of global migrations throughout history,…

  18. The walking robot project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, P.; Sagraniching, E.; Bennett, M.; Singh, R.

    1991-01-01

    A walking robot was designed, analyzed, and tested as an intelligent, mobile, and a terrain adaptive system. The robot's design was an application of existing technologies. The design of the six legs modified and combines well understood mechanisms and was optimized for performance, flexibility, and simplicity. The body design incorporated two tripods for walking stability and ease of turning. The electrical hardware design used modularity and distributed processing to drive the motors. The software design used feedback to coordinate the system and simple keystrokes to give commands. The walking machine can be easily adapted to hostile environments such as high radiation zones and alien terrain. The primary goal of the leg design was to create a leg capable of supporting a robot's body and electrical hardware while walking or performing desired tasks, namely those required for planetary exploration. The leg designers intent was to study the maximum amount of flexibility and maneuverability achievable by the simplest and lightest leg design. The main constraints for the leg design were leg kinematics, ease of assembly, degrees of freedom, number of motors, overall size, and weight.

  19. A Walk through Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renfroe, Mark; Letendre, Wanda

    1996-01-01

    Describes a seventh-grade class project where students constructed a "time tunnel" (a walk-through display with models and exhibits illustrating various themes and eras). Beginning modestly, the tunnel grew over seven years to include 11 different display scenes. Discusses the construction of the project and benefits to the school. (MJP)

  20. Effect of aerobic and resistance exercise training on late-onset Pompe disease patients receiving enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Terzis, Gerasimos; Dimopoulos, Filippos; Papadimas, George K; Papadopoulos, Constantinos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Fatouros, Ioannis; Kavouras, Stavros A; Manta, Panagiota

    2011-11-01

    Pompe disease is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the deficiency of acid α-glycosidase resulting in lysosomal accumulation of glycogen. The late-onset disease form is characterized by progressive skeletal and respiratory muscle dysfunction. In addition to the recently introduced enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), treatments such as protein-enriched diet and exercise training have been proposed, although little is known about their effectiveness on the physical condition of such patients. Aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of exercise training on muscular strength and body composition in five patients with late-onset Pompe disease receiving ERT. All subjects followed a 20 week lasting program of supervised aerobic and progressive resistance exercise training. Before and after the training period, body composition was determined with dual X-ray absorptiometry and isometric muscular strength was measured with a specialized load transducer. Functional capacity was assessed using the 6-min shuttle walk test. A significant increase in muscular strength (15-50% at various body parts, p<0.05) and 6-minute walking distance (203.8 ± 177 m before vs. 248.2 ± 184 m after, p<0.01) was observed after training, whereas total and lower extremities lean body mass did not change significantly. These results suggest that exercise training has a positive effect on muscular strength and functional capacity in patients on ERT with late-onset Pompe disease.

  1. Training improves walking capacity and cardiovascular function in arteritis.

    PubMed

    Lima, Aluísio H R de A; Lins-Filho, Ozéas L; Soares, Antonio H G; Batista, Rafael M F; Ritti-Dias, Raphael M

    2014-06-01

    Patients with arteritis have a high risk of mortality from cardiovascular disorders. However, whether these patients benefit from an intervention involving exercise remains unclear. In this study, we assessed the effects of an unsupervised exercise program on walking capacity, quality of life, and cardiovascular parameters of a patient with arteritis. A 33-year-old man reporting symptoms of claudication during walking was studied. Imaging tests revealed severe atherosclerosis and arteritis was diagnosed. Five weekly sessions of walking for 16 weeks increased claudication distance and total walking distance, produced improvements in six out of the eight health-related quality-of-life domains, decreased systolic blood pressure, and changed cardiac autonomic modulation toward parasympathetic modulation. This case report showed that unsupervised exercise training improved walking capacity, quality of life, and cardiovascular parameters in a patient with arteritis.

  2. [Walking abnormalities in children].

    PubMed

    Segawa, Masaya

    2010-11-01

    Walking is a spontaneous movement termed locomotion that is promoted by activation of antigravity muscles by serotonergic (5HT) neurons. Development of antigravity activity follows 3 developmental epochs of the sleep-wake (S-W) cycle and is modulated by particular 5HT neurons in each epoch. Activation of antigravity activities occurs in the first epoch (around the age of 3 to 4 months) as restriction of atonia in rapid eye movement (REM) stage and development of circadian S-W cycle. These activities strengthen in the second epoch, with modulation of day-time sleep and induction of crawling around the age of 8 months and induction of walking by 1 year. Around the age of 1 year 6 months, absence of guarded walking and interlimb cordination is observed along with modulation of day-time sleep to once in the afternoon. Bipedal walking in upright position occurs in the third epoch, with development of a biphasic S-W cycle by the age of 4-5 years. Patients with infantile autism (IA), Rett syndrome (RTT), or Tourette syndrome (TS) show failure in the development of the first, second, or third epoch, respectively. Patients with IA fail to develop interlimb coordination; those with RTT, crawling and walking; and those with TS, walking in upright posture. Basic pathophysiology underlying these condition is failure in restricting atonia in REM stage; this induces dysfunction of the pedunculopontine nucleus and consequently dys- or hypofunction of the dopamine (DA) neurons. DA hypofunction in the developing brain, associated with compensatory upward regulation of the DA receptors causes psychobehavioral disorders in infancy (IA), failure in synaptogenesis in the frontal cortex and functional development of the motor and associate cortexes in late infancy through the basal ganglia (RTT), and failure in functional development of the prefrontal cortex through the basal ganglia (TS). Further, locomotion failure in early childhood causes failure in development of functional

  3. Medical Aspects of Space Walking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, Story

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Musgrave has acquired extensive experience during a distinguished and impressive career that includes flying as an astronaut on six Shuttle missions, participating in many hours of extravehicular activity, and contributing his myriad talents toward great public service, especially in the area of education. He has a unique perspective as a physician, scientist, engineer, pilot, and scholar. His interests and breadth of knowledge, which astound even the seasoned space enthusiast, have provided the space program an extraordinary scientific and technical expertise. Dr. Musgrave presented a personal perspective on space flight with particular emphasis on extravehicular activity (EVA or space walking), which was copiously illustrated with photographs from many space missions. His theme was two fold: the exacting and detailed preparations required for successful execution of a mission plan and a cosmic view of mankind's place in the greater scheme of things.

  4. Effect of Backward Walking on Attention: Possible Application on ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Viggiano, Davide; Travaglio, Michele; Cacciola, Giovanna; Di Costanzo, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    The human requires attentive effort as assessed in dual-task experiments. Consistently, an attentive task can modify the walking pattern and a attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is accompanied by gait modifications. Here we investigated the relationships between backward walking and attentive performances in ADHD children (n=13) and healthy age-, height and weight matched controls (n=17). We evaluated the attentive/impulsive profile by means of a Go/No-Go task and the backward and forward gait parameters by step length, cadence and Froude number. Moreover, to test the causal relationship between attention and gait parameters, we trained children to walk backward. The training program consisted of 10 min backward walking session, thrice a week for two months. Results showed a significant negative correlation between Froude number during backward walking and reaction time in the Go/No-Go test. Besides, after training with backward walking control children increased their cadence by 9.3% and their Froude number by 17% during backward walking. Conversely, ADHD children did not modify their walking parameters after training, and showed a significant reduction in their number of errors in the Go/No-Go task (−49%) compared to the score before the training. These data suggest that specific physical training with attention-demanding tasks may improve attentive performance. PMID:25674550

  5. Correlations between aerobic capacity, pulmonary and cognitive functioning in the older women.

    PubMed

    Kara, B; Pinar, L; Uğur, F; Oğuz, M

    2005-04-01

    Regular aerobic exercise improves aerobic capacity and increases brain blood flow and oxygenation. Exercise also stimulates the reticular activating system and leads to a centrally excited state thereby makes the brain active and alert. In the present study, an aerobic exercise program consisting of submaximal level calisthenic exercises was devised for relatively healthy women between 60 and 80 years old, attending a solidarity center for the aged for daily activities. The effects of exercise on aerobic fitness, and the correlations between aerobic capacities, pulmonary functions and cognition were evaluated. Following a general health examination, 45 female volunteers fulfilling the international criteria of exercising standards for the aged were included in the program. The rhythmic and entertaining calisthenic exercises were performed by the older women for four months, three days a week, 40 or 50 minutes a day. Tests for aerobic capacities, pulmonary functions, and some neuropsychologic performances were carried out during the sedentary period and after the exercise program. The results revealed significant improvements in aerobic capacity, pulmonary functions, and some of the cognitive functions after the 4-month exercise program. We found strong relationships between aerobic capacities and cognitive functioning. Overall, the subjects expressed their happiness and well being on every occasion, during and after the exercise program.

  6. “Slow walking with turns” increases quadriceps and erector spinae muscle activity

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Mayumi; Hatamoto, Yoichi; Higaki, Yasuki; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To maintain an independent lifestyle, older adults should improve muscle strength and mass, or aerobic capacity. A new exercise pattern, called slow walking with turns, which incorporates turning as an extra load additional to walking. The purpose of this study was to measure oxygen consumption during exercise and muscle activity while turning. [Subjects and Methods] Recreationally active volunteers participated. The participants performed 20 turns per minute while walking back and forth over distances of 1.5 to 3.5 m. We measured oxygen consumption, heart rate, and rating of perceived exertion and performed electromyography during the exercise. [Results] The metabolic equivalents of the exercise were 4.0 ± 0.4 to 6.3 ± 4.0 Mets. Activity was significantly greater in the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and erector spinae during the turn phase of slow walking with turns than during the stance phase of treadmill walking. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that slow walking with turns may help to preserve the muscle strength and mass of the trunk and lower limbs that are needed to maintain an independent lifestyle. Slow walking can be performed easily by older people, and in slow walking with turns, the exercise intensity can be adjusted as required for each individual. PMID:28356623

  7. Spin-1 quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Daichi; Kubo, Toshihiro; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Yamashita, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    We study the quantum walks of two interacting spin-1 bosons. We derive an exact solution for the time-dependent wave function, which describes the two-particle dynamics governed by the one-dimensional spin-1 Bose-Hubbard model. We show that propagation dynamics in real space and mixing dynamics in spin space are correlated via the spin-dependent interaction in this system. The spin-mixing dynamics has two characteristic frequencies in the limit of large spin-dependent interactions. One of the characteristic frequencies is determined by the energy difference between two bound states, and the other frequency relates to the cotunneling process of a pair of spin-1 bosons. Furthermore, we numerically analyze the growth of the spin correlations in quantum walks. We find that long-range spin correlations emerge showing a clear dependence on the sign of the spin-dependent interaction and the initial state.

  8. Tightrope walking bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Maleprade, Helene; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David

    2016-11-01

    A fiber can hold a certain amount of liquid, which allows us to capture flying drops and control their motion. Immersed in water, a fiber can efficiently capture air bubbles only if it is hydrophobic. Using a superhydrophobic coating on an inclined wire, we experimentally control the rising velocity of air bubbles walking along the tightrope. We discuss the nature of the friction around the walker, and the resulting speed of bubbles.

  9. Aerobic Exercise Preserves Olfaction Function in Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeldt, Anson B.; Dey, Tanujit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Based on anecdotal reports of improved olfaction following aerobic exercise, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week aerobic exercise program on olfaction function in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. Thirty-eight participants with idiopathic PD were randomized to either an aerobic exercise group (n = 23) or a nonexercise control group (n = 15). The aerobic exercise group completed a 60-minute cycling session three times per week for eight weeks while the nonexercise control group received no intervention. All participants completed the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) at baseline, end of treatment, and a four-week follow up. Results. Change in UPSIT scores between the exercise and nonexercise groups from baseline to EOT (p = 0.01) and from baseline to EOT+4 (p = 0.02) favored the aerobic exercise group. Individuals in the nonexercise group had worsening olfaction function over time, while the exercise group was spared from decline. Discussion. The difference in UPSIT scores suggested that aerobic exercise may be altering central nervous system pathways that regulate the physiologic or cognitive processes controlling olfaction in individuals with PD. While these results provide promising preliminary evidence that exercise may modify the disease process, further systematic evaluation is necessary. PMID:27999706

  10. Effects of exercise on functional aerobic capacity in lower limb osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Escalante, Y; García-Hermoso, A; Saavedra, J M

    2011-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease. The reduced aerobic capacity of patients with lower limb osteoarthritis affects their independence in performing everyday activities. The purpose of this systematic review was to summarize evidence for the effectiveness and structure of exercise programs on functional aerobic capacity (ability to perform activities of daily living that require sustained aerobic metabolism) in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis. A computerized search was made of seven databases. Effect sizes (ES) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated, and the heterogeneity of the studies was assessed using Cochran's Q statistic applied to the ES means. The 20 studies that satisfied the inclusion criteria were selected for analysis. These studies were grouped into five categories according to the characteristics of the exercise program: land-based interventions (strength programs, tai chi, aerobic programs, mixed exercise programs) and aquatic intervention (hydrotherapy). The functional aerobic capacity improved in tai chi programs (ES=0.66; 95% CI, 0.23-1.09), aerobic programs (ES=0.90; 95% CI, 0.70-1.10), and mixed programs (ES=0.47; 95% CI, -0.38-0.39). The conclusions were: (i) despite recommendations for the use of exercise programs for aerobic fitness in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis, few randomized clinical trials have been conducted; (ii) the structure of the exercise programs (program content and duration, and session frequency and duration) is very heterogeneous; (iii) overall, exercise programs based on tai chi, aerobic, and mixed exercise seem to give better results than hydrotherapy programs, but without the differences being altogether clear.

  11. Fractional random walk lattice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelitsch, T. M.; Collet, B. A.; Riascos, A. P.; Nowakowski, A. F.; Nicolleau, F. C. G. A.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze time-discrete and time-continuous ‘fractional’ random walks on undirected regular networks with special focus on cubic periodic lattices in n  =  1, 2, 3,.. dimensions. The fractional random walk dynamics is governed by a master equation involving fractional powers of Laplacian matrices {{L}\\fracα{2}}} where α =2 recovers the normal walk. First we demonstrate that the interval 0<α ≤slant 2 is admissible for the fractional random walk. We derive analytical expressions for the transition matrix of the fractional random walk and closely related the average return probabilities. We further obtain the fundamental matrix {{Z}(α )} , and the mean relaxation time (Kemeny constant) for the fractional random walk. The representation for the fundamental matrix {{Z}(α )} relates fractional random walks with normal random walks. We show that the matrix elements of the transition matrix of the fractional random walk exihibit for large cubic n-dimensional lattices a power law decay of an n-dimensional infinite space Riesz fractional derivative type indicating emergence of Lévy flights. As a further footprint of Lévy flights in the n-dimensional space, the transition matrix and return probabilities of the fractional random walk are dominated for large times t by slowly relaxing long-wave modes leading to a characteristic {{t}-\\frac{n{α}} -decay. It can be concluded that, due to long range moves of fractional random walk, a small world property is emerging increasing the efficiency to explore the lattice when instead of a normal random walk a fractional random walk is chosen.

  12. Walking tests during the exercise training: specific use for the cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Casillas, J-M; Hannequin, A; Besson, D; Benaïm, S; Krawcow, C; Laurent, Y; Gremeaux, V

    2013-10-01

    Walk tests, principally the six-minute walk test (6mWT), constitute a safe, useful submaximal tool for exercise tolerance testing in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The 6mWT result reflects functional status, walking autonomy and efficacy of CR on walking endurance, which is more pronounced in patients with low functional capacity (heart failure - cardiac surgery). The 6mWT result is a strong predictor of mortality. However, clinically significant changes and reliability are still subject to debate - probably because of the ambiguity in terms of the target speed (either comfortable or brisk walking). Of the other time-based walk tests, the 2-minute-walk test is the only one applicable during CR, reserved for patients with severe disabilities by its psychometric properties. Fixed-distance tests (principally the 200m fast walk test) and incremental shuttle walking, tests explore higher levels of effort and may represent a safe and inexpensive alternative to laboratory-based tests during CR. These walking tests may be useful for personalizing prescription of training programs. However, the minimum clinically significant difference has not yet been determined. Lastly, walking tests appear to be potential useful tools in promoting physical activity and behavioural changes at home. Thus, validation of other walk tests with better psychometric properties will be necessary.

  13. The effect of a worksite based walking programme on cardiovascular risk in previously sedentary civil servants [NCT00284479

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Marie H; Murtagh, Elaine M; Boreham, Colin AG; Hare, Lesley G; Nevill, Alan M

    2006-01-01

    Background A significant proportion of Europeans do not meet the recommendations for 30 mins of physical activity 5 times per week. Whether lower frequency, moderate intensity exercise alters cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk has received little attention. This study examined the effects of 45 minutes self-paced walking, 2 d· wk-1 on aerobic fitness, blood pressure (BP), body composition, lipids and C-Reactive Protein (CRP) in previously sedentary civil servants. Methods 37 subjects (24 women) aged 41.5 ± 9.3 years were randomly assigned to either two 45 minute walks per week (walking group) or no training (control group). Aerobic fitness, body composition, blood pressure (BP), CRP and lipoprotein variables were measured at baseline and following 8 weeks. Steps counts were measured at baseline and during weeks 4 and 8 of the intervention. Results Compared to the control group, the walking group showed a significant reduction in systolic BP and maintained body fat levels (P < 0.05). There were no changes other risk factors. Subjects took significantly more steps on the days when prescribed walking was performed (9303 ± 2665) compared to rest days (5803 ± 2749; P < 0.001). Conclusion These findings suggest that walking twice per week for 45 minutes at ~ 62% HRmax, improves activity levels, reduces systolic BP and prevents an increase in body fat in previously sedentary adults. This walking prescription, however, failed to induce significant improvements in other markers of cardiovascular disease risk following eight weeks of training. PMID:16716211

  14. Youth Walking and Biking Rates Vary by Environments around 5 Louisiana Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustat, Jeanette; Richards, Katherine; Rice, Janet; Andersen, Lori; Parker-Karst, Kathryn; Cole, Shalanda

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of obesity in children is high, and many do not meet physical activity recommendations. The Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program encourages school-aged children to walk and bike to school. We assessed the condition of the walking/biking environment around schools in Louisiana prior to the state's first SRTS program.…

  15. A Feasibility Study Related To Inactive Cancer Survivors Compared with Non-Cancer Controls during Aerobic Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Drum, Scott N.; Klika, Riggs J.; Carter, Susan D.; Sprod, Lisa K.; Donath, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Cancer survivors (CA) tend to demonstrate metabolic, cardiac, and ventilatory alterations due to previous chemotherapy and radiation that may impair adaptability following aerobic exercise training. Exercise training adaptations of CA finished with primary treatment compared to non-cancer participants (NC) have not yet been extensively elucidated. Thus, the present study compared physiologic responses of CA versus NC following a low-to-moderate intensity, 8-wk aerobic training program. Thirty-seven previously sedentary participants (CA: n = 14, 12 females; NC: n = 23, 19 females) with no heart or metabolic disease did not differ in age, height, weight, and body mass index (51 ± 2 y, 1.66 ± 0.02 m, 83.8 ± 3.2 kg, and 30.5 ± 1 kg·m-2). Each participant underwent baseline, 3-, 6-, and 8-wk VO2peak treadmill testing using the USAFSAM protocol and walked on a treadmill three times per week at 80-90% of ventilatory threshold (VT) for approximately 40-min·session-1. Variables obtained on the VO2peak tests included: HR at stage 2 (HR@stage2), rating of perceived exertion at stage 2 (RPE@stage2), lactate threshold (LT), ventilatory threshold (VT), salivary cortisol at 30-min post VO2peak test (SC@30-minPost),VO2peak level, time of fatigue (TOF), and maximal heart rate (HRmax). NC had significantly (p < 0.05) higher VO2peak, TOF, and HRmax at baseline, 3- and 6-wks of training but not at 8-wks. There were no differences between groups on RPE@stage2 except at baseline (p < 0.05). A significant (p < 0.05) interaction was observed only for RPE@stage2 with CA rating their initial RPE significantly greater at baseline versus NC. CA notably improved submaximal and maximal exercise capacity during 8 weeks of aerobic training and did not show altered adaptability compared to NC. We suggest prescribing aerobic exercise training at low/moderate intensity and duration initially, with progressive increases in duration and intensity after approximately 8-weeks. If available and

  16. Persistence of random walk records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2014-06-01

    We study records generated by Brownian particles in one dimension. Specifically, we investigate an ordinary random walk and define the record as the maximal position of the walk. We compare the record of an individual random walk with the mean record, obtained as an average over infinitely many realizations. We term the walk ‘superior’ if the record is always above average, and conversely, the walk is said to be ‘inferior’ if the record is always below average. We find that the fraction of superior walks, S, decays algebraically with time, S ˜ t-β, in the limit t → ∞, and that the persistence exponent is nontrivial, β = 0.382 258…. The fraction of inferior walks, I, also decays as a power law, I ˜ t-α, but the persistence exponent is smaller, α = 0.241 608…. Both exponents are roots of transcendental equations involving the parabolic cylinder function. To obtain these theoretical results, we analyze the joint density of superior walks with a given record and position, while for inferior walks it suffices to study the density as a function of position.

  17. Agile Walking Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, Stanley J.; Lisec, Thomas R.; Spiessbach, Andrew J.; Waldron, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed agile walking robot operates over rocky, sandy, and sloping terrain. Offers stability and climbing ability superior to other conceptual mobile robots. Equipped with six articulated legs like those of insect, continually feels ground under leg before applying weight to it. If leg sensed unexpected object or failed to make contact with ground at expected point, seeks alternative position within radius of 20 cm. Failing that, robot halts, examines area around foot in detail with laser ranging imager, and replans entire cycle of steps for all legs before proceeding.

  18. Rugged Walking Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, Stanley J.; Lisec, Thomas R.; Spiessbach, Andrew J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed walking-beam robot simpler and more rugged than articulated-leg walkers. Requires less data processing, and uses power more efficiently. Includes pair of tripods, one nested in other. Inner tripod holds power supplies, communication equipment, computers, instrumentation, sampling arms, and articulated sensor turrets. Outer tripod holds mast on which antennas for communication with remote control site and video cameras for viewing local and distant terrain mounted. Propels itself by raising, translating, and lowering tripods in alternation. Steers itself by rotating raised tripod on turntable.

  19. Estimating oxygen uptake and energy expenditure during treadmill walking by neural network analysis of easy-to-obtain inputs.

    PubMed

    Beltrame, Thomas; Amelard, Robert; Villar, Rodrigo; Shafiee, Mohammad J; Wong, Alexander; Hughson, Richard L

    2016-11-01

    The study of oxygen uptake (V̇o2) dynamics during walking exercise transitions adds valuable information regarding fitness. However, direct V̇o2 measurements are not practical for general population under realistic settings. Devices to measure V̇o2 are associated with elevated cost, uncomfortable use of a mask, need of trained technicians, and impossibility of long-term data collection. The objective of this study was to predict the V̇o2 dynamics from heart rate and inputs from the treadmill ergometer by a novel artificial neural network approach. To accomplish this, 10 healthy young participants performed one incremental and three moderate constant work rate treadmill walking exercises. The speed and grade used for the moderate-intensity protocol was related to 80% of the V̇o2 response at the gas exchange threshold estimated during the incremental exercise. The measured V̇o2 was used to train an artificial neural network to create an algorithm able to predict the V̇o2 based on easy-to-obtain inputs. The dynamics of the V̇o2 response during exercise transition were evaluated by exponential modeling. Within each participant, the predicted V̇o2 was strongly correlated to the measured V̇o2 ( = 0.97 ± 0.0) and presented a low bias (~0.2%), enabling the characterization of the V̇o2 dynamics during treadmill walking exercise. The proposed algorithm could be incorporated into smart devices and fitness equipment, making them suitable for tracking changes in aerobic fitness and physical health beyond the infrequent monitoring of patients during clinical interventions and rehabilitation programs.

  20. Random-walk enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chi H; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A; Goodman, Myron F

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C→U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  1. Random-walk enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C → U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics. PMID:26465508

  2. Random-walk enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  3. Extensive Functional Evaluations to Monitor Aerobic Training in Becker Muscular Dystrophy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tramonti, Caterina; Rossi, Bruno; Chisari, Carmelo

    2016-06-13

    Low-intensity aerobic training seems to have positive effects on muscle strength, endurance and fatigue in Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) patients. We describe the case of a 33-year old BMD man, who performed a four-week aerobic training. Extensive functional evaluations were executed to monitor the efficacy of the rehabilitative treatment. Results evidenced an increased force exertion and an improvement in muscle contraction during sustained exercise. An improvement of walk velocity, together with agility, endurance capacity and oxygen consumption during exercise was observed. Moreover, an enhanced metabolic efficiency was evidenced, as shown by reduced lactate blood levels after training. Interestingly, CK showed higher levels after the training protocol, revealing possible muscle damage. In conclusion, aerobic training may represent an effective method improving exercise performance, functional status and metabolic efficiency. Anyway, a careful functional assessment should be taken into account as a useful approach in the management of the disease's rehabilitative treatment.

  4. Extensive Functional Evaluations to Monitor Aerobic Training in Becker Muscular Dystrophy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tramonti, Caterina; Rossi, Bruno; Chisari, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    Low-intensity aerobic training seems to have positive effects on muscle strength, endurance and fatigue in Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) patients. We describe the case of a 33-year old BMD man, who performed a four-week aerobic training. Extensive functional evaluations were executed to monitor the efficacy of the rehabilitative treatment. Results evidenced an increased force exertion and an improvement in muscle contraction during sustained exercise. An improvement of walk velocity, together with agility, endurance capacity and oxygen consumption during exercise was observed. Moreover, an enhanced metabolic efficiency was evidenced, as shown by reduced lactate blood levels after training. Interestingly, CK showed higher levels after the training protocol, revealing possible muscle damage. In conclusion, aerobic training may represent an effective method improving exercise performance, functional status and metabolic efficiency. Anyway, a careful functional assessment should be taken into account as a useful approach in the management of the disease’s rehabilitative treatment. PMID:27478558

  5. I-WALK: An Innovative Approach to Community Walkability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeger, Christopher J.; Lillehoj, Catherine J.; Jensen, Alan D.; Wilson, Suzy; Levinson, Lydia R.

    2014-01-01

    One way of combating rising obesity rates and decreasing physical activity levels among children is to promote active transportation to and from schools. The award-winning I-WALK program provides a comprehensive framework for addressing community walkability and related infrastructure. The program uses a unique and innovative methodology that…

  6. Effect of whole-body vibration exercise and muscle strengthening, balance, and walking exercises on walking ability in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kawanabe, Kazuhiro; Kawashima, Akira; Sashimoto, Issei; Takeda, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Yoshihiro; Iwamoto, Jun

    2007-03-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the beneficial effect of whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise in addition to muscle strengthening, balance, and walking exercises on the walking ability in the elderly. Sixty-seven elderly participants were divided into two groups; the WBV exercise plus routine exercises group (n=40) and the routine exercises alone group (n=27). WBV exercise was performed on a Galileo machine (Novotec, Pforzheim, Germany) at an intensity of 12-20 Hz, for a duration of 4 minutes, once every week. All the participants in both the groups were similarly instructed to undergo routine exercises such as balance and muscle strengthening training, and take walking exercise twice a week. The period of this study was 2 months to evaluate the acute effects of WBV exercise. The mean age of the participants was 72.0 years (range, 59-86 years). At baseline, there were significant negative correlations between age and the walking speed, step length, and maximum standing time on one leg. After the 2-month exercise program, the walking speed, step length, and the maximum standing time on one leg were significantly improved in the WBV exercise plus routine exercises group, while no significant changes in these parameters were observed in the routine exercises alone group. Thus, the present study showed the beneficial effect of WBV exercise in addition to muscle strengthening, balance, and walking exercises in improving the walking ability in the elderly. WBV exercise was safe and well tolerated in the elderly.

  7. To walk or not to walk: insights from a qualitative description study with women suffering from fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Baños, Yolanda; Pastor, María-Ángeles; Velasco, Lilian; López-Roig, Sofía; Peñacoba, Cecilia; Lledo, Ana; Rodríguez, Charo

    2016-08-01

    Walking improves health outcomes in fibromyalgia; however, there is low adherence to this practice. The aim of this research was to explore the beliefs of women suffering from fibromyalgia toward walking, and the meaning that they attribute to the behavior of walking as part of their fibromyalgia treatment. This study is a qualitative description research. Forty-six (46) women suffering from fibromyalgia and associated with local fibromyalgia associations located in four different Spanish cities (Elche, Alicante, Madrid, and Talavera de la Reina) participated in focus group discussions in the summer 2012. Thematic content analysis was performed in transcribed verbatim from interviews. Participants perceived several inhibitors for walking even when they had positive beliefs toward its therapeutic value. Whereas participants believed that walking can generate improvement in their disease and their health in general, they did not feel able to actually do so given their many physical impediments. Furthermore, participants struggled with social isolation and stigma, which was lessened through the conscious support of family. Advice from family doctors was also a very important facilitator to participants. In a health care delivery context that favors person-centered care, and in order to foster adherence to walking-based fibromyalgia treatments, it is recommended that therapeutic walking programs be tailored to each woman' individual circumstances, and developed in close collaboration with them to help them increase control over their health and their condition.

  8. Chemical characterization of some aerobic liquids in CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Brooks C.

    1993-01-01

    Untreated aqueous soybean and wheat leachate and aerobically treated wheat leachate prepared from crop residues that are produced as a component of the Controlled Ecological Life Support System program designed to support long duration space missions were compared, and a general chemical characterization was accomplished. Solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography were used to accomplish comparisons based on chromatographic and ultraviolet absorption properties of the components that are present. Specific compounds were not identified; however, general composition related to the initial presence of phenol-like compounds and their disappearance during aerobic treatment was explored.

  9. A plasmonic nanorod that walks on DNA origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Duan, Xiaoyang; Liu, Na

    2015-08-01

    In nano-optics, a formidable challenge remains in precise transport of a single optical nano-object along a programmed and routed path toward a predefined destination. Molecular motors in living cells that can walk directionally along microtubules have been the inspiration for realizing artificial molecular walkers. Here we demonstrate an active plasmonic system, in which a plasmonic nanorod can execute directional, progressive and reverse nanoscale walking on two or three-dimensional DNA origami. Such a walker comprises an anisotropic gold nanorod as its `body' and discrete DNA strands as its `feet'. Specifically, our walker carries optical information and can in situ optically report its own walking directions and consecutive steps at nanometer accuracy, through dynamic coupling to a plasmonic stator immobilized along its walking track. Our concept will enable a variety of smart nanophotonic platforms for studying dynamic light-matter interaction, which requires controlled motion at the nanoscale well below the optical diffraction limit.

  10. Mood alterations in mindful versus aerobic exercise modes.

    PubMed

    Netz, Yael; Lidor, Ronnie

    2003-09-01

    The results of most recent studies have generally indicated an improvement in mood after participation in aerobic exercise. However, only a few researchers have compared mindful modes of exercise with aerobic exercise to examine the effect of 1 single session of exercise on mood. In the present study, the authors assessed state anxiety, depressive mood, and subjective well-being prior to and following 1 class of 1 of 4 exercise modes: yoga, Feldenkrais (awareness through movement), aerobic dance, and swimming; a computer class served as a control. Participants were 147 female general curriculum and physical education teachers (mean age = 40.15, SD = 0.2) voluntarily enrolled in a 1-year enrichment program at a physical education college. Analyses of variance for repeated measures revealed mood improvement following Feldenkrais, swimming, and yoga but not following aerobic dance and computer lessons. Mindful low-exertion activities as well as aerobic activities enhanced mood in 1 single session of exercise. The authors suggest that more studies assessing the mood-enhancing benefits of mindful activities such as Feldenkrais and yoga are needed.

  11. The Impact of Walking Exercises and Resistance Training upon the Walking Distance in Patients with Chronic Lower Limb Ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Oszkinis, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this paper is to compare the impact of supervised walking and resistance training upon the walking distance in PAD patients. Materials and Methods. The examination involved 50 PAD patients at the 2nd stage of the disease according to Fontaine's scale. The participants were randomly allocated to two groups: one exercising on the treadmill (n = 24) and one performing resistance exercises of lower limbs (n = 26). Results. The 12-week program of supervised rehabilitation led to a significant increase in the intermittent claudication distance measured both on the treadmill and during the 6-minute walking test. The group training on the treadmill showed a statistically significant increase of the initial claudication distance (ICD) and the absolute claudication distance (ACD) measured on the treadmill, as well as of ICD and the total walking distance (TWD) measured during the 6-minute walking test. Within the group performing resistance exercises, a statistically significant improvement was observed in the case of parameters measured on the treadmill: ICD and ACD. Conclusions. The supervised rehabilitation program, in the form of both walking and resistance exercises, contributes to the increase in the intermittent claudication distance. The results obtained in both groups were similar. PMID:27833919

  12. The Impact of Walking Exercises and Resistance Training upon the Walking Distance in Patients with Chronic Lower Limb Ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Maria; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Majchrzycki, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this paper is to compare the impact of supervised walking and resistance training upon the walking distance in PAD patients. Materials and Methods. The examination involved 50 PAD patients at the 2nd stage of the disease according to Fontaine's scale. The participants were randomly allocated to two groups: one exercising on the treadmill (n = 24) and one performing resistance exercises of lower limbs (n = 26). Results. The 12-week program of supervised rehabilitation led to a significant increase in the intermittent claudication distance measured both on the treadmill and during the 6-minute walking test. The group training on the treadmill showed a statistically significant increase of the initial claudication distance (ICD) and the absolute claudication distance (ACD) measured on the treadmill, as well as of ICD and the total walking distance (TWD) measured during the 6-minute walking test. Within the group performing resistance exercises, a statistically significant improvement was observed in the case of parameters measured on the treadmill: ICD and ACD. Conclusions. The supervised rehabilitation program, in the form of both walking and resistance exercises, contributes to the increase in the intermittent claudication distance. The results obtained in both groups were similar.

  13. Quantum walks on quotient graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Krovi, Hari; Brun, Todd A.

    2007-06-15

    A discrete-time quantum walk on a graph {gamma} is the repeated application of a unitary evolution operator to a Hilbert space corresponding to the graph. If this unitary evolution operator has an associated group of symmetries, then for certain initial states the walk will be confined to a subspace of the original Hilbert space. Symmetries of the original graph, given by its automorphism group, can be inherited by the evolution operator. We show that a quantum walk confined to the subspace corresponding to this symmetry group can be seen as a different quantum walk on a smaller quotient graph. We give an explicit construction of the quotient graph for any subgroup H of the automorphism group and illustrate it with examples. The automorphisms of the quotient graph which are inherited from the original graph are the original automorphism group modulo the subgroup H used to construct it. The quotient graph is constructed by removing the symmetries of the subgroup H from the original graph. We then analyze the behavior of hitting times on quotient graphs. Hitting time is the average time it takes a walk to reach a given final vertex from a given initial vertex. It has been shown in earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 74, 042334 (2006)] that the hitting time for certain initial states of a quantum walks can be infinite, in contrast to classical random walks. We give a condition which determines whether the quotient graph has infinite hitting times given that they exist in the original graph. We apply this condition for the examples discussed and determine which quotient graphs have infinite hitting times. All known examples of quantum walks with hitting times which are short compared to classical random walks correspond to systems with quotient graphs much smaller than the original graph; we conjecture that the existence of a small quotient graph with finite hitting times is necessary for a walk to exhibit a quantum speedup.

  14. Health-Promoting Effects of Serial vs. Integrated Combined Strength and Aerobic Training.

    PubMed

    Karatrantou, K; Gerodimos, V; Häkkinen, K; Zafeiridis, A

    2017-01-01

    Combined strength and aerobic training programs are widely used for improving markers of physical fitness and health. We compared the efficiency of a serial and an integrated combined training program on health and overall fitness in middle-aged females. 54 females (46.7±4.5yrs) were assigned to a serial (SCG) or an integrated (ICG) combined training group or to a control group (CG). The SCG and ICG performed a 3-month training combining aerobic dance and calisthenics. The 2 training programs differ in the sequence of aerobic and strength exercises. SCG performed the strength exercises prior to aerobic; in ICG, the aerobic and strength exercises were altered in a predetermined order. Body composition/circumferences, blood pressure, respiratory function, flexibility, balance, muscle strength/endurance, power and aerobic capacity were measured before and after training. SCG and ICG significantly increased muscle strength and endurance, power, aerobic capacity, flexibility, balance, fat-free mass and respiratory function (p<0.001-0.05), while significant reductions were observed for blood pressure, heart rate and body fat/circumferences (p<0.001-0.05). However, there were no significant differences between SCG and ICG after training. Serial and integrated combined training programs confer analogous adaptations and can be used interchangeably for counteracting the detrimental effects of sedentary lifestyle on indices of physical fitness and health.

  15. Walking indoors, walking outdoors: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Dalla Volta, Riccardo; Fasano, Fabrizio; Cerasa, Antonio; Mangone, Graziella; Quattrone, Aldo; Buccino, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    An observation/execution matching system for walking has not been assessed yet. The present fMRI study was aimed at assessing whether, as for object-directed actions, an observation/execution matching system is active for walking and whether the spatial context of walking (open or narrow space) recruits different neural correlates. Two experimental conditions were employed. In the execution condition, while being scanned, participants performed walking on a rolling cylinder located just outside the scanner. The same action was performed also while observing a video presenting either an open space (a country field) or a narrow space (a corridor). In the observation condition, participants observed a video presenting an individual walking on the same cylinder on which the actual action was executed, the open space video and the narrow space video, respectively. Results showed common bilateral activations in the dorsal premotor/supplementary motor areas and in the posterior parietal lobe for both execution and observation of walking, thus supporting a matching system for this action. Moreover, specific sectors of the occipital–temporal cortex and the middle temporal gyrus were consistently active when processing a narrow space versus an open one, thus suggesting their involvement in the visuo-motor transformation required when walking in a narrow space. We forward that the present findings may have implications for rehabilitation of gait and sport training. PMID:26483745

  16. Die aerobe Glykolyse der Tumorzelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Friedhelm

    1981-01-01

    A high aerobic glycolysis (aerobic lactate production) is the most significant feature of the energy metabolism of rapidly growing tumor cells. Several mechanisms, which may be different in different cell lines, seem to be involved in this characteristic of energy metabolism of the tumor cell. Changes in the cell membrane leading to increased uptake and utilization of glucose, a high level of fetal types of isoenzymes, a decreased number of mitochondria and a reduced capacity to metabolize pyruvate are some factors which must be taken into consideration. It is not possible to favour one of them at the present time.

  17. Slow-walking inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Halter, Sebastian; Núñez, Carlos; Tasinato, Gianmassimo E-mail: s.halter@physik.uni-muenchen.de E-mail: gianmassimo.tasinato@port.ac.uk

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new model of slow-roll inflation in string cosmology, based on warped throat supergravity solutions displaying 'walking' dynamics, i.e. the coupling constant of the dual gauge theory slowly varies over a range of energy scales. The features of the throat geometry are sourced by a rich field content, given by the dilaton and RR and NS fluxes. By considering the motion of a D3-brane probe in this geometry, we are able to analytically calculate the brane potential in a physically interesting regime. This potential has an inflection point: in its proximity we realize a model of inflation lasting sixty e-foldings, and whose robust predictions are in agreement with current observations. We are also able to interpret some of the most interesting aspects of this scenario in terms of the properties of the QFT dual theory.

  18. Water-walking devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, David L.; Prakash, Manu; Chan, Brian; Bush, John W. M.

    2007-11-01

    We report recent efforts in the design and construction of water-walking machines inspired by insects and spiders. The fundamental physical constraints on the size, proportion and dynamics of natural water-walkers are enumerated and used as design criteria for analogous mechanical devices. We report devices capable of rowing along the surface, leaping off the surface and climbing menisci by deforming the free surface. The most critical design constraint is that the devices be lightweight and non-wetting. Microscale manufacturing techniques and new man-made materials such as hydrophobic coatings and thermally actuated wires are implemented. Using high-speed cinematography and flow visualization, we compare the functionality and dynamics of our devices with those of their natural counterparts.

  19. Water-walking devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, David L.; Prakash, Manu; Chan, Brian; Bush, John W. M.

    We report recent efforts in the design and construction of water-walking machines inspired by insects and spiders. The fundamental physical constraints on the size, proportion and dynamics of natural water-walkers are enumerated and used as design criteria for analogous mechanical devices. We report devices capable of rowing along the surface, leaping off the surface and climbing menisci by deforming the free surface. The most critical design constraint is that the devices be lightweight and non-wetting. Microscale manufacturing techniques and new man-made materials such as hydrophobic coatings and thermally actuated wires are implemented. Using highspeed cinematography and flow visualization, we compare the functionality and dynamics of our devices with those of their natural counterparts.

  20. Effects of virtual reality training using Nintendo Wii and treadmill walking exercise on balance and walking for stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Bang, Yo-Soon; Son, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of virtual reality training using Nintendo Wii on balance and walking for stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Forty stroke patients with stroke were randomly divided into two exercise program groups: virtual reality training (n=20) and treadmill (n=20). The subjects underwent their 40-minute exercise program three times a week for eight weeks. Their balance and walking were measured before and after the complete program. We measured the left/right weight-bearing and the anterior/posterior weight-bearing for balance, as well as stance phase, swing phase, and cadence for walking. [Results] For balance, both groups showed significant differences in the left/right and anterior/posterior weight-bearing, with significant post-program differences between the groups. For walking, there were significant differences in the stance phase, swing phase, and cadence of the virtual reality training group. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that virtual reality training providing visual feedback may enable stroke patients to directly adjust their incorrect weight center and shift visually. Virtual reality training may be appropriate for patients who need improved balance and walking ability by inducing their interest for them to perform planned exercises on a consistent basis.

  1. Effects of virtual reality training using Nintendo Wii and treadmill walking exercise on balance and walking for stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Yo-Soon; Son, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of virtual reality training using Nintendo Wii on balance and walking for stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Forty stroke patients with stroke were randomly divided into two exercise program groups: virtual reality training (n=20) and treadmill (n=20). The subjects underwent their 40-minute exercise program three times a week for eight weeks. Their balance and walking were measured before and after the complete program. We measured the left/right weight-bearing and the anterior/posterior weight-bearing for balance, as well as stance phase, swing phase, and cadence for walking. [Results] For balance, both groups showed significant differences in the left/right and anterior/posterior weight-bearing, with significant post-program differences between the groups. For walking, there were significant differences in the stance phase, swing phase, and cadence of the virtual reality training group. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that virtual reality training providing visual feedback may enable stroke patients to directly adjust their incorrect weight center and shift visually. Virtual reality training may be appropriate for patients who need improved balance and walking ability by inducing their interest for them to perform planned exercises on a consistent basis. PMID:27942130

  2. Reduced Gravity Walking Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    A test subject being suited up for studies on the Reduced Gravity Walking Simulator located in the hanger at Langley Research Center. The initial version of this simulator was located inside the hanger. Later a larger version would be located at the Lunar Landing Facility. The purpose of this simulator was to study the subject while walking, jumping or running. Researchers conducted studies of various factors such as fatigue limit, energy expenditure, and speed of locomotion. Francis B. Smith wrote in his paper 'Simulators For Manned Space Research,' 'I would like to conclude this talk with a discussion of a device for simulating lunar gravity which is very effective and yet which is so simple that its cost is in the order of a few thousand dollars at most, rather than hundreds of thousands. With a little ingenuity, one could almost build this type simulator in his backyard for children to play on. The principle is ...if a test subject is suspended in a sling so that his body axis makes an angle of 9 1/2 degrees with the horizontal and if he then 'stands' on a platform perpendicular to his body axis, the component of the earth's gravity forcing him toward the platform is one times the sine of 9 1/2 degrees or approximately 1/6 of the earth's normal gravity field. That is, a 180 pound astronaut 'standing' on the platform would exert a force of only 30 pounds - the same as if he were standing upright on the lunar surface.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308; Francis B. Smith, 'Simulators For Manned Space Research,' Paper for 1966 IEEE International Convention, New York, NY, March 21-25, 1966.

  3. General review of maximal aerobic velocity measurement at laboratory. Proposition of a new simplified protocol for maximal aerobic velocity assessment.

    PubMed

    Berthon, P; Fellmann, N

    2002-09-01

    The maximal aerobic velocity concept developed since eighties is considered as either the minimal velocity which elicits the maximal aerobic consumption or as the "velocity associated to maximal oxygen consumption". Different methods for measuring maximal aerobic velocity on treadmill in laboratory conditions have been elaborated, but all these specific protocols measure V(amax) either during a maximal oxygen consumption test or with an association of such a test. An inaccurate method presents a certain number of problems in the subsequent use of the results, for example in the elaboration of training programs, in the study of repeatability or in the determination of individual limit time. This study analyzes 14 different methods to understand their interests and limits in view to propose a general methodology for measuring V(amax). In brief, the test should be progressive and maximal without any rest period and of 17 to 20 min total duration. It should begin with a five min warm-up at 60-70% of the maximal aerobic power of the subjects. The beginning of the trial should be fixed so that four or five steps have to be run. The duration of the steps should be three min with a 1% slope and an increasing speed of 1.5 km x h(-1) until complete exhaustion. The last steps could be reduced at two min for a 1 km x h(-1) increment. The maximal aerobic velocity is adjusted in relation to duration of the last step.

  4. A Pilot Study of Women’s Affective Responses to Common and Uncommon Forms of Aerobic Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Courtney J.; Smith, Jane Ellen; Bryan, Angela D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the extent to which participants exposed to an uncommon versus common exercise stimulus would result in more favourable affect at post task. Design Experimental design. Participants, (N = 120) American women aged 18–45 years, were randomly assigned to complete 30-minutes of either the uncommon (HOOP; n = 58) or common (WALK; n = 62) exercise stimulus. Main Outcome Measures Self-reported affect and intentions for future exercise were measured before and after the 30-minute exercise bout. Results Analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) were run to compare post-task affect across the HOOP and WALK conditions. At post-task, participants assigned to HOOP reported more positively valenced affect, higher ratings of positive activated affect, lower ratings of negative deactivated affect, and stronger intentions for future aerobic exercise compared to participants assigned to WALK. Conclusions Participants who completed an uncommon bout of aerobic exercise (HOOP) reported more favourable affect post-exercise, as well as stronger intentions for future exercise, compared to participants who completed a common bout of aerobic exercise (WALK). Future work using a longitudinal design is needed to understand the relationships between familiarity with an exercise stimulus, affective responses to exercise, motivation for future exercise behaviour, and exercise maintenance over time. PMID:26394246

  5. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  6. Design of a walking robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, William; Dowling, Kevin

    1994-03-01

    Carnegie Mellon University's Autonomous Planetary Exploration Program (APEX) is currently building the Daedalus robot; a system capable of performing extended autonomous planetary exploration missions. Extended autonomy is an important capability because the continued exploration of the Moon, Mars and other solid bodies within the solar system will probably be carried out by autonomous robotic systems. There are a number of reasons for this - the most important of which are the high cost of placing a man in space, the high risk associated with human exploration and communication delays that make teleoperation infeasible. The Daedalus robot represents an evolutionary approach to robot mechanism design and software system architecture. Daedalus incorporates key features from a number of predecessor systems. Using previously proven technologies, the Apex project endeavors to encompass all of the capabilities necessary for robust planetary exploration. The Ambler, a six-legged walking machine was developed by CMU for demonstration of technologies required for planetary exploration. In its five years of life, the Ambler project brought major breakthroughs in various areas of robotic technology. Significant progress was made in: mechanism and control, by introducing a novel gait pattern (circulating gait) and use of orthogonal legs; perception, by developing sophisticated algorithms for map building; and planning, by developing and implementing the Task Control Architecture to coordinate tasks and control complex system functions. The APEX project is the successor of the Ambler project.

  7. Design of a walking robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittaker, William; Dowling, Kevin

    1994-01-01

    Carnegie Mellon University's Autonomous Planetary Exploration Program (APEX) is currently building the Daedalus robot; a system capable of performing extended autonomous planetary exploration missions. Extended autonomy is an important capability because the continued exploration of the Moon, Mars and other solid bodies within the solar system will probably be carried out by autonomous robotic systems. There are a number of reasons for this - the most important of which are the high cost of placing a man in space, the high risk associated with human exploration and communication delays that make teleoperation infeasible. The Daedalus robot represents an evolutionary approach to robot mechanism design and software system architecture. Daedalus incorporates key features from a number of predecessor systems. Using previously proven technologies, the Apex project endeavors to encompass all of the capabilities necessary for robust planetary exploration. The Ambler, a six-legged walking machine was developed by CMU for demonstration of technologies required for planetary exploration. In its five years of life, the Ambler project brought major breakthroughs in various areas of robotic technology. Significant progress was made in: mechanism and control, by introducing a novel gait pattern (circulating gait) and use of orthogonal legs; perception, by developing sophisticated algorithms for map building; and planning, by developing and implementing the Task Control Architecture to coordinate tasks and control complex system functions. The APEX project is the successor of the Ambler project.

  8. The effect of acute treadmill walking on cognitive control and academic achievement in preadolescent children.

    PubMed

    Hillman, C H; Pontifex, M B; Raine, L B; Castelli, D M; Hall, E E; Kramer, A F

    2009-03-31

    The effect of an acute bout of moderate treadmill walking on behavioral and neuroelectric indexes of the cognitive control of attention and applied aspects of cognition involved in school-based academic performance were assessed. A within-subjects design included 20 preadolescent participants (age=9.5+/-0.5 years; eight female) to assess exercise-induced changes in performance during a modified flanker task and the Wide Range Achievement Test 3. The resting session consisted of cognitive testing followed by a cardiorespiratory fitness assessment to determine aerobic fitness. The exercise session consisted of 20 min of walking on a motor-driven treadmill at 60% of estimated maximum heart rate followed by cognitive testing once heart rate returned to within 10% of pre-exercise levels. Results indicated an improvement in response accuracy, larger P3 amplitude, and better performance on the academic achievement test following aerobic exercise relative to the resting session. Collectively, these findings indicate that single, acute bouts of moderately-intense aerobic exercise (i.e. walking) may improve the cognitive control of attention in preadolescent children, and further support the use of moderate acute exercise as a contributing factor for increasing attention and academic performance. These data suggest that single bouts of exercise affect specific underlying processes that support cognitive health and may be necessary for effective functioning across the lifespan.

  9. Visual control of walking velocity.

    PubMed

    François, Matthieu; Morice, Antoine H P; Bootsma, Reinoud J; Montagne, Gilles

    2011-06-01

    Even if optical correlates of self-motion velocity have already been identified, their contribution to the control of displacement velocity remains to be established. In this study, we used a virtual reality set-up coupled to a treadmill to test the role of both Global Optic Flow Rate (GOFR) and Edge Rate (ER) in the regulation of walking velocity. Participants were required to walk at a constant velocity, corresponding to their preferred walking velocity, while eye height and texture density were manipulated. This manipulation perturbed the natural relationship between the actual walking velocity and its optical specification by GOFR and ER, respectively. Results revealed that both these sources of information are indeed used by participants to control walking speed, as demonstrated by a slowing down of actual walking velocity when the optical specification of velocity by either GOFR or ER gives rise to an overestimation of actual velocity, and vice versa. Gait analyses showed that these walking velocity adjustments result from simultaneous adaptations in both step length and step duration. The role of visual information in the control of self-motion velocity is discussed in relation with other factors.

  10. Arthritis and Aerobic Exercise: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ike, Robert W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Arthritic patients who regularly do aerobic exercise make significant gains in aerobic and functional status, and in subjective areas like pain tolerance and mood. Still, they are often advised to curtail physical activity. Guidelines are presented for physicians prescribing aerobic exercise. An exercise tolerance test is recommended. (SM)

  11. Constraining walking and custodial technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Foadi, Roshan; Frandsen, Mads T.; Sannino, Francesco

    2008-05-01

    We show how to constrain the physical spectrum of walking technicolor models via precision measurements and modified Weinberg sum rules. We also study models possessing a custodial symmetry for the S parameter at the effective Lagrangian level - custodial technicolor - and argue that these models cannot emerge from walking-type dynamics. We suggest that it is possible to have a very light spin-one axial (vector) boson. However, in the walking dynamics the associated vector boson is heavy while it is degenerate with the axial in custodial technicolor.

  12. Anti-gravity training improves walking capacity and postural balance in patients with muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Berthelsen, Martin Peter; Husu, Edith; Christensen, Sofie Bouschinger; Prahm, Kira Philipsen; Vissing, John; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies in patients with muscular dystrophies suggest positive effects of aerobic and strength training. These studies focused training on using bicycle ergometers and conventional strength training, which precludes more severely affected patients from participating, because of their weakness. We investigated the functional effects of combined aerobic and strength training in patients with Becker and limb-girdle muscular dystrophies with knee muscle strength levels as low as 3% of normal strength. Eight patients performed 10 weeks of aerobic and strength training on an anti-gravity treadmill, which offered weight support up to 80% of their body weight. Six minute walking distance, dynamic postural balance, and plasma creatine kinase were assessed 10 weeks prior to training, immediately before training and after 10 weeks of training. Training elicited an improvement of walking distance by 8±2% and dynamic postural balance by 13±4%, indicating an improved physical function. Plasma creatine kinase remained unchanged. These results provide evidence that a combination of aerobic and strength training during anti-gravity has the potential to safely improve functional ability in severely affected patients with Becker and limb-girdle muscular dystrophies.

  13. Effects of Kettlebell Training on Aerobic Capacity.

    PubMed

    Falatic, J Asher; Plato, Peggy A; Holder, Christopher; Finch, Daryl; Han, Kyungmo; Cisar, Craig J

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the effects of a kettlebell training program on aerobic capacity. Seventeen female National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate soccer players (age: 19.7 ± 1.0 years, height: 166.1 ± 6.4 cm, weight: 64.2 ± 8.2 kg) completed a graded exercise test to determine maximal oxygen consumption (V̇O2max). Participants were assigned to a kettlebell intervention group (KB) (n = 9) or a circuit weight-training (CWT) control group (n = 8). Participants in the KB group completed a kettlebell snatch test to determine individual snatch repetitions. Both groups trained 3 days a week for 4 weeks in addition to their off-season strength and conditioning program. The KB group performed the 15:15 MVO2 protocol (20 minutes of kettlebell snatching with 15 seconds of work and rest intervals). The CWT group performed multiple free-weight and dynamic body-weight exercises as part of a continuous circuit program for 20 minutes. The 15:15 MVO2 protocol significantly increased V̇O2max in the KB group. The average increase was 2.3 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹, or approximately a 6% gain. There was no significant change in V̇O2max in the CWT control group. Thus, the 4-week 15:15 MVO2 kettlebell protocol, using high-intensity kettlebell snatches, significantly improved aerobic capacity in female intercollegiate soccer players and could be used as an alternative mode to maintain or improve cardiovascular conditioning.

  14. Effect of Aerobic Exercise Training on Blood Pressure in Indians: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Punia, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. High blood pressure (BP) is one of the most important modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, which accounts for one in every eight deaths worldwide. It has been predicted that, by 2020, there would be 111% increase in cardiovascular deaths in India. Aerobic exercise in the form of brisk walking, jogging, running, and cycling would result in reduction in BP. Many meta-analytical studies from western world confirm this. However, there is no such review from Indian subcontinent. Objective. Our objective is to systematically review and report the articles from India in aerobic exercise on blood pressure. Methodology. Study was done in March 2016 in Google Scholar using search terms “Aerobic exercise” AND “Training” AND “Blood pressure” AND “India.” This search produced 3210 titles. Results. 24 articles were identified for this review based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Total of 1107 subjects participated with median of 25 subjects. Studies vary in duration from +3 weeks to 12 months with each session lasting 15–60 minutes and frequency varies from 3 to 8 times/week. The results suggest that there was mean reduction of −05.00 mmHg in SBP and −03.09 mmHg in DBP after aerobic training. Conclusion. Aerobic training reduces the blood pressure in Indians. PMID:27493989

  15. Impact of a pilot Walking School Bus intervention on children’s pedestrian safety behaviors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Walking School Buses (WSB) are groups of children, led to and from school by parents or other adults, in which children are picked up at designated "bus stops." Pedestrian safety should be taught and modeled by the adults on the walk to school. WSB programs have been reported to increase children’s ...

  16. Base Station Walk-Back

    NASA Video Gallery

    Train to improve your lung, heart, and other muscle endurance while walking a progressive, measured distance. The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitement of exploration to challenge stu...

  17. Quantum snake walk on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Rosmanis, Ansis

    2011-02-15

    I introduce a continuous-time quantum walk on graphs called the quantum snake walk, the basis states of which are fixed-length paths (snakes) in the underlying graph. First, I analyze the quantum snake walk on the line, and I show that, even though most states stay localized throughout the evolution, there are specific states that most likely move on the line as wave packets with momentum inversely proportional to the length of the snake. Next, I discuss how an algorithm based on the quantum snake walk might potentially be able to solve an extended version of the glued trees problem, which asks to find a path connecting both roots of the glued trees graph. To the best of my knowledge, no efficient quantum algorithm solving this problem is known yet.

  18. Integrated photonic quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Lebugle, Maxime; Guzman-Silva, Diego; Perez-Leija, Armando; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 20 years quantum walks (QWs) have gained increasing interest in the field of quantum information science and processing. In contrast to classical walkers, quantum objects exhibit intrinsic properties like non-locality and non-classical many-particle correlations, which renders QWs a versatile tool for quantum simulation and computation as well as for a deeper understanding of genuine quantum mechanics. Since they are highly controllable and hardly interact with their environment, photons seem to be ideally suited quantum walkers. In order to study and exploit photonic QWs, lattice structures that allow low loss coherent evolution of quantum states are demanded. Such requirements are perfectly met by integrated optical waveguide devices that additionally allow a substantial miniaturization of experimental settings. Moreover, by utilizing the femtosecond direct laser writing technique three-dimensional waveguide structures are capable of analyzing QWs also on higher dimensional geometries. In this context, advances and findings of photonic QWs are discussed in this review. Various concepts and experimental results are presented covering, such as different quantum transport regimes, the Boson sampling problem, and the discrete fractional quantum Fourier transform.

  19. Big power from walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illenberger, Patrin K.; Madawala, Udaya K.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric Elastomer Generators (DEG) offer an opportunity to capture the energy otherwise wasted from human motion. By integrating a DEG into the heel of standard footwear, it is possible to harness this energy to power portable devices. DEGs require substantial auxiliary systems which are commonly large, heavy and inefficient. A unique challenge for these low power generators is the combination of high voltage and low current. A void exists in the semiconductor market for devices that can meet these requirements. Until these become available, existing devices must be used in an innovative way to produce an effective DEG system. Existing systems such as the Bi-Directional Flyback (BDFB) and Self Priming Circuit (SPC) are an excellent example of this. The BDFB allows full charging and discharging of the DEG, improving power gained. The SPC allows fully passive voltage boosting, removing the priming source and simplifying the electronics. This paper outlines the drawbacks and benefits of active and passive electronic solutions for maximizing power from walking.

  20. Sweat Rates During Continuous and Interval Aerobic Exercise: Implications for NASA Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Scott, Jessica; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic deconditioning is one of the effects spaceflight. Impaired crewmember performance due to loss of aerobic conditioning is one of the risks identified for mitigation by the NASA Human Research Program. Missions longer than 8 days will involve exercise countermeasures including those aimed at preventing the loss of aerobic capacity. The NASA Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) will be NASA's centerpiece architecture for human space exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Aerobic exercise within the small habitable volume of the MPCV is expected to challenge the ability of the environmental control systems, especially in terms of moisture control. Exercising humans contribute moisture to the environment by increased respiratory rate (exhaling air at 100% humidity) and sweat. Current acceptable values are based on theoretical models that rely on an "average" crew member working continuously at 75% of their aerobic capacity (Human Systems Integration Requirements Document). Evidence suggests that high intensity interval exercise for much shorter durations are equally effective or better in building and maintaining aerobic capacity. This investigation will examine sweat and respiratory rates for operationally relevant continuous and interval aerobic exercise protocols using a variety of different individuals. The results will directly inform what types of aerobic exercise countermeasures will be feasible to prescribe for crewmembers aboard the MPCV.

  1. Technicolor walks at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Alexander; Foadi, Roshan; Frandsen, Mads T.; Jaervinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco; Pukhov, Alexander

    2009-02-01

    We analyze the potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to observe signatures of phenomenologically viable walking technicolor models. We study and compare the Drell-Yan and vector boson fusion mechanisms for the production of composite heavy vectors. We find that the heavy vectors are most easily produced and detected via the Drell-Yan processes. The composite Higgs phenomenology is also studied. If technicolor walks at the LHC, its footprints will be visible and our analysis will help in uncovering them.

  2. 10 CFR 429.53 - Walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers. 429.53 Section 429... CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.53 Walk-in coolers and walk... are applicable to walk-in coolers and freezers; and (2) (b) Certification reports. (1) Except...

  3. 10 CFR 429.53 - Walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers. 429.53 Section 429... CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.53 Walk-in coolers and walk... are applicable to walk-in coolers and freezers; and (2) (b) Certification reports. (1) Except...

  4. Cardiovascular program to improve physical fitness in those over 60 years old – pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Rodríguez, Alfonso; Chinchilla-Minguet, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Background In Spain, more than 50% of 60-year-olds are obese. Obesity is a disease with serious cardiovascular risks. The mortality rate for cardiovascular disease in Spain is 31.1%. Objectives To improve aerobic fitness, strength, flexibility and balance, and body composition (BC) in persons over 60 years old. Materials and methods A clinical intervention study of 24 participants was carried out over a period of 3 months. Aerobic fitness was assessed using the Rockport 1-Mile Walk Test. Upper-body strength was evaluated with an ad hoc test. Flexibility and balance were evaluated using the Sit and Reach Test and the Stork Balance Stand Test, respectively. Anthropometric measurements were taken by bioelectrical impedance. Results After 3 months of training, aerobic fitness was improved, as demonstrated by improved test times (pretest 13.04 minutes, posttest 12.13 minutes; P<0.05). Body composition was also improved, but the results were not statistically significant (fat mass pretest 31.58%±5.65%, posttest 30.65%±6.31%; skeletal muscle mass pretest 43.99±9.53 kg, posttest 46.63±10.90 kg). Conclusion Our data show that in subjects over 60 years old, aerobic fitness was improved due to program intervention. However, these results should be treated with caution, because of the limited sample size and the brief time period of this pilot study. A more rigorous study would include a sample of at least 100 participants. PMID:25143714

  5. Promoting safe walking and biking to school: the Marin County success story.

    PubMed

    Staunton, Catherine E; Hubsmith, Deb; Kallins, Wendi

    2003-09-01

    Walking and biking to school can be an important part of a healthy lifestyle, yet most US children do not start their day with these activities. The Safe Routes to School Program in Marin County, California, is working to promote walking and biking to school. Using a multipronged approach, the program identifies and creates safe routes to schools and invites communitywide involvement. By its second year, the program was serving 4665 students in 15 schools. Participating public schools reported an increase in school trips made by walking (64%), biking (114%), and carpooling (91%) and a decrease in trips by private vehicles carrying only one student (39%).

  6. Recruitment of the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum in Parkinsonian rats following skilled aerobic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa G.; Heintz, Ryan; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise modality and complexity play a key role in determining neurorehabilitative outcome in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Exercise training (ET) that incorporates both motor skill training and aerobic exercise has been proposed to synergistically improve cognitive and automatic components of motor control in PD patients. Here we introduced such a skilled aerobic ET paradigm in a rat model of dopaminergic deafferentation. Rats with bilateral, intra-striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions were exposed to forced ET for 4 weeks, either on a simple running wheel (non-skilled aerobic exercise, NSAE) or on a complex wheel with irregularly spaced rungs (skilled aerobic exercise, SAE). Cerebral perfusion was mapped during horizontal treadmill walking or at rest using [14C]-iodoantipyrine 1 week after the completion of ET. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was quantified by autoradiography and analyzed in 3-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping. SAE compared to NSAE resulted in equal or greater recovery in motor deficits, as well as greater increases in rCBF during walking in the prelimbic area of the prefrontal cortex, broad areas of the somatosensory cortex, and the cerebellum. NSAE compared to SAE animals showed greater activation in the dorsal caudate-putamen and dorsal hippocampus. Seed correlation analysis revealed enhanced functional connectivity in SAE compared to NSAE animals between the prelimbic cortex and motor areas, as well as altered functional connectivity between midline cerebellum and sensorimotor regions. Our study provides the first evidence for functional brain reorganization following skilled aerobic exercise in Parkinsonian rats, and suggests that SAE compared to NSAE results in enhancement of prefrontal cortex- and cerebellum-mediated control of motor function. PMID:25747184

  7. Recruitment of the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum in Parkinsonian rats following skilled aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa G; Heintz, Ryan; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2015-05-01

    Exercise modality and complexity play a key role in determining neurorehabilitative outcome in Parkinson's disease (PD). Exercise training (ET) that incorporates both motor skill training and aerobic exercise has been proposed to synergistically improve cognitive and automatic components of motor control in PD patients. Here we introduced such a skilled aerobic ET paradigm in a rat model of dopaminergic deafferentation. Rats with bilateral, intra-striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions were exposed to forced ET for 4weeks, either on a simple running wheel (non-skilled aerobic exercise, NSAE) or on a complex wheel with irregularly spaced rungs (skilled aerobic exercise, SAE). Cerebral perfusion was mapped during horizontal treadmill walking or at rest using [(14)C]-iodoantipyrine 1week after the completion of ET. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was quantified by autoradiography and analyzed in 3-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping. SAE compared to NSAE resulted in equal or greater recovery in motor deficits, as well as greater increases in rCBF during walking in the prelimbic area of the prefrontal cortex, broad areas of the somatosensory cortex, and the cerebellum. NSAE compared to SAE animals showed greater activation in the dorsal caudate-putamen and dorsal hippocampus. Seed correlation analysis revealed enhanced functional connectivity in SAE compared to NSAE animals between the prelimbic cortex and motor areas, as well as altered functional connectivity between midline cerebellum and sensorimotor regions. Our study provides the first evidence for functional brain reorganization following skilled aerobic exercise in Parkinsonian rats, and suggests that SAE compared to NSAE results in enhancement of prefrontal cortex- and cerebellum-mediated control of motor function.

  8. Effect of aerobic training and aerobic and resistance training on the inflammatory status of hypertensive older adults.

    PubMed

    Lima, Leandra G; Bonardi, José M T; Campos, Giulliard O; Bertani, Rodrigo F; Scher, Luria M L; Louzada-Junior, Paulo; Moriguti, Júlio C; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Lima, Nereida K C

    2015-08-01

    There is a relationship between high levels of inflammatory markers and low adhesion to the practice of physical activity in the older population. The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of two types of exercise programs, i.e., aerobic training and aerobic plus resistance training on the plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) of elderly hypertensive subjects. Hypertensive older volunteers in use of antihypertensive drugs were randomized to three groups: aerobic group (AG), resistance and aerobic group (RAG) and control group (CG). Training lasted 10 weeks, with sessions held three times a week. Blood samples were collected before training and 24 h after completion of the 30 sessions for the determination of serum IL-6 and TNF-α levels. Body mass index was obtained before and after 10 weeks. After intervention, BMI values were lower in AG and RAG compared to CG (p < 0.001), IL-6 was reduced in AG compared to CG (p = 0.04), and TNF-α levels were lower only in RAG compared to CG (p = 0.01). Concluding, both types of training were effective in reducing BMI values in hypertensive older subjects. Aerobic exercise produced the reduction of plasma IL-6 levels. However, the combination of aerobic and resistance exercise, which would be more indicated for the prevention of loss of functionality with aging, showed lower TNF-α mediator after training than control group and a greater fall of TNF-α levels associated to higher BMI reduction.

  9. Use of formative research and social network theory to develop a group walking intervention: Sumter County on the Move!

    PubMed

    Forthofer, Melinda; Burroughs-Girardi, Ericka; Stoisor-Olsson, Liliana; Wilcox, Sara; Sharpe, Patricia A; Pekuri, Linda M

    2016-10-01

    Although social support is a frequently cited enabler of physical activity, few studies have examined how to harness social support in interventions. This paper describes community-based formative research to design a walking program for mobilizing naturally occurring social networks to support increases in walking behavior. Focus group methods were used to engage community members in discussions about desired walking program features. The research was conducted with underserved communities in Sumter County, South Carolina. The majority of focus group participants were women (76%) and African American (92%). Several important themes emerged from the focus group results regarding attitudes toward walking, facilitators of and barriers to walking, ideal walking program characteristics, and strategies for encouraging community members to walk. Most noteably, the role of existing social networks as a supportive influence on physical activity was a recurring theme in our formative research and a gap in the existing evidence base. The resulting walking program focused on strategies for mobilizing, supporting and reinforcing existing social networks as mechanisms for increasing walking. Our approach to linking theory, empirical evidence and community-based formative research for the development of a walking intervention offers an example for practitioners developing intervention strategies for a wide range of behaviors.

  10. Calcium precipitate induced aerobic granulation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunli; Lee, Duu-Jong; Yang, Xue; Wang, Yayi; Wang, Xingzu; Liu, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic granulation is a novel biotechnology for wastewater treatment. This study refined existing aerobic granulation mechanisms as a sequencing process including formation of calcium precipitate under alkaline pH to form inorganic cores, followed by bacterial attachment and growth on these cores to form the exopolysaccharide matrix. Mature granules comprised an inner core and a matrix layer and a rim layer with enriched microbial strains. The inorganic core was a mix of different crystals of calcium and phosphates. Functional strains including Sphingomonas sp., Paracoccus sp. Sinorhizobium americanum strain and Flavobacterium sp. attached onto the cores. These functional strains promote c-di-GMP production and the expression by Psl and Alg genes for exopolysaccharide production to enhance formation of mature granules.

  11. Aerobic microbial enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Torsvik, T.; Gilje, E.; Sunde, E.

    1995-12-31

    In aerobic MEOR, the ability of oil-degrading bacteria to mobilize oil is used to increase oil recovery. In this process, oxygen and mineral nutrients are injected into the oil reservoir in order to stimulate growth of aerobic oil-degrading bacteria in the reservoir. Experiments carried out in a model sandstone with stock tank oil and bacteria isolated from offshore wells showed that residual oil saturation was lowered from 27% to 3%. The process was time dependent, not pore volume dependent. During MEOR flooding, the relative permeability of water was lowered. Oxygen and active bacteria were needed for the process to take place. Maximum efficiency was reached at low oxygen concentrations, approximately 1 mg O{sub 2}/liter.

  12. Effect of aerobic exercise on patients with primary fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salek, A K; Khan, M M; Ahmed, S M; Rashid, M I; Emran, M A; Mamun, M A

    2005-07-01

    Sixty eight adult patients of fibromyalgia were included in this prospective study from the Outpatient Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka during the period of January 2003 to June 2003. Study samples were assigned into two treatment groups: Group A (n = 38) with exercise by static bicycle and aerobic walking in addition to tricyclic antidepressant and analgesic and Group B (n = 30) was non exercise group, treated with tricyclic antidepressant and analgesic only. The total duration of treatment was 16 weeks. Pre-treatment (week 0) and post treatment (week 16) evaluation was performed in both groups. Evaluation parameters included pain grade, number of trigger points, occurrence of arousal at night, frequency of micturition and global evaluation by the physician. After 16 weeks, mean improvement of exercise group and non exercise group was 48% and 39% respectively but this difference was not statistically significant. Therefore, from this study it was observed that aerobic exercise showed no significant benefit to fibromyalgia patients.

  13. WWOX loss activates aerobic glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells undergo reprogramming of glucose metabolism to limit energy production to glycolysis-a state known as "aerobic glycolysis." Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1α) is a transcription factor that regulates many genes responsible for this switch. As discussed here, new data suggest that the tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) modulates HIF1α, thereby regulating this metabolic state.

  14. WWOX loss activates aerobic glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells undergo reprogramming of glucose metabolism to limit energy production to glycolysis—a state known as “aerobic glycolysis.” Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1α) is a transcription factor that regulates many genes responsible for this switch. As discussed here, new data suggest that the tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) modulates HIF1α, thereby regulating this metabolic state. PMID:27308416

  15. Comparison of forward walking and backward walking in stroke hemiplegia patients focusing on the paretic side

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Misato; Takami, Akiyoshi; Oda, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the features of backward walking in stroke patients with hemiplegia by focusing on the joint movements and moments of the paretic side, walking speed, stride length, and cadence. [Subjects and Methods] Nine stroke patients performed forward walking and backward walking along a 5-m walkway. Walking speed and stride length were self-selected. Movements were measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system and a force plate. One walking cycle of the paretic side was analyzed. [Results] Walking speed, stride length, and cadence were significantly lower in backward walking than in forward walking. Peak hip extension was significantly lower in backward walking and peak hip flexion moment, knee extension moment, and ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion moments were lower in backward walking. [Conclusion] Unlike forward walking, backward walking requires conscious hip joint extension. Conscious extension of the hip joint is hard for stroke patients with hemiplegia. Therefore, the range of hip joint movement declined in backward walking, and walking speed and stride length also declined. The peak ankle plantar flexion moment was significantly lower in backward walking than in forward walking, and it was hard to generate propulsion power in backward walking. These difficulties also affected the walking speed. PMID:28265136

  16. Aerobic Metabolism of Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Mickelson, M. N.

    1967-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae cultures possess an aerobic pathway for glucose oxidation that is strongly inhibited by cyanide. The products of glucose oxidation by aerobically grown cells of S. agalactiae 50 are lactic and acetic acids, acetylmethylcarbinol, and carbon dioxide. Glucose degradation products by aerobically grown cells, as percentage of glucose carbon, were 52 to 61% lactic acid, 20 to 23% acetic acid, 5.5 to 6.5% acetylmethylcarbinol, and 14 to 16% carbon dioxide. There was no evidence for a pentose cycle or a tricarboxylic acid cycle. Crude cell-free extracts of S. agalactiae 50 possessed a strong reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH2) oxidase that is also cyanide-sensitive. Dialysis or ultrafiltration of the crude, cell-free extract resulted in loss of NADH2 oxidase activity. Oxidase activity was restored to the inactive extract by addition of the ultrafiltrate or by addition of menadione or K3Fe(CN)6. Noncytochrome iron-containing pigments were present in cell-free extracts of S. agalactiae. The possible participation of these pigments in the respiration of S. agalactiae is presently being studied. PMID:4291090

  17. Effects of dominant somatotype on aerobic capacity trainability

    PubMed Central

    Chaouachi, M; Chaouachi, A; Chamari, K; Chtara, M; Feki, Y; Amri, M; Trudeau, F

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the association between dominant somatotype and the effect on aerobic capacity variables of individualised aerobic interval training. Methods: Forty one white North African subjects (age 21.4±1.3 years; V·o2max = 52.8±5.7 ml kg–1 min–1) performed three exercise tests 1 week apart (i) an incremental test on a cycle ergometer to determine V·o2max and V·o2 at the second ventilatory threshold (VT2); (ii) a VAM-EVAL track test to determine maximal aerobic speed (vV·o2max); and (iii) an exhaustive constant velocity test to determine time limit performed at 100% vV·o2max (tlim100). Subjects were divided into four somatometric groups: endomorphs-mesomorphs (Endo-meso; n = 9), mesomorphs (Meso; n = 11), mesomorphs-ectomorphs (Meso-ecto; n = 12), and ectomorphs (Ecto; n = 9). Subjects followed a 12 week training program (two sessions/week). Each endurance training session consisted of the maximal number of successive fractions for each subject. Each fraction consisted of one period of exercise at 100% of vV·o2max and one of active recovery at 60% of vV·o2max. The duration of each period was equal to half the individual tlim100 duration (153.6±39.7 s). After the training program, all subjects were re-evaluated for comparison with pre-test results. Results: Pre- and post-training data were grouped by dominant somatotype. Two way ANOVA revealed significant somatotype-aerobic training interaction effects (p<0.001) for improvements in vV·o2max, V·o2max expressed classically and according to allometric scaling, and V·o2 at VT2. There were significant differences among groups post-training: the Meso-ecto and the Meso groups showed the greatest improvements in aerobic capacity. Conclusion: The significant somatotype-aerobic training interaction suggests different trainability with intermittent and individualised aerobic training according to somatotype. PMID:16306506

  18. Effects of an 18 week walking programme on cardiac function in previously sedentary or relatively inactive adults.

    PubMed Central

    Woolf-May, K; Bird, S; Owen, A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of an 18 week walking programme upon cardiac function. METHODS: 29 sedentary or relatively inactive but otherwise healthy subjects (15 walkers and 14 controls, aged 40-68 years) completed the study. The walkers completed a progressive 18 week walking programme which required an estimated average energy expenditure of 900 kcal week-1 for the total duration of the study and 1161 kcal week-1 during the final six weeks. Walking was carried out at an intensity of 67.8 (SD 4.99)% of maximum oxygen consumption and 73.8(6.99%) of maximum heart rate. Before and after the intervention all subjects underwent an M mode echocardiogram, graded treadmill walking test, and step test for the assessment of aerobic fitness. RESULTS: After 18 weeks the results of the control group showed no change in any of the variables measured while the walkers showed a statistically significant increase in the velocity of relaxation of the longitudinal myocardial fibres of the left ventricle and a decrease in heart rate measured during the step tests, indicating an improvement in aerobic capacity. CONCLUSIONS: Walking promotes improvements in cardiovascular fitness. Moderate forms of exercise may improve cardiac function. Images p50-a PMID:9132212

  19. Mechanical design of walking machines.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Keisuke; Hirose, Shigeo

    2007-01-15

    The performance of existing actuators, such as electric motors, is very limited, be it power-weight ratio or energy efficiency. In this paper, we discuss the method to design a practical walking machine under this severe constraint with focus on two concepts, the gravitationally decoupled actuation (GDA) and the coupled drive. The GDA decouples the driving system against the gravitational field to suppress generation of negative power and improve energy efficiency. On the other hand, the coupled drive couples the driving system to distribute the output power equally among actuators and maximize the utilization of installed actuator power. First, we depict the GDA and coupled drive in detail. Then, we present actual machines, TITAN-III and VIII, quadruped walking machines designed on the basis of the GDA, and NINJA-I and II, quadruped wall walking machines designed on the basis of the coupled drive. Finally, we discuss walking machines that travel on three-dimensional terrain (3D terrain), which includes the ground, walls and ceiling. Then, we demonstrate with computer simulation that we can selectively leverage GDA and coupled drive by walking posture control.

  20. The QWalk simulator of quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquezino, F. L.; Portugal, R.

    2008-09-01

    Several research groups are giving special attention to quantum walks recently, because this research area have been used with success in the development of new efficient quantum algorithms. A general simulator of quantum walks is very important for the development of this area, since it allows the researchers to focus on the mathematical and physical aspects of the research instead of deviating the efforts to the implementation of specific numerical simulations. In this paper we present QWalk, a quantum walk simulator for one- and two-dimensional lattices. Finite two-dimensional lattices with generic topologies can be used. Decoherence can be simulated by performing measurements or by breaking links of the lattice. We use examples to explain the usage of the software and to show some recent results of the literature that are easily reproduced by the simulator. Program summaryProgram title: QWalk Catalogue identifier: AEAX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public Licence No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 10 010 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 172 064 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: Any computer with a C compiler that accepts ISO C99 complex arithmetic (recent versions of GCC, for instance). Pre-compiled Windows versions are also provided Operating system: The software should run in any operating system with a recent C compiler. Successful tests were performed in Linux and Windows RAM: Less than 10 MB were required for a two-dimensional lattice of size 201×201. About 400 MB, for a two-dimensional lattice of size 1601×1601 Classification: 16.5 Nature of problem: Classical simulation of discrete quantum walks in one- and two-dimensional lattices. Solution method: Iterative approach without explicit representation of

  1. The Group Walk-Talk: A Therapeutic Challenge for Secondary Students with Social/Emotional Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Bruce; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The article describes the origin, philosophy, planning, and evaluation of the Grundy, Illinois, alternative school program which enables secondary students to talk about their emotional and behavior problems during healthful group walks. (MC)

  2. Two-photon quantum walk in a multimode fiber.

    PubMed

    Defienne, Hugo; Barbieri, Marco; Walmsley, Ian A; Smith, Brian J; Gigan, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton propagation in connected structures-a quantum walk-offers the potential of simulating complex physical systems and provides a route to universal quantum computation. Increasing the complexity of quantum photonic networks where the walk occurs is essential for many applications. We implement a quantum walk of indistinguishable photon pairs in a multimode fiber supporting 380 modes. Using wavefront shaping, we control the propagation of the two-photon state through the fiber in which all modes are coupled. Excitation of arbitrary output modes of the system is realized by controlling classical and quantum interferences. This report demonstrates a highly multimode platform for multiphoton interference experiments and provides a powerful method to program a general high-dimensional multiport optical circuit. This work paves the way for the next generation of photonic devices for quantum simulation, computing, and communication.

  3. Szegedy's quantum walk with queries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Raqueline A. M.

    2016-11-01

    When searching for a marked vertex in a graph, Szegedy's usual search operator is defined by using the transition probability matrix of the random walk with absorbing barriers at the marked vertices. Instead of using this operator, we analyze searching with Szegedy's quantum walk by using reflections around the marked vertices, that is, the standard form of quantum query. We show we can boost the probability to 1 of finding a marked vertex in the complete graph. Numerical simulations suggest that the success probability can be improved for other graphs, like the two-dimensional grid. We also prove that, for a certain class of graphs, we can express Szegedy's search operator, obtained from the absorbing walk, using the standard query model.

  4. Intervention Mapping to Develop a Print Resource for Dog-Walking Promotion in Canada.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Julia; Dwyer, John J M; Coe, Jason B

    2016-10-25

    Promoting dog walking among dog owners is consistent with One Health, which focuses on the mutual health benefits of the human-animal relationship for people and animals. In this study, we used intervention mapping (a framework to develop programs and resources for health promotion) to develop a clearer understanding of the determinants of dog walking to develop curricular and educational resources for promoting regular dog walking among dog owners. Twenty-six adult dog owners in Ontario participated in a semi-structured interview about dog walking in 2014. Thematic analysis entailing open, axial, and selective coding was conducted. Among the reasons why the participating dog owners walk their dog were the obligation to the dog, the motivation from the dog, self-efficacy, the dog's health, the owner's health, socialization, a well-behaved dog, and having a routine. The main barriers to dog walking were weather, lack of time, the dog's behavior while walking, and feeling unsafe. We compared interview results to findings in previous studies of dog walking to create a list of determinants of dog walking that we used to create a matrix of change objectives. Based on these results, we developed a print resource to promote regular dog walking among dog owners. The findings can be used by veterinary educators to inform course content that specifically educates veterinary students on the promotion of dog walking among dog owners and the benefits to both humans and animals. The study also offers veterinarians a further understanding upon which to initiate a conversation and develop educational resources for promoting regular dog walking among dog-owning clients.

  5. Walking droplets in confined domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáenz, Pedro; Bush, John

    2016-11-01

    A millimetric liquid drop can walk spontaneously along the surface of a vibrating fluid bath, propelled by a resonant interaction with its own wave field. These walking droplets exhibit features previously thought to be exclusive to the microscopic quantum realm. We here explore experimentally the dynamics and statistics of this macroscopic wave-particle system in confined domains, or 'corrals'. Particular attention is given to characterizing the influence of the corral geometry on the emergent probability distributions. The relation to analogous quantum systems (specifically, quantum corrals, the quantum mirage and scarring in Bose-Einstein condensates) is discussed. NSF support via CMMI-1333242.

  6. Lower limb loading in step aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Wu, H-W; Hsieh, H-M; Chang, Y-W; Wang, L-H

    2012-11-01

    Participation in aerobic dance is associated with a number of lower extremity injuries, and abnormal joint loading seems to be a factor in these. However, information on joint loading is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinetics of the lower extremity in step aerobic dance and to compare the differences of high-impact and low-impact step aerobic dance in 4 aerobic movements (mambo, kick, L step and leg curl). 18 subjects were recruited for this study. High-impact aerobic dance requires a significantly greater range of motion, joint force and joint moment than low-impact step aerobic dance. The peak joint forces and moments in high-impact step aerobic dance were found to be 1.4 times higher than in low-impact step aerobic dance. Understanding the nature of joint loading may help choreographers develop dance combinations that are less injury-prone. Furthermore, increased knowledge about joint loading may be helpful in lowering the risk of injuries in aerobic dance instructors and students.

  7. After Talking the Talk, Now Walk the Walk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vukovic, Paul

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes what his students are doing following the ATM Easter conference in Telford, where he was inspired by a workshop entitled "Vitamin D Maths," conducted by Jocelyn D'Arcy. He describes an activity that allows his Year 11 students to walk through angles drawn on the floors. This topic will now literally…

  8. Bilingual Text4Walking Food Service Employee Intervention Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Diana; Wilbur, JoEllen; Fogg, Louis; Sandi, Giselle; Moss, Angela; Ocampo, Edith V

    2016-01-01

    Background Half of all adults in the United States do not meet the level of recommended aerobic physical activity. Physical activity interventions are now being conducted in the workplace. Accessible technology, in the form of widespread usage of cell phones and text messaging, is available for promoting physical activity. Objective The purposes of this study, which was conducted in the workplace, were to determine (1) the feasibility of implementing a bilingual 12-week Text4Walking intervention and (2) the effect of the Text4Walking intervention on change in physical activity and health status in a food service employee population. Methods Before conducting the study reported here, the Text4Walking research team developed a database of motivational physical activity text messages in English. Because Hispanic or Latino adults compose one-quarter of all adults employed in the food service industry, the Text4Walking team translated the physical activity text messages into Spanish. This pilot study was guided by the Physical Activity Health Promotion Framework and used a 1-group 12-week pre- and posttest design with food service employees who self-reported as being sedentary. The aim of the study was to increase the number of daily steps over the baseline by 3000 steps. Three physical activity text messages were delivered weekly. In addition, participants received 3 motivational calls during the study. Results SPSS version 19.0 and R 3.0 were used to perform the data analysis. There were 33 employees who participated in the study (57.6% female), with a mean age of 43.7 years (SD 8.4). The study included 11 Hispanic or Latino participants, 8 of whom requested that the study be delivered in Spanish. There was a 100% retention rate in the study. At baseline, the participants walked 102 (SD 138) minutes/day (per self-report). This rate increased significantly (P=.008) to 182 (SD 219) minutes/day over the course of the study. The participants had a baseline mean of 10

  9. Aerobic exercise for Alzheimer's disease: A randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Van Sciver, Angela; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Honea, Robyn A.; Brooks, William M.; Billinger, Sandra A.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Burns, Jeffrey M.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in the role of physical exercise as a therapeutic strategy for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We assessed the effect of 26 weeks (6 months) of a supervised aerobic exercise program on memory, executive function, functional ability and depression in early AD. Methods and findings This study was a 26-week randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of 150 minutes per week of aerobic exercise vs. non-aerobic stretching and toning control intervention in individuals with early AD. A total of 76 well-characterized older adults with probable AD (mean age 72.9 [7.7]) were enrolled and 68 participants completed the study. Exercise was conducted with supervision and monitoring by trained exercise specialists. Neuropsychological tests and surveys were conducted at baseline,13, and 26 weeks to assess memory and executive function composite scores, functional ability (Disability Assessment for Dementia), and depressive symptoms (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia). Cardiorespiratory fitness testing and brain MRI was performed at baseline and 26 weeks. Aerobic exercise was associated with a modest gain in functional ability (Disability Assessment for Dementia) compared to individuals in the ST group (X2 = 8.2, p = 0.02). There was no clear effect of intervention on other primary outcome measures of Memory, Executive Function, or depressive symptoms. However, secondary analyses revealed that change in cardiorespiratory fitness was positively correlated with change in memory performance and bilateral hippocampal volume. Conclusions Aerobic exercise in early AD is associated with benefits in functional ability. Exercise-related gains in cardiorespiratory fitness were associated with improved memory performance and reduced hippocampal atrophy, suggesting cardiorespiratory fitness gains may be important in driving brain benefits. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01128361 PMID:28187125

  10. Exercise training enhances aerobic capacity in juvenile estuarine crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus).

    PubMed

    Owerkowicz, Tomasz; Baudinette, Russell V

    2008-06-01

    Aerobic capacity (VO2max) of endothermic vertebrates is known to increase with exercise training, but this effect has not been found to-date in non-avian reptiles. We exercised juvenile estuarine crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) to walk at 0.75-0.88 km/h on a treadmill for up to 20 min a day over 16 weeks, and compared their aerobic performance with that of unexercised crocodiles. In the exercised group, VO2max increased from 6.9 to 8.5 mLO2/kg/min (+28%), and locomotor endurance increased from 3.8 to 6.9 min (+82%). Neither VO2max nor endurance changed significantly in the sedentary group. This finding extends the exercise training effect onto another vertebrate clade, and demonstrates that ectothermic amniotes are capable of elevating their aerobic capacity in response to exercise training. We propose that differences in cardiopulmonary structure and function in non-avian reptiles may be responsible for the absence (in squamates) or presence (in crocodilians) of a strong training effect on aerobic capacity.

  11. Brisk Walk May Help Sidestep Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_162978.html Brisk Walk May Help Sidestep Heart Disease In just 10 weeks, cholesterol, blood pressure and ... at moderate intensity may lower the risk of heart disease, a small study suggests. "We know walking is ...

  12. Crutches and children - standing and walking

    MedlinePlus

    ... patientinstructions/000641.htm Crutches and children - standing and walking To use the sharing features on this page, ... leg. Keep the crutches slightly forward and apart. Walking with Crutches (No Weight Bearing on Hurt Foot ...

  13. Dissipative quantum computing with open quantum walks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-12-04

    An open quantum walk approach to the implementation of a dissipative quantum computing scheme is presented. The formalism is demonstrated for the example of an open quantum walk implementation of a 3 qubit quantum circuit consisting of 10 gates.

  14. On Convergent Probability of a Random Walk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Y.-F.; Ching, W.-K.

    2006-01-01

    This note introduces an interesting random walk on a straight path with cards of random numbers. The method of recurrent relations is used to obtain the convergent probability of the random walk with different initial positions.

  15. A comparison of the health benefits of reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) and moderate-intensity walking in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Ruffino, José S; Songsorn, Preeyaphorn; Haggett, Malindi; Edmonds, Daniel; Robinson, Anthony M; Thompson, Dylan; Vollaard, Niels B J

    2017-02-01

    Reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) is a genuinely time-efficient intervention that can improve aerobic capacity and insulin sensitivity in sedentary individuals. The present study compared the effects of REHIT and moderate-intensity walking on health markers in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in a counter-balanced crossover study. Sixteen men with T2D (mean ± SD age: 55 ± 5 years, body mass index: 30.6 ± 2.8 kg·m(-2), maximal aerobic capacity: 27 ± 4 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) completed 8 weeks of REHIT (three 10-min low-intensity cycling sessions/week with two "all-out" 10-20-s sprints) and 8 weeks of moderate-intensity walking (five 30-min sessions/week at an intensity corresponding to 40%-55% of heart-rate reserve), with a 2-month wash-out period between interventions. Before and after each intervention, participants underwent an incremental fitness test, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan, and continuous glucose monitoring. REHIT was associated with a significantly larger increase in maximal aerobic capacity compared with walking (7% vs. 1%; time × intervention interaction effect: p < 0.05). Both REHIT and walking decreased resting mean arterial pressure (-4%; main effect of time: p < 0.05) and plasma fructosamine (-5%; main effect of time: p < 0.05). Neither intervention significantly improved OGTT-derived measures of insulin sensitivity, glycaemic control measured using continuous glucose monitors, blood lipid profile, or body composition. We conclude that REHIT is superior to a 5-fold larger volume of moderate-intensity walking in improving aerobic fitness, but similar to walking REHIT is not an effective intervention for improving insulin sensitivity or glycaemic control in T2D patients in the short term.

  16. Falling while walking: A hidden contributor to pedestrian injury.

    PubMed

    Oxley, Jennifer; O'Hern, Steve; Burtt, Duane; Rossiter, Ben

    2017-02-07

    -related injuries that require hospital admission, while also having the highest rate of emergency department presentations when adjusting for age and exposure based on estimates of aggregate walking distances. The study also highlighted that the most common injury sustained from a fall were fractures. The implications of these findings and identification of 'best-practice' within a Safe System context are discussed in terms of enhancements to the physical environment (particularly footpath, kerb and ramp construction and maintenance), implementation of fall hazard assessment and management strategies, and educational programs to highlight the risks for falls and recommend preventative strategies, and overall enhancements of general fall interventions to include falls while walking outside (including exercise interventions). In addition, a number of research and data needs, particularly collection of in-depth data to identify contributory factors and injury outcomes related to falls while walking incidents.

  17. A Walk to the Well.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weir, Phil

    1994-01-01

    During a walk, an outdoor education teacher reflects on the status of outdoor education in Ottawa (Canada) and importance of maintaining a close relationship with nature. He looks for signs of an old log home site, observes a hawk's flight, discovers remains of a plastic bag in an owl pellet, and realizes that everyone is working on survival. (LP)

  18. Walking Tips for Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most ppular form of exercise among older adults and it's a great choice. What can walking do for you? strengthen muscles help prevent weight gain lower risks of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and osteoporosis improve balance lower the likelihood of falling If ...

  19. Behavior Management by Walking Around

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boardman, Randolph M.

    2004-01-01

    An emerging concept from the field of business is to manage organizations by wandering around and engaging staff and consumers in informal interactions. The author extends these ideas to settings serving children and youth. In the best seller, In Search of Excellence, Peters and Waterman (1982) introduced Management by Walking Around (MBWA) as an…

  20. Walk around the Block Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Understanding the Built Environment, Prairie Village, KS.

    This curriculum packet contains two teacher-developed lesson plans for upper elementary students focusing on the built environment. The first lesson plan, "The Built Environment--An Integrating Theme" (Liesa Schroeder), offers suggestions for developing a walking tour around the school neighborhood, a historic area, or a city square. It…

  1. Walking to Save a County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slotnick, Karen

    1981-01-01

    Describes the 10-year history and accomplishments of the Walk to Save the County which has preserved more than 400 acres of Onondaga County, New York. Outlines organizational structure, promotional strategies, awards, and educational opportunities involved in this annual fund-raising hike by third- through eighth-grade students. (NEC)

  2. The 1991-1992 walking robot design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarm, Shapour; Dayawansa, Wijesurija; Tsai, Lung-Wen; Peritt, Jon

    1992-01-01

    The University of Maryland Walking Machine team designed and constructed a robot. This robot was completed in two phases with supervision and suggestions from three professors and one graduate teaching assistant. Bob was designed during the Fall Semester 1991, then machined, assembled, and debugged in the Spring Semester 1992. The project required a total of 4,300 student hours and cost under $8,000. Mechanically, Bob was an exercise in optimization. The robot was designed to test several diverse aspects of robotic potential, including speed, agility, and stability, with simplicity and reliability holding equal importance. For speed and smooth walking motion, the footpath contained a long horizontal component; a vertical aspect was included to allow clearance of obstacles. These challenges were met with a leg design that utilized a unique multi-link mechanism which traveled a modified tear-drop footpath. The electrical requirements included motor, encoder, and voice control circuitry selection, manual controller manufacture, and creation of sensors for guidance. Further, there was also a need for selection of the computer, completion of a preliminary program, and testing of the robot.

  3. KidsWalk-to-School: A Guide To Promote Walking to School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (DHHS/CDC), Atlanta, GA.

    This guide encourages people to create safe walking and biking routes to school, promoting four issues: physically active travel, safe and walkable routes to school, crime prevention, and health environments. The chapters include: "KidsWalk-to-School: A Guide to Promote Walking to School" (Is there a solution? Why is walking to school important?…

  4. Walking pattern classification and walking distance estimation algorithms using gait phase information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jeen-Shing; Lin, Che-Wei; Yang, Ya-Ting C; Ho, Yu-Jen

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a walking pattern classification and a walking distance estimation algorithm using gait phase information. A gait phase information retrieval algorithm was developed to analyze the duration of the phases in a gait cycle (i.e., stance, push-off, swing, and heel-strike phases). Based on the gait phase information, a decision tree based on the relations between gait phases was constructed for classifying three different walking patterns (level walking, walking upstairs, and walking downstairs). Gait phase information was also used for developing a walking distance estimation algorithm. The walking distance estimation algorithm consists of the processes of step count and step length estimation. The proposed walking pattern classification and walking distance estimation algorithm have been validated by a series of experiments. The accuracy of the proposed walking pattern classification was 98.87%, 95.45%, and 95.00% for level walking, walking upstairs, and walking downstairs, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed walking distance estimation algorithm was 96.42% over a walking distance.

  5. Adherence of older women with strength training and aerobic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Picorelli, Alexandra Miranda Assumpção; Pereira, Daniele Sirineu; Felício, Diogo Carvalho; Dos Anjos, Daniela Maria; Pereira, Danielle Aparecida Gomes; Dias, Rosângela Corrêa; Assis, Marcella Guimarães; Pereira, Leani Souza Máximo

    2014-01-01

    Background Participation of older people in a program of regular exercise is an effective strategy to minimize the physical decline associated with age. The purpose of this study was to assess adherence rates in older women enrolled in two different exercise programs (one aerobic exercise and one strength training) and identify any associated clinical or functional factors. Methods This was an exploratory observational study in a sample of 231 elderly women of mean age 70.5 years. We used a structured questionnaire with standardized tests to evaluate the relevant clinical and functional measures. A specific adherence questionnaire was developed by the researchers to determine motivators and barriers to exercise adherence. Results The adherence rate was 49.70% in the aerobic exercise group and 56.20% in the strength training group. Multiple logistic regression models for motivation were significant (P=0.003) for the muscle strengthening group (R2=0.310) and also significant (P=0.008) for the aerobic exercise group (R2=0.154). A third regression model for barriers to exercise was significant (P=0.003) only for the muscle strengthening group (R2=0.236). The present study shows no direct relationship between worsening health status and poor adherence. Conclusion Factors related to adherence with exercise in the elderly are multifactorial. PMID:24600212

  6. Developmental Continuity? Crawling, Cruising, and Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adolph, Karen E.; Berger, Sarah E.; Leo, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    This research examined developmental continuity between "cruising" (moving sideways holding onto furniture for support) and walking. Because cruising and walking involve locomotion in an upright posture, researchers have assumed that cruising is functionally related to walking. Study 1 showed that most infants crawl and cruise concurrently prior…

  7. Generalized Open Quantum Walks on Apollonian Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pawela, Łukasz; Gawron, Piotr; Miszczak, Jarosław Adam; Sadowski, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the model of generalized open quantum walks on networks using the Transition Operation Matrices formalism. We focus our analysis on the mean first passage time and the average return time in Apollonian networks. These results differ significantly from a classical walk on these networks. We show a comparison of the classical and quantum behaviour of walks on these networks. PMID:26177452

  8. The effect of short-term aerobic exercise on depression and body image in Iranian women.

    PubMed

    Zarshenas, Sareh; Houshvar, Parsa; Tahmasebi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of short-term aerobic exercise on depression symptoms and body image attitudes among Iranian women. In this quasiexperimental study, 82 females were assigned to experimental group (aerobic exercise group, n = 41) or control group (waiting list, n = 41) and evaluated by Beck Depression Inventory-second edition (BDI-II) and Multidimensional Body Self-Relation Questionnaire (MBSRQ), respectively. The experimental group received four-week aerobic exercise program, and control group had been asked to wait for the next four weeks. Results of this study confirmed the significant decrease in depression symptoms at the experimental group compared to control group (P < 0.5). For the body image dependent variables, significant improvement was also found in appearance evaluation, appearance orientation, health orientation, and illness orientation in aerobic exercise group (P < 0.5).

  9. A study on macronutrient self-selection after acute aerobic exercise in college females

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Young; Kim, Min-Jeong; Cho, Ik-Rae; Won, Yu-Mi; Han, Mi-Kyung; Jung, Kon-Nym; Lee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Jae-Hee; Chin, Ji-Hyoung; Roh, Jae-Hun; Min, Seung-Hi; Lee, Taek-Kyun; Park, Hyo-Joo; Jang, Kwon; Kwon, Se-Jeong; Kang, Suh-Jung; Shin, Mi-Ae; Kim, Hu-Nyun; Hong, Jae-Seung; Choi, Eun-Hi; An, Nam-Il; Kim, Ji-Hyuk; Kim, Mi-Suk

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to determine whether acute aerobic exercise (climbing) is associated with changes in the dietary intake pattern. [Subjects and Methods] Food intake and physical activity data for 15 female college students were sampled for 3 days and categorized according to routine activity or high-intensity activity such as hiking. Nutrient intake based on the data was analyzed using a nutrition program. [Results] Carbohydrate and protein intake was significantly decreased after exercise compared to before acute aerobic exercise, but lipid intake showed no significant difference. Calorie intake was significantly decreased after exercise compared to before exercise; however, calorie consumption was significantly increased after exercise. [Conclusion] Aerobic exercise causes a decrease in total calories by inducing reduction in carbohydrate and protein intake. Therefore, aerobic exercise is very important for weight (body fat) control since it causes positive changes in the food intake pattern in female students. PMID:27799693

  10. Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy after Aerobic Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Adam R.; Harber, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Current dogma suggests aerobic exercise training has minimal effect on skeletal muscle size. We and others have demonstrated that aerobic exercise acutely and chronically alters protein metabolism and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy. These findings promote an antithesis to the status quo by providing novel perspective on skeletal muscle mass regulation and insight into exercise-countermeasures for populations prone to muscle loss. PMID:24508740

  11. Aerobic rice mechanization: techniques for crop establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusairy, K. M.; Ayob, H.; Chan, C. S.; Fauzi, M. I. Mohamed; Mohamad Fakhrul, Z. O.; Shahril Shah, G. S. M.; Azlan, O.; Rasad, M. A.; Hashim, A. M.; Arshad, Z.; E, E. Ibrahim; Saifulizan, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Rice being the staple food crops, hundreds of land races in it makes the diversity of rice crops. Aerobic rice production was introduced which requires much less water input to safeguard and sustain the rice production and conserve water due to decreasing water resources, climatic changes and competition from urban and industrial users. Mechanization system plays an important role for the success of aerobic rice cultivation. All farming activities for aerobic rice production are run on aerobic soil conditions. Row seeder mechanization system is developed to replace conventional seeding technique on the aerobic rice field. It is targeted for small and the large scale aerobic rice farmers. The aero - seeder machine is used for the small scale aerobic rice field, while the accord - seeder is used for the large scale aerobic rice field. The use of this mechanization machine can eliminate the tedious and inaccurate seeding operations reduce labour costs and increases work rate. The machine is easy to operate and it can increase crop establishment rate. It reduce missing hill, increasing planting and crop with high yield can be produce. This machine is designed for low costs maintenance and it is easy to dismantle and assemble during maintenance and it is safe to be used.

  12. Community-based walking exercise for peripheral artery disease: An exploratory pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Ryan J; Hiatt, William R; Casserly, Ivan P; Rogers, R Kevin; Main, Deborah S; Kohrt, Wendy M; Ho, P Michael; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2016-01-01

    Supervised walking exercise is an effective treatment to improve walking ability of patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD), but few exercise programs in community settings have been effective. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of a community-based walking exercise program with training, monitoring, and coaching (TMC) components to improve exercise performance and patient-reported outcomes in PAD patients. This was a randomized, controlled trial including PAD patients who previously received peripheral endovascular therapy or presented with stable claudication. Patients randomized (n=25) to the intervention group received a comprehensive community-based walking exercise program with elements of TMC over 14 weeks. Patients in the control group did not receive treatment beyond standard advice to walk. The primary outcome in the intent-to-treat (ITT) analyses was peak walking time (PWT) on a graded treadmill. Secondary outcomes included claudication onset time (COT) and patient-reported outcomes assessed via the Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ). Intervention group patients (n=10) did not significantly improve PWT when compared with the control group patients (n=10) (mean±standard error: +2.1±0.7 vs. 0.0±0.7 min, p=0.052). Changes in COT and WIQ scores were greater for intervention patients compared with control patients (COT: +1.6±0.8 vs. −0.6±0.7 min, p=0.045; WIQ: +18.3±4.2 vs. −4.6±4.2%, p=0.001). This pilot using a walking program with TMC and an ITT analyses did not improve the primary outcome in PAD patients. Other walking performance and patient self-reported outcomes were improved following exercise in community settings. Further study is needed to determine whether this intervention improves outcomes in a trial employing a larger sample size. PMID:25755148

  13. Whole-body aerobic resistance training circuit improves aerobic fitness and muscle strength in sedentary young females.

    PubMed

    Myers, Terrence R; Schneider, Matthew G; Schmale, Matthew S; Hazell, Tom J

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to determine whether a time-effective whole-body aerobic resistance training circuit using only body weight exercises is as effective in improving aerobic and anaerobic fitness, as well as muscular strength and endurance as a traditional concurrent style training combining resistance and endurance training. Thirty-four sedentary females (20.9 ± 3.2 years; 167.6 ± 6.4 cm; 65.0 ± 15.2 kg) were assigned to either: (a) a combined resistance and aerobic exercise group (COMBINED; n = 17) or (b) a circuit-based whole-body aerobic resistance training circuit group (CIRCUIT; n = 17). Training was 3 days per week for 5 weeks. Pre- and post-training measures included a (Equation is included in full-text article.)test, anaerobic Wingate cycling test, and muscular strength and endurance tests. After training, (Equation is included in full-text article.)improved with CIRCUIT by 11% (p = 0.015), with no change for COMBINED (p = 0.375). Both relative peak power output and relative average power output improved with CIRCUIT by 5% (p = 0.027) and 3.2% (p = 0.006), respectively, and with COMBINED by 5.3% (p = 0.025) and 5.1% (p = 0.003). Chest and hamstrings 1 repetition maximum (1RM) improved with CIRCUIT by 20.6% (p = 0.011) and 8.3% (p = 0.022) and with COMBINED by 35.6% (p < 0.001) and 10.2% (p = 0.004), respectively. Only the COMBINED group improved back (11.7%; p = 0.017) and quadriceps (9.6%; p = 0.006) 1RM. The COMBINED group performed more repetitions at 60% of their pretraining 1RM for back (10.0%; p = 0.006) and hamstring (23.3%; p = 0.056) vs. CIRCUIT. Our results suggest that a circuit-based whole-body aerobic resistance training program can elicit a greater cardiorespiratory response and similar muscular strength gains with less time commitment compared with a traditional resistance training program combined with aerobic exercise.

  14. Relationship between perceived and measured changes in walking after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ada; Eng, Janice; Rand, Debbie

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Examining participant-perceived change in walking provides insight into whether changes were meaningful for participants. This study examined the relationships between change scores in standardized walking outcomes and ratings of perceived change following exercise post-stroke. Methods Self- and fast-paced gait speed and 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) distance were assessed in 22 participants (age 67±10.3 years, 1.8±0.9 years post-stroke) before and after a 3-month exercise program. Perceived changes were evaluated using a 15-point Likert scale. Correlation analyses between measured and perceived change were performed. Subgroups of low and high baseline scores were compared for differences in measured and perceived change. Results 6MWT change was correlated with perceived change (ρ=0.52, P=0.01), greater change was demonstrated among participants who perceived improvement relative to those who did not (difference 34.4 meters (95% CI 17.2, 51.6), P=0.04). After controlling for measured change, participants with low baseline 6MWT distances perceived less change compared to those who walked high distances at baseline (P=0.006). Discussion and Conclusions A global rating scale using meaningful and context-specific questions was used to determine the relationship between measured and participant-perceived change in 6MWT distance. A meaningful difference in 6MWT change was observed between participants who did and those who did not perceive improvement. Individuals with lower baseline scores may require larger changes in walking distance to perceive that a change has occurred. This study contributes to a growing body of evidence about the relationships between perceived and measured change in function, and is a step in determining thresholds for perceived change in walking after stroke. PMID:22850336

  15. Gait velocity and walking distance to predict community walking after stroke.

    PubMed

    An, SeungHeon; Lee, YunBok; Shin, HyeonHui; Lee, GyuChang

    2015-12-01

    Gait speed and walking distance were evaluated as predictors for levels of community walking after stroke. In this study, 103 stroke survivors were identified as limited (n = 67) or independent community walkers (n = 36). Ten meter and six min walk tests were used to measure gait speed and walking distance, respectively. The discriminative properties of gait speed and walking distance for community walking were investigated using receiver operating characteristic curves. Cut-off values of 0.87 m/s for community walking gait speed for walking distance had positive predictive values of 65% and 55%, respectively. The negative predictive value ranged from 89% for gait speed to 79% for walking distance. Gait speed and walking distance showed significant differences between limited and independent community walking. Gait speed was more significantly related to community walking than walking distance. The results of this study suggest that gait speed is a better predictor for community walking than walking distance in moderately affected post-stroke survivors.

  16. Directed random walk with random restarts: The Sisyphus random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Miquel; Villarroel, Javier

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we consider a particular version of the random walk with restarts: random reset events which suddenly bring the system to the starting value. We analyze its relevant statistical properties, like the transition probability, and show how an equilibrium state appears. Formulas for the first-passage time, high-water marks, and other extreme statistics are also derived; we consider counting problems naturally associated with the system. Finally we indicate feasible generalizations useful for interpreting different physical effects.

  17. Directed random walk with random restarts: The Sisyphus random walk.

    PubMed

    Montero, Miquel; Villarroel, Javier

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we consider a particular version of the random walk with restarts: random reset events which suddenly bring the system to the starting value. We analyze its relevant statistical properties, like the transition probability, and show how an equilibrium state appears. Formulas for the first-passage time, high-water marks, and other extreme statistics are also derived; we consider counting problems naturally associated with the system. Finally we indicate feasible generalizations useful for interpreting different physical effects.

  18. Theory of Random Walks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, M.

    1996-11-01

    We develope a mathematical analysis derived from a simple vector-kick model of the evolution of a laser field due to strictly phase diffusion and having arbitrary average photon number barn. We write the exact-coupled, nonlinear equations in two dynamical variables, namely the magnitude of the new field E_0^' and the differential change in angle δ φ. A closed form approximate solution to find the variance in the tangent of phase, for small angles, has yielded the theoretical lower limit for large photon number √n=E_0>> 1. The exact solution to the variance in the tangent of phase angle δ φ was made possible by a trigonometric substitution method, and the transformed argument has been analyzed using residue calculus. There is a double-zero at z=0, simple-poles at z=± i, and double poles at z=± √(E0 +1)(E_0-1) i, in the Argand plane. The variance in the tangent of phase is found to be <(tan δφ)^2> = 2π(√(barn)/(barn-1) -1). An extension of this result would include effects due to amplification and saturation. The general result would include a regime of small photon numbers. Part C of program listing

  19. Aerobic fitness testing: an update.

    PubMed

    Stevens, N; Sykes, K

    1996-12-01

    This study confirms that all three tests are reliable tools for the assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness and the prediction of aerobic capacity. While this particular study consisted of active, youthful subjects, subsequent studies at University College Chester have found similar findings with larger databases and a wider cross-section of subjects. The Astrand cycle test and Chester step test are submaximal tests with error margins of 5-15 per cent and therefore, not as precise as maximal testing. However, they still give a reasonably accurate reflection of an individual's fitness without the cost, time, effort and risk on the part of the subject. The bleep test is a low-cost maximal test designed for well-motivated, active individuals who are used to running to physical exhaustion. Used on other groups, results will not accurately reflect cardiorespiratory fitness values. While all three tests have inherent advantages and disadvantages, perhaps the most important factors are the knowledge and skills of the tester. Without a sound understanding of the physiological principles underlying these tests, and the ability to conduct an accurate assessment and evaluation of results in a knowledgeable and meaningful way, then the credibility of the tests and the results become suspect. However, used correctly, aerobic capacity tests can provide valuable baseline data about the fitness levels of individuals and data from which exercise programmes may be developed. The tests also enable fitness improvements to be monitored, help to motivate participants by establishing reasonable and achievable goals, assist in risk stratification and facilitate participants' education about the importance of physical fitness for work and for life. Since this study was completed, further tests have been repeated on 140 subjects of a wider age and ability range. This large database confirms the results found in this study.

  20. Aerobic glycolysis and lymphocyte transformation

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A.; Radik, Judith L.; Ferber, Ernst; Weidemann, Maurice J.

    1978-01-01

    1. The role of enhanced aerobic glycolysis in the transformation of rat thymocytes by concanavalin A has been investigated. Concanavalin A addition doubled [U-14C]glucose uptake by rat thymocytes over 3h and caused an equivalent increased incorporation into protein, lipids and RNA. A disproportionately large percentage of the extra glucose taken up was converted into lactate, but concanavalin A also caused a specific increase in pyruvate oxidation, leading to an increase in the percentage contribution of glucose to the respiratory fuel. 2. Acetoacetate metabolism, which was not affected by concanavalin A, strongly suppressed pyruvate oxidation in the presence of [U-14C]glucose, but did not prevent the concanavalin A-induced stimulation of this process. Glucose uptake was not affected by acetoacetate in the presence or absence of concanavalin A, but in each case acetoacetate increased the percentage of glucose uptake accounted for by lactate production. 3. [3H]Thymidine incorporation into DNA in concanavalin A-treated thymocyte cultures was sensitive to the glucose concentration in the medium in a biphasic manner. Very low concentrations of glucose (25μm) stimulated DNA synthesis half-maximally, but maximum [3H]thymidine incorporation was observed only when the glucose concentration was raised to 1mm. Lactate addition did not alter the sensitivity of [3H]-thymidine uptake to glucose, but inosine blocked the effect of added glucose and strongly inhibited DNA synthesis. 4. It is suggested that the major function of enhanced aerobic glycolysis in transforming lymphocytes is to maintain higher steady-state amounts of glycolytic intermediates to act as precursors for macromolecule synthesis. PMID:310305

  1. Aerobic training in persons who have recovered from juvenile dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Riisager, M; Mathiesen, P R; Vissing, J; Preisler, N; Ørngreen, M C

    2013-12-01

    A recent study has shown that 36 persons who had recovered from juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) have on average an 18% decrease in maximal oxygen uptake. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a 12-week aerobic training program in this group, and assess whether aerobic training can normalize aerobic capacity to the expected level for age and gender. The patients participating in the study, one male and nine females (16-42 years of age), were in remission from JDM, defined as no clinical or biochemical evidence of disease activity and no medical treatment for 1 year. The patients had a median disease duration of 3.4 years (1.4-10.3), a median treatment duration of 2.4 years (0.4-9.3) and a median duration of remission of 7.0 years (1.2-30.0). Patients trained at home on a cycle ergometer for 12 weeks at a heart rate interval corresponding to 65% of their maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)). VO(2max) and maximal workload (W(max)) were determined before and after the 12-week training period through an incremental cycling test to exhaustion. The patients served as their own controls. Eight patients with JDM in remission completed the 12-week exercise program; one patient completed 9 weeks out of the 12-week program and one dropped out of the study. Training increased VO(2max) and W(max) by 26% and 30% (P < 0.001). Creatine kinase (CK) levels were normal pre-training and did not change with training, reflecting no muscle damage. We also found that at a given workload, heart rate was lowered significantly after the 12-week training period, indicating an improvement in cardiovascular fitness. This study shows that 12 weeks of moderate-intensity aerobic training is an effective and safe method to increase oxidative capacity and fitness in persons who have recovered from JDM. The results indicate that the low oxidative capacity in JDM patients in remission is reversible and can be improved. Thus, we recommend frequent aerobic training to be incorporated

  2. Walking dynamics are symmetric (enough)

    PubMed Central

    Ankaralı, M. Mert; Sefati, Shahin; Madhav, Manu S.; Long, Andrew; Bastian, Amy J.; Cowan, Noah J.

    2015-01-01

    Many biological phenomena such as locomotion, circadian cycles and breathing are rhythmic in nature and can be modelled as rhythmic dynamical systems. Dynamical systems modelling often involves neglecting certain characteristics of a physical system as a modelling convenience. For example, human locomotion is frequently treated as symmetric about the sagittal plane. In this work, we test this assumption by examining human walking dynamics around the steady state (limit-cycle). Here, we adapt statistical cross-validation in order to examine whether there are statistically significant asymmetries and, even if so, test the consequences of assuming bilateral symmetry anyway. Indeed, we identify significant asymmetries in the dynamics of human walking, but nevertheless show that ignoring these asymmetries results in a more consistent and predictive model. In general, neglecting evident characteristics of a system can be more than a modelling convenience—it can produce a better model. PMID:26236826

  3. 78 FR 20695 - Walk-Through Metal Detectors and Hand-Held Metal Detectors Test Method Validation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... Office of Justice Programs Walk-Through Metal Detectors and Hand-Held Metal Detectors Test Method... has recently developed updated versions of its minimum performance standards for walk-through metal detectors and hand-held metal detectors. In order to ensure that the test methods in the standards...

  4. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Edvardsen, Elisabeth; Ingjer, Frank; Bø, Kari

    2011-12-01

    Edvardsen, E, Ingjer, F, and Bø, K. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3479-3485, 2011-This study compared the aerobic capacity during maximal aerobic dance and treadmill running in fit women. Thirteen well-trained female aerobic dance instructors aged 30 ± 8.17 years (mean ± SD) exercised to exhaustion by running on a treadmill for measurement of maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)max) and peak heart rate (HRpeak). Additionally, all subjects performed aerobic dancing until exhaustion after a choreographed videotaped routine trying to reach the same HRpeak as during maximal running. The p value for statistical significance between running and aerobic dance was set to ≤0.05. The results (mean ± SD) showed a lower VO(2)max in aerobic dance (52.2 ± 4.02 ml·kg·min) compared with treadmill running (55.9 ± 5.03 ml·kg·min) (p = 0.0003). Further, the mean ± SD HRpeak was 182 ± 9.15 b·min in aerobic dance and 192 ± 9.62 b·min in treadmill running, giving no difference in oxygen pulse between the 2 exercise forms (p = 0.32). There was no difference in peak ventilation (aerobic dance: 108 ± 10.81 L·min vs. running: 113 ± 11.49 L·min). In conclusion, aerobic dance does not seem to be able to use the whole aerobic capacity as in running. For well endurance-trained women, this may result in a lower total workload at maximal intensities. Aerobic dance may therefore not be as suitable as running during maximal intensities in well-trained females.

  5. Walking to a multisensory beat.

    PubMed

    Roy, Charlotte; Lagarde, Julien; Dotov, Dobromir; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2017-04-01

    Living in a complex and multisensory environment demands constant interaction between perception and action. In everyday life it is common to combine efficiently simultaneous signals coming from different modalities. There is evidence of a multisensory benefit in a variety of laboratory tasks (temporal judgement, reaction time tasks). It is less clear if this effect extends to ecological tasks, such as walking. Furthermore, benefits of multimodal stimulation are linked to temporal properties such as the temporal window of integration and temporal recalibration. These properties have been examined in tasks involving single, non-repeating stimulus presentations. Here we investigate the same temporal properties in the context of a rhythmic task, namely audio-tactile stimulation during walking. The effect of audio-tactile rhythmic cues on gait variability and the ability to synchronize to the cues was studied in young adults. Participants walked with rhythmic cues presented at different stimulus-onset asynchronies. We observed a multisensory benefit by comparing audio-tactile to unimodal stimulation. Moreover, both the temporal window of integration and temporal recalibration mediated the response to multimodal stimulation. In sum, rhythmic behaviours obey the same principles as temporal discrimination and detection behaviours and thus can also benefit from multimodal stimulation.

  6. A plasmonic nanorod that walks on DNA origami

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chao; Duan, Xiaoyang; Liu, Na

    2015-01-01

    In nano-optics, a formidable challenge remains in precise transport of a single optical nano-object along a programmed and routed path toward a predefined destination. Molecular motors in living cells that can walk directionally along microtubules have been the inspiration for realizing artificial molecular walkers. Here we demonstrate an active plasmonic system, in which a plasmonic nanorod can execute directional, progressive and reverse nanoscale walking on two or three-dimensional DNA origami. Such a walker comprises an anisotropic gold nanorod as its ‘body' and discrete DNA strands as its ‘feet'. Specifically, our walker carries optical information and can in situ optically report its own walking directions and consecutive steps at nanometer accuracy, through dynamic coupling to a plasmonic stator immobilized along its walking track. Our concept will enable a variety of smart nanophotonic platforms for studying dynamic light–matter interaction, which requires controlled motion at the nanoscale well below the optical diffraction limit. PMID:26303016

  7. Aerobic fitness ecological validity in elite soccer players: a metabolic power approach.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Vincenzo; Impellizzeri, Franco; Castagna, Carlo

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between match metabolic power (MP) categories and aerobic fitness in elite-level male soccer players. Seventeen male professional soccer players were tested for VO2max, maximal aerobic speed (MAS), VO2 at ventilatory threshold (VO2VT and %VO2VT), and speed at a selected blood lactate concentration (4 mmol·L(-1), V(L4)). Aerobic fitness tests were performed at the end of preseason and after 12 and 24 weeks during the championship. Aerobic fitness and MP variables were considered as mean of all seasonal testing and of 16 Championship home matches for all the calculations, respectively. Results showed that VO2max (from 0.55 to 0.68), MAS (from 0.52 to 0.72), VO2VT (from 0.72 to 0.83), %VO2maxVT (from 0.62 to 0.65), and V(L4) (from 0.56 to 0.73) were significantly (p < 0.05 to 0.001) large to very large associated with MP variables. These results provide evidence to the ecological validity of aerobic fitness in male professional soccer. Strength and conditioning professionals should consider aerobic fitness in their training program when dealing with professional male soccer players. The MP method resulted an interesting approach for tracking external load in male professional soccer players.

  8. Positive messaging promotes walking in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Notthoff, Nanna; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Walking is among the most cost-effective and accessible means of exercise. Mounting evidence suggests that walking may help to maintain physical and cognitive independence in old age by preventing a variety of health problems. However, older Americans fall far short of meeting the daily recommendations for walking. In two studies, we examined whether considering older adults’ preferential attention to positive information may effectively enhance interventions aimed at promoting walking. In Study 1, we compared the effectiveness of positive, negative, and neutral messages to encourage walking (as measured with pedometers). Older adults who were informed about the benefits of walking walked more than those who were informed about the negative consequences of failing to walk, whereas younger adults were unaffected by framing valence. In Study 2, we examined within-person change in walking in older adults in response to positively- or negatively-framed messages over a 28-day period. Once again, positively-framed messages more effectively promoted walking than negatively-framed messages, and the effect was sustained across the intervention period. Together, these studies suggest that consideration of age-related changes in preferences for positive and negative information may inform the design of effective interventions to promote healthy lifestyles. Future research is needed to examine the mechanisms underlying the greater effectiveness of positively as opposed to negatively framed messages and the generalizability of findings to other intervention targets and other subpopulations of older adults. PMID:24956001

  9. Segment lengths influence hill walking strategies.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Riley C; Gottschall, Jinger S

    2014-08-22

    Segment lengths are known to influence walking kinematics and muscle activity patterns. During level walking at the same speed, taller individuals take longer, slower strides than shorter individuals. Based on this, we sought to determine if segment lengths also influenced hill walking strategies. We hypothesized that individuals with longer segments would display more joint flexion going uphill and more extension going downhill as well as greater lateral gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis activity in both directions. Twenty young adults of varying heights (below 155 cm to above 188 cm) walked at 1.25 m/s on a level treadmill as well as 6° and 12° up and downhill slopes while we collected kinematic and muscle activity data. Subsequently, we ran linear regressions for each of the variables with height, leg, thigh, and shank length. Despite our population having twice the anthropometric variability, the level and hill walking patterns matched closely with previous studies. While there were significant differences between level and hill walking, there were few hill walking variables that were correlated with segment length. In support of our hypothesis, taller individuals had greater knee and ankle flexion during uphill walking. However, the majority of the correlations were between tibialis anterior and lateral gastrocnemius activities and shank length. Contrary to our hypothesis, relative step length and muscle activity decreased with segment length, specifically shank length. In summary, it appears that individuals with shorter segments require greater propulsion and toe clearance during uphill walking as well as greater braking and stability during downhill walking.

  10. CARDIORESPIRATORY FUNCTION BEFORE AND AFTER AEROBIC EXERCISE TRAINING IN PATIETNS WITH INTERSTITIAL LUNG DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Keyser, Randall E.; Woolstenhulme, Joshua G.; Chin, Lisa M.K.; Nathan, Steven D.; Weir, Nargues A.; Connors, Gerilynn; Drinkard, Bart; Lamberti, James; Chan, Leighton

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To characterize the cardiorespiratory response to exercise before and after aerobic exercise training in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). METHODS We performed a clinical study, examining 13 patients (New York Heart Association/World Health Organization Functional Class II or III) before and after 10-weeks of supervised treadmill exercise walking, at 70–80% of heart rate reserve, 30–45 minutes per session, 3 times per week. Outcome variables included measures of cardiorespiratory function during a treadmill cardiopulmonary exercise test (tCPET), with additional near infrared spectroscopy measurements of peripheral oxygen extraction and bioimpedance cardiography measurements of cardiac output. 6-minute walk test distance (6MWD) was also measured. RESULTS All subjects participated in at least 24 of their 30, scheduled exercise sessions with no significant adverse events. After training, the mean 6MWD increased by 52±48 meters (P=.001), peak tCPET time increased by 163±130 seconds (P=.001), and time to achieve gas exchange threshold increased by 145±37 seconds (P<.001). Despite a negligible increase in peak oxygen uptake (VO2) with no changes to cardiac output, the overall work rate/VO2 relationship was enhanced after training. Muscle oxygen extraction increased by 16% (P=.049) after training. CONCLUSION Clinically significant improvements in cardiorespiratory function were observed after aerobic exercise training in this group of subjects with ILD. These improvements appear to have been mediated by increases in the peripheral extraction of oxygen rather than changes in oxygen delivery. PMID:25313451

  11. Conditioning and Aerobics for Older Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Joyce

    1980-01-01

    A class designed for the maintenance and gradual improvement of senior citizens' physical fitness includes relaxation training, flexibility and stretching exercises, interval training activities (designed as a link between less strenuous exercise and more strenuous activities), and aerobic exercises. (CJ)

  12. The rise of oxygen and aerobic biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mak A

    2012-01-11

    Analysis of conserved protein folding domains across extant genomes by Kim et al. in this issue of Structure provides insights into the timing of some of the earliest aerobic metabolisms to arise on Earth.

  13. The Energetics of Aerobic versus Anaerobic Respiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Timothy D.; Schwenz, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and a discussion of the results of an experiment designed to investigate the difference in energy gained from the aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of glucose are presented. Sample experimental and calculated data are included. (CW)

  14. Quantum walks with random phase shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Kosik, Jozef; Buzek, Vladimir; Hillery, Mark

    2006-08-15

    We investigate quantum walks in multiple dimensions with different quantum coins. We augment the model by assuming that at each step the amplitudes of the coin state are multiplied by random phases. This model enables us to study in detail the role of decoherence in quantum walks and to investigate the quantum-to-classical transition. We also provide classical analog of the quantum random walks studied. Interestingly enough, it turns out that the classical counterparts of some quantum random walks are classical random walks with a memory and biased coin. In addition random phase shifts 'simplify' the dynamics (the cross-interference terms of different paths vanish on average) and enable us to give a compact formula for the dispersion of such walks.

  15. The application of walking training in the rehabilitation of patients after coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Dylewicz, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Walking is regarded as one of the most common and utilitarian activities of everyday life. Rehabilitation programs developed on the basis of this form of activity often constitute the primary method of rehabilitating patients after coronary artery bypass grafting. This paper provides a review of literature concerning various forms of walking training, discussing their impact on the parameters of exercise capacity and verifying the training methods with regard to the current guidelines. Attention is drawn to the diversity of the exercise protocols applied during the early and late stages of rehabilitation and pre-rehabilitation programs including: treadmill walking, walking down the corridor, treadmill walking enriched with virtual reality, and walking as an element of training sessions consisting of many different forms of activities. Exercise protocols were also analyzed in terms of their safety, especially in the case of high-intensity interval training. Despite the variety of the available rehabilitation programs, the training methodology requires constant improvement, particularly in terms of load dosage and the supervision of training sessions. PMID:26702291

  16. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-27

    distribution is unlimited. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report...2211 diamond nanocrystals, REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) ARO 8. PERFORMING...Room 254, Mail Code 8725 New York, NY 10027 -7922 ABSTRACT Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals Report Title We investigate

  17. Aerobic biodegradation of selected monoterpenes.

    PubMed

    Misra, G; Pavlostathis, S G; Perdue, E M; Araujo, R

    1996-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to assess the biotransformation potential of four hydrocarbon monoterpenes (d-limonene, alpha-pinene, gamma-terpinene, and terpinolene) and four alcohols (arbanol, linalool, plinol, and alpha-terpineol) under aerobic conditions at 23 degrees C. Both forest-soil extract and enriched cultures were used as inocula for the biodegradation experiments conducted first without, then with prior microbial acclimation to the monoterpenes tested. All four hydrocarbons and two alcohols were readily degraded. The increase in biomass and headspace CO2 concentrations paralleled the depletion of monoterpenes, thus confirming that terpene disappearance was the result of biodegradation accompanied by microbial growth and mineralization. Plinol resisted degradation in assays using inocula from diverse sources, while arbanol degraded very slowly. A significant fraction of d-limonene-derived carbon was accounted for as non-extractable, dissolved organic carbon, whereas terpineol exhibited a much higher degree of utilization. The rate and extent of monoterpene biodegradation were not significantly affected by the presence of dissolved natural organic matter.

  18. Aerobic catabolism of bile acids.

    PubMed Central

    Leppik, R A; Park, R J; Smith, M G

    1982-01-01

    Seventy-eight stable cultures obtained by enrichment on media containing ox bile or a single bile acid were able to utilize one or more bile acids, as well as components of ox bile, as primary carbon sources for growth. All isolates were obligate aerobes, and most (70) were typical (48) or atypical (22) Pseudomonas strains, the remainder (8) being gram-positive actinomycetes. Of six Pseudomonas isolates selected for further study, five produced predominantly acidic catabolites after growth on glycocholic acid, but the sixth, Pseudomonas sp. ATCC 31752, accumulated as the principal product a neutral steroid catabolite. Optimum growth of Pseudomonas sp. ATCC 31752 on ox bile occurred at pH 7 to 8 and from 25 to 30 degrees C. No additional nutrients were required to sustain good growth, but growth was stimulated by the addition of ammonium sulfate and yeast extract. Good growth was obtained with a bile solids content of 40 g/liter in shaken flasks. A near-theoretical yield of neutral steroid catabolites, comprising a major (greater than 50%) and three minor products, was obtained from fermentor growth of ATCC 31752 in 6.7 g of ox bile solids per liter. The possible commercial exploitation of these findings to produce steroid drug intermediates for the pharmaceutical industry is discussed. PMID:7149711

  19. Quantum walk with one variable absorbing boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feiran; Zhang, Pei; Wang, Yunlong; Liu, Ruifeng; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2017-01-01

    Quantum walks constitute a promising ingredient in the research on quantum algorithms; consequently, exploring different types of quantum walks is of great significance for quantum information and quantum computation. In this study, we investigate the progress of quantum walks with a variable absorbing boundary and provide an analytical solution for the escape probability (the probability of a walker that is not absorbed by the boundary). We simulate the behavior of escape probability under different conditions, including the reflection coefficient, boundary location, and initial state. Moreover, it is also meaningful to extend our research to the situation of continuous-time and high-dimensional quantum walks.

  20. Cell phones change the way we walk.

    PubMed

    Lamberg, Eric M; Muratori, Lisa M

    2012-04-01

    Cell phone use among pedestrians leads to increased cognitive distraction, reduced situation awareness and increases in unsafe behavior. Performing a dual-task, such as talking or texting with a cell phone while walking, may interfere with working memory and result in walking errors. At baseline, thirty-three participants visually located a target 8m ahead; then vision was occluded and they were instructed to walk to the remembered target. One week later participants were assigned to either walk, walk while talking on a cell phone, or walk while texting on a cell phone toward the target with vision occluded. Duration and final location of the heel were noted. Linear distance traveled, lateral angular deviation from the start line, and gait velocity were derived. Changes from baseline to testing were analyzed with paired t-tests. Participants engaged in cell phone use presented with significant reductions in gait velocity (texting: 33% reduction, p=0.01; talking: 16% reduction, p=0.02). Moreover, participants who were texting while walking demonstrated a 61% increase in lateral deviation (p=0.04) and 13% increase in linear distance traveled (p=0.03). These results suggest that the dual-task of walking while using a cell phone impacts executive function and working memory and influences gait to such a degree that it may compromise safety. Importantly, comparison of the two cell phone conditions demonstrates texting creates a significantly greater interference effect on walking than talking on a cell phone.

  1. Visual Acuity During Treadmill Walking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, B. T.; Brady, R.; vanEmmerik, R. E. A.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2006-01-01

    An awareness of the physical world is essential for successful navigation through the environment. Vision is the means by which this awareness is made possible for most people. However, without adequate compensation, the movements of the body during walking could impair vision. Previous research has shown how the eyes, head and trunk movements are coordinated to provide the compensation necessary for clear vision, but the overall effectiveness of these coordinated movements is unknown. The goal of the research presented here was to provide a direct measure of visual performance during locomotion, while also investigating the degree to which coordinated head and body movements can be altered to facilitate the goal of seeing clearly.

  2. Quantum Walks with Encrypted Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Peter P.; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.; Gilchrist, Alexei

    2012-10-01

    In the setting of networked computation, data security can be a significant concern. Here we consider the problem of allowing a server to remotely manipulate client supplied data, in such a way that both the information obtained by the client about the server’s operation and the information obtained by the server about the client’s data are significantly limited. We present a protocol for achieving such functionality in two closely related models of restricted quantum computation—the boson sampling and quantum walk models. Because of the limited technological requirements of the boson scattering model, small scale implementations of this technique are feasible with present-day technology.

  3. Effect of aerobic exercise during pregnancy on antenatal depression

    PubMed Central

    El-Rafie, Mervat M; Khafagy, Ghada M; Gamal, Marwa G

    2016-01-01

    Background Antenatal depression is not uncommon and is associated with a greater risk of negative pregnancy outcomes. Aim Exploring the effect of exercise in preventing and treating antenatal depression. Methods This was a prospective interventional controlled study carried out in 100 pregnant women treated at the Ain-Shams Family Medicine Center and Maadi Outpatient Clinic, Cairo, Egypt. The participants were divided into two groups (n=50 in the exercise group and n=50 in the control group). The exercise group regularly attended supervised sessions for 12 weeks. The activities in each session included walking, aerobic exercise, stretching, and relaxation. The control group completed their usual antenatal care. The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was used to assess depression symptoms at the first interview and immediately after the 12-week intervention. Results Compared to the control group, the exercise group showed significantly improved depressive symptoms as measured with the CES-D after the 12-week intervention on the CES-D (P=0.001). Within groups, the exercise group demonstrated a significant improvement of depressive symptoms from baseline to intervention completion, while the control group demonstrated no significant changes over time. Conclusion Exercise during pregnancy was positively associated with reduced depressive symptoms. PMID:26955293

  4. Effect of beetroot juice supplementation on aerobic response during swimming.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Marco; Roberto, Silvana; Milia, Raffaele; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Olla, Sergio; Loi, Andrea; Migliaccio, Gian Mario; Padulo, Johnny; Orlandi, Carmine; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2014-01-29

    The beneficial effects of beetroot juice supplementation (BJS) have been tested during cycling, walking, and running. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether BJS can also improve performance in swimmers. Fourteen moderately trained male master swimmers were recruited and underwent two incremental swimming tests randomly assigned in a pool during which workload, oxygen uptake (VO₂), carbon dioxide production (VCO₂), pulmonary ventilation (VE), and aerobic energy cost (AEC) of swimming were measured. One was a control swimming test (CSW) and the other a swimming test after six days of BJS (0.5 l/day organic beetroot juice containing about 5.5 mmol of NO₃⁻). Results show that workload at anaerobic threshold was significantly increased by BJS as compared to the CSW test (6.3 ± 1 and 6.7 ± 1.1 kg during the CSW and the BJS test respectively). Moreover, AEC was significantly reduced during the BJS test (1.9 ± 0.5 during the SW test vs. 1.7 ± 0.3 kcal·kg⁻¹1·h⁻¹ during the BJS test). The other variables lacked a statistically significant effect with BJS. The present investigation provides evidence that BJS positively affects performance of swimmers as it reduces the AEC and increases the workload at anaerobic threshold.

  5. Effect of Beetroot Juice Supplementation on Aerobic Response during Swimming

    PubMed Central

    Pinna, Marco; Roberto, Silvana; Milia, Raffaele; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Olla, Sergio; Loi, Andrea; Migliaccio, Gian Mario; Padulo, Johnny; Orlandi, Carmine; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effects of beetroot juice supplementation (BJS) have been tested during cycling, walking, and running. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether BJS can also improve performance in swimmers. Fourteen moderately trained male master swimmers were recruited and underwent two incremental swimming tests randomly assigned in a pool during which workload, oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2), pulmonary ventilation (VE), and aerobic energy cost (AEC) of swimming were measured. One was a control swimming test (CSW) and the other a swimming test after six days of BJS (0.5l/day organic beetroot juice containing about 5.5 mmol of NO3−). Results show that workload at anaerobic threshold was significantly increased by BJS as compared to the CSW test (6.3 ± 1 and 6.7 ± 1.1 kg during the CSW and the BJS test respectively). Moreover, AEC was significantly reduced during the BJS test (1.9 ± 0.5 during the SW test vs. 1.7 ± 0.3 kcal·kg−1·h−1 during the BJS test). The other variables lacked a statistically significant effect with BJS. The present investigation provides evidence that BJS positively affects performance of swimmers as it reduces the AEC and increases the workload at anaerobic threshold. PMID:24481133

  6. The Recovery of Walking in Stroke Patients: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Sung Ho

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the literature on walking recovery of stroke patients as it relates to the following subjects: epidemiology of walking dysfunction, recovery course of walking, and recovery mechanism of walking (neural control of normal walking, the evaluation methods for leg motor function, and motor recovery mechanism of leg). The recovery of walking…

  7. Aerobic exercise, subjective health and psychological well-being within age and gender subgroups.

    PubMed

    Ransford, H E; Palisi, B J

    1996-06-01

    This research examines relationships between different forms of aerobic exercise (swim, walk, jog, dance) and two measures of health: subjective health and psychological well-being. We hypothesize that the relationship between aerobic exercise and subjective health/well-being will be notably stronger for older than younger persons and females than males. This prediction is based on Homans' exchange theory of investments and rewards. Since social norms concerning aerobic exercise are likely to be weaker among older (than younger) persons and among women than men, older persons and women who do exercise are making special investments and should expect greater rewards (good health). The concept of 'exercise norms' implies social comparisons with others. Accordingly, age comparative data were analyzed to see if older persons who exercise see themselves as more active than their age peers than do younger persons. Data come from a national probability sample of 3025 adults (National Survey of Personal Health Practices and Consequences). As predicted, exercise was much more strongly related to subjective health and well-being among older than younger respondents. In the main, the gender hypothesis was not supported.

  8. IMU-based ambulatory walking speed estimation in constrained treadmill and overground walking.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuozhi; Li, Qingguo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of a walking speed estimation system based on using an inertial measurement unit (IMU), a combination of accelerometers and gyroscopes. The walking speed estimation algorithm segments the walking sequence into individual stride cycles (two steps) based on the inverted pendulum-like behaviour of the stance leg during walking and it integrates the angular velocity and linear accelerations of the shank to determine the displacement of each stride. The evaluation was performed in both treadmill and overground walking experiments with various constraints on walking speed, step length and step frequency to provide a relatively comprehensive assessment of the system. Promising results were obtained in providing accurate and consistent walking speed/step length estimation in different walking conditions. An overall percentage root mean squared error (%RMSE) of 4.2 and 4.0% was achieved in treadmill and overground walking experiments, respectively. With an increasing interest in understanding human walking biomechanics, the IMU-based ambulatory system could provide a useful walking speed/step length measurement/control tool for constrained walking studies.

  9. The Walking Interventions Through Texting (WalkIT) Trial: Rationale, Design, and Protocol for a Factorial Randomized Controlled Trial of Adaptive Interventions for Overweight and Obese, Inactive Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Jane C; Hollingshead, Kevin E; Todd, Michael; Jarrett, Catherine L; Tucker, Wesley J; Angadi, Siddhartha S

    2015-01-01

    Background Walking is a widely accepted and frequently targeted health promotion approach to increase physical activity (PA). Interventions to increase PA have produced only small improvements. Stronger and more potent behavioral intervention components are needed to increase time spent in PA, improve cardiometabolic risk markers, and optimize health. Objective Our aim is to present the rationale and methods from the WalkIT Trial, a 4-month factorial randomized controlled trial (RCT) in inactive, overweight/obese adults. The main purpose of the study was to evaluate whether intensive adaptive components result in greater improvements to adults’ PA compared to the static intervention components. Methods Participants enrolled in a 2x2 factorial RCT and were assigned to one of four semi-automated, text message–based walking interventions. Experimental components included adaptive versus static steps/day goals, and immediate versus delayed reinforcement. Principles of percentile shaping and behavioral economics were used to operationalize experimental components. A Fitbit Zip measured the main outcome: participants’ daily physical activity (steps and cadence) over the 4-month duration of the study. Secondary outcomes included self-reported PA, psychosocial outcomes, aerobic fitness, and cardiorespiratory risk factors assessed pre/post in a laboratory setting. Participants were recruited through email listservs and websites affiliated with the university campus, community businesses and local government, social groups, and social media advertising. Results This study has completed data collection as of December 2014, but data cleaning and preliminary analyses are still in progress. We expect to complete analysis of the main outcomes in late 2015 to early 2016. Conclusions The Walking Interventions through Texting (WalkIT) Trial will further the understanding of theory-based intervention components to increase the PA of men and women who are healthy, insufficiently

  10. Walking Performance: Correlation between Energy Cost of Walking and Walking Participation. New Statistical Approach Concerning Outcome Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, Marco; Rampello, Anais; Agosti, Maurizio; Massucci, Maurizio; Bovolenta, Federica; Sale, Patrizio

    2013-01-01

    Walking ability, though important for quality of life and participation in social and economic activities, can be adversely affected by neurological disorders, such as Spinal Cord Injury, Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis or Traumatic Brain Injury. The aim of this study is to evaluate if the energy cost of walking (CW), in a mixed group of chronic patients with neurological diseases almost 6 months after discharge from rehabilitation wards, can predict the walking performance and any walking restriction on community activities, as indicated by Walking Handicap Scale categories (WHS). One hundred and seven subjects were included in the study, 31 suffering from Stroke, 26 from Spinal Cord Injury and 50 from Multiple Sclerosis. The multivariable binary logistical regression analysis has produced a statistical model with good characteristics of fit and good predictability. This model generated a cut-off value of.40, which enabled us to classify correctly the cases with a percentage of 85.0%. Our research reveal that, in our subjects, CW is the only predictor of the walking performance of in the community, to be compared with the score of WHS. We have been also identifying a cut-off value of CW cost, which makes a distinction between those who can walk in the community and those who cannot do it. In particular, these values could be used to predict the ability to walk in the community when discharged from the rehabilitation units, and to adjust the rehabilitative treatment to improve the performance. PMID:23468871

  11. Interface Reconstruction with Directional Walking

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, J

    2009-05-22

    Young's interface reconstruction with three-dimensional arbitrary mesh, in general, is rather tedious to implement compared to the case of a regular mesh. The main difficulty comes from the construction of a planar facet that bounds a certain volume inside a cell. Unlike the five basic configurations with a Cartesian mesh, there can be a great number of different configurations in the case of a general mesh. We represent a simple method that can derive the topology/geometry of the intersection of arbitrary planar objects in a uniform way. The method is based on a directional walking on the surface of objects, and links the intersection points with the paths of the walking naturally defining the intersection of objects. The method works in both two and three dimensions. The method does not take advantage of convexity, thus decomposition of an object is not necessary. Therefore, the solution with this method will have a reduced number of edges and less data storage, compared with methods that use shape decomposition. The treatment is general for arbitrary polyhedrons, and no look-up tables are needed. The same operation can easily be extended for curved geometry. The implementation of this new algorithm shall allow the interface reconstruction on an arbitrary mesh to be as simple as it is on a regular mesh. Furthermore, we exactly compute the integral of partial cell volume bounded by quadratic interface. Therefore, interface reconstruction with higher than second order accuracy can be achieved on an arbitrary mesh.

  12. Quantum walk on a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bru, Luis A.; de Valcárcel, Germán J.; Di Molfetta, Giuseppe; Pérez, Armando; Roldán, Eugenio; Silva, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    We consider the two-dimensional alternate quantum walk on a cylinder. We concentrate on the study of the motion along the open dimension, in the spirit of looking at the closed coordinate as a small or "hidden" extra dimension. If one starts from localized initial conditions on the lattice, the dynamics of the quantum walk that is obtained after tracing out the small dimension shows the contribution of several components which can be understood from the study of the dispersion relations for this problem. In fact, these components originate from the contribution of the possible values of the quasimomentum in the closed dimension. In the continuous space-time limit, the different components manifest as a set of Dirac equations, with each quasimomentum providing the value of the corresponding mass. We briefly discuss the possible link of these ideas to the simulation of high-energy physical theories that include extra dimensions. Finally, entanglement between the coin and spatial degrees of freedom is studied, showing that the entanglement entropy clearly overcomes the value reached with only one spatial dimension.

  13. Energy expenditure during 2-day trail walking in the mountains (2,857 m) and the effects of amino acid supplementation in older men and women.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Muneshige; Miyagawa, Ken; Iwashita, Soh; Noda, Tsuneyuki; Hamada, Koichiro; Genno, Hirokazu; Nose, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    We compared relative exercise intensity and active energy expenditure (AEE) on trail walking in the mountains, with those of daily exercise training, and whether branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) and arginine supplementation attenuated the release of markers indicating muscle damage and declines in physical performance. Twenty-one subjects (~63 years) were divided into two groups: amino acid (AA, 51 g of amino acids and 40 g of carbohydrate, male/female = 6/4) or placebo (PL, 91 g of carbohydrate, male/female = 6/5) supplementation during 2 days of trail walking in the mountains. We measured heart rate (HR), AEE, fatigue sensation, water and food intake, and sweat loss during walking. In addition, we measured peak aerobic capacity [Formula: see text] and heart rate (HR(peak)) with graded-intensity walking, vertical jumping height (VJ) before and after walking. We found that average HR and AEE during uphill walking were ~100% HR(peak) and ~60% [Formula: see text], while they were ~80 and ~20% during downhill walking, respectively. Moreover, average total AEE per day was sevenfold that of their daily walking training. VJ after walking remained unchanged compared with the baseline in AA (P > 0.2), while it was reduced by ~10% in PL (P < 0.01), although with no significant difference in the reduction between the groups (P > 0.4). The responses of other variables were not significantly different between groups (all, P > 0.2). Thus, trail walking in the mountains required a high-intensity effort for older people, while the effects of BCAA and arginine supplementation were modest in this condition.

  14. Walking activities and wear of prostheses.

    PubMed Central

    Seedhom, B B; Wallbridge, N C

    1985-01-01

    A study of the walking activities of 243 individuals was carried out. The individuals came from four different occupations and had an age range of 17-83 years. The survey carried out in this investigation showed surprisingly little correlation between variables such as age, height, and weight of individuals and their speed of walking, length of stride, or distance walked. Correlation matrices were obtained for the whole sample and then for each sex, showing similar trends. The most significant correlation was between the height of an individual and the length of the stride, and there was a lesser correlation between age and the number of steps walked by an individual per day. Further statistical analyses showed that males in manual occupations walked most and those in sedentary occupations walked least. On the other hand, in the female groups housewives seemed to walk least and those in technical occupations walked most. The average number of steps walked per day by a male individual for the whole sample was 9537; that for females was 9839. The corresponding distances walked per day were 6.7 and 6.5 km. The differences were not statistically significant. Predictions of wear of prosthetic components made of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene were made on the basis of the above data and other variables affecting wear, such as the weight of the subject and the area available for contact during walking. Charts have been constructed of the penetration of the metallic component into the plastic one for both hip knee prostheses, thus enabling predictions of the wear of the plastic components of these two most widely used prostheses. Owing to the wide ranging values of the variables used in making the predictions of wear, these latter should be regarded only as 'safe' first estimates. PMID:4083940

  15. Impact of a pilot Walking School Bus intervention on children's pedestrian safety behaviors [abstract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Walking School Bus (WSB) programs have increased children's active commuting to school and physical activity; however, the impact on child pedestrian safety behaviors has not been studied. Our study objective was to evaluate the impact of a WSB program on children's pedestrian safety behaviors. We c...

  16. Effect of long term anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic starvation on aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Pijuan, Maite; Werner, Ursula; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2009-08-01

    The effect of long term anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic starvation on the structure and activity of aerobic granules was studied. Aerobic granular sludge treating abattoir wastewater and achieving high levels of nutrient removal was subjected to 4-5 week starvation under anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic conditions. Microscopic pictures of granules at the beginning of the starvation period presented a round and compact surface morphology with a much defined external perimeter. Under both starvation conditions, the morphology changed at the end of starvation with the external border of the granules surrounded by floppy materials. The loss of granular compactness was faster and more pronounced under anaerobic/aerobic starvation conditions. The release of Ca(2+) at the onset of anaerobic/aerobic starvation suggests a degradation of extracellular polymeric substances. The activity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria was reduced by 20 and 36% during anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic starvation, respectively. When fresh wastewater was reintroduced, the granules recovered their initial morphology within 1 week of normal operation and the nutrient removal activity recovered fully in 3 weeks. The results show that both anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic conditions are suitable for maintaining granule structure and activity during starvation.

  17. Aerobic exercise increases peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity in sedentary adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing prevalence of obesity and its consequences is a serious public health concern. The present study was undertaken to determine whether a controlled aerobic exercise program (without weight loss) improves insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in sedentary adolescents. Twenty nine p...

  18. Two-photon quantum walk in a multimode fiber

    PubMed Central

    Defienne, Hugo; Barbieri, Marco; Walmsley, Ian A.; Smith, Brian J.; Gigan, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton propagation in connected structures—a quantum walk—offers the potential of simulating complex physical systems and provides a route to universal quantum computation. Increasing the complexity of quantum photonic networks where the walk occurs is essential for many applications. We implement a quantum walk of indistinguishable photon pairs in a multimode fiber supporting 380 modes. Using wavefront shaping, we control the propagation of the two-photon state through the fiber in which all modes are coupled. Excitation of arbitrary output modes of the system is realized by controlling classical and quantum interferences. This report demonstrates a highly multimode platform for multiphoton interference experiments and provides a powerful method to program a general high-dimensional multiport optical circuit. This work paves the way for the next generation of photonic devices for quantum simulation, computing, and communication. PMID:27152325

  19. Inference of phylogenetic distances from DNA-walk divergences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licinio, P.; Caligiorne, R. B.

    2004-10-01

    A formalism for the analysis of DNA-sequences is presented. It develops the concept of a composition vector potential which incorporates intrinsic double-strand and four-base symmetries. The vector potential allows for straightforward coarse graining and graphical representation of whole genomes. Its projections are mapped onto DNA-walks. It is shown that distances due to mutation between sequences can be estimated from mean square differences between walks. A computer program for global alignment of sequences (DNAWD) is thus developed and applied to a set of toy sequences representing evolution under mutation. The distance matrix output of DNAWD is shown to provide a good estimate of the associated phylogenetic tree.

  20. Walking on an Oscillating Treadmill: Two Paths to Functional Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Rachel A.; Peters, Brian T.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    We mounted a treadmill on top of a six degree-of-freedom motion base platform to investigate and characterize locomotor responses produced by healthy adults when introduced to a novel walking condition. Subjects were classified into two groups according to how their stride times were affected by the perturbation. Our data suggest that a person's choice of adaptation strategy is influenced by the relationship between his unique, natural stride frequency and the external frequency imposed by the motion base. Our data suggest that a person's stride time response while walking on a laterally oscillating treadmill is influenced by the relationship between his unique, natural stride frequency and the imposed external frequency of the motion base. This relationship may be useful for checking the efficacy of gait training and rehabilitation programs. Preselecting and manipulating a person's EST could be one way to draw him out of his preferred "entrainment well" during therapy or training.

  1. Statistical Modeling of Robotic Random Walks on Different Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, Austin; Kinnaman, Laura

    Issues of public safety, especially with crowd dynamics and pedestrian movement, have been modeled by physicists using methods from statistical mechanics over the last few years. Complex decision making of humans moving on different terrains can be modeled using random walks (RW) and correlated random walks (CRW). The effect of different terrains, such as a constant increasing slope, on RW and CRW was explored. LEGO robots were programmed to make RW and CRW with uniform step sizes. Level ground tests demonstrated that the robots had the expected step size distribution and correlation angles (for CRW). The mean square displacement was calculated for each RW and CRW on different terrains and matched expected trends. The step size distribution was determined to change based on the terrain; theoretical predictions for the step size distribution were made for various simple terrains. It's Dr. Laura Kinnaman, not sure where to put the Prefix.

  2. Treadmill walking is not equivalent to overground walking for the study of walking smoothness and rhythmicity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Row Lazzarini, Brandi S; Kataras, Theodore J

    2016-05-01

    Treadmills are appealing for gait studies, but some gait mechanics are disrupted during treadmill walking. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of speed and treadmill walking on walking smoothness and rhythmicity of 40 men and women between the ages of 70-96 years. Gait smoothness was examined during overground (OG) and treadmill (TM) walking by calculating the harmonic ratio from linear accelerations measured at the level of the lumbar spine. Rhythmicity was quantified as the stride time standard deviation. TM walking was performed at two speeds: a speed matching the natural OG walk speed (TM-OG), and a preferred TM speed (PTM). A dual-task OG condition (OG-DT) was evaluated to determine if TM walking posed a similar cognitive challenge. Statistical analysis included a one-way Analysis of Variance with Bonferroni corrected post hoc comparisons and the Wilcoxon signed rank test for non-normally distributed variables. Average PTM speed was slower than OG. Compared to OG, those who could reach the TM-OG speed (74.3% of sample) exhibited improved ML smoothness and rhythmicity, and the slower PTM caused worsened vertical and AP smoothness, but did not affect rhythmicity. PTM disrupted smoothness and rhythmicity differently than the OG-DT condition, likely due to reduced speed. The use of treadmills for gait smoothness and rhythmicity studies in older adults is problematic; some participants will not achieve OG speed during TM walking, walking at the TM-OG speed artificially improves rhythmicity and ML smoothness, and walking at the slower PTM speed worsens vertical and AP gait smoothness.

  3. Walking...A Step in the Right Direction!

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3. Go Divide your walk into three parts: Warm up by walking slowly. Increase your speed to a ... stretching only after you have warmed up. To warm up, walk slowly for a few minutes before picking ...

  4. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking.

    PubMed

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-04-01

    Voluntary limb modifications must be integrated with basic walking patterns during visually guided walking. In this study we tested whether voluntary gait modifications can become more automatic with practice. We challenged walking control by presenting visual stepping targets that instructed subjects to modify step length from one trial to the next. Our sequence learning paradigm is derived from the serial reaction-time (SRT) task that has been used in upper limb studies. Both random and ordered sequences of step lengths were used to measure sequence-specific and sequence-nonspecific learning during walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 yr,n= 20) could learn a specific sequence of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 yr,n= 8) had lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning were the same compared with those of older children (11-16 yr,n= 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited at faster walking speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that spatial sequence learning can be integrated with a highly automatic task such as walking. These findings suggest that adults and children use implicit knowledge about the sequence to plan and execute leg movement during visually guided walking.

  5. Walking economy in people with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Cory L; Schenkman, Margaret L; McFann, Kim; Wolfe, Pamela; Kohrt, Wendy M

    2009-01-01

    Gait dysfunction is an early problem identified by patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Alterations in gait may result in an increase in the energy cost of walking (i.e., walking economy). The purpose of this study was to determine whether walking economy is atypical in patients with PD when compared with healthy controls. A secondary purpose was to evaluate the associations of age, sex, and level of disease severity with walking economy in patients with PD. The rate of oxygen consumption (VO2) and other responses to treadmill walking were compared in 90 patients (64.4±10.3 yr) and 44 controls (64.6±7.3 yr) at several walking speeds. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) were calculated to determine relationships of age, sex, and disease state with walking economy in PD patients. Walking economy was significantly worse in PD patients than in controls at all speeds above 1.0 mph. Across all speeds, VO2 was 6 to 10% higher in PD patients. Heart rate, minute ventilation, respiratory exchange ratio, and rating of perceived exertion were correspondingly elevated. No significant relationship of age, sex, or UPDRS score with VO2 was found for patients with PD. The findings suggest that the physiologic stress of daily physical activities is increased in patients with early to mid-stage PD, and this may contribute to the elevated level of fatigue that is characteristic of PD. PMID:19441128

  6. Quantum random walks and decision making.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Karthik H

    2014-01-01

    How realistic is it to adopt a quantum random walk model to account for decisions involving two choices? Here, we discuss the neural plausibility and the effect of initial state and boundary thresholds on such a model and contrast it with various features of the classical random walk model of decision making.

  7. Welly-Walks for Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fradley, Carol

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how a regular walk in the wind or the rain can help develop science knowledge and skills. The author describes one "welly-walk" and links it to National Curriculum for England requirements so that readers can see how easy it is. (Contains 1 figure and 1 box.)

  8. Chinese City Children and Youth's Walking Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quan, Minghui; Chen, Peijie; Zhuang, Jie; Wang, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although walking has been demonstrated as one of the best forms for promoting physical activity (PA), little is known about Chinese city children and youth's walking behavior. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess ambulatory PA behavior of Chinese city children and youth. Method: The daily steps of 2,751 children and youth…

  9. Quantum vs. classical walks with memory two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimcovic, Zlatko; Kovchegov, Yevgeniy

    2010-03-01

    Quantum walks is an emerging field in quantum computing. It is expected to become the next most effective tool in speeding up quantum algorithms, possibly achieving the similar gain in speed as was the case with Gibbs sampling in classical computing. There already exist examples of super-exponential speed up using only quantum walks. Markov chains, or random walks on graphs, have many uses in physics; and walks with memory are standard models for a number of phenomena. We study persistent quantum walks, and compare them with equivalent classical Markov processes. The first question to ask is how the mixing time compares between persistent quantum and classical walks. Since quantum walks are generated by unitary matrices, they do not converge to a stationary state. The mixing time is then naturally introduced via a limiting distribution defined as the average of the probability distributions over time (Cesaro sum). We compare the mixing times, along with other properties, using numerical methods and spectral analysis. Our preliminary results indicate a significant speedup in some cases, and a number of other interesting aspects of quantum walks.

  10. Differences in Preseason Aerobic Fitness Screening in Professional and Pre-professional Modern Dancers.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Shaw; Codman, Emma; Hash-Campbell, Dana; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi

    2016-03-01

    The aerobic demands of today's dance repertoire warrant understanding of the current cardiorespiratory fitness of dancers. The purpose of this study was to compare aerobic fitness levels of professional and pre-professional modern dancers and determine change over time. A retrospective analysis of four groups, two professional, and two pre-professional, was conducted in preseason annual screens, occurring before the professional dancers' rehearsal period and the students' academic training. Resting (HRrest), peak (HRpeak), and recovery (HRrecov) heart rate, and blood pressure (BP) were compared in 577 dancers, using an accelerated 3-minute step test. Smoking, asthma, and aerobic and cross training rates between groups were also compared. A 4 (group) X 2 (gender) MANOVA design determined differences between groups and genders in all dependent variables (p < 0.05). Using a repeated measures ANOVA design, we compared a subgroup over 3 years and one pre-professional group over 4 years. There were differences between groups in systolic BP and all HR variables (p < 0.001). Professional dancers reflected better cardiorespiratory fitness than pre-professional dancers. There were differences between groups in aerobic and cross training activities but no differences in smoking incidence or asthma rates. Pre-professional dancers demonstrated improvement in aerobic fitness over time (p = 0.006) while professionals did not change. Professional dancers display better aerobic fitness, which may reflect their performance demands. Wellness programs appear to enhance fitness in pre-professional dance students over time. Additional aerobic training is recommended for pre-professional modern dance students to prepare them for the performance demands of a professional career.

  11. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-05-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  12. Learning to walk changes infants' social interactions.

    PubMed

    Clearfield, Melissa W

    2011-02-01

    The onset of crawling marks a motor, cognitive and social milestone. The present study investigated whether independent walking marks a second milestone for social behaviors. In Experiment 1, the social and exploratory behaviors of crawling infants were observed while crawling and in a baby-walker, resulting in no differences based on posture. In Experiment 2, the social behaviors of independently walking infants were compared to age-matched crawling infants in a baby-walker. Independently walking infants spent significantly more time interacting with the toys and with their mothers, and also made more vocalizations and more directed gestures compared to infants in the walker. Experiment 3 tracked infants' social behaviors longitudinally across the transition from crawling and walking. Even when controlled for age, the transition to independent walking marked increased interaction time with mothers, as well as more sophisticated interactions, including directing mothers' attention to particular objects. The results suggest a developmental progression linking social interactions with milestones in locomotor development.

  13. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-01-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor. PMID:27146471

  14. Go naked: diapers affect infant walking.

    PubMed

    Cole, Whitney G; Lingeman, Jesse M; Adolph, Karen E

    2012-11-01

    In light of cross-cultural and experimental research highlighting effects of childrearing practices on infant motor skill, we asked whether wearing diapers, a seemingly innocuous childrearing practice, affects infant walking. Diapers introduce bulk between the legs, potentially exacerbating infants' poor balance and wide stance. We show that walking is adversely affected by old-fashioned cloth diapers, and that even modern disposable diapers - habitually worn by most infants in the sample - incur a cost relative to walking naked. Infants displayed less mature gait patterns and more missteps and falls while wearing diapers. Thus, infants' own diapers constitute an ongoing biomechanical perturbation while learning to walk. Furthermore, shifts in diapering practices may have contributed to historical and cross-cultural differences in infant walking.

  15. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Wang, Jingbo B; Matthews, Jonathan C F

    2016-05-05

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  16. Neighbourhood walking and regeneration in deprived communities.

    PubMed

    Mason, Phil; Kearns, Ade; Bond, Lyndal

    2011-05-01

    More frequent neighbourhood walking is a realistic goal for improving physical activity in deprived areas. We address regeneration activity by examining associations of residents' circumstances and perceptions of their local environment with frequent (5+ days/week) local walking (NW5) in 32 deprived neighbourhoods (Glasgow, UK), based on interview responses from a random stratified cross-sectional sample of 5657 residents. Associations were investigated by bivariate and multilevel, multivariate logistic regression. People living in low-rise flats or houses reported greater NW5 than those in multi-storey flats. Physical and social aspects of the neighbourhood were more strongly related to walking than perceptions of housing and neighbourhood, especially the neighbourhood's external reputation, and feelings of safety and belonging. Amenity use, especially of parks, play areas and general shops (mainly in the neighbourhood), was associated with more walking. Multidimensional regeneration of the physical, service, social and psychosocial environments of deprived communities therefore seems an appropriate strategy to boost walking.

  17. Biomass Program Overview Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-01

    This presentation is an interactive walk through of the Program's vision of advancing the biofuels and bioproducts industry and highlights the research and development activities that will help achieve it.

  18. Hemodynamic responses are reduced with aerobic compared with resistance blood flow restriction exercise.

    PubMed

    May, Anthony K; Brandner, Christopher R; Warmington, Stuart A

    2017-02-01

    The hemodynamics of light-load exercise with an applied blood-flow restriction (BFR) have not been extensively compared between light-intensity, BFR, and high-intensity forms of both resistance and aerobic exercise in the same participant population. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use a randomized crossover design to examine the hemodynamic responses to resistance and aerobic BFR exercise in comparison with a common high-intensity and light-intensity non-BFR exercise. On separate occasions participants completed a leg-press (resistance) or treadmill (aerobic) trial. Each trial comprised a light-intensity bout (LI) followed by a light-intensity bout with BFR (80% resting systolic blood pressure (LI+BFR)), then a high-intensity bout (HI). To characterize the hemodynamic response, measures of cardiac output, stroke volume, heart rate and blood pressure were taken at baseline and exercise for each bout. Exercising hemodynamics for leg-press LI+BFR most often resembled those for HI and were greater than LI (e.g. for systolic blood pressure LI+BFR = 152 ± 3 mmHg; HI = 153 ± 3; LI = 143 ± 3 P < 0.05). However, exercising hemodynamics for treadmill LI+BFR most often resembled those for LI and were lower than HI (e.g. for systolic pressure LI+BFR = 124 ± 2 mmHg; LI = 123 ± 2; HI = 140 ± 3 P < 0.05). In conclusion, the hemodynamic response for light aerobic (walking) BFR exercise suggests this mode of BFR exercise may be preferential for chronic use to develop muscle size and strength, and other health benefits in certain clinical populations that are contraindicated to heavy-load resistance exercise.

  19. Short-Term Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Symptoms in Multiple Sclerosis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Lorna; McFadyen, Angus K.; Marshall-McKenna, Rebecca; Mattison, Paul; Miller, Linda; McFarlane, Niall G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This pilot study was conducted to determine whether a 15-minute bout of moderate-intensity aerobic cycling exercise would affect symptoms (pain and fatigue) and function (Timed 25-Foot Walk test [T25FW] and Timed Up and Go test [TUG]) in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and to compare these results with those of a healthy control group. Methods: Eight people with MS (Expanded Disability Status Scale score 5–6; Karnofsky score 50–80), eight people with CFS (Karnofsky score 50–80), and eight healthy volunteers participated in the study. Pain and fatigue levels and results of the T25FW and TUG were established at baseline as well as at 30 minutes, 2 hours, and 24 hours following a 15-minute stationary cycling aerobic exercise test. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and covariance (ANCOVA) were used to analyze the findings over time. Results: At baseline there were statistically significant differences between groups in fatigue (P = .039), T25FW (P = .034), and TUG (P = .010). A significant group/time interaction emerged for fatigue levels (P= .005). We found no significant group/time interaction for pain levels or function. Conclusions: Undertaking 15 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic cycling exercise had no significant adverse effects on pain or function in people with MS and CFS (with a Karnofsky score of 50–80) within a 24-hour time period. These initial results suggest that people with MS or CFS may undertake 15 minutes of cycling as moderate aerobic exercise with no expected negative impact on pain or function. PMID:25061431

  20. Snell's law and walking droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John; Pucci, Giuseppe; Aubin, Benjamin; Brun, Pierre-Thomas; Faria, Luiz

    2016-11-01

    Droplets walking on the surface of a vibrating bath have been shown to exhibit a number of quantum-like features. We here present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of such droplets crossing a linear step corresponding to a reduction in bath depth. When the step is sufficiently large, the walker reflects off the step; otherwise, it is refracted as it crosses the step. Particular attention is given to an examination of the regime in which the droplet obeys a form of Snell's Law, a behavior captured in accompanying simulations. Attempts to provide theoretical rationale for the dependence of the effective refractive index on the system parameters are described. Supported by NSF through CMMI-1333242.

  1. Aerobic exercise training intensity in patients with chronic heart failure: principles of assessment and prescription.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Mezzani, Alessandro

    2011-02-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a significant cause of worldwide mortality and morbidity, whose clinical picture is characterized by exercise intolerance and impaired quality of life. Aerobic exercise training is a well-established nonpharmacological tool improving the CHF’s pathophysiological, clinical, and prognostic picture, and prescription of an adequate training intensity is crucial to obtain both exercise-induced benefits and a reasonable control of exercise-related risk. However, clarity is still lacking regarding the definition of exercise intensity domains and the lower and upper intensity limits of prescriptible aerobic exercise in CHF patients. The purpose of this review is to provide an update of the methods for the exercise intensity assessment and continuous aerobic training intensity prescription in the CHF population, furnishing indications useful for implementation of physical rehabilitation programs in these patients.

  2. Postural Balance Following Aerobic Fatigue Tests: A Longitudinal Study Among Young Athletes.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Nili; Eliakim, Alon; Zaav, Aviva; Pantanowitz, Michal; Halumi, Monder; Eisenstein, Tamir; Meckel, Yoav; Nemet, Dan

    2016-01-01

    General fatigue can cause aggravation of postural balance, with increased risk for injuries. The present longitudinal study aimed to evaluate the postural balance of young athletes following field aerobic tests throughout 1 year of training. Thirty children from a sports center in Nazareth, participating in a 3 times/week training program (specific to basketball, soccer, or athletic training), were assessed. Postural balance parameters were taken before, immediately after, and 10 min after a 20 m shuttle-run aerobic test, at 3 time points during 1 training year (Start/Y, Mid/Y, and End/Y). Fitness improved at the Mid/Y and End/Y compared to Start/Y. Postural balance significantly deteriorated immediately after the aerobic test and improved significantly in the 10-min testing in all 3 time points, with significant deterioration in the End/Y compared with the Start/Y. In conclusions, postural balance deteriorates immediately after aerobic exercises, and at the end of the year. To better practice drills related to postural balance and possibly to prevent injuries, it is best for young athletes to properly rest immediately following aerobic exercises and to practice postural balance mainly at the beginning and at the middle of the training year.

  3. Influence of Aerobic Training and Combinations of Interventions on Cognition and Neuroplasticity after Stroke.

    PubMed

    Constans, Annabelle; Pin-Barre, Caroline; Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Decherchi, Patrick; Laurin, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Stroke often aggravated age-related cognitive impairments that strongly affect several aspects of quality of life. However, few studies are, to date, focused on rehabilitation strategies that could improve cognition. Among possible interventions, aerobic training is well known to enhance cardiovascular and motor functions but may also induce beneficial effects on cognitive functions. To assess the effectiveness of aerobic training on cognition, it seems necessary to know whether training promotes the neuroplasticity in brain areas involved in cognitive functions. In the present review, we first explore in both human and animal how aerobic training could improve cognition after stroke by highlighting the neuroplasticity mechanisms. Then, we address the potential effect of combinations between aerobic training with other interventions, including resistance exercises and pharmacological treatments. In addition, we postulate that classic recommendations for aerobic training need to be reconsidered to target both cognition and motor recovery because the current guidelines are only focused on cardiovascular and motor recovery. Finally, methodological limitations of training programs and cognitive function assessment are also developed in this review to clarify their effectiveness in stroke patients.

  4. Influence of Aerobic Training and Combinations of Interventions on Cognition and Neuroplasticity after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Constans, Annabelle; Pin-barre, Caroline; Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Decherchi, Patrick; Laurin, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Stroke often aggravated age-related cognitive impairments that strongly affect several aspects of quality of life. However, few studies are, to date, focused on rehabilitation strategies that could improve cognition. Among possible interventions, aerobic training is well known to enhance cardiovascular and motor functions but may also induce beneficial effects on cognitive functions. To assess the effectiveness of aerobic training on cognition, it seems necessary to know whether training promotes the neuroplasticity in brain areas involved in cognitive functions. In the present review, we first explore in both human and animal how aerobic training could improve cognition after stroke by highlighting the neuroplasticity mechanisms. Then, we address the potential effect of combinations between aerobic training with other interventions, including resistance exercises and pharmacological treatments. In addition, we postulate that classic recommendations for aerobic training need to be reconsidered to target both cognition and motor recovery because the current guidelines are only focused on cardiovascular and motor recovery. Finally, methodological limitations of training programs and cognitive function assessment are also developed in this review to clarify their effectiveness in stroke patients. PMID:27445801

  5. Thinking, Walking, Talking: Integratory Motor and Cognitive Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Leisman, Gerry; Moustafa, Ahmed A.; Shafir, Tal

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we argue that motor and cognitive processes are functionally related and most likely share a similar evolutionary history. This is supported by clinical and neural data showing that some brain regions integrate both motor and cognitive functions. In addition, we also argue that cognitive processes coincide with complex motor output. Further, we also review data that support the converse notion that motor processes can contribute to cognitive function, as found by many rehabilitation and aerobic exercise training programs. Support is provided for motor and cognitive processes possessing dynamic bidirectional influences on each other. PMID:27252937

  6. Therapeutic aspects of aerobic dance participation.

    PubMed

    Estivill, M

    1995-01-01

    An ethnographic analysis of aerobic dance exercise culture was conducted to determine the impact of the culture on the mind-body connection. After a review of the predominant theories on the relationship between vigorous exercise and elevated mood, aerobic dance participants' experiences are reported to illustrate how cognitive experience and self-esteem may be influenced. Interviews revealed that some participants achieved a pleasantly altered state of consciousness and respite from depression and stress. The relationship of the work ethic to achievement of participant satisfaction is underscored.

  7. Enhancing Cognitive Training Through Aerobic Exercise After a First Schizophrenia Episode: Theoretical Conception and Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Nuechterlein, Keith H; Ventura, Joseph; McEwen, Sarah C; Gretchen-Doorly, Denise; Vinogradov, Sophia; Subotnik, Kenneth L

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive training (CT) and aerobic exercise have separately shown promise for improving cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Aerobic exercise releases brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which promotes synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. Thus, aerobic exercise provides a neurotrophic platform for neuroplasticity-based CT. The combination of aerobic exercise and CT may yield more robust effects than CT alone, particularly in the initial course of schizophrenia. In a pilot study, 7 patients with a recent onset of schizophrenia were assigned to Cognitive Training & Exercise (CT&E) and 9 to CT alone for a 10-week period. Posit Science programs were used for CT. Neurocognitive training focused on tuning neural circuits related to perceptual processing and verbal learning and memory. Social cognitive training used the same learning principles with social and affective stimuli. Both groups participated in these training sessions 2d/wk, 2h/d. The CT&E group also participated in an aerobic conditioning program for 30 minutes at our clinic 2d/wk and at home 2d/wk. The effect size for improvement in the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery Overall Composite score for CT&E patients relative to CT patients was large. Functional outcome, particularly independent living skills, also tended to improve more in the CT&E than in the CT group. Muscular endurance, cardiovascular fitness, and diastolic blood pressure also showed relative improvement in the CT&E compared to the CT group. These encouraging pilot study findings support the promise of combining CT and aerobic exercise to improve the early course of schizophrenia.

  8. Safety and efficacy of a 6-month home-based exercise program in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bankolé, Landry-Cyrille; Millet, Guillaume Y.; Temesi, John; Bachasson, Damien; Ravelojaona, Marion; Wuyam, Bernard; Verges, Samuel; Ponsot, Elodie; Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Kadi, Fawzi; Féasson, Léonard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Previous randomized controlled trials investigating exercise training programs in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) patients are scarce and of short duration only. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of a 6-month home-based exercise training program on fitness, muscle, and motor function in FSHD patients. Methods: Sixteen FSHD patients were randomly assigned to training (TG) and control (CG) groups (both n = 8) in a home-based exercise intervention. Training consisted of cycling 3 times weekly for 35 minutes (combination of strength, high-intensity interval, and low-intensity aerobic) at home for 24 weeks. Patients in CG also performed an identical training program (CTG) after 24 weeks. The primary outcome was change in peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) measured every 6 weeks. The principal secondary outcomes were maximal quadriceps strength (MVC) and local quadriceps endurance every 12 weeks. Other outcome measures included maximal aerobic power (MAP) and experienced fatigue every 6 weeks, 6-minute walking distance every 12 weeks, and muscle characteristics from vastus lateralis biopsies taken pre- and postintervention. Results: The compliance rate was 91% in TG. Significant improvements with training were observed in the VO2 peak (+19%, P = 0.002) and MAP by week 6 and further to week 24. Muscle endurance, MVC, and 6-minute walking distance increased and experienced fatigue decreased. Muscle fiber cross-sectional area and citrate synthase activity increased by 34% (P = 0.008) and 46% (P = 0.003), respectively. Dystrophic pathophysiologic patterns were not exacerbated. Similar improvements were experienced by TG and CTG. Conclusions: A combined strength and interval cycling exercise-training program compatible with patients’ daily professional and social activities leads to significant functional benefits without compromising muscle tissue. PMID:27495097

  9. Built Environment Correlates of Walking: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saelens, Brian E.; Handy, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the empirical investigation into the relations between built environmental and physical activity. To create places that facilitate and encourage walking, practitioners need an understanding of the specific characteristics of the built environment that correlate most strongly with walking. This paper reviews evidence on the built environment correlates with walking. Method Included in this review were 13 reviews published between 2002 and 2006 and 29 original studies published in 2005 and up through May 2006. Results were summarized based on specific characteristics of the built environment and transportation walking versus recreational walking. Results Previous reviews and newer studies document consistent positive relations between walking for transportation and density, distance to non-residential destinations, and land use mix; findings for route/network connectivity, parks and open space, and personal safety are more equivocal. Results regarding recreational walking were less clear. Conclusions More recent evidence supports the conclusions of prior reviews, and new studies address some of the limitations of earlier studies. Although prospective studies are needed, evidence on correlates appears sufficient to support policy changes. PMID:18562973

  10. The work of walking: a calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Webb, P; Saris, W H; Schoffelen, P F; Van Ingen Schenau, G J; Ten Hoor, F

    1988-08-01

    Experiments were designed to test the traditional assumption that during level walking all of the energy from oxidation of fuel appears as heat and no work is done. Work is force expressed through distance, or energy transferred from a man to the environment, but not as heat. While wearing a suit calorimeter in a respiration chamber, five women and five men walked for 70 to 90 min on a level treadmill at 2.5, 4.6, and 6.7 km.h-1 and pedalled a cycle ergometer for 70 to 90 min against 53 and 92 W loads. They also walked with a weighted backpack and against a horizontal load. During cycling, energy from fuel matched heat loss plus the power measured by the ergometer. During walking, however, energy from fuel exceeded that which appeared as heat, meaning that work was done. The power increased with walking speed; values were 14, 29, and 63 W, which represented 11, 12, and 13% of the incremental cost of fuel above the resting level. Vertical and horizontal loads increased the fuel cost and heat loss of walking but did not alter the power output. This work energy did not re-appear as thermal energy during 18 h of recovery. The most likely explanation of the work done is in the inter-action between the foot and the ground, such as compressing the heel of the shoe and bending the sole. We conclude that work is done in level walking.

  11. A 'water walkers' exercise program for the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Heyneman, C A; Premo, D E

    1992-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that older people, stereotyped as weak, frail, and inactive, demonstrate an equal capacity to reap the physical and psychological benefits of recreational exercise. A low cost aquatic exercise program is proposed that is geared towards those persons who, because of their physical limitations, are unable to participate in the more traditional walking or low-impact aerobics programs currently available for seniors. A water-based program would allow these people to gain all the advantages of land-based exercise with out stress or strain on arthritic joints. In addition, the use of water walkers (a buoyancy device which attaches easily around the waist) would allow total freedom of movement without fear of deep water. Those with various levels of disability could, therefore, participate at their own pace. Two programs, including transportation, would be provided twice a week for 8 weeks each. An individual 45-minute session would consist of a warm-up period with gentle stretching, a cardiovascular segment, a cool-down period, strength-training, and a final stretching time. All exercises would be conducted with participants wearing the water walkers, allowing total immersion to the shoulder. Free to move about the pool, they would be encouraged to interact socially with one another. The results of the program would be determined by measuring range of motion, cardiovascular endurance, and strength before and after each 8-week session. Participants' level of self confidence and life satisfaction will be estimated and any psychological improvement will be documented. PMID:1561306

  12. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  13. Quantum Walk Schemes for Universal Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Michael S.

    Random walks are a powerful tool for the efficient implementation of algorithms in classical computation. Their quantum-mechanical analogues, called quantum walks, hold similar promise. Quantum walks provide a model of quantum computation that has recently been shown to be equivalent in power to the standard circuit model. As in the classical case, quantum walks take place on graphs and can undergo discrete or continuous evolution, though quantum evolution is unitary and therefore deterministic until a measurement is made. This thesis considers the usefulness of continuous-time quantum walks to quantum computation from the perspectives of both their fundamental power under various formulations, and their applicability in practical experiments. In one extant scheme, logical gates are effected by scattering processes. The results of an exhaustive search for single-qubit operations in this model are presented. It is shown that the number of distinct operations increases exponentially with the number of vertices in the scattering graph. A catalogue of all graphs on up to nine vertices that implement single-qubit unitaries at a specific set of momenta is included in an appendix. I develop a novel scheme for universal quantum computation called the discontinuous quantum walk, in which a continuous-time quantum walker takes discrete steps of evolution via perfect quantum state transfer through small 'widget' graphs. The discontinuous quantum-walk scheme requires an exponentially sized graph, as do prior discrete and continuous schemes. To eliminate the inefficient vertex resource requirement, a computation scheme based on multiple discontinuous walkers is presented. In this model, n interacting walkers inhabiting a graph with 2n vertices can implement an arbitrary quantum computation on an input of length n, an exponential savings over previous universal quantum walk schemes. This is the first quantum walk scheme that allows for the application of quantum error correction

  14. Quantum walk public-key cryptographic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachou, C.; Rodrigues, J.; Mateus, P.; Paunković, N.; Souto, A.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum Cryptography is a rapidly developing field of research that benefits from the properties of Quantum Mechanics in performing cryptographic tasks. Quantum walks are a powerful model for quantum computation and very promising for quantum information processing. In this paper, we present a quantum public-key cryptographic system based on quantum walks. In particular, in the proposed protocol the public-key is given by a quantum state generated by performing a quantum walk. We show that the protocol is secure and analyze the complexity of public key generation and encryption/decryption procedures.

  15. [Walking assist robot and its clinical application].

    PubMed

    Kakou, Hiroaki; Shitama, Hideo; Kimura, Yoshiko; Nakamoto, Yoko; Furuta, Nami; Honda, Kanae; Wada, Futoshi; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2009-06-01

    The walking assist robot was developed to improve gait disturbance in patients with severe disabilities. The robot had a trunk supporter, power generator and operating arms which held patient's lower extremities and simulated walking, a control unit, biofeedback system, and a treadmill. We applied the robot-aided gait training to three patients with severe gait disturbance induced by stroke, axonal Guillan-Barré syndrome or spinal cord injury, and the walking assist robot turned out to be effective in improving the gait disturbance.

  16. Machines that walk: The adaptive suspension vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shin-Min; Waldron, Kenneth J.

    The design and operation of statically stable fully terrain-adaptive walking machines are discussed, with an emphasis on the adaptive-suspension vehicle developed at Ohio State University (Waldron and McGhee, 1986). Chapters are devoted to a review of walking-machine development, gait analysis and gaits for level walking, gaits for irregular terrain, coordination, leg design by four-bar linkage synthesis, design of a pantograph leg, motion-controlled ankle design, and the Adaptive Suspension Vehicle. Diagrams, drawings, and graphs are provided.

  17. Random walks on simplicial complexes and harmonics†

    PubMed Central

    Steenbergen, John

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, we introduce a class of random walks with absorbing states on simplicial complexes. Given a simplicial complex of dimension d, a random walk with an absorbing state is defined which relates to the spectrum of the k‐dimensional Laplacian for 1 ≤ k ≤ d. We study an example of random walks on simplicial complexes in the context of a semi‐supervised learning problem. Specifically, we consider a label propagation algorithm on oriented edges, which applies to a generalization of the partially labelled classification problem on graphs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Random Struct. Alg., 49, 379–405, 2016

  18. A combined exercise model for improving muscle strength, balance, walking distance, and motor agility in multiple sclerosis patients: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Sangelaji, Bahram; Kordi, Mohammadreza; Banihashemi, Farzaneh; Nabavi, Seyed Massood; Khodadadeh, Sara; Dastoorpoor, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disease with a variety of signs and symptoms. Exercise therapy has been shown to improve physical functions in MS. However, questions about an optimal exercise therapy remain. In this regard, we suggest a combined exercise therapy including aerobic and resistance exercises for MS patients. The study is designed to observe, test and compare the effects of proposed combined exercises on strength, balance, agility, fatigue, speed, and walking distance in people with mild to moderate MS [0 < expanded disability status scale (EDSS) < 5]. Methods: A total of 40 people with relapse-remitting MS (16 male, 0 < EDSS < 5) were randomized into one of the four groups (3 intervention and one control). The intervention consisted of various combinations of aerobic and resistance exercises with different repetition rates. Pre- and post-intervention scores of fatigue severity scale (FSS), timed up and go (TUG) test, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), 10- and 20-MWT, Berg balance scale (BBS), and one repetition maximum (1RM) test were recorded and analyzed. Results: For most tests, post-intervention values of the group 1, with 3-aerobic and 1-resistance exercises, were significantly higher compared to control group (P < 0.050). However, no significant progression was observed in the other two intervention groups. Conclusion: A combination of three aerobic exercises with one resistance exercise may result in improved balance, locomotion, and endurance in MS patients. PMID:27648171

  19. High Point Walking for Health: Creating Built and Social Environments That Support Walking in a Public Housing Community

    PubMed Central

    Rabkin, Janice; Sharify, Denise; Song, Lin

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We implemented and evaluated multiple interventions to increase walking activity at a multicultural public housing site. Methods. A community-based participatory research partnership and community action teams assessed assets and barriers related to walking and developed multiple interventions to promote walking activity. Interventions included sponsoring walking groups, improving walking routes, providing information about walking options, and advocating for pedestrian safety. A pre–post study design was used to assess the changes in walking activity. Results. Self-reported walking activity increased among walking group participants from 65 to 109 minutes per day (P = .001). The proportion that reported being at least moderately active for at least 150 minutes per week increased from 62% to 81% (P = .018). Conclusions. A multicomponent intervention developed through participatory research methods that emphasized walking groups and included additional strategies to change the built and social environments increased walking activity at a public housing site in Seattle. PMID:19890163

  20. Anaerobic and aerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.

    1996-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used pure cultures of aerobic microorganisms. In many cases, attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions by pure cultures result in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, mixed culture systems properly operated result in the transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and in some cases mineralization of TNT occurs. In this paper, the mixed culture system is described with emphasis on intermediates and the characteristics of the aerobic microbial process including the necessity for a co-substrate. The possibility of removing TNT under aerobic/anoxic conditions is described in detail. Another option for the biodegradation of TNT and nitroaromatics is under anaerobic, sulfate reducing conditions. In this instance, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. TNT under sulfate reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitro groups from TNT is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the formation of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). These metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. The data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT under different growth condition are reviewed in this report.

  1. Aerobic Exercise Prescription for Rheumatoid Arthritics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Blanche W.; Williams, Hilda L.

    The use of exercise as a general treatment for rheumatoid arthritics (RA) has included range of motion, muscular strength, water exercise and rest therapy while virtually ignoring possible benefits of aerobic exercise. The purposes of this project were to examine the guidelines for exercise prescription in relation to this special population and…

  2. Reflections on Psychotherapy and Aerobic Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Wade

    This document provides a series of reflections by a practicing psychologist on the uses of aerobic workouts in psychotherapy. Two case histories are cited to illustrate the contention that the mode of exercise, rather than simply its presence or absence, is the significant indicator of a patient's emotional well-being or psychopathology. The first…

  3. AEROBIC DENITRIFICATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR NITROGEN FATE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Mississippi, as well as most nitrogen-degraded rivers and streams, NO3- is the dominant N species and therefore understanding its biogeochemical behavior is critical for accurate nitrogen fate modeling. To our knowledge this is the first work to report aerobic denitrificat...

  4. Media for the aerobic growth of campylobacter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of agar and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) concentration on aerobic growth of Campylobacter in a fumarate-pyruvate medium was examined. The broth medium was supplemented with 0.0 to 0.2% agar and inoculated with 106 CFU/ml of Campylobacter coli 33559, Campylobacter fetus 27349, Campylobacter...

  5. Criterion Related Validity of Karate Specific Aerobic Test (KSAT)

    PubMed Central

    Chaabene, Helmi; Hachana, Younes; Franchini, Emerson; Tabben, Montassar; Mkaouer, Bessem; Negra, Yassine; Hammami, Mehrez; Chamari, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Karate is one the most popular combat sports in the world. Physical fitness assessment on a regular manner is important for monitoring the effectiveness of the training program and the readiness of karatekas to compete. Objectives: The aim of this research was to examine the criterion related to validity of the karate specific aerobic test (KSAT) as an indicator of aerobic level of karate practitioners. Patients and Methods: Cardiorespiratory responses, aerobic performance level through both treadmill laboratory test and YoYo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YoYoIRTL1) as well as time to exhaustion in the KSAT test (TE’KSAT) were determined in a total of fifteen healthy international karatekas (i.e. karate practitioners) (means ± SD: age: 22.2 ± 4.3 years; height: 176.4 ± 7.5 cm; body mass: 70.3 ± 9.7 kg and body fat: 13.2 ± 6%). Results: Peak heart rate obtained from KSAT represented ~99% of maximal heart rate registered during the treadmill test showing that KSAT imposes high physiological demands. There was no significant correlation between KSAT’s TE and relative (mL/min kg) treadmill maximal oxygen uptake (r = 0.14; P = 0.69; [small]). On the other hand, there was a significant relationship between KSAT’s TE and the velocity associated with VO2max (vVO2max) (r = 0.67; P = 0.03; [large]) as well as the velocity at VO2 corresponding to the second ventilatory threshold (vVO2 VAT) (r = 0.64; P = 0.04; [large]). Moreover, significant relationship was found between TE’s KSAT and both the total distance covered and parameters of intermittent endurance measured through YoYoIRTL1. Conclusions: The KSAT has not proved to have indirect criterion related validity as no significant correlations have been found between TE’s KSAT and treadmill VO2max. Nevertheless, as correlated to other aerobic fitness variables, KSAT can be considered as an indicator of karate specific endurance. The establishment of the criterion related validity of the KSAT

  6. Adolescents' Interest and Performances in Aerobic Fitness Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Xihe; Chen, Senlin; Parrott, James

    2014-01-01

    This study examined adolescents' interest in aerobic fitness testing and its relation to the test performances. Adolescents (N = 356) from three middle schools participated in the study. The participants took two aerobic fitness tests: the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER) and One-Mile Run (1MR) with a two-day interval, and…

  7. Ventilation and Speech Characteristics during Submaximal Aerobic Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Susan E.; Hipp, Jenny; Alessio, Helaine

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined alterations in ventilation and speech characteristics as well as perceived dyspnea during submaximal aerobic exercise tasks. Method: Twelve healthy participants completed aerobic exercise-only and simultaneous speaking and aerobic exercise tasks at 50% and 75% of their maximum oxygen consumption (VO[subscript 2] max).…

  8. Effect of walking speed on lower extremity joint loading in graded ramp walking.

    PubMed

    Schwameder, Hermann; Lindenhofer, Elke; Müller, Erich

    2005-07-01

    Lower extremity joint loading during walking is strongly affected by the steepness of the slope and might cause pain and injuries in lower extremity joint structures. One feasible measure to reduce joint loading is the reduction of walking speed. Positive effects have been shown for level walking, but not for graded walking or hiking conditions. The aim of the study was to quantify the effect of walking speed (separated into the two components, step length and cadence) on the joint power of the hip, knee and ankle and to determine the knee joint forces in uphill and downhill walking. Ten participants walked up and down a ramp with step lengths of 0.46, 0.575 and 0.69 m and cadences of 80, 100 and 120 steps per minute. The ramp was equipped with a force platform and the locomotion was filmed with a 60 Hz video camera. Loading of the lower extremity joints was determined using inverse dynamics. A two-dimensional knee model was used to calculate forces in the knee structures during the stance phase. Walking speed affected lower extremity joint loading substantially and significantly. Change of step length caused much greater loading changes for all joints compared with change of cadence; the effects were more distinct in downhill than in uphill walking. The results indicate that lower extremity joint loading can be effectively controlled by varying step length and cadence during graded uphill and downhill walking. Hikers can avoid or reduce pain and injuries by reducing walking speed, particularly in downhill walking.

  9. Evidence for the different physiological significance of the 6- and 2-minute walk tests in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Researchers have recently advocated for the 2-minute walk (2MW) as an alternative for the 6-minute walk (6MW) to assess long distance ambulation in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). This recommendation has not been based on physiological considerations such as the rate of oxygen consumption (V·O2) over the 6MW range. Objective This study examined the pattern of change in V·O2 over the range of the 6MW in a large sample of persons with MS who varied as a function of disability status. Method Ninety-five persons with clinically-definite MS underwent a neurological examination for generating an Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, and then completion of the 6MW protocol while wearing a portable metabolic unit and an accelerometer. Results There was a time main effect on V·O2 during the 6MW (p = .0001) such that V·O2 increased significantly every 30 seconds over the first 3 minutes of the 6MW, and then remained stable over the second 3 minutes of the 6MW. This occurred despite no change in cadence across the 6MW (p = .84). Conclusions The pattern of change in V·O2 indicates that there are different metabolic systems providing energy for ambulation during the 6MW in MS subjects and steady state aerobic metabolism is reached during the last 3 minutes of the 6MW. By extension, the first 3 minutes would represent a test of mixed aerobic and anaerobic work, whereas the second 3 minutes would represent a test of aerobic work during walking. PMID:22380843

  10. Reference values for the incremental shuttle walk test in healthy subjects: from the walk distance to physiological responses *,**

    PubMed Central

    Dourado, Victor Zuniga; Guerra, Ricardo Luís Fernandes; Tanni, Suzana Erico; Antunes, Letícia Cláudia de Oliveira; Godoy, Irma

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine reference values for incremental shuttle walk distance (ISWD) and peak physiological responses during the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT), as well as to develop a series of predictive equations for those variables in healthy adults. METHODS: We evaluated 103 healthy participants ≥ 40 years of age (54 women and 49 men). We fitted each participant with a gas analysis system for use during the ISWT. Oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide production, minute ventilation, heart rate (HR), ISWD, and maximal walking velocity (MWV) were obtained as primary outcomes. We also assessed hand grip strength (HGS) and lean body mass (LBM). RESULTS: The regression analysis models, including physiological variables, ISWD, and MWV (adjusted for age, body mass, height, and sex), produced R2 values ranging from 0.40 to 0.65 (for HR and peak VO2, respectively). Using the models including LBM or HGS, we obtained no significant increase in the R2 values for predicting peak VO2, although the use of those models did result in slight increases in the R2 values for ISWD and MWV (of 8% and 12%, respectively). The variables ISWD, MWV, and ISWD × body mass, respectively, explained 76.7%, 73.3%, and 81.2% of peak VO2 variability. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide reference values for ISWD and physiological responses to the ISWT, which can be properly estimated by determining simple demographic and anthropometric characteristics in healthy adults ≥ 40 years of age. The ISWT could be used in assessing physical fitness in the general adult population and in designing individualized walking programs. PMID:23670504

  11. Urban Walking and the Pedagogies of the Street

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bairner, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Drawing upon the extensive literature on urban walking and also on almost 60 years' experience of walking the streets, this article argues that there is a pressing need to re-assert the educational value of going for a walk. After a brief discussion of the social significance of the "flaneur," the historic pioneer of urban walking, the article…

  12. Nordic Walking Practice Might Improve Plantar Pressure Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Martinez-Nova, Alfonso; Morey-Klapsing, G.; Encarnacion-Martinez, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Nordic walking (NW), characterized by the use of two walking poles, is becoming increasingly popular (Morgulec-Adamowicz, Marszalek, & Jagustyn, 2011). We studied walking pressure patterns of 20 experienced and 30 beginner Nordic walkers. Plantar pressures from nine foot zones were measured during trials performed at two walking speeds (preferred…

  13. Walking and Eating Behavior of Toddlers at 12 Months Old

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koda, Naoko; Akimoto, Yuko; Hirose, Toshiya; Hinobayashi, Toshihiko; Minami, Tetsuhiro

    2004-01-01

    Locomotive and eating behavior of 52 toddlers was observed at 12 months old in a nursery school and investigated in relation to the acquisition of independent walking. The toddlers who acquired walking ate more by themselves using the hands than the toddlers who did not start walking. This suggested that acquisition of walking was associated with…

  14. Walking after Stroke: Comfortable versus Maximum Safe Speed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohannon, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    This study attempted to (1) determine whether stroke patients (n=20) can safely increase their walking speed above that of comfortable walking; (2) describe the relationship between comfortable and maximum safe walking speed; and (3) examine correlations between maximum and comfortable speeds and a functional walking score. Subjects were able to…

  15. Minimal walking technicolor: Setup for collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Foadi, Roshan; Frandsen, Mads T.; Ryttov, Thomas A.; Sannino, Francesco

    2007-09-01

    Different theoretical and phenomenological aspects of the minimal and nonminimal walking technicolor theories have recently been studied. The goal here is to make the models ready for collider phenomenology. We do this by constructing the low energy effective theory containing scalars, pseudoscalars, vector mesons, and other fields predicted by the minimal walking theory. We construct their self-interactions and interactions with standard model fields. Using the Weinberg sum rules, opportunely modified to take into account the walking behavior of the underlying gauge theory, we find interesting relations for the spin-one spectrum. We derive the electroweak parameters using the newly constructed effective theory and compare the results with the underlying gauge theory. Our analysis is sufficiently general such that the resulting model can be used to represent a generic walking technicolor theory not at odds with precision data.

  16. Community walking in people with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Robyn M; Morris, Meg E; Woollacott, Marjorie H; Brauer, Sandra G

    2012-01-01

    People with Parkinson's disease often have walking difficulty, and this is likely to be exacerbated while walking in places in the community, where people are likely to face greater and more varied challenges. This study aims to understand the facilitators and the barriers to walking in the community perceived by people with Parkinson's disease. This qualitative study involved 5 focus groups (n = 34) of people with Parkinson's disease and their partners residing in metropolitan and rural regions in Queensland, Australia. Results found that people with PD reported to use internal personal strategies as facilitators to community walking, but identified primarily external factors, particularly the environmental factors as barriers. The adoption of strategies or the use of facilitators allows people with Parkinson's disease to cope so that participants often did not report disability.

  17. Epidemic spreading driven by biased random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Cunlai; Li, Siyuan; Yang, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Random walk is one of the basic mechanisms of many network-related applications. In this paper, we study the dynamics of epidemic spreading driven by biased random walks in complex networks. In our epidemic model, infected nodes send out infection packets by biased random walks to their neighbor nodes, and this causes the infection of susceptible nodes that receive the packets. Infected nodes recover from the infection at a constant rate λ, and will not be infected again after recovery. We obtain the largest instantaneous number of infected nodes and the largest number of ever-infected nodes respectively, by tuning the parameter α of the biased random walks. Simulation results on model and real-world networks show that spread of the epidemic becomes intense and widespread with increase of either delivery capacity of infected nodes, average node degree, or homogeneity of node degree distribution.

  18. Walking with coffee: why does it spill?

    PubMed

    Mayer, H C; Krechetnikov, R

    2012-04-01

    In our busy lives, almost all of us have to walk with a cup of coffee. While often we spill the drink, this familiar phenomenon has never been explored systematically. Here we report on the results of an experimental study of the conditions under which coffee spills for various walking speeds and initial liquid levels in the cup. These observations are analyzed from the dynamical systems and fluid mechanics viewpoints as well as with the help of a model developed here. Particularities of the common cup sizes, the coffee properties, and the biomechanics of walking proved to be responsible for the spilling phenomenon. The studied problem represents an example of the interplay between the complex motion of a cup, due to the biomechanics of a walking individual, and the low-viscosity-liquid dynamics in it.

  19. Walking with coffee: Why does it spill?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, H. C.; Krechetnikov, R.

    2012-04-01

    In our busy lives, almost all of us have to walk with a cup of coffee. While often we spill the drink, this familiar phenomenon has never been explored systematically. Here we report on the results of an experimental study of the conditions under which coffee spills for various walking speeds and initial liquid levels in the cup. These observations are analyzed from the dynamical systems and fluid mechanics viewpoints as well as with the help of a model developed here. Particularities of the common cup sizes, the coffee properties, and the biomechanics of walking proved to be responsible for the spilling phenomenon. The studied problem represents an example of the interplay between the complex motion of a cup, due to the biomechanics of a walking individual, and the low-viscosity-liquid dynamics in it.

  20. Random walks in the history of life

    PubMed Central

    Cornette, James L.; Lieberman, Bruce S.

    2004-01-01

    The simplest null hypothesis for evolutionary time series is that the observed data follow a random walk. We examined whether aspects of Sepkoski's compilation of marine generic diversity depart from a random walk by using statistical tests from econometrics. Throughout most of the Phanerozoic, the random-walk null hypothesis is not rejected for marine diversity, accumulated origination or accumulated extinction, suggesting that either these variables were correlated with environmental variables that follow a random walk or so many mechanisms were affecting these variables, in different ways, that the resultant trends appear random. The only deviation from this pattern involves rejection of the null hypothesis for roughly the last 75 million years for the diversity and accumulated origination time series. PMID:14684835

  1. Database of Standardized Questionnaires About Walking & Bicycling

    Cancer.gov

    This database contains questionnaire items and a list of validation studies for standardized items related to walking and biking. The items come from multiple national and international physical activity questionnaires.

  2. Holographic walking from tachyon DBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutasov, David; Lin, Jennifer; Parnachev, Andrei

    2012-10-01

    We use holography to study conformal phase transitions, which are believed to be realized in four dimensional QCD and play an important role in walking technicolor models of electroweak symmetry breaking. At strong coupling they can be modeled by the non-linear dynamics of a tachyonic scalar field with mass close to the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound in anti-de Sitter spacetime. Taking the action for this field to have a tachyon-Dirac-Born-Infeld form gives rise to models that resemble hard and soft wall AdS/QCD, with a dynamically generated wall. For hard wall models, the highly excited spectrum has the KK form mn˜n; in the soft wall case we exhibit potentials with mn˜nα, 0<α⩽1/2. We investigate the finite temperature phase structure and find first or second order symmetry restoration transitions, depending on the behavior of the potential near the origin of field space.

  3. Adaptive walking in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Simieli, Lucas; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Nineteen elders with AD participated in the study. A veteran neuropsychiatrist established the degree of AD in the sample. To determine dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait, patients performed five trials for each experimental condition: free and adaptive gait with and without a dual-task (regressive countdown). Spatial and temporal parameters were collected through an optoelectronic tridimensional system. The central stride was analyzed in free gait, and the steps immediately before (approaching phase) and during the obstacle crossing were analyzed in adaptive gait. Results indicated that AD patients walked more slowly during adaptive gait and free gait, using conservative strategies when confronted either with an obstacle or a secondary task. Furthermore, patients sought for stability to perform the tasks, particularly for adaptive gait with dual task, who used anticipatory and online adjustments to perform the task. Therefore, the increase of task complexity enhances cognitive load and risk of falls for AD patients.

  4. Adaptive Walking in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Simieli, Lucas; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Nineteen elders with AD participated in the study. A veteran neuropsychiatrist established the degree of AD in the sample. To determine dual-task effects on free and adaptive gait, patients performed five trials for each experimental condition: free and adaptive gait with and without a dual-task (regressive countdown). Spatial and temporal parameters were collected through an optoelectronic tridimensional system. The central stride was analyzed in free gait, and the steps immediately before (approaching phase) and during the obstacle crossing were analyzed in adaptive gait. Results indicated that AD patients walked more slowly during adaptive gait and free gait, using conservative strategies when confronted either with an obstacle or a secondary task. Furthermore, patients sought for stability to perform the tasks, particularly for adaptive gait with dual task, who used anticipatory and online adjustments to perform the task. Therefore, the increase of task complexity enhances cognitive load and risk of falls for AD patients. PMID:22991684

  5. Effect of habitual aerobic exercise on body weight and arterial function in overweight and obese men.

    PubMed

    Miyaki, Asako; Maeda, Seiji; Yoshizawa, Mutsuko; Misono, Maiko; Saito, Yoko; Sasai, Hiroyuki; Kim, Maeng-Kyu; Nakata, Yoshio; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Ajisaka, Ryuichi

    2009-09-15

    The effect of habitual exercise on vascular function, including central arterial distensibility and endothelial function, in obese subjects has not yet been clarified. We investigated whether aerobic exercise training affects central arterial distensibility and endothelial function in middle-age overweight and obese men. A total of 21 overweight and obese men (age 50 +/- 2 years, body mass index 30 +/- 1 kg/m(2)) completed a 12-week aerobic exercise intervention. Aerobic exercise training significantly reduced their body weight and resulted in a significant decrease in body mass index. After the weight-reduction exercise program, carotid arterial compliance (determined by simultaneous B-mode ultrasonography and arterial applanation tonometry on the common carotid artery) significantly increased; and the beta-stiffness index, an index of arterial compliance adjusted for distending pressure, significantly decreased. The concentrations of plasma endothelin-1, a potent vasoconstrictor peptide produced by vascular endothelial cells, significantly decreased and plasma nitric oxide (measured as the stable end product [nitrite/nitrate]), a potent vasodilator produced by vascular endothelial cells, significantly increased after the weight-reduction exercise program. In conclusion, weight reduction by aerobic exercise training in overweight and obese men increased the central arterial distensibility. This increase might contribute to the improvement in endothelial function, as assessed by a decrease in endothelin-1 and an increase in nitric oxide, after exercise training-induced weight loss.

  6. Acute effects of moderate intensity aerobic exercise on affective withdrawal symptoms and cravings among women smokers.

    PubMed

    Williams, David M; Dunsiger, Shira; Whiteley, Jessica A; Ussher, Michael H; Ciccolo, Joseph T; Jennings, Ernestine G

    2011-08-01

    A growing number of laboratory studies have shown that acute bouts of aerobic exercise favorably impact affect and cravings among smokers. However, randomized trials have generally shown exercise to have no favorable effect on smoking cessation or withdrawal symptoms during quit attempts. The purpose of the present study was to explore this apparent contradiction by assessing acute changes in affect and cravings immediately prior to and following each exercise and contact control session during an eight-week smoking cessation trial. Sixty previously low-active, healthy, female smokers were randomized to an eight-week program consisting of brief baseline smoking cessation counseling and the nicotine patch plus either three sessions/week of moderate intensity aerobic exercise or contact control. Findings revealed a favorable impact of exercise on acute changes in positive activated affect (i.e., energy), negative deactivated affect (i.e., tiredness), and cigarette cravings relative to contact control. However, effects dissipated from session to session. Results suggest that aerobic exercise has potential as a smoking cessation treatment, but that it must be engaged in frequently and consistently over time in order to derive benefits. Thus, it is not surprising that previous randomized controlled trials-in which adherence to exercise programs has generally been poor-have been unsuccessful in showing effects of aerobic exercise on smoking cessation outcomes.

  7. "I'm Just a'-Walking the Dog" correlates of regular dog walking.

    PubMed

    Christian nee Cutt, Hayley; Giles-Corti, Billie; Knuiman, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Intrapersonal and environmental factors associated with dog walking (N = 483) were examined. A greater proportion of regular (80%) than irregular (59%) dog walkers met the recommended 150 minutes of physical activity per week. Owners who perceived greater social support and motivation from their dogs to walk, and who had access to a dog-supportive park within their neighborhood, were more likely to regularly walk with their dogs, even after adjustment for other well-known correlates of physical activity. The higher level of physical activity of regular dog walkers can be attributed to the additional walking these owners perform with their dogs.

  8. Influence of contextual task constraints on preferred stride parameters and their variabilities during human walking.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Lauro V; Rebula, John R; Kuo, Arthur D; Adamczyk, Peter G

    2015-10-01

    Walking is not always a free and unencumbered task. Everyday activities such as walking in pairs, in groups, or on structured walkways can limit the acceptable gait patterns, leading to motor behavior that differs from that observed in more self-selected gait. Such different contexts may lead to gait performance different than observed in typical laboratory experiments, for example, during treadmill walking. We sought to systematically measure the impact of such task constraints by comparing gait parameters and their variability during walking in different conditions over-ground, and on a treadmill. We reconstructed foot motion from foot-mounted inertial sensors, and characterized forward, lateral and angular foot placement while subjects walked over-ground in a straight hallway and on a treadmill. Over-ground walking was performed in three variations: with no constraints (self-selected, SS); while deliberately varying walking speed (self-varied, SV); and while following a toy pace car programmed to vary speed (externally-varied, EV). We expected that these conditions would exhibit a statistically similar relationship between stride length and speed, and between stride length and stride period. We also expected treadmill walking (TM) would differ in two ways: first, that variability in stride length and stride period would conform to a constant-speed constraint opposite in slope from the normal relationship; and second, that stride length would decrease, leading to combinations of stride length and speed not observed in over-ground conditions. Results showed that all over-ground conditions used similar stride length-speed relationships, and that variability in treadmill walking conformed to a constant-speed constraint line, as expected. Decreased stride length was observed in both TM and EV conditions, suggesting adaptations due to heightened awareness or to prepare for unexpected changes or problems. We also evaluated stride variability in constrained and

  9. Influence of contextual task constraints on preferred stride parameters and their variabilities during human walking

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Lauro V.; Rebula, John R.; Kuo, Arthur D.; Adamczyk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Walking is not always a free and unencumbered task. Everyday activities such as walking in pairs, in groups, or on structured walkways can limit the acceptable gait patterns, leading to motor behavior that differs from that observed in more self-selected gait. Such different contexts may lead to gait performance different than observed in typical laboratory experiments, for example, during treadmill walking. We sought to systematically measure the impact of such task constraints by comparing gait parameters and their variability during walking in different conditions over-ground, and on a treadmill. We reconstructed foot motion from foot-mounted inertial sensors, and characterized forward, lateral and angular foot placement while subjects walked over-ground in a straight hallway and on a treadmill. Over-ground walking was performed in three variations: with no constraints (self-selected, SS); while deliberately varying walking speed (self-varied, SV); and while following a toy pace car programmed to vary speed (externally-varied, EV). We expected that these conditions would exhibit a statistically similar relationship between stride length and speed, and between stride length and stride period. We also expected treadmill walking (TM) would differ in two ways: first, that variability in stride length and stride period would conform to a constant-speed constraint opposite in slope from the normal relationship; and second, that stride length would decrease, leading to combinations of stride length and speed not observed in over-ground conditions. Results showed that all over-ground conditions used similar stride length-speed relationships, and that variability in treadmill walking conformed to a constant-speed constraint line, as expected. Decreased stride length was observed in both TM and EV conditions, suggesting adaptations due to heightened awareness or to prepare for unexpected changes or problems. We also evaluated stride variability in constrained and

  10. Biomechanical implications of walking with indigenous footwear

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Catherine; Stassijns, Gaetane; Cornelis, Wim; D'Août, Kristiaan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This study investigates biomechanical implications of walking with indigenous “Kolhapuri” footwear compared to barefoot walking among a population of South Indians. Materials and methods Ten healthy adults from South India walked barefoot and indigenously shod at voluntary speed on an artificial substrate. The experiment was repeated outside, on a natural substrate. Data were collected from (1) a heel‐mounted 3D‐accelerometer recording peak impact at heel contact, (2) an ankle‐mounted 3D‐goniometer (plantar/dorsiflexion and inversion/eversion), and (3) sEMG electrodes at the m. tibialis anterior and the m. gastrocnemius medialis. Results Data show that the effect of indigenous footwear on the measured variables, compared to barefoot walking, is relatively small and consistent between substrates (even though subjects walked faster on the natural substrate). Walking barefoot, compared to shod walking yields higher impact accelerations, but the differences are small and only significant for the artificial substrate. The main rotations of the ankle joint are mostly similar between conditions. Only the shod condition shows a faster ankle rotation over the rapid eversion motion on the natural substrate. Maximal dorsiflexion in late stance differs between the footwear conditions on an artificial substrate, with the shod condition involving a less dorsiflexed ankle, and the plantar flexion at toe‐off is more extreme when shod. Overall the activity pattern of the external foot muscles is similar. Discussion The indigenous footwear studied (Kolhapuri) seems to alter foot biomechanics only in a subtle way. While offering some degree of protection, walking in this type of footwear resembles barefoot gait and this type of indigenous footwear might be considered “minimal”. PMID:28101944

  11. Mesonic spectroscopy of minimal walking technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino; Pica, Claudio; Rago, Antonio

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the structure and the novel emerging features of the mesonic nonsinglet spectrum of the minimal walking technicolor theory. Precision measurements in the nonsinglet pseudoscalar and vector channels are compared to the expectations for an IR-conformal field theory and a QCD-like theory. Our results favor a scenario in which minimal walking technicolor is (almost) conformal in the infrared, while spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking seems less plausible.

  12. Evaluating Walking in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Walking limitations are among the most visible manifestations of multiple sclerosis (MS). Regular walking assessments should be a component of patient management and require instruments that are appropriate from the clinician's and the patient's perspectives. This article reviews frequently used instruments to assess walking in patients with MS, with emphasis on their validity, reliability, and practicality in the clinical setting. Relevant articles were identified based on PubMed searches using the following terms: “multiple sclerosis AND (walking OR gait OR mobility OR physical activity) AND (disability evaluation)”; references of relevant articles were also searched. Although many clinician- and patient-driven instruments are available, not all have been validated in MS, and some are not sensitive enough to detect small but clinically important changes. Choosing among these depends on what needs to be measured, psychometric properties, the clinical relevance of results, and practicality with respect to space, time, and patient burden. Of the instruments available, the clinician-observed Timed 25-Foot Walk and patient self-report 12-Item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale have properties that make them suitable for routine evaluation of walking performance. The Dynamic Gait Index and the Timed Up and Go test involve other aspects of mobility, including balance. Tests of endurance, such as the 2- or 6-Minute Walk, may provide information on motor fatigue not captured by other tests. Quantitative measurement of gait kinetics and kinematics, and recordings of mobility in the patient's environment via accelerometry or Global Positioning System odometry, are currently not routinely used in the clinical setting. PMID:24453700

  13. Calcaneal loading during walking and running

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giddings, V. L.; Beaupre, G. S.; Whalen, R. T.; Carter, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study of the foot uses experimentally measured kinematic and kinetic data with a numerical model to evaluate in vivo calcaneal stresses during walking and running. METHODS: External ground reaction forces (GRF) and kinematic data were measured during walking and running using cineradiography and force plate measurements. A contact-coupled finite element model of the foot was developed to assess the forces acting on the calcaneus during gait. RESULTS: We found that the calculated force-time profiles of the joint contact, ligament, and Achilles tendon forces varied with the time-history curve of the moment about the ankle joint. The model predicted peak talocalcaneal and calcaneocuboid joint loads of 5.4 and 4.2 body weights (BW) during walking and 11.1 and 7.9 BW during running. The maximum predicted Achilles tendon forces were 3.9 and 7.7 BW for walking and running. CONCLUSIONS: Large magnitude forces and calcaneal stresses are generated late in the stance phase, with maximum loads occurring at approximately 70% of the stance phase during walking and at approximately 60% of the stance phase during running, for the gait velocities analyzed. The trajectories of the principal stresses, during both walking and running, corresponded to each other and qualitatively to the calcaneal trabecular architecture.

  14. Goals and Social Comparisons Promote Walking Behavior.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Gretchen B; Colby, Helen; Convery, Kimberly; Coups, Elliot J

    2016-05-01

    The effectiveness of a pedometer intervention was affected by manipulating the goals given to participants and by providing social comparison feedback about how participants' performance compared with others. In study 1 (n= 148), university staff members received a low, medium, or high walking goal (10%, 50%, or 100% increase over baseline walking). Participants walked 1358 more steps per day (95% confidence interval [CI], 729, 1985), when receiving a high goal than when receiving a medium goal, but a medium goal did not increase walking relative to a low goal (554 more steps; 95% CI, -71,1179). In study 2 (n= 64), participants received individual feedback only or individual plus social comparison feedback. Participants walked 1120 more steps per day (95% CI, 538, 1703) when receiving social comparison feedback than when receiving only individual feedback. Goals and the performance of others act as reference points and influence the effect that pedometer feedback has on walking behavior, illustrating the applicability of the principles of behavioral economics and social psychology to the design of health behavior interventions.

  15. Developmental continuity? Crawling, cruising, and walking.

    PubMed

    Adolph, Karen E; Berger, Sarah E; Leo, Andrew J

    2011-03-01

    This research examined developmental continuity between "cruising" (moving sideways holding onto furniture for support) and walking. Because cruising and walking involve locomotion in an upright posture, researchers have assumed that cruising is functionally related to walking. Study 1 showed that most infants crawl and cruise concurrently prior to walking, amassing several weeks of experience with both skills. Study 2 showed that cruising infants perceive affordances for locomotion over an adjustable gap in a handrail used for manual support, but despite weeks of cruising experience, cruisers are largely oblivious to the dangers of gaps in the floor beneath their feet. Study 3 replicated the floor-gap findings for infants taking their first independent walking steps, and showed that new walkers also misperceive affordances for locomoting between gaps in a handrail. The findings suggest that weeks of cruising do not teach infants a basic fact about walking: the necessity of a floor to support their body. Moreover, this research demonstrated that developmental milestones that are temporally contiguous and structurally similar might have important functional discontinuities.

  16. Coined quantum walks on percolation graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Godfrey; Knott, Paul; Bailey, Joe; Kendon, Viv

    2010-12-01

    Quantum walks, both discrete (coined) and continuous time, form the basis of several quantum algorithms and have been used to model processes such as transport in spin chains and quantum chemistry. The enhanced spreading and mixing properties of quantum walks compared with their classical counterparts have been well studied on regular structures and also shown to be sensitive to defects and imperfections in the lattice. As a simple example of a disordered system, we consider percolation lattices, in which edges or sites are randomly missing, interrupting the progress of the quantum walk. We use numerical simulation to study the properties of coined quantum walks on these percolation lattices in one and two dimensions. In one dimension (the line), we introduce a simple notion of quantum tunnelling and determine how this affects the properties of the quantum walk as it spreads. On two-dimensional percolation lattices, we show how the spreading rate varies from linear in the number of steps down to zero as the percolation probability decreases towards the critical point. This provides an example of fractional scaling in quantum-walk dynamics.

  17. Uphill and Downhill Walking in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Samaei, Afshin; Hajihasani, Abdolhamid; Fatemi, Elham; Motaharinezhad, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various exercise protocols have been recommended for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the effects of uphill and downhill walking exercise on mobility, functional activities, and muscle strength in MS patients. Methods: Thirty-four MS patients were randomly allocated to either the downhill or uphill treadmill walking group for 12 sessions (3 times/wk) of 30 minutes' walking on a 10% negative slope (n = 17) or a 10% positive slope (n = 17), respectively. Measurements were taken before and after the intervention and after 4-week follow-up and included fatigue by Modified Fatigue Impact Scale; mobility by Modified Rivermead Mobility Index; disability by Guy's Neurological Disability Scale; functional activities by 2-Minute Walk Test, Timed 25-Foot Walk test, and Timed Up and Go test; balance indices by Biodex Balance System; and quadriceps and hamstring isometric muscles by torque of left and right knee joints. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to investigate the intervention effects on the measurements. Results: After the intervention, significant improvement was found in the downhill group versus the uphill group in terms of fatigue, mobility, and disability indices; functional activities; balance indices; and quadriceps isometric torque (P < .05). The results were stable at 4-week follow-up. Conclusions: Downhill walking on a treadmill may improve muscle performance, functional activity, and balance control in MS patients. These findings support the idea of using eccentric exercise training in MS rehabilitation protocols. PMID:26917996

  18. Convergence of quantum random walks with decoherence

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Shimao; Feng Zhiyong; Yang, Wei-Shih; Xiong Sheng

    2011-10-15

    In this paper, we study the discrete-time quantum random walks on a line subject to decoherence. The convergence of the rescaled position probability distribution p(x,t) depends mainly on the spectrum of the superoperator L{sub kk}. We show that if 1 is an eigenvalue of the superoperator with multiplicity one and there is no other eigenvalue whose modulus equals 1, then P(({nu}/{radical}(t)),t) converges to a convex combination of normal distributions. In terms of position space, the rescaled probability mass function p{sub t}(x,t){identical_to}p({radical}(t)x,t), x is an element of Z/{radical}(t), converges in distribution to a continuous convex combination of normal distributions. We give a necessary and sufficient condition for a U(2) decoherent quantum walk that satisfies the eigenvalue conditions. We also give a complete description of the behavior of quantum walks whose eigenvalues do not satisfy these assumptions. Specific examples such as the Hadamard walk and walks under real and complex rotations are illustrated. For the O(2) quantum random walks, an explicit formula is provided for the scaling limit of p(x,t) and their moments. We also obtain exact critical exponents for their moments at the critical point and show universality classes with respect to these critical exponents.

  19. Aerobic Exercise for Reducing Migraine Burden: Mechanisms, Markers, and Models of Change Processes

    PubMed Central

    Irby, Megan B.; Bond, Dale S.; Lipton, Richard B.; Nicklas, Barbara; Houle, Timothy T.; Penzien, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Engagement in regular exercise routinely is recommended as an intervention for managing and preventing migraine, and yet empirical support is far from definitive. We possess at best a weak understanding of how aerobic exercise and resulting change in aerobic capacity influence migraine, let alone the optimal parameters for exercise regimens as migraine therapy (eg, who will benefit, when to prescribe, optimal types, and doses/intensities of exercise, level of anticipated benefit). These fundamental knowledge gaps critically limit our capacity to deploy exercise as an intervention for migraine. Overview Clear articulation of the markers and mechanisms through which aerobic exercise confers benefits for migraine would prove invaluable and could yield insights on migraine pathophysiology. Neurovascular and neuroinflammatory pathways, including an effect on obesity or adiposity, are obvious candidates for study given their role both in migraine as well as the changes known to accrue with regular exercise. In addition to these biological pathways, improvements in aerobic fitness and migraine alike also are mediated by changes in psychological and sociocognitive factors. Indeed a number of specific mechanisms and pathways likely are operational in the relationship between exercise and migraine improvement, and it remains to be established whether these pathways operate in parallel or synergistically. As heuristics that might conceptually benefit our research programs here forward, we: (1) provide an extensive listing of potential mechanisms and markers that could account for the effects of aerobic exercise on migraine and are worthy of empirical exploration and (2) present two exemplar conceptual models depicting pathways through which exercise may serve to reduce the burden of migraine. Conclusion Should the promise of aerobic exercise as a feasible and effective migraine therapy be realized, this line of endeavor stands to benefit migraineurs (including the

  20. Balance perturbation system to improve balance compensatory responses during walking in old persons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Ageing commonly disrupts the balance control and compensatory postural responses that contribute to maintaining balance and preventing falls during perturbation of posture. This can lead to increased risk of falling in old adults (65 years old and over). Therefore, improving compensatory postural responses during walking is one of the goals in fall prevention programs. Training is often used to achieve this goal. Most fall prevention programs are usually directed towards improving voluntary postural control. Since compensatory postural responses triggered by a slip or a trip are not under direct volitional control these exercises are less expected to improve compensatory postural responses due to lack of training specificity. Thus, there is a need to investigate the use balance perturbations during walking to train more effectively compensatory postural reactions during walking. This paper describes the Balance Measure & Perturbation System (BaMPer System) a system that provides small, controlled and unpredictable perturbations during treadmill walking providing valuable perturbation, which allows training compensatory postural responses during walking which thus hypothesize to improve compensatory postural responses in older adults. PMID:20630113

  1. Speed training with body weight unloading improves walking energy cost and maximal speed in 75- to 85-year-old healthy women.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elju E; De Vito, Giuseppe; Macaluso, Andrea

    2007-11-01

    This randomized controlled study was designed to prove the hypothesis that a novel approach to high-speed interval training, based on walking on a treadmill with the use of body weight unloading (BWU), would have improved energy cost and speed of overground walking in healthy older women. Participants were randomly assigned to either the exercise group (n = 11, 79.6 +/- 3.7 yr, mean +/- SD) or the nonintervention control group (n = 11, 77.6 +/- 2.3 yr). During the first 6 wk, the exercise group performed walking interval training on the treadmill with 40% BWU at the maximal walking speed corresponding to an intensity close to heart rate at ventilatory threshold (T(vent) walking speed). Each session consisted of four sets of 5 min of walking (three 1-min periods at T(vent) walking speed, with two 1-min intervals at comfortable walking speed in between each period at T(vent) walking speed) with 1-min interval between each set. Speed was increased session by session until the end of week 6. BWU was then progressively reduced to 10% during the last 6 wk of intervention. After 12 wk, the walking energy cost per unit of distance at all self-selected overground walking speeds (slow, comfortable, and fast) was significantly reduced in the range from 18 to 21%. The exercise group showed a 13% increase in maximal walking speed and a 67% increase in mechanical power output at T(vent) after the training program. The novel "overspeed" training approach has been demonstrated to be effective in improving energy cost and speed of overground walking in healthy older women.

  2. Aerobic training modulates T cell activation in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gomes, W F; Lacerda, A C R; Brito-Melo, G E A; Fonseca, S F; Rocha-Vieira, E; Leopoldino, A A O; Amorim, M R; Mendonça, V A

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee (kOA) is a disease that mainly affects the elderly and can lead to major physical and functional limitations. However, the specific effects of walking, particularly on the immune system, are unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the effect of 12 weeks of walking (3×/week) on the leukocyte profile and quality of life (QL) of elderly women with kOA. Sixteen women (age: 67±4 years, body mass index: 28.07±4.16 kg/m2) participated in a walking program. The variables were assessed before and after 12 weeks of training with a progressively longer duration (30-55 min) and higher intensity (72-82% of HRmax determined using a graded incremental treadmill test). The QL was assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and blood samples were collected for analysis with a cell counter and the San Fac flow cytometer. Walking training resulted in a 47% enhancement of the self-reported QL (P<0.05) and a 21% increase in the VO2max (P<0.0001) in elderly women with kOA. Furthermore, there was a reduction in CD4+ cells (pre=46.59±7%, post=44.58±9%, P=0.0189) and a higher fluorescence intensity for CD18+CD4+ (pre=45.30±10, post=64.27±33, P=0.0256) and CD18+CD8+ (pre=64.2±27, post=85.02±35, P=0.0130). In conclusion, the walking program stimulated leukocyte production, which may be related to the immunomodulatory effect of exercise. Walking also led to improvements in the QL and physical performance in elderly women with kOA.

  3. Aerobic training modulates T cell activation in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, W.F.; Lacerda, A.C.R.; Brito-Melo, G.E.A.; Fonseca, S.F.; Rocha-Vieira, E.; Leopoldino, A.A.O.; Amorim, M.R.; Mendonça, V.A.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee (kOA) is a disease that mainly affects the elderly and can lead to major physical and functional limitations. However, the specific effects of walking, particularly on the immune system, are unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the effect of 12 weeks of walking (3×/week) on the leukocyte profile and quality of life (QL) of elderly women with kOA. Sixteen women (age: 67±4 years, body mass index: 28.07±4.16 kg/m2) participated in a walking program. The variables were assessed before and after 12 weeks of training with a progressively longer duration (30–55 min) and higher intensity (72–82% of HRmax determined using a graded incremental treadmill test). The QL was assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and blood samples were collected for analysis with a cell counter and the San Fac flow cytometer. Walking training resulted in a 47% enhancement of the self-reported QL (P<0.05) and a 21% increase in the VO2max (P<0.0001) in elderly women with kOA. Furthermore, there was a reduction in CD4+ cells (pre=46.59±7%, post=44.58±9%, P=0.0189) and a higher fluorescence intensity for CD18+CD4+ (pre=45.30±10, post=64.27±33, P=0.0256) and CD18+CD8+ (pre=64.2±27, post=85.02±35, P=0.0130). In conclusion, the walking program stimulated leukocyte production, which may be related to the immunomodulatory effect of exercise. Walking also led to improvements in the QL and physical performance in elderly women with kOA. PMID:27828665

  4. Quantum walks with tuneable self-avoidance in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilleri, Elizabeth; Rohde, Peter P.; Twamley, Jason

    2014-04-01

    Quantum walks exhibit many unique characteristics compared to classical random walks. In the classical setting, self-avoiding random walks have been studied as a variation on the usual classical random walk. Here the walker has memory of its previous locations and preferentially avoids stepping back to locations where it has previously resided. Classical self-avoiding random walks have found numerous algorithmic applications, most notably in the modelling of protein folding. We consider the analogous problem in the quantum setting - a quantum walk in one dimension with tunable levels of self-avoidance. We complement a quantum walk with a memory register that records where the walker has previously resided. The walker is then able to avoid returning back to previously visited sites or apply more general memory conditioned operations to control the walk. We characterise this walk by examining the variance of the walker's distribution against time, the standard metric for quantifying how quantum or classical a walk is. We parameterise the strength of the memory recording and the strength of the memory back-action on the walker, and investigate their effect on the dynamics of the walk. We find that by manipulating these parameters, which dictate the degree of self-avoidance, the walk can be made to reproduce ideal quantum or classical random walk statistics, or a plethora of more elaborate diffusive phenomena. In some parameter regimes we observe a close correspondence between classical self-avoiding random walks and the quantum self-avoiding walk.

  5. Fatiguing upper body aerobic exercise impairs balance.

    PubMed

    Douris, Peter C; Handrakis, John P; Gendy, Joseph; Salama, Mina; Kwon, Dae; Brooks, Richard; Salama, Nardine; Southard, Veronica

    2011-12-01

    Douris, PC, Handrakis, JP, Gendy, J, Salama, M, Kwon, D, Brooks, R, Salama, N, and Southard, V. Fatiguing upper body aerobic exercise impairs balance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3299-3305, 2011-There are many studies that have examined the effects of selectively fatiguing lower extremity muscle groups with various protocols, and they have all shown to impair balance. There is limited research regarding the effect of fatiguing upper extremity exercise on balance. Muscle fiber-type recruitment patterns may be responsible for the difference between balance impairments because of fatiguing aerobic and anaerobic exercise. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect that aerobic vs. anaerobic fatigue, upper vs. lower body fatigue will have on balance, and if so, which combination will affect balance to a greater degree. Fourteen healthy subjects, 7 men and 7 women (mean age 23.5 ± 1.7 years) took part in this study. Their mean body mass index was 23.6 ± 3.2. The study used a repeated-measures design. The effect on balance was documented after the 4 fatiguing conditions: aerobic lower body (ALB), aerobic upper body (AUB), anaerobic lower body, anaerobic upper body (WUB). The aerobic conditions used an incremental protocol performed to fatigue, and the anaerobic used the Wingate protocol. Balance was measured as a single-leg stance stability score using the Biodex Balance System. A stability score for each subject was recorded immediately after each of the 4 conditions. A repeated-measures analysis of variance with the pretest score as a covariate was used to analyze the effects of the 4 fatiguing conditions on balance. There were significant differences between the 4 conditions (p = 0.001). Post hoc analysis revealed that there were significant differences between the AUB, mean score 4.98 ± 1.83, and the WUB, mean score 4.09 ± 1.42 (p = 0.014) and between AUB and ALB mean scores 4.33 ± 1.40 (p = 0.029). Normative data for single-leg stability testing for

  6. The Walking School Bus and children's physical activity: A pilot cluster randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the impact of a "walking school bus" program on children's rates of active commuting to school and physical activity. We conducted a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial among 4th-graders from 8 schools in Houston, Texas (N = 149). Random allocation to treatment or control condition...

  7. Impact of a pilot walking school bus intervention on children's pedestrian safety behaviors: a pilot study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Walking school buses (WSB) increased children's physical activity, but impact on pedestrian safety behaviors (PSB) is unknown. We tested the feasibility of a protocol evaluating changes to PSB during a WSB program. Outcomes were school-level street crossing PSB prior to (Time 1) and during weeks 4–5...

  8. Understanding walking activity in multiple sclerosis: step count, walking intensity and uninterrupted walking activity duration related to degree of disability.

    PubMed

    Neven, An; Vanderstraeten, Annelien; Janssens, Davy; Wets, Geert; Feys, Peter

    2016-09-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), physical activity (PA) is most commonly measured as number of steps, while also walking intensity and walking activity duration are keys for a healthy lifestyle. The aim of this study was to investigate (1) the number of steps persons with MS (PwMS) take; (2) the number of steps they take at low and moderate intensity; and (3) their walking activity duration for 2, 3, 6, 10, 12 and 14 uninterrupted minutes; all related to the degree of disability. 64 PwMS participated, distinguished in a mild (n = 31) and moderate MS subgroup (n = 34) based on their ambulatory dysfunction (Disease Steps). Standardized clinical tests were performed, and step data from the StepWatch Activity Monitor were collected for seven consecutive days. The results showed that (1) step count in PwMS was lower than PA recommendations, and is negatively influenced by a higher disability degree. (2) No walking was registered during 77 % of the day. PwMS are making steps for 22 % at low and only 1 % at moderate intensity. (3) Both MS subgroups rarely walk for more than six uninterrupted minutes, especially not at moderate intensity. PwMS need to be encouraged to make steps at moderate intensity, and to make steps for longer periods of time (minimal ten uninterrupted minutes).

  9. Assessing walking behaviors of selected subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Le Masurier, Guy C; Bauman, Adrian E; Corbin, Charles B; Konopack, James F; Umstattd, Renee M; VAN Emmerik, Richard E A

    2008-07-01

    Recent innovations in physical activity (PA) assessment have made it possible to assess the walking behaviors of a wide variety of populations. Objective measurement methods (e.g., pedometers, accelerometers) have been widely used to assess walking and other prevalent types of PA. Questionnaires suitable for international populations (e.g., the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire) and measurement techniques for the assessment of gait patterns in disabled populations allow for the study of walking and its health benefits among many populations. Results of studies using the aforementioned techniques indicate that children are more active than adolescents and adolescents are more active than adults. Males, particularly young males, are typically more active than females. The benefits associated with regular participation in PA for youth and walking for older adults have been well documented, although improvements in the assessments of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial parameters must be made if we are to fully understand the benefits of walking for people of all ages. Most youth meet appropriate age-related PA activity recommendations, but adults, particularly older adults and adults with disabilities, are less likely to meet PA levels necessary for the accrual of health benefits. International studies indicate variation in walking by culture. It is clear, however, that walking is a prevalent form of PA across countries and a movement form that has great potential in global PA promotion. Continued development of measurement techniques that allow for the study of individualized gait patterns will help us add to the already rich body of knowledge on chronically disabled populations and allow for individual prescriptions for these populations.

  10. Framework for discrete-time quantum walks and a symmetric walk on a binary tree

    SciTech Connect

    Dimcovic, Zlatko; Rockwell, Daniel; Milligan, Ian; Burton, Robert M.; Kovchegov, Yevgeniy; Nguyen, Thinh

    2011-09-15

    We formulate a framework for discrete-time quantum walks, motivated by classical random walks with memory. We present a specific representation of the classical walk with memory 2, on which this is based. The framework has no need for coin spaces, it imposes no constraints on the evolution operator other than unitarity, and is unifying of other approaches. As an example we construct a symmetric discrete-time quantum walk on the semi-infinite binary tree. The generating function of the amplitude at the root is computed in closed form, as a function of time and the initial level n in the tree, and we find the asymptotic and a full numerical solution for the amplitude. It exhibits a sharp interference peak and a power-law tail, as opposed to the exponentially decaying tail of a broadly peaked distribution of the classical symmetric random walk on a binary tree. The probability peak is orders of magnitude larger than it is for the classical walk (already at small n). The quantum walk shows a polynomial algorithmic speedup in n over the classical walk, which we conjecture to be of the order 2/3, based on strong trends in data.

  11. 10 CFR 429.53 - Walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers. 429.53 Section 429.53 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR... WICFs with transparent reach-in doors and windows: The glass type of the doors and windows (e.g.,...

  12. The effects of four weeks aerobic training on saliva cortisol and testosterone in young healthy persons

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad H.; Gabr, Sami A.; Aly, Farag A.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of 4 weeks moderate aerobic exercise on outcome measures of saliva stress hormones and lactate levels in healthy adult volunteers. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen healthy students with an age range of 15–25 years participated in this study. The participants performed an exercise test of moderate intensity for 4 weeks, three times per week. The exercise was treadmill walking. Saliva concentrations of cortisol, testosterone and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured before and after the 4 weeks of moderate aerobic training using immunoassay techniques. [Results] After 4 weeks of exercise, there were significant increases in cortisol, free testosterone levels, and LDH activity along with a significant decrease in the ratios between testosterone and cortisol levels. No significant correlations were found among the studied parameters in the resting stage, a result which supports the positive effect of exercise on stress hormones following 4 weeks of training. [Conclusion] The results suggest that four weeks exercise of moderate intensity significantly affects the salivary stress hormones of young healthy volunteers. The data support the importance of salivary stress hormones as potential biological markers especially for older ages. However, more research is required to validate these biological markers which determine the host response to physical activity. PMID:26311920

  13. Perceptions of Group-Based Walks and Strategies to Inform the Development of an Intervention in Retirement Villages: Perspectives of Residents and Village Managers.

    PubMed

    Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie; Ntoumanis, Nikos; Uren, Hannah; Stathi, Afroditi; Wold, Catrina; Hill, Keith D

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to explore perceptions of group-based walking and gather suggestions to inform the development of a group-based walking intervention among older adults in retirement villages. Twenty-four physically inactive residents (16 female, 8 male; age range: 69-88) and four managers from four retirement villages were interviewed. Inductive thematic analysis revealed six broad themes: lack of motivation, values versus constraints, fears and confidence, need for structure, creating a sense of belonging, and the physical environment as a double-edged sword. Proposed intervention strategies included using trained walk leaders, using small groups, planning for flexibility, setting attainable goals, creating a routine, creating opportunities for sharing experiences, and planning a variety of walks. Group-based walking programs may be used to promote physical activity but careful planning of such programs is needed to make them appealing and feasible to a diverse group of residents.

  14. Industry Talks the Talk and Walks the Walk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, C. Deanna

    2008-01-01

    Home Builders Institute (HBI), the workforce development arm of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB), is dedicated to the advancement and enrichment of education and training programs serving the needs of the building industry. For more than 30 years, HBI has trained skilled workers in residential construction, promoted the industry as…

  15. Aerobic and two-stage anaerobic-aerobic sludge digestion with pure oxygen and air aeration.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Gregor D; Ros, Milenko

    2008-01-01

    The degradability of excess activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant was studied. The objective was establishing the degree of degradation using either air or pure oxygen at different temperatures. Sludge treated with pure oxygen was degraded at temperatures from 22 degrees C to 50 degrees C while samples treated with air were degraded between 32 degrees C and 65 degrees C. Using air, sludge is efficiently degraded at 37 degrees C and at 50-55 degrees C. With oxygen, sludge was most effectively degraded at 38 degrees C or at 25-30 degrees C. Two-stage anaerobic-aerobic processes were studied. The first anaerobic stage was always operated for 5 days HRT, and the second stage involved aeration with pure oxygen and an HRT between 5 and 10 days. Under these conditions, there is 53.5% VSS removal and 55.4% COD degradation at 15 days HRT - 5 days anaerobic, 10 days aerobic. Sludge digested with pure oxygen at 25 degrees C in a batch reactor converted 48% of sludge total Kjeldahl nitrogen to nitrate. Addition of an aerobic stage with pure oxygen aeration to the anaerobic digestion enhances ammonium nitrogen removal. In a two-stage anaerobic-aerobic sludge digestion process within 8 days HRT of the aerobic stage, the removal of ammonium nitrogen was 85%.

  16. Nitrification and aerobic denitrification in anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Alzate Marin, Juan C; Caravelli, Alejandro H; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of achieving nitrogen (N) removal using a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) exposed to anoxic/aerobic (AN/OX) phases, focusing to achieve aerobic denitrification. This process will minimize emissions of N2O greenhouse gas. The effects of different operating parameters on the reactor performance were studied: cycle duration, AN/OX ratio, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration (DOC), and organic load. The highest inorganic N removal (NiR), close to 70%, was obtained at pH=7.5, low organic load (440mgCOD/(Lday)) and high aeration given by 12h cycle, AN/OX ratio=0.5:1.0 and DOC higher than 4.0mgO2/L. Nitrification followed by high-rate aerobic denitrification took place during the aerobic phase. Aerobic denitrification could be attributed to Tetrad-forming organisms (TFOs) with phenotype of glycogen accumulating organisms using polyhydroxyalkanoate and/or glycogen storage. The proposed AN/OX system constitutes an eco-friendly N removal process providing N2 as the end product.

  17. Torque-stiffness-controlled dynamic walking with central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Vanderborght, Bram; Van Ham, Ronald; Wang, Qining

    2014-12-01

    Walking behavior is modulated by controlling joint torques in most existing passivity-based bipeds. Controlled Passive Walking with adaptable stiffness exhibits controllable natural motions and energy efficient gaits. In this paper, we propose torque-stiffness-controlled dynamic bipedal walking, which extends the concept of Controlled Passive Walking by introducing structured control parameters and a bio-inspired control method with central pattern generators. The proposed walking paradigm is beneficial in clarifying the respective effects of the external actuation and the internal natural dynamics. We present a seven-link biped model to validate the presented walking. Effects of joint torque and joint stiffness on gait selection, walking performance and walking pattern transitions are studied in simulations. The work in this paper develops a new solution of motion control of bipedal robots with adaptable stiffness and provides insights of efficient and sophisticated walking gaits of humans.

  18. A marching-walking hybrid induces step length adaptation and transfers to natural walking.

    PubMed

    Long, Andrew W; Finley, James M; Bastian, Amy J

    2015-06-01

    Walking is highly adaptable to new demands and environments. We have previously studied adaptation of locomotor patterns via a split-belt treadmill, where subjects learn to walk with one foot moving faster than the other. Subjects learn to adapt their walking pattern by changing the location (spatial) and time (temporal) of foot placement. Here we asked whether we can induce adaptation of a specific walking pattern when one limb does not "walk" but instead marches in place (i.e., marching-walking hybrid). The marching leg's movement is limited during the stance phase, and thus certain sensory signals important for walking may be reduced. We hypothesized that this would produce a spatial-temporal strategy different from that of normal split-belt adaptation. Healthy subjects performed two experiments to determine whether they could adapt their spatial-temporal pattern of step lengths during the marching-walking hybrid and whether the learning transfers to over ground walking. Results showed that the hybrid group did adapt their step lengths, but the time course of adaptation and deadaption was slower than that for the split-belt group. We also observed that the hybrid group utilized a mostly spatial strategy whereas the split-belt group utilized both spatial and temporal strategies. Surprisingly, we found no significant difference between the hybrid and split-belt groups in over ground transfer. Moreover, the hybrid group retained more of the learned pattern when they returned to the treadmill. These findings suggest that physical rehabilitation with this marching-walking paradigm on conventional treadmills may produce changes in symmetry comparable to what is observed during split-belt training.

  19. Foot Progression Angle Walking Test

    PubMed Central

    Ranawat, Anil S.; Gaudiani, Michael A.; Slullitel, Pablo A.; Satalich, James; Rebolledo, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Determining an accurate clinical diagnosis for nonarthritic hip pain may be challenging, as symptoms related to femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) or hip instability can be difficult to elucidate with current testing methods. In addition, commonly utilized physical examination maneuvers are static and do not include a dynamic or weightbearing assessment to reproduce activity-related symptoms. Therefore, implementing a dynamic assessment for FAI and hip instability could help to improve diagnostic accuracy for routine clinical examinations of patients with nonarthritic hip pain. Purpose: To assess the efficacy of a novel diagnostic foot progression angle walking (FPAW) test for identifying hip pathology related to FAI or hip instability. Study Design: Prospective cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This prospective study included 199 consecutive patients who were evaluated for unilateral hip pain and who underwent FPAW testing along with standard physical examination testing. Demographic data, including age, sex and hip laterality, were collected from each patient. FPAW testing was performed with directed internal and external foot progression angles from their baseline measurements, with a positive test reproducing pain and/or discomfort. Comparisons were then made with flexion adduction internal rotation (FADIR) and flexion abduction external rotation (FABER) tests as the designated diagnostic standard examinations for FAI and hip instability, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity, along with the McNemar chi-square test for group comparison, were used to generate summary statistics. In addition, areas under the combined receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) of test performance were calculated for both FPAW and the designated standard examination tests (FADIR, FABER). Radiographic imaging was used subsequently to confirm the diagnosis. Results: The average age of the study cohort was 35.4 ± 11.8 years, with 114 patients being

  20. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale as a predictor of peak aerobic capacity and ambulatory function.

    PubMed

    Ivey, Frederick M; Katzel, Leslie I; Sorkin, John D; Macko, Richard F; Shulman, Lisa M

    2012-01-01

    The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) is a widely applied index of disease severity. Our objective was to assess the utility of UPDRS for predicting peak aerobic capacity (VO2 peak) and ambulatory function. Participants (n = 70) underwent evaluation for UPDRS (Total and Motor ratings), VO2 peak, 6-minute walk distance (6MW), and 30-foot self-selected walking speed (SSWS). Using regression, we determined the extent to which the Total and Motor UPDRS scores predicted each functional capacity measure after adjusting for age and sex. We also tested whether adding the Hoehn and Yahr scale (H-Y) to the model changed predictive power of the UPDRS. Adjusted for age and sex, both the Total UPDRS and Motor UPDRS subscale failed to predict VO2 peak. The Total UPDRS did weakly predict 6MW and SSWS (both p < 0.05), but the Motor UPDRS subscale did not predict these ambulatory function tests. After adding H-Y to the model, Total UPDRS was no longer an independent predictor of 6MW but remained a predictor of SSWS. We conclude that Total and Motor UPDRS rating scales do not predict VO2 peak, but that a weak relationship exists between Total UPDRS and measures of ambulatory function.

  1. Energy cost of walking with flat feet.

    PubMed

    Otman, S; Basgöze, O; Gökce-Kutsal, Y

    1988-08-01

    A comparative study has been conducted to assess the effects of arch support on oxygen consumption in 20 subjects with flat feet who were generally complaining about fatigue, and also to explore whether their feeling of weariness was objective or not. The resting, walking and final recovery heart rates, blood pressures, and walking oxygen consumption values of the patients with flat feet were measured and calculated and compared to a control group using treadmill and oxygen consumption devices. In stage one the patients did not wear any arch support. Then suitable arch supports were prepared for each patient and in stage two they wore these arch supports. The results did not show any significant difference between the resting heart rates, blood pressure and oxygen consumptions. However, differences in walking heart rate, systolic blood pressure, final recovery heart rate, oxygen consumption, and energy cost values were found to be significant between stage one and two of the test in the patient group. The difference in walking diastolic blood pressure values without and with arch support were found to be insignificant. It may therefore be deduced that oxygen consumption during walking is decreased when a suitable arch support is applied to patients with flat feet.

  2. Kinematic responses to changes in walking orientation and gravitational load in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mendes, César S; Rajendren, Soumya V; Bartos, Imre; Márka, Szabolcs; Mann, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    Walking behavior is context-dependent, resulting from the integration of internal and external influences by specialized motor and pre-motor centers. Neuronal programs must be sufficiently flexible to the locomotive challenges inherent in different environments. Although insect studies have contributed substantially to the identification of the components and rules that determine locomotion, we still lack an understanding of how multi-jointed walking insects respond to changes in walking orientation and direction and strength of the gravitational force. In order to answer these questions we measured with high temporal and spatial resolution the kinematic properties of untethered Drosophila during inverted and vertical walking. In addition, we also examined the kinematic responses to increases in gravitational load. We find that animals are capable of shifting their step, spatial and inter-leg parameters in order to cope with more challenging walking conditions. For example, flies walking in an inverted orientation decreased the duration of their swing phase leading to increased contact with the substrate and, as a result, greater stability. We also find that when flies carry additional weight, thereby increasing their gravitational load, some changes in step parameters vary over time, providing evidence for adaptation. However, above a threshold that is between 1 and 2 times their body weight flies display locomotion parameters that suggest they are no longer capable of walking in a coordinated manner. Finally, we find that functional chordotonal organs are required for flies to cope with additional weight, as animals deficient in these proprioceptors display increased sensitivity to load bearing as well as other locomotive defects.

  3. Kinematic Responses to Changes in Walking Orientation and Gravitational Load in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, César S.; Rajendren, Soumya V.; Bartos, Imre; Márka, Szabolcs; Mann, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    Walking behavior is context-dependent, resulting from the integration of internal and external influences by specialized motor and pre-motor centers. Neuronal programs must be sufficiently flexible to the locomotive challenges inherent in different environments. Although insect studies have contributed substantially to the identification of the components and rules that determine locomotion, we still lack an understanding of how multi-jointed walking insects respond to changes in walking orientation and direction and strength of the gravitational force. In order to answer these questions we measured with high temporal and spatial resolution the kinematic properties of untethered Drosophila during inverted and vertical walking. In addition, we also examined the kinematic responses to increases in gravitational load. We find that animals are capable of shifting their step, spatial and inter-leg parameters in order to cope with more challenging walking conditions. For example, flies walking in an inverted orientation decreased the duration of their swing phase leading to increased contact with the substrate and, as a result, greater stability. We also find that when flies carry additional weight, thereby increasing their gravitational load, some changes in step parameters vary over time, providing evidence for adaptation. However, above a threshold that is between 1 and 2 times their body weight flies display locomotion parameters that suggest they are no longer capable of walking in a coordinated manner. Finally, we find that functional chordotonal organs are required for flies to cope with additional weight, as animals deficient in these proprioceptors display increased sensitivity to load bearing as well as other locomotive defects. PMID:25350743

  4. Safe, Affordable, Convenient: Environmental Features of Malls and Other Public Spaces Used by Older Adults for Walking

    PubMed Central

    King, Diane K.; Allen, Peg; Jones, Dina L.; Marquez, David X.; Brown, David R.; Rosenberg, Dori; Janicek, Sarah; Allen, Laila; Belza, Basia

    2016-01-01

    Background Midlife and older adults use shopping malls for walking, but little research has examined mall characteristics that contribute to their walkability. Methods We used modified versions of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-Healthy Aging Research Network (HAN) Environmental Audit and the System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) tool to systematically observe 443 walkers in 10 shopping malls. We also observed 87 walkers in 6 community-based nonmall/nongym venues where older adults routinely walked for physical activity. Results All venues had public transit stops and accessible parking. All malls and 67% of nonmalls had wayfinding aids, and most venues (81%) had an established circuitous walking route and clean, well-maintained public restrooms (94%). All venues had level floor surfaces, and one-half had benches along the walking route. Venues varied in hours of access, programming, tripping hazards, traffic control near entrances, and lighting. Conclusions Despite diversity in location, size, and purpose, the mall and nonmall venues audited shared numerous environmental features known to promote walking in older adults and few barriers to walking. Future research should consider programmatic features and outreach strategies to expand the use of malls and other suitable public spaces for walking. PMID:26181907

  5. A randomized 9-month study of blood pressure and body fat responses to aerobic training versus combined aerobic and resistance training in older men.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Nelson; Mendes, Romeu; Abrantes, Catarina; Sampaio, Jaime; Oliveira, José

    2013-08-01

    This randomized study evaluated the impact of different exercise training modalities on blood pressure and body fat responses in apparently healthy older men. Forty-eight elderly men (aged 65-75 years) were randomly assigned to an aerobic training group (ATG, n=15), a combined aerobic and resistance training group (CTG, n=16), or a control group (n=17). Both exercise training programs were moderate-to-vigorous intensity, three days/week for 9-months. Strength, aerobic endurance, body fat and blood pressure were measured on five different occasions. The data were analyzed using a mixed-model ANOVA, and the independence between systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and group was tested. A significant main effect of group (p<0.001) was observed in strength and aerobic endurance, with higher performance observed in the CTG. A significant main effect of group (p<0.001) and time (p=0.029) was observed in body fat percentage, with a 2.3% decrease in CTG. A significant main effect of time was observed in SBP (p=0.005) and in DBP (p=0.011) for both ATG and CTG. Mean decreases in SBP and DBP, respectively, were 15 and 6 mmHg for ATG and 24 and 12 mmHg for CTG. There was a significant association for SBP (p=0.008) and DBP (p=0.005) in the CTG, with significant individual BP profile modifications. Both exercise-training programs reduce resting blood pressure. However, only the combined exercise training was effective at reducing body fat percentage; consequently, there were larger changes in blood pressure, which result in a significant reduction in hypertensive subjects.

  6. Structure-biodegradability study and computer-automated prediction of aerobic biodegradation of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Klopman, G.; Tu, M.

    1997-09-01

    It is shown that a combination of two programs, MultiCASE and META, can help assess the biodegradability of industrial organic materials in the ecosystem. MultiCASE is an artificial intelligence computer program that had been trained to identify molecular substructures believed to cause or inhibit biodegradation and META is an expert system trained to predict the aerobic biodegradation products of organic molecules. These two programs can be used to help evaluate the fate of disposed chemicals by estimating their biodegradability and the nature of their biodegradation products under conditions that may model the environment.

  7. Aerobic training as a means to enhance inhibition: what's yet to be studied?

    PubMed

    Levin, Oron; Netz, Yael

    2015-01-01

    Some of the neurodegenerative processes in healthy aging, including changes in structural and biochemical properties of the brain, are argued to affect cortical inhibitory functions. Age-related deficits in the ability to control cerebral inhibition may explain wide range of motor and cognitive deficits that healthy older adults experience in daily life such as impaired coordination skills and declines in attention, concentration, and learning abilities. Importantly, evidence from many studies suggests that impaired inhibitory control in advancing age can be delayed or even alleviated by aerobic exercise training. Findings from a recent study by Duchesne and colleagues (2015) may provide insights into this process. First, observations from Duchesne et al. indicated that aerobic exercise training program improved cognitive inhibitory functioning in both patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and matched older controls. Second, Duchesne et al. showed that cognitive inhibition and motor skills were highly correlated both pre- and post-exercise in PD but not in controls. Based on the aforementioned findings we highlight possible mechanisms that may play a role in the interactions between cognitive and motor inhibitory functions in healthy elderly that could benefit from aerobic exercise training: specifically, the brain neurotransmission systems and the frontal-basal ganglia network. In conclusion, we raise two fundamental questions which are yet to be addressed: (1) the extent to which different brain neurotransmitter systems are affected by aerobic exercise training; (2) the extent to which neurotransmitter levels prior to the onset of intervention may facilitate (or impede) training-induced neuroplasticity in the aging brain.

  8. Effects of Cognitive Training with and without Aerobic Exercise on Cognitively-Demanding Everyday Activities

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Mark A.; Binder, Ellen F.; Bugg, Julie M.; Waldum, Emily R.; Dufault, Carolyn; Meyer, Amanda; Johanning, Jennifer; Zheng, Jie; Schechtman, Kenneth B.; Kudelka, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the potential benefits of a novel cognitive training protocol and an aerobic exercise intervention, both individually and in concert, on older adults’ performances in laboratory simulations of select real-world tasks. The cognitive training focused on a range of cognitive processes, including attentional coordination, prospective memory, and retrospective-memory retrieval, processes that are likely involved in many everyday tasks, and that decline with age. Primary outcome measures were three laboratory tasks that simulated everyday activities: Cooking Breakfast, Virtual Week, and Memory for Health Information. Two months of cognitive training improved older adults’ performance on prospective memory tasks embedded in Virtual Week. Cognitive training, either alone or in combination with six months of aerobic exercise, did not significantly improve Cooking Breakfast or Memory for Health Information. Although gains in aerobic power were comparable to previous reports, aerobic exercise did not produce improvements for the primary outcome measures. Discussion focuses on the possibility that cognitive training programs that include explicit strategy instruction and varied practice contexts may confer gains to older adults for performance on cognitively challenging everyday tasks. PMID:25244489

  9. Aerobic exercise training-induced decrease in plasma visfatin and insulin resistance in obese female adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Jin; Shin, Yun-A; Lee, Kyoung-Young; Jun, Tae-Won; Song, Wook

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess differences in the levels of plasma visfatin among female adolescents and changes in plasma visfatin and insulin resistance in obese female adolescents after 12 wk of aerobic exercise training. Twenty normal-weight female students (body-mass index [BMI] < 22.9 kg/m² and body fat ≤ 29.9) and 18 obese female students (BMI ≥ 25 kg/ m² and body fat ≥ 30%) participated in this study. Eleven obese students were assigned to an exercise group and completed a 12-wk aerobic exercise-training program that included four 40- to 50-min sessions per wk with an energy expenditure of 300-400 kcal/d. Seven obese students were assigned to a control group that received no exercise sessions or dietary restriction. The plasma visfatin levels of obese female adolescents were significantly higher (p < .05) than those of the normal-weight female adolescents. The plasma visfatin levels (294.00 ± 124.74 ng/ml to 185.55 ± 67.30 ng/ml, p < .01) and insulin resistance (p < .05) were significantly reduced after 12 wk of aerobic exercise. The results suggest that aerobic exercise resulting in an energy expenditure of 1,200-1,600 kcal/wk for 12 wk decreases plasma visfatin and insulin resistance in obese female adolescents.

  10. Positional Role Differences in the Aerobic and Anaerobic Power of Elite Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Pojskić, Haris; Šeparović, Vlatko; Užičanin, Edin; Muratović, Melika; Mačković, Samir

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the aerobic and anaerobic power and capacity of elite male basketball players who played multiple positions. Fifty-five healthy players were divided into the following three different subsamples according to their positional role: guards (n = 22), forwards (n = 19) and centers (n = 14). The following three tests were applied to estimate their aerobic and anaerobic power and capacities: the countermovement jump (CMJ), a multistage shuttle run test and the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST). The obtained data were used to calculate the players’ aerobic and anaerobic power and capacities. To determine the possible differences between the subjects considering their different positions on the court, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the Bonferroni post-hoc test for multiple comparisons was used. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the different groups of players in eleven out of sixteen measured variables. Guards and forwards exhibited greater aerobic and relative values of anaerobic power, allowing shorter recovery times and the ability to repeat high intensity, basketball-specific activities. Centers presented greater values of absolute anaerobic power and capacities, permitting greater force production during discrete tasks. Coaches can use these data to create more individualized strength and conditioning programs for different positional roles. PMID:26839622

  11. Comparison of regular aerobic and yoga on the quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hassanpour-Dehkordi, Ali; Jivad, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Background: The pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by fatigue, motor weakness, and spasticity, to name a few. MS symptoms may lead to physical inactivity associated with the development of secondary diseases. This study was to investigate the effect of regular aerobic and yoga on the quality of life of patients with MS. Methods: The present quasi-experimental study was conducted on 90 patients with chronic MS chosen randomly and divided into two test and one control groups. Data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 11.5) through paired t-test, ANOVA, and Tukey’s post hoc. Results: There were no significant differences among the scores of quality of life in the three groups prior to investigation. Although they were significant after intervention. The mean score of yoga group was higher than that of aerobic group, and aerobic group showed a higher mean score compared with the control. Conclusion: Yoga and aerobic exercises may improve quality of life in patients with MS. It is highly recommended that the governor along with MS societies and other organizations servicing and supporting patients start to develop sport-regulated programs to help improve quality of life for these patients. PMID:25694999

  12. Walking in the neighbourhood: Performing social citizenship in dementia.

    PubMed

    Phinney, Alison; Kelson, Elizabeth; Baumbusch, Jennifer; O'Connor, Deborah; Purves, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    The proliferation of community-based activity programs for people with dementia suggests an appetite for new approaches to support quality of life and well-being for this population. Such groups also have potential to promote social citizenship, although this remains poorly understood. This article presents findings from a subset of data from an ethnographic study of a community-based program for people with young onset dementia; it focuses on Paul's Club and the experiences of 12-15 members who are physically healthy, with moderate to moderately severe dementia. Analysis suggests how aspects of social citizenship are constructed and revealed through the Club's everyday practice of walking in the neighbourhood. Three major themes emerged: Keeping the focus off dementia; Creating a place of belonging; and Claiming a place in the community How the group balances consideration of members' vulnerability and agency is discussed, and the article concludes with implications for future practice and research initiatives.

  13. Treadmill walking in water induces greater respiratory muscle fatigue than treadmill walking on land in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Yamashina, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Hisayo; Naghavi, Nooshin; Hirasawa, Yoshikazu; Takeda, Ryosuke; Ota, Akemi; Imai, Daiki; Miyagawa, Toshiaki; Okazaki, Kazunobu

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of walking in water on respiratory muscle fatigue compared with that of walking on land at the same exercise intensity. Ten healthy males participated in 40-min treadmill walking trials on land and in water at an intensity of 60% of peak oxygen consumption. Respiratory function and respiratory muscle strength were evaluated before and after walking trials. Inspiratory muscle strength and forced expiratory volume in 1 s were significantly decreased immediately after walking in water, and expiratory muscle strength was significantly decreased immediately and 5 min after walking in water compared with the baseline. The decreases of inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength were significantly greater compared with that after walking on land. In conclusion, greater inspiratory and expiratory muscle fatigue was induced by walking in water than by walking on land at the same exercise intensity in healthy young men.

  14. Mean first return time for random walks on weighted networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xing-Li; Ling, Xiang; Long, Jiancheng; Shi, Qing; Hu, Mao-Bin

    2015-11-01

    Random walks on complex networks are of great importance to understand various types of phenomena in real world. In this paper, two types of biased random walks on nonassortative weighted networks are studied: edge-weight-based random walks and node-strength-based random walks, both of which are extended from the normal random walk model. Exact expressions for stationary distribution and mean first return time (MFRT) are derived and examined by simulation. The results will be helpful for understanding the influences of weights on the behavior of random walks.

  15. Photonics walking up a human hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hao; Parmeggiani, Camilla; Martella, Daniele; Wasylczyk, Piotr; Burresi, Matteo; Wiersma, Diederik S.

    2016-03-01

    While animals have access to sugars as energy source, this option is generally not available to artificial machines and robots. Energy delivery is thus the bottleneck for creating independent robots and machines, especially on micro- and nano- meter length scales. We have found a way to produce polymeric nano-structures with local control over the molecular alignment, which allowed us to solve the above issue. By using a combination of polymers, of which part is optically sensitive, we can create complex functional structures with nanometer accuracy, responsive to light. In particular, this allowed us to realize a structure that can move autonomously over surfaces (it can "walk") using the environmental light as its energy source. The robot is only 60 μm in total length, thereby smaller than any known terrestrial walking species, and it is capable of random, directional walking and rotating on different dry surfaces.

  16. Quantum walk search through potential barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.

    2016-12-01

    An ideal quantum walk transitions from one vertex to another with perfect fidelity, but in physical systems, the particle may be hindered by potential energy barriers. Then the particle has some amplitude of tunneling through the barriers, and some amplitude of staying put. We investigate the algorithmic consequence of such barriers for the quantum walk formulation of Grover’s algorithm. We prove that the failure amplitude must scale as O(1/\\sqrt{N}) for search to retain its quantum O(\\sqrt{N}) runtime; otherwise, it searches in classical O(N) time. Thus searching larger ‘databases’ requires increasingly reliable hop operations or error correction. This condition holds for both discrete- and continuous-time quantum walks.

  17. Diffraction and interference of walking drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, Giuseppe; Harris, Daniel M.; Bush, John W. M.

    2016-11-01

    A decade ago, Yves Couder and Emmanuel Fort discovered a wave-particle association on the macroscopic scale: a drop can bounce indefinitely on a vibrating bath of the same liquid and can be piloted by the waves that it generates. These walking droplets have been shown to exhibit several quantum-like features, including single-particle diffraction and interference. Recently, the original diffraction and interference experiments of Couder and Fort have been revisited and contested. We have revisited this system using an improved experimental set-up, and observed a strong dependence of the behavior on system parameters, including drop size and vibrational forcing. In both the single- and the double-slit geometries, the diffraction pattern is dominated by the interaction of the walking droplet with a planar boundary. Critically, in the double-slit geometry, the walking droplet is influenced by both slits by virtue of its spatially extended wave field. NSF support via CMMI-1333242.

  18. Walking Training and Cortisol to DHEA-S Ratio in Postmenopause: an Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Di Blasio, Andrea; Izzicupo, Pascal; Di Baldassarre, Angela; Gallina, Sabina; Bucci, Ines; Giuliani, Cesidio; Di Santo, Serena; Di Iorio, Angelo; Ripari, Patrizio; Napolitano, Giorgio

    2017-03-22

    The literature indicates that the plasma cortisol-to-dihydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S) ratio is a marker of health status after menopause, when a decline in both estrogens and DHEA-S, and an increase in cortisol occur. An increase in the cortisol-to-DHEA-S ratio has been positively correlated with metabolic syndrome, all-cause mortality, cancer and other diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a walking program on the plasma cortisol-to-DHEA-S ratio in postmenopausal women. Fifty-one postmenopausal women participated in a 13-week supervised walking program, in the metropolitan area of Pescara (Italy), from June to September 2013. Participants were evaluated in April-May and September-October of the same year. The linear mixed model showed that the variation of the log10Cortisol-to-log10DHEA-S ratio was associated with the volume of exercise (p = .03). Participants having lower adherence to the walking program did not have a significantly modified either log10Cortisol, nor log10DHEA-S, while those having the highest adherence had a significant reduction in log10Cortisol (p = .016), and a nearly significant increase in log10DHEA-S (p = .084). Walking training appeared to reduce the plasma log10Cortisol-to-log10DHEA-S ratio, although a minimum level of training was necessary to achieve this significant reduction.

  19. Neighborhood walkability, fear and risk of falling and response to walking promotion: The Easy Steps to Health 12-month randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Merom, D.; Gebel, K.; Fahey, P.; Astell-Burt, T.; Voukelatos, A.; Rissel, C.; Sherrington, C.

    2015-01-01

    In older adults the relationships between health, fall-related risk factors, perceived neighborhood walkability, walking behavior and intervention impacts are poorly understood. To determine whether: i) health and fall-related risk factors were associated with perceptions of neighborhood walkability; ii) perceived environmental attributes, and fall-related risk factors predicted change in walking behavior at 12 months; and iii) perceived environmental attributes and fall-related risk factors moderated the effect of a self-paced walking program on walking behavior. Randomized trial on walking and falls conducted between 2009 and 2012 involving 315 community-dwelling inactive adults ≥ 65 years living in Sydney, Australia. Measures were: mobility status, fall history, injurious fall and fear of falling (i.e., fall-related risk factors), health status, walking self-efficacy and 11 items from the neighborhood walkability scale and planned walking ≥ 150 min/week at 12 months. Participants with poorer mobility, fear of falling, and poor health perceived their surroundings as less walkable. Walking at 12 months was significantly greater in “less greenery” (AOR = 3.3, 95% CI: 1.11–9.98) and “high traffic” (AOR = 1.98, 95% CI: 1.00–3.91) neighborhoods. The intervention had greater effects in neighborhoods perceived to have poorer pedestrian infrastructure (p for interaction = 0.036). Low perceived walkability was shaped by health status and did not appear to be a barrier to walking behavior. There appears to be a greater impact of, and thus, need for, interventions to encourage walking in environments perceived not to have supportive walking infrastructure. Future studies on built environments and walking should gather information on fall-related risk factors to better understand how these characteristics interact. PMID:26844140

  20. A Pilot Intervention to Promote Walking and Wellness and to Improve the Health of College Faculty and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Danell J.; Davis, Liz; Rancour, Patrice; Robinson, Marianne; Neel-Wilson, Trish; Wagner, Susan

    2007-01-01

    There is a need to investigate novel interventions that promote worksite physical activity and wellness. Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 12-week walking program supplemented with a pedometer, computer educational program, and weekly e-mails. Methods: College faculty and staff participated in a…

  1. Predictive Walking-Age Health Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Priyanka; Tank, Krishna; Monday, Tapas; Chen, Chih-Hung; Deen, M Jamal

    2017-02-09

    A simple, low-power and wearable health analyzer for early identification and management of some diseases is presented. To achieve this goal, we propose a walking pattern analysis system that uses features such as speed, energy, turn ratio, and bipedal behavior to characterize and classify individuals in distinct walking-ages. A database is constructed from 74 healthy young adults in the age range of 18 to 60 years using the combination of inertial signals from an accelerometer and a gyroscope on a level path including turns. An efficient advanced signal decomposition method called improved complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition with adaptive noise (Improved CEEMDAN) was used for feature extraction. Analyses show that the gait of healthy able-bodied individuals exhibits a natural bipedal asymmetry to a certain level depending on the activity-type and age, which relate to individual's functional attributes rather than pathological gait. The analysis of turn ratio, a measure of activity-transition9 energy change and stability, indicated turning to be less locally stable than straight-line walking making it a more reliable measure for determining falls and other health issues. Extracted features were used to analyze two distinct walking-age groups of the healthy young adults based on their walking pattern, classifying 18-45 years old individuals in one group and 46-60 years old in the other group. Our proposed simple, inexpensive walking analyzer system can be easily used as an ambulatory screening tool by clinicians to identify at risk population at the early onset of some diseases.

  2. Stride Counting in Human Walking and Walking Distance Estimation Using Insole Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Phuc Huu; Lee, Jinwook; Kwon, Ae-Ran; Jeong, Gu-Min

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method of estimating walking distance based on a precise counting of walking strides using insole sensors. We use an inertial triaxial accelerometer and eight pressure sensors installed in the insole of a shoe to record walkers’ movement data. The data is then transmitted to a smartphone to filter out noise and determine stance and swing phases. Based on phase information, we count the number of strides traveled and estimate the movement distance. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, we created two walking databases on seven healthy participants and tested the proposed method. The first database, which is called the short distance database, consists of collected data from all seven healthy subjects walking on a 16 m distance. The second one, named the long distance database, is constructed from walking data of three healthy subjects who have participated in the short database for an 89 m distance. The experimental results show that the proposed method performs walking distance estimation accurately with the mean error rates of 4.8% and 3.1% for the short and long distance databases, respectively. Moreover, the maximum difference of the swing phase determination with respect to time is 0.08 s and 0.06 s for starting and stopping points of swing phases, respectively. Therefore, the stride counting method provides a highly precise result when subjects walk. PMID:27271634

  3. Developing Point-of-Decision Prompts to Encourage Airport Walking: The Walk to Fly Study

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, Ginny M.; Paul, Prabasaj; Watson, Kathleen Bachtel; Dorn, Joan M.; Fulton, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Background Point-of-decision prompts may be appropriate to promote walking, instead of using a mechanized mode of transport, such as a train, in airports. To our knowledge, no current studies describe the development of messages for prompts in this setting. Methods In-person interviews were conducted with 150 randomly selected airport travelers who rode the train to their departure gate. Travelers reported various reasons for riding the train to their gate. They were asked about messages that would encourage them to walk. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted for reasons for riding the train. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted for messages to encourage walking to the departure gate. Results Travelers reported not knowing walking was an option (23.8%), seeing others riding the train (14.4%), and being afraid of getting lost (9.2%) as reasons for riding the train. Many indicated that directional signs and prompts promoting walking as exercise would encourage them to walk instead of riding the train. Conclusions Some reasons for riding the train in an airport may be modifiable by installing point-of-decision prompts. Providing directional signs to travelers may prompt them to walk to their gate instead of riding the train. Similar prompts may also be considered in other community settings. PMID:26445371

  4. Aerobic Exercise Training in Post-Polio Syndrome: Process Evaluation of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Voorn, Eric L.; Koopman, Fieke S.; Brehm, Merel A.; Beelen, Anita; de Haan, Arnold; Gerrits, Karin H. L.; Nollet, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore reasons for the lack of efficacy of a high intensity aerobic exercise program in post-polio syndrome (PPS) on cardiorespiratory fitness by evaluating adherence to the training program and effects on muscle function. Design A process evaluation using data from an RCT. Patients Forty-four severely fatigued individuals with PPS were randomized to exercise therapy (n = 22) or usual care (n = 22). Methods Participants in the exercise group were instructed to exercise 3 times weekly for 4 months on a bicycle ergometer (60–70% heart rate reserve). Results The attendance rate was high (median 89%). None of the participants trained within the target heart rate range during >75% of the designated time. Instead, participants exercised at lower intensities, though still around the anaerobic threshold (AT) most of the time. Muscle function did not improve in the exercise group. Conclusion Our results suggest that severely fatigued individuals with PPS cannot adhere to a high intensity aerobic exercise program on a cycle ergometer. Despite exercise intensities around the AT, lower extremity muscle function nor cardiorespiratory fitness improved. Improving the aerobic capacity in PPS is difficult through exercise primarily focusing on the lower extremities, and may require a more individualized approach, including the use of other large muscle groups instead. Trial Registration Netherlands National Trial Register NTR1371 PMID:27419388

  5. Effects of Exercise Rehab on Male Asthmatic Patients: Aerobic Verses Rebound Training

    PubMed Central

    Zolaktaf, Vahid; Ghasemi, Gholam A; Sadeghi, Morteza

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are some auspicious records on applying aerobic exercise for asthmatic patients. Recently, it is suggested that rebound exercise might even increase the gains. This study was designed to compare the effects of rebound therapy to aerobic training in male asthmatic patients. Methods: Sample included 37 male asthmatic patients (20-40 years) from the same respiratory clinic. After signing the informed consent, subjects volunteered to take part in control, rebound, or aerobic groups. There was no change in the routine medical treatment of patients. Supervised exercise programs continued for 8 weeks, consisting of two sessions of 45 to 60 minutes per week. Criteria measures were assessed pre- and post exercise program. Peak exercise capacity (VO2peak) was estimated by modified Bruce protocol, Forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and FEV1% were measured by spirometer. Data were analyzed by repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Significant interactions were observed for all 4 criteria measures (P < 0.01), meaning that both the exercise programs were effective in improving FVC, FEV1, FEV1%, and VO2peak. Rebound exercise produced more improvement in FEV1, FEV1%, and VO2peak. Conclusions: Regular exercise strengthens the respiratory muscles and improves the cellular respiration. At the same time, it improves the muscular, respiratory, and cardio-vascular systems. Effects of rebound exercise seem to be promising. Findings suggest that rebound exercise is a useful complementary means for asthmatic male patients. PMID:23717762

  6. Quantum Random Walks with General Particle States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belton, Alexander C. R.

    2014-06-01

    A convergence theorem is obtained for quantum random walks with particles in an arbitrary normal state. This unifies and extends previous work on repeated-interactions models, including that of Attal and Pautrat (Ann Henri Poincaré 7:59-104 2006) and Belton (J Lond Math Soc 81:412-434, 2010; Commun Math Phys 300:317-329, 2010). When the random-walk generator acts by ampliation and either multiplication or conjugation by a unitary operator, it is shown that the quantum stochastic cocycle which arises in the limit is driven by a unitary process.

  7. Environmental factors influencing older adults’ walking for transportation: a study using walk-along interviews

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Current knowledge on the relationship between the physical environment and walking for transportation among older adults (≥ 65 years) is limited. Qualitative research can provide valuable information and inform further research. However, qualitative studies are scarce and fail to include neighborhood outings necessary to study participants’ experiences and perceptions while interacting with and interpreting the local social and physical environment. The current study sought to uncover the perceived environmental influences on Flemish older adults’ walking for transportation. To get detailed and context-sensitive environmental information, it used walk-along interviews. Methods Purposeful convenience sampling was used to recruit 57 older adults residing in urban or semi-urban areas. Walk-along interviews to and from a destination (e.g. a shop) located within a 15 minutes’ walk from the participants’ home were conducted. Content analysis was performed using NVivo 9 software (QSR International). An inductive approach was used to derive categories and subcategories from the data. Results Data were categorized in the following categories and subcategories: access to facilities (shops & services, public transit, connectivity), walking facilities (sidewalk quality, crossings, legibility, benches), traffic safety (busy traffic, behavior of other road users), familiarity, safety from crime (physical factors, other persons), social contacts, aesthetics (buildings, natural elements, noise & smell, openness, decay) and weather. Conclusions The findings indicate that to promote walking for transportation a neighborhood should provide good access to shops and services, well-maintained walking facilities, aesthetically appealing places, streets with little traffic and places for social interaction. In addition, the neighborhood environment should evoke feelings of familiarity and safety from crime. Future quantitative studies should investigate if (changes

  8. A marching-walking hybrid induces step length adaptation and transfers to natural walking

    PubMed Central

    Long, Andrew W.; Finley, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Walking is highly adaptable to new demands and environments. We have previously studied adaptation of locomotor patterns via a split-belt treadmill, where subjects learn to walk with one foot moving faster than the other. Subjects learn to adapt their walking pattern by changing the location (spatial) and time (temporal) of foot placement. Here we asked whether we can induce adaptation of a specific walking pattern when one limb does not “walk” but instead marches in place (i.e., marching-walking hybrid). The marching leg's movement is limited during the stance phase, and thus certain sensory signals important for walking may be reduced. We hypothesized that this would produce a spatial-temporal strategy different from that of normal split-belt adaptation. Healthy subjects performed two experiments to determine whether they could adapt their spatial-temporal pattern of step lengths during the marching-walking hybrid and whether the learning transfers to over ground walking. Results showed that the hybrid group did adapt their step lengths, but the time course of adaptation and deadaption was slower than that for the split-belt group. We also observed that the hybrid group utilized a mostly spatial strategy whereas the split-belt group utilized both spatial and temporal strategies. Surprisingly, we found no significant difference between the hybrid and split-belt groups in over ground transfer. Moreover, the hybrid group retained more of the learned pattern when they returned to the treadmill. These findings suggest that physical rehabilitation with this marching-walking paradigm on conventional treadmills may produce changes in symmetry comparable to what is observed during split-belt training. PMID:25867742

  9. Effects of Aerobic Dance on Physical Work Capacity, Cardiovascular Function and Body Composition of Middle-Age Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdy, Deborah B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This study proposed to determine the effects of aerobics on physical work capacity, cardiovascular function and body composition of 28 women aged 25 to 44 years. Measurements taken after a conditioning program showed significant changes in work capacity and cardiovascular function for the conditioned group but no change in body composition.…

  10. Reasonable expectations: how much aerobic capacity, muscle strength, and quality of life can improve with exercise training in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark A; Pozehl, Bunny

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the literature that describes the magnitude of functional and quality of life gains with a traditional moderate-intensity aerobic and resistance training programs is reviewed, and differences between the impact of exercise training in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction versus heart failure with reduced ejection fraction are discussed.

  11. Talk the Walk: Does Socio-Cognitive Resource Reallocation Facilitate the Development of Walking?

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Edna

    2016-01-01

    Walking is of interest to psychology, robotics, zoology, neuroscience and medicine. Human’s ability to walk on two feet is considered to be one of the defining characteristics of hominoid evolution. Evolutionary science propses that it emerged in response to limited environmental resources; yet the processes supporting its emergence are not fully understood. Developmental psychology research suggests that walking elicits cognitive advancements. We postulate that the relationship between cognitive development and walking is a bi-directional one; and further suggest that the initiation of novel capacities, such as walking, is related to internal socio-cognitive resource reallocation. We shed light on these notions by exploring infants’ cognitive and socio-communicative outputs prospectively from 6–18 months of age. Structured bi/tri weekly evaluations of symbolic and verbal development were employed in an urban cohort (N = 9) for 12 months, during the transition from crawling to walking. Results show links between preemptive cognitive changes in socio-communicative output, symbolic-cognitive tool-use processes, and the age of emergence of walking. Plots of use rates of lower symbolic play levels before and after emergence of new skills illustrate reductions in use of previously attained key behaviors prior to emergence of higher symbolic play, language and walking. Further, individual differences in age of walking initiation were strongly related to the degree of reductions in complexity of object-use (r = .832, p < .005), along with increases, counter to the general reduction trend, in skills that serve recruitment of external resources [socio-communication bids before speech (r = -.696, p < .01), and speech bids before walking; r = .729, p < .01)]. Integration of these proactive changes using a computational approach yielded an even stronger link, underscoring internal resource reallocation as a facilitator of walking initiation (r = .901, p<0.001). These

  12. [Sulfa-drug wastewater treatment with anaerobic/aerobic process].

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Zhang, H; Zhu, H; Zhang, Z; Zhuang, Y; Dai, S

    2001-09-01

    Sulfa drug wastewater was treated with anaerobic/aerobic process. The removal ratios of TOC reached about 50% in anaerobic phase and about 70% in aerobic phase respectively, while volume loading rate of TOC was about 1.2 kg/(m3.d) in anaerobic phase and about 0.6 kg/(m3.d) in aerobic phase. Removal of TOC in anaerobic phase was attributed to the reduction of sulfate.

  13. [Cardiovascular protection and mechanisms of actions of aerobic exercise].

    PubMed

    Hou, Zuo-Xu; Zhang, Yuan; Gao, Feng

    2014-08-01

    It is well established that aerobic exercise exerts beneficial effect on cardiovascular system, but the underlying mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. Recent studies have shown that aerobic exercise ameliorates insulin resistance, inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction which play important roles in the development of cardiovascular disease. In this review, we discussed the underlying mechanisms of the cardioprotective role of aerobic exercise, especially the latest progress in this field.

  14. Aerobic program in persons with stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Francica, Juliana V; Bigongiari, Aline; Mochizuki, Luis; Miranda, Maria Luiza J; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: O objetivo deste estudo foi realizar uma revisão sistemática sobre o exercício após acidente vascular cerebral.Material e Métodos: Para isso, foi realizada uma revisão sistemática de ensaios clínicos randomizados e controlados publicados no PubMed e PEDro. Os critérios para inclusão dos artigos foram: Estudos - ensaios clínicos randomizados ou controlados; participantes - adultos de qualquer idade com diagnóstico clínico de acidente vascular cerebral; intervenções - qualquer treino físico aeróbio que vise melhorar a capacidade e/ou função cardiovascular. Dois revisores independentes categorizaram os ensaios selecionados, avaliaram a qualidade metodológica e extraíram os dados relevantes. A análise realizada foi dos vários protocolos usados tanto para a avaliaçãoe treino de indivíduos pós-acidente vascular cerebral.Resultados: De acordo com estudos clínicos analisados, uma vasta gama de instrumentos foi utilizada para medir a capacidade funcional dos pacientes. Ergometria e ergoespirometria foram os principais dispositivos da avaliação da capacidade cardiovascular. Treino\\exercício na bicicleta ergométrica foi a estratégia de treino mais comumente usada, e fisioterapia convencional (baseada em alongamentos, fortalecimentos, treino de equilíbrio, coordenação e marcha) foi a terapia de controle mais frequente.Discussão: A duração do programa variou de 4 semanas a 6 meses, a frequência semanal média foi de três sessões por semana, enquanto que a intensidade do treinamento variou de 40 a 80% da frequência cardíaca máxima ou VO2 máximo. A duração de sessões de treino variou entre 25 minutos a 1 hora.Conclusão: O treino físico é uma ferramenta promissora para o tratamento de pacientes pós-AVC, tanto em termos de melhoria da capacidade funcional e da capacidade cardiovascular. No entanto, mais estudos são necessários para ampliar a área de atuação terapêutica nesta população.

  15. The development of metacognitive knowledge of basic motor skill: walking.

    PubMed

    Lee, K; Chen, L

    1996-09-01

    The development of children's metacognitive knowledge of walking was investigated. Sixty elementary school children (30 boys and 30 girls), 9, 11, and 13 years of age, viewed a video presentation of an adult performing normal walking and six different forms of partial walking (varying in terms of the presence or absence of four essential features of normal walking: arm swing, leg swing, arm-leg coordination, and distance traveled). Then the children were asked to rate the partial walking. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed that children of all these ages appreciated the differences between normal walking and partial walking. As age increased, the degree of importance of the four features became more differentiated. By 13 years of age, the children considered leg swing to be the most important feature of walking, arm swing the second, arm-leg coordination the third, and distance traveled the least important feature.

  16. Efficacy of a multidisciplinary treatment program in patients with severe fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Casanueva-Fernández, Benigno; Llorca, Javier; Rubió, Josep Blanch I; Rodero-Fernández, Baltasar; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a multidisciplinary treatment program in patients severely affected by fibromyalgia. Thirty-four fibromyalgia patients were randomly divided into two groups. The control group: 17 women who continued their medical treatment and participated in four educational sessions and the experimental group that included 17 patients who besides the former medical treatment also underwent a weekly 1-h session program for 8 weeks including massage therapy, ischemic pressure on the 18 tender points, aerobic exercise and thermal therapy. At the beginning of the program, there were no significant differences between the two groups in any of the parameters. At the end of treatment, there was a significant improvement in the experimental group in the following items: vitality, social functioning, grip strength and the 6-min walk test. At 1 month after the end of treatment, the experimental group showed significant differences in overall health perception, social functioning, grip strength and the 6-min walk test. At that time, considering the threshold for clinical efficacy set at an improvement of 30% or above for the analyzed variables, 25% of the patients met the requirement for improvement of the following: number of symptoms: Visual Analogic Scale for fatigue, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and Beck Anxiety Inventory. In conclusion, patients with severe manifestations of fibromyalgia can obtain improvement with a short-term, low-cost and simple-delivery multidisciplinary program. However, additional studies including higher numbers of patients are needed to confirm the beneficial effect of this treatment program.

  17. Biotransformation of phytosterols under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Christy M; Giles, Hamilton D; Banerjee, Sujit; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2014-07-01

    Phytosterols are plant-derived sterols present in pulp and paper wastewater and have been implicated in the endocrine disruption of aquatic species. Bioassays were performed to assess the effect of an additional carbon source and/or solubilizing agent on the aerobic biotransformation of a mixture of three common phytosterols (β-sitosterol, stigmasterol and campesterol). The aerobic biotransformation of the phytosterol mixture by a mixed culture developed from a pulp and paper wastewater treatment system was examined under three separate conditions: with phytosterols as the sole added carbon source, with phytosterols and dextrin as an additional carbon source, and with phytosterols added with ethanol as an additional carbon source and solubilizing agent. Significant phytosterol removal was not observed in assays set up with phytosterol powder, either with or without an additional carbon source. In contrast, all three phytosterols were aerobically degraded when added as a dissolved solution in ethanol. Thus, under the experimental conditions of this study, the bioavailability of phytosterols was limited without the presence of a solubilizing agent. The total phytosterol removal rate was linear for the first six days before re-spiking, with a rate of 0.47 mg/L-d (R(2) = 0.998). After the second spiking, the total phytosterol removal rate was linear for seven days, with a rate of 0.32 mg/L-d (R(2) = 0.968). Following the 7th day, the phytosterol removal rate markedly accelerated, suggesting two different mechanisms are involved in phytosterol biotransformation, more likely related to the production of enzyme(s) involved in phytosterol degradation, induced under different cell growth conditions. β-sitosterol was preferentially degraded, as compared to stigmasterol and campesterol, although all three phytosterols fell below detection limits by the 24th day of incubation.

  18. Aerobic Capacity and Postprandial Flow Mediated Dilation.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kevin D; Miller, James J; Robinson, James H; Olive, Jennifer L

    The consumption of a high-fat meal induces transient vascular dysfunction. Aerobic exercise enhances vascular function in healthy individuals. Our purpose was to determine if different levels of aerobic capacity impact vascular function, as measured by flow mediated dilation, following a high-fat meal. Flow mediated dilation of the brachial artery was determined before, two- and four-hours postprandial a high-fat meal in young males classified as highly trained (n = 10; VO2max = 74.6 ± 5.2 ml·kg·min(-1)) or moderately active (n = 10; VO2max = 47.3 ± 7.1 ml·kg·min(-1)). Flow mediated dilation was reduced at two- (p < 0.001) and four-hours (p < 0.001) compared to baseline for both groups but was not different between groups at any time point (p = 0.108). Triglycerides and insulin increased at two- (p < 0.001) and four-hours (p < 0.05) in both groups. LDL-C was reduced at four-hours (p = 0.05) in highly trained subjects, and two- and four-hours (p ≤ 0.01) in moderately active subjects. HDL-C decreased at two- (p = 0.024) and four-hours (p = 0.014) in both groups. Glucose increased at two-hours postprandial for both groups (p = 0.003). Our results indicate that a high-fat meal results in reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in highly trained and moderately active individuals with no difference between groups. Thus, high aerobic capacity does not protect against transient reductions in vascular function after the ingestion of a single high-fat meal compared to individuals who are moderately active.

  19. Screening and identification of aerobic denitrifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, K.; Deng, H. M.; Chen, Y. T.; Zhou, H. J.; Yan, G. X.

    2016-08-01

    With the standards of the effluent quality more stringent, it becomes a quite serious problem for municipalities and industries to remove nitrogen from wastewater. Bioremediation is a potential method for the removal of nitrogen and other pollutants because of its high efficiency and low cost. Seven predominant aerobic denitrifiers were screened and characterized from the activated sludge in the CAST unit. Some of these strains removed 87% nitrate nitrogen at least. Based on their phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, the isolates were identified as the genera of Ralstonia, Achromobacter, Aeromonas and Enterobacter.

  20. Effects of strength vs aerobic exercise on pain severity in adults with fibromyalgia: a randomized equivalence trial.

    PubMed

    Hooten, W Michael; Qu, Wenchun; Townsend, Cynthia O; Judd, Jeffrey W

    2012-04-01

    Strength training and aerobic exercise have beneficial effects on pain in adults with fibromyalgia. However, the equivalence of strengthening and aerobic exercise has not been reported. The primary aim of this randomized equivalence trial involving patients with fibromyalgia admitted to an interdisciplinary pain treatment program was to test the hypothesis that strengthening (n=36) and aerobic (n=36) exercise have equivalent effects (95% confidence interval within an equivalence margin ± 8) on pain, as measured by the pain severity subscale of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory. Secondary aims included determining the effects of strengthening and aerobic exercise on peak Vo(2) uptake, leg strength, and pressure pain thresholds. In an intent-to-treat analysis, the mean (± standard deviation) pain severity scores for the strength and aerobic groups at study completion were 34.4 ± 11.5 and 37.6 ± 11.9, respectively. The group difference was -3.2 (95% confidence interval, -8.7 to 2.3), which was within the equivalence margin of Δ8. Significant improvements in pain severity (P<.001), peak Vo(2) (P<.001), strength (P<.001), and pain thresholds (P<.001) were observed from baseline to week 3 in the intent-to-treat analysis; however, patients in the aerobic group (mean change 2.0 ± 2.6 mL/kg/min) experienced greater gains (P<.013) in peak Vo(2) compared to the strength group (mean change 0.4 ± 2.6 mL/kg/min). Knowledge of the equivalence and physiological effects of exercise have important clinical implications that could allow practitioners to target exercise recommendations on the basis of comorbid medical conditions or patient preference for a particular type of exercise. This study found that strength and aerobic exercise had equivalent effects on reducing pain severity among patients with fibromyalgia.