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Sample records for aerobraked chemical system

  1. Thermal protection systems for aerobrakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1993-01-01

    In summary, advantages of the ablative thermal protection system (TPS) for aerobrakes are: (1) proven reliable TPS systems; (2) well characterized (thermally) with good, existing thermal analysis capability; (3) good candidate materials are available; (4) not sensitive to defects and more difficult to damage then RSI or C-C; (5) design program which demonstrated simple (direct bond) application of large panels; (6) thermal excursions not catastrophic; and (7) no SIP required.

  2. Aerobraking systems for manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a synopsis of aerobraking uses, benefits, performance requirements, design issues, and technology requirements for manned Mars missions. Aerobraking can provide significant advantages in several key mission functions: Mars orbit capture, Mars entry from orbit, and earth orbit capture or direct entry. The resulting range of aerobraking performance requirements are described. Study results show that none of the aerobrake unique concerns are show stoppers but are issues having reasonable design solutions and operational impacts.

  3. Chemical nonequilibrium and viscous flow computation for conic aerobrake bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. P.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional analyses are presented for the viscous, reactive flow over a complete entry-body configuration with a wide-angle conic surface. The predictive method uses a split approach that solves iteratively the Navier-Stokes and the continuity equations of chemical species. The finite-difference formulation and the computational grid are adapted to the bow shock and the conformally mapped body such that the velocity components are in the computational spherical-polar space. Combinations of several conic forebody and afterbody configurations have been studied using wind-tunnel, Space Shuttle, and aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle (AOTV) entry conditions. The effects of the borebody bluntness and of finite-rate chemical reactions on the shock layer, the wall catalycity on the boundary layer, the shear-layer impingement on the afterbody, and the base-flow environment are discussed.

  4. Aerobrake concepts for NTP systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Manuel I.

    1992-01-01

    Design concepts are described for landing large spacecraft masses on the Mars surface in support of manned missions with interplanetary transportation using Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP). Included are the mission and systems analyses, trade studies and sensitivity analyses, design analyses, technology assessment, and derived requirements to support this concept. The mission phases include the Mars de-orbit, entry, terminal descent, and terminal touchdown. The study focuses primarily on Mars surface delivery from orbit after Mars orbit insertion using an NTP. The requirements associated with delivery of logistical supplies, habitats, and other equipment on minimum energy Earth to Mars transfers are also addressed in a preliminary fashion.

  5. Regenerative Aerobraking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's exploration goals for Mars and Beyond will require new power systems and in situ resource utilization technologies. Regenerative aerobraking may offer a revolutionary approach for in situ power generation and oxygen harvesting during these exploration missions. In theory, power and oxygen can be collected during aerobraking and stored for later use in orbit or on the planet. This technology would capture energy and oxygen from the plasma field that occurs naturally during hypersonic entry using well understood principles of magnetohydrodynamics and oxygen filtration. This innovative approach generates resources upon arrival at the operational site, and thus greatly differs from the traditional approach of taking everything you need with you from Earth. Fundamental analysis, computational fluid dynamics, and some testing of experimental hardware have established the basic feasibility of generating power during a Mars entry. Oxygen filtration at conditions consistent with spacecraft entry parameters at Mars has been studied to a lesser extent. Other uses of the MHD power are presented. This paper illustrates how some features of regenerative aerobraking may be applied to support human and robotic missions at Mars.

  6. Preliminary design of a large tetrahedral truss/hexagonal panel aerobrake structural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper introduces an aerobrake structural concept consisting of two primary components: (1) a lightweight erectable tetrahedral support truss, and (2) a heatshield composed of individual sandwich hexagonal panels which, when attached to the truss, function as a continuous aerobraking surface. A general preliminary analysis procedure to design the aerobrake components is developed, and values of the aerobrake design parameters which minimize the mass and packaging volume for a 120-foot-diameter aerobrake are determined. Sensitivity of the aerobrake design to variations in design parameters is also assessed.

  7. Aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D. (Inventor); Nagy, Kornel (Inventor); Roberts, Barney B. (Inventor); Ried, Robert C. (Inventor); Kroll, Kenneth R. (Inventor); Gamble, Joe (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle which includes an aerobraking device which also serves as a heat shield in the shape of a raked-off elliptic or circular cone with a circular or elliptical base, and with an ellipsoid or other blunt shape nose. The aerobraking device is fitted with a toroid-like skirt and is integral with the support structure of the propulsion system and other systems of the space vehicle. The vehicle is intended to be transported in components to a space station in lower earth orbit where it is assembled for use as a transportation system from low earth orbit to geosynchronous earth orbit and return. Conventional guidance means are included for autonomous flight.

  8. Aerobraking Cost and Risk Decisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, David A.; Tolson, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Four missions have successfully employed aerobraking at Venus and Mars to reduce the spacecraft orbit period and achieve the desired orbit geometry. The propellant mass reductions enabled by the aerobraking technique allow the use of smaller launch systems, which translate to significant savings in launch costs for flight projects. However, there is a significant increase in mission risk associated with the use of aerobraking. Flying a spacecraft through a planetary atmosphere hundreds of times during months of around-the-clock operations places the spacecraft in harm's way, and is extraordinarily demanding on the flight team. There is a cost/risk trade that must be evaluated when a project is choosing between a mission baseline that includes aerobraking, or selecting a larger launch vehicle to enable purely propulsive orbit insertion. This paper provides a brief history of past and future aerobraking missions, describes the aerobraking technique, summarizes the costs associated with aerobraking, and concludes with a suggested methodology for evaluating the cost/risk trade when considering the aerobraking approach.

  9. Aerobraking cost/risk decisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, David A.; Tolson, Robert

    2005-01-01

    this paper provides a brief history of past and future aerobraking missions, describes the aerobraking technique, summarizes the costs associated with aerobraking, and concludes with a suggested methodology for evaluating the cost/risk trade when selecting the aerobraking approach.

  10. The aerobraking space transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Glen; Carpenter, Brian; Corns, Steve; Harris, Robert; Jun, Brian; Munro, Bruce; Pulling, Eric; Sekhon, Amrit; Welton, Walt; Jakubowski, A.

    1990-01-01

    With the advent of the Space Station and the proposed Geosynchronous Operation Support Center (GeoShack) in the early 21st century, the need for a cost effective, reusable orbital transport vehicle has arisen. This transport vehicle will be used in conjunction with the Space Shuttle, the Space Station, and GeoShack. The vehicle will transfer mission crew and payloads between low earth and geosynchronous orbits with minimal cost. Recent technological advances in thermal protection systems such as those employed in the Space Shuttle have made it possible to incorporate and aerobrake on the transfer vehicle to further reduce transport costs. The research and final design configuration of the aerospace senior design team from VPISU, working in conjunction with NASA, are presented. The topic of aerobraking and focuses on the evolution of an Aerobraking Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV), is addressed.

  11. The Innovative DE orbiting Aerobrake System "IDEAS " for Small Satellites: The Use of Gossamer Technolgy for a Cleaner Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santerre, B.; Bonnefond, T.; Dupuy, C.

    2008-08-01

    From the birth of space adventure until now, a huge number of objects have been put in orbit. Today, space environment is more and more crowded. The assessed number of objects sizing more than 1 cm is 300000. About 9600 objects are referenced, with only 500 useful. 22% of satellites are non operating satellites. For these reasons, space debris is becoming a real concern. The Inter Agency Space Debris Cordination (IDAC), composed of 11 space agencies, has defined a code of conduct to limit the space debris. In 2004, CNES decided to apply this code of conduct. As a consequence, the in-orbit life time (after operative life) of every satellite must be limited to 25 years. In the frame of this code of conduct, Astrium Space Transportation is developing in collaboration with CNES, a solution for slow deorbiting of small satellites using passive aerobraking. The Gossamer technology has been identified as the best solution to fulfil this functional requirement and to limit cost and performance impacts for the satellite. The interest of using gossamer technologies for small satellite aerobraking system was demonstrated by a feasibility study performed by Astrium Space Transportation during 2005. The main advantages of the retained solution are the easy accommodation on satellite, the simple electrical interface with the satellite, the ability to be operated even on an underperforming spacecraft (as long as telemetry can be received) and the absence of need of any specific satellite control. The trade-off between several inflatable technologies led to the selection of kapton/aluminium/kapton laminates, mainly because of the specific requirements of the mission (low available electrical power, long passive-life duration before deployment, no attitude control during deployment = non defined thermal conditions). This technology is currently developed and will be qualified for an application on a CNES satellite, called Microscope, that is asked to reduce its natural deorbiting

  12. Autonomous Aerobraking at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, Jill L.; Tolson, Robert; Cianciolo, Alicia Dwyer; Dec, John

    2002-01-01

    Aerobraking has become a proven approach for orbital missions at Mars. A launch of a 1000 kg class spacecraft on a Delta class booster saves 90% of the post-MOI fuel otherwise required to circularize the orbit. In 1997, Mars Global Surveyor demonstrated the feasibility and Mars 2001 Odyssey completed a nearly trouble free aerobraking phase in January 2002. In 2006, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter will also utilize aerobraking. From the flight operations standpoint, however, aerobraking is labor intensive and high risk due to the large density variability in the Mars thermosphere. The maximum rate of aerobraking is typically limited by the maximum allowable temperature of the solar array which is the primary drag surface. Prior missions have used a surrogate variable, usually maximum free stream heat flux, as a basis for performing periapsis altitude corridor control maneuvers. This paper provides an adaptive sequential method for operationally relating measured temperatures to heat flux profile characteristics and performing maneuvers based directly on measured temperatures and atmospheric properties derived from the heat flux profiles. Simulations of autonomous aerobraking are performed using Odyssey mission data.

  13. Mars aerobrake assembly simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filatovs, G. J.; Lee, Gordon K. F.; Garvey, John

    1992-01-01

    On-orbit assembly operation simulations in neutral buoyancy conditions are presently undertaken by a partial/full-scale Mars mission aerobrake mockup, whose design, conducted in the framework of an engineering senior students' design project, involved several levels of constraints for critical physical and operational features. Allowances had to be made for the auxiliary constraints introduced by underwater testing, as well as the subsegmenting required for overland shipment to the neutral-buoyancy testing facility. This mockup aerobrake's fidelity is determined by the numerous, competing design objectives.

  14. Minimum accommodation for aerobrake assembly. Phase 2: Structural concepts for a lunar transfer vehicle aerobrake which can be assembled on orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Watson, Judith J.; Tutterow, Robin D.

    1993-01-01

    A multidisciplinary conceptual study was conducted to define a reusable lunar transfer vehicle (LTV) aerobrake which could be launched on a Space Shuttle of Titan 4 and assembled on orbit at Space Station Freedom. A major objective was to design an aerobrake, with integrated structure and thermal protection systems, which has a mass less than 20 percent (9040 lb) of the LTV lunar return mass. The aerobrake segmentation concepts, the structural concepts, a joint concept for assembly, and a structural design with analysis of the aerobrake are described. Results show that a 50-foot diameter LTV aerobrake can be designed for on-orbit assembly which will achieve the 20 percent mass budget.

  15. Manned Mars aerobrake vehicle design issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Delma C., Jr.; Powell, Richard W.; Braun, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    The paper examines the preliminary definition of the stagnation region aerothermodynamic environment, the effect of convective/radiative effect of trim angle-of-attack mispredictions, packaging issues, and the implications of wake flow for vehicles not having an aft aeroshell. The implications of each of these factors for a Mars aerobrake configuration with a L/D in the range of 0.3-0.5 is evaluated. It is shown that packaging and wake flow requirements have a significant impact on the final design of a low L/D aerobrake. Due to the large proportion of carbonaceous species in the Martian atmosphere, radiative heating is seen to play a more dominant role in the stagnation region aerothermodynamics than for an equivalent earth entry. It is concluded that this radiation amplification is an additional reason to consider a multiple aerobrake system.

  16. Magellan aerobrake navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giorgini, Jon; Wong, S. Kuen; You, Tung-Han; Chadbourne, Pam; Lim, Lily

    1995-01-01

    The Magellan spacecraft has been aerobraked into a 197 x 541 km near-circular orbit around Venus from which it is conducting a high-resolution gravity mapping mission. This was the first interplanetary aerobrake maneuver and involved flying the spacecraft through the upper reaches of the Venusian atmosphere 730 times over a 70 day period. Round-trip light-time varied from 9.57 to 18.83 minutes during this period. Navigation for this dynamic phase of the Magellan mission was planned and executed in the face of budget-driven down-sizing with all spacecraft safe modes disabled and a flight-team one-third the size of comparable interplanetary missions. Successful execution of this manuever using spacecraft hardware not designed to operate in a planetary atmosphere, demonstrated a practical cost-saving technique for both large and small future interplanetary missions.

  17. Aerobrake design studies for manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, M.; Chargin, M.; Henline, W.; Hamm, K. R., Jr.; Miura, H.; Chiu, A.; Yang, L.

    1991-01-01

    The dimensions of aerobrakes and associated heat shields are calculated as a fraction of the vehicle mass required for a high-velocity manned Mars entry. The entry speed and deceleration limit are assumed to be 8.6 km/sec and 5 earth g, respectively, to consider vehicles with low lift-drag ratio (L/D) and ballistic coefficients of 100 and 200 kg/sq m, as well as a vehicle with a medium L/D and a ballistic coefficient of 375 kg/sq m. The aerobrake mass plus the heat shield divided by an optimized, blunt-shaped vehicle's total mass is 15 and 13 percent for ballistic coefficients of 100 and 200 kg/sq m, respectively. For a winged vehicle the mass fraction is 17 percent because the higher ballistic coefficient requires more thermal protection to account for the greater temperatures generated. It is concluded that aerobraking is more efficient than propulsive braking because the mass fraction for a propulsive system would be 4 or 5 times greater than those calculated for aerobraking.

  18. Implementation and Simulation Results using Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddock, Robert W.; DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Bowes, Angela; Prince, Jill L. H.; Powell, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    An Autonomous Aerobraking software system is currently under development with support from the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) that would move typically ground-based operations functions to onboard an aerobraking spacecraft, reducing mission risk and mission cost. The suite of software that will enable autonomous aerobraking is the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software (AADS) and consists of an ephemeris model, onboard atmosphere estimator, temperature and loads prediction, and a maneuver calculation. The software calculates the maneuver time, magnitude and direction commands to maintain the spacecraft periapsis parameters within design structural load and/or thermal constraints. The AADS is currently tested in simulations at Mars, with plans to also evaluate feasibility and performance at Venus and Titan.

  19. Minimum accommodation for aerobrake assembly, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, Stephen J.; Haynes, Davy A.; Tutterow, Robin D.; Watson, Judith J.; Russell, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A multi-element study was done to assess the practicality of a Space Station Freedom-based aerobrake system for the Space Exploration Initiative. The study was organized into six parts related to structure, aerodynamics, robotics and assembly, thermal protection system, inspection, and verification, all tied together by an integration study. The integration activity managed the broad issues related to meeting mission requirements. This report is a summary of the issues addressed by the integration team.

  20. The effect of interplanetary trajectory options on a manned Mars aerobrake configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Robert D.; Powell, Richard W.; Hartung, Lin C.

    1990-01-01

    Manned Mars missions originating in low Earth orbit (LEO) in the time frame 2010 to 2025 were analyzed to identify preferred mission opportunities and their associated vehicle and trajectory characteristics. Interplanetary and Mars atmospheric trajectory options were examined under the constraints of an initial manned exploration scenario. Two chemically propelled vehicle options were considered: (1) an all propulsive configuration, and (2) a configuration which employs aerobraking at Earth and Mars with low lift/drag (L/D) shapes. Both the interplanetary trajectory options as well as the Mars atmospheric passage are addressed to provide a coupled trajectory simulation. Direct and Venus swingby interplanetary transfers with a 60 day Mars stopover are considered. The range and variation in both Earth and Mars entry velocity are also defined. Two promising mission strategies emerged from the study: (1) a 1.0 to 2.0 year Venus swingby mission, and (2) a 2.0 to 2.5 year direct mission. Through careful trajectory selection, 11 mission opportunities are identified in which the Mars entry velocity is between 6 and 10 km/sec and Earth entry velocity ranges from 11.5 to 12.5 km/sec. Simulation of the Earth return aerobraking maneuver is not performed. It is shown that a low L/D configuration is not feasible for Mars aerobraking without substantial improvements in the interplanetary navigation system. However, even with an advanced navigation system, entry corridor and aerothermal requirements restrict the number of potential mission opportunities. It is also shown that for a large blunt Mars aerobrake configuration, the effects of radiative heating can be significant at entry velocities as low as 6.2 km/sec and will grow to dominate the aerothermal environment at entry velocities above 8.5 km/sec. Despite the additional system complexity associated with an aerobraking vehicle, the use of aerobraking was shown to significantly lower the required initial LEO weight. In

  1. Aerobrakes For A Manned Mars Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, G. P.

    1990-01-01

    Paper presents results of study of aerobraking in manned mission to Mars. Describes geometry and aerodynamic characteristics of aerobraked vehicle. Discusses computer program, WTRAJ, used to simulate trajectories near planets. Analyzes aerocapture processes for both Mars and Earth. Examines mass efficiency, or saving in propellant mass, afforded by aerobraking.

  2. Thermal Analysis Methods for Aerobraking Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.; Gasbarre, Joseph F.; Dec, John A.

    2005-01-01

    As NASA begins exploration of other planets, a method of non-propulsively slowing vehicles at the planet, aerobraking, may become a valuable technique for managing vehicle design mass and propellant. An example of this is Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), which will launch in late 2005 and reach Mars in March of 2006. In order to save propellant, MRO will use aerobraking to modify the initial orbit at Mars. The spacecraft will dip into the atmosphere briefly on each orbit, and during the drag pass, the atmospheric drag on the spacecraft will slow it, thus lowering the orbit apoapsis. The largest area on the spacecraft, and that most affected by the heat generated during the aerobraking process, is the solar arrays. A thermal analysis of the solar arrays was conducted at NASA Langley, to simulate their performance throughout the entire roughly 6-month period of aerobraking. Several interesting methods were used to make this analysis more rapid and robust. Two separate models were built for this analysis, one in Thermal Desktop for radiation and orbital heating analysis, and one in MSC.Patran for thermal analysis. The results from the radiation model were mapped in an automated fashion to the Patran thermal model that was used to analyze the thermal behavior during the drag pass. A high degree of automation in file manipulation as well as other methods for reducing run time were employed, since toward the end of the aerobraking period the orbit period is short, and in order to support flight operations the runs must be computed rapidly. All heating within the Patran Thermal model was combined in one section of logic, such that data mapped from the radiation model and aeroheating model, as well as skin temperature effects on the aeroheating and surface radiation, could be incorporated easily. This approach calculates the aeroheating at any given node, based on its position and temperature as well as the density and velocity at that trajectory point. Run times on

  3. Development of Autonomous Aerobraking - Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Phase 1 of the Development of Autonomous Aerobraking (AA) Assessment investigated the technical capability of transferring the processes of aerobraking maneuver (ABM) decision-making (currently performed on the ground by an extensive workforce and communicated to the spacecraft via the deep space network) to an efficient flight software algorithm onboard the spacecraft. This document describes Phase 2 of this study, which was a 12-month effort to improve and rigorously test the AA Development Software developed in Phase 1. Aerobraking maneuver; Autonomous Aerobraking; Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software; Deep Space Network; NASA Engineering and Safety Center

  4. Autonomous Aerobraking Using Thermal Response Surface Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Jill L.; Dec, John A.; Tolson, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    Aerobraking is a proven method of significantly increasing the science payload that can be placed into low Mars orbits when compared to an all propulsive capture. However, the aerobraking phase is long and has mission cost and risk implications. The main cost benefit is that aerobraking permits the use of a smaller and cheaper launch vehicle, but additional operational costs are incurred during the long aerobraking phase. Risk is increased due to the repeated thermal loading of spacecraft components and the multiple attitude and propulsive maneuvers required for successful aerobraking. Both the cost and risk burdens can be significantly reduced by automating the aerobraking operations phase. All of the previous Mars orbiter missions that have utilized aerobraking have increasingly relied on onboard calculations during aerobraking. Even though the temperature of spacecraft components has been the limiting factor, operational methods have relied on using a surrogate variable for mission control. This paper describes several methods, based directly on spacecraft component maximum temperature, for autonomously predicting the subsequent aerobraking orbits and prescribing apoapsis propulsive maneuvers to maintain the spacecraft within specified temperature limits. Specifically, this paper describes the use of thermal response surface analysis in predicting the temperature of the spacecraft components and the corresponding uncertainty in this temperature prediction.

  5. Aerobraking at Venus and Mars: A Comparison of the Magellan and Mars Global Surveyor Aerobraking Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Daniel T.

    2000-01-01

    On February 4, 1999 the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft became the second spacecraft to successfully aerobrake into a nearly circular orbit about another planet. This paper will highlight some of the similarities and differences between the aerobraking phases of this mission and the first mission to use aerobraking, the Magellan mission to Venus. Although the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft was designed for aerobraking and the Magellan spacecraft was not, aerobraking MGS was a much more challenging task than aerobraking Magellan, primarily because the spacecraft was damaged during the initial deployment of the solar panels. The MGS aerobraking phase had to be completely redesigned to minimize the bending moment acting on a broken yoke connecting one of the solar panels to the spacecraft. Even if the MGS spacecraft was undamaged, aerobraking at Mars was more challenging than aerobraking at Venus for several reasons. First, Mars is subject to dust storms, which can significantly change the temperature of the atmosphere due to increased solar heating in the low and middle altitudes (below 50 km), which in turn can significantly increase the density at the aerobraking altitudes (above 100 km). During the first part of the MGS aerobraking phase, a regional dust storm was observed to have a significant and very rapid effect on the entire atmosphere of Mars. Computer simulations of global dust storms on Mars indicate that even larger density increases are possible than those observed during the MGS aerobraking phases. For many aerobraking missions, the duration of the aerobraking phase must be kept as short as possible to minimize the total mission cost. For Mars missions, a short aerobraking phase means that there will be less margin to accommodate atmospheric variability, so the operations team must be ready to propulsively raise periapsis by tens of kilometers on very short notice. This issue was less of a concern on Venus, where the thick lower atmosphere and

  6. Aerobrake assembly with minimum Space Station accommodation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, Steven J.; Butler, David H.; Doggett, William R.; Russell, James W.; Hurban, Theresa

    1991-01-01

    The minimum Space Station Freedom accommodations required for initial assembly, repair, and refurbishment of the Lunar aerobrake were investigated. Baseline Space Station Freedom support services were assumed, as well as reasonable earth-to-orbit possibilities. A set of three aerobrake configurations representative of the major themes in aerobraking were developed. Structural assembly concepts, along with on-orbit assembly and refurbishment scenarios were created. The scenarios were exercised to identify required Space Station Freedom accommodations. Finally, important areas for follow-on study were also identified.

  7. Development of Autonomous Aerobraking (Phase 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Powell, Richard W.; Prince, Jill L.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center received a request from Mr. Daniel Murri (NASA Technical Fellow for Flight Mechanics) to develop an autonomous aerobraking capability. An initial evaluation for all phases of this assessment was approved to proceed at the NESC Review Board meeting. The purpose of phase 1 of this study was to provide an assessment of the feasibility of autonomous aerobraking. During this phase, atmospheric, aerodynamic, and thermal models for a representative spacecraft were developed for both the onboard algorithm known as Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software, and a ground-based "truth" simulation developed for testing purposes. The results of the phase 1 assessment are included in this report.

  8. Aerobraking Maneuver (ABM) Report Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Forrest; Gladden, Roy; Khanampornpan, Teerapat

    2008-01-01

    abmREPORT Version 3.1 is a Perl script that extracts vital summarization information from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) aerobraking ABM build process. This information facilitates sequence reviews, and provides a high-level summarization of the sequence for mission management. The script extracts information from the ENV, SSF, FRF, SCMFmax, and OPTG files and burn magnitude configuration files and presents them in a single, easy-to-check report that provides the majority of the parameters necessary for cross check and verification during the sequence review process. This means that needed information, formerly spread across a number of different files and each in a different format, is all available in this one application. This program is built on the capabilities developed in dragReport and then the scripts evolved as the two tools continued to be developed in parallel.

  9. Space Tug Aerobraking Study. Volume 2: Technical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corso, C. J.; Eyer, C. L.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility and practicality of employing an aerobraking trajectory for return of the reusable Space Tug from geosynchronous and other high energy missions was investigated. The aerobraking return trajectory modes from high orbits employ transfer ellipses which have low perigee altitudes wherein the earth's sensible atmosphere provides drag to reduce the Tug descent delta velocity requirements and thus decrease the required return trip propulsive energy. An aerobraked Space Tug, sized to the Space Shuttle payload capability and dimensional constraints, can accomplish 95 percent of the geosynchronous missions with a single Shuttle/Tug launch per mission. Aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, trajectory, quidance and control, configuration concepts, materials, weights and performance parameters were identified. Sensitivities to trajectory uncertainties, atmospheric anomalies and re-entry environments were determined. New technology requirements and future studies required to further enhance the aerobraking potential were identified.

  10. Structural considerations in the design of a Mars mission aerobrake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hairr, John; Klang, Eric

    A design for a Mars mission aerobrake with rib-stringer construction coupled with a generic shell using composite materials, which is shown to produce a feasible alternative to propulsive braking, is presented. For the case of a spherical shell subjected to a uniform pressure loading the membrane stress state is isotropic and independent of material properties. The stresses due to bending are significant and dominate only near the attachment points. The addition of meridional stiffeners increased the buckling load and absorbed a large portion of the stresses near the attachment points. The final design employed a high modulus graphite/epoxy composite material. The final weight of the structure when subjected to a 2.0 psi stagnation pressure loading was about 42,000 pounds. This constituted 9 percent of the total spacecraft weight, well below the 15 percent upper limit. It is concluded that aerobraking is a feasible alternative to a propulsive braking system. A rib-stringer shell composition coupled with composite materials is a viable configuration for an aerobrake structure.

  11. Autonomous Aerobraking: A Design, Development, and Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Jill L. H.; Powell, Richard W.; Murri, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Aerobraking has been used four times to decrease the apoapsis of a spacecraft in a captured orbit around a planetary body with a significant atmosphere utilizing atmospheric drag to decelerate the spacecraft. While aerobraking requires minimum fuel, the long time required for aerobraking requires both a large operations staff, and large Deep Space Network resources. A study to automate aerobraking has been sponsored by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center to determine initial feasibility of equipping a spacecraft with the onboard capability for autonomous aerobraking, thus saving millions of dollars incurred by a large aerobraking operations workforce and continuous DSN coverage. This paper describes the need for autonomous aerobraking, the development of the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software that includes an ephemeris estimator, an atmospheric density estimator, and maneuver calculation, and the plan forward for continuation of this study.

  12. MESUR probe aerobrake preliminary design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, M.; Henline, W.; Chargin, M.; Papadopoulos, P.; Chen, Y.; Yang, L.; Hamm, K.

    1992-01-01

    Aerobrake design for the Mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) vehicles is considered which is intended for both a nominal entry velocity of 7 km/sec and a high-speed case of 9 km/sec. Topics discussed include the entry environment, the thermal protection requirements for several types of heat shield materials, the structural design of the aeroshell, and the total aerobrake masses and mass fractions. For the nominal 7 km/sec entry, a silicone elastometric charring ablator, SLA-561, was found to be the lightest heat shield material. For the 7 km/sec entry, the mass fraction of the aerobrake was 13.2 percent. For the 9 km/sec entry, the heat shield consisted of the medium-density ablator AVCOAT-5026; SLA-561 was used on part of the conical skirt. The aerobrake mass fraction in this case was 18 percent. It is recommended that separate aerobrakes be designed for probes entering at 7 and 9 km/sec.

  13. MESUR probe aerobrake preliminary design study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauber, M.; Henline, W.; Chargin, M.; Papadopoulos, P.; Chen, Y.; Yang, L.; Hamm, K.

    1992-07-01

    Aerobrake design for the Mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) vehicles is considered which is intended for both a nominal entry velocity of 7 km/sec and a high-speed case of 9 km/sec. Topics discussed include the entry environment, the thermal protection requirements for several types of heat shield materials, the structural design of the aeroshell, and the total aerobrake masses and mass fractions. For the nominal 7 km/sec entry, a silicone elastometric charring ablator, SLA-561, was found to be the lightest heat shield material. For the 7 km/sec entry, the mass fraction of the aerobrake was 13.2 percent. For the 9 km/sec entry, the heat shield consisted of the medium-density ablator AVCOAT-5026; SLA-561 was used on part of the conical skirt. The aerobrake mass fraction in this case was 18 percent. It is recommended that separate aerobrakes be designed for probes entering at 7 and 9 km/sec.

  14. Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software: Phase 2 Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cianciolo, Alicia D.; Maddock, Robert W.; Prince, Jill L.; Bowes, Angela; Powell, Richard W.; White, Joseph P.; Tolson, Robert; O'Shaughnessy, Daniel; Carrelli, David

    2013-01-01

    NASA has used aerobraking at Mars and Venus to reduce the fuel required to deliver a spacecraft into a desired orbit compared to an all-propulsive solution. Although aerobraking reduces the propellant, it does so at the expense of mission duration, large staff, and DSN coverage. These factors make aerobraking a significant cost element in the mission design. By moving on-board the current ground-based tasks of ephemeris determination, atmospheric density estimation, and maneuver sizing and execution, a flight project would realize significant cost savings. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) sponsored Phase 1 and 2 of the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software (AADS) study, which demonstrated the initial feasibility of moving these current ground-based functions to the spacecraft. This paper highlights key state-of-the-art advancements made in the Phase 2 effort to verify that the AADS algorithms are accurate, robust and ready to be considered for application on future missions that utilize aerobraking. The advancements discussed herein include both model updates and simulation and benchmark testing. Rigorous testing using observed flight atmospheres, operational environments and statistical analysis characterized the AADS operability in a perturbed environment.

  15. Density prediction in Mars' aerobraking region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moudden, Y.; Forbes, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerobraking at Mars is significantly impacted by the density variability at altitudes between about 100 and 140 km. Density changes can be quite substantial from orbit to orbit and from day to day. Much of this variability arises from tides propagating upward from the lower atmosphere. In this paper we present first results from a method developed to predict density variability in Mars aerobraking region due to this source. It consists of employing physics-based tidal functions to fit tidal temperatures between 60 and 80 km inferred from Mars Climate Sounder measurements on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and using these functions to predict the density variations at aerobraking altitudes due to vertical propagation of the fitted tidal components. Validation against densities measured by the Mars Global Surveyor accelerometer suggest that these initial results capture salient features sufficiently well that users may want to incorporate them into operational models.

  16. Plasmadynamic effects in thermochemical nonequilibrium aerobrake flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; Shebalin, J. V.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses modifications to the governing equations of thermochemical nonequilibrium flow to include plasmadynamic effects. The magnetic field about a 1.1-m nose-radius aerobrake entering the earth's atmosphere at 80-km altitude and traveling 12 km/s is computed. The result of coupling the additional terms into the Langley Aerothermodynamics Upwind Relaxation Algorithm indicate that plasmadynamic effects are negligible for this two-temperature Mars-return aerobraking simulation. By examining the magnitude of the ohmic heating and observing a decrease in this heating when coupling terms are included in the two-temperature solution, it is argued that a three-temperature solution should not produce any different conclusions for aerobraking into the earth's atmosphere.

  17. Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software: Phase One Performance Analysis at Mars, Venus, and Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddock, Robert W.; Bowes, Angela; Powell, Richard W.; Prince, Jill L. H.; Cianciolo, Alicia Dwyer

    2012-01-01

    When entering orbit about a planet or moon with an appreciable atmosphere, instead of using only the propulsion system to insert the spacecraft into its desired orbit, aerodynamic drag can be used after the initial orbit insertion to further decelerate the spacecraft. Several past NASA missions have used this aerobraking technique to reduce the fuel required to deliver a spacecraft into a desired orbit. Aerobraking was first demonstrated at Venus with Magellan in 1993 and then was used to achieve the science orbit of three Mars orbiters: Mars Global Surveyor in 1997, Mars Odyssey in 2001, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in 2006. Although aerobraking itself reduces the propellant required to reach a final low period orbit, it does so at the expense of additional mission time to accommodate the aerobraking operations phase (typically 3-6 months), a large mission operations staff, and significant Deep Space Network (DSN) coverage. By automating ground based tasks and analyses associated with aerobraking and moving these onboard the spacecraft, a flight project could save millions of dollars in operations staffing and DSN costs (Ref. 1).

  18. Orbital Transfer Vehicle (space taxi) with aerobraking at Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This report shall cover all major aspects of the design of an Aeroassisted Manned Transfer Vehicle (or TAXI) for use as part of advanced manned Mars missions based on a cycling ship concept. Along with the heliocentric orbiting Cycling Spacecraft, such a TAXI would be a primary component of a long-term transportation system for Mars exploration. The Aeroassisted Manned Transfer Vehicle (AMTV) design developed shall operate along transfer trajectories between Earth and a Cycling Spacecraft (designed by the University of Michigan) and Mars. All operations of the AMTV shall be done primarily within the sphere of influence of the two planets. Maximum delta-V's for the vehicle have been established near 9 km/sec, with transfer durations of about 3 days. Acceleration deltaV's will be accomplished using 3 SSME-based hydrogen-oxygen chemical rockets (l(sub sp) = 485 sec & Thrust greater than = 300,00 Ib(sub f)/engine) with a thrust vector directly opposite the aerobraking deceleration vector. The aerobraking deceleration portion of an AMTV mission would be accomplished in this design by a moderate L/D aeroshield of an ellipsoidally-blunt, raked-off, elliptic cone (EBROEC) shape. The reusable thermal protection material comprising the shield will consist of a flexible, multi-layer, ceramic fabric stretched over a lightweight, rigid, shape - defining truss structure. Behind this truss, other components, including the engine supports, would be attached and protected from heating during aerobraking passes. Among these other components would be 2 LOX tanks and 4 LH2 tanks (and their support frames) holding over 670,000 lbm of propellant necessary to impart the required delta-V to the 98,000 lbm burnout mass vehicle. A 20,000 lbm crew module with docking port (oriented parallel to the accel./decel. axis) will provide accommodations for 9 crew members (11 under extreme conditions) for durations up to seven days, thus allowing extra time for emergency situations. This AMTV will be

  19. Autonomous Aerobraking: Thermal Analysis and Response Surface Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Thornblom, Mark N.

    2011-01-01

    A high-fidelity thermal model of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter was developed for use in an autonomous aerobraking simulation study. Response surface equations were derived from the high-fidelity thermal model and integrated into the autonomous aerobraking simulation software. The high-fidelity thermal model was developed using the Thermal Desktop software and used in all phases of the analysis. The use of Thermal Desktop exclusively, represented a change from previously developed aerobraking thermal analysis methodologies. Comparisons were made between the Thermal Desktop solutions and those developed for the previous aerobraking thermal analyses performed on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter during aerobraking operations. A variable sensitivity screening study was performed to reduce the number of variables carried in the response surface equations. Thermal analysis and response surface equation development were performed for autonomous aerobraking missions at Mars and Venus.

  20. Raked circular-cone aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul (Inventor); Davies, Carol B. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle (AOTV) (80) has aerobrake (82) with a blunted raked-off circular-cone configuration. The other components of the AOTV, including command/control module (95), fuel tanks (86, 88, 89 and 91), rocket engines (94) and afterbody (84), are positioned substantially along resultant force axis (104) of the AOTV (80). The axis (104) coincides with the resultant (sum of lift and drag) force vector. Afterbody (84) is mounted behind the aerobrake (82) with its length extending rearwardly from the aerobrake. The base flow clearance angle .phi. of the aerobrake (80) is 25.degree., thus allowing the afterbody (84) to extend rearwardly from the aerobrake (82) to a much greater extent than possible with a raked-off elliptic-cone aerobraking shield configuration. Afterbody size limitation and other problems associated with the raked-off elliptic-cone aerobraking shield configuration are alleviated by the combination of the aerobrake shape and positioning of the fuel tanks (86, 88, 89 and 91), rocket engines (94) and afterbody (84).

  1. Chemical and Solar Electric Propulsion Systems Analyses for Mars Sample Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Benjamin B.; Green, Shaun E.; Coverstone, Victoria L.; Woo, Byoungsam

    2004-01-01

    Conceptual in-space transfer stages, including those utilizing solar electric propulsion, chemical propulsion, and chemical propulsion with aerobraking or aerocapture assist at Mars, were evaluated. Roundtrip Mars sample return mission vehicles were analyzed to determine how specific system technology selections influence payload delivery capability. Results show how specific engine, thruster, propellant, capture mode, trip time and launch vehicle technology choices would contribute to increasing payload or decreasing the size of the required launch vehicles. Heliocentric low-thrust trajectory analyses for Solar Electric Transfer were generated with the SEPTOP code.

  2. Aerobraking in a dusty Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I-Dee; Tauber, Michael; Papadopoulos, Periklis

    1990-01-01

    The effects of dust particle impacts on the erosion of the heat shield were estimated for a 26 m diameter aerobraking vehicle entering the Mars atmosphere at 8.6 km/sec. An explicit Navier-Stokes code was used to compute the flow field about the vehicle for the actual Martian atmospheric composition at a speed of 7.5 km/sec. The deceleration and melting of the dust particles within the forebody shock-layer was computed for dust spherules having initial diameters from 3 to 10 microns. Two heat shield materials were considered: Shuttle tiles with glassy surfaces and a low-density ablator known as Avcoat.

  3. An Atmospheric Variability Model for Venus Aerobraking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolson, Robert T.; Prince, Jill L. H.; Konopliv, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    Aerobraking has proven to be an enabling technology for planetary missions to Mars and has been proposed to enable low cost missions to Venus. Aerobraking saves a significant amount of propulsion fuel mass by exploiting atmospheric drag to reduce the eccentricity of the initial orbit. The solar arrays have been used as the primary drag surface and only minor modifications have been made in the vehicle design to accommodate the relatively modest aerothermal loads. However, if atmospheric density is highly variable from orbit to orbit, the mission must either accept higher aerothermal risk, a slower pace for aerobraking, or a tighter corridor likely with increased propulsive cost. Hence, knowledge of atmospheric variability is of great interest for the design of aerobraking missions. The first planetary aerobraking was at Venus during the Magellan mission. After the primary Magellan science mission was completed, aerobraking was used to provide a more circular orbit to enhance gravity field recovery. Magellan aerobraking took place between local solar times of 1100 and 1800 hrs, and it was found that the Venusian atmospheric density during the aerobraking phase had less than 10% 1 sigma orbit to orbit variability. On the other hand, at some latitudes and seasons, Martian variability can be as high as 40% 1 sigmaFrom both the MGN and PVO mission it was known that the atmosphere, above aerobraking altitudes, showed greater variability at night, but this variability was never quantified in a systematic manner. This paper proposes a model for atmospheric variability that can be used for aerobraking mission design until more complete data sets become available.

  4. Autonomous aerobraking for low-cost interplanetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrelli, David; O'Shaughnessy, Daniel; Strikwerda, Thomas; Kaidy, James; Prince, Jill; Powell, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Aerobraking has previously been used to reduce the propellant required to deliver an orbiter to its desired final orbit. In principle, aerobraking should be possible around any target planet or moon having sufficient atmosphere to permit atmospheric drag to provide a portion of the mission ΔV, in lieu of supplying all of the required ΔV propulsively. The spacecraft is flown through the upper atmosphere of the target using multiple passes, ensuring that the dynamic pressure and thermal loads remain within the spacecraft's design parameters. NASA has successfully conducted aerobraking operations four times, once at Venus and three times at Mars. While aerobraking reduces the fuel required, it does so at the expense of time (typically 3-6 months), continuous Deep Space Network (DSN) coverage, and a large ground staff. These factors can result in aerobraking being a very expensive operational phase of the mission. However, aerobraking has matured to the point that much of the daily operation could potentially be performed autonomously onboard the spacecraft, thereby reducing the required ground support and attendant aerobraking related costs. To facilitate a lower-risk transition from ground processing to an autonomous capability, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has assembled a team of experts in aerobraking and interplanetary guidance and control to develop a high-fidelity, flight-like simulation. This simulation will be used to demonstrate the overall feasibility while exploring the potential for staff and DSN coverage reductions that autonomous aerobraking might provide. This paper reviews the various elements of autonomous aerobraking and presents an overview of the various models and algorithms that must be transformed from the current ground processing methodology to a flight-like environment. Additionally the high-fidelity flight software test bed, being developed from models used in a recent interplanetary mission, will be summarized.

  5. Preliminary design of a large tetrahedral truss/hexagonal heatshield panel aerobrake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    An aerobrake structural concept is introduced which consists of two primary components: (1) a lightweight erectable tetrahedral support truss; and (2) sandwich hexagonal heatshield panels which, when attached to the truss, form a continuous impermeable aerobraking surface. Generic finite element models and a general analysis procedure to design tetrahedral truss/hexagonal heatshield panel aerobrakes is developed, and values of the aerobrake design parameters which minimize mass and packaging volume for a 120-foot-diameter aerobrake are determined. Sensitivity of the aerobrake design to variations in design parameters is also assessed. The results show that a 120-foot-diameter aerobrake is viable using the concept presented (i.e., the aerobrake mass is less than or equal to 15 percent of the payload spacecraft mass). Minimizing the aerobrake mass (by increasing the number of rings in the support truss) however, leads to aerobrakes with the highest part count.

  6. Onboard Atmospheric Modeling and Prediction for Autonomous Aerobraking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolson, Robert H.; Prince, Jill L. H.

    2011-01-01

    Aerobraking has proven to be an effective means of increasing the science payload for planetary orbiting missions and/or for enabling the use of less expensive launch vehicles. Though aerobraking has numerous benefits, large operations cost have been required to maintain the aerobraking time line without violating aerodynamic heating or other constraints. Two operations functions have been performed on an orbit by orbit basis to estimate atmospheric properties relevant to aerobraking. The Navigation team typically solves for an atmospheric density scale factor using DSN tracking data and the atmospheric modeling team uses telemetric accelerometer data to recover atmospheric density profiles. After some effort, decisions are made about the need for orbit trim maneuvers to adjust periapsis altitude to stay within the aerobraking corridor. Autonomous aerobraking would reduce the need for many ground based tasks. To be successful, atmospheric modeling must be performed on the vehicle in near real time. This paper discusses the issues associated with estimating the planetary atmosphere onboard and evaluates a number of the options for Mars, Venus and Titan aerobraking missions.

  7. Space tug aerobraking study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corso, C. J.; Eyer, C. L.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility and practicality of employing an aerobraking trajectory for return of the reusable space tug from geosynchronous orbit was investigated. The aerobraking return trajectory modes employ transfer ellipses from high orbits which have low perigee altitudes wherein the earth's sensible atmosphere provides drag to reduce the tug return delta velocity requirements and thus decrease the required return trip propulsive energy. Aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, trajectories, guidance and control, configuration concepts, materials, weights and performance were considered. Sensitivities to trajectory uncertainties, atmospheric anomalies and reentry environments were determined. New technology requirements and future studies required to further enhance the aerobraking potential were identified.

  8. The Next Generation of Mars-GRAM and Its Role in the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Ramey, Holly S.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM 2010 is currently being used to develop the onboard atmospheric density estimator that is part of the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan. In previous versions, Mars-GRAM was less than realistic when used for sensitivity studies for Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) MapYear=0 and large optical depth values, such as tau=3. A comparison analysis has been completed between Mars-GRAM, TES and data from the Planetary Data System (PDS) resulting in updated coefficients for the functions relating density, latitude, and longitude of the sun. The adjustment factors are expressed as a function of height (z), Latitude (Lat) and areocentric solar longitude (Ls). The latest release of Mars-GRAM 2010 includes these adjustment factors that alter the in-put data from MGCM and MTGCM for the Mapping Year 0 (user-controlled dust) case. The greatest adjustment occurs at large optical depths such as tau greater than 1. The addition of the adjustment factors has led to better correspondence to TES Limb data from 0-60 km as well as better agreement with MGS, ODY and MRO data at approximately 90-135 km. Improved simulations utilizing Mars-GRAM 2010 are vital to developing the onboard atmospheric density estimator for the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan. Mars-GRAM 2010 was not the only planetary GRAM utilized during phase 1 of this plan; Titan-GRAM and Venus-GRAM were used to generate density data sets for Aerobraking Design Reference Missions. These data sets included altitude profiles (both vertical and along a trajectory), GRAM perturbations (tides, gravity waves, etc.) and provided density and scale height values for analysis by other Autonomous Aero-braking team members.

  9. Chemical Management System

    1998-10-30

    CMS provides an inventory of all chemicals on order or being held in the laboratory, to provide a specific location for all chemical containers, to ensure that health and safety regulatory codes are being upheld, and to provide PNNL staff with hazardous chemical information to better manage their inventories. CMS is comprised of five major modules: 1) chemical purchasing, 2) chemical inventory, 3) chemical names, properties, and hazard groups, 4) reporting, and 5) system administration.

  10. Aeroheating Thermal Analysis Methods for Aerobraking Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.; Dec, John A.; George, Benjamin E.

    2002-01-01

    Mars missions often employ aerobraking upon arrival at Mars as a low-mass method to gradually reduce the orbit period from a high-altitude, highly elliptical insertion orbit to the final science orbit. Two recent missions that made use of aerobraking were Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) and Mars Odyssey. Both spacecraft had solar arrays as the main aerobraking surface area. Aerobraking produces a high heat load on the solar arrays, which have a large surface area exposed to the airflow and relatively low mass. To accurately model the complex behavior during aerobraking, the thermal analysis must be tightly coupled to the flight mechanics, aerodynamics, and atmospheric modeling efforts being performed during operations. To properly represent the temperatures prior to and during the drag pass, the model must include the orbital solar and planetary heat fluxes. The correlation of the thermal model to flight data allows a validation of the modeling process, as well as information on what processes dominate the thermal behavior. This paper describes the thermal modeling method that was developed for this purpose, as well as correlation for two flight missions, and a discussion of improvements to the methodology.

  11. Aerothermodynamic environments of aerobraking vehicles for manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledoux, Stephen T.; Vas, Irwin E.

    1991-01-01

    The aerothermodynamic environments of manned spacraft aerobraking in the Martian and earth atmospheres are evaluated. Thermal performance of aerobrake concepts are examined for current cryogenic-aerobrake and advanced propulsion missions entailing three different modes of aerobraking: (1) aerocapture into an orbit about Mars, (2) descent and landing at Mars, and (3) Mars return direct entry at earth. Analyses for these vehicles and modes included both radiative and convective heating, where radiative heating is shown to be a significant portion of the total stagnation point heating induced on the vehicle. A comprehensive parametric study of the effects of ballistic coefficient, nose radius, entry velocity, and L/D on stagnation point heating is described. Optimal nose radii for ranges of ballistic coefficient and entry velocity are determined. The peak heating rates are shown to be 83 W/sq cm and 90 W/sq cm for a low and high L/D Mars transfer vehicle configuration, respectively. Heating profiles for these vehicles using boundary layer techniques show that a high L/D shape will result in a smaller high-temperature region provided the flow is laminar. An examination of a crew return vehicle for a Mars return direct entry trajectory shows that the thermal protection for this aerobrake will require an ablative material for heat rejection due to the large heating rates (about 1 kW/sq cm).

  12. Design study of an integrated aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. D.; Roberts, B. B.; Nagy, K.; Taylor, P.; Gamble, J. D.; Ceremeli, C. J.; Knoll, K. R.; Li, C. P.; Reid, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    An aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle (AOTV) concept, which has an aerobrake structure that is integrated with the propulsion stage, is discussed. The concept vehicle is to be assembled in space and is space-based. The advantages of aeroassist over an all propulsive vehicle are discussed and it is shown that the vehicle considered is very competitive with inflatable and deployable concepts from mass and performance aspects. The aerobrake geometry is an ellipsoidally blunted, raked-off, elliptical wide-angle cone with a toroidal skirt. Propellant tanks, engines, and subsystems are integrated into a closed, isogrid aerobrake structure which provides rigidity. The vehicle has two side-firing, gimbaled RL-10 type engines and carries 38,000 kg of useable propellant. The trajectory during aerobraking is determined from an adaptive guidance logic, and the heating is determined from engineering correlations as well as 3-D Navier-Stokes solutions. The AOTV is capable of placing 13,500 kg payload into geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) or carrying a LEO-GEO-LEO round-trip payload of 7100 kg. A two-stage version considered for lunar missions results in a lunar surface delivery capability of 18,000 kg or a round-trip capability of 6800 kg with 3860 kg delivery-only capability.

  13. Structural performance of two aerobrake hexagonal heat shield panel concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Dyess, James W.

    1992-01-01

    Structural sizing and performance are presented for two structural concepts for an aerobrake hexagonal heat shield panel. One concept features a sandwich construction with an aluminum honeycomb core and thin quasi-isotropic graphite-epoxy face sheets. The other concept features a skin-rib isogrid construction with thin quasi-isotropic graphite-epoxy skins and graphite-epoxy ribs oriented at 0, +60, and -60 degs along the panel. Linear static, linear bifurcation buckling, and nonlinear static analyses were performed to compare the structural performance of the two panel concepts and assess their feasibility for a lunar transfer vehicle aerobrake application.

  14. Results of the Venus Express Aerobraking Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svedhem, Hakan; Müller-Wodarg, Ingo

    2014-11-01

    After a very successful mission orbiting Venus for more than 8 years, slowly the fuel is running out and the spacecraft will inevitably one day end up in the hot and acid atmosphere of the planet. Being near the end of the mission and in a position to accept some risk to the spacecraft we decided to take the opportunity to dip down deep into the atmosphere, to around 130 km, in a controlled manner, in order to make detailed in situ investigations of this for remote sensing instruments difficult to access region. The on board accelerometers gave direct measurements of the deceleration which in turn is directly proportional to the local atmospheric density. This provided an excellent way to study both the total density profile throughout the orbital arc in the atmosphere and small scale density variations in the region of the pericentre. The spacecraft behaved perfectly well throughout the whole campaign and provided a wealth of data both on the atmosphere and on the response of the spacecraft to the harsh environment with strong heat loads and some dynamic stress. At the time of the campaign the pericentre was located near the terminator at about 75 degrees Northern latitude. Aerobraking is a very efficient method of reducing the pericentre velocity and thereby reducing the apocentre altitude and the orbital period.The so called "walk-in" phase started at an altitude of 190 km on 17 May and the campaign ended on 11 July, after having reached a lowest altitude of 129.2 km. Subsequently, a series of orbit control manoeuvres lifted up the pericentre to 460 km altitude and the science activities were resumed after a thorough check-out of the spacecraft. We have detected a highly variable atmosphere, both on a day to day basis and within the individual pericentre passes. The duration of each pass was approximately 100 s and the maximum dynamic pressure achieved was more than 0.75 N/m2, probably a record for a spacecraft that continued its operation afterwards. The

  15. Systems Chemical Biology

    PubMed Central

    Oprea, Tudor I.; Tropsha, Alexander; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Rintoul, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing availability of data related to genes, proteins and their modulation by small molecules, paralleled by the emergence of simulation tools in systems biology, has provided a vast amount of biological information. However, there is a critical need to develop cheminformatics tools that can integrate chemical knowledge with these biological databases, with the goal of creating systems chemical biology. PMID:17637771

  16. Computational Systems Chemical Biology

    PubMed Central

    Oprea, Tudor I.; May, Elebeoba E.; Leitão, Andrei; Tropsha, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    There is a critical need for improving the level of chemistry awareness in systems biology. The data and information related to modulation of genes and proteins by small molecules continue to accumulate at the same time as simulation tools in systems biology and whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) continue to evolve. We called this emerging area at the interface between chemical biology and systems biology systems chemical biology, SCB (Oprea et al., 2007). The overarching goal of computational SCB is to develop tools for integrated chemical-biological data acquisition, filtering and processing, by taking into account relevant information related to interactions between proteins and small molecules, possible metabolic transformations of small molecules, as well as associated information related to genes, networks, small molecules and, where applicable, mutants and variants of those proteins. There is yet an unmet need to develop an integrated in silico pharmacology / systems biology continuum that embeds drug-target-clinical outcome (DTCO) triplets, a capability that is vital to the future of chemical biology, pharmacology and systems biology. Through the development of the SCB approach, scientists will be able to start addressing, in an integrated simulation environment, questions that make the best use of our ever-growing chemical and biological data repositories at the system-wide level. This chapter reviews some of the major research concepts and describes key components that constitute the emerging area of computational systems chemical biology. PMID:20838980

  17. Equilibria in Chemical Systems

    1992-01-01

    SOLGASMIX-PV calculates equilibrium relationships in complex chemical systems. Chemical equilibrium calculations involve finding the system composition, within certain constraints, which contains the minimum free energy. The constraints are the preservation of the masses of each element present and either constant pressure or volume. SOLGASMIX-PV can calculate equilibria in systems containing a gaseous phase, condensed phase solutions, and condensed phases of invariant and variable stoichiometry. Either a constant total gas volume or a constant total pressuremore » can be assumed. Unit activities for condensed phases and ideality for solutions are assumed, although nonideal systems can be handled provided activity coefficient relationships are available.« less

  18. Aerobraking strategies for the sample of comet coma earth return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro; Uesugi, Kuninori; Yen, Chen-Wan L.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a study to the validate the applicability of the aerobraking concept to the SOCCER (sample of comet coma earth return) mission using a six-DOF computer simulation of the aerobraking process are presented. The SOCCER spacecraft and the aerobraking scenario and power supply problem are briefly described. Results are presented for the spin effect, payload exposure problem, and sun angle effect.

  19. Aeroheating Mapping to Thermal Model for Autonomous Aerobraking Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal modeling has been performed to evaluate the potential for autonomous aerobraking of a spacecraft in the atmosphere of a planet. As part of this modeling, the aeroheating flux during aerobraking must be applied to the spacecraft solar arrays to evaluate their thermal response. On the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) mission, this was done via two separate thermal models and an extensive suite of mapping scripts. That method has been revised, and the thermal analysis of an aerobraking pass can now be accomplished via a single thermal model, using a new capability in the Thermal Desktop software. This capability, Boundary Condition Mapper, has the ability to input heating flux files that vary with time, position on the solar array, and with the skin temperature. A recently added feature to the Boundary Condition Mapper is that this module can also utilize files that describe the variation of aeroheating over the surface with atmospheric density (rather than time); this is the format of the MRO aeroheating files. This capability has allowed a huge streamlining of the MRO thermal process, simplifying the procedure for importing new aeroheating files and trajectory information. The new process, as well as the quantified time savings, is described.

  20. Aerobraking - An activity on the border betweeen science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svedhem, Håkan

    2014-05-01

    Aeorbraking is a technique whereby an orbiting spacecraft is slowed down by the drag of a planetary atmosphere against the surfaces of a spacecraft. It has been applied only few times in the past in order to lower the orbit around a planet, notably on Mars and on Venus. A properly designed aerobraking campaign can save significant amounts of fuel that otherwise would have to be used to achieve an equivalent orbit change, and so can enable missions that would not be possible with conventional orbit modification by thrusters. During the passage through the upper atmosphere very valuable data on the local density can be collected through the use of standard AOCS accelerometers and gyros. From these data local temperature and pressure can be derived. Variations can be studied at small scales and over a large range of altitudes. Such data are difficult or impossible to collect with remote means. Venus Express has now entered its last year of operations, limited by its available fuel, and in June-July this year a tree weeks long campaign of aerobraking will be performed. This presentation will cover the fundamentals of aerobraking and the expected science products from this campaign.

  1. Preliminary structural design of a lunar transfer vehicle aerobrake. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Lance B.

    1992-01-01

    An aerobrake concept for a Lunar transfer vehicle was weight optimized through the use of the Taguchi design method, structural finite element analyses and structural sizing routines. Six design parameters were chosen to represent the aerobrake structural configuration. The design parameters included honeycomb core thickness, diameter to depth ratio, shape, material, number of concentric ring frames, and number of radial frames. Each parameter was assigned three levels. The minimum weight aerobrake configuration resulting from the study was approx. half the weight of the average of all twenty seven experimental configurations. The parameters having the most significant impact on the aerobrake structural weight were identified.

  2. A comparison of chemical propulsion, nuclear thermal propulsion, and multimegawatt electric propulsion for Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Robert H.; Blandino, John J.; Leifer, Stephanie D.

    1991-01-01

    Various propulsion systems are considered for a split-mission piloted exploration of Mars in terms of reducing total initial mass in low earth orbit (IMLEO) as well as trip time. Aerobraked nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), multimegawatt (MMW) nuclear electric propulsion (NEP), and MMW solar electric propulsion (SEP) are discussed and compared to a baseline aerobraked chemical propulsion system. NTP offers low IMLEO, MMW NEP allows both low IMLEO and a short trip time, and both nuclear systems offer better mission characteristics than the chemical system. The MMW SEP is concluded to be less efficient in spite of a lower IMLEO because of the system's higher specific mass and nonconstant power production. It is recommended that MMW NEP and SEP systems be considered for application to Mars cargo missions. The NEP system is concluded to be the most effective propulsion configuration for piloted Mars missions and lunar base missions.

  3. Heavily loaded joints for assembling aerobrake support trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandel, Hannskarl; Olsson, Nils; Levintov, Boris

    1990-01-01

    The major emphasis was to develop erectable joints for large aerobrake support trusses. The truss joints must be able to withstand the large forces experienced by the truss during the aero-pass, as well as be easily assembled and disassembled on orbit by astronauts or robots. Other important design considerations include; strength, stiffness, and allowable error in strut length. Six mechanical joint designs, as well as a seventh joint design, where a high strength epoxy is injected to make the connection rigid, are presented.

  4. Low L/D aerobrake test at Mach 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, L. M.; Engel, C. D.; Sulyma, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    An aerobraking Orbital transfer vehicle may be used to increase the Space Shuttle mission capability to and from high orbits. A Mach 10 wind-tunnel test was performed for a low lift-drag aerobrake, to define a preliminary aerothermal environment for this candidate concept. Test hardware simulated the ribs and stretched fabric of conceptual flight hardware. Pressures, paint-melting histories, and oilflow data were measured on the brake. Pressure and thermocouple heating rate data were measured on the payload. Brake peak heating is at the edge at all angles of attack, although the stagnation point is not outboard of 75 percent radius even at 20 degrees angle of attack. Brake ribs show slightly higher heating than flats, although pressures are essentially constant. Payload peak heating occurs near 12 degrees angle of attack, and is 30 percent of the sphere stagnation point heating (for a sphere of brake diameter). Payload pressure distributions follow the heating pattern. Reynolds number effects are small on the brake and large on the payload, for the range of test conditions: 0.4-1.0 million/foot.

  5. Magnetic observations of Venus ionosphere during Venus Express aerobraking campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tielong; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Russell, Christopher; Luhmann, Janet

    2015-04-01

    During the late days of the Venus Express mission, an aerobraking campaign was performed in May - July 2014. The altering of the spacecraft orbit allows the pericenter went to as low as 129.7 km in altitude, which is well below the main peak ionosphere altitude of ~140 km. Magnetic observations during aerobraking campaign shows that the Venus ionosphere exhibits the same magnetic properties as observed by Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) during solar maximum for altitude above 150 km which was the lowest altitude reached by PVO: magnetized ionosphere with large-scale horizontal magnetic field; or unmagnetized ionosphere with numerous small-scale thin structures, so-called flux ropes. However, around or below main peak ionosphere altitude, we find only very low background magnetic field of several nanotesla, without any large magnetic belt or larger spikes of fields, the so-called flux ropes. Apparently the magnetization of the ionosphere or the penetration of the magnetic ropes stops at main peak ionosphere altitude.

  6. Chemical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  7. Applications of low lift to drag ratio aerobrakes using angle of attack variation for control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulqueen, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Several applications of low lift to drag ratio aerobrakes are investigated which use angle of attack variation for control. The applications are: return from geosynchronous or lunar orbit to low Earth orbit; and planetary aerocapture at Earth and Mars. A number of aerobrake design considerations are reviewed. It was found that the flow impingement behind the aerobrake and the aerodynamic heating loads are the primary factors that control the sizing of an aerobrake. The heating loads and other loads, such as maximum acceleration, are determined by the vehicle ballistic coefficient, the atmosphere entry conditions, and the trajectory design. Several formulations for defining an optimum trajectory are reviewed, and the various performance indices that can be used are evaluated. The 'nearly grazing' optimal trajectory was found to provide the best compromise between the often conflicting goals of minimizing the vehicle propulsive requirements and minimizing vehicle loads. The relationship between vehicle and trajectory design is investigated further using the results of numerical simulations of trajectories for each aerobrake application. The data show the sensitivity of the trajectories to several vehicle parameters and atmospheric density variations. The results of the trajectory analysis show that low lift to drag ratio aerobrakes, which use angle of attack variation for control, can potentially be used for a wide range of aerobrake applications.

  8. Thermal Modeling of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Solar Panel and Instruments during Aerobraking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Gasbarre, Joseph F.; Amundsen, Ruth M.

    2007-01-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) launched on August 12, 2005 and started aerobraking at Mars in March 2006. During the spacecraft s design phase, thermal models of the solar panels and instruments were developed to determine which components would be the most limiting thermally during aerobraking. Having determined the most limiting components, thermal limits in terms of heat rate were established. Advanced thermal modeling techniques were developed utilizing Thermal Desktop and Patran Thermal. Heat transfer coefficients were calculated using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo technique. Analysis established that the solar panels were the most limiting components during the aerobraking phase of the mission.

  9. The Strategy for the Second Phase of Aerobraking Mars Global Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, M. D.; Esposito, P. B.; Alwar, V.; Demcak, S. W.; Graat, E. J.; Burkhart, P. D.; Portock, B. M.

    2000-01-01

    On February 19, 1999, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft was able to propulsively establish its mapping orbit. This event followed the completion of the second phase of aerobraking for the MGS spacecraft on February 4, 1999. For the first time, a spacecraft at Mars had successfully employed aerobraking methods in order to reach its desired pre-launch mapping orbit. This was accomplished despite a damaged spacecraft solar array. The MGS spacecraft was launched on November 7, 1996, and after a ten month interplanetary transit was inserted into a highly elliptical capture orbit at Mars on September 12, 1997. Unlike other interplanetary missions, the MGS spacecraft was launched with a planned mission delta-V ((Delta)V) deficit of nearly 1250 m/s. To overcome this AV deficit, aerobraking techniques were employed. However, damage discovered to one of the spacecraft's two solar arrays after launch forced major revisions to the original aerobraking planning of the MGS mission. In order to avoid a complete structural failure of the array, peak dynamic pressure levels for the spacecraft were established at a major spacecraft health review in November 1997. These peak dynamic pressure levels were roughly one-third of the original mission design values. Incorporating the new dynamic pressure limitations into mission replanning efforts resulted in an 'extended' orbit insertion phase for the mission. This 'extended' orbit insertion phase was characterized by two distinct periods of aerobraking separated by an aerobraking hiatus that would last for several months in an intermediate orbit called the "Science Phasing Orbit" (SPO). This paper describes and focuses on the strategy for the second phase of aerobraking for the MGS mission called "Aerobraking Phase 2." This description will include the baseline aerobraking flight profile, the trajectory control methodology, as well as the key trajectory metrics that were monitored in order to successfully "guide' the spacecraft to

  10. A survey of aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul

    1987-01-01

    The five existing design concepts of the aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle (namely, the raked sphere-cone designs, conical lifting-brake, raked elliptic-cone, lifting-body, and ballute) are reviewed and critiqued. Historical backgrounds, and the geometrical, aerothermal, and operational features of these designs are reviewed first. Then, the technological requirements for the vehicle (namely, navigation, aerodynamic stability and control, afterbody flow impingement, nonequilibrium radiation, convective heat-transfer rates, mission abort and multiple atmospheric passes, transportation and construction, and the payload-to-vehicle weight requirements) are delineated by summarizing the recent advancements made on these issues. Each of the five designs are critiqued and rated on these issues. The highest and the lowest ratings are given to the raked sphere-cone and the ballute design, respectively.

  11. Mechanistic model for catalytic recombination during aerobraking maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    Several mechanistic models are developed to predict recombination coefficients for use in heat shield design for reusable surface insulation (RSI) on aerobraking vehicles such as space shuttles. The models are applied over a temperature range of 300 to 1800 K and a stagnation pressure range of 0 to 3,000 Pa. A four parameter model in temperature was found to work best; however, several models (including those with atom concentrations at the surface) were also investigated. Mechanistic models developed with atom concentration terms may be applicable when sufficient data becomes available. The requirement is shown for recombination experiments in the 300 to 1000 K and 1500 to 1850 K temperature range, with deliberate concentration variations.

  12. Computation of three-dimensional flow about aerobrake configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. P.

    1986-01-01

    Ellipsoid, cone and cylinder aerobrake configurations are analyzed to provide comparison data between experimental and model predictions. An analytical model was devised to account for the shock layer ahead of the body and in the near-wake region in terms of the Navier-Stokes equations expressed in conformal polar and azimuthal-angle coordinates. Using polar coordinates simplified the equations by mapping the body onto a sphere, a procedure which also reduced the magnitude of the discretization errors. The equations are then solved using an alternating direction implicit (ADI) factorization technique. Computations were carried out for Mach 3-10 at various grid resolutions and compared with available wind tunnel data. The model generated pressure distributions, heat transfer coefficients and velocity profile data that agreed relatively well with experimental data at a reduced computational cost. Further work is necessary to identify the location of shocks and to model flows about asymmetric configurations.

  13. Miniature chemical measurement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Prospect of microfabricated monolithic devices that accomplish complete chemical assays is enticing. Early work with microfabricated chemical analysis devices focused on separations methods. More recently reagent manipulation has been integrated with separation devices to create more powerful capabilities. Examples of procedures, other than separations, that have been demonstrated on micromachined structures include reagent mixing, dilution, and reaction, preconcentration through sample stacking and biopolymer tagging for detection. Developments in liquid phase microfabricated chemical analysis devices are reviewed.

  14. Venus Upper Atmosphere - Results from the Venus Express Aerobraking Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svedhem, H.

    2015-12-01

    During the last year of operations Venus Express was conducting an experimental aerobraking campaign. The objectives were twofold; firstly, to exercise for the first time the techniques of orbit modification by aerobraking with a European spacecraft, in order to prepare for future scientific ESA missions, and secondly, to collect information on atmospheric density by direct measurements in an environment difficult to sample with other means. Several of the scientific instruments on board Venus Express measured gas abundances of various gasses, including CO2, up to an altitude of 130km, but no reliable measurements could be made of total density and no remote measurements could be done above this altitude. The on board accelerometers gave direct measurements of the deceleration which in turn is directly proportional to the local atmospheric density. This provided an excellent way to study both the total density profile throughout the orbital arc in the atmosphere and small scale density variations in the region of the pericentre. The spacecraft behaved perfectly well throughout the whole campaign and provided a wealth of data both on the atmosphere and on the response of the spacecraft to the harsh environment with strong heat loads and some dynamic stress. At the time of the campaign the pericentre was located near the terminator at about 75 degrees Northern latitude. The so called "walk-in" phase started at an altitude of 190 km on 17 May 2014 and the campaign ended on 11 July, after having reached a lowest altitude of 129.2 km. Subsequently, a series of orbit control manoeuvres lifted up the pericentre to 460 km altitude and the science activities were resumed after a thorough check-out of the spacecraft. We have detected a highly variable atmosphere, both on a day to day basis and within the individual pericentre passes. The duration of each pass was approximately 100 s and the maximum dynamic pressure achieved was more than 0.75 N/m2. The orbital period was

  15. Chemical sensor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrach, Murray R. (Inventor); Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A chemical sensing apparatus and method for the detection of sub parts-per-trillion concentrations of molecules in a sample by optimizing electron utilization in the formation of negative ions is provided. A variety of media may be sampled including air, seawater, dry sediment, or undersea sediment. An electrostatic mirror is used to reduce the kinetic energy of an electron beam to zero or near-zero kinetic energy.

  16. Control algorithms for aerobraking in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Donald T.; Shipley, Buford W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The Analytic Predictor Corrector (APC) and Energy Controller (EC) atmospheric guidance concepts were adapted to control an interplanetary vehicle aerobraking in the Martian atmosphere. Changes are made to the APC to improve its robustness to density variations. These changes include adaptation of a new exit phase algorithm, an adaptive transition velocity to initiate the exit phase, refinement of the reference dynamic pressure calculation and two improved density estimation techniques. The modified controller with the hybrid density estimation technique is called the Mars Hybrid Predictor Corrector (MHPC), while the modified controller with a polynomial density estimator is called the Mars Predictor Corrector (MPC). A Lyapunov Steepest Descent Controller (LSDC) is adapted to control the vehicle. The LSDC lacked robustness, so a Lyapunov tracking exit phase algorithm is developed to guide the vehicle along a reference trajectory. This algorithm, when using the hybrid density estimation technique to define the reference path, is called the Lyapunov Hybrid Tracking Controller (LHTC). With the polynomial density estimator used to define the reference trajectory, the algorithm is called the Lyapunov Tracking Controller (LTC). These four new controllers are tested using a six degree of freedom computer simulation to evaluate their robustness. The MHPC, MPC, LHTC, and LTC show dramatic improvements in robustness over the APC and EC.

  17. Meteorological accuracy requirements for aerobraking orbital transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalecki, L. M.; Cerimele, C. J.; Gamble, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Accuracy requirements for the prediction of atmospheric density for a transfer mission from geosynchronous orbit to low earth orbit using an aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle are presented. Uniform density variations such as would occur seasonally and diurnally were considered as well as density 'pockets' similar to what may have been observed on some of the Space Shuttle Orbiter entry flights. Variations in the lift-to-drag ratio from 0.3 to 1.5 were evaluated, with the values of the ratio of the vehicle weight to the product of the aerodynamic lift coefficient and the aerodynamic reference area ranging from 20 to 100 lb/sq ft. The results of the study indicated no problems for the range of lift-to-drag ratio values considered for uniform density variations of at least + or - 50 percent. However, density 'pockets' created problems if variations of + or - 30 percent from nominal occurred over altitude ranges of 1,000 to 10,000 ft.

  18. The effects of self-generated and applied magnetic fields on the computation of flow over a Mars return aerobrake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant

    1991-01-01

    A CFD technique is developed to calculate the electromagnetic phenomena simultaneously with the fluid flow in the shock layer over an axisymmetric blunt body in a thermal-equilibrium chemical-nonequilibrium environment. The flowfield is solved using an explicit time-marching, first-order spatially accurate scheme. The electromagnetic phenomena are coupled to the real-gas flow solver through an iterative procedure. The electromagnetic terms introduce a strong stiffness, which was overcome by using significantly smaller time steps for the electromagnetic conservation equation. The technique is applied in calculating the flow over a Mars return aerobrake vehicle entering the Earth's atmosphere. For the case where no external field is applied, the electromagnetic effects have little impact on the flowfield.

  19. Weight optimization of an aerobrake structural concept for a lunar transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Lance B.; Unal, Resit; Rowell, Lawrence F.; Rehder, John J.

    1992-01-01

    An aerobrake structural concept for a lunar transfer vehicle was weight optimized through the use of the Taguchi design method, finite element analyses, and element sizing routines. Six design parameters were chosen to represent the aerobrake structural configuration. The design parameters included honeycomb core thickness, diameter-depth ratio, shape, material, number of concentric ring frames, and number of radial frames. Each parameter was assigned three levels. The aerobrake structural configuration with the minimum weight was 44 percent less than the average weight of all the remaining satisfactory experimental configurations. In addition, the results of this study have served to bolster the advocacy of the Taguchi method for aerospace vehicle design. Both reduced analysis time and an optimized design demonstrated the applicability of the Taguchi method to aerospace vehicle design.

  20. Mars global surveyor navigation and aerobraking at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, P.; Alwar, V.; Demcak, S.; Graat, E.; Johnston, M.; Mase, R.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft was successfully inserted into an elliptical orbit around Mars on 9/12/97, 01:53:49 UTC. This orbit was near polar (inclination = 93.26 deg) with an orbital period of 44.993 hours and apoapsis and periapsis altitudes of 54,025.9 km and 262.9 km respectively. After a short aerobraking (AB) initiation interval (9/12/97 to 10/2/97), the main phase of AB or orbit period reduction was established. However shortly thereafter, a significant problem with the minus-Y axis solar array developed which necessitated a temporary suspension of AB. Ultimately, this forced the Project to abandon the original plan to complete AB on 1/18/98 and establish the mapping orbit on 3/15/98. The revised plan called for a reduced level of AB, thus subjecting the solar array and yoke assembly to less aerodynamic stress. After 201 orbits and 196 days after MOI, the first phase of AB has ended, the orbital period was 11.64 hours with apoapsis and periapsis altitudes of 17,870.3 and 170.7 km respectively. At present, MGS is in a science phasing orbit (SPO) and shall acquire science data from 3/28/98 to 9/11/98. Thereafter the second phase of AB shall begin and is expected to end during Feb 1999 when the orbital period shall be 1.9 hours and the orbit's descending node shall be at the 2:00 am (local mean solar time) orientation.

  1. Mars Global Surveyor: Aerobraking and Observations Support Using a Mars Global Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Bridger, Alison F. C.; Harberle, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    This is a Final Report for a Joint Research Interchange (JRI) between NASA Ames Research Center and San Jose State University, Department of Meteorology. Using a global atmospheric circulation model for Mars, the focus of this JRI has been to provide support for the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft aerobraking activities and interpretation guidance of preliminary observations. ne primary atmospheric model applied in this investigation has been a high-top version of the NASA Ames Mars general circulation model (MGCM). Comparisons with an atmospheric model designed primarily for engineering purposes (Mars-GRAM) has also been carried out. From a suite of MGCM simulations, we have assessed plausible spatial and temporal variability in atmospheric density at high altitudes (e.g., 70-110 km) for seasonal dates and locations during Phase 1 aerobraking. Diagnostic tools have been developed to analyze circulation fields from the MGCM simulations, and these tools have been applied in the creation of a Mars climate catalogue database. Throughout Phase 1 aerobraking activities, analysis products have been provided to the MGS aerobraking atmospheric advisory group (AAG). Analyses of circulation variability at the coupling level between the MGCM and a Mars thermospheric global circulation model (MTGCM) has also been assessed. Finally, using a quasi-geostrophic dynamical formulation with the MGCM simulations, diagnosis of breaking planetary (Rossby) waves in Mars' middle atmosphere has been carried out. Titles of papers presented at scientific workshops and seminars, and a publication in the scientific literature are provided.

  2. Mars Global Surveyor: Aerobraking and Observations Support Using a Mars Global Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Bridger, Alison F. C.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    This is a Final Report for a Joint Research Interchange (JRI) between NASA Ames Research Center and San Jose State University, Department of Meteorology. Using a global atmospheric circulation model for Mars, the focus of this JRI has been to provide support for the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft aerobraking activities and interpretation guidance of preliminary observations. The primary atmospheric model applied in this investigation has been a high-top version of the NASA Ames Mars general circulation model (MGCM). Comparisons with an atmospheric model designed primarily for engineering purposes (Mars-GRAM) has also been carried out. From a suite of MGCM simulations, we have assessed plausible spatial and temporal variability in atmospheric density at high altitudes (e.g., 70-1 10 km) for seasonal dates and locations during Phase 1 aerobraking. Diagnostic tools have been developed to analyze circulation fields from the MGCM simulations, and these tools have been applied in the creation of a Mars climate catalogue database. Throughout Phase I aerobraking activities, analysis products have been provided to the MGS aerobraking atmospheric advisory group (AAG). Analyses of circulation variability at the coupling level between the MGCM and a Mars thermospheric global circulation model (MTGCM) has also been assessed. Finally, using a quasi-geostrophic dynamical formulation with the MGCM simulations, diagnosis of breaking planetary (Rossby) waves in Mars middle atmosphere has been carried out. Titles of papers presented at scientific workshops and seminars, and a publication in the scientific literature are provided.

  3. Mars Global Surveyor: Aerobraking and Observations Support Using a Mars Global Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Bridger, Alison F. C.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    This is a Final Report for a Joint Research Interchange (JRI) between NASA Ames Research Center and San Jose State University, Department of Meteorology. Using a global atmospheric circulation model for Mars, the focus of this JRI has been to provide support for the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft aerobraking activities and interpretation guidance of preliminary observations. The primary atmospheric model applied in this investigation has been a high-top version of the NASA Ames Mars general circulation model (MGCM). Comparisons with an atmospheric model designed primarily for engineering purposes (Mars-GRAM) has also been carried out. From a suite of MGCM simulations, we have assessed plausible spatial and temporal variability in atmospheric density at high altitudes (e.g., 70-110 km) for seasonal dates and locations during Phase I aerobraking. Diagnostic tools have been developed to analyze circulation fields from the MGCM simulations, and these tools have been applied in the creation of a Mars climate catalogue database. Throughout Phase I aerobraking activities, analysis products have been provided to the MGS aerobraking atmospheric advisory group (AAG). Analyses of circulation variability at the coupling level between the MGCM and a Mars thermospheric global circulation model (MTGCM) has also been assessed. Finally, using a quasi-geostrophic dynamical formulation with the MGCM simulations, diagnosis of breaking planetary (Rossby) waves in Mars' middle atmosphere has been carried out. Titles of papers presented at scientific workshops and seminars, and a publication in the scientific literature are provided.

  4. Application of Accelerometer Data to Mars Odyssey Aerobraking and Atmospheric Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolson, R. H.; Keating, G. M.; George, B. E.; Escalera, P. E.; Werner, M. R.; Dwyer, A. M.; Hanna, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Aerobraking was an enabling technology for the Mars Odyssey mission even though it involved risk due primarily to the variability of the Mars upper atmosphere. Consequently, numerous analyses based on various data types were performed during operations to reduce these risk and among these data were measurements from spacecraft accelerometers. This paper reports on the use of accelerometer data for determining atmospheric density during Odyssey aerobraking operations. Acceleration was measured along three orthogonal axes, although only data from the component along the axis nominally into the flow was used during operations. For a one second count time, the RMS noise level varied from 0.07 to 0.5 mm/s2 permitting density recovery to between 0.15 and 1.1 kg per cu km or about 2% of the mean density at periapsis during aerobraking. Accelerometer data were analyzed in near real time to provide estimates of density at periapsis, maximum density, density scale height, latitudinal gradient, longitudinal wave variations and location of the polar vortex. Summaries are given of the aerobraking phase of the mission, the accelerometer data analysis methods and operational procedures, some applications to determining thermospheric properties, and some remaining issues on interpretation of the data. Pre-flight estimates of natural variability based on Mars Global Surveyor accelerometer measurements proved reliable in the mid-latitudes, but overestimated the variability inside the polar vortex.

  5. Navigation for Muses-A (HITEN) aerobraking in the earth's atmosphere - Preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawaguchi, J.; Ichikawa, T.; Nishimura, T.; Uesugi, K.; Efron, L.; Ellis, J.; Menon, P. R.; Tucker, B.

    1991-01-01

    Aerobraking phase covariance study results and preliminary joint JPL/ISAS orbit determination findings are presented. Possible explanations for differences in the JPL and ISAS perigee altitude results are discussed. Agreement between predicted and reconstructed values for the altitude and time of perigee passage attests to the accuracy of the JPL orbit solutions.

  6. Mars Aerobraking Spacecraft State Estimation by Processing Inertial Measurement Unit Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jah, Moriba K.; Lisano, Michael E.,, II; Born, George H.; Axelrad, Penina

    2006-01-01

    Aerobraking is an efficient technique for orbit adjustment of planetary spacecraft, such as Magellan (Venus), Mars Global Surveyor, and Mars Odyssey. Determination of the vehicle state during the aerobraking phase has conventionally been performed using only radiometric tracking data prior to and following the atmospheric drag pass. This approach is sufficiently accurate and timely to meet current mission operational requirements; however, it is expensive in terms of ground support and leads to delayed results because ofthe need for post-drag pass data. This research presents a new approach to estimation of the vehicle state during the atmospheric pass that sequentially incorporates observations from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and models of the vehicle and environment. The approach, called Inertial Measurements for Aerobraking Navigation (IMAN), is shown to perform at a level comparable to the conventional methods in terms of navigation accuracy and superior to them in terms of availability of the results immediately after completion ofthe pass. Furthermore, the research shows that IMAN can be used to reliably predict subsequent periapsis times and locations over all aerobraking regimes. IMAN also yields accurate peak dynamic pressure and heating rates, critical for a successful corridor control strategy, comparable to navigation team reconstructed values. This research also provides the first instance of the utilization of the Unscented Kalman Filter for the purpose of estimating an actual spacecraft trajectory arc about another planet.

  7. The Development and Evaluation of an Operational Aerobraking Strategy for the Mars 2001 Odyssey Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tartabini, Paul V.; Munk, Michelle M.; Powell, Richard W.

    2002-01-01

    The Mars 2001 Odyssey Orbiter successfully completed the aerobraking phase of its mission on January 11, 2002. This paper discusses the support provided by NASA's Langley Research Center to the navigation team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the planning and operational support of Mars Odyssey Aerobraking. Specifically, the development of a three-degree-of-freedom aerobraking trajectory simulation and its application to pre-flight planning activities as well as operations is described. The importance of running the simulation in a Monte Carlo fashion to capture the effects of mission and atmospheric uncertainties is demonstrated, and the utility of including predictive logic within the simulation that could mimic operational maneuver decision-making is shown. A description is also provided of how the simulation was adapted to support flight operations as both a validation and risk reduction tool and as a means of obtaining a statistical basis for maneuver strategy decisions. This latter application was the first use of Monte Carlo trajectory analysis in an aerobraking mission.

  8. Space transfer concepts and analysis for exploration missions. Implementation plan and element description document (draft final). Volume 2: Cryo/aerobrake vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The cryogenic/aerobrake (CAB) and the cryogenic all-propulsive (CAP) concept designs developed in support of the Space Transfer Concepts and Analysis for Exploration Missions (STCAEM) study are presented. The evolution of the CAB and CAP concepts is described along with the requirements, guidelines and assumptions for the designs. Operating modes and options are defined and systems descriptions of the vehicles are presented. Artificial gravity configuration options and space and ground support systems are discussed. Finally, an implementation plan is presented which addresses technology needs, schedules, facilities, and costs.

  9. Chemical Abstracts Service Chemical Registry System: History, Scope, and Impacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisgerber, David W.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the history, scope, and applications of the Chemical Abstracts Service Chemical Registry System, a computerized database that uniquely identifies chemical substances on the basis of their molecular structures. Explains searching the system is and discusses its use as an international resource. (66 references) (Author/LRW)

  10. Chemically Assisted Photocatalytic Oxidation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andino, Jean; Wu, Chang-Yu; Mazyck, David; Teixeira, Arthur A.

    2009-01-01

    The chemically assisted photocatalytic oxidation system (CAPOS) has been proposed for destroying microorganisms and organic chemicals that may be suspended in the air or present on surfaces of an air-handling system that ventilates an indoor environment. The CAPOS would comprise an upstream and a downstream stage that would implement a tandem combination of two partly redundant treatments. In the upstream stage, the air stream and, optionally, surfaces of the air-handling system would be treated with ozone, which would be generated from oxygen in the air by means of an electrical discharge or ultraviolet light. In the second stage, the air laden with ozone and oxidation products from the first stage would be made to flow in contact with a silica-titania photocatalyst exposed to ultraviolet light in the presence of water vapor. Hydroxyl radicals generated by the photocatalytic action would react with both carbon containing chemicals and microorganisms to eventually produce water and carbon dioxide, and ozone from the first stage would be photocatalytically degraded to O2. The net products of the two-stage treatment would be H2O, CO2, and O2.

  11. High energy chemical laser system

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, D.W.; Pearson, R.K.

    1975-12-23

    A high energy chemical laser system is described wherein explosive gaseous mixtures of a reducing agent providing hydrogen isotopes and interhalogen compounds are uniformly ignited by means of an electrical discharge, flash- photolysis or an electron beam. The resulting chemical explosion pumps a lasing chemical species, hydrogen fluoride or deuterium fluoride which is formed in the chemical reaction. The generated lasing pulse has light frequencies in the 3- micron range. Suitable interhalogen compounds include bromine trifluoride (BrF$sub 3$), bromine pentafluoride (BrF$sub 5$), chlorine monofluoride (ClF), chlorine trifluoride (ClF$sub 3$), chlorine pentafluoride (ClF$sub 5$), iodine pentafluoride (IF$sub 5$), and iodine heptafluoride (IF$sub 7$); and suitable reducing agents include hydrogen (H$sub 2$), hydrocarbons such as methane (CH$sub 4$), deuterium (D$sub 2$), and diborane (B$sub 2$H$sub 6$), as well as combinations of the gaseous compound and/or molecular mixtures of the reducing agent.

  12. A comparison of two conformal mapping techniques applied to an aerobrake body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hommel, Mark J.

    1987-01-01

    Conformal mapping is a classical technique which has been utilized for solving problems in aerodynamics and hydrodynamics. Conformal mapping has been successfully applied in the construction of grids around airfoils, engine inlets and other aircraft configurations. Conformal mapping techniques were applied to an aerobrake body having an axis of symmetry. Two different approaches were utilized: (1) Karman-Trefftz transformation; and (2) Point Wise Schwarz Christoffel transformation. In both cases, the aerobrake body was mapped onto a near circle, and a grid was generated in the mapped plane. The mapped body and grid were then mapped back into physical space and the properties of the associated grids were examined. Advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are discussed.

  13. Thermal Analysis and Correlation of the Mars Odyssey Spacecraft's Solar Array During Aerobraking Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Gasbarre, Joseph F.; George, Benjamin E.

    2002-01-01

    The Mars Odyssey spacecraft made use of multipass aerobraking to gradually reduce its orbit period from a highly elliptical insertion orbit to its final science orbit. Aerobraking operations provided an opportunity to apply advanced thermal analysis techniques to predict the temperature of the spacecraft's solar array for each drag pass. Odyssey telemetry data was used to correlate the thermal model. The thermal analysis was tightly coupled to the flight mechanics, aerodynamics, and atmospheric modeling efforts being performed during operations. Specifically, the thermal analysis predictions required a calculation of the spacecraft's velocity relative to the atmosphere, a prediction of the atmospheric density, and a prediction of the heat transfer coefficients due to aerodynamic heating. Temperature correlations were performed by comparing predicted temperatures of the thermocouples to the actual thermocouple readings from the spacecraft. Time histories of the spacecraft relative velocity, atmospheric density, and heat transfer coefficients, calculated using flight accelerometer and quaternion data, were used to calculate the aerodynamic heating. During aerobraking operations, the correlations were used to continually update the thermal model, thus increasing confidence in the predictions. This paper describes the thermal analysis that was performed and presents the correlations to the flight data.

  14. A survey of chemical information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Shaikh, Aneesa Bashir

    1985-01-01

    A survey of the features, functions, and characteristics of a fairly wide variety of chemical information storage and retrieval systems currently in operation is given. The types of systems (together with an identification of the specific systems) addressed within this survey are as follows: patents and bibliographies (Derwent's Patent System; IFI Comprehensive Database; PULSAR); pharmacology and toxicology (Chemfile; PAGODE; CBF; HEEDA; NAPRALERT; MAACS); the chemical information system (CAS Chemical Registry System; SANSS; MSSS; CSEARCH; GINA; NMRLIT; CRYST; XTAL; PDSM; CAISF; RTECS Search System; AQUATOX; WDROP; OHMTADS; MLAB; Chemlab); spectra (OCETH; ASTM); crystals (CRYSRC); and physical properties (DETHERM). Summary characteristics and current trends in chemical information systems development are also examined.

  15. Chemical/hydrogen energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-06-01

    This report describes activities conducted during 1986 within the Chemical/Hydrogen Energy Systems (C/HES) Program, for which Bookhaven National Laboratory provides technical and management support to the U.S. Department of Energy. Research and exploratory efforts under this program have been directed towards developing a base technology that will apply to hydrogen production, storage, and transport. Major areas of interest include: (1) High Temperature Water Vapor Electrolysis for Hydrogen Generation (Westinghouse); (2) Evaluation of Materials for Medium Temperature Water Vapor Electrolysis; (3) Cryoadsorption of Hydrogen on Activated Carbon (Syracuse). Contributions in 1986 made by private sector contractors, university, researchers, and BNL in-house technical staff are summarized in the report. Also included is a summary of related International Energy Agency (IEA) cooperative efforts as well as plans and major activities scheduled for 1987.

  16. Chemical Tracking Systems: Not Your Usual Global Positioning System!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2007-01-01

    The haphazard storing and tracking of chemicals in the laboratory is a serious safety issue facing science teachers. To get control of your chemicals, try implementing a "chemical tracking system". A chemical tracking system (CTS) is a database of chemicals used in the laboratory. If implemented correctly, a CTS will reduce purchasing costs,…

  17. Film processing investigation. [improved chemical mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The present operational chemical mixing system for the Photographic Technology Division is evaluated, and the limitations are defined in terms of meeting the present and programmed chemical supply and delivery requirements. A major redesign of the entire chemical mixing, storage, analysis, and supply system is recommended. Other requirements for immediate and future implementations are presented.

  18. Unnatural selection in chemical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, Leslie E.

    1995-01-01

    The theory of evolution through natural selection was proposed by Darwin and Wallace to explain how the characteristics of populations of animals change with time. An examination of their assumptions shows that the theory has much broader application than they originally envisaged. We now know that in appropriate environments RNA molecules or computer viruses, for example, can evolve. The adventure with which we are concerned is the quest for chemical systems that undergo processes analogous to Darwinian selection in the test tube. The search is not restricted to systems that are closely related to nucleic acids, although most of the available experimental evidence concerns such systems. A population of molecules satisfies all the requirements of the theory is there are different kinds of molecules in the population and if each individual molecule can direct the formation of copies of itself, then a population of molecules will adapt to a varying environment by changing its composition so as to maintain as high as possible a rate of replication. Sol Spiegelman is the inventor of 'unnatural selection'. He showed clearly that populations of RNA molecules evolve when replicated repeatedly by Q beta RNA polymerase under a chosen set of adverse reaction conditions. In the systems that he studied, the initial population was fairly homogeneous and much of the variation was created during the course of the experiment by mutation, that is, error of replication. The term 'unnatural selection' will be used loosely to describe evolution of nucleic acids or other replicatable polymers in vitro. The term 'Natural Selection' will be reserved for the evolution of living organisms and their viruses. Natural Section usually involves the coevolution of nucleic acids and proteins, while 'unnatural selection', as practiced so far, allows replicating nucleic acids to evolve but hold constant the enzymes that catalyze replication. It is widely believed that biology based on DNA, RNA, and

  19. Introduction to the Chemical Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    The CMS, a Laboratory-wide electronic chemical inventory tracking system, will assist PNL by establishing comprehensive, integrated, Laboratory-wide databases supported by consistent and standardized procedures for chemical inventory management. It will provide PNL with the information needed to meet its current chemical management responsibilities and regulatory requirements. Its objectives are to provide an inventory of all chemicals being held at PNL facilities, to provide a specific location for all chemical containers, to ensure that health and safety regulatory codes are being upheld, and to provide PNL staff and managers with hazardous-chemical information for better inventory management. It is composed of 5 modules: chemical purchasing; chemical inventory; chemical names, properties, and hazardous groups; reporting; and system manager.

  20. Emergency destruction system for recovered chemical munitions

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, T.J.; Stofleth, J.H.; Haroldsen, B.L.

    1998-04-01

    At the request of the US Army Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel, Sandia National Laboratories is developing a transportable system for destroying recovered, explosively configured, chemical warfare munitions. The system uses shaped charges to access the agent and burster followed by chemical neutralization to destroy them. The entire process takes place inside a sealed pressure vessel. In this paper, they review the design, operation, and testing of a prototype system capable of containing up to one pound of explosive.

  1. Theoretical research program to study chemical reactions in AOTV bow shock tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, P.

    1986-01-01

    Progress in the development of computational methods for the characterization of chemical reactions in aerobraking orbit transfer vehicle (AOTV) propulsive flows is reported. Two main areas of code development were undertaken: (1) the implementation of CASSCF (complete active space self-consistent field) and SCF (self-consistent field) analytical first derivatives on the CRAY X-MP; and (2) the installation of the complete set of electronic structure codes on the CRAY 2. In the area of application calculations the main effort was devoted to performing full configuration-interaction calculations and using these results to benchmark other methods. Preprints describing some of the systems studied are included.

  2. Nonequilibrium effects on the aerothermodynamics of transatmospheric and aerobraking vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, Basil; Candler, Graham V.

    1993-01-01

    A 3D CFD algorithm is used to study the effect of thermal and chemical nonequilibrium on slender and blunt body aerothermodynamics. Both perfect gas and reacting gas air models are used to compute the flow over a generic transatmospheric vehicle and a proposed lunar transfer vehicle. The reacting air is characterized by a translational-rotational temperature and a vibrational-electron-electronic temperature and includes eight chemical species. The effects of chemical reaction, vibrational excitation, and ionization on lift-to-drag ratio and trim angle are investigated. Results for the NASA Ames All-body Configuration show a significant difference in center of gravity location for a reacting gas flight case when compared to a perfect gas wind tunnel case at the same Mach number, Reynolds number, and angle of attack. For the same center of gravity location, the wind tunnel model trims at lower angle of attack than the full-scale flight case. Nonionized and ionized results for a proposed lunar transfer vehicle compare well to computational results obtained from a previously validated reacting gas algorithm. Under the conditions investigated, effects of weak ionization on the heat transfer and aerodynamic coefficients were minimal.

  3. Advanced Chemical Propulsion System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portz, Ron; Alexander, Leslie; Chapman, Jack; England, Chris; Henderson, Scott; Krismer, David; Lu, Frank; Wilson, Kim; Miller, Scott

    2007-01-01

    A detailed; mission-level systems study has been performed to show the benefit resulting from engine performance gains that will result from NASA's In-Space Propulsion ROSS Cycle 3A NRA, Advanced Chemical Technology sub-topic. The technology development roadmap to accomplish the NRA goals are also detailed in this paper. NASA-Marshall and NASA-JPL have conducted mission-level studies to define engine requirements, operating conditions, and interfaces. Five reference missions have been chosen for this analysis based on scientific interest, current launch vehicle capability and trends in space craft size: a) GTO to GEO, 4800 kg, delta-V for GEO insertion only approx.1830 m/s; b) Titan Orbiter with aerocapture, 6620 kg, total delta V approx.210 m/s, mostly for periapsis raise after aerocapture; c) Enceladus Orbiter (Titan aerocapture) 6620 kg, delta V approx.2400 m/s; d) Europa Orbiter, 2170 kg, total delta V approx.2600 m/s; and e) Mars Orbiter, 2250 kg, total delta V approx.1860 m/s. The figures of merit used to define the benefit of increased propulsion efficiency at the spacecraft level include propulsion subsystem wet mass, volume and overall cost. The objective of the NRA is to increase the specific impulse of pressure-fed earth storable bipropellant rocket engines to greater than 330 seconds with nitrogen tetroxide and monomothylhydrazine propellants and greater than 335 , seconds with nitrogen tetroxide and hydrazine. Achievement of the NRA goals will significantly benefit NASA interplanetary missions and other government and commercial opportunities by enabling reduced launch weight and/or increased payload. The study also constitutes a crucial stepping stone to future development, such as pump-fed storable engines.

  4. Mars Aerobraking Data and its Interpretation with Applications to Future Mars Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Keating, G. M.; Withers, P. G.

    Recent Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) (1997-1999) and 2001 Mars Odyssey (Odyssey) (2001-2002) aerobraking exercises have provided a wealth of new measurements that contribute to the characterization of the Mars upper atmosphere structure (100-170 km) [e.g. Keating et al., 1998; Withers et al., 2003; Bougher et al., 2003]. The primary objectives for investigating the Martian upper atmosphere encompass both engineering and scientific purposes. For the former, it is essential to determine the short (diurnal and dust storm) and long term (seasonal and solar cycle) trends in the upper atmosphere climate. This information will be used to plan future aerobraking and descent exercises at the planet. Ultimately, it is important to determine the rates of escape of key species from the Martian upper atmosphere. Aerobraking data is limited in its spatial and temporal sampling, thereby serving only as the starting point for these detailed global studies of the Martian upper atmosphere. Several key discoveries have been made during MGS and Odyssey aerobraking campaigns using Accelerometer measurements. It is confirmed that Mars upper atmosphere temperatures are the product of both solar cycle plus seasonal forcing. Zonal averaged latitudinal densities at constant heights are observed to decrease toward the winter polar night, as expected. However, a winter polar warming is observed during perihelion conditions near the Martian mesopause. No such warming is revealed in the opposite winter polar region during aphelion conditions. Longitude-fixed density features are observed during constant local time sampling; strong wavenumber 1-3 components are identified. Upward propagating non-migrating tides, linked to surface topographic features, are likely responsible. Finally, Mars dust storm impacts are felt at thermospheric heights within a few days of the onset of dust lofting. Thus, the Mars thermospheric structure and dynamics are typically driven by in-situ solar EUV/UV processes with

  5. CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF AFTERBURNER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report reviews the chemistry and reaction kinetics of oxidation and pyrolysis reaction that occur in afterburners (or fume incinerators) that are used to destroy organic pollutants in air or gas streams. Chemical kinetic rate data are compiled for both complex and global reac...

  6. Chemical morphogenesis: turing patterns in an experimental chemical system.

    PubMed

    Dulos, E; Boissonade, J; Perraud, J J; Rudovics, B; De Kepper, P

    1996-11-01

    Patterns resulting from the sole interplay between reaction and diffusion are probably involved in certain stages of morphogenesis in biological systems, as initially proposed by Alan Turing. Self-organization phenomena of this type can only develop in nonlinear systems (i.e. involving positive and negative feedback loops) maintained far from equilibrium. We present Turing patterns experimentally observed in a chemical system. An oscillating chemical reaction, the CIMA reaction, is operated in an open spatial reactor designed in order to obtain a pure reaction-diffusion system. The two types of Turing patterns observed, hexagonal arrays of spots and parallel stripes, are characterized by an intrinsic wavelength. We identify the origin of the necessary diffusivity between activator and inhibitor. We also describe a pattern growth mechanism by spot splitting that recalls cell division. PMID:8953211

  7. Hazardous chemical tracking system (HAZ-TRAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Bramlette, J D; Ewart, S M; Jones, C E

    1990-07-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO) developed and implemented a computerized hazardous chemical tracking system, referred to as Haz-Trac, for use at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Haz-Trac is designed to provide a means to improve the accuracy and reliability of chemical information, which enhances the overall quality and safety of ICPP operations. The system tracks all chemicals and chemical components from the time they enter the ICPP until the chemical changes form, is used, or becomes a waste. The system runs on a Hewlett-Packard (HP) 3000 Series 70 computer. The system is written in COBOL and uses VIEW/3000, TurboIMAGE/DBMS 3000, OMNIDEX, and SPEEDWARE. The HP 3000 may be accessed throughout the ICPP, and from remote locations, using data communication lines. Haz-Trac went into production in October, 1989. Currently, over 1910 chemicals and chemical components are tracked on the system. More than 2500 personnel hours were saved during the first six months of operation. Cost savings have been realized by reducing the time needed to collect and compile reporting information, identifying and disposing of unneeded chemicals, and eliminating duplicate inventories. Haz-Trac maintains information required by the Superfund Amendment Reauthorization Act (SARA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

  8. Evidence for Recent Liquid Water on Mars: Seepage Sites in 'Aerobraking Crater' Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    (A) [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (B) [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (C) (D) You will need 3D glasses to view this anaglyph

    The first clue that there might be places on Mars where liquid groundwater seeps out onto the surface came from a picture taken by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) during the pre-mapping Orbit Insertion Phase of the mission. The picture, shown in (A)above, was taken at the end of December 1997 while the spacecraft was still in the midst of aerobraking maneuvers to put it into the circular orbit needed for the Mapping Phase of the project. The Aerobraking 1 image, AB1-07707, showed dark, v-shaped scars on the western wall of a 50 kilometer-(31 mile)-diameter impact crater in southern Noachis Terra at 65oS, 15oW (see B, above, for context). The v-shaped features taper downslope to form narrow, somewhat curved channels. The relationship seen here was interpreted by MOC scientists to be similar to seepage landforms on Earth that form where springs emerge on a slope and water runs downhill.

    Once MGS achieved its Mapping Orbit in March 1999, the MOC was in a better position to take pictures of 10 times higher resolution than the Aerobraking AB1-07707 image. The opportunity to take a new picture of the proposed 'seepage' sites on the wall of the crater in southern Noachis finally arose in January 2000. The result is MOC image M11-00530, shown above in (top) and (C). This new close-up shows that the darkly-shaped scars host many small channels of only a few meters (yards) across. These small channels run downslope and coalesce at the apex (or point) of each 'v'. Amid the small channels are many large boulders, some of them the size of houses, that have eroded out of the crater wall. A 3-D view created using the AB1 and M11 images is shown in (D). The stereo picture (red-blue '3D' glasses required) emphasizes the presence of small channels and valleys, and shows that these valleys start

  9. Modeling of Spacecraft Advanced Chemical Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benfield, Michael P. J.; Belcher, Jeremy A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of the Advanced Chemical Propulsion System (ACPS) model for Earth and Space Storable propellants. This model was developed by the System Technology Operation of SAIC-Huntsville for the NASA MSFC In-Space Propulsion Project Office. Each subsystem of the model is described. Selected model results will also be shown to demonstrate the model's ability to evaluate technology changes in chemical propulsion systems.

  10. Chaos in a chemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, R.; Srivastava, P. K.; Chattopadhyay, J.

    2013-07-01

    Chaotic oscillations have been observed experimentally in dual-frequency oscillator OAP - Ce+4-BrO- 3-H2SO4 in CSTR. The system shows variation of oscillating potential and frequencies when it moves from low frequency to high frequency region and vice-versa. It was observed that system bifurcate from low frequency to chaotic regime through periode-2 and period-3 on the other hand system bifurcate from chaotic regime to high frequency oscillation through period-2. It was established that the observed oscillations are chaotic in nature on the basis of next amplitude map and bifurcation sequences.

  11. HUBBLE WATCHES THE RED PLANET AS MARS GLOBAL SURVEYOR BEGINS AEROBRAKING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    his NASA Hubble Space Telescope picture of Mars was taken on Sept. 12, one day after the arrival of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft and only five hours before the beginning of autumn in the Martian northern hemisphere. (Mars is tilted on its axis like Earth, so it has similar seasonal changes, including an autumnal equinox when the Sun crosses Mars' equator from the northern to the southern hemisphere). This Hubble picture was taken in support of the MGS mission. Hubble is monitoring the Martian weather conditions during the early phases of MGS aerobraking; in particular, the detection of large dust storms are important inputs into the atmospheric models used by the MGS mission to plan aerobraking operations. Though a dusty haze fills the giant Hellas impact basin south of the dark fin-shaped feature Syrtis Major, the dust appears to be localized within Hellas. Unless the region covered expands significantly, the dust will not be of concern for MGS aerobraking. Other early signs of seasonal transitions on Mars are apparent in the Hubble picture. The northern polar ice cap is blanketed under a polar hood of clouds that typically start forming in late northern summer. As fall progresses, sunlight will dwindle in the north polar region and the seasonal polar cap of frozen carbon dioxide will start condensing onto the surface under these clouds. Hubble observations will continue until October 13, as MGS carefully uses the drag of the Martian atmosphere to circularize its orbit about the Red Planet. After mid-October, Mars will be too close to the Sun, in angular separation, for Hubble to safely view. The image is a composite of three separately filtered colored images taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). Resolution is 35 miles (57 kilometers) per pixel (picture element). The Pathfinder landing site near Ares Valles is about 2200 miles (3600 kilometers) west of the center of this image, so was not visible during this observation. Mars was 158

  12. Chemical production processes and systems

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Johnathan E.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; White, James F.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2014-06-17

    Hydrogenolysis systems are provided that can include a reactor housing an Ru-comprising hydrogenolysis catalyst and wherein the contents of the reactor is maintained at a neutral or acidic pH. Reactant reservoirs within the system can include a polyhydric alcohol compound and a base, wherein a weight ratio of the base to the compound is less than 0.05. Systems also include the product reservoir comprising a hydrogenolyzed polyhydric alcohol compound and salts of organic acids, and wherein the moles of base are substantially equivalent to the moles of salts or organic acids. Processes are provided that can include an Ru-comprising catalyst within a mixture having a neutral or acidic pH. A weight ratio of the base to the compound can be between 0.01 and 0.05 during exposing.

  13. Chemical production processes and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Johnathan E; Muzatko, Danielle S; White, James F; Zacher, Alan H

    2015-04-21

    Hydrogenolysis systems are provided that can include a reactor housing an Ru-comprising hydrogenolysis catalyst and wherein the contents of the reactor is maintained at a neutral or acidic pH. Reactant reservoirs within the system can include a polyhydric alcohol compound and a base, wherein a weight ratio of the base to the compound is less than 0.05. Systems also include the product reservoir comprising a hydrogenolyzed polyhydric alcohol compound and salts of organic acids, and wherein the moles of base are substantially equivalent to the moles of salts or organic acids. Processes are provided that can include an Ru-comprising catalyst within a mixture having a neutral or acidic pH. A weight ratio of the base to the compound can be between 0.01 and 0.05 during exposing.

  14. In-Space Chemical Propulsion System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byers, David C.; Woodcock, Gordon; Benfield, Michael P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple, new technologies for chemical systems are becoming available and include high temperature rockets, very light propellant tanks and structures, new bipropellant and monopropellant options, lower mass propellant control components, and zero boil off subsystems. Such technologies offer promise of increasing the performance of in-space chemical propulsion for energetic space missions. A mass model for pressure-fed, Earth and space-storable, advanced chemical propulsion systems (ACPS) was developed in support of the NASA MSFC In-Space Propulsion Program. Data from flight systems and studies defined baseline system architectures and subsystems and analyses were formulated for parametric scaling relationships for all ACPS subsystem. The paper will first provide summary descriptions of the approaches used for the systems and the subsystems and then present selected analyses to illustrate use of the model for missions with characteristics of current interest.

  15. In-Space Chemical Propulsion System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byers, David C.; Woodcock, Gordon; Benfield, M. P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple, new technologies for chemical systems are becoming available and include high temperature rockets, very light propellant tanks and structures, new bipropellant and monopropellant options, lower mass propellant control components, and zero boil off subsystems. Such technologies offer promise of increasing the performance of in-space chemical propulsion for energetic space missions. A mass model for pressure-fed, Earth and space-storable, advanced chemical propulsion systems (ACPS) was developed in support of the NASA MSFC In-Space Propulsion Program. Data from flight systems and studies defined baseline system architectures and subsystems and analyses were formulated for parametric scaling relationships for all ACPS subsystems. The paper will first provide summary descriptions of the approaches used for the systems and the subsystems and then present selected analyses to illustrate use of the model for missions with characteristics of current interest.

  16. Interplanetary trajectory optimization of Mars aerobraking missions with constrained atmospheric entry velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striepe, Scott A.; Braun, Robert D.; Powell, Richard W.; Fowler, Wallace T.

    1991-01-01

    Many current manned Mars mission studies are using low lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) vehicles to aerobrake at both Mars and earth. The use of these low L/D vehicles imposes constraints on the allowable velocity at the atmospheric interface. This paper will demonstrate that if these entry velocity constraints are incorporated into the interplanetary analysis, more opportunities can be achieved for a small increase in initial LEO mass. These additional opportunities result from varying the initial launch date, the encounter dates, and possibly using a powered Venus swingby on either the inbound or outbound transfer. This paper presents results for three atmospheric entry velocity ranges at Mars arrival and one velocity limitation upon Earth return. The results indicate that by carefully selecting the interplanetary trajectory, an optimum initial LEO mass mission can be found for even highly restrictive entry velocity missions in practically all of the 15 years studied.

  17. Chemical heat pump and chemical energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Edward C.; Huxtable, Douglas D.

    1985-08-06

    A chemical heat pump and storage system employs sulfuric acid and water. In one form, the system includes a generator and condenser, an evaporator and absorber, aqueous acid solution storage and water storage. During a charging cycle, heat is provided to the generator from a heat source to concentrate the acid solution while heat is removed from the condenser to condense the water vapor produced in the generator. Water is then stored in the storage tank. Heat is thus stored in the form of chemical energy in the concentrated acid. The heat removed from the water vapor can be supplied to a heat load of proper temperature or can be rejected. During a discharge cycle, water in the evaporator is supplied with heat to generate water vapor, which is transmitted to the absorber where it is condensed and absorbed into the concentrated acid. Both heats of dilution and condensation of water are removed from the thus diluted acid. During the discharge cycle the system functions as a heat pump in which heat is added to the system at a low temperature and removed from the system at a high temperature. The diluted acid is stored in an acid storage tank or is routed directly to the generator for reconcentration. The generator, condenser, evaporator, and absorber all are operated under pressure conditions specified by the desired temperature levels for a given application. The storage tanks, however, can be maintained at or near ambient pressure conditions. In another form, the heat pump system is employed to provide usable heat from waste process heat by upgrading the temperature of the waste heat.

  18. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-26

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  19. Chemical Biological Emergency Management Information System

    2004-06-15

    CB-EMIS is designed to provide information and analysis to transit system operators and emergency responders in the event of a chemical attack on a subway system. The software inforporates detector data, video images, train data, meteorological data, and above- and below-ground plume dispersion models, hight of the liquid level.

  20. Chemical instabilities in closed systems with illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Rusheng Li; Ross, J. )

    1991-03-21

    The authors study closed chemical reaction systems with illumination and show theoretically, on an autocatalytic reaction model and a substrate-inhibited enzyme reaction model, that if a photochemical reaction may transform some of the products of the reactions in the mechanism into reactants, the closed system may give rise to chemical instabilities, including multiple stationary states and oscillations, under both isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. The essential points in the occurrence of these chemical instabilities are the positive feedback provided by the autocatalytic reaction or substrate inhibition and the displacement of the system far from equilibrium by the photochemical reactions. There are functional similarities between the closed, illuminated systems and open systems (continuous stirred tank reactor, CSTR). Experimental verification of such chemical instabilities in a closed, illuminated system remains to be shown; but the theoretical possibility shown here opens the way to convert radiation energy of the light directly into mechanical energy, in isothermal systems with variable volume and nonisothermal systems at constant volume.

  1. A polarization system for persistent chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven-Jones, Julia; Appelhans, Leah; Couphos, Eric; Embree, Todd; Finnegan, Patrick; Goldstein, Dennis; Karelitz, David; LaCasse, Charles; Luk, Ting S.; Mahamat, Adoum; Massey, Lee; Tanbakuchi, Anthony; Washburn, Cody; Vigil, Steven

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development of a prototype polarization tag based system for detecting chemical vapors. The system primarily consists of two components, a chemically sensitive tag that experiences a change in its optical polarization properties when exposed to a specific chemical of interest, and an optical imaging polarimeter that is used to measure the polarization properties of the tags. Although the system concept could be extended to other chemicals, for the initial system prototype presented here the tags were developed to be sensitive to hydrogen fluoride (HF) vapors. HF is used in many industrial processes but is highly toxic and thus monitoring for its presence and concentration is often of interest for personnel and environmental safety. The tags are periodic multilayer structures that are produced using standard photolithographic processes. The polarimetric imager has been designed to measure the degree of linear polarization reflected from the tags in the short wave infrared. By monitoring the change in the reflected polarization signature from the tags, the polarimeter can be used to determine if the tag was exposed to HF gas. In this paper, a review of the system development effort and preliminary test results are presented and discussed, as well as our plan for future work.

  2. Compact chemical energy system for seismic applications

    DOEpatents

    Engelke, Raymond P.; Hedges, Robert O.; Kammerman, Alan B.; Albright, James N.

    1998-01-01

    A chemical energy system is formed for producing detonations in a confined environment. An explosive mixture is formed from nitromethane (NM) and diethylenetriamine (DETA). A slapper detonator is arranged adjacent to the explosive mixture to initiate detonation of the mixture. NM and DETA are not classified as explosives when handled separately and can be safely transported and handled by workers in the field. In one aspect of the present invention, the chemicals are mixed at a location where an explosion is to occur. For application in a confined environment, the chemicals are mixed in an inflatable container to minimize storage space until it is desired to initiate an explosion. To enable an inflatable container to be used, at least 2.5 wt % DETA is used in the explosive mixture. A barrier is utilized that is formed of a carbon composite material to provide the appropriate barrel geometry and energy transmission to the explosive mixture from the slapper detonator system.

  3. Chemical reactions in reverse micelle systems

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Dean W.; Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.; Consani, Keith A.

    1993-08-24

    This invention is directed to conducting chemical reactions in reverse micelle or microemulsion systems comprising a substantially discontinuous phase including a polar fluid, typically an aqueous fluid, and a microemulsion promoter, typically a surfactant, for facilitating the formation of reverse micelles in the system. The system further includes a substantially continuous phase including a non-polar or low-polarity fluid material which is a gas under standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and which is generally a water-insoluble fluid in a near critical or supercritical state. Thus, the microemulsion system is maintained at a pressure and temperature such that the density of the non-polar or low-polarity fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. The method of carrying out chemical reactions generally comprises forming a first reverse micelle system including an aqueous fluid including reverse micelles in a water-insoluble fluid in the supercritical state. Then, a first reactant is introduced into the first reverse micelle system, and a chemical reaction is carried out with the first reactant to form a reaction product. In general, the first reactant can be incorporated into, and the product formed in, the reverse micelles. A second reactant can also be incorporated in the first reverse micelle system which is capable of reacting with the first reactant to form a product.

  4. Coupled chemical oscillators and emergent system properties.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Irving R

    2014-09-25

    We review recent work on a variety of systems, from the nanometre to the centimetre scale, including microemulsions, microfluidic droplet arrays, gels and flow reactors, in which chemical oscillators interact to generate novel spatiotemporal patterns and/or mechanical motion. PMID:24835430

  5. Chemical oscillations in closed macromolecular systems.

    PubMed Central

    Di Cera, E; Phillipson, P E; Wyman, J

    1988-01-01

    A cycle of irreversible, first-order, autocatalytic reactions among different states of a polyfunctional macromolecule, subject to the conservation of mass, can display stable chemical oscillations. This introduces a class of nonlinear dynamic models for energy transduction in closed macromolecular systems. PMID:3413066

  6. Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization of Complex Chemical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostko, Oleg; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Ahmed, Musahid

    2016-05-01

    Tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation coupled to mass spectrometry is applied to the study of complex chemical systems. The identification of novel reactive intermediates and radicals is revealed in flame, pulsed photolysis, and pyrolysis reactors, leading to the elucidation of spectroscopy, reaction mechanisms, and kinetics. Mass-resolved threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence measurements provide unprecedented access to vibrationally resolved spectra of free radicals present in high-temperature reactors. Photoionization measurements in water clusters, nucleic acid base dimers, and their complexes with water provide signatures of proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded and π-stacked systems. Experimental and theoretical methods to track ion-molecule reactions and fragmentation pathways in intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems in sugars and alcohols are described. Photoionization of laser-ablated molecules, clusters, and their reaction products inform thermodynamics and spectroscopy that are relevant to astrochemistry and catalysis. New directions in coupling VUV radiation to interrogate complex chemical systems are discussed.

  7. Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization of Complex Chemical Systems.

    PubMed

    Kostko, Oleg; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Ahmed, Musahid

    2016-05-27

    Tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation coupled to mass spectrometry is applied to the study of complex chemical systems. The identification of novel reactive intermediates and radicals is revealed in flame, pulsed photolysis, and pyrolysis reactors, leading to the elucidation of spectroscopy, reaction mechanisms, and kinetics. Mass-resolved threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence measurements provide unprecedented access to vibrationally resolved spectra of free radicals present in high-temperature reactors. Photoionization measurements in water clusters, nucleic acid base dimers, and their complexes with water provide signatures of proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded and π-stacked systems. Experimental and theoretical methods to track ion-molecule reactions and fragmentation pathways in intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems in sugars and alcohols are described. Photoionization of laser-ablated molecules, clusters, and their reaction products inform thermodynamics and spectroscopy that are relevant to astrochemistry and catalysis. New directions in coupling VUV radiation to interrogate complex chemical systems are discussed. PMID:26980311

  8. The chemical disaster response system in Japan.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Tetsu; Ninomiya, Norifumi; Ohta, Muneo

    2003-01-01

    During the last decade, Japan has experienced the largest burden of chemical terrorism-related events in the world, including the: (1) 1994 Matsumoto sarin attack; (2) 1995 Tokyo subway sarin attack; (3) 1998 Wakayama arsenic incident; (4) 1998 Niigata sodium-azide incident; and (5) 1998 Nagano cyanide incident. Two other intentional cyanide releases in Tokyo subway and railway station restrooms were thwarted in 1995. These events spurred Japan to improve the following components of its chemical disaster-response system: (1) scene demarcation; (2) emergency medical care; (3) mass decontamination; (4) personal protective equipment; (5) chemical detection; (6) information-sharing and coordination; and (7) education and training. Further advances occurred as result of potential chemical terrorist threats to the 2000 Kyushu-Okinawa G8 Summit, which Japan hosted. Today, Japan has an integrated system of chemical disaster response that involves local fire and police services, local emergency medical services (EMS), local hospitals, Japanese Self-Defense Forces, and the Japanese Poison Information Center. PMID:15141857

  9. Chemical evolution: A solar system perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.

    1989-01-01

    During the last three decades major advances were made in the understanding of the formation of carbon compounds in the universe and of the occurrence of processes of chemical evolution in the solar system and beyond. This was made possible by the development of new astronomical techniques and by the exploration of the solar system by means of properly instrumented spacecraft. Some of the major findings made as a result of these observations are summarized.

  10. Hubble Watches the Red Planet as Mars Global Surveyor Begins Aerobraking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    [RIGHT] This NASA Hubble Space Telescope picture of Mars was taken on Sept. 12, one day after the arrival of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft and only five hours before the beginning of autumn in the Martian northern hemisphere. (Mars is tilted on its axis like Earth, so it has similar seasonal changes, including an autumnal equinox when the Sun crosses Mars' equator from the northern to the southern hemisphere).

    This Hubble picture was taken in support of the MGS mission. Hubble is monitoring the Martian weather conditions during the early phases of MGS aerobraking; in particular, the detection of large dust storms are important inputs into the atmospheric models used by the MGS mission to plan aerobraking operations.

    Though a dusty haze fills the giant Hellas impact basin south of the dark fin-shaped feature Syrtis Major, the dust appears to be localized within Hellas. Unless the region covered expands significantly, the dust will not be of concern for MGS aerobraking.

    Other early signs of seasonal transitions on Mars are apparent in the Hubble picture. The northern polar ice cap is blanketed under a polar hood of clouds that typically start forming in late northern summer. As fall progresses, sunlight will dwindle in the north polar region and the seasonal polar cap of frozen carbon dioxide will start condensing onto the surface under these clouds.

    Hubble observations will continue until October 13, as MGS carefully uses the drag of the Martian atmosphere to circularize its orbit about the Red Planet. After mid-October, Mars will be too close to the Sun, in angular separation, for Hubble to safely view.

    The image is a composite of three separately filtered colored images taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). Resolution is 35 miles (57 kilometers) per pixel (picture element). The Pathfinder landing site near Ares Valles is about 2200 miles (3600 kilometers) west of the center of this image, so was not visible during this

  11. Lightweight autonomous chemical identification system (LACIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozos, George; Lin, Hai; Burch, Timothy

    2012-06-01

    Smiths Detection and Intelligent Optical Systems have developed prototypes for the Lightweight Autonomous Chemical Identification System (LACIS) for the US Department of Homeland Security. LACIS is to be a handheld detection system for Chemical Warfare Agents (CWAs) and Toxic Industrial Chemicals (TICs). LACIS is designed to have a low limit of detection and rapid response time for use by emergency responders and could allow determination of areas having dangerous concentration levels and if protective garments will be required. Procedures for protection of responders from hazardous materials incidents require the use of protective equipment until such time as the hazard can be assessed. Such accurate analysis can accelerate operations and increase effectiveness. LACIS is to be an improved point detector employing novel CBRNE detection modalities that includes a militaryproven ruggedized ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) with an array of electro-resistive sensors to extend the range of chemical threats detected in a single device. It uses a novel sensor data fusion and threat classification architecture to interpret the independent sensor responses and provide robust detection at low levels in complex backgrounds with minimal false alarms. The performance of LACIS prototypes have been characterized in independent third party laboratory tests at the Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI, Columbus, OH) and indoor and outdoor field tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). LACIS prototypes will be entering operational assessment by key government emergency response groups to determine its capabilities versus requirements.

  12. Endocrine Disrupting Chemical Impacts on Aquatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobling, Susan

    2014-07-01

    We often talk about the importance of water, but one area that's often overlooked is the safety of our water supply. How many people actually think about the purity of their water when they turn on the tap? We may have real reason to be concerned because our water delivery systems and treatment technology seem to be stuck in the past, relying on old water treatment and water delivery systems. While these systems still do a great job filtering out particles, parasites and bacteria, they usually fail to remove 21st century contaminants like pesticides, industrial chemicals, lead, pharmaceuticals and arsenic. Indeed our water contains already a whole plethora of things in daily commerce and pharmaceuticals are increasingly showing up in the water supply, including antibiotics, anti-convulsants, mood altering medications and sex hormones. As the world's dependence on chemicals grows, our water supplies will continue to feel the effects, which inevitably will touch every person on this planet...

  13. 46 CFR 154.1140 - Dry chemical system: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dry chemical system: General. 154.1140 Section 154.1140... Firefighting System: Dry Chemical § 154.1140 Dry chemical system: General. Each liquefied flammable gas carrier must have a dry chemical firefighting system that meets §§ 154.1145 through 154.1170, Part 56...

  14. 46 CFR 154.1140 - Dry chemical system: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dry chemical system: General. 154.1140 Section 154.1140... Firefighting System: Dry Chemical § 154.1140 Dry chemical system: General. Each liquefied flammable gas carrier must have a dry chemical firefighting system that meets §§ 154.1145 through 154.1170, Part 56...

  15. 46 CFR 154.1140 - Dry chemical system: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dry chemical system: General. 154.1140 Section 154.1140... Firefighting System: Dry Chemical § 154.1140 Dry chemical system: General. Each liquefied flammable gas carrier must have a dry chemical firefighting system that meets §§ 154.1145 through 154.1170, Part 56...

  16. 46 CFR 154.1140 - Dry chemical system: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dry chemical system: General. 154.1140 Section 154.1140... Firefighting System: Dry Chemical § 154.1140 Dry chemical system: General. Each liquefied flammable gas carrier must have a dry chemical firefighting system that meets §§ 154.1145 through 154.1170, Part 56...

  17. 46 CFR 154.1140 - Dry chemical system: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dry chemical system: General. 154.1140 Section 154.1140... Firefighting System: Dry Chemical § 154.1140 Dry chemical system: General. Each liquefied flammable gas carrier must have a dry chemical firefighting system that meets §§ 154.1145 through 154.1170, Part 56...

  18. Chemical compositions of primitive solar system particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Steve R.; Bajt, S.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical studies of micrometeorites are of fundamental importance primarily because atmospheric entry selection effects (such as destruction of friable objects) are less significant than those for conventional meteorites. As a result, particles that have experienced very little postaccretional processing have a significant chance of surviving the Earth encounter and subsequent collection. Thus, chemical analyses of these relatively unaltered micrometeorites may lead to a better understanding of the compositions of the most primitive materials in the solar system and thereby constrain the conditions (physical and chemical) that existed in the early solar nebula. Micrometeorites have been collected from the stratosphere, polar ices, and ocean sediments, but the stratospheric collection is the best source for the most unaltered material because they are small and are not heated to their melting points. Despite the fact that the stratospheric micrometeorites have masses in the nanogram range, a variety of microanalytical techniques have been applied to bulk chemical analyses with part-per-million sensitivity. In some cases, multi-disciplinary studies (e.g., chemistry and mineralogy) have been performed on individual particles. The first-order conclusion is that the chondrite-like particles are chemically similar to carbonaceous chondrites but in detail are distinct from members of the conventional meteorite collection. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the results to date and identify important areas for further study.

  19. Gas Phase Chemical Detection with an Integrated Chemical Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, Albert G.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Susan L.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carloyn M.; Reno, John L.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1999-07-08

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample concentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described. The design and performance of novel micromachined acoustic wave devices, with the potential for improved chemical sensitivity, are also described.

  20. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    R. Jarek

    2004-11-23

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports.

  1. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    G.H. Nieder-Westermann

    2005-04-07

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports.

  2. Coaxial-Flow System for Chemical Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Paul J.; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade, chemical cytometry performed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) has become increasingly valuable as a bio-analytical tool to quantify analytes from single cells. However, extensive use of CE-based chemical cytometry has been hindered by the relatively low throughput for the analysis of single adherent cells. In order to overcome the low throughput of CE-based analysis of adherent cells and increase its utility in evaluating cellular attributes, new higher throughput methods are needed. Integration of a coaxial buffer exchange system with CE-based chemical cytometry increased the rate of serial analyses of cells. In the designed system, fluid flow through a tube coaxial to the separation capillary was used to supply electrophoretic buffer to the capillary. This sheath or coaxial fluid was turned off between analysis of cells and on during cell sampling and electrophoresis. Thus, living cells were not exposed to the nonphysiologic electrophoretic buffer prior to lysis. Key parameters of the system such as the relative capillary-sheath positions, buffer flow velocities, and the cell chamber design were optimized. To demonstrate the utility of the system, rat basophilic leukemic cells loaded with Oregon Green and fluorescein were serially lysed and loaded into a capillary. Separation of the contents of 20 cells at a rate of 0.5 cells/min was demonstrated. PMID:17979298

  3. Densities inferred from ESA's Venus Express aerobraking campaign at 130 km altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruinsma, Sean; Marty, Jean-Charles; Svedhem, Håkan; Williams, Adam; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    In June-July 2014, ESA performed a planned aerobraking campaign with Venus Express to measure neutral densities above 130 km in Venus' atmosphere by means of the engineering accelerometers. To that purpose, the orbit perigee was lowered to approximately 130 km in order to enhance the atmospheric drag effect to the highest tolerable levels for the spacecraft; the accelerometer resolution and precision were not sufficient at higher altitudes. This campaign was requested as part of the Venus Express Atmospheric Drag Experiment (VExADE). A total of 18 orbits (i.e. days) were processed using the attitude quaternions to correctly orient the spacecraft bus and solar arrays in inertial space, which is necessary to accurately compute the exposed surface in the ram direction. The accelerometer data provide good measurements approximately from 130-140 km altitude; the length of the profiles is about 85 seconds, and they are on the early morning side (LST=4.5) at high northern latitude (70°N-82°N). The densities are a factor 2-3 larger than Hedin's VTS-3 thermosphere model, which is consistent with earlier results obtained via classical precise orbit determination at higher altitudes. Wavelike structures with amplitudes of 20% and more are detected, with wavelengths of about 100-500 km. We cannot entirely rule out that these waves are caused by the spacecraft or due to some unknown instrumental effect, but we estimate this probability to be very low.

  4. A TW in Mars' Atmosphere and Implications for the Aerobraking region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moudden, Y.; Forbes, J.

    2009-05-01

    A solar terminator wave (TW) is found in high-resolution general circulation model (GCM) simulations of Mars' atmosphere. In the horizontal plane at 160 km the wave fronts precede the westward-moving dusk terminator, exhibit a horizontal wavelength of order 15°-30° or 900-1800km, and are oriented about 10°-30° with respect to the terminator. The disturbance originates in the lower atmosphere due to dust insolation absorption, propagates upward with an effective vertical wavelength of order 60 km, and increases in amplitude as the dust extends further away from the surface. The TW density amplitudes for low and elevated dust layers (both with opacities = 1.0) are of order ± 15-20% and ± 30% at 160 km, which are sufficiently large to pose a concern for aerobraking operations. Temperature and wind perturbations for the former case are of order ± 10-20 K and ± 30-75 m/s. The Mars TW shares many common features with a TW recently observed in Earth's thermosphere and simulated with a GCM.

  5. In situ observations of waves in Venus’s polar lower thermosphere with Venus Express aerobraking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Wodarg, Ingo C. F.; Bruinsma, Sean; Marty, Jean-Charles; Svedhem, Håkan

    2016-08-01

    Waves are ubiquitous phenomena found in oceans and atmospheres alike. From the earliest formal studies of waves in the Earth’s atmosphere to more recent studies on other planets, waves have been shown to play a key role in shaping atmospheric bulk structure, dynamics and variability. Yet, waves are difficult to characterize as they ideally require in situ measurements of atmospheric properties that are difficult to obtain away from Earth. Thus, we have incomplete knowledge of atmospheric waves on planets other than our own, and we are thereby limited in our ability to understand and predict planetary atmospheres. Here we report the first ever in situ observations of atmospheric waves in Venus’s thermosphere (130-140 km) at high latitudes (71.5°-79.0°). These measurements were made by the Venus Express Atmospheric Drag Experiment (VExADE) during aerobraking from 24 June to 11 July 2014. As the spacecraft flew through Venus’s atmosphere, deceleration by atmospheric drag was sufficient to obtain from accelerometer readings a total of 18 vertical density profiles. We infer an average temperature of T = 114 +/- 23 K and find horizontal wave-like density perturbations and mean temperatures being modulated at a quasi-5-day period.

  6. Chemical dosimetry system for criticality accidents.

    PubMed

    Miljanić, Saveta; Ilijas, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI) criticality dosimetry system consists of a chemical dosimetry system for measuring the total (neutron + gamma) dose, and a thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry system for a separate determination of the gamma ray component. The use of the chemical dosemeter solution chlorobenzene-ethanol-trimethylpentane (CET) is based on the radiolytic formation of hydrochloric acid, which protonates a pH indicator, thymolsulphonphthalein. The high molar absorptivity of its red form at 552 nm is responsible for a high sensitivity of the system: doses in the range 0.2-15 Gy can be measured. The dosemeter has been designed as a glass ampoule filled with the CET solution and inserted into a pen-shaped plastic holder. For dose determinations, a newly constructed optoelectronic reader has been used. The RBI team took part in the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002, with the CET dosimetry system. For gamma ray dose determination TLD-700 TL detectors were used. The results obtained with CET dosemeter show very good agreement with the reference values. PMID:15353694

  7. Chemical management system at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Morss, H.S.; Hischier, R.C.; Keto, D.N.; Woodring, J.L.; Davis, J.T.; Sherva, B.

    1995-07-01

    The Argonne Chemical Management System (CMS) is comprised of several applications and the Infrastructure Modules. The Infrastructure Modules, which provide the integrated computing software foundation, include a security processor, common tables, reporting framework, utilities, and other facilities common to applications processing chemical information. The MSDS Sheets were scanned and the images stored for automated faxing to the requester. User searches are accomplished based on ``search`` data keyed into the Oracle Tables; the desired MSDS is subsequently faxed. The system has been designed as an ``open`` system and is totally portable. During development and production the CMS has operated in VAX, VMS, Sun Unix, and Hewlett-Packard HP-UX environments. The only restrictions are that the MSDS Faxing Server must operate under Unix and the bar code scanning processes are accomplished using a portable PC. The current system consists of 20 Oracle Tables, over 350 columns of data, 25 Standard reports, 45 screens, and a number of utilities. With the Oracle RDBMS the computing platform may be sized to the volume of data and processing activity. The Laboratory`s implementation is on an HP 9000 Model H50 with 256 megabytes of memory, 32 concurrent users, and 8 gigabytes of disk storage that is primarily for the MSDS images.

  8. Integrated Assessment Systems for Chemical Warfare Material

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Snyder; D. A. Verrill; G. L. Thinnes; K. D. Watts; R. J. McMorland

    1999-05-27

    The US Army must respond to a variety of situations involving suspect discovered, recovered, stored, and buried chemical warfare materiel (CWM). In some cases, the identity of the fill materiel and the status of the fusing and firing train cannot be visually determined due to aging of the container, or because the item is contained in an over-pack. In these cases, non-intrusive assessments are required to provide information to allow safe handling, storage, and disposal of the materiel. This paper will provide an overview of the integrated mobile and facility-based CWM assessment system prototypes that have been, and are being developed, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the US Army Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel Project. In addition, this paper will discuss advanced sensors being developed to enhance the capability of the existing and future assessment systems. The Phase I Mobile Munitions Assessment System (MMAS) is currently being used by the Army's Technical Escort Unit (TEU) at Dugway Proving Ground, Utah. This system includes equipment for non-intrusively identifying the munitions fill materiel and for assessing the condition and stability of the fuzes, firing trains, and other potential safety hazards. The system provides a self-contained, integrated command post including an on-board computer system, communications equipment, video and photographic equipment, weather monitoring equipment, and miscellaneous safety-related equipment. The Phase II MMAS is currently being tested and qualified for use by the INEEL and the US Army. The Phase II system contains several new assessment systems that significantly enhance the ability to assess CWM. A facility-based munitions assessment system prototype is being developed for the assessment of CWM stored in igloos at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Arkansas. This system is currently in the design and fabrication stages. Numerous CWM advanced sensors are being developed and tested, and

  9. Chemically generated convective transport in microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Das, Sambeeta; Altemose, Alicia; Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna; Sen, Ayusman

    High precision manipulation of small volumes of fluid, containing suspended micron sized objects like cells, viruses, and large molecules, is one of the main goals in designing modern lab-on-a-chip devices which can find a variety of chemical and biological applications. To transport the cargo toward sensing elements, typical microfluidic devices often use pressure driven flows. Here, we propose to use enzymatic chemical reactions which decompose reagent into less dense products and generate flows that can transport particles. Density variations that lead to flow in the assigned direction are created between the place where reagent is fed into the solution and the location where it is decomposed by enzymes attached to the surface of the microchannel. When the reagent is depleted, the fluid motion stops and particles sediment to the bottom. We demonstrate how the choice of chemicals, leading to specific reaction rates, can affect the transport properties. In particular, we show that the intensity of the fluid flow, the final location of cargo, and the time for cargo delivery are controlled by the amount and type of reagent in the system.

  10. Performance Evaluation of Hyperspectral Chemical Detection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truslow, Eric

    Remote sensing of chemical vapor plumes is a difficult but important task with many military and civilian applications. Hyperspectral sensors operating in the long wave infrared (LWIR) regime have well demonstrated detection capabilities. However, the identification of a plume's chemical constituents, based on a chemical library, is a multiple hypothesis-testing problem that standard detection metrics do not fully describe. Our approach partitions and weights a confusion matrix to develop both the standard detection metrics and an identification metric based on the Dice index. Using the developed metrics, we demonstrate that using a detector bank followed by an identifier can achieve superior performance relative to either algorithm individually. Performance of the cascaded system relies on the first pass reliably detecting the plume. However, detection performance is severely hampered by the inclusion of plume pixels in estimates of background quantities. We demonstrate that this problem, known as contamination, can be mitigated by iteratively applying a spatial filter to the detected pixels. Multiple detection and filtering passes can remove nearly all contamination from the background estimates, a vast improvement over single-pass techniques.

  11. Portable chemical detection system with intergrated preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Mark J.; Brusseau, Charles A.; Hannum, David W.; Linker, Kevin L.

    2005-12-27

    A portable system for the detection of chemical particles such as explosive residue utilizes a metal fiber substrate that may either be swiped over a subject or placed in a holder in a collection module which can shoot a jet of gas at the subject to dislodge residue, and then draw the air containing the residue into the substrate. The holder is then placed in a detection module, which resistively heats the substrate to evolve the particles, and provides a gas flow to move the particles to a miniature detector in the module.

  12. Chemical evolution of primitive solar system bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Mills, T.

    1989-01-01

    Observations on organic molecules and compounds containing biogenic elements in the interstellar medium and in the primitive bodies of the solar system are reviewed. The discovery of phosphorus molecular species in dense interstellar clouds, the existence of organic ions in the dust and gas phase of the comas of Comet Halley, and the presence of presolar, deuterium-hydrogen ratios in the amino acids of carbonaceous chondrites are discussed. The relationships between comets, dark asteroids, and carbonaceous chondrites are examined. Also, consideration is given to the chemical evolution of Titan, the primitive earth, and early Mars.

  13. Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) Observations: Atmospheric Temperatures During Aerobraking and Science Phasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrath, Barney J.; Pearl, John C.; Smith, Michael D.; Maguire, William C.; Christensen, Philip R.; Dason, Shymala; Kaelberer, Monte S.

    1999-01-01

    Between September 1997, when the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft arrived at Mars, and September 1998 when the final aerobraking phase of the mission began, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) has acquired an extensive data set spanning approximately half of a Martian year. Nadir-viewing spectral measurements from this data set within the 15-micrometers CO2 absorption band are inverted to obtain atmospheric temperature profiles from the surface up to about the 0.1 mbar level. The computational procedure used to retrieve the temperatures is presented. Mean meridional cross sections of thermal structure are calculated for periods of time near northern hemisphere fall equinox, winter solstice, and spring equinox, as well as for a time interval immediately following the onset of the Noachis Terra dust storm. Gradient thermal wind cross sections are calculated from the thermal structure. Regions of possible wave activity are identified using cross sections of rms temperature deviations from the mean. Results from both near-equinox periods show some hemispheric asymmetry with peak eastward thermal winds in the north about twice the magnitude of those in the south. The results near solstice show an intense circumpolar vortex at high northern latitudes and waves associated with the vortex jet core. Warming of the atmosphere aloft at mid-northern latitudes suggests the presence of a strong cross-equatorial Hadley circulation. Although the Noachis dust storm did not become global in scale, strong perturbations to the atmospheric structure are found, including an enhanced temperature maximum aloft at high northern latitudes resulting from intensification of the Hadley circulation. TES results for the various seasonal conditions are compared with published results from Mars general circulation models, and generally good qualitative agreement is found.

  14. Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) Observations of Dust Opacity During Aerobraking and Science Phasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Pearl, John C.; Conrath, Barney J.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) arrived at Mars in September 1997 near Mars southern spring equinox and has now provided monitoring of conditions in the Mars atmosphere for more than half a Mars year. The large majority of the spectra taken by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) are in a nadir geometry (downward looking mode) where Mars is observed through the atmosphere. Most of these contain the distinct spectral signature of atmospheric dust. For these nadir-geometry spectra we retrieve column-integrated infrared aerosol (dust) opacities. TES observations during the aerobraking and science-phasing portions of the MGS mission cover the seasonal range L(sub s)=184 deg - 28 deg. Excellent spatial coverage was obtained in the southern hemisphere. Northern hemisphere coverage is generally limited to narrow strips taken during the periapsis pass but is still very valuable. At the beginning of the mission the 9-(micron)meter dust opacity at midsouthern latitudes was low (0.15-0.25). As the season advanced through southern spring and into summer, TES observed several regional dust storms (including the Noachis dust storm of November 1997) where peak 9-(micron)meter dust opacities approached or exceeded unity, as well as numerous smaller local storms. Both large and small dust storms exhibited significant changes in both spatial coverage and intensity over a timescale of a day. Throughout southern spring and summer the region at the edge of the retreating southern seasonal polar ice cap was observed to be consistently more dusty than other latitudes.

  15. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    R. Jarek

    2005-08-29

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs documents. The updates

  16. 33 CFR 127.609 - Dry chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dry chemical systems. 127.609... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Firefighting § 127.609 Dry chemical systems. (a) Each marine transfer area for LNG must have a dry chemical system that provides at least two dry...

  17. 33 CFR 127.609 - Dry chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dry chemical systems. 127.609... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Firefighting § 127.609 Dry chemical systems. (a) Each marine transfer area for LNG must have a dry chemical system that provides at least two dry...

  18. 29 CFR 1910.161 - Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. 1910.161 Section... § 1910.161 Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. (a) Scope and application. This section applies to all fixed extinguishing systems, using dry chemical as the extinguishing agent, installed to meet...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.161 - Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. 1910.161 Section... § 1910.161 Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. (a) Scope and application. This section applies to all fixed extinguishing systems, using dry chemical as the extinguishing agent, installed to meet...

  20. 33 CFR 127.609 - Dry chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dry chemical systems. 127.609... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Firefighting § 127.609 Dry chemical systems. (a) Each marine transfer area for LNG must have a dry chemical system that provides at least two dry...

  1. 33 CFR 127.609 - Dry chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dry chemical systems. 127.609... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Firefighting § 127.609 Dry chemical systems. (a) Each marine transfer area for LNG must have a dry chemical system that provides at least two dry...

  2. 29 CFR 1910.161 - Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. 1910.161 Section... § 1910.161 Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. (a) Scope and application. This section applies to all fixed extinguishing systems, using dry chemical as the extinguishing agent, installed to meet...

  3. 29 CFR 1910.161 - Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. 1910.161 Section... § 1910.161 Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. (a) Scope and application. This section applies to all fixed extinguishing systems, using dry chemical as the extinguishing agent, installed to meet...

  4. 33 CFR 127.609 - Dry chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dry chemical systems. 127.609... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Firefighting § 127.609 Dry chemical systems. (a) Each marine transfer area for LNG must have a dry chemical system that provides at least two dry...

  5. Mars transportation system synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Archie C.; Mulqueen, John A.; Emrich, William J.

    Performance and requirements synthesized to support the manned Mars mission of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) are presented. Emphasis is placed on the Mars transportation system (MTS), which uses nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion technology associated with accomplishing the manned Mars mission. Data are also presented for a propulsion system options comparison of chemical/aerobrake and nuclear electric propulsion systems. Vehicle- and weight-scaling are used to determine the MTS mass, size, and performance range required for different Mars mission durations. The split sprint, opposition, and conjunction class mission modes are employed to determine the MTS requirements envelope. MTS sensitivity to Mars surface payload, crew size, Mars orbit payload, NTR engine thrust level, engine specific impulse, and NTR engine thrust-to-weight ratio are synthesized. A suggested NTR technology level to accomplish both cargo and piloted Mars missions is discussed.

  6. Fracture Reactivation in Chemically Reactive Rock Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.; Hooker, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Reactivation of existing fractures is a fundamental process of brittle failure that controls the nucleation of earthquake ruptures, propagation and linkage of hydraulic fractures in oil and gas production, and the evolution of fault and fracture networks and thus of fluid and heat transport in the upper crust. At depths below 2-3 km, and frequently shallower, brittle processes of fracture growth, linkage, and reactivation compete with chemical processes of fracture sealing by mineral precipitation, with precipitation rates similar to fracture opening rates. We recently found rates of fracture opening in tectonically quiescent settings of 10-20 μm/m.y., rates similar to euhedral quartz precipitation under these conditions. The tendency of existing partially or completely cemented fractures to reactivate will vary depending on strain rate, mineral precipitation kinetics, strength contrast between host rock and fracture cement, stress conditions, degree of fracture infill, and fracture network geometry. Natural fractures in quartzite of the Cambrian Eriboll Formation, NW Scotland, exhibit a complex history of fracture formation and reactivation, with reactivation involving both repeated crack-seal opening-mode failure and shear failure of fractures that formed in opening mode. Fractures are partially to completely sealed with crack-seal or euhedral quartz cement or quartz cement fragmented by shear reactivation. Degree of cementation controls the tendency of fractures for later shear reactivation, to interact elastically with adjacent open fractures, and their intersection behavior. Using kinematic, dynamic, and diagenetic criteria, we determine the sequence of opening-mode fracture formation and later shear reactivation. We find that sheared fracture systems of similar orientation display spatially varying sense of slip We attribute these inconsistent directions of shear reactivation to 1) a heterogeneous stress field in this highly fractured rock unit and 2

  7. Chemical evolution of primitive solar system bodies.

    PubMed

    Oró, J; Mills, T

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we summarize some of the most salient observations made recently on the organic molecules and other compounds of the biogenic elements present in the interstellar medium and in the primitive bodies of the solar system. They include the discovery of the first phosphorus molecular species in dense interstellar clouds, the presence of complex organic ions in the dust and gas phase of Halley's coma, the finding of unusual, probably presolar, deuterium-hydrogen ratios in the amino acids of carbonaceous chondrites, and new developments on the chemical evolution of Titan, the primitive Earth, and early Mars. Some of the outstanding problems concerning the synthesis of organic molecules on different cosmic bodies are also discussed from an exobiological perspective. PMID:11537358

  8. Chemical environments of submarine hydrothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    Perhaps because black-smoker chimneys make tremendous subjects for magazine covers, the proposal that submarine hydrothermal systems were involved in the origin of life has caused many investigators to focus on the eye-catching hydrothermal vents. In much the same way that tourists rush to watch the spectacular eruptions of Old Faithful geyser with little regard for the hydrology of the Yellowstone basin, attention is focused on the spectacular, high-temperature hydrothermal vents to the near exclusion of the enormous underlying hydrothermal systems. Nevertheless, the magnitude and complexity of geologic structures, heat flow, and hydrologic parameters which characterize the geyser basins at Yellowstone also characterize submarine hydrothermal systems. However, in the submarine systems the scale can be considerably more vast. Like Old Faithful, submarine hydrothermal vents have a spectacular quality, but they are only one fascinating aspect of enormous geologic systems operating at seafloor spreading centers throughout all of the ocean basins. A critical study of the possible role of hydrothermal processes in the origin of life should include the full spectrum of probable environments. The goals of this chapter are to synthesize diverse information about the inorganic geochemistry of submarine hydrothermal systems, assemble a description of the fundamental physical and chemical attributes of these systems, and consider the implications of high-temperature, fluid-driven processes for organic synthesis. Information about submarine hydrothermal systems comes from many directions. Measurements made directly on venting fluids provide useful, but remarkably limited, clues about processes operating at depth. The oceanic crust has been drilled to approximately 2.0 km depth providing many other pieces of information, but drilling technology has not allowed the bore holes and core samples to reach the maximum depths to which aqueous fluids circulate in oceanic crust. Such

  9. The Rationale/Benefits of Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion for NASA's Lunar Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.

    1994-01-01

    The solid core nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) represents the next major evolutionary step in propulsion technology. With its attractive operating characteristics, which include high specific impulse (approximately 850-1000 s) and engine thrust-to-weight (approximately 4-20), the NTR can form the basis for an efficient lunar space transportation system (LTS) capable of supporting both piloted and cargo missions. Studies conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center indicate that an NTR-based LTS could transport a fully-fueled, cargo-laden, lunar excursion vehicle to the Moon, and return it to low Earth orbit (LEO) after mission completion, for less initial mass in LEO than an aerobraked chemical system of the type studied by NASA during its '90-Day Study.' The all-propulsive NTR-powered LTS would also be 'fully reusable' and would have a 'return payload' mass fraction of approximately 23 percent--twice that of the 'partially reusable' aerobraked chemical system. Two NTR technology options are examined--one derived from the graphite-moderated reactor concept developed by NASA and the AEC under the Rover/NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) programs, and a second concept, the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR). The paper also summarizes NASA's lunar outpost scenario, compares relative performance provided by different LTS concepts, and discusses important operational issues (e.g., reusability, engine 'end-of life' disposal, etc.) associated with using this important propulsion technology.

  10. Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

    2014-03-01

    , they performed a sensitivity analysis for velocity, height and polydispersity and compared results against literature data for experimental studies of CLC beds with no reaction. Finally, they present an optimization space using simple non-reactive configurations. In Subtask 5.3, through a series of experimental studies, behavior of a variety of oxygen carriers with different loadings and manufacturing techniques was evaluated under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. The influences of temperature, degree of carrier conversion and thermodynamic driving force resulting from the difference between equilibrium and system O{sub 2} partial pressures were evaluated through several experimental campaigns, and generalized models accounting for these influences were developed to describe oxidation and oxygen release. Conversion of three solid fuels with widely ranging reactivities was studied in a small fluidized bed system, and all but the least reactive fuel (petcoke) were rapidly converted by oxygen liberated from the CLOU carrier. Attrition propensity of a variety of carriers was also studied, and the carriers produced by freeze granulation or impregnation of preformed substrates displayed the lowest rates of attrition. Subtask 5.4 focused on gathering kinetic data for a copper-based oxygen carrier to assist with modeling of a functioning chemical looping reactor. The kinetics team was also responsible for the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material.

  11. Systems analysis of past, present, and future chemical terrorism scenarios.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2012-03-01

    Throughout history, as new chemical threats arose, strategies for the defense against chemical attacks have also evolved. As a part of an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development project, a systems analysis of past, present, and future chemical terrorism scenarios was performed to understand how the chemical threats and attack strategies change over time. For the analysis, the difficulty in executing chemical attack was evaluated within a framework of three major scenario elements. First, historical examples of chemical terrorism were examined to determine how the use of chemical threats, versus other weapons, contributed to the successful execution of the attack. Using the same framework, the future of chemical terrorism was assessed with respect to the impact of globalization and new technologies. Finally, the efficacy of the current defenses against contemporary chemical terrorism was considered briefly. The results of this analysis justify the need for continued diligence in chemical defense.

  12. Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

    2011-07-01

    Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is one promising fuel-combustion technology, which can facilitate economic CO2 capture in coal-fired power plants. It employs the oxidation/reduction characteristics of a metal, or oxygen carrier, and its oxide, the oxidizing gas (typically air) and the fuel source may be kept separate. This work focused on two classes of oxygen carrier, one that merely undergoes a change in oxidation state, such as Fe3O4/Fe2O3 and one that is converted from its higher to its lower oxidation state by the release of oxygen on heating, i.e., CuO/Cu2O. This topical report discusses the results of four complementary efforts: (1) the development of process and economic models to optimize important design considerations, such as oxygen carrier circulation rate, temperature, residence time; (2) the development of high-performance simulation capabilities for fluidized beds and the collection, parameter identification, and preliminary verification/uncertainty quantification (3) the exploration of operating characteristics in the laboratory-scale bubbling bed reactor, with a focus on the oxygen carrier performance, including reactivity, oxygen carrying capacity, attrition resistance, resistance to deactivation, cost and availability (4) the identification of mechanisms and rates for the copper, cuprous oxide, and cupric oxide system using thermogravimetric analysis.

  13. BIOAVAILABILITY OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS IN AQUATIC SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Before a chemical can elicit toxicity, the animal must accumulate a dose at a target tissue of sufficient magnitude to produce a response. Bioavailability refers to the degree to which this accumulation occurs relative to the amount of chemical present in the environment, and is ...

  14. Hazard ranking systems for chemical wastes and chemical waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, R.D.; Parker, F.L. ); Crutcher, M.R. and Associates, Inc., Columbia, IL )

    1991-01-01

    Hazardous materials and substances have always existed in the environment. Mankind has evolved to live with some degree of exposure to toxic materials. Until recently the risk has been from natural toxins or natural background radiation. While rapid technological advances over the past few decades have improved the lifestyle of our society, they have also dramatically increased the availability, volume and types of synthetic and natural hazardous materials. Many of their effects are as yet uncertain. Products and manufacturing by-products that no longer serve a useful purpose are deemed wastes. For some waste products land disposal will always be their ultimate fate. Hazardous substances are often included in the waste products. One needs to classify wastes by degree of hazard (risk). Risk (degree of probability of loss) is usually defined for risk assessment as probability of an occurrence times the consequences of the occurrence. Perhaps even more important than the definition of risk is the choice of a risk management strategy. The choice of strategy will be strongly influenced by the decision criteria used. Those decision criteria could be utility (the greatest happiness of the greatest number), rights or technology based or some combination of the three. It is necessary to make such choices about the definition of risks and criteria for management. It is clear that these are social (i.e., political) and value choices and science has little to say on this matter. This is another example of what Alvin Weinberg has named Transcience where the subject matter is scientific and technical but the choices are social, political and moral. This paper shall deal only with the scientific and technical aspects of the hazardous waste problem to create a hazardous substances classification system.

  15. A thermodynamical framework for chemically reacting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, K.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we develop a thermodynamic framework that is capable of describing the response of viscoelastic materials that are undergoing chemical reactions that takes into account stoichiometry. Of course, as a special sub-case, we can also describe the response of elastic materials that undergo chemical reactions. The study generalizes the framework developed by Rajagopal and co-workers to study the response of a disparate class of bodies undergoing entropy producing processes. One of the quintessential feature of this framework is that the second law of thermodynamics is formulated by introducing Gibbs' potential, which is the natural way to study problems involving chemical reactions. The Gibbs potential-based formulation also naturally leads to implicit constitutive equations for the stress tensor. Another feature of the framework is that the constraints due to stoichiometry can also be taken into account in a consistent manner. The assumption of maximization of the rate of entropy production due to dissipation, heat conduction, and chemical reactions is invoked to determine an equation for the evolution of the natural configuration κ p( t)( B), the heat flux vector and a novel set of equations for the evolution of the concentration of the chemical constituents. To determine the efficacy of the framework with regard to chemical reactions, those occurring during vulcanization, a challenging set of chemical reactions, are chosen. More than one type of reaction mechanism is considered and the theoretically predicted distribution of mono, di and polysulfidic cross-links agree reasonably well with available experimental data.

  16. THE REVISED ORGANIC CHEMICAL PRODUCERS DATA BASE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the revised Organic Chemical Producers Data Base (OCPDB), an automated chemical information system developed for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Improvements have been made in two ways: (1) expansion of the data base to include more chemicals...

  17. CHEMTRAN and the Interconversion of Chemical Substructure Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granito, Charles E.

    1973-01-01

    The need for the interconversion of chemical substructure systems is discussed and CHEMTRAN, a new service, designed especially for creating interconversion programs, is introduced. (7 references) (Author)

  18. Chemical Stimulation of Engineered Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Peter, E.

    2008-08-08

    The objective of this project is to design, develop and demonstrate methods for the chemical stimulation of candidate EGS reservoirs as well as the chemical treatment of mineral-scaled wellbores. First, a set of candidate chemical compounds capable of dissolving calcite was identified. A series of tests was then performed on each candidate in order to screen it for thermal stability and reactivity towards calcite. A detailed analysis was then performed on each compound that emerged from the screening tests in order to characterize its decay kinetics and reaction kinetics as functions of temperature and chemical composition. From among the compounds emerging from the laboratory studies, one compounds was chosen for a field experiment in order to verify the laboratory predictions.

  19. Control and optimization system and method for chemical looping processes

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng; Joshi, Abhinaya; Lei, Hao

    2014-06-24

    A control system for optimizing a chemical loop system includes one or more sensors for measuring one or more parameters in a chemical loop. The sensors are disposed on or in a conduit positioned in the chemical loop. The sensors generate one or more data signals representative of an amount of solids in the conduit. The control system includes a data acquisition system in communication with the sensors and a controller in communication with the data acquisition system. The data acquisition system receives the data signals and the controller generates the control signals. The controller is in communication with one or more valves positioned in the chemical loop. The valves are configured to regulate a flow of the solids through the chemical loop.

  20. Control and optimization system and method for chemical looping processes

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng; Joshi, Abhinaya; Lei, Hao

    2015-02-17

    A control system for optimizing a chemical loop system includes one or more sensors for measuring one or more parameters in a chemical loop. The sensors are disposed on or in a conduit positioned in the chemical loop. The sensors generate one or more data signals representative of an amount of solids in the conduit. The control system includes a data acquisition system in communication with the sensors and a controller in communication with the data acquisition system. The data acquisition system receives the data signals and the controller generates the control signals. The controller is in communication with one or more valves positioned in the chemical loop. The valves are configured to regulate a flow of the solids through the chemical loop.

  1. Introducing DAE Systems in Undergraduate and Graduate Chemical Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandela, Ravi Kumar; Sridhar, L. N.; Rengaswamy, Raghunathan

    2010-01-01

    Models play an important role in understanding chemical engineering systems. While differential equation models are taught in standard modeling and control courses, Differential Algebraic Equation (DAE) system models are not usually introduced. These models appear naturally in several chemical engineering problems. In this paper, the introduction…

  2. MODELING CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS IN ANAEROBIC BIOFILM SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rigorous steady-state models of acetate- and methanol-utilizing methanogenic biofilms are developed taking into account the mass transfer of neutral and ionic species, pH changes within the biofilm, pH-dependent Monod kinetics, chemical equilibrium,, electronueutrality, gas produ...

  3. Integrated chemical management system: A tool for managing chemical information at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    Costain, D.

    1995-07-01

    The Integrated Chemical Management System is a computer-based chemical information at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. Chemical containers are identified by bar code labels and information on the type, quantity and location of chemicals are tracked on individual data bases in separate buildings. Chemical inventories from multiple buildings are uploaded to a central sitewide chemical data base where reports are available from Product, Waste, and Chemical Use modules. Hazardous chemical information is provided by a separate Material Safety Data Sheet module and excess chemicals are traded between chemical owners and users with the aid of the Chemical Exchange Module.

  4. FMC Chemicals: Burner Management System Upgrade Improves Performance and Saves Energy at a Chemical Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-07-01

    FMC Chemicals Corporation increased the efficiency of two large coal-fired boilers at its soda ash mine in Green River, Wyoming, by upgrading the burner management system. The project yields annual energy savings of 250,000 MMBtu.

  5. Microcalibrator system for chemical signature and reagent delivery.

    SciTech Connect

    Staton, Alan W.; Simonson, Robert Joseph; Adkins, Douglas Ray; Rawlinson, Kim Scott; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Hance, Bradley G.; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Sanchez, Lawrence James; Ellison, Jennifer Anne; Sokolowski, Sara Suzette

    2005-03-01

    Networked systems of low-cost, small, integrable chemical sensors will enable monitoring of Nonproliferation and Materials Control targets and chemical weapons threats. Sandia-designed prototype chemical sensor systems are undergoing extended field testing supported by DOE and other government agencies. A required surety component will be verification of microanalytical system performance, which can be achieved by providing a programmable source of chemical signature(s) for autonomous calibration of analytical systems. In addition, such a controlled chemical source could be used to dispense microaliquots of derivatization reagents, extending the analysis capability of chemical sensors to a wider range of targets. We have developed a microfabricated system for controlled release of selected compounds (calibrants) into the analytical stream of microsensor systems. To minimize pumping and valve requirements of microfluidic systems, and to avoid degradation issues associated with storage of dilute solutions, we have utilized thermally labile organic salts as solid-phase reservoir materials. Reproducible deposition of tetrapropyl ammonium hydroxide onto arrays of microfabricated heating elements can provide a pair of calibration marker compounds (one fast and one slow-eluting compound) for GC analyses. The use of this microaliquot gas source array for hydrogen generation is currently under further development. The goal of the latter effort will be to provide a source of high-pressure, low viscosity GC carrier gas for Sandia's next-generation microfabricated gas-phase chemical analysis systems.

  6. Discovery of Chemical Toxicity via Biological Networks and Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Habib, Tanwir; Guan, Xin; Escalon, Barbara; Falciani, Francesco; Chipman, J.K.; Antczak, Philipp; Edwards, Stephen; Taylor, Ronald C.; Vulpe, Chris; Loguinov, Alexandre; Van Aggelen, Graham; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Garcia-Reyero, Natalia

    2010-09-30

    Both soldiers and animals are exposed to many chemicals as the result of military activities. Tools are needed to understand the hazards and risks that chemicals and new materials pose to soldiers and the environment. We have investigated the potential of global gene regulatory networks in understanding the impact of chemicals on reproduction. We characterized effects of chemicals on ovaries of the model animal system, the Fathead minnow (Pimopheles promelas) connecting chemical impacts on gene expression to circulating blood levels of the hormones testosterone and estradiol in addition to the egg yolk protein vitellogenin. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional gene expression data to characterize chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis that governs reproduction in fathead minnows. The construction of global gene regulatory networks provides deep insights into how drugs and chemicals effect key organs and biological pathways.

  7. Chemical Constraints on the Early Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyckoff, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Chemical abundances of comets and star-forming regions provide p o w d clues to the conditions which prevailed in the outer solar nebula. Hence comparative spectroscopic studies of cometary and molecular cloud gases provide vital insights into conditions in the solar protoplanetary disk at heliocentric distances beyond 5 AU 4.6 Gyr ago. We proposed a research program which combined optical and sub-millimeter techniques with laboratory spectroscopy, and sought to determine key diagnostic constraints on single-star protoplanetary disk models.

  8. Explosive destruction system for disposal of chemical munitions

    DOEpatents

    Tschritter, Kenneth L.; Haroldsen, Brent L.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Stofleth, Jerome H.; DiBerardo, Raymond A.

    2005-04-19

    An explosive destruction system and method for safely destroying explosively configured chemical munitions. The system comprises a sealable, gas-tight explosive containment vessel, a fragment suppression system positioned in said vessel, and shaped charge means for accessing the interior of the munition when the munition is placed within the vessel and fragment suppression system. Also provided is a means for treatment and neutralization of the munition's chemical fills, and means for heating and agitating the contents of the vessel. The system is portable, rapidly deployable and provides the capability of explosively destroying and detoxifying chemical munitions within a gas-tight enclosure so that there is no venting of toxic or hazardous chemicals during detonation.

  9. Conservation-dissipation structure of chemical reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Yong, Wen-An

    2012-12-01

    In this Brief Report, we show that balanced chemical reaction systems governed by the law of mass action have an elegant conservation-dissipation structure. From this structure a number of important conclusions can be easily deduced. In particular, with the help of this structure we can rigorously justify the classical partial equilibrium approximation in chemical kinetics. PMID:23368081

  10. Information System for Environmental Chemicals: Training for End Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voigt, Kristina; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Discusses factors to consider in identifying and accessing appropriate data sources for environmental chemical information and describes three training programs for end-users: (1) a course on retrieval of information on dangerous substances; (2) a seminar on German offline databases on chemicals; and (3) a workshop on the Information System for…

  11. 29 CFR 1910.161 - Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Fire Protection Fixed Fire Suppression Equipment... employer shall sample the dry chemical supply of all but stored pressure systems at least annually...

  12. AN ADVANCED SYSTEM FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION IN CHEMICAL COMPLEXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    One important accomplishment is that the system will give process engineers interactively and simultaneously use of programs for total cost analysis, life cycle assessment and sustainability metrics to provide direction for the optimal chemical complex analysis pro...

  13. A rule-based expert system for chemical prioritization using effects-based chemical categories.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, P K; Kolanczyk, R C; Hornung, M W; Tapper, M A; Denny, J S; Sheedy, B R; Aladjov, H

    2014-01-01

    A rule-based expert system (ES) was developed to predict chemical binding to the estrogen receptor (ER) patterned on the research approaches championed by Gilman Veith to whom this article and journal issue are dedicated. The ERES was built to be mechanistically transparent and meet the needs of a specific application, i.e. predict for all chemicals within two well-defined inventories (industrial chemicals used as pesticide inerts and antimicrobial pesticides). These chemicals all lack structural features associated with high affinity binders and thus any binding should be low affinity. Similar to the high-quality fathead minnow database upon which Veith QSARs were built, the ERES was derived from what has been termed gold standard data, systematically collected in assays optimized to detect even low affinity binding and maximizing confidence in the negatives determinations. The resultant logic-based decision tree ERES, determined to be a robust model, contains seven major nodes with multiple effects-based chemicals categories within each. Predicted results are presented in the context of empirical data within local chemical structural groups facilitating informed decision-making. Even using optimized detection assays, the ERES applied to two inventories of >600 chemicals resulted in only ~5% of the chemicals predicted to bind ER. PMID:24779615

  14. Systems approach to chemical spill response information needs

    SciTech Connect

    Parnarouskis, M.C.; Flessner, M.F.; Potts, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The Chemical Hazards Response Information System (CHRIS) has been specifically designed to meet the emergency needs of US Coast Guard field personnel, currently providing them with information on 900 hazardous chemicals, with methods of predicting hazards resulting from accidental discharges, and with procedures for selecting and implementing response to accident discharges. The major components of CHRIS and the computerized hazard assessment models within the Hazard Assessment Computer System are described in detail.

  15. Mining chemical patents with an ensemble of open systems

    PubMed Central

    Leaman, Robert; Wei, Chih-Hsuan; Zou, Cherry; Lu, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    The significant amount of medicinal chemistry information contained in patents makes them an attractive target for text mining. In this manuscript, we describe systems for named entity recognition (NER) of chemicals and genes/proteins in patents, using the CEMP (for chemicals) and GPRO (for genes/proteins) corpora provided by the CHEMDNER task at BioCreative V. Our chemical NER system is an ensemble of five open systems, including both versions of tmChem, our previous work on chemical NER. Their output is combined using a machine learning classification approach. Our chemical NER system obtained 0.8752 precision and 0.9129 recall, for 0.8937 f-score on the CEMP task. Our gene/protein NER system is an extension of our previous work for gene and protein NER, GNormPlus. This system obtained a performance of 0.8143 precision and 0.8141 recall, for 0.8137 f-score on the GPRO task. Both systems achieved the highest performance in their respective tasks at BioCreative V. We conclude that an ensemble of independently-created open systems is sufficiently diverse to significantly improve performance over any individual system, even when they use a similar approach. Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Lu/Demo/tmTools/. PMID:27173521

  16. Mining chemical patents with an ensemble of open systems.

    PubMed

    Leaman, Robert; Wei, Chih-Hsuan; Zou, Cherry; Lu, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    The significant amount of medicinal chemistry information contained in patents makes them an attractive target for text mining. In this manuscript, we describe systems for named entity recognition (NER) of chemicals and genes/proteins in patents, using the CEMP (for chemicals) and GPRO (for genes/proteins) corpora provided by the CHEMDNER task at BioCreative V. Our chemical NER system is an ensemble of five open systems, including both versions of tmChem, our previous work on chemical NER. Their output is combined using a machine learning classification approach. Our chemical NER system obtained 0.8752 precision and 0.9129 recall, for 0.8937 f-score on the CEMP task. Our gene/protein NER system is an extension of our previous work for gene and protein NER, GNormPlus. This system obtained a performance of 0.8143 precision and 0.8141 recall, for 0.8137 f-score on the GPRO task. Both systems achieved the highest performance in their respective tasks at BioCreative V. We conclude that an ensemble of independently-created open systems is sufficiently diverse to significantly improve performance over any individual system, even when they use a similar approach.Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Lu/Demo/tmTools/. PMID:27173521

  17.  Introduction: Self-organization in nonequilibrium chemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Irving R.; Pojman, John A.; Steinbock, Oliver

    2006-09-01

    The field of self-organization in nonequilibrium chemical systems comprises the study of dynamical phenomena in chemically reacting systems far from equilibrium. Systematic exploration of this area began with investigations of the temporal behavior of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky oscillating reaction, discovered accidentally in the former Soviet Union in the 1950s. The field soon advanced into chemical waves in excitable media and propagating fronts. With the systematic design of oscillating reactions in the 1980s and the discovery of Turing patterns in the 1990s, the scope of these studies expanded dramatically. The articles in this Focus Issue provide an overview of the development and current state of the field.

  18. Environmental sentinel biomonitors: integrated response systems for monitoring toxic chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schalie, William H.; Reuter, Roy; Shedd, Tommy R.; Knechtges, Paul L.

    2002-02-01

    Operational environments for military forces are becoming potentially more dangerous due to the increased number, use, and misuse of toxic chemicals across the entire range of military missions. Defense personnel may be exposed to harmful chemicals as a result of industrial accidents or intentional or unintentional action of enemy, friendly forces, or indigenous populations. While there has been a significant military effort to enable forces to operate safely and survive and sustain operations in nuclear, biological, chemical warfare agent environments, until recently there has not been a concomitant effort associated with potential adverse health effects from exposures of deployed personnel to toxic industrial chemicals. To provide continuous real-time toxicity assessments across a broad spectrum of individual chemicals or chemical mixtures, an Environmental Sentinel Biomonitor (ESB) system concept is proposed. An ESB system will integrate data from one or more platforms of biologically-based systems and chemical detectors placed in the environment to sense developing toxic conditions and transmit time-relevant data for use in risk assessment, mitigation, and/or management. Issues, challenges, and next steps for the ESB system concept are described, based in part on discussions at a September 2001 workshop sponsored by the U.S. Army Center for Environmental Health Research.

  19. Chemical treatment costs reduced with in-pond raceway systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production systems such as in-pond raceway systems (IPRS) and split ponds are providing an alternative to traditional pond culture for raising catfish in several southeastern states. One advantage noted by farmers utilizing these systems is the reduced cost associated with the chemical treatment of ...

  20. Soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system and method

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, Jr., John W.

    1991-01-01

    A real time soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system includes a plurality of ground-engaging tools in association with individual soil sensors which measure soil chemical levels. The system includes the addition of a solvent which rapidly saturates the soil/tool interface to form a conductive solution of chemicals leached from the soil. A multivalent electrode, positioned within a multivalent frame of the ground-engaging tool, applies a voltage or impresses a current between the electrode and the tool frame. A real-time soil chemical sensor and controller senses the electrochemical reaction resulting from the application of the voltage or current to the leachate, measures it by resistivity methods, and compares it against pre-set resistivity levels for substances leached by the solvent. Still greater precision is obtained by calibrating for the secondary current impressed through solvent-less soil. The appropriate concentration is then found and the servo-controlled delivery system applies the appropriate amount of fertilizer or agricultural chemicals substantially in the location from which the soil measurement was taken.

  1. Soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system and method

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, J.W. Jr.

    1991-07-23

    A real time soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system includes a plurality of ground-engaging tools in association with individual soil sensors which measure soil chemical levels. The system includes the addition of a solvent which rapidly saturates the soil/tool interface to form a conductive solution of chemicals leached from the soil. A multivalent electrode, positioned within a multivalent frame of the ground-engaging tool, applies a voltage or impresses a current between the electrode and the tool frame. A real-time soil chemical sensor and controller senses the electrochemical reaction resulting from the application of the voltage or current to the leachate, measures it by resistivity methods, and compares it against pre-set resistivity levels for substances leached by the solvent. Still greater precision is obtained by calibrating for the secondary current impressed through solvent-less soil. The appropriate concentration is then found and the servo-controlled delivery system applies the appropriate amount of fertilizer or agricultural chemicals substantially in the location from which the soil measurement was taken. 5 figures.

  2. High throughput chemical munitions treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Haroldsen, Brent L.; Stofleth, Jerome H.; Didlake, Jr., John E.; Wu, Benjamin C-P

    2011-11-01

    A new High-Throughput Explosive Destruction System is disclosed. The new system is comprised of two side-by-side detonation containment vessels each comprising first and second halves that feed into a single agent treatment vessel. Both detonation containment vessels further comprise a surrounding ventilation facility. Moreover, the detonation containment vessels are designed to separate into two half-shells, wherein one shell can be moved axially away from the fixed, second half for ease of access and loading. The vessels are closed by means of a surrounding, clam-shell type locking seal mechanisms.

  3. Studies on Semantic Systems Chemical Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Current "one disease, one target and one drug" drug development paradigm is under question as relatively few drugs have reached the market in the last two decades. Increasingly research focus is being placed on the study of drug action against biological systems as a whole rather than against a single component (called "Systems…

  4. Chemical Equilibrium Composition of Aqueous Systems

    1996-12-30

    MINEQL is a subroutine package to calculate equilibrium composition of an aqueous system, accounting for mass transfer. MINEQL-EIR contains an additional base on enthalpy and heat capacity data and has the option to do calculations at temperatures different from 25 degrees C.

  5. Development of a Persistent Chemical Agent Simulator System (PCASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcginness, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a persistent chemical agent simulation system (PCASS) is described. This PCASS is to be used for the military training of troops to simulate actual chemical warfare. The purpose of this system is to facilitate in the determination of chemical contamination and effectiveness of decontamination for training purposes. The fluorescent tracer employed has no daylight activation, but yet is easily removed with a decontaminate solution or water and surfactants. Also employed is a time delayed color developing system. When an individual is subjected to the PCASS and does not decontaminate adequately, red blotches or red coloration will develop as a function of time and temperature. The intent of this is to simulate the delayed chemical reaction of mustard contaminates.

  6. Chemical launch system options for microspacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Mark G.

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents launch vehicle and upper-stage options for application to lunar and interplanetary microspacecraft missions. Particular attention is given to the capabilities of Piggyback, small launch vehicles, and large launch vehicles. It is noted that Piggyback options on the Shuttle and expendable launch vehicles enable near-term earth-orbital missions and the potential for lunar and planetary missions if an electric-propulsion upper-stage is developed. Launch systems like the Space Shuttle could be used to launch large members of microspacecraft in 'constellation deployment' and 'shotgun' class missions to a variety of solar-system targets such as the sun, asteroids, comets, the moon, Mars, and Saturn.

  7. Advanced coating lining systems for challenging chemical environments

    SciTech Connect

    Brupbacher, J.M.; Stiles, J.E.

    1997-08-01

    Advanced coatings and coating lining systems are being increasingly used by industry to protect process equipment in challenging chemical environments. This includes not only severe corrosive liquors encountered in many Chemical Process Industry streams, but also the high purity process liquors and rinse systems of the pharmaceutical and microelectronics industries. This paper discusses the design options for optimizing the performance of fluoropolymer-based coating systems for industry-specific applications such as these. Design factors discussed will include surface pre-treatment options, chemical and mechanical bonding systems, field-proven and advanced polymer barrier coatings, homogeneous and graded polymer barrier stacks, and imbedded permeation barriers. The processing techniques for applying engineered coatings will be discussed since processing also plays an important role in the design options available to individual coating applicators and ultimate performance of the coating system applied. Several case studies will be presented and discussed.

  8. Anderson localization for chemically realistic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terletska, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Disorder which is ubiquitous for most materials can strongly effect their properties. It may change their electronic structures or even cause their localization, known as Anderson localization. Although, substantial progress has been achieved in the description of the Anderson localization, a proper mean-field theory of this phenomenon for more realistic systems remains elusive. Commonly used theoretical methods such as the coherent potential approximation and its cluster extensions fail to describe the Anderson transition, as the average density of states (DOS) employed in such theories is not critical at the transition. However, near the transition, due to the spatial confinement of carriers, the local DOS becomes highly skewed with a log-normal distribution, for which the most probable and the typical values differ noticeably from the average value. Dobrosavljevic et.al., incorporated such ideas in their typical medium theory (TMT), and showed that the typical (not average) DOS is critical at the transition. While the TMT is able to capture the localized states, as a local single site theory it still has several drawbacks. For the disorder Anderson model in three dimension it underestimates the critical disorder strength, and fails to capture the re-entrance behavior of the mobility edge. We have recently developed a cluster extension of the TMT, which addresses these drawbacks by systematically incorporating non-local corrections. This approach converges quickly with cluster size and allows us to incorporate the effect of interactions and realistic electronic structure. As the first steps towards realistic material modeling, we extended our TMDCA formalisms to systems with the off diagonal disorder and multiple bands structures. We also applied our TMDCA scheme to systems with both disorder and interactions and found that correlations effects tend to stabilize the metallic behavior even in two dimensions. This work was supported by DOE SciDAC Grant No. DE-FC02

  9. Chemical Pattern Formation in Far-From Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John Evan

    The diffusive instability was proposed as a mechanism for pattern formation in chemical systems, in the context of biological morphogenesis, by Alan Turing in 1952. The instability gives rise to a chemical pattern with an intrinsic "chemical wavelength" that is independent of the system size. Since 1952, the diffusive instability, or Turing bifurcation, has been invoked to explain pattern formation in a variety of fields. To date there has been no unambiguous observation of such an instability. Model studies of the instability are usually carried out on systems containing two variables. Such works do not address issues that are of fundamental importance in experimental studies. How does one go about finding Turing bifurcations in systems with many parameters and for which the chemical kinetics are only partially known? What is the chemical wavelength? Turing bifurcations cannot occur in systems with all diffusion coefficients exactly equal. How unequal must the diffusion coefficients be for a system to undergo a Turing bifurcation?. Reacting and diffusing systems obey a partial -differential equation which is a sum of a diffusion term and a reaction term. Dropping the diffusion term results in an ordinary differential equation describing the reaction kinetics in a well-mixed system. In this dissertation it is shown that, for systems with an arbitrary number of variables, Turing bifurcations can occur with diffusion coefficients arbitrarily close to equal, provided the corresponding well-mixed system is sufficiently close to a point of coalescence of Hopf and saddle-node bifurcations. Since the bifurcation set can be obtained directly from experiments, one does not need a detailed microscopic theory of the reaction kinetics. Similarly, the chemical wavelength can be estimated from experimental measurements without knowledge of the reaction kinetics.

  10. Discrete Stochastic Simulation Methods for Chemically Reacting Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yang; Samuels, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Discrete stochastic chemical kinetics describe the time evolution of a chemically reacting system by taking into account the fact that in reality chemical species are present with integer populations and exhibit some degree of randomness in their dynamical behavior. In recent years, with the development of new techniques to study biochemistry dynamics in a single cell, there are increasing studies using this approach to chemical kinetics in cellular systems, where the small copy number of some reactant species in the cell may lead to deviations from the predictions of the deterministic differential equations of classical chemical kinetics. This chapter reviews the fundamental theory related to stochastic chemical kinetics and several simulation methods that are based on that theory. We focus on non-stiff biochemical systems and the two most important discrete stochastic simulation methods: Gillespie's Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA) and the tau-leaping method. Different implementation strategies of these two methods are discussed. Then we recommend a relatively simple and efficient strategy that combines the strengths of the two methods: the hybrid SSA/tau-leaping method. The implementation details of the hybrid strategy are given here and a related software package is introduced. Finally, the hybrid method is applied to simple biochemical systems as a demonstration of its application. PMID:19216925

  11. Membrane-Organized Chemical Photoredox Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, James K.

    2014-09-18

    This project has three interrelated goals relevant to solar water photolysis, which are to develop: (1) vesicle-organized assemblies for H2 photoproduction that utilize pyrylium and structurally related compounds as combined photosensitizers and cyclic electroneutral transmembrane electron carriers; (2) transmembrane redox systems whose reaction rates can be modulated by light; and (3) homogeneous catalysts for water oxidation. . In area (1), initial efforts to photogenerate H2 from vectorially-organized vesicles containing occluded colloidal Pt and commonly available pyrylium ions as transmembrane redox mediators were unsuccessful. New pyrylium compounds with significantly lower reduction potentials have been synthesized to address this problem, their apparent redox potentials in functioning systems have been now evaluated by using a series of occluded viologens, and H2 photoproduction has been demonstrated in continuous illumination experiments. In area (2), spirooxazine-quinone dyads have been synthesized and their capacity to function as redox mediators across bilayer membranes has been evaluated through continuous photolysis and transient spectrophotometric measurements. Photoisomerization of the spiro moiety to the ring-open mero form caused net quantum yields to decrease significantly, providing a basis for photoregulation of transmembrane redox. Research on water oxidation (area 3) has been directed at understanding mechanisms of catalysis by cis,cis-[(bpy)2Ru(OH2)]2O4+ and related polyimine complexes. Using a variety of physical techniques, we have: (i) identified the redox state of the complex ion that is catalytically active; (ii) shown using 18O isotopic labeling that there are two reaction pathways, both of which involve participation of solvent H2O; and (iii) detected and characterized by EPR and resonance Raman spectroscopies new species which may be key intermediates in the catalytic cycle.

  12. Multi-scenario modelling of uncertainty in stochastic chemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R. David; Ricardez-Sandoval, Luis A.

    2014-09-15

    Uncertainty analysis has not been well studied at the molecular scale, despite extensive knowledge of uncertainty in macroscale systems. The ability to predict the effect of uncertainty allows for robust control of small scale systems such as nanoreactors, surface reactions, and gene toggle switches. However, it is difficult to model uncertainty in such chemical systems as they are stochastic in nature, and require a large computational cost. To address this issue, a new model of uncertainty propagation in stochastic chemical systems, based on the Chemical Master Equation, is proposed in the present study. The uncertain solution is approximated by a composite state comprised of the averaged effect of samples from the uncertain parameter distributions. This model is then used to study the effect of uncertainty on an isomerization system and a two gene regulation network called a repressilator. The results of this model show that uncertainty in stochastic systems is dependent on both the uncertain distribution, and the system under investigation. -- Highlights: •A method to model uncertainty on stochastic systems was developed. •The method is based on the Chemical Master Equation. •Uncertainty in an isomerization reaction and a gene regulation network was modelled. •Effects were significant and dependent on the uncertain input and reaction system. •The model was computationally more efficient than Kinetic Monte Carlo.

  13. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Jolley; R. Jarek; P. Mariner

    2004-02-09

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  14. Chemical diffusion in ZrNb system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, R. V.; Kale, G. B.; Garg, S. P.

    1995-05-01

    The temperature and concentration dependence of interdiffusion coefficients in zirconium-niobium system has been established in the temperature range between 1593 and 1993 K by employing an electron probe micro analyser. The interdiffusion coefficients are found to increase with increase in zirconium content in the alloy and can be described by the relation D˜(C) = A (T)e5.6C Here, A( T) is the temperature dependent parameter and has the value of tracer diffusion coefficient at infinite dilution. C is the mole fraction of the component. The temperature dependence of interdiffusion coefficients can be represented by the Arrhenius expression of the type D˜(C) = D˜A 0eQ˜/RT The activation energy ( Q˜c) and frequency factor ( D˜0) values in the composition range between 5 and 90% Zr lie in the range of 216 to 276 kJ/mol, and 10 -7 to 10 -5 m 2/s, respectively. An attempt has also been made to evaluate the impurity diffusion data by using interdiffusion values.

  15. Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Sample Tracking System Design Document

    SciTech Connect

    Bargelski, C. J.; Berrett, D. E.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the system architecture of the Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Sample Tracking System at Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the course of the document observations are made concerning the objectives, constraints and limitations, technical approaches, and the technical deliverables.

  16. Development of a terrestrial chemical spill management system.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Derek L; Abkowitz, Mark D

    2007-08-17

    Adequately preparing for and responding to terrestrial (land-based) chemical spills are critical to the protection of human health and the environment. To facilitate analysis and support decision-making for such events, the authors have developed an environmental risk management system that characterizes the ability of a spilled chemical to immediately impact human health, groundwater, surface water, and soil resources, and incorporates these four risk areas into an overall measure of terrestrial chemical risk. This system incorporates a risk index model, leverages geographic information systems (GIS) technology, and contains a comprehensive chemical and environmental database to assess and delineate the immediate threat posed by a terrestrial chemical spill. It is designed to serve a variety of stakeholders, including managers and policy-makers, who would benefit from generating screening-level environmental risk assessments without requiring a technical background or collection of detailed environmental and chemical data. Areas of potential application include transportation routing, industrial zoning, environmental regulatory compliance and enforcement, spill response, and security planning. PMID:17250961

  17. A rule-based expert system for chemical prioritization using effects-based chemical categories

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rule-based expert system (ES) was developed to predict chemical binding to the estrogen receptor (ER) patterned on the research approaches championed by Gilman Veith to whom this article and journal issue are dedicated. The ERES was built to be mechanistically-transparent and m...

  18. Propulsive options for a manned Mars transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Robert D.; Blersch, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    In this investigation, five potential manned Mars transportation systems are compared. These options include: (1) a single vehicle, chemically propelled (CHEM) option, (2) a single vehicle, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) option, (3) a single vehicle solar electric propulsion (SEP) option, (4) a single vehicle hybrid nuclear electric propulsion (NEP)/CHEM option, and (5) a dual vehicle option (NEP cargo spacecraft and CHEM manned vehicle). In addition to utilizing the initial vehicle weight in low-earth orbit as a measure of mission feasibility, this study addresses the major technological barriers each propulsive scenario must surpass. It is shown that instead of a single clearly superior propulsion system, each means of propulsion may be favored depending upon the specified program policy and the extent of the desired manned flight time. Furthermore, the effect which aerobraking and multiple transfer cycles have upon mission feasibility is considered.

  19. Process Control Systems in the Chemical Industry: Safety vs. Security

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Hahn; Thomas Anderson

    2005-04-01

    Traditionally, the primary focus of the chemical industry has been safety and productivity. However, recent threats to our nation’s critical infrastructure have prompted a tightening of security measures across many different industry sectors. Reducing vulnerabilities of control systems against physical and cyber attack is necessary to ensure the safety, security and effective functioning of these systems. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has developed a strategy to secure these vulnerabilities. Crucial to this strategy is the Control Systems Security and Test Center (CSSTC) established to test and analyze control systems equipment. In addition, the CSSTC promotes a proactive, collaborative approach to increase industry's awareness of standards, products and processes that can enhance the security of control systems. This paper outlines measures that can be taken to enhance the cybersecurity of process control systems in the chemical sector.

  20. A Portable System for Nuclear, Chemical Agent and Explosives Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W.E.; Buckley, W.M.; Kreek, S.A.; Caffrey, A.J.; Mauger, G.J.; Lavietes, A.D.; Dougan, A.D.

    2000-09-29

    The FRIS/PINS hybrid integrates the LLNL-developed Field Radionuclide Identification System (FRIS) with the INEEL-developed Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) chemical assay system to yield a combined general radioisotope, special nuclear material, and chemical weapons/explosives detection and identification system. The PINS system uses a neutron source and a high-purity germanium {gamma}-ray detector. The FRIS system uses an electrochemically cooled germanium detector and its own analysis software to detect and identify special nuclear material and other radioisotopes. The FRIS/PINS combined system also uses the electromechanically-cooled germanium detector. There is no other currently available integrated technology that can combine an active neutron interrogation and analysis capability for CWE with a passive radioisotope measurement and identification capability for special nuclear material.

  1. Chemical environments of submarine hydrothermal systems. [supporting abiogenetic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper synthesizes diverse information about the inorganic geochemistry of submarine hydrothermal systems, provides a description of the fundamental physical and chemical properties of these systems, and examines the implications of high-temperature, fluid-driven processes for organic synthesis. Emphasis is on a few general features, i.e., pressure, temperature, oxidation states, fluid composition, and mineral alteration, because these features will control whether organic synthesis can occur in hydrothermal systems.

  2. Development of a persistent chemical agent simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A Persistent Chemical Agent Simulation System was developed (PCASS) to simulate, for force-on-force training exercises, the field environment produced by the presence of persistent chemical agents. Such a simulant system must satisfy several requirements to be of value as a training aid. Specifically, it must provide for realistic training which will generate competency in at least the following areas: (1) detection of the persistent agent presence; (2) proper use of protective equipment and procedures; (3) determination of the extent of contamination; and (4) decontamination of equipment and personnel.

  3. APOLLO: A computer program for the calculation of chemical equilibrium and reaction kinetics of chemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.D.

    1991-11-01

    Several of the technologies being evaluated for the treatment of waste material involve chemical reactions. Our example is the in situ vitrification (ISV) process where electrical energy is used to melt soil and waste into a ``glass like`` material that immobilizes and encapsulates any residual waste. During the ISV process, various chemical reactions may occur that produce significant amounts of products which must be contained and treated. The APOLLO program was developed to assist in predicting the composition of the gases that are formed. Although the development of this program was directed toward ISV applications, it should be applicable to other technologies where chemical reactions are of interest. This document presents the mathematical methodology of the APOLLO computer code. APOLLO is a computer code that calculates the products of both equilibrium and kinetic chemical reactions. The current version, written in FORTRAN, is readily adaptable to existing transport programs designed for the analysis of chemically reacting flow systems. Separate subroutines EQREACT and KIREACT for equilibrium ad kinetic chemistry respectively have been developed. A full detailed description of the numerical techniques used, which include both Lagrange multiplies and a third-order integrating scheme is presented. Sample test problems are presented and the results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature.

  4. APOLLO: A computer program for the calculation of chemical equilibrium and reaction kinetics of chemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.D.

    1991-11-01

    Several of the technologies being evaluated for the treatment of waste material involve chemical reactions. Our example is the in situ vitrification (ISV) process where electrical energy is used to melt soil and waste into a glass like'' material that immobilizes and encapsulates any residual waste. During the ISV process, various chemical reactions may occur that produce significant amounts of products which must be contained and treated. The APOLLO program was developed to assist in predicting the composition of the gases that are formed. Although the development of this program was directed toward ISV applications, it should be applicable to other technologies where chemical reactions are of interest. This document presents the mathematical methodology of the APOLLO computer code. APOLLO is a computer code that calculates the products of both equilibrium and kinetic chemical reactions. The current version, written in FORTRAN, is readily adaptable to existing transport programs designed for the analysis of chemically reacting flow systems. Separate subroutines EQREACT and KIREACT for equilibrium ad kinetic chemistry respectively have been developed. A full detailed description of the numerical techniques used, which include both Lagrange multiplies and a third-order integrating scheme is presented. Sample test problems are presented and the results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature.

  5. FGD systems -- Physical deterioration of the chemical plant facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dille, E.R.; Ridge, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    The Clean Air Act of 1970 established the initial requirements for the control of flue gas emissions from fossil-fuel-fired power plants in the US. Until then, only mechanical collectors and electrostatic precipitators regulated smoke and fly ash emissions from these plants. Now, a new technique for controlling the chemical emissions from a fossil-fuel-fired power plant had to be installed. Since there was practically no time for a research and development program, the power industry had to move quickly to select a compliance system. They chose to modify existing technology from the chemical industry for their specific need. Thus, wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems were born into the power industry and a chemical plant was added between the electrostatic precipitator and the chimney. This paper provides insight on how a program can be implemented to reconcile the materials and corrosion protection techniques available today to the specific areas of an FGD system. This paper focuses on a typical wet limestone FGD process. This type of process constitutes the vast majority of the FGD systems by total megawatt generation in the US. The power industry must learn from its chemical plant experience if it intends to extend the service life of FGD systems to match the design life of the remaining plant power block.

  6. Interannual Comparison of Temporal and Spatial Structure in the Martian Thermosphere from Atmospheric Accelerometer Measurements of Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) during Aerobraking and Stellar Occultation Measurements from the SPICAM Ultraviolet Infrared Atmospheric Spectrometer of Mars Express (MEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theriot, Michael; Keating, G.; Blanchard, R.; Bougher, S.; Zurek, R.; Tolson, R.; Murphy, J.; Forget, F.; Bertaux, J.

    2006-09-01

    Before MRO's arrival at Mars, during Mars Express orbits 17 to 2888, SPICAM obtained 617 stellar occultation measurements of density and temperature structure from 40km to 140km. SPICAM measurements give global atmospheric structure over an entire Martian year. Where SPICAM derived atmospheric profiles overlap MRO aerobraking altitudes from 100km to 140km, we have made interannual comparisons with in situ MRO accelerometer derived atmospheric profiles for matching season, local solar time, latitude, longitude and altitude. Designed for aerobraking, MRO launched August 12, 2005, and achieved Mars Orbital Insertion (MOI) March 10, 2006. Atmospheric density decreases exponentially with increasing height. Using small propulsive changes to apoapsis orbital velocity, periapsis altitude was adjusted to the necessary density surfaces for safe aerobraking. MRO periapsis precessed from the South Pole at 6pm LST to near the equator at 3am LST. Meanwhile, apoapsis dramatically shrank from 40,000km at MOI to 460 km at aerobraking completion (ABX) mid-September 2006. Then, a few small propulsive maneuvers established the Primary Science Orbit (PSO), which without aerobraking would have required an additional 400 kg of fuel. Honeywell's substantially improved electronics package for its IMU (QA-2000 accelerometer, gyro, electronics) maximized accelerometer sensitivities as requested by The George Washington University, JPL, and Lockheed Martin, enabling good signal-to-noise-ratios up to at least 170km, critical for upper atmospheric science. Each of the 500+ MRO aerobraking orbits provides a distribution of density, scale-height, and temperature along the orbital path, providing key in situ insight into various upper atmosphere (> 100 km) processes. Characterization of key temporal and spatial cycles including: polar vortices, winter polar warming, dust storms, planetary scale waves, gravity waves, and gravitational tides associated with topography, validates and constrains both

  7. Review of systemization of the Tooele Chemical Agent Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    In 1993, at Tooele Army Depot, Utah, the Army completed construction of the Tooele Chemical Agent Disposal Facility (TOCDF), the first complete facility for destruction of lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions to be built in the continental United States. The TOCDF will employ the Army`s baseline incineration system to destroy the depot`s increment of the nation`s aging unitary chemical stockpile. This book assesses Army changes and improvements to the TOCDF in response to recommendations contained in earlier reports of the committee. It assesses aspects of the facility`s readiness for safe agent handling and destruction operations, its agent monitoring system, and its site specific risk assessment.

  8. Introduction: Self-organization in nonequilibrium chemical systems.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Irving R; Pojman, John A; Steinbock, Oliver

    2006-09-01

    The field of self-organization in nonequilibrium chemical systems comprises the study of dynamical phenomena in chemically reacting systems far from equilibrium. Systematic exploration of this area began with investigations of the temporal behavior of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky oscillating reaction, discovered accidentally in the former Soviet Union in the 1950s. The field soon advanced into chemical waves in excitable media and propagating fronts. With the systematic design of oscillating reactions in the 1980s and the discovery of Turing patterns in the 1990s, the scope of these studies expanded dramatically. The articles in this Focus Issue provide an overview of the development and current state of the field. PMID:17014235

  9. Insect-gene-activity detection system for chemical and biological warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, Ryan S.; Schilling, Amanda S.; Lopez, Arturo M.; Rayms-Keller, Alfredo

    2002-02-01

    Detection of multiple chemical and biological weapons (CBW) agents and/or complex mixtures of toxic industrial chemicals (TIC) is imperative for both the commercial and military sectors. In a military scenario, a multi-CBW attack would create confusion, thereby delaying decontamination and therapeutic efforts. In the commercial sector, polluted sites invariably contain a mixture of TIC. Novel detection systems capable of detecting CBW and TIC are sorely needed. While it may be impossible to build a detector capable of discriminating all the possible combinations of CBW, a detection system capable of statistically predicting the most likely composition of a given mixture is within the reach of current emerging technologies. Aquatic insect-gene activity may prove to be a sensitive, discriminating, and elegant paradigm for the detection of CBW and TIC. We propose to systematically establish the expression patterns of selected protein markers in insects exposed to specific mixtures of chemical and biological warfare agents to generate a library of biosignatures of exposure. The predicting capabilities of an operational library of biosignatures of exposures will allow the detection of emerging novel or genetically engineered agents, as well as complex mixtures of chemical and biological weapons agents. CBW and TIC are discussed in the context of war, terrorism, and pollution.

  10. 30 CFR 75.1101-22 - Inspection of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inspection of dry powder chemical systems. 75...-22 Inspection of dry powder chemical systems. (a) Each dry powder chemical system shall be examined... the dry powder chemical system has been actuated, all components of the system shall be...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1101-22 - Inspection of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inspection of dry powder chemical systems. 75...-22 Inspection of dry powder chemical systems. (a) Each dry powder chemical system shall be examined... the dry powder chemical system has been actuated, all components of the system shall be...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1101-22 - Inspection of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inspection of dry powder chemical systems. 75...-22 Inspection of dry powder chemical systems. (a) Each dry powder chemical system shall be examined... the dry powder chemical system has been actuated, all components of the system shall be...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1101-22 - Inspection of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inspection of dry powder chemical systems. 75...-22 Inspection of dry powder chemical systems. (a) Each dry powder chemical system shall be examined... the dry powder chemical system has been actuated, all components of the system shall be...

  14. Model reduction for stochastic chemical systems with abundant species.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen; Cianci, Claudia; Grima, Ramon

    2015-12-01

    Biochemical processes typically involve many chemical species, some in abundance and some in low molecule numbers. We first identify the rate constant limits under which the concentrations of a given set of species will tend to infinity (the abundant species) while the concentrations of all other species remains constant (the non-abundant species). Subsequently, we prove that, in this limit, the fluctuations in the molecule numbers of non-abundant species are accurately described by a hybrid stochastic description consisting of a chemical master equation coupled to deterministic rate equations. This is a reduced description when compared to the conventional chemical master equation which describes the fluctuations in both abundant and non-abundant species. We show that the reduced master equation can be solved exactly for a number of biochemical networks involving gene expression and enzyme catalysis, whose conventional chemical master equation description is analytically impenetrable. We use the linear noise approximation to obtain approximate expressions for the difference between the variance of fluctuations in the non-abundant species as predicted by the hybrid approach and by the conventional chemical master equation. Furthermore, we show that surprisingly, irrespective of any separation in the mean molecule numbers of various species, the conventional and hybrid master equations exactly agree for a class of chemical systems. PMID:26646867

  15. A robust platform for chemical genomics in bacterial systems

    PubMed Central

    French, Shawn; Mangat, Chand; Bharat, Amrita; Côté, Jean-Philippe; Mori, Hirotada; Brown, Eric D.

    2016-01-01

    While genetic perturbation has been the conventional route to probing bacterial systems, small molecules are showing great promise as probes for cellular complexity. Indeed, systematic investigations of chemical-genetic interactions can provide new insights into cell networks and are often starting points for understanding the mechanism of action of novel chemical probes. We have developed a robust and sensitive platform for chemical-genomic investigations in bacteria. The approach monitors colony volume kinetically using transmissive scanning measurements, enabling acquisition of growth rates and conventional endpoint measurements. We found that chemical-genomic profiles were highly sensitive to concentration, necessitating careful selection of compound concentrations. Roughly 20,000,000 data points were collected for 15 different antibiotics. While 1052 chemical-genetic interactions were identified using the conventional endpoint biomass approach, adding interactions in growth rate resulted in 1564 interactions, a 50–200% increase depending on the drug, with many genes uncharacterized or poorly annotated. The chemical-genetic interaction maps generated from these data reveal common genes likely involved in multidrug resistance. Additionally, the maps identified deletion backgrounds exhibiting class-specific potentiation, revealing conceivable targets for combination approaches to drug discovery. This open platform is highly amenable to kinetic screening of any arrayable strain collection, be it prokaryotic or eukaryotic. PMID:26792836

  16. Model reduction for stochastic chemical systems with abundant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stephen; Cianci, Claudia; Grima, Ramon

    2015-12-01

    Biochemical processes typically involve many chemical species, some in abundance and some in low molecule numbers. We first identify the rate constant limits under which the concentrations of a given set of species will tend to infinity (the abundant species) while the concentrations of all other species remains constant (the non-abundant species). Subsequently, we prove that, in this limit, the fluctuations in the molecule numbers of non-abundant species are accurately described by a hybrid stochastic description consisting of a chemical master equation coupled to deterministic rate equations. This is a reduced description when compared to the conventional chemical master equation which describes the fluctuations in both abundant and non-abundant species. We show that the reduced master equation can be solved exactly for a number of biochemical networks involving gene expression and enzyme catalysis, whose conventional chemical master equation description is analytically impenetrable. We use the linear noise approximation to obtain approximate expressions for the difference between the variance of fluctuations in the non-abundant species as predicted by the hybrid approach and by the conventional chemical master equation. Furthermore, we show that surprisingly, irrespective of any separation in the mean molecule numbers of various species, the conventional and hybrid master equations exactly agree for a class of chemical systems.

  17. A robust platform for chemical genomics in bacterial systems.

    PubMed

    French, Shawn; Mangat, Chand; Bharat, Amrita; Côté, Jean-Philippe; Mori, Hirotada; Brown, Eric D

    2016-03-15

    While genetic perturbation has been the conventional route to probing bacterial systems, small molecules are showing great promise as probes for cellular complexity. Indeed, systematic investigations of chemical-genetic interactions can provide new insights into cell networks and are often starting points for understanding the mechanism of action of novel chemical probes. We have developed a robust and sensitive platform for chemical-genomic investigations in bacteria. The approach monitors colony volume kinetically using transmissive scanning measurements, enabling acquisition of growth rates and conventional endpoint measurements. We found that chemical-genomic profiles were highly sensitive to concentration, necessitating careful selection of compound concentrations. Roughly 20,000,000 data points were collected for 15 different antibiotics. While 1052 chemical-genetic interactions were identified using the conventional endpoint biomass approach, adding interactions in growth rate resulted in 1564 interactions, a 50-200% increase depending on the drug, with many genes uncharacterized or poorly annotated. The chemical-genetic interaction maps generated from these data reveal common genes likely involved in multidrug resistance. Additionally, the maps identified deletion backgrounds exhibiting class-specific potentiation, revealing conceivable targets for combination approaches to drug discovery. This open platform is highly amenable to kinetic screening of any arrayable strain collection, be it prokaryotic or eukaryotic. PMID:26792836

  18. Model reduction for stochastic chemical systems with abundant species

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Stephen; Cianci, Claudia; Grima, Ramon

    2015-12-07

    Biochemical processes typically involve many chemical species, some in abundance and some in low molecule numbers. We first identify the rate constant limits under which the concentrations of a given set of species will tend to infinity (the abundant species) while the concentrations of all other species remains constant (the non-abundant species). Subsequently, we prove that, in this limit, the fluctuations in the molecule numbers of non-abundant species are accurately described by a hybrid stochastic description consisting of a chemical master equation coupled to deterministic rate equations. This is a reduced description when compared to the conventional chemical master equation which describes the fluctuations in both abundant and non-abundant species. We show that the reduced master equation can be solved exactly for a number of biochemical networks involving gene expression and enzyme catalysis, whose conventional chemical master equation description is analytically impenetrable. We use the linear noise approximation to obtain approximate expressions for the difference between the variance of fluctuations in the non-abundant species as predicted by the hybrid approach and by the conventional chemical master equation. Furthermore, we show that surprisingly, irrespective of any separation in the mean molecule numbers of various species, the conventional and hybrid master equations exactly agree for a class of chemical systems.

  19. Discourse for slide presentation: An overview of chemical detection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Randy Alan; Galen, Theodore J.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1990-01-01

    A brief overview of some of the analytical techniques currently used in monitoring and analyzing permanent gases and selected volatile organic compound in air are presented. Some of the analytical considerations in developing a specific method are discussed. Four broad groups of hardware are discussed: compound class specific personal monitors, gas chromatographic systems, infrared spectroscopic systems, and mass spectrometric residual gas analyzer systems. Three types of detectors are also discussed: catalytic sensor based systems, photoionization detectors, and wet or dry chemical reagent systems. Under gas chromatograph based systems five detector systems used in combination with a GC are covered: thermal conductivity detectors, photoionization detectors, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometric systems, quadrapole mass spectrometric systems, and a relatively recent development, a surface acoustic wave vapor detector.

  20. AN AUTOMATED MULTISAMPLE-STREAM CHEMICAL MONITORING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    An automated system has been designed and operated successfully for the past two years for chemical analysis of nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon compounds in the study of the fate of pollutants. Nine samples from along a simulated river are pumped into the laboratory, and eight d...

  1. Computer program determines chemical composition of physical system at equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, S. S.

    1966-01-01

    FORTRAN 4 digital computer program calculates equilibrium composition of complex, multiphase chemical systems. This is a free energy minimization method with solution of the problem reduced to mathematical operations, without concern for the chemistry involved. Also certain thermodynamic properties are determined as byproducts of the main calculations.

  2. Release mitigation spray safety systems for chemical demilitarization applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Jonathan; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Brockmann, John E.; Servantes, Brandon; Sanchez, Andres L.; Tucker, Mark David; Allen, Ashley N.; Wilson, Mollye C.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.

    2010-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has conducted proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating effective knockdown and neutralization of aerosolized CBW simulants using charged DF-200 decontaminant sprays. DF-200 is an aqueous decontaminant, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and procured and fielded by the US Military. Of significance is the potential application of this fundamental technology to numerous applications including mitigation and neutralization of releases arising during chemical demilitarization operations. A release mitigation spray safety system will remove airborne contaminants from an accidental release during operations, to protect personnel and limit contamination. Sandia National Laboratories recently (November, 2008) secured funding from the US Army's Program Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materials Agency (PMNSCMA) to investigate use of mitigation spray systems for chemical demilitarization applications. For non-stockpile processes, mitigation spray systems co-located with the current Explosive Destruction System (EDS) will provide security both as an operational protective measure and in the event of an accidental release. Additionally, 'tented' mitigation spray systems for native or foreign remediation and recovery operations will contain accidental releases arising from removal of underground, unstable CBW munitions. A mitigation spray system for highly controlled stockpile operations will provide defense from accidental spills or leaks during routine procedures.

  3. Manned Mars Explorer project: Guidelines for a manned mission to the vicinity of Mars using Phobos as a staging outpost; schematic vehicle designs considering chemical and nuclear electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, Sean; Neubek, Deb; Baxmann, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    The Manned Mars Explorer (MME) project responds to the fundamental problems of sending human beings to Mars in a mission scenario and schematic vehicle designs. The mission scenario targets an opposition class Venus inbound swingby for its trajectory with concentration on Phobos and/or Deimos as a staging base for initial and future Mars vicinity operations. Optional vehicles are presented as a comparison using nuclear electric power/propulsion technology. A Manned Planetary Vehicle and Crew Command Vehicle are used to accomplish the targeted mission. The Manned Planetary Vehicle utilizes the mature technology of chemical propulsion combined with an advanced aerobrake, tether and pressurized environment system. The Crew Command Vehicle is the workhorse of the mission performing many different functions including a manned Mars landing, and Phobos rendezvous.

  4. NMR chemical shifts in periodic systems from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastiani, Daniel; Goward, Gillian; Schnell, Ingo; Parrinello, Michele

    2002-08-01

    A recently developed ab-initio method for the calculation of NMR chemical shifts and magnetic susceptibilities in systems under periodic boundary conditions is presented and applied to a hydrogen-bonded molecular crystal. The calculations can unambiguously assign the chemical shifts to individual atoms in experimental spectra, and can further serve for the validation of simulated atomic trajectories and geometries. Apart from the example presented, the method can be applied to crystalline and amorphous insulators, as well as to isolated molecules using a supercell technique. The results are in good agreement with experiment.

  5. CMOS-MEMS Chemiresistive and Chemicapacitive Chemical Sensor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, Nathan S.

    Integrating chemical sensors with testing electronics is a powerful technique with the potential to lower power and cost and allow for lower system limits of detection. This thesis explores the possibility of creating an integrated sensor system intended to be embedded within respirator cartridges to notify the user that hazardous chemicals will soon leak into the face mask. For a chemical sensor designer, this application is particularly challenging due to the need for a very sensitive and cheap sensor that will be exposed to widely varying environmental conditions during use. An octanethiol-coated gold nanoparticle chemiresistor to detect industrial solvents is developed, focusing on characterizing the environmental stability and limits of detection of the sensor. Since the chemiresistor was found to be highly sensitive to water vapor, a series of highly sensitive humidity sensor topologies were developed, with sensitivities several times previous integrated capacitive humidity sensors achieved. Circuit techniques were then explored to reduce the humidity sensor limits of detection, including the analysis of noise, charge injection, jitter and clock feedthrough in a charge-based capacitance measurement (CBCM) circuit and the design of a low noise Colpitts LC oscillator. The characterization of high resistance gold nanoclusters for capacitive chemical sensing was also performed. In the final section, a preconcentrator, a heater element intended to release a brief concentrated pulse of analate, was developed and tested for the purposes of lowering the system limit of detection.

  6. Spatiotemporal Coding of Individual Chemicals by the Gustatory System

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Sam; Campillo Rodriguez, Chelsey; Sun, Kui

    2015-01-01

    Four of the five major sensory systems (vision, olfaction, somatosensation, and audition) are thought to use different but partially overlapping sets of neurons to form unique representations of vast numbers of stimuli. The only exception is gustation, which is thought to represent only small numbers of basic taste categories. However, using new methods for delivering tastant chemicals and making electrophysiological recordings from the tractable gustatory system of the moth Manduca sexta, we found chemical-specific information is as follows: (1) initially encoded in the population of gustatory receptor neurons as broadly distributed spatiotemporal patterns of activity; (2) dramatically integrated and temporally transformed as it propagates to monosynaptically connected second-order neurons; and (3) observed in tastant-specific behavior. Our results are consistent with an emerging view of the gustatory system: rather than constructing basic taste categories, it uses a spatiotemporal population code to generate unique neural representations of individual tastant chemicals. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our results provide a new view of taste processing. Using a new, relatively simple model system and a new set of techniques to deliver taste stimuli and to examine gustatory receptor neurons and their immediate followers, we found no evidence for labeled line connectivity, or basic taste categories such as sweet, salty, bitter, and sour. Rather, individual tastant chemicals are represented as patterns of spiking activity distributed across populations of receptor neurons. These representations are transformed substantially as multiple types of receptor neurons converge upon follower neurons, leading to a combinatorial coding format that uniquely, rapidly, and efficiently represents individual taste chemicals. Finally, we found that the information content of these neurons can drive tastant-specific behavior. PMID:26338341

  7. An expert system for prediction of chemical toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, James P.; Aldridge, Andrew J., IV; Passino-Reader, Dora R.; Frank, Anthony M.

    1992-01-01

    The National Fisheries Research Center- Great Lakes has developed an interactive computer program that uses the structure of an organic molecule to predict its acute toxicity to four aquatic species. The expert system software, written in the muLISP language, identifies the skeletal structures and substituent groups of an organic molecule from a user-supplied standard chemical notation known as a SMILES string, and then generates values for four solvatochromic parameters. Multiple regression equations relate these parameters to the toxicities (expressed as log10LC50s and log10EC50s, along with 95% confidence intervals) for four species. The system is demonstrated by prediction of toxicity for anilide-type pesticides to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). This software is designed for use on an IBM-compatible personal computer by personnel with minimal toxicology background for rapid estimation of chemical toxicity. The system has numerous applications, with much potential for use in the pharmaceutical industry

  8. Performance metrics for the evaluation of hyperspectral chemical identification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truslow, Eric; Golowich, Steven; Manolakis, Dimitris; Ingle, Vinay

    2016-02-01

    Remote sensing of chemical vapor plumes is a difficult but important task for many military and civilian applications. Hyperspectral sensors operating in the long-wave infrared regime have well-demonstrated detection capabilities. However, the identification of a plume's chemical constituents, based on a chemical library, is a multiple hypothesis testing problem which standard detection metrics do not fully describe. We propose using an additional performance metric for identification based on the so-called Dice index. Our approach partitions and weights a confusion matrix to develop both the standard detection metrics and identification metric. Using the proposed metrics, we demonstrate that the intuitive system design of a detector bank followed by an identifier is indeed justified when incorporating performance information beyond the standard detection metrics.

  9. 30 CFR 75.1101-14 - Installation of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Installation of dry powder chemical systems. 75...-14 Installation of dry powder chemical systems. (a) Self-contained dry powder chemical systems shall... fire-control components of each dry powder chemical system shall be a type approved by the...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1101-14 - Installation of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Installation of dry powder chemical systems. 75...-14 Installation of dry powder chemical systems. (a) Self-contained dry powder chemical systems shall... fire-control components of each dry powder chemical system shall be a type approved by the...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1101-14 - Installation of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Installation of dry powder chemical systems. 75...-14 Installation of dry powder chemical systems. (a) Self-contained dry powder chemical systems shall... fire-control components of each dry powder chemical system shall be a type approved by the...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1101-14 - Installation of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Installation of dry powder chemical systems. 75...-14 Installation of dry powder chemical systems. (a) Self-contained dry powder chemical systems shall... fire-control components of each dry powder chemical system shall be a type approved by the...

  13. Implementation of an Online Database for Chemical Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David B. Owen, II; McRight, Patrick S.; Cardiff, Eric H.

    2009-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins University, Chemical Propulsion Information Analysis Center (CPIAC) has been working closely with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC); NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC); the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH); The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (APL); and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to capture satellite and spacecraft propulsion system information for an online database tool. The Spacecraft Chemical Propulsion Database (SCPD) is a new online central repository containing general and detailed system and component information on a variety of spacecraft propulsion systems. This paper only uses data that have been approved for public release with unlimited distribution. The data, supporting documentation, and ability to produce reports on demand, enable a researcher using SCPD to compare spacecraft easily, generate information for trade studies and mass estimates, and learn from the experiences of others through what has already been done. This paper outlines the layout and advantages of SCPD, including a simple example application with a few chemical propulsion systems from various NASA spacecraft.

  14. Maximum Probability Reaction Sequences in Stochastic Chemical Kinetic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Maryam; Perkins, Theodore J.

    2010-01-01

    The detailed behavior of many molecular processes in the cell, such as protein folding, protein complex assembly, and gene regulation, transcription and translation, can often be accurately captured by stochastic chemical kinetic models. We investigate a novel computational problem involving these models – that of finding the most-probable sequence of reactions that connects two or more states of the system observed at different times. We describe an efficient method for computing the probability of a given reaction sequence, but argue that computing most-probable reaction sequences is EXPSPACE-hard. We develop exact (exhaustive) and approximate algorithms for finding most-probable reaction sequences. We evaluate these methods on test problems relating to a recently-proposed stochastic model of folding of the Trp-cage peptide. Our results provide new computational tools for analyzing stochastic chemical models, and demonstrate their utility in illuminating the behavior of real-world systems. PMID:21629860

  15. Bioorthogonal Chemical Activation of Kinases in Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective manipulation of protein kinases under living conditions is highly desirable yet extremely challenging, particularly in a gain-of-function fashion. Here we employ our recently developed bioorthogonal cleavage reaction as a general strategy for intracellular activation of individual kinases. Site-specific incorporation of trans-cyclooctene-caged lysine in place of the conserved catalytic lysine, in conjunction with the cleavage partner dimethyl-tetrazine, allowed efficient lysine decaging with the kinase activity chemically rescued in living systems. PMID:27280167

  16. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  17. Predictive spectroscopy and chemical imaging based on novel optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Matthew Paul

    1998-10-01

    This thesis describes two futuristic optical systems designed to surpass contemporary spectroscopic methods for predictive spectroscopy and chemical imaging. These systems are advantageous to current techniques in a number of ways including lower cost, enhanced portability, shorter analysis time, and improved S/N. First, a novel optical approach to predicting chemical and physical properties based on principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed and evaluated. A regression vector produced by PCA is designed into the structure of a set of paired optical filters. Light passing through the paired filters produces an analog detector signal directly proportional to the chemical/physical property for which the regression vector was designed. Second, a novel optical system is described which takes a single-shot approach to chemical imaging with high spectroscopic resolution using a dimension-reduction fiber-optic array. Images are focused onto a two- dimensional matrix of optical fibers which are drawn into a linear distal array with specific ordering. The distal end is imaged with a spectrograph equipped with an ICCD camera for spectral analysis. Software is used to extract the spatial/spectral information contained in the ICCD images and deconvolute them into wave length-specific reconstructed images or position-specific spectra which span a multi-wavelength space. This thesis includes a description of the fabrication of two dimension-reduction arrays as well as an evaluation of the system for spatial and spectral resolution, throughput, image brightness, resolving power, depth of focus, and channel cross-talk. PCA is performed on the images by treating rows of the ICCD images as spectra and plotting the scores of each PC as a function of reconstruction position. In addition, iterative target transformation factor analysis (ITTFA) is performed on the spectroscopic images to generate ``true'' chemical maps of samples. Univariate zero-order images, univariate first

  18. Identification of heavy and superheavy nuclides using chemical separator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türler, Andreas

    1999-11-01

    With the recent synthesis of superheavy nuclides produced in the reactions 48Ca+238U and 48Ca+242,244Pu, much longer-lived nuclei than the previously known neutron-deficient isotopes of the heaviest elements have been identified. Half-lives of several hours and up to several years have been predicted for the longest-lived isotopes of these elements. Thus, the sensitivity of radiochemical separation techniques may present a viable alternative to physical separator systems for the discovery of some of the predicted longer-lived heavy and superheavy nuclides. The advantages of chemical separator systems in comparison to kinematic separators lie in the possibility of using thick targets, high beam intensities spread over larger target areas and in providing access to nuclides emitted under large angles and low velocities. Thus, chemical separator systems are ideally suited to study also transfer and (HI, αxn) reaction products. In the following, a study of (HI, αxn) reactions will be presented and prospects to chemically identify heavy and superheavy elements discussed.

  19. Chemical reaction network approaches to Biochemical Systems Theory.

    PubMed

    Arceo, Carlene Perpetua P; Jose, Editha C; Marin-Sanguino, Alberto; Mendoza, Eduardo R

    2015-11-01

    This paper provides a framework to represent a Biochemical Systems Theory (BST) model (in either GMA or S-system form) as a chemical reaction network with power law kinetics. Using this representation, some basic properties and the application of recent results of Chemical Reaction Network Theory regarding steady states of such systems are shown. In particular, Injectivity Theory, including network concordance [36] and the Jacobian Determinant Criterion [43], a "Lifting Theorem" for steady states [26] and the comprehensive results of Müller and Regensburger [31] on complex balanced equilibria are discussed. A partial extension of a recent Emulation Theorem of Cardelli for mass action systems [3] is derived for a subclass of power law kinetic systems. However, it is also shown that the GMA and S-system models of human purine metabolism [10] do not display the reactant-determined kinetics assumed by Müller and Regensburger and hence only a subset of BST models can be handled with their approach. Moreover, since the reaction networks underlying many BST models are not weakly reversible, results for non-complex balanced equilibria are also needed. PMID:26363083

  20. The ram accelerator - A chemically driven mass launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaloupis, P.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1988-01-01

    The ram accelerator, a chemically propelled mass driver, is presented as a viable new approach for directly launching acceleration-insensitive payloads into low earth orbit. The propulsion principle is similar to that of a conventional air-breathing ramjet. The cargo vehicle resembles the center-body of a ramjet and travels through a tube filled with a pre-mixed fuel and oxidizer mixture. The launch tube acts as the outer cowling of the ramjet and the combustion process travels with the vehicle. Two drive modes of the ram accelerator propulsion system are described, which when used in sequence are capable of accelerating the vehicle to as high as 10 km/sec. The requirements are examined for placing a 2000 kg vehicle into a 500 km orbit with a minimum of on-board rocket propellant for circularization maneuvers. It is shown that aerodynamic heating during atmospheric transit results in very little ablation of the nose. An indirect orbital insertion scenario is selected, utilizing a three step maneuver consisting of two burns and aerobraking. An on-board propulsion system using storable liquid propellants is chosen in order to minimize propellant mass requirements, and the use of a parking orbit below the desired final orbit is suggested as a means to increase the flexibility of the mass launch concept. A vehicle design using composite materials is proposed that will best meet the structural requirements, and a preliminary launch tube design is presented.

  1. Propellant management for low thrust chemical propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamlyn, K. M.; Dergance, R. H.; Aydelott, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Low-thrust chemical propulsion systems (LTPS) will be required for orbital transfer of large space systems (LSS). The work reported in this paper was conducted to determine the propellant requirements, preferred propellant management technique, and propulsion system sizes for the LTPS. Propellants were liquid oxygen (LO2) combined with liquid hydrogen (LH2), liquid methane or kerosene. Thrust levels of 100, 500, and 1000 lbf were combined with 1, 4, and 8 perigee burns for transfer from low earth orbit to geosynchronous earth orbit. This matrix of systems was evaluated with a multilayer insulation (MLI) or a spray-on-foam insulation. Vehicle sizing results indicate that a toroidal tank configuration is needed for the LO2/LH2 system. Multiple perigee burns and MLI allow far superior LSS payload capability. Propellant settling, combined with a single screen device, was found to be the lightest and least complex propellant management technique.

  2. Engineered Barrier Systems Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    W.E. Lowry

    2001-12-13

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01.

  3. Building an R&D chemical registration system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Small molecule chemistry is of central importance to a number of R&D companies in diverse areas such as the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, food flavoring, and cosmeceutical industries. In order to store and manage thousands of chemical compounds in such an environment, we have built a state-of-the-art master chemical database with unique structure identifiers. Here, we present the concept and methodology we used to build the system that we call the Unique Compound Database (UCD). In the UCD, each molecule is registered only once (uniqueness), structures with alternative representations are entered in a uniform way (normalization), and the chemical structure drawings are recognizable to chemists and to a cartridge. In brief, structural molecules are entered as neutral entities which can be associated with a salt. The salts are listed in a dictionary and bound to the molecule with the appropriate stoichiometric coefficient in an entity called “substance”. The substances are associated with batches. Once a molecule is registered, some properties (e.g., ADMET prediction, IUPAC name, chemical properties) are calculated automatically. The UCD has both automated and manual data controls. Moreover, the UCD concept enables the management of user errors in the structure entry by reassigning or archiving the batches. It also allows updating of the records to include newly discovered properties of individual structures. As our research spans a wide variety of scientific fields, the database enables registration of mixtures of compounds, enantiomers, tautomers, and compounds with unknown stereochemistries. PMID:22650418

  4. Nine-size system for chemical defense gloves. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Robinette, K.M.; Annis, J.F.

    1986-07-01

    The purpose of this effort was to meet the need for improved sizing of chemical defense gloves for Air Force men and women. A nine-size system was developed from available hand data. The development process and size values are presented in this report. Some summary statistics and regression equations are provided to aid investigators who may wish to make modifications. Although the anthropometric sizing system outlined in this report is statistically sound, it is experimental. The authors recommend that anthropometric fit-testing be conducted prior to full-scale glove production.

  5. Detailed Chemical Abundances of Planet-Hosting Wide Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Claude E.; Schuler, Simon C.; Stassun, Keivan; Pepper, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed chemical abundance analysis of planet-hosting wide binary systems. Each of these binary systems consists of two stars with similar spectral types (ranging from G2V - K2V), and in each system, at least one star hosts a giant planet with an orbital pericenter ~< 0.5 AU. We investigate if giant planets on such orbits could have scattered inner rocky planets into the atmospheres of their host stars, and thereby imprint a detectable chemical signature in the stellar photospheric abundances. Using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise echelle spectra, we derive the chemical abundances ([X/H]) of 15 elements covering a range of condensation temperatures (Tc). For stars in our sample with approximately solar metallicity, the refractory elements (Tc > 900 K) show a positive correlation between [X/H] and Tc. However, for stars with super-solar metallicities, the refractory elements show a negative correlation between [X/H] and Tc. We interpret these results in the context of numerical simulations of giant planet migration that predict the accretion of hydrogen-depleted rocky material by the host star. We demonstrate that a simple model for a solar-metallicity star accreting material with Earth-like composition predicts a positive correlation between [X/H] and Tc, while for a supersolar-metallicity star the model predicts a negative correlation. The stark contrast between the predicted correlations for solar-metallicity and supersolar-metallicity stars may indicate that extracting any chemical signature of rocky planetary accretion is particularly challenging for very metal-rich stars.

  6. Transferring Knowledge: A Parallel between Teaching Chemical Engineering and Developing Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberge, P. R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are expert systems development and teaching, the representation and processing of knowledge, knowledge representation in chemical engineering, and expert systems in chemical engineering. The seven phases of expert system development are illustrated. (CW)

  7. Stepwise Evolution of Nonliving to Living Chemical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindahl, Paul A.

    2004-08-01

    Steps by which a nonliving chemical system could have transformed into a living system are described and discussed, assuming general features of Wächtershäuser's chemo-autotrophic surface theory of the origin of life. Environmental species such as CO2 and H2S are proposed to have reacted to form a quasi-steady state metal-bound intermediate (CH3-M) that slowly decayed into waste (CH4). Unpredictable dispersive reactions expanded the system to include surface-bound forms of the citric acid cycle intermediates (oxaloacetate --> citrate). Further reaction yielded an autocatalytic system in which raw materials are converted into the system at exponential rates. Combinatorial dispersive reactions that improved the performance of this system were automatically selected and incorporated into it. Systems evolved critical features of living systems (proteins, membranes, proteins, nucleic acids, etc.) using two related mechanisms called grafting and waste-conversion. Such living systems were transformed from less recognizable types (characterized by autocatalytic spreading, decentralization, poorly defined boundaries, etc.) into more recognizable ones (encapsulated by membranes, controlled by single-molecule genomes, etc.) that self-replicated by a cell division cycle and could evolve by the standard gene-based Darwinian mechanism. The resulting systems are viewed as having an autocatalytic network composed of three linked autocatalytic subreactions.

  8. Aerothermodynamic environments for Mars entry, Mars return, and lunar return aerobraking missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochelle, W. C.; Bouslog, S. A.; Ting, P. C.; Curry, D. M.

    1990-06-01

    The aeroheating environments to vehicles undergoing Mars aerocapture, earth aerocapture from Mars, and earth aerocapture from the moon are presented. An engineering approach for the analysis of various types of vehicles and trajectories was taken, rather than performing a benchmark computation for a specific point at a selected time point in a trajectory. The radiation into Mars using the Mars Rover Sample Return (MRSR) 2-ft nose radius bionic remains a small contributor of heating for 6 to 10 km/sec; however, at 12 km/sec it becomes comparable with the convection. For earth aerocapture, returning from Mars, peak radiation for the MRSR SRC is only 25 percent of the peak convection for the 12-km/sec trajectory. However, when large vehicles are considered with this trajectory, peak radiation can become 2 to 4 times higher than the peak convection. For both Mars entry and return, a partially ablative Thermal Protection System (TPS) would be required, but for Lunar Transfer Vehicle return an all-reusable TPS can be used.

  9. Aerothermodynamic environments for Mars entry, Mars return, and lunar return aerobraking missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochelle, W. C.; Bouslog, S. A.; Ting, P. C.; Curry, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    The aeroheating environments to vehicles undergoing Mars aerocapture, earth aerocapture from Mars, and earth aerocapture from the moon are presented. An engineering approach for the analysis of various types of vehicles and trajectories was taken, rather than performing a benchmark computation for a specific point at a selected time point in a trajectory. The radiation into Mars using the Mars Rover Sample Return (MRSR) 2-ft nose radius bionic remains a small contributor of heating for 6 to 10 km/sec; however, at 12 km/sec it becomes comparable with the convection. For earth aerocapture, returning from Mars, peak radiation for the MRSR SRC is only 25 percent of the peak convection for the 12-km/sec trajectory. However, when large vehicles are considered with this trajectory, peak radiation can become 2 to 4 times higher than the peak convection. For both Mars entry and return, a partially ablative Thermal Protection System (TPS) would be required, but for Lunar Transfer Vehicle return an all-reusable TPS can be used.

  10. Chemical energy storage system for SEGS solar thermal power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. R.; Lamarche, J. L.; Spanner, G. E.

    1991-09-01

    In October 1988, a symposium was held in Helendale, California, to discuss thermal energy storage (TES) concepts applicable to medium temperature (200 to 400 C) solar thermal electric power plants, in general, and the solar electric generating system (SEGS) plants developed by Luz International, in particular. Chemical reaction energy storage based on the reversible reaction between metal oxides and metal hydroxides was identified as a leading candidate for meeting Luz International's cost and performance requirements. The principal objectives of this study were to identify the design conditions, requirements, and potential feasibility for a chemical energy storage system applied to a SEGS solar thermal power plant. The remaining sections of this report begin by providing an overview of the chemical reaction energy storage concept and a SEGS solar thermal power plant. Subsequent sections describe the initial screening of alternative evaporation energy sources and the more detailed evaluation of design alternatives considered for the preferred evaporation energy source. The final sections summarize the results, conclusions, and recommendations.

  11. MULTIOBJECTIVE OPTIMIZATION POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS INVOLVING CHEMICAL LOOPING COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    Juan M. Salazar; Urmila M. Diwekar; Stephen E. Zitney

    2009-01-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system using coal gasification is an important approach for future energy options. This work focuses on understading the system operation and optimizing it in the presence of uncertain operating conditions using ASPEN Plus and CAPE-OPEN compliant stochastic simulation and multiobjective optimization capabilities developed by Vishwamitra Research Institute. The feasible operating surface for the IGCC system is generated and deterministic multiobjective optimization is performed. Since the feasible operating space is highly non-convex, heuristics based techniques that do not require gradient information are used to generate the Pareto surface. Accurate CFD models are simultaneously developed for the gasifier and chemical looping combustion system to characterize and quantify the process uncertainty in the ASPEN model.

  12. Unique chemical tagging and detection system using encapsulated perfluorocarbon tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Jay; Kaish, Norman

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the R&D proposed and underdevelopment by Tracer Detection Technology Corp. (TDT) for a series of commercially viable products that will form the basis of a patented chemical vapor tag system to identify and locate drugs, crops, chemical compounds and currency. TDT has concentrated its efforts on user interface and applications in its R&D planning, and has worked closely with a number of U.S Government agencies to form an inter-agency user group to assist in funding and guidance for our efforts. Based on discussions with U.S. Customs, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, National Institute of Justice (at Rome Air Development Center), DARPA, Department of Defense, Drug Enforcement Agency and the Central Intelligence Agency, there are a number of specific law enforcement problems that can be addressed with this technique.

  13. Cycles and the qualitative evolution of chemical systems.

    PubMed

    Kreyssig, Peter; Escuela, Gabi; Reynaert, Bryan; Veloz, Tomas; Ibrahim, Bashar; Dittrich, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Cycles are abundant in most kinds of networks, especially in biological ones. Here, we investigate their role in the evolution of a chemical reaction system from one self-sustaining composition of molecular species to another and their influence on the stability of these compositions. While it is accepted that, from a topological standpoint, they enhance network robustness, the consequence of cycles to the dynamics are not well understood. In a former study, we developed a necessary criterion for the existence of a fixed point, which is purely based on topological properties of the network. The structures of interest we identified were a generalization of closed autocatalytic sets, called chemical organizations. Here, we show that the existence of these chemical organizations and therefore steady states is linked to the existence of cycles. Importantly, we provide a criterion for a qualitative transition, namely a transition from one self-sustaining set of molecular species to another via the introduction of a cycle. Because results purely based on topology do not yield sufficient conditions for dynamic properties, e.g. stability, other tools must be employed, such as analysis via ordinary differential equations. Hence, we study a special case, namely a particular type of reflexive autocatalytic network. Applications for this can be found in nature, and we give a detailed account of the mitotic spindle assembly and spindle position checkpoints. From our analysis, we conclude that the positive feedback provided by these networks' cycles ensures the existence of a stable positive fixed point. Additionally, we use a genome-scale network model of the Escherichia coli sugar metabolism to illustrate our findings. In summary, our results suggest that the qualitative evolution of chemical systems requires the addition and elimination of cycles. PMID:23071525

  14. Cycles and the Qualitative Evolution of Chemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kreyssig, Peter; Escuela, Gabi; Reynaert, Bryan; Veloz, Tomas; Ibrahim, Bashar; Dittrich, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Cycles are abundant in most kinds of networks, especially in biological ones. Here, we investigate their role in the evolution of a chemical reaction system from one self-sustaining composition of molecular species to another and their influence on the stability of these compositions. While it is accepted that, from a topological standpoint, they enhance network robustness, the consequence of cycles to the dynamics are not well understood. In a former study, we developed a necessary criterion for the existence of a fixed point, which is purely based on topological properties of the network. The structures of interest we identified were a generalization of closed autocatalytic sets, called chemical organizations. Here, we show that the existence of these chemical organizations and therefore steady states is linked to the existence of cycles. Importantly, we provide a criterion for a qualitative transition, namely a transition from one self-sustaining set of molecular species to another via the introduction of a cycle. Because results purely based on topology do not yield sufficient conditions for dynamic properties, e.g. stability, other tools must be employed, such as analysis via ordinary differential equations. Hence, we study a special case, namely a particular type of reflexive autocatalytic network. Applications for this can be found in nature, and we give a detailed account of the mitotic spindle assembly and spindle position checkpoints. From our analysis, we conclude that the positive feedback provided by these networks' cycles ensures the existence of a stable positive fixed point. Additionally, we use a genome-scale network model of the Escherichia coli sugar metabolism to illustrate our findings. In summary, our results suggest that the qualitative evolution of chemical systems requires the addition and elimination of cycles. PMID:23071525

  15. Chemical Kinetics of Hydrocarbon Ignition in Practical Combustion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C.K.

    2000-07-07

    Chemical kinetic factors of hydrocarbon oxidation are examined in a variety of ignition problems. Ignition is related to the presence of a dominant chain branching reaction mechanism that can drive a chemical system to completion in a very short period of time. Ignition in laboratory environments is studied for problems including shock tubes and rapid compression machines. Modeling of the laboratory systems are used to develop kinetic models that can be used to analyze ignition in practical systems. Two major chain branching regimes are identified, one consisting of high temperature ignition with a chain branching reaction mechanism based on the reaction between atomic hydrogen with molecular oxygen, and the second based on an intermediate temperature thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Kinetic models are then used to describe ignition in practical combustion environments, including detonations and pulse combustors for high temperature ignition, and engine knock and diesel ignition for intermediate temperature ignition. The final example of ignition in a practical environment is homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) which is shown to be a problem dominated by the kinetics intermediate temperature hydrocarbon ignition. Model results show why high hydrocarbon and CO emissions are inevitable in HCCI combustion. The conclusion of this study is that the kinetics of hydrocarbon ignition are actually quite simple, since only one or two elementary reactions are dominant. However, there are many combustion factors that can influence these two major reactions, and these are the features that vary from one practical system to another.

  16. PHOTOELECTROCHEMISTRY AND PHOTOCATALYSIS IN NANOSCALE INORGANIC CHEMICAL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Mallouk

    2007-05-27

    The goal of our DOE-supported research has been to explore the use of solid state materials as organizing media for, and as active components of, artificial photosynthetic systems. In this work we strive to understand how photoinduced electron and energy transfer reactions occur in the solid state, and to elucidate design principles for using nanoscale inorganic materials in photochemical energy conversion schemes. A unifying theme in this project has been to move beyond the study of simple transient charge separation to integrated chemical systems that can effect permanent charge separation in the form of energy-rich chemicals. This project explored the use of zeolites as organizing media for electron donor-acceptor systems and artificial photosynthetic assemblies. Layer-by-layer synthetic methods were developed using lamellar semiconductors, and multi-step, visible light driven energy/electron transfer cascades were studied by transient specroscopic techniques. By combining molecular photosensitizers with lamellar semiconductors and intercalated catalyst particles, the first non-sacrificial systems for visible light driven hydrogen evolution were developed and studied. Oxygen evolving catalyst particles and semiconductor nanowires were also studied with the goal of achieving photocatalytic water splitting using visible light.

  17. Laminated plastic microfluidic components for biological and chemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.M.; Matson, D.W.; Bennett, W.D.; Lin, Y.; Hammerstrom, D.J.

    1999-07-01

    Laminated plastic microfluidic components are being developed for biological testing systems and chemical sensors. Applications include a DNA thermal cycler, DNA analytical systems, electrophoretic flow systems, dialysis systems, and metal sensors for ground water. This article describes fabrication processes developed for these plastic microfluidic components, and the fabrication of a chromium metal sensor and a microdialysis device. Most of the components have a stacked architecture. Using this architecture, the fluid flows, or is pumped through, as many as nine laminated functional levels. Functions include pumping, mixing, reaction, detection, reservoirs, separations, and electronics. Polyimide, poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), and polycarbonate materials with thicknesses between 25 and 125 {mu}m are used to construct the components. This makes the components low cost, inert to many biological fluids and chemicals, and disposable. The components are fabricated by excimer laser micromachining the microchannel patterns and microstructures in the various laminates. In some cases, micropumps are integrated into these components to move the fluids. Vias and interconnects are also cut by the laser and integrated with micropumps. The laminates are sealed and bonded by adhesive and thermal processes and are leak tight. The parts withstand pressures as high as 790 kPa. Typical channel widths are 50 to 100 {mu}m, with aspect ratios near 5. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  18. Detailed Chemical Abundances of Planet-Hosting Wide Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Claude Ernest; Schuler, Simon; Stassun, Keivan

    2015-08-01

    We present a detailed chemical abundance analysis of planet-hosting wide binary systems. Each of these binary systems consists of two stars with similar spectral types (ranging from G2V - K2V), and in each system, at least one star hosts a giant planet with an orbital pericenter ~< 0.5 AU. We examine the photospheric abundances of the host stars to determine if they have ingested rocky planetary material as a result of the close-in giant planets scattering inner rocky planets into the star as they migrated to their present-day locations. Using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise echelle spectra, for both stars in each system we derive the chemical abundances ([X/H]) of 15 elements covering a range of condensation temperatures (Tc). For stars in our sample with approximately solar metallicity, the refractory elements (Tc > 900 K) show a positive correlation between [X/H] and Tc. However, for stars with super-solar metallicities, the refractory elements show a negative correlation between [X/H] and Tc. We interpret these results in the context of numerical simulations of giant planet migration that predict the accretion of hydrogen-depleted rocky material by the host star. We demonstrate that a simple model for a solar-metallicity star accreting material with Earth-like composition predicts a positive correlation between [X/H] and Tc, while for a supersolar-metallicity star the model predicts a negative correlation. The stark contrast between the predicted correlations for solar-metallicity and supersolar-metallicity stars may indicate that extracting any chemical signature of rocky planetary accretion is particularly challenging for very metal-rich stars.

  19. The System of Chemical Elements Distribution in the Hydrosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzh, Vyacheslav D.

    2013-04-01

    The chemical composition of the hydrosphere is a result of substance migration and transformation on lithosphere-river, river-sea, and ocean-atmosphere boundaries. The chemical elements composition of oceanic water is a fundamental multi-dimensional constant for our planet. Detailed studies revealed three types of chemical element distribution in the ocean: 1) Conservative: concentration normalized to salinity is the constant in space and time; 2) Nutrient-type: element concentration in the surface waters decreases due to the biosphere consumption; and 3) Litho-generative: complex character of distribution of elements, which enter the ocean with the river runoff and interred almost entirely in sediments. The correlation between the chemical elements compositions of the river and oceanic water is high (r = 0.94). We conclude that biogeochemical features of each chemical element are determined by the relationship between its average concentration in the ocean and the intensity of its migration through hydrosphere boundary zones. In our presentation, we shall show intensities of global migration and average concentrations in the ocean in the co ordinates lgC - lg [tau], where C is an average element concentration and [tau] is its residence time in the ocean. We have derived a relationship between three main geochemical parameters of the dissolved forms of chemical elements in the hydrosphere: 1) average concentration in the ocean, 2) average concentration in the river runoff and 3) the type of distribution in oceanic water. Using knowledge of two of these parameters, it allows gaining theoretical knowledge of the third. The System covers all chemical elements for the entire range of observed concentrations. It even allows to predict the values of the annual river transport of dissolved Be, C, N, Ge, Tl, Re, to refine such estimates for P, V, Zn, Br, I, and to determine the character of distribution in the ocean for Au and U. Furthermore, the System allowed estimating

  20. Intelligent Chemical Sensor Systems for In-space Safety Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Xu, J. C.; Neudeck, P. G.; Makel, D. B.; Ward, B.; Liu, C. C.

    2006-01-01

    Future in-space and lunar operations will require significantly improved monitoring and Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) throughout the mission. In particular, the monitoring of chemical species is an important component of an overall monitoring system for space vehicles and operations. For example, in leak monitoring of propulsion systems during launch, inspace, and on lunar surfaces, detection of low concentrations of hydrogen and other fuels is important to avoid explosive conditions that could harm personnel and damage the vehicle. Dependable vehicle operation also depends on the timely and accurate measurement of these leaks. Thus, the development of a sensor array to determine the concentration of fuels such as hydrogen, hydrocarbons, or hydrazine as well as oxygen is necessary. Work has been on-going to develop an integrated smart leak detection system based on miniaturized sensors to detect hydrogen, hydrocarbons, or hydrazine, and oxygen. The approach is to implement Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) based sensors incorporated with signal conditioning electronics, power, data storage, and telemetry enabling intelligent systems. The final sensor system will be self-contained with a surface area comparable to a postage stamp. This paper discusses the development of this "Lick and Stick" leak detection system and it s application to In-Space Transportation and other Exploration applications.

  1. Overview of Systems Considerations for On-Board Chemical Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aardahl, Christopher L.; Rassat, Scot D.

    2009-08-01

    Recent advances in chemical hydrogen storage systems are reviewed. Factors impacting design and implementation of chemical hydrogen storage systems for on-board vehicular use are highlighted. The physical and chemical characteristics of chemical hydrogen fuels and their spent fuel counterparts are considered to provide guidance to future technology developers. Heat management, fuel stability, reactor design, and fuel morphology are examples of issues that must be considered for the future of chemical hydrogen storage systems.

  2. Overview of Systems Considerations for On-Board Chemical Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aardahl, Christopher L.; Rassat, Scot D.

    2009-08-01

    Recent advances in chemical hydrogen storage systems are reviewed. Factors impacting design and implementation of chemical hydrogen storage systems for on-board vehicular use are highlighted. The physical and chemical characteristics of chemical hydrogen fuels and their spent fuel counterparts are considered to provide guidance to future technology developers. Heat management, fuel stability, reactor design, and fuel morphology are examples of issues that must be considered for the future of chemical hydrogen storage systems

  3. Hazard ranking systems for chemical wastes and chemical waste sites. Hazardous waste ranking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, R.D.; Parker, F.L.; Crutcher, M.R.

    1991-12-31

    Hazardous materials and substances have always existed in the environment. Mankind has evolved to live with some degree of exposure to toxic materials. Until recently the risk has been from natural toxins or natural background radiation. While rapid technological advances over the past few decades have improved the lifestyle of our society, they have also dramatically increased the availability, volume and types of synthetic and natural hazardous materials. Many of their effects are as yet uncertain. Products and manufacturing by-products that no longer serve a useful purpose are deemed wastes. For some waste products land disposal will always be their ultimate fate. Hazardous substances are often included in the waste products. One needs to classify wastes by degree of hazard (risk). Risk (degree of probability of loss) is usually defined for risk assessment as probability of an occurrence times the consequences of the occurrence. Perhaps even more important than the definition of risk is the choice of a risk management strategy. The choice of strategy will be strongly influenced by the decision criteria used. Those decision criteria could be utility (the greatest happiness of the greatest number), rights or technology based or some combination of the three. It is necessary to make such choices about the definition of risks and criteria for management. It is clear that these are social (i.e., political) and value choices and science has little to say on this matter. This is another example of what Alvin Weinberg has named Transcience where the subject matter is scientific and technical but the choices are social, political and moral. This paper shall deal only with the scientific and technical aspects of the hazardous waste problem to create a hazardous substances classification system.

  4. Brookhaven National Laboratory chemical/hydrogen energy systems program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzina, A.

    1981-01-01

    FY 81 status and highlights are summarized for each of the major activities (hydrogen production, hydrogen storage/transport, and chemical energy systems). The solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) water electrolysis project at General Electric was redirected in February 1981. The static feed water electrolysis concept pursued at Life Systems, Inc. continues to show promise as a low-cost, high-efficiency alternative to conventional as well as SPE systems. Advanced alkaline electrolysis component testing at Teledyne Energy Systems indicates that improved electrode, catalyst, and separator systems capable of operating in the 120/sup 0/C temperature regime can compete with the more realistic projections of SPE electrolyzer cost and performance characterization. Microcavity storage systems investigated by Robert J. Teitel Associates were found unsuitable for the cost-effective storage of hydrogen in either bulk or mobile storage applications. Natural gas supplementation with hydrogen was reevaluated at BNL. The use of ammonia as a hydrogen transport/storage alternative was examined at BNL. Hydrogen separation/purification from industrial waste streams is a project under investigation at APCI/Ergenics. Emphasis is being placed on identifying metal hydrides and their poison-resistant characteristics. H/sub 2/ recovery from H/sub 2/S investigations at SRI have proceeded successfully with reasonable success by having demonstrated that H/sub 2/S bubbled through molten copper results in a high purity (approx. 99% H/sub 2/ product and the molten reactant can be easily recycled. The H/sub 2/SO/sub 4//H/sub 2/O chemical heat pump development at Rocket Research Corporation has progressed on schedule.

  5. JOVIAN STRATOSPHERE AS A CHEMICAL TRANSPORT SYSTEM: BENCHMARK ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xi; Shia Runlie; Yung, Yuk L.

    2013-04-20

    We systematically investigated the solvable analytical benchmark cases in both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) chemical-advective-diffusive systems. We use the stratosphere of Jupiter as an example but the results can be applied to other planetary atmospheres and exoplanetary atmospheres. In the 1D system, we show that CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} are mainly in diffusive equilibrium, and the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} profile can be approximated by modified Bessel functions. In the 2D system in the meridional plane, analytical solutions for two typical circulation patterns are derived. Simple tracer transport modeling demonstrates that the distribution of a short-lived species (such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) is dominated by the local chemical sources and sinks, while that of a long-lived species (such as C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) is significantly influenced by the circulation pattern. We find that an equator-to-pole circulation could qualitatively explain the Cassini observations, but a pure diffusive transport process could not. For slowly rotating planets like the close-in extrasolar planets, the interaction between the advection by the zonal wind and chemistry might cause a phase lag between the final tracer distribution and the original source distribution. The numerical simulation results from the 2D Caltech/JPL chemistry-transport model agree well with the analytical solutions for various cases.

  6. Applications of neural networks in chemical engineering: Hybrid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, J.J.; Osborne-Lee, I.W. ); Grizzaffi, P.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Expert systems are known to be useful in capturing expertise and applying knowledge to chemical engineering problems such as diagnosis, process control, process simulation, and process advisory. However, expert system applications are traditionally limited to knowledge domains that are heuristic and involve only simple mathematics. Neural networks, on the other hand, represent an emerging technology capable of rapid recognition of patterned behavior without regard to mathematical complexity. Although useful in problem identification, neural networks are not very efficient in providing in-depth solutions and typically do not promote full understanding of the problem or the reasoning behind its solutions. Hence, applications of neural networks have certain limitations. This paper explores the potential for expanding the scope of chemical engineering areas where neural networks might be utilized by incorporating expert systems and neural networks into the same application, a process called hybridization. In addition, hybrid applications are compared with those using more traditional approaches, the results of the different applications are analyzed, and the feasibility of converting the preliminary prototypes described herein into useful final products is evaluated. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  8. System for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Richard G.; Blasewitz, Albert G.

    1982-01-01

    An improved method and system for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material having a high through-put. The solid waste material is added to an annular vessel (10) substantially filled with concentrated sulfuric acid. Concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide is added to the sulfuric acid within the annular vessel while the sulfuric acid is reacting with the solid waste. The solid waste is mixed within the sulfuric acid so that the solid waste is substantilly fully immersed during the reaction. The off gas from the reaction and the products slurry residue is removed from the vessel during the reaction.

  9. A Self-Calibrating Remote Control Chemical Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Jessica Croft

    2007-06-01

    The Susie Mine, part of the Upper Tenmile Mining Area, is located in Rimini, MT about 15 miles southwest of Helena, MT. The Upper Tenmile Creek Mining Area is an EPA Superfund site with 70 abandoned hard rock mines and several residential yards prioritized for clean up. Water from the Susie mine flows into Tenmile Creek from which the city of Helena draws part of its water supply. MSE Technology Applications in Butte, Montana was contracted by the EPA to build a treatment system for the Susie mine effluent and demonstrate a system capable of treating mine waste water in remote locations. The Idaho National Lab was contracted to design, build and demonstrate a low maintenance self-calibrating monitoring system that would monitor multiple sample points, allow remote two-way communications with the control software and allow access to the collected data through a web site. The Automated Chemical Analysis Monitoring (ACAM) system was installed in December 2006. This thesis documents the overall design of the hardware, control software and website, the data collected while MSE-TA’s system was operational, the data collected after MSE-TA’s system was shut down and suggested improvements to the existing system.

  10. Persistent confusion of total entropy and chemical system entropy in chemical thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Weber, G

    1996-07-23

    The change in free energy with temperature at constant pressure of a chemical reaction is determined by the sum (dS) of changes in entropy of the system of reagents, dS(i), and the additional entropy change of the surroundings, dS(H), that results from the enthalpy change, W. A faulty identification of the total entropy change on reaction with dS(i) has been responsible for the attribution of general validity to the expressions (d deltaG/dT)p = -deltaS(i) and d(deltaG/T)/d(1/T)= deltaH, which are found in most textbooks and in innumerable papers. PMID:8755493

  11. From chemical neuroanatomy to an understanding of the olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Oboti, L.; Peretto, P.; De Marchis, S.; Fasolo, A.

    2011-01-01

    The olfactory system of mammals is the appropriate model for studying several aspects of neuronal physiology spanning from the developmental stage to neural network remodelling in the adult brain. Both the morphological and physiological understanding of this system were strongly supported by classical histochemistry. It is emblematic the case of the Olfactory Marker Protein (OMP) staining, the first, powerful marker for fully differentiated olfactory receptor neurons and a key tool to investigate the dynamic relations between peripheral sensory epithelia and central relay regions given its presence within olfactory fibers reaching the olfactory bulb (OB). Similarly, the use of thymidine analogues was able to show neurogenesis in an adult mammalian brain far before modern virus labelling and lipophilic tracers based methods. Nowadays, a wealth of new histochemical techniques combining cell and molecular biology approaches is available, giving stance to move from the analysis of the chemically identified circuitries to functional research. The study of adult neurogenesis is indeed one of the best explanatory examples of this statement. After defining the cell types involved and the basic physiology of this phenomenon in the OB plasticity, we can now analyze the role of neurogenesis in well testable behaviours related to socio-chemical communication in rodents. PMID:22297441

  12. SRS: Site ranking system for hazardous chemical and radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Rechard, R.P.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Brown, S.L.

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the rationale and presents instructions for a site ranking system (SRS). SRS ranks hazardous chemical and radioactive waste sites by scoring important and readily available factors that influence risk to human health. Using SRS, sites can be ranked for purposes of detailed site investigations. SRS evaluates the relative risk as a combination of potentially exposed population, chemical toxicity, and potential exposure of release from a waste site; hence, SRS uses the same concepts found in a detailed assessment of health risk. Basing SRS on the concepts of risk assessment tends to reduce the distortion of results found in other ranking schemes. More importantly, a clear logic helps ensure the successful application of the ranking procedure and increases its versatility when modifications are necessary for unique situations. Although one can rank sites using a detailed risk assessment, it is potentially costly because of data and resources required. SRS is an efficient approach to provide an order-of-magnitude ranking, requiring only readily available data (often only descriptive) and hand calculations. Worksheets are included to make the system easier to understand and use. 88 refs., 19 figs., 58 tabs.

  13. From chemical neuroanatomy to an understanding of the olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Oboti, L; Peretto, P; Marchis, S De; Fasolo, A

    2011-01-01

    The olfactory system is the appropriate model for studying several aspects of neuronal physiology spanning from the developmental stage to neural network remodelling in the adult brain. Both the morphological and physiological understanding of this system were strongly supported by classical histochemistry. It is emblematic the case of the Olfactory Marker Protein (OMP) staining, the first, powerful marker for fully differentiated olfactory receptor neurons and a key tool to investigate the dynamic relations between peripheral sensory epithelia and central relay regions given its presence within olfactory fibers reaching the olfactory bulb (OB). Similarly, the use of thymidine analogues was able to show neurogenesis in an adult mammalian brain far before modern virus labelling and lipophilic tracers based methods. Nowadays, a wealth of new histochemical techniques combining cell and molecular biology approaches is available, giving stance to move from the analysis of the chemically identified circuitries to functional research. The study of adult neurogenesis is indeed one of the best explanatory examples of this statement. After defining the cell types involved and the basic physiology of this phenomenon in the OB plasticity, we can now analyze the role of neurogenesis in well testable behaviours related to socio-chemical communication in rodents. PMID:22297441

  14. Materials Problems in Chemical Liquid-Propellant Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, L. L.

    1959-01-01

    With the advent of the space age, new adjustments in technical thinking and engineering experience are necessary. There is an increasing and extensive interest in the utilization of materials for components to be used at temperatures ranging from -423 to over 3500 deg F. This paper presents a description of the materials problems associated with the various components of chemical liquid rocket systems. These components include cooled and uncooled thrust chambers, injectors, turbine drive systems, propellant tanks, and cryogenic propellant containers. In addition to materials limitations associated with these components, suggested research approaches for improving materials properties are made. Materials such as high-temperature alloys, cermets, carbides, nonferrous alloys, plastics, refractory metals, and porous materials are considered.

  15. A monolithically-integrated μGC chemical sensor system.

    PubMed

    Manginell, Ronald P; Bauer, Joseph M; Moorman, Matthew W; Sanchez, Lawrence J; Anderson, John M; Whiting, Joshua J; Porter, Daniel A; Copic, Davor; Achyuthan, Komandoor E

    2011-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is used for organic and inorganic gas detection with a range of applications including screening for chemical warfare agents (CWA), breath analysis for diagnostics or law enforcement purposes, and air pollutants/indoor air quality monitoring of homes and commercial buildings. A field-portable, light weight, low power, rapid response, micro-gas chromatography (μGC) system is essential for such applications. We describe the design, fabrication and packaging of μGC on monolithically-integrated Si dies, comprised of a preconcentrator (PC), μGC column, detector and coatings for each of these components. An important feature of our system is that the same mechanical micro resonator design is used for the PC and detector. We demonstrate system performance by detecting four different CWA simulants within 2 min. We present theoretical analyses for cost/power comparisons of monolithic versus hybrid μGC systems. We discuss thermal isolation in monolithic systems to improve overall performance. Our monolithically-integrated μGC, relative to its hybrid cousin, will afford equal or slightly lower cost, a footprint that is 1/2 to 1/3 the size and an improved resolution of 4 to 25%. PMID:22163970

  16. A Monolithically-Integrated μGC Chemical Sensor System

    PubMed Central

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Bauer, Joseph M.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Sanchez, Lawrence J.; Anderson, John M.; Whiting, Joshua J.; Porter, Daniel A.; Copic, Davor; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.

    2011-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is used for organic and inorganic gas detection with a range of applications including screening for chemical warfare agents (CWA), breath analysis for diagnostics or law enforcement purposes, and air pollutants/indoor air quality monitoring of homes and commercial buildings. A field-portable, light weight, low power, rapid response, micro-gas chromatography (μGC) system is essential for such applications. We describe the design, fabrication and packaging of μGC on monolithically-integrated Si dies, comprised of a preconcentrator (PC), μGC column, detector and coatings for each of these components. An important feature of our system is that the same mechanical micro resonator design is used for the PC and detector. We demonstrate system performance by detecting four different CWA simulants within 2 min. We present theoretical analyses for cost/power comparisons of monolithic versus hybrid μGC systems. We discuss thermal isolation in monolithic systems to improve overall performance. Our monolithically-integrated μGC, relative to its hybrid cousin, will afford equal or slightly lower cost, a footprint that is 1/2 to 1/3 the size and an improved resolution of 4 to 25%. PMID:22163970

  17. Hazard Classification of Household Chemical Products in Korea according to the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and labeling of Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to review the validity of the need for the application of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) to household chemical products in Korea. The study also aimed to assess the severity of health and environmental hazards of household chemical products using the GHS. Methods 135 products were classified as ‘cleaning agents and polishing agents’ and 98 products were classified as ‘bleaches, disinfectants, and germicides.’ The current status of carcinogenic classification of GHS and carcinogenicity was examined for 272 chemical substances contained in household chemical products by selecting the top 11 products for each of the product categories. In addition, the degree of toxicity was assessed through analysis of whether the standard of the Republic of Korea’s regulations on household chemical products had been exceeded or not. Results According to GHS health and environmental hazards, “acute toxicity (oral)” was found to be the highest for two product groups, ‘cleaning agents and polishing agents’, and ‘bleaches, disinfectants, and germicides’ (result of classification of 233 household chemical products) at 37.8% and 52.0% respectively. In an analysis of carcinogenicity assuming a threshold of IARC 2B for the substances in household chemical products, we found ‘cleaning agents and polishing agents’ to contain 12 chemical substances and ‘bleaches, disinfectants, and germicides’ 11 chemical substances. Conclusion Some of the household chemical products were found to have a high hazard level including acute toxicity and germ cell mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and reproductive toxicity. Establishing a hazard information delivery system including the application of GHS to household chemical products in Korea is urgent as well. PMID:24472347

  18. 30 CFR 75.1101-22 - Inspection of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inspection of dry powder chemical systems. 75... COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1101-22 Inspection of dry powder chemical systems. (a) Each dry powder chemical system shall be...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1101-13 - Dry powder chemical systems; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dry powder chemical systems; general. 75.1101-13 Section 75.1101-13 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-13 Dry powder chemical systems; general. Self-contained dry powder chemical systems may be...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1101-17 - Sealing of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sealing of dry powder chemical systems. 75.1101-17 Section 75.1101-17 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-17 Sealing of dry powder chemical systems. Each dry powder chemical system shall be adequately...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1101-20 - Safeguards for dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safeguards for dry powder chemical systems. 75...-20 Safeguards for dry powder chemical systems. Adequate guards shall be provided along all belt conveyors in the vicinity of each dry powder chemical system to protect persons whose vision is...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1101-13 - Dry powder chemical systems; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dry powder chemical systems; general. 75.1101-13 Section 75.1101-13 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-13 Dry powder chemical systems; general. Self-contained dry powder chemical systems may be...

  3. 30 CFR 75.1101-20 - Safeguards for dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safeguards for dry powder chemical systems. 75...-20 Safeguards for dry powder chemical systems. Adequate guards shall be provided along all belt conveyors in the vicinity of each dry powder chemical system to protect persons whose vision is...

  4. 30 CFR 75.1101-13 - Dry powder chemical systems; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dry powder chemical systems; general. 75.1101-13 Section 75.1101-13 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-13 Dry powder chemical systems; general. Self-contained dry powder chemical systems may be...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1101-17 - Sealing of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sealing of dry powder chemical systems. 75.1101-17 Section 75.1101-17 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-17 Sealing of dry powder chemical systems. Each dry powder chemical system shall be adequately...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1101-17 - Sealing of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sealing of dry powder chemical systems. 75.1101-17 Section 75.1101-17 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-17 Sealing of dry powder chemical systems. Each dry powder chemical system shall be adequately...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1101-20 - Safeguards for dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safeguards for dry powder chemical systems. 75...-20 Safeguards for dry powder chemical systems. Adequate guards shall be provided along all belt conveyors in the vicinity of each dry powder chemical system to protect persons whose vision is...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1101-16 - Dry powder chemical systems; sensing and fire-suppression devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dry powder chemical systems; sensing and fire... Protection § 75.1101-16 Dry powder chemical systems; sensing and fire-suppression devices. (a) Each self-contained dry powder chemical system shall be equipped with sensing devices which shall be designed...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1101-20 - Safeguards for dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safeguards for dry powder chemical systems. 75...-20 Safeguards for dry powder chemical systems. Adequate guards shall be provided along all belt conveyors in the vicinity of each dry powder chemical system to protect persons whose vision is...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1101-17 - Sealing of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sealing of dry powder chemical systems. 75.1101-17 Section 75.1101-17 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-17 Sealing of dry powder chemical systems. Each dry powder chemical system shall be adequately...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1101-13 - Dry powder chemical systems; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dry powder chemical systems; general. 75.1101-13 Section 75.1101-13 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-13 Dry powder chemical systems; general. Self-contained dry powder chemical systems may be...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1101-13 - Dry powder chemical systems; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dry powder chemical systems; general. 75.1101-13 Section 75.1101-13 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-13 Dry powder chemical systems; general. Self-contained dry powder chemical systems may be...

  13. Coupled thermal-hydraulic-chemical modelling of enhanced geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bächler, D.; Kohl, T.

    2005-05-01

    The study investigates thermal-, hydraulic- and chemically coupled processes of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). On the basis of the two existing numerical codes, the finite element program FRACTURE and the geochemical module of CHEMTOUGH, FRACHEM was developed, to simulate coupled thermal-hydraulic-chemical (THC) processes, accounting for the Soultz specific conditions such as the high salinity of the reservoir fluid and the high temperatures. The finite element part calculates the thermal and hydraulic field and the geochemical module the chemical processes. According to the characteristics of the Soultz EGS reservoir, the geochemical module was modified. (i) The Debye-Huckel approach was replaced by the Pitzer formalism. (ii) New kinetic laws for calcite, dolomite, quartz and pyrite were implemented. (iii) The porosity-permeability relation was replaced by a new relation for fractured rock. (iv) The possibility of re-injecting the produced fluid was implemented. The sequential non-iterative approach (SNIA) was used to couple transport and reactions. Sensitivity analyses proved the proper functionality of FRACHEM, but highlighted the sensitivity of the SNIA approach to time steps. To quantify the FRACHEM results, a comparative simulation with the code SHEMAT was conducted, which validated FRACHEM. Coupled THC processes in a fractured zone in the Soultz reservoir at 3500 m (T0= 165 °C), which occur as a result of the injection of fluid (Tinj= 65 °C) at one end of the zone and the production at the other end, were modelled for 2 yr. Calcite is the most reactive mineral and therefore the porosity and permeability evolution results from the calcite reactions: near the injection point, porosity and permeability increase and near the production well they decrease. After 2 yr, the system seems to be very close to steady-state. Therefore, mineral dissolution and precipitation during the circulation of the fluid in the reservoir do not represent a limiting factor on

  14. Low level exposure to chemicals and immune system

    SciTech Connect

    Colosio, C. . E-mail: claudio.colosio@icps.it; Birindelli, S.; Corsini, E.; Galli, C.L.; Maroni, M.

    2005-09-01

    Industrialized countries are facing an increase of diseases attributable to an alteration of the immune system function, and concern is growing that this trend could be at least partially attributable to new and modified patterns of exposure to chemicals. Among chemicals matter of concern, pesticides can be included. The Authors have reviewed the existing evidence of pesticide immunotoxicity in humans, showing that existing data are inadequate to raise conclusions on the immunotoxic risk related to these compounds. The limits of existing studies are: poor knowledge on exposure levels, heterogeneity of the approach, and difficulty in giving a prognostic significance to the slight changes often observed. To overcome these limits, the Authors have proposed a tier approach, based on three steps: the first, addressed at pointing out a possible immunomodulation; the second, at refining the results and the third one, when needed, to finalize the study and to point out concordance with previous results. Studies should preferably be carried out through comparison of pre- and post-exposure findings in the same groups of subjects to be examined immediately after the end of the exposure. A simplification of the first step approach can be used by the occupational health physician and the occupational toxicologist. Conclusions on the prognostic significance of the slight changes often observed will be reached only by validating the hypothesis generated by field studies with an epidemiological approach. In this field, the most useful option is represented by longitudinal perspective studies.

  15. JOHNSTON ATOLL CHEMICAL AGENT DISPOSAL SYSTEM (JACADS) CLOSURE PLAN DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The JACADS project consists of four incinerators including a liquid chemical agent waste processor, an explosives treatment incinerator and a batch metal parts treatment unit. Its mission was to disassemble and destroy chemcial weapons and bulk chemical agent. This prototypical...

  16. Illustrating Chemical Concepts through Food Systems: Introductory Chemistry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, E., IV; Setser, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    Demonstrations involving foods that illustrate chemical concepts are described, including vaporization of liquids and Graham's law of diffusion, chemical reaction rates, adsorption, properties of solutions, colloidal dispersions, suspensions, and hydrogen ion concentration. (CS)

  17. A non-chemical system for online weed control.

    PubMed

    Rueda-Ayala, Victor; Peteinatos, Gerassimos; Gerhards, Roland; Andújar, Dionisio

    2015-01-01

    Non-chemical weed control methods need to be directed towards a site-specific weeding approach, in order to be able to compete the conventional herbicide equivalents. A system for online weed control was developed. It automatically adjusts the tine angle of a harrow and creates different levels of intensity: from gentle to aggressive. Two experimental plots in a maize field were harrowed with two consecutive passes. The plots presented from low to high weed infestation levels. Discriminant capabilities of an ultrasonic sensor were used to determine the crop and weed variability of the field. A controlling unit used ultrasonic readings to adjust the tine angle, producing an appropriate harrowing intensity. Thus, areas with high crop and weed densities were more aggressively harrowed, while areas with lower densities were cultivated with a gentler treatment; areas with very low densities or without weeds were not treated. Although the weed development was relatively advanced and the soil surface was hard, the weed control achieved by the system reached an average of 51% (20%-91%), without causing significant crop damage as a result of harrowing. This system is proposed as a relatively low cost, online, and real-time automatic harrow that improves the weed control efficacy, reduces energy consumption, and avoids the usage of herbicide. PMID:25831085

  18. A Non-Chemical System for Online Weed Control

    PubMed Central

    Rueda-Ayala, Victor; Peteinatos, Gerassimos; Gerhards, Roland; Andújar, Dionisio

    2015-01-01

    Non-chemical weed control methods need to be directed towards a site-specific weeding approach, in order to be able to compete the conventional herbicide equivalents. A system for online weed control was developed. It automatically adjusts the tine angle of a harrow and creates different levels of intensity: from gentle to aggressive. Two experimental plots in a maize field were harrowed with two consecutive passes. The plots presented from low to high weed infestation levels. Discriminant capabilities of an ultrasonic sensor were used to determine the crop and weed variability of the field. A controlling unit used ultrasonic readings to adjust the tine angle, producing an appropriate harrowing intensity. Thus, areas with high crop and weed densities were more aggressively harrowed, while areas with lower densities were cultivated with a gentler treatment; areas with very low densities or without weeds were not treated. Although the weed development was relatively advanced and the soil surface was hard, the weed control achieved by the system reached an average of 51% (20%–91%), without causing significant crop damage as a result of harrowing. This system is proposed as a relatively low cost, online, and real-time automatic harrow that improves the weed control efficacy, reduces energy consumption, and avoids the usage of herbicide. PMID:25831085

  19. Proceedings of the DOE chemical energy storage and hydrogen energy systems contracts review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    Sessions were held on electrolysis-based hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen production, hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen storage materials, end-use applications and system studies, chemical heat pump/chemical energy storage systems, systems studies and assessment, thermochemical hydrogen production cycles, advanced production concepts, and containment materials. (LHK)

  20. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-01-15

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  1. Thermal and chemical evolution of The Geysers geothermal system, California

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.N.

    1992-01-01

    Fluid inclusions and mineral assemblages provide a reward of the thermal and chemical changes that occurred during the evolution of The Geysers geothermal system. The data document the presence of an extensive liquid dominated geothermal system that developed in response to felsite intrusion and its evolution to a vapor-dominated regime. Temperatures within the early liquid-dominated system ranged from 175 C at a distance of 7200 feet from the felsite to more than 350 C near the contact while salinities varied from 5 equivalent weight percent NaCl (at a distance of 5500 feet) to more than 26 weight percent NaCl. As temperatures around the felsite declined, the liquid-dominated system collapsed upon itself. Downward migration of the low salinity waters resulted in dilution of the fluids present in regions now occupied by the caprock and normal vapor-dominated reservoir. In contrast, dilution was minor in rocks now hosting the high-temperature vapor-dominated reservoir. This suggests that low permeabilities are the primary reason for the development of the high-temperature reservoir. Boiling within the caprock produced late-stage veins of calcite and quartz. As the fluid boiled off, condensate was trapped as low salinity fluid inclusions. Within the main body of the reservoir, a liquid phase with salinities of up to 7 equivalent weight percent NaCl persisted to temperatures between 250 and 270 C. However, except for the presence of vapor-rich inclusions, little evidence of boiling within the reservoir rocks was preserved.

  2. Chemical Looping Combustion System-Fuel Reactor Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gamwo, I.K.; Jung, J.; Anderson, R.R.; Soong, Y.

    2007-04-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a process in which an oxygen carrier is used for fuel combustion instead of air or pure oxygen as shown in the figure below. The combustion is split into air and fuel reactors where the oxidation of the oxygen carrier and the reduction of the oxidized metal occur respectively. The CLC system provides a sequestration-ready CO2 stream with no additional energy required for separation. This major advantage places combustion looping at the leading edge of a possible shift in strict control of CO2 emissions from power plants. Research in this novel technology has been focused in three distinct areas: techno-economic evaluations, integration of the system into power plant concepts, and experimental development of oxygen carrier metals such as Fe, Ni, Mn, Cu, and Ca. Our recent thorough literature review shows that multiphase fluid dynamics modeling for CLC is not available in the open literature. Here, we have modified the MFIX code to model fluid dynamic in the fuel reactor. A computer generated movie of our simulation shows bubble behavior consistent with experimental observations.

  3. Capillary Action may Cool Systems and Precisely balance Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriske, Richard

    2011-10-01

    It is well known that it takes no work for Water to rise in a Capillary tube against the force of Gravity. There is a precise balance in this system that resembles Robert Millikan's ``Oil Drop'' experiment, where mass was balanced against the electrostatic force. If at the top of the capillary tube there is evaporation, one can see that the system is cooled as another water molecule has room to move up the column. Furthermore, if the evaporation process can be controlled one photon at a time, a precise balance is created between a photon, and the height/mass of the column. If other molecules are place in the column, they can be moved up and down the column, in a chromatograph way, in a fairly precise manner, by controlling evaporation and molecular weight. If in addition to all of this, the interface of the solution against the walls of the column have Fermi levels, it can be seen as a very precise Electrochemical Device. In the situation of nanotubes, as opposed to trees and plants, these properties can be used to create measure environmental properties and to Balance Chemical Reactions. Forests, and Plants may cool themselves and their environment using this process, and using this process coupled with more energetic photons through photosynthesis.

  4. Photoacoustic chemical sensing: layered systems and excitation source analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Logan S.; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2015-05-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a versatile tool that is well suited for the ranged interrogation of layered samples. We have previously demonstrated standoff photoacoustic (PA) chemical detection of condensed phase samples at one meter distance using an interferometric sensing platform. Current research investigates layered solid samples constructed from a thin layer of energetic material deposited on a substrate. The PA signal from the system, as measured by the interferometer, changes based on the differing optical and mechanical properties of the substrate. This signal variance must be understood in order to develop a sensor capable of detecting trace quantities of hazardous materials independent of the surface. Optical absorption and modal excitation are the two biggest sources of PA signal generated in the sample/substrate system. Finally, the mode of operation of the excitation source is investigated. Most PA sensing paradigms use a quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating in either pulsed or modulated CW mode. We will discuss photoacoustic signal generation with respect to these different operating modes.

  5. PROTOTYPE ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL SYSTEM FOR CHEMICAL FATE PARAMETERS FOR POLLUTANT FATE MODELS. SPARC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) is a computer modeling system that calculates a large number of physical and chemical properties for chemical pollutants from their molecular structure and from basic information about the environment such as media, temperat...

  6. TOXICITY-BASED CHEMICAL AGENT DETECTION SYSTEMS: CONTINUOUS MONITOR AND EXPOSURE HISTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will develop and characterize chemical agent detection systems that will provide broad toxicological screening information to first responders and building decontamination personnel. The primary goal for this technology is to detect the presence of airborne chemic...

  7. Assessment of Infrared Remote Chemical Sensing Systems with Numeric Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, H.; McVey, B.; Schmitt, M.

    1998-11-01

    A general approach to the evaluation of remote chemical sensors is described that can be used to provide evaluation of the chemical detection in a particular chemical scenario. It will be used to make comparisons of a CO{sub 2} laser differential absorption lidar sensor and a passive thermal FTIR sensor. The focus of the study will be to evaluate the advantage of the FTIR sensor's increased spectral coverage and number of frequency channels.

  8. Chemical Equilibrium in Supramolecular Systems as Studied by NMR Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gaitano, Gustavo; Tardajos, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    Undergraduate students are required to study the chemical balance in supramolecular assemblies constituting two or more interacting species, by using proton NMR spectrometry. A good knowledge of physical chemistry, fundamentals of chemical balance, and NMR are pre-requisites for conducting this study.

  9. Raman chemical imaging system for food safety and quality inspection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raman chemical imaging technique combines Raman spectroscopy and digital imaging to visualize composition and structure of a target, and it offers great potential for food safety and quality research. In this study, a laboratory-based Raman chemical imaging platform was designed and developed. The i...

  10. Gaussian approximations for stochastic systems with delay: Chemical Langevin equation and application to a Brusselator system

    SciTech Connect

    Brett, Tobias Galla, Tobias

    2014-03-28

    We present a heuristic derivation of Gaussian approximations for stochastic chemical reaction systems with distributed delay. In particular, we derive the corresponding chemical Langevin equation. Due to the non-Markovian character of the underlying dynamics, these equations are integro-differential equations, and the noise in the Gaussian approximation is coloured. Following on from the chemical Langevin equation, a further reduction leads to the linear-noise approximation. We apply the formalism to a delay variant of the celebrated Brusselator model, and show how it can be used to characterise noise-driven quasi-cycles, as well as noise-triggered spiking. We find surprisingly intricate dependence of the typical frequency of quasi-cycles on the delay period.

  11. 30 CFR 75.1101-15 - Construction of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Construction of dry powder chemical systems. 75.1101-15 Section 75.1101-15 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-15 Construction of dry powder chemical systems. (a) Each self-contained dry powder system shall...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1101-15 - Construction of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Construction of dry powder chemical systems. 75.1101-15 Section 75.1101-15 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-15 Construction of dry powder chemical systems. (a) Each self-contained dry powder system shall...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1101-15 - Construction of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Construction of dry powder chemical systems. 75.1101-15 Section 75.1101-15 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-15 Construction of dry powder chemical systems. (a) Each self-contained dry powder system shall...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1101-15 - Construction of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Construction of dry powder chemical systems. 75.1101-15 Section 75.1101-15 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-15 Construction of dry powder chemical systems. (a) Each self-contained dry powder system shall...

  15. FLEX: AN EXPERT SYSTEM FOR REVIEWING THE CHEMICAL RESISTANCE OF FLEXIBLE MEMBRANE LINERS FOR WASTE MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A computerized, expert system (FLEX) has been developed that will assess the chemical resistance of flexible membrane liners (FML) used at waste management facilities. hese FML's must be chemically resistant to the waste, its leachates, or both. o demonstrate chemical resistancy,...

  16. A computer-Based System for Handling Chemical Nomenclature and Structural Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowlett, Russell J.; Tate, Fred A.

    1972-01-01

    Among other improvements in chemical nomenclature used in the Chemical Registry System, Chemical Abstracts Service intends to standardize the fundamental principles for naming cyclic structures so that procedures for the derivation of ring names can become more amenable to computer generation and translation. (Author/NH)

  17. Fluid flow and chemical reaction kinetics in metamorphic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lasaga, A.C.; Rye, D.M. )

    1993-05-01

    The treatment and effects of chemical reaction kinetics during metamorphism are developed along with the incorporation of fluid flow, diffusion, and thermal evolution. The interplay of fluid flow and surface reaction rates, the distinction between steady state and equilibrium, and the possible overstepping of metamorphic reactions are discussed using a simple analytic model. This model serves as an introduction to the second part of the paper, which develops a reaction model that solves the coupled temperature-fluid flow-chemical composition differential equations relevant to metamorphic processes. Consideration of stable isotopic evidence requires that such a kinetic model be considered for the chemical evolution of a metamorphic aureole. A general numerical scheme is discussed to handle the solution of the model. The results of this kinetic model allow us to reach several important conclusions regarding the factors controlling the chemical evolution of mineral assemblages during a metamorphic event. 41 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. CHEMICAL AND PHOTOCHEMICAL TRANSFORMATION OF SELECTED PESTICIDES IN AQUATIC SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of laboratory studies to quantitatively predict chemical and photochemical transformation rates and products of pesticides in water. It includes a general discussion of relevant transformation processes and associated kinetic expressions. The proc...

  19. Local and systemic effects of mechanico-chemical retraction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Mark; Goodchild, Jason H

    2013-09-01

    The process of recording an acceptable fixed prosthodontic impression must include appropriate tissue management. This article reviews the effects of mechanical and chemical tissue retraction for fixed prosthodontics, specifically discussing the use of retraction cord with or without chemicals to control sulcular hemorrhage and moisture. Common astringents, hemostatics, and vasoconstrictors used in dentistry as gingival retraction agents are discussed, and recommendations for modification of patient and treatment management are provided. PMID:24350912

  20. A lateral guidance algorithm to reduce the post-aerobraking burn requirements for a lift-modulated orbital transfer vehicle. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, G. C.

    1986-01-01

    A lateral guidance algorithm which controls the location of the line of intersection between the actual and desired orbital planes (the hinge line) is developed for the aerobraking phase of a lift-modulated orbital transfer vehicle. The on-board targeting algorithm associated with this lateral guidance algorithm is simple and concise which is very desirable since computation time and space are limited on an on-board flight computer. A variational equation which describes the movement of the hinge line is derived. Simple relationships between the plane error, the desired hinge line position, the position out-of-plane error, and the velocity out-of-plane error are found. A computer simulation is developed to test the lateral guidance algorithm for a variety of operating conditions. The algorithm does reduce the total burn magnitude needed to achieve the desired orbit by allowing the plane correction and perigee-raising burn to be combined in a single maneuver. The algorithm performs well under vacuum perigee dispersions, pot-hole density disturbance, and thick atmospheres. The results for many different operating conditions are presented.

  1. Diagnostic for Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Etch Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappelli, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's requirements for the rapid development and validation of future generation electronic devices as well as associated materials and processes, enabling technologies ion the processing of semiconductor materials arising from understanding etch chemistries are being developed through a research collaboration between Stanford University and NASA-Ames Research Center, Although a great deal of laboratory-scale research has been performed on many of materials processing plasmas, little is known about the gas-phase and surface chemical reactions that are critical in many etch and deposition processes, and how these reactions are influenced by the variation in operating conditions. In addition, many plasma-based processes suffer from stability and reliability problems leading to a compromise in performance and a potentially increased cost for the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Such a lack of understanding has hindered the development of process models that can aid in the scaling and improvement of plasma etch and deposition systems. The research described involves the study of plasmas used in semiconductor processes. An inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source in place of the standard upper electrode assembly of the Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) radio-frequency (RF) Reference Cell is used to investigate the discharge characteristics and chemistries. This ICP source generates plasmas with higher electron densities (approximately 10(exp 12)/cu cm) and lower operating pressures (approximately 7 mTorr) than obtainable with the original parallel-plate version of the GEC Cell. This expanded operating regime is more relevant to new generations of industrial plasma systems being used by the microelectronics industry. The motivation for this study is to develop an understanding of the physical phenomena involved in plasma processing and to measure much needed fundamental parameters, such as gas-phase and surface reaction rates. species

  2. The U.S. EPA Geographic Information System for mapping environmental releases of Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) chemicals.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, J R; Sorensen, J W; Eckert, J W; Carreras, E M

    1993-04-01

    This study characterizes the environmental releases of toxic chemicals of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) in the southeastern United States by using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Geographic Information System (GIS) to map them. These maps show that the largest quantities of TRI releases in the Southeast are usually near densely populated areas. This GIS mapping approach takes the first steps in defining those areas in the region which may be potential exposure zones and which could be strategic targets for future risk screening efforts in this geographic area. PMID:8502789

  3. Study of electrical and chemical propulsion systems for auxiliary propulsion of large space systems, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. W.

    1981-01-01

    The five major tasks of the program are reported. Task 1 is a literature search followed by selection and definition of seven generic spacecraft classes. Task 2 covers the determination and description of important disturbance effects. Task 3 applies the disturbances to the generic spacecraft and adds maneuver and stationkeeping functions to define total auxiliary propulsion systems requirements for control. The important auxiliary propulsion system characteristics are identified and sensitivities to control functions and large space system characteristics determined. In Task 4, these sensitivities are quantified and the optimum auxiliary propulsion system characteristics determined. Task 5 compares the desired characteristics with those available for both electrical and chemical auxiliary propulsion systems to identify the directions technology advances should take.

  4. Attrition Rate of Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feilen, Harry Martin

    This project developed an evaluation methodology for determining, accurately and rapidly, the attrition resistance of oxygen carrier materials used in chemical looping technologies. Existing test protocols, to evaluate attrition resistance of granular materials, are conducted under non-reactive and ambient temperature conditions. They do not accurately reflect the actual behavior under the unique process conditions of chemical looping, including high temperatures and cyclic operation between oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. This project developed a test method and equipment that represented a significant improvement over existing protocols. Experimental results obtained from this project have shown that hematite exhibits different modes of attrition, including both due to mechanical stresses and due to structural changes in the particles due to chemical reaction at high temperature. The test methodology has also proven effective in providing reactivity changes of the material with continued use, a property, which in addition to attrition, determines material life. Consumption/replacement cost due to attrition or loss of reactivity is a critical factor in the economic application of the chemical looping technology. This test method will allow rapid evaluation of a wide range of materials that are best suited for this technology. The most important anticipated public benefit of this project is the acceleration of the development of chemical looping technology for lowering greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion.

  5. Chemical geothermometers and mixing models for geothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    1977-01-01

    Qualitative chemical geothermometers utilize anomalous concentrations of various "indicator" elements in groundwaters, streams, soils, and soil gases to outline favorable places to explore for geothermal energy. Some of the qualitative methods, such as the delineation of mercury and helium anomalies in soil gases, do not require the presence of hot springs or fumaroles. However, these techniques may also outline fossil thermal areas that are now cold. Quantitative chemical geothermometers and mixing models can provide information about present probable minimum subsurface temperatures. Interpretation is easiest where several hot or warm springs are present in a given area. At this time the most widely used quantitative chemical geothermometers are silica, Na/K, and Na-K-Ca. ?? 1976.

  6. Component pattern analysis of chemicals using multispectral THz imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Kodo; Ogawa, Yuichi; Watanabe, Yuki

    2004-04-01

    We have developed a novel basic technology for terahertz (THz) imaging, which allows detection and identification of chemicals by introducing the component spatial pattern analysis. The spatial distributions of the chemicals were obtained from terahertz multispectral transillumination images, using absorption spectra previously measured with a widely tunable THz-wave parametric oscillator. Further we have applied this technique to the detection and identification of illicit drugs concealed in envelopes. The samples we used were methamphetamine and MDMA, two of the most widely consumed illegal drugs in Japan, and aspirin as a reference.

  7. A new chemical analysis system using a photocathode RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yasushi; Yang, Jinfeng; Hirose, Masafumi; Sakai, Fumio; Tsunemi, Akira; Yorozu, Masafumi; Okada, Yasuhiro; Endo, Akira; Wang, Xijie; Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2000-11-01

    A compact chemical analysis (pulse radiolysis) apparatus using a BNL-type s-band photocathode RF gun (GUN-IV) is now under development at Sumitomo Heavy Industries (SHI). Using the apparatus, fast chemical reactions induced by 3.5 ps pulse of electron beam can be analyzed by means of time-resolved photo-absorption spectroscopy with 10 ps laser pulses in the wavelength range of 210-2000 nm. The high-precision control of RF phase makes 10 ps of time-resolution possible for the analysis.

  8. The development of the globally harmonized system (GHS) of classification and labelling of hazardous chemicals.

    PubMed

    Winder, Chris; Azzi, Rola; Wagner, Drew

    2005-10-17

    The hazards of chemicals can be classified using classification criteria that are based on physical, chemical and ecotoxicological endpoints. These criteria may be developed be iteratively, based on scientific or regulatory processes. A number of national and international schemes have been developed over the past 50 years, and some, such as the UN Dangerous Goods system or the EC system for hazardous substances, are in widespread use. However, the unnecessarily complicated multiplicity of existing hazard classifications created much unnecessary confusion at the user level, and a recommendation was made at the 1992 Rio Earth summit to develop a globally harmonized chemical hazard classification and compatible labelling system, including material safety data sheets and easily understandable symbols, that could be used for manufacture, transport, use and disposal of chemical substances. This became the globally harmonized system for the Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). The developmental phase of the GHS is largely complete. Consistent criteria for categorising chemicals according to their toxic, physical, chemical and ecological hazards are now available. Consistent hazard communication tools such as labelling and material safety data sheets are also close to finalisation. The next phase is implementation of the GHS. The Intergovernmental Forum for Chemical Safety recommends that all countries implement the GHS as soon as possible with a view to have the system fully operational by 2008. When the GHS is in place, the world will finally have one system for classification of chemical hazards. PMID:16039045

  9. Transfer of the EPA/NIH Chemical Information System (CIS) to Private Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadec, Sarah T.; Jover, Antonio

    This paper discusses the programmatic concerns, the evaluation, and the ultimate decisions which led to the transfer of CIS (Chemical Information System) to the private sector. CIS is a complex, integrated system of some 20 chemical databases and data analysis programs which provide access to physical, toxicological, environmental effects, and…

  10. 30 CFR 75.1101-14 - Installation of dry powder chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-14 Installation of dry powder chemical systems. (a) Self-contained dry powder chemical systems shall be installed to protect each belt-drive, belt takeup, electrical-controls, gear reducing units and 50 feet of fire-resistant belt or 150 feet of non-fire-resistant belt adjacent to the belt drive. (b)...

  11. 33 CFR 149.416 - What are the requirements for a dry chemical fire suppression system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the requirements for a dry chemical fire suppression system? 149.416 Section 149.416 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... the requirements for a dry chemical fire suppression system? Each natural gas deepwater port must...

  12. 33 CFR 149.416 - What are the requirements for a dry chemical fire suppression system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for a dry chemical fire suppression system? 149.416 Section 149.416 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... the requirements for a dry chemical fire suppression system? Each natural gas deepwater port must...

  13. COMPUTER SUPPORT SYSTEMS FOR ESTIMATING CHEMICAL TOXICITY: PRESENT CAPABILITIES AND FUTURE TRENDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer Support Systems for Estimating Chemical Toxicity: Present Capabilities and Future Trends

    A wide variety of computer-based artificial intelligence (AI) and decision support systems exist currently to aid in the assessment of toxicity for environmental chemicals. T...

  14. Strategic Considerations in the Design of a Screening System for Substructure Searches of Chemical Structure Files

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, George W.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    A major problem in the design of screening systems for substructure searches of chemical structure files is the development of a methodology for selection of an optimal set of structural characteristics to act as screens. Distributions of several structural characteristics of the Chemical Abstracts Service Registry System are summarized. (13…

  15. Computer program determines chemical equilibria in complex systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S.; Zeleznik, F. J.

    1966-01-01

    Computer program numerically solves nonlinear algebraic equations for chemical equilibrium based on iteration equations independent of choice of components. This program calculates theoretical performance for frozen and equilibrium composition during expansion and Chapman-Jouguet flame properties, studies combustion, and designs hardware.

  16. 93Nb NMR chemical shift scale for niobia systems.

    PubMed

    Lapina, Olga B; Khabibulin, Dzhalil F; Romanenko, Konstantin V; Gan, Zhehong; Zuev, Mikhail G; Krasil'nikov, Vladimir N; Fedorov, Vladimir E

    2005-09-01

    93Nb solid-state NMR spectra of a series of inorganic niobates with Nb in different oxygen coordination environments were measured. For all studied compounds the chemical shielding and quadrupole tensor parameters were determined using conventional and ultrahigh field NMR facilities, ultrahigh speed MAS, DQ STMAS, solid-echo and computer modeling. It has been demonstrated that the 93Nb isotropic chemical shift is sensitive to the coordination number of Nb sites. For the first time the 93Nb NMR chemical shift scale for NbOx polyhedra in solid materials has been proposed: for four-coordinated Nb sites, the isotropic shifts occur from -650 to -950 ppm; five-coordinated Nb sites have the isotropic shifts in the range of -900 to -980 ppm; for six-coordinated Nb sites the isotropic shifts vary from -900 to -1360 ppm; the shifts from -1200 to -1600 ppm are typical for seven-coordinated Nb sites; for eight-coordinated Nb sites the shifts are higher than -1400 ppm. The possible correlation between the value of the isotropic chemical shift and the ionic character of the NbOx-MOy polyhedra association has been suggested. The magnitude of the 93Nb quadrupole coupling constant depends on the local symmetry of Nb sites and may vary from hundreds of kHz to hundreds of MHz. PMID:16216475

  17. Steady-State Multiplicity Features of Chemically Reacting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luss, Dan

    1986-01-01

    Analyzes steady-state multiplicity in chemical reactors, focusing on the use of two mathematical tools, namely, the catastrophe theory and the singularity theory with a distinguished parameter. These tools can be used to determine the maximum number of possible solutions and the different types of bifurcation diagrams. (JN)

  18. Method and system for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water

    DOEpatents

    McMurtrey, Ryan D.; Ginosar, Daniel M.; Moor, Kenneth S.; Shook, G. Michael; Barker, Donna L.

    2003-01-01

    A method and system for extraction of chemicals from an groundwater remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating groundwater contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

  19. Electrostatic particle sampler and chemical sensor system for land mine detection by chemical signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Mike; Cumming, Colin J.; la Grone, Marcus J.; Taylor, Robert

    1998-09-01

    Locating landmines and UXO by detection of the chemical signature emanating from these devices is extremely challenging due to several of the physical properties of explosives. Because the explosives used in landmines and UXO have extremely low vapor pressures, the concentration of explosive vapors escaping from the ordnance is very low. Fate and transport studies of explosives in soil over buried ordnance have indicated that once released into the soil, virtually all of the explosive vapor is quickly adsorbed onto the surface of soil particles. This behavior is not surprising, since explosives are known to readily adsorb onto most types of surfaces. The adsorption of explosive onto soil particles is to an extent a reversible process, enabling diffusion of explosive through the soil. Unfortunately, because of irreversible adsorption and other processes occurring in the soil that destroy or degrade the explosive, the concentration of explosive reaching the surface of the ground is extremely low. However, dogs are able to locate buried ordnance, indicating that explosive signature compounds are present at or near the surface of the ground at concentrations in excess of the minimum detection limit of canines. Since the fate and transport studies indicate a much higher concentration of explosive adsorbed onto soil particles than in the vapor phase, sampling the explosive adsorbed onto soil particles may be a more efficient approach to sampling explosives than sampling explosive vapor in the air over buried ordnance. An electrostatic particle sampler has been designed which is capable of rapidly and efficiently sampling soil particles. Once the soil particles have been sampled, the explosive is desorbed from the particles, concentrated, and then presented to a sensitive chemical detector for analysis. In its present configuration, the particle sampler delivers a vapor phase sample to the detector, but the device could be adapted to deliver samples in the solvent phase

  20. A Cellular System for Spatial Signal Decoding in Chemical Gradients.

    PubMed

    Hegemann, Björn; Unger, Michael; Lee, Sung Sik; Stoffel-Studer, Ingrid; van den Heuvel, Jasmin; Pelet, Serge; Koeppl, Heinz; Peter, Matthias

    2015-11-23

    Directional cell growth requires that cells read and interpret shallow chemical gradients, but how the gradient directional information is identified remains elusive. We use single-cell analysis and mathematical modeling to define the cellular gradient decoding network in yeast. Our results demonstrate that the spatial information of the gradient signal is read locally within the polarity site complex using double-positive feedback between the GTPase Cdc42 and trafficking of the receptor Ste2. Spatial decoding critically depends on low Cdc42 activity, which is maintained by the MAPK Fus3 through sequestration of the Cdc42 activator Cdc24. Deregulated Cdc42 or Ste2 trafficking prevents gradient decoding and leads to mis-oriented growth. Our work discovers how a conserved set of components assembles a network integrating signal intensity and directionality to decode the spatial information contained in chemical gradients. PMID:26585298

  1. Some Sensitivity Studies of Chemical Transport Simulated in Models of the Soil-Plant-Litter System

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, C.L.

    2002-10-28

    Fifteen parameters in a set of five coupled models describing carbon, water, and chemical dynamics in the soil-plant-litter system were varied in a sensitivity analysis of model response. Results are presented for chemical distribution in the components of soil, plants, and litter along with selected responses of biomass, internal chemical transport (xylem and phloem pathways), and chemical uptake. Response and sensitivity coefficients are presented for up to 102 model outputs in an appendix. Two soil properties (chemical distribution coefficient and chemical solubility) and three plant properties (leaf chemical permeability, cuticle thickness, and root chemical conductivity) had the greatest influence on chemical transport in the soil-plant-litter system under the conditions examined. Pollutant gas uptake (SO{sub 2}) increased with change in plant properties that increased plant growth. Heavy metal dynamics in litter responded to plant properties (phloem resistance, respiration characteristics) which induced changes in the chemical cycling to the litter system. Some of the SO{sub 2} and heavy metal responses were not expected but became apparent through the modeling analysis.

  2. CD-REST: a system for extracting chemical-induced disease relation in literature.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Wu, Yonghui; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wang, Jingqi; Lee, Hee-Jin; Xu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Mining chemical-induced disease relations embedded in the vast biomedical literature could facilitate a wide range of computational biomedical applications, such as pharmacovigilance. The BioCreative V organized a Chemical Disease Relation (CDR) Track regarding chemical-induced disease relation extraction from biomedical literature in 2015. We participated in all subtasks of this challenge. In this article, we present our participation system Chemical Disease Relation Extraction SysTem (CD-REST), an end-to-end system for extracting chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. CD-REST consists of two main components: (1) a chemical and disease named entity recognition and normalization module, which employs the Conditional Random Fields algorithm for entity recognition and a Vector Space Model-based approach for normalization; and (2) a relation extraction module that classifies both sentence-level and document-level candidate drug-disease pairs by support vector machines. Our system achieved the best performance on the chemical-induced disease relation extraction subtask in the BioCreative V CDR Track, demonstrating the effectiveness of our proposed machine learning-based approaches for automatic extraction of chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. The CD-REST system provides web services using HTTP POST request. The web services can be accessed fromhttp://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr The online CD-REST demonstration system is available athttp://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html. Database URL:http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr;http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html. PMID:27016700

  3. Design and development of computer-aided chemical systems: virtual labs for teaching chemical experiments in undergraduate and graduate courses.

    PubMed

    Luque Ruiz, I; López Espinosa, E; Cerruela García, G; Gómez-Nieto, M A

    2001-01-01

    An environment for the construction of virtual chemistry experiments is presented. This environment is based on the E(V) = M + m model-Experiment (Virtual) = Materials + method-proposed and described herein, which allows the representation and subsequent building of chemistry experiments in virtual 3D worlds to any degree of complexity. The object-based nature of the environment not only allows its use on the Internet but also facilitates integration with other systems, while enabling the system to represent and organize knowledge in such a way that it is available to any teaching environment dealing with chemical laboratory experiments. PMID:11500127

  4. SSAC - SPACE SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Space System Architecture Code (SSAC) is a computer program for performing sensitivity studies on operating parameters of space missions. Data is included for a mission to Mars and back to Earth (launch parameters are for even numbered years between 2014 and 2028). SSAC is a menu-driven tool that can examine the effects of varying such parameters as crew size for piloted missions, chemical vs. nuclear electric propulsion, specific impulse, and other variables. The structure of SSAC allows user control over the following options: 1) mass scaling; 2) number of stages for multistage missions; 3) specific impulse; 4) electric propulsion efficiency; 5) aerobraking; 6) payload mass; 7) Mars Lander parameters; 8) crew resource requirements; 9) escape spiral times; 10) total propulsion times; 11) attitude control parameters; 12) telecommunications options and 13) optimum trajectories. This package is written in FORTRAN 77 for DEC VAX series computers running VMS and is intended to be run interactively, although it can be modified for batch mode. The program has a menu-based user interface and requires 59K of main memory. Many different parameter dependencies can be graphically displayed on Tektronix-compatible output devices. SSAC is available in DEC VAX BACKUP format on a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape (standard distribution media) or a TK50 tape cartridge. This program was developed in 1990 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. DEC, VAX, and VMS are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. Tektronix is a trademark of Tektronix, Inc.

  5. Fieldable Fourier Transform Spectrometer: System Construction, Background Variability Measurements, and Chemical Attack Warning Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchell, Brian K.; Harper, Warren W.; Batishko, Charles R.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sheen, David M.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Schultz, John F.

    2002-10-01

    The infrared sensors task at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on the science and technology of remote and in-situ chemical sensors for detecting proliferation and countering terrorism. Missions to be addressed by remote chemical sensor development will include detecting proliferation of nuclear or chemical weapons, and providing warning of terrorist use of chemical weapons. Missions to be addressed by in-situ chemical sensor development include countering terrorism by screening luggage, personnel, and shipping containers for explosives, firearms, narcotics, chemical weapons, or chemical weapons residues, and mapping contaminated areas. The science and technology relevant to these primary missions is also likely to be useful for battlefield chemical weapons defense, air operations support, monitoring emissions from chemical weapons destruction facilities or industrial chemical plants, and law enforcement applications. PNNL will seek to serve organizations with direct interest in these missions through collaborative research and development efforts approved by NA-22. During FY02, PNNL began assembling a remote IR detection capability that would allow field experiments to be conducted. The capability consists of a commercially available FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) emission spectrometer and a frequency-modulation differential-absorption LIDAR (FM-DIAL) system being developed at PNNL. To provide environmental protection for these systems, a large, well insulated, temperature controlled trailer was specified and procured. While the FTIR system was field-ready, the FM-DIAL system required many modifications to prepare for field deployment. This document provides an overview of the FTIR system, summarizes the modifications made to the FM-DIAL system, and describes the salient features of the remote systems trailer.

  6. Metal transport and chemical heterogeneity in early star forming systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Jeremy S.; Sluder, Alan; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljević, Miloš; Bromm, Volker

    2015-08-01

    To constrain the properties of the first stars with the chemical abundance patterns observed in metal-poor stars, one must identify any non-trivial effects that the hydrodynamics of metal dispersal can imprint on the abundances. We use realistic cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to quantify the distribution of metals resulting from one Population III supernova and from a small number of such supernovae exploding in close succession. Overall, supernova ejecta are highly inhomogeneously dispersed throughout the simulations. When the supernova bubbles collapse, quasi-virialized metal-enriched clouds, fed by fallback from the bubbles and by streaming of metal-free gas from the cosmic web, grow in the centres of the dark matter haloes. Partial turbulent homogenization on scales resolved in the simulation is observed only in the densest clouds where the vortical time-scales are short enough to ensure true homogenization on subgrid scales. However, the abundances in the clouds differ from the gross yields of the supernovae. Continuing the simulations until the cloud have gone into gravitational collapse, we predict that the abundances in second-generation stars will be deficient in the innermost mass shells of the supernova (if only one has exploded) or in the ejecta of the latest supernovae (when multiple have exploded). This indicates that hydrodynamics gives rise to biases complicating the identification of nucleosynthetic sources in the chemical abundance spaces of the surviving stars.

  7. Temporal cross-correlation asymmetry and departure from equilibrium in a bistable chemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianca, C.; Lemarchand, A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper aims at determining sustained reaction fluxes in a nonlinear chemical system driven in a nonequilibrium steady state. The method relies on the computation of cross-correlation functions for the internal fluctuations of chemical species concentrations. By employing Langevin-type equations, we derive approximate analytical formulas for the cross-correlation functions associated with nonlinear dynamics. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of the chemical master equation are performed in order to check the validity of the Langevin equations for a bistable chemical system. The two approaches are found in excellent agreement, except for critical parameter values where the bifurcation between monostability and bistability occurs. From the theoretical point of view, the results imply that the behavior of cross-correlation functions cannot be exploited to measure sustained reaction fluxes in a specific nonlinear system without the prior knowledge of the associated chemical mechanism and the rate constants.

  8. Noise-induced multistability in chemical systems: Discrete versus continuum modeling.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Andrew; Liao, Shuohao; Vejchodský, Tomáš; Erban, Radek; Grima, Ramon

    2015-04-01

    The noisy dynamics of chemical systems is commonly studied using either the chemical master equation (CME) or the chemical Fokker-Planck equation (CFPE). The latter is a continuum approximation of the discrete CME approach. It has recently been shown that for a particular system, the CFPE captures noise-induced multistability predicted by the CME. This phenomenon involves the CME's marginal probability distribution changing from unimodal to multimodal as the system size decreases below a critical value. We here show that the CFPE does not always capture noise-induced multistability. In particular we find simple chemical systems for which the CME predicts noise-induced multistability, whereas the CFPE predicts monostability for all system sizes. PMID:25974443

  9. WAR DSS: A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The second generation of the Waste Reduction (WAR) Algorithm is constructed as a decision support system (DSS) in the design of chemical manufacturing facilities. The WAR DSS is a software tool that can help reduce the potential environmental impacts (PEIs) of industrial chemical...

  10. Chemical Convection in the Lunar Core from Melting Experiments on the Iron-Sulfur System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Wang, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental results on the liquidus curve of the Fe-S system at the pressures of the lunar core provide constraints on the Moon’s thermal and chemical states and the role of chemical convection in the origin of early lunar core dynamo.

  11. Application of chemical dehumidification system to a roof fan house at Michoud Assembly Facility at New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of a chemical dehumidification system to reduce the energy consumption associated with dehumidification of the chilled air is assessed. A comparative energy consumption and cost analysis of the chemical dehumidification and existing systems and the savings offered by the proposed chemical dehumidification system over the existing air washer-reheat system are presented.

  12. Chemical imaging of biological systems with the scanning electrochemical microscope.

    PubMed

    Gyurcsányi, Róbert E; Jágerszki, Gyula; Kiss, Gergely; Tóth, Klára

    2004-06-01

    A brief overview on recent advances in the application of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to the investigation of biological systems is presented. Special emphasis is given to the mapping of local enzyme activity by SECM, which is exemplified by relevant original systems. PMID:15110274

  13. Violation of the mass-action law in dilute chemical systems.

    PubMed

    Brogioli, Doriano

    2013-11-14

    The mass-action law, which predicts the rates of chemical reactions, is widely used for modeling the kinetics of the chemical reactions and their stationary states, also for complex chemical reaction networks. However, violations of the mass-action equations have been reported in various cases: in confined systems with a small number of molecules, in non-ideally-stirred systems, when the reactions are limited by the diffusion, at high concentrations of reactants, or in chemical reaction networks with marginally stable mass-action equations. In this paper, I describe a new mechanism, leading to the violation of the mass-action equations, that takes place at a low concentration of at least one of the reactants; in this limit, the reaction rates can be easily inferred from the chemical reaction network. I propose that this mechanism underlies the replication stability of the hypercycles, a class of chemical reaction networks hypothetically connected with abiogenesis. I provide two simple examples of chemical reaction networks in which the mechanism leading to the violation of the mass-action law is present. I study the two chemical reaction networks by means of a simulation performed with a cellular automaton model. The results have a general validity and represent a limitation of the validity of the mass-action law, which has been overlooked up to now in the studies about the chemical reaction networks. PMID:24320249

  14. Violation of the mass-action law in dilute chemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogioli, Doriano

    2013-11-01

    The mass-action law, which predicts the rates of chemical reactions, is widely used for modeling the kinetics of the chemical reactions and their stationary states, also for complex chemical reaction networks. However, violations of the mass-action equations have been reported in various cases: in confined systems with a small number of molecules, in non-ideally-stirred systems, when the reactions are limited by the diffusion, at high concentrations of reactants, or in chemical reaction networks with marginally stable mass-action equations. In this paper, I describe a new mechanism, leading to the violation of the mass-action equations, that takes place at a low concentration of at least one of the reactants; in this limit, the reaction rates can be easily inferred from the chemical reaction network. I propose that this mechanism underlies the replication stability of the hypercycles, a class of chemical reaction networks hypothetically connected with abiogenesis. I provide two simple examples of chemical reaction networks in which the mechanism leading to the violation of the mass-action law is present. I study the two chemical reaction networks by means of a simulation performed with a cellular automaton model. The results have a general validity and represent a limitation of the validity of the mass-action law, which has been overlooked up to now in the studies about the chemical reaction networks.

  15. Chemical modeling of irreversible reactions in nuclear waste-water-rock systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wolery, T.J.

    1981-02-01

    Chemical models of aqueous geochemical systems are usually built on the concept of thermodynamic equilibrium. Though many elementary reactions in a geochemical system may be close to equilibrium, others may not be. Chemical models of aqueous fluids should take into account that many aqueous redox reactions are among the latter. The behavior of redox reactions may critically affect migration of certain radionuclides, especially the actinides. In addition, the progress of reaction in geochemical systems requires thermodynamic driving forces associated with elementary reactions not at equilibrium, which are termed irreversible reactions. Both static chemical models of fluids and dynamic models of reacting systems have been applied to a wide spectrum of problems in water-rock interactions. Potential applications in nuclear waste disposal range from problems in geochemical aspects of site evaluation to those of waste-water-rock interactions. However, much further work in the laboratory and the field will be required to develop and verify such applications of chemical modeling.

  16. EXPOSURE METHODOLOGIES AND SYSTEMS FOR LONG-TERM CHEMICAL CARCINOGENICITY STUDIES WITH SMALL FISH SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing waterborne chemical carcinogens in fish models requires accurate, reliable, and reproducible exposures. Because carcinogenesis is a chronic toxicological process and is often associated with prolonged latency periods, systems must accommodate lengthy in-life test periods ...

  17. GREENER CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN ALTERNATIVES ARE REVEALED USING THE WASTE REDUCTION DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM (WAR DSS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Waste Reduction Decision Support System (WAR DSS) is a Java-based software product providing comprehensive modeling of potential adverse environmental impacts (PEI) predicted to result from newly designed or redesigned chemical manufacturing processes. The purpose of this so...

  18. IMMUNE SYSTEM MATURITY AND SENSITIVITY TO CHEMICAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well established that human diseases associated with abnormal immune function, including some common infectious diseases and asthma, are considerably more prevalent at younger ages. The immune system continues to mature after birth, and functional immaturity accounts for m...

  19. Linear-noise approximation and the chemical master equation agree up to second-order moments for a class of chemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grima, Ramon

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that the linear-noise approximation (LNA) agrees with the chemical master equation, up to second-order moments, for chemical systems composed of zero and first-order reactions. Here we show that this is also a property of the LNA for a subset of chemical systems with second-order reactions. This agreement is independent of the number of interacting molecules.

  20. Measurement of proton chemical shifts in invisible states of slowly exchanging protein systems by chemical exchange saturation transfer.

    PubMed

    Bouvignies, Guillaume; Kay, Lewis E

    2012-12-13

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful technique for studies of transiently formed, sparsely populated (excited) conformational states of protein molecules in slow exchange with a dominant structure. The most popular form of the experiment, and the version originally developed, uses a weak (1)H radio frequency field to perturb longitudinal magnetization of one state with the effect transferred to magnetization in the second conformation via chemical exchange. A significant limitation of the method for protein applications emerges from (1)H magnetization transfer via dipolar relaxation (NOE effect) that can severely complicate analysis of the resulting CEST profile. This is particularly an issue since the (1)H chemical shifts of the excited state, critical for structural studies of these elusive conformers, become difficult to extract. Here we present a method for measurement of these shifts via CEST experiments in which the NOE effect is not an issue. The methodology is illustrated through applications to a pair of exchanging systems where the results are cross-validated. PMID:23194058

  1. Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, and chemical reactant sources

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C

    2013-11-26

    Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, chemical reactant sources, and related methods are disclosed. In one embodiment, a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor system comprising a reaction chamber, a combustion torch positioned to direct a flame into the reaction chamber, and one or more reactant feed assemblies configured to electrically energize at least one electrically conductive solid reactant structure to form a plasma and feed each electrically conductive solid reactant structure into the plasma to form at least one product is disclosed. In an additional embodiment, a chemical reactant source for a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor comprising an elongated electrically conductive reactant structure consisting essentially of at least one chemical reactant is disclosed. In further embodiments, methods of forming a chemical reactant source and methods of chemically converting at least one reactant into at least one product are disclosed.

  2. Development and testing of dry chemicals in advanced extinguishing systems for jet engine nacelle fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, R. L.; Ling, A. C. (Editor); Mayer, L. A.; Myronik, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    The effectiveness of dry chemical in extinguishing and delaying reignition of fires resulting from hydrocarbon fuel leaking onto heated surfaces such as can occur in jet engine nacelles is studied. The commercial fire extinguishant dry chemical tried are sodium and potassium bicarbonate, carbonate, chloride, carbamate (Monnex), metal halogen, and metal hydroxycarbonate compounds. Synthetic and preparative procedures for new materials developed, a new concept of fire control by dry chemical agents, descriptions of experiment assemblages to test dry chemical fire extinguishant efficiencies in controlling fuel fires initiated by hot surfaces, comparative testing data for more than 25 chemical systems in a 'static' assemblage with no air flow across the heated surface, and similar comparative data for more than ten compounds in a dynamic system with air flows up to 350 ft/sec are presented.

  3. Modeling of thermodynamic and chemical changes in low-temperature geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, A.L.

    1986-12-01

    A method was developed to incorporate the transport of several chemical components into a model of the transport of fluid mass and heat within a geothermal system. It was demonstrated that the use of coupled hydrological, thermal and chemical data allows for the determination of field porosities, amounts and regions of cool recharge into the system as well as field permeabilities and the hot reservoir volume. With the additional information a reliable prediction of the long-term cooling rate can be made.

  4. Chemical and morphological filters in a specialized floral mimicry system.

    PubMed

    Martos, Florent; Cariou, Marie-Louise; Pailler, Thierry; Fournel, Jacques; Bytebier, Benny; Johnson, Steven D

    2015-07-01

    Many plant species attract insect pollinators through chemical mimicry of their oviposition sites, often detaining them in a trap chamber that ensures pollen transfer. These plant mimics are considered to be unspecialized at the pollinator species level, yet field observations of a mycoheterotrophic rainforest orchid (Gastrodia similis), which emits an odour reminiscent of rotting fruit, indicate that it is pollinated by a single drosophilid fly species (Scaptodrosophila bangi). We investigated the roles of floral volatiles and the dimensions of the trap chamber in enforcing this specialization, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses, bioassays and scanning electron microscopy. We showed that G. similis flowers predominantly emit three fatty-acid esters (ethyl acetate, ethyl isobutyrate and methyl isobutyrate) that were shown in experiments to attract only Scaptodrosophila flies. We additionally showed that the trap chamber, which flies enter into via a touch-sensitive 'trapdoor', closely matches the body size of the pollinator species S. bangi and plays a key role in pollen transfer. Our study demonstrates that specialization in oviposition site mimicry is due primarily to volatile chemistry and is reflected in the dimensions of the trapping apparatus. It also indicates that mycoheterotrophic plants can be specialized both on mycorrhizal fungi and insect pollinators. PMID:25704464

  5. Chemical energy system for a borehole seismic source. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Engelke, R.; Hedges, R.O.

    1996-03-01

    We describe a detonation system that will be useful in the seismological examination of geological structures. The explosive component of this system is produced by the mixing of two liquids; these liquids are classified as non-explosive materials by the Department of Transportation. This detonation system could be employed in a borehole tool in which many explosions are made to occur at various points in the borehole. The explosive for each explosion would be mixed within the tool immediately prior to its being fired. Such an arrangement ensures that no humans are ever in proximity to explosives. Initiation of the explosive mixture is achieved with an electrical slapper detonator whose specific parameters are described; this electrical initiation system does not contain any explosive. The complete electrical/mechanical/explosive system is shown to be able to perform correctly at temperatures {le}120{degrees}C and at depths in a water-filled borehole of {le} 4600 ft (i.e., at pressures of {le}2000 psig).

  6. Application of laser Doppler velocimeter to chemical vapor laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, Luther R.; Hunter, William W., Jr.; Lee, Ja H.; Fletcher, Mark T.; Tabibi, Bagher M.

    1993-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system was used to measure iodide vapor flow fields inside two different-sized tubes. Typical velocity profiles across the laser tubes were obtained with an estimated +/-1 percent bias and +/-0.3 to 0.5 percent random uncertainty in the mean values and +/-2.5 percent random uncertainty in the turbulence-intensity values. Centerline velocities and turbulence intensities for various longitudinal locations ranged from 13 to 17.5 m/sec and 6 to 20 percent, respectively. In view of these findings, the effects of turbulence should be considered for flow field modeling. The LDV system provided calibration data for pressure and mass flow systems used routinely to monitor the research laser gas flow velocity.

  7. Chemical evolution of a high-level magma system: the Black Mountain volcanic center, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, T.A.; Noble, D.C.; Younker, L.W.

    1983-09-01

    A comprehensive study of stratigraphically controlled samples of both lavas and ash-flow tuffs from the Black Mountain volcanic center enables us to evaluate magmatic processes. The results of this study are used to: (1) determine how this high-level magma system developed; (2) compare this system with other similar systems; and (3) correlate ash-flow sheets using their chemical characteristics.

  8. Concentration fluctuations in a mesoscopic oscillating chemical reaction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hong; Saffarian, Saveez; Elson, Elliot L.

    2002-08-01

    Under sustained pumping, kinetics of macroscopic nonlinear biochemical reaction systems far from equilibrium either can be in a stationary steady state or can execute sustained oscillations about a fixed mean. For a system of two dynamic species X and Y, the concentrations nx and ny will be constant or will repetitively trace a closed loop in the (nx, ny) phase plane, respectively. We study a mesoscopic system with nx and ny very small; hence the occurrence of random fluctuations modifies the deterministic behavior and the law of mass action is replaced by a stochastic model. We show that nx and ny execute cyclic random walks in the (nx, ny) plane whether or not the deterministic kinetics for the corresponding macroscopic system represents a steady or an oscillating state. Probability distributions and correlation functions for nx(t) and ny(t) show quantitative but not qualitative differences between states that would appear as either oscillating or steady in the corresponding macroscopic systems. A diffusion-like equation for probability P(nx, ny, t) is obtained for the two-dimensional Brownian motion in the (nx, ny) phase plane. In the limit of large nx, ny, the deterministic nonlinear kinetics derived from mass action is recovered. The nature of large fluctuations in an oscillating nonequilibrium system and the conceptual difference between "thermal stochasticity" and "temporal complexity" are clarified by this analysis. This result is relevant to fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and metabolic reaction networks. fluorescence correlation spectroscopy | limit cycle | nanobiochemistry | nonequilibrium steady state | random walk

  9. Advanced polychromator systems for remote chemical sensing (LDRD project 52575).

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Allen, James Joe

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this LDRD project was to develop a programmable diffraction grating fabricated in SUMMiT V{trademark}. Two types of grating elements (vertical and rotational) were designed and demonstrated. The vertical grating element utilized compound leveraged bending and the rotational grating element used vertical comb drive actuation. This work resulted in two technical advances and one patent application. Also a new optical configuration of the Polychromator was demonstrated. The new optical configuration improved the optical efficiency of the system without degrading any other aspect of the system. The new configuration also relaxes some constraint on the programmable diffraction grating.

  10. Nano-based chemical sensor array systems for uninhabited ground and airborne vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantley, Christina; Ruffin, Paul B.; Edwards, Eugene

    2009-03-01

    In a time when homemade explosive devices are being used against soldiers and in the homeland security environment, it is becoming increasingly evident that there is an urgent need for high-tech chemical sensor packages to be mounted aboard ground and air vehicles to aid soldiers in determining the location of explosive devices and the origin of bio-chemical warfare agents associated with terrorist activities from a safe distance. Current technologies utilize relatively large handheld detection systems that are housed on sizeable robotic vehicles. Research and development efforts are underway at the Army Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) to develop novel and less expensive nano-based chemical sensors for detecting explosives and chemical agents used against the soldier. More specifically, an array of chemical sensors integrated with an electronics control module on a flexible substrate that can conform to and be surface-mounted to manned or unmanned vehicles to detect harmful species from bio-chemical warfare and other explosive devices is being developed. The sensor system under development is a voltammetry-based sensor system capable of aiding in the detection of any chemical agent and in the optimization of sensor microarray geometry to provide nonlinear Fourier algorithms to characterize target area background (e.g., footprint areas). The status of the research project is reviewed in this paper. Critical technical challenges associated with achieving system cost, size, and performance requirements are discussed. The results obtained from field tests using an unmanned remote controlled vehicle that houses a CO2/chemical sensor, which detects harmful chemical agents and wirelessly transmits warning signals back to the warfighter, are presented. Finally, the technical barriers associated with employing the sensor array system aboard small air vehicles will be discussed.

  11. A reliable control system for measurement on film thickness in copper chemical mechanical planarization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongkai; Qu, Zilian; Zhao, Qian; Tian, Fangxin; Zhao, Dewen; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, a variety of film thickness measurement techniques for copper chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) are subsequently proposed. In this paper, the eddy-current technique is used. In the control system of the CMP tool developed in the State Key Laboratory of Tribology, there are in situ module and off-line module for measurement subsystem. The in situ module can get the thickness of copper film on wafer surface in real time, and accurately judge when the CMP process should stop. This is called end-point detection. The off-line module is used for multi-points measurement after CMP process, in order to know the thickness of remained copper film. The whole control system is structured with two levels, and the physical connection between the upper and the lower is achieved by the industrial Ethernet. The process flow includes calibration and measurement, and there are different algorithms for two modules. In the process of software development, C++ is chosen as the programming language, in combination with Qt OpenSource to design two modules' GUI and OPC technology to implement the communication between the two levels. In addition, the drawing function is developed relying on Matlab, enriching the software functions of the off-line module. The result shows that the control system is running stably after repeated tests and practical operations for a long time.

  12. A reliable control system for measurement on film thickness in copper chemical mechanical planarization system.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongkai; Qu, Zilian; Zhao, Qian; Tian, Fangxin; Zhao, Dewen; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, a variety of film thickness measurement techniques for copper chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) are subsequently proposed. In this paper, the eddy-current technique is used. In the control system of the CMP tool developed in the State Key Laboratory of Tribology, there are in situ module and off-line module for measurement subsystem. The in situ module can get the thickness of copper film on wafer surface in real time, and accurately judge when the CMP process should stop. This is called end-point detection. The off-line module is used for multi-points measurement after CMP process, in order to know the thickness of remained copper film. The whole control system is structured with two levels, and the physical connection between the upper and the lower is achieved by the industrial Ethernet. The process flow includes calibration and measurement, and there are different algorithms for two modules. In the process of software development, C++ is chosen as the programming language, in combination with Qt OpenSource to design two modules' GUI and OPC technology to implement the communication between the two levels. In addition, the drawing function is developed relying on Matlab, enriching the software functions of the off-line module. The result shows that the control system is running stably after repeated tests and practical operations for a long time. PMID:24387462

  13. A reliable control system for measurement on film thickness in copper chemical mechanical planarization system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongkai; Qu, Zilian; Zhao, Qian; Tian, Fangxin; Zhao, Dewen; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2013-12-15

    In recent years, a variety of film thickness measurement techniques for copper chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) are subsequently proposed. In this paper, the eddy-current technique is used. In the control system of the CMP tool developed in the State Key Laboratory of Tribology, there are in situ module and off-line module for measurement subsystem. The in situ module can get the thickness of copper film on wafer surface in real time, and accurately judge when the CMP process should stop. This is called end-point detection. The off-line module is used for multi-points measurement after CMP process, in order to know the thickness of remained copper film. The whole control system is structured with two levels, and the physical connection between the upper and the lower is achieved by the industrial Ethernet. The process flow includes calibration and measurement, and there are different algorithms for two modules. In the process of software development, C++ is chosen as the programming language, in combination with Qt OpenSource to design two modules’ GUI and OPC technology to implement the communication between the two levels. In addition, the drawing function is developed relying on Matlab, enriching the software functions of the off-line module. The result shows that the control system is running stably after repeated tests and practical operations for a long time.

  14. Closed-Loop Control of Chemical Injection Rate for a Direct Nozzle Injection System

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiang; Walgenbach, Martin; Doerpmond, Malte; Schulze Lammers, Peter; Sun, Yurui

    2016-01-01

    To realize site-specific and variable-rate application of agricultural pesticides, accurately metering and controlling the chemical injection rate is necessary. This study presents a prototype of a direct nozzle injection system (DNIS) by which chemical concentration transport lag was greatly reduced. In this system, a rapid-reacting solenoid valve (RRV) was utilized for injecting chemicals, driven by a pulse-width modulation (PWM) signal at 100 Hz, so with varying pulse width the chemical injection rate could be adjusted. Meanwhile, a closed-loop control strategy, proportional-integral-derivative (PID) method, was applied for metering and stabilizing the chemical injection rate. In order to measure chemical flow rates and input them into the controller as a feedback in real-time, a thermodynamic flowmeter that was independent of chemical viscosity was used. Laboratory tests were conducted to assess the performance of DNIS and PID control strategy. Due to the nonlinear input–output characteristics of the RRV, a two-phase PID control process obtained better effects as compared with single PID control strategy. Test results also indicated that the set-point chemical flow rate could be achieved within less than 4 s, and the output stability was improved compared to the case without control strategy. PMID:26805833

  15. Closed-Loop Control of Chemical Injection Rate for a Direct Nozzle Injection System.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiang; Walgenbach, Martin; Doerpmond, Malte; Schulze Lammers, Peter; Sun, Yurui

    2016-01-01

    To realize site-specific and variable-rate application of agricultural pesticides, accurately metering and controlling the chemical injection rate is necessary. This study presents a prototype of a direct nozzle injection system (DNIS) by which chemical concentration transport lag was greatly reduced. In this system, a rapid-reacting solenoid valve (RRV) was utilized for injecting chemicals, driven by a pulse-width modulation (PWM) signal at 100 Hz, so with varying pulse width the chemical injection rate could be adjusted. Meanwhile, a closed-loop control strategy, proportional-integral-derivative (PID) method, was applied for metering and stabilizing the chemical injection rate. In order to measure chemical flow rates and input them into the controller as a feedback in real-time, a thermodynamic flowmeter that was independent of chemical viscosity was used. Laboratory tests were conducted to assess the performance of DNIS and PID control strategy. Due to the nonlinear input-output characteristics of the RRV, a two-phase PID control process obtained better effects as compared with single PID control strategy. Test results also indicated that the set-point chemical flow rate could be achieved within less than 4 s, and the output stability was improved compared to the case without control strategy. PMID:26805833

  16. Large-Area Chemical and Biological Decontamination Using a High Energy Arc Lamp (HEAL) System.

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, Chad E; Smith, Rob R; Vass, Arpad Alexander; Ilgner, Ralph H; Brown, Gilbert M

    2008-01-01

    Methods for quickly decontaminating large areas exposed to chemical and biological (CB) warfare agents can present significant logistical, manpower, and waste management challenges. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is pursuing an alternate method to decompose CB agents without the use of toxic chemicals or other potentially harmful substances. This process uses a high energy arc lamp (HEAL) system to photochemically decompose CB agents over large areas (12 m2). Preliminary tests indicate that more than 5 decades (99.999%) of an Anthrax spore simulant (Bacillus globigii) were killed in less than 7 seconds of exposure to the HEAL system. When combined with a catalyst material (TiO2) the HEAL system was also effective against a chemical agent simulant, diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP). These results demonstrate the feasibility of a rapid, large-area chemical and biological decontamination method that does not require toxic or corrosive reagents or generate hazardous wastes.

  17. A Titan Explorer Mission Utilizing Solar Electric Propulsion and Chemical Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cupples, Michael; Coverstone, Vicki

    2003-01-01

    Mission and Systems analyses were performed for a Titan Explorer Mission scenario utilizing medium class launch vehicles, solar electric propulsion system (SEPS) for primary interplanetary propulsion, and chemical propulsion for capture at Titan. An examination of a range of system factors was performed to determine their affect on the payload delivery capability to Titan. The effect of varying the launch vehicle, solar array power, associated number of SEPS thrusters, chemical propellant combinations, tank liner thickness, and tank composite overwrap stress factor was investigated. This paper provides a parametric survey of the aforementioned set of system factors, delineating their affect on Titan payload delivery, as well as discussing aspects of planetary capture methodology.

  18. Studies of chemical abundances in the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.

    1977-01-01

    Ground-based observations and the Pioneer 10 mission have led to new discoveries and revisions of previous ideas about the outer solar system. Among these are the discovery of atmospheres on lo and Ganymede, emission from sodium and hydrogen in a cloud around lo, and the presence of acetylene, ethane, and phosphine in the atmosphere of Jupiter. Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, continues to be an extremely interesting and baffling object, clearly very different in composition from the bodies we are familiar with in the inner solar system; this is also true of Ganymede and Callisto. New data on the abundances of methane and hydrogen in the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune suggest that the values of C/H in these atmospheres may be much lower than had been previously thought. This result reinforces the apparent compositional differences between these two planets and Jupiter and Saturn, whose atmospheres exhibit a near-solar value for this ratio.

  19. Effects of deprotected species on chemically amplified resist systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Toshiyuki; Ikezaki, Yoji; Kajita, Toru; Kobayashi, Eiichi; Tsuji, Akira

    1994-05-01

    We studied the deprotecting chemistry of poly(4-hydroxystyrene) based positive-working CA resist systems by using model reactions. Detailed analyses of acid-catalyzed deprotecting reactions of TMS-, THP-, and t-BOC-protected p-cresols were carried out, and it was found that alkylated derivatives of p- cresol were formed as major products for THP- and t-BOC-protected p-cresol, while no alkylated products were obtained for TMS derivatives after deprotection treatment (90 degree(s)C, 2 min). In the THP- and t-BOC-protected PHS systems were also observed such alkylations, which decreased the alkaline dissolution rate of the polymer film. The alkylations are considered to lower the alkaline dissolution contrast between an exposed area and an unexposed area in a resist film, and to deteriorate the resist performance. Therefore, we propose to introduce an alkylation inhibitor to the resist components so as to improve the performance.

  20. Dynamic control and information processing in chemical reaction systems by tuning self-organization behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebiedz, Dirk; Brandt-Pollmann, Ulrich

    2004-09-01

    Specific external control of chemical reaction systems and both dynamic control and signal processing as central functions in biochemical reaction systems are important issues of modern nonlinear science. For example nonlinear input-output behavior and its regulation are crucial for the maintainance of the life process that requires extensive communication between cells and their environment. An important question is how the dynamical behavior of biochemical systems is controlled and how they process information transmitted by incoming signals. But also from a general point of view external forcing of complex chemical reaction processes is important in many application areas ranging from chemical engineering to biomedicine. In order to study such control issues numerically, here, we choose a well characterized chemical system, the CO oxidation on Pt(110), which is interesting per se as an externally forced chemical oscillator model. We show numerically that tuning of temporal self-organization by input signals in this simple nonlinear chemical reaction exhibiting oscillatory behavior can in principle be exploited for both specific external control of dynamical system behavior and processing of complex information.

  1. CD-REST: a system for extracting chemical-induced disease relation in literature

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Wu, Yonghui; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wang, Jingqi; Lee, Hee-Jin; Xu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Mining chemical-induced disease relations embedded in the vast biomedical literature could facilitate a wide range of computational biomedical applications, such as pharmacovigilance. The BioCreative V organized a Chemical Disease Relation (CDR) Track regarding chemical-induced disease relation extraction from biomedical literature in 2015. We participated in all subtasks of this challenge. In this article, we present our participation system Chemical Disease Relation Extraction SysTem (CD-REST), an end-to-end system for extracting chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. CD-REST consists of two main components: (1) a chemical and disease named entity recognition and normalization module, which employs the Conditional Random Fields algorithm for entity recognition and a Vector Space Model-based approach for normalization; and (2) a relation extraction module that classifies both sentence-level and document-level candidate drug–disease pairs by support vector machines. Our system achieved the best performance on the chemical-induced disease relation extraction subtask in the BioCreative V CDR Track, demonstrating the effectiveness of our proposed machine learning-based approaches for automatic extraction of chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. The CD-REST system provides web services using HTTP POST request. The web services can be accessed from http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr. The online CD-REST demonstration system is available at http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html. Database URL: http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr; http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html PMID:27016700

  2. Molecular noise induces concentration oscillations in chemical systems with stable node steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, D. L. K.; Grima, R.

    2013-02-01

    It is well known that internal or molecular noise induces concentration oscillations in chemical systems whose deterministic models exhibit damped oscillations. In this article we show, using the linear-noise approximation of the chemical master equation, that noise can also induce oscillations in systems whose deterministic descriptions admit no damped oscillations, i.e., systems with a stable node. This non-intuitive phenomenon is remarkable since, unlike noise-induced oscillations in systems with damped deterministic oscillations, it cannot be explained by noise excitation of the deterministic resonant frequency of the system. We here prove the following general properties of stable-node noise-induced oscillations for systems with two species: (i) the upper bound of their frequency is given by the geometric mean of the real eigenvalues of the Jacobian of the system, (ii) the upper bound of the Q-factor of the oscillations is inversely proportional to the distance between the real eigenvalues of the Jacobian, and (iii) these oscillations are not necessarily exhibited by all interacting chemical species in the system. The existence and properties of stable-node oscillations are verified by stochastic simulations of the Brusselator, a cascade Brusselator reaction system, and two other simple chemical systems involving auto-catalysis and trimerization. It is also shown how external noise induces stable node oscillations with different properties than those stimulated by internal noise.

  3. Low-thrust chemical propulsion system pump technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabiers, R. L.; Siebenhaar, A.

    1981-01-01

    Candidate pump and driver systems for low thrust cargo orbit transfer vehicle engines which deliver large space structures to geosynchronous equatorial orbit and beyond are evaluated. The pumps operate to 68 atmospheres (1000 psi) discharge pressure and flowrates suited to cryogenic engines using either LOX/methane or LOX/hydrogen propellants in thrust ranges from 445 to 8900 N (100 to 2000 lb F). Analysis of the various pumps and drivers indicate that the low specific speed requirement will make high fluid efficiencies difficult to achieve. As such, multiple stages are required. In addition, all pumps require inducer stages. The most attractive main pumps are the multistage centrifugal pumps.

  4. Chemical Applications of a Programmable Image Acquisition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogren, Paul J.; Henry, Ian; Fletcher, Steven E. S.; Kelly, Ian

    2003-06-01

    Image analysis is widely used in chemistry, both for rapid qualitative evaluations using techniques such as thin layer chromatography (TLC) and for quantitative purposes such as well-plate measurements of analyte concentrations or fragment-size determinations in gel electrophoresis. This paper describes a programmable system for image acquisition and processing that is currently used in the laboratories of our organic and physical chemistry courses. It has also been used in student research projects in analytical chemistry and biochemistry. The potential range of applications is illustrated by brief presentations of four examples: (1) using well-plate optical transmission data to construct a standard concentration absorbance curve; (2) the quantitative analysis of acetaminophen in Tylenol and acetylsalicylic acid in aspirin using TLC with fluorescence detection; (3) the analysis of electrophoresis gels to determine DNA fragment sizes and amounts; and, (4) using color change to follow reaction kinetics. The supplemental material in JCE Online contains information on two additional examples: deconvolution of overlapping bands in protein gel electrophoresis, and the recovery of data from published images or graphs. The JCE Online material also presents additional information on each example, on the system hardware and software, and on the data analysis methodology.

  5. Chemical abundances of giant stars in the Crater stellar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, P.; Caffau, E.; Zaggia, S.; François, P.; Sbordone, L.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We obtained spectra for two giants of Crater (Crater J113613-105227 and Crater J113615-105244) using X-Shooter at the VLT, with the purpose of determining their radial velocities and metallicities. Methods: Radial velocities were determined by cross-correlating the spectra with that of a standard star. The spectra were analysed with the MyGIsFOS code using a grid of synthetic spectra computed from one-dimensional, local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model atmospheres. Effective temperature and surface gravity were derived from photometry measured from images obtained by the Dark Energy Survey. Results: The radial velocities are 144.3 ± 4.0 km s-1 for Crater J113613-105227 and and 134.1 ± 4.0km s-1 for Crater J113615-105244. The metallicities are [Fe/H] = -1.73 and [Fe/H] = -1.67, respectively. In addition to the iron abundance, we were able to determine abundances for nine elements: Na, Mg, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, and Ba. For Na and Ba we took into account deviations from LTE because the corrections are significant. The abundance ratios are similar in the two stars and resemble those of Galactic stars of the same metallicity. In the deep photometric images we detected several stars that lie to the blue of the turn-off. Conclusions: The radial velocities imply that both stars are members of the Crater stellar system. The difference in velocity between the two taken at face value implies a velocity dispersion >3.7 km s-1 at a 95% confidence level. Our spectroscopic metallicities agree excellently well with those determined by previous investigations using photometry. Our deep photometry and the spectroscopic metallicity imply an age of 7 Gyr for the main population of the system. The stars to the blue of the turn-off can be interpreted as a younger population that is of the same metallicity and an age of 2.2 Gyr. Finally, spatial and kinematical parameters support the idea that this system is associated with the galaxies Leo IV and Leo V. All the

  6. Medicinal chemical properties of successful central nervous system drugs.

    PubMed

    Pajouhesh, Hassan; Lenz, George R

    2005-10-01

    Fundamental physiochemical features of CNS drugs are related to their ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier affinity and exhibit CNS activity. Factors relevant to the success of CNS drugs are reviewed. CNS drugs show values of molecular weight, lipophilicity, and hydrogen bond donor and acceptor that in general have a smaller range than general therapeutics. Pharmacokinetic properties can be manipulated by the medicinal chemist to a significant extent. The solubility, permeability, metabolic stability, protein binding, and human ether-ago-go-related gene inhibition of CNS compounds need to be optimized simultaneously with potency, selectivity, and other biological parameters. The balance between optimizing the physiochemical and pharmacokinetic properties to make the best compromises in properties is critical for designing new drugs likely to penetrate the blood brain barrier and affect relevant biological systems. This review is intended as a guide to designing CNS therapeutic agents with better drug-like properties. PMID:16489364

  7. Ram accelerator direct launch system for space cargo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A new method of efficiently accelerating relatively large masses (up to several metric tons) to velocities of 0.6 km/sec up to 12 km/sec using chemical energy has been developed. The vehicle travels through a tube filled with a premixed gaseous fuel and oxidizer mixture. There is no propellant on-board the vehicle. The tube acts as the outer cowling of a ram jet and the energy release process travels with the vehicle. The ballistic efficiency remains high up to extremely high velocities and the acceleration can be maintained at a nearly constant level. Five modes of ram accelerator operation have been investigated; these modes differ primarily in the method of chemical heat release and the operational velocity range, and include two subsonic combustion modes (one of which involves thermally choke a combustion behind the vehicle) and three detonation drive modes. These modes of propulsion are capable of efficient acceleration in the range of 0.6-12 km/sec, although aerodynamic heating becomes severe above about 8 km/sec. Experiments carried out to date at the University of Washington up to 2 km/sec have established proof of principle of the ram accelerator concept and have shown close agreement between predicted and measured performance. A launch system capable of delivering two metric tons into low earth orbit was selected for the purposes of the present study. The preliminary analysis indicates that the overall dimensions of a restricted acceleration (less than approx. 1000 g) launch facility would require a tube 1 m in diameter, with an overall length of approximately 4 km. As in any direct launch scheme, a small on-board rocket is required to circularize the otherwise highly elliptical orbit which intersects the Earth. Various orbital insertion scenarios have been explored for the case of a 9 km/sec ram accelerator launch. These include direct insertion through a single circularization maneuver (i.e., on rocket burn), insertion involving two burns, and a

  8. Design and development of a space station hazardous material system for assessing chemical compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congo, Richard T.

    1990-01-01

    As the Space Station nears reality in funding support from Congress, NASA plans to perform over a hundred different missions in the coming decade. Incrementally deployed, the Space Station will evolve into modules linked to an integral structure. Each module will have characteristic functions, such as logistics, habitation, and materials processing. Because the Space Station is to be user friendly for experimenters, NASA is anticipating that a variety of different chemicals will be taken on-board. Accidental release of these potentially toxic chemicals and their chemical compatibility is the focus of this discourse. The Microgravity Manufacturing Processing Facility (MMPF) will contain the various facilities within the U.S. Laboratory (USL). Each facility will have a characteristic purpose, such as alloy solidification or vapor crystal growth. By examining the proposed experiments for each facility, identifying the chemical constituents, their physical state and/or changes, byproducts and effluents, those payloads can be identified which may contain toxic, explosive, or reactive compounds that require processing or containment in mission peculiar waste management systems. Synergistic reactions from mixed effluent streams is of major concern. Each experiment will have it own data file, complete with schematic, chemical listing, physical data, etc. Chemical compatibility information from various databases will provide assistance in the analysis of alternate disposal techniques (pretreatment, separate storage, etc.). Along with data from the Risk Analysis of the Proposed USL Waste Management System, accidental release of potentially toxic and catastrophic chemicals would be eliminated or reduced.

  9. System, device, and methods for real-time screening of live cells, biomarkers, and chemical signatures

    DOEpatents

    Sundaram, S Kamakshi [Richland, WA; Riley, Brian J [West Richland, WA; Weber, Thomas J [Richland, WA; Sacksteder, Colette A [West Richland, WA; Addleman, R Shane [Benton City, WA

    2011-06-07

    An ATR-FTIR device and system are described that defect live-cell responses to stimuli and perturbations in real-time. The system and device can monitor perturbations resulting from exposures to various physical, chemical, and biological materials in real-time, as well as those sustained over a long period of time, including those associated with stimuli having unknown modes-of-action (e.g. nanoparticles). The device and system can also be used to identify specific chemical species or substances that profile cellular responses to these perturbations.

  10. Chemically synthesized lithium peroxide composite cathodes for closed system Li-O2 batteries.

    PubMed

    Bhargav, Amruth; Guo, Wei; Fu, Yongzhu

    2016-04-28

    A binder-free lithium peroxide-carbon nanofiber composite cathode was synthesized chemically to be used in a closed system lithium-oxygen battery without external supply of oxygen. This cathode enhances the closed system performance and exhibits good rechargeability with cyclability up to 50 cycles. This composite cathode provides scope for full cell development. PMID:27032704

  11. Chemical Signatures of Interstellar Dusts Preserved in Primitive Chondrites and Inner Planets of the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, Qing-Zhu

    2002-01-01

    We show that the inheritance of interstellar materials by the solar system is not only documented by the presence of presolar grains, various isotopic anomalies, but also expressed in the chemical element distribution in the inner solar system. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Integrating Sustainable Development in Chemical Engineering Education: The Application of an Environmental Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montanes, M. T.; Palomares, A. E.; Sanchez-Tovar, R.

    2012-01-01

    The principles of sustainable development have been integrated in chemical engineering education by means of an environmental management system. These principles have been introduced in the teaching laboratories where students perform their practical classes. In this paper, the implementation of the environmental management system, the problems…

  13. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  14. IRON TUBERCULATION: PHYSIO-CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A SINGLE PIPE FROM A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nature of iron tubercles inside unlined iron pipes of drinking water distribution systems are influenced by water quality and therefore susceptible to changes in water chemistry. The underlying assumption is that tubercles in a system have similar physio-chemical properties. ...

  15. Low-thrust chemical propulsion system propellant expulsion and thermal conditioning study. Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merino, F.; Wakabayashi, I.; Pleasant, R. L.; Hill, M.

    1982-01-01

    Preferred techniques for providing abort pressurization and engine feed system net positive suction pressure (NPSP) for low thrust chemical propulsion systems (LTPS) were determined. A representative LTPS vehicle configuration is presented. Analysis tasks include: propellant heating analysis; pressurant requirements for abort propellant dump; and comparative analysis of pressurization techniques and thermal subcoolers.

  16. PHYSIO-CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF IRON TUBERCULATION FROM A SINGLE DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corrosion of iron pipes in Drinking Water Distribution Systems (DWDS) contributes to the formation of tubercles whose physio-chemical properties are influenced by the composition of the waters in the distribution system. Thus the objective of this study was to assess the extent o...

  17. Application of a reversible chemical reaction system to solar thermal power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanseth, E. J.; Won, Y. S.; Seibowitz, L. P.

    1980-08-01

    Three distributed dish solar thermal power systems using various applications of SO2/SO3 chemical energy storage and transport technology were comparatively assessed. Each system features various roles for the chemical system: (1) energy storage only, (2) energy transport, or (3) energy transport and storage. These three systems were also compared with the dish-Stirling, using electrical transport and battery storage, and the central receiver Rankine system, with thermal storage, to determine the relative merit of plants employing a thermochemical system. As an assessment criterion, the busbar energy costs were compared. Separate but comparable solar energy cost computer codes were used for distributed receiver and central receiver systems. Calculations were performed for capacity factors ranging from 0.4 to 0.8. The results indicate that SO2/SO3 technology has the potential to be more cost effective in transporting the collected energy than in storing the energy for the storage capacity range studied (2-15 hours)

  18. Application of a reversible chemical reaction system to solar thermal power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanseth, E. J.; Won, Y. S.; Seibowitz, L. P.

    1980-01-01

    Three distributed dish solar thermal power systems using various applications of SO2/SO3 chemical energy storage and transport technology were comparatively assessed. Each system features various roles for the chemical system: (1) energy storage only, (2) energy transport, or (3) energy transport and storage. These three systems were also compared with the dish-Stirling, using electrical transport and battery storage, and the central receiver Rankine system, with thermal storage, to determine the relative merit of plants employing a thermochemical system. As an assessment criterion, the busbar energy costs were compared. Separate but comparable solar energy cost computer codes were used for distributed receiver and central receiver systems. Calculations were performed for capacity factors ranging from 0.4 to 0.8. The results indicate that SO2/SO3 technology has the potential to be more cost effective in transporting the collected energy than in storing the energy for the storage capacity range studied (2-15 hours)

  19. Development of a real-time chemical injection system for air-assisted variable-rate sprayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A chemical injection system is an effective method to minimize chemical waste and reduce the environmental pollution in pesticide spray applications. A microprocessor controlled injection system implementing a ceramic piston metering pump was developed to accurately dispense chemicals to be mixed wi...

  20. 40 CFR 63.443 - Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Paper Industry § 63.443 Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. (a... kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. 63.443 Section 63.443 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... operator of each pulping system using a semi-chemical or soda process subject to the requirements of...

  1. 40 CFR 63.443 - Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Paper Industry § 63.443 Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. (a... kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. 63.443 Section 63.443 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... operator of each pulping system using a semi-chemical or soda process subject to the requirements of...

  2. 40 CFR 63.443 - Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Paper Industry § 63.443 Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. (a... kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. 63.443 Section 63.443 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... operator of each pulping system using a semi-chemical or soda process subject to the requirements of...

  3. 40 CFR 63.443 - Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. 63.443 Section 63.443 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Paper Industry § 63.443 Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. (a... operator of each pulping system using a semi-chemical or soda process subject to the requirements of...

  4. 40 CFR 63.443 - Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. 63.443 Section 63.443 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Paper Industry § 63.443 Standards for the pulping system at kraft, soda, and semi-chemical processes. (a... operator of each pulping system using a semi-chemical or soda process subject to the requirements of...

  5. A Preliminary Study for Chemical Ranking System in Terms of Soil and Groundwater Contamination by Chemical Accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Jeong, Y. C.; Kim, K. E.; Lee, D.; Yoo, K.; Kim, J.; Hwang, S.

    2015-12-01

    A variety of chemicals could affect human health and ecosystems by chemical accidents such as fire, explosion, and/or spill. Chemical accidents make chemicals spread to the environment via various routes such as dispersion into ambient air, soil, and surface/ground water media. Especially, soil and groundwater contamination by chemical accidents become a secondary source to have a long term effect on human health and environment. Strength of long term effect by soil and groundwater contamination depends largely on inherent characteristics of a chemical and its fate in soil and groundwater. Therefore, in this study, we developed a framework on how to determine what kind of chemicals is more important in management scheme in terms of soil and groundwater contamination during chemical accidents. We ranked approximately fifty chemicals using this framework which takes into account an exposure into soil and groundwater, toxicity, persistence, and bioaccumulation of a chemical. This framework helps to prepare systematically the management plan for chemical related facilities. Furthermore, results from our study can make a policy maker have interests in highly ranked chemicals and facilities.

  6. INSPACE CHEMICAL PROPULSION SYSTEMS AT NASA's MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER: HERITAGE AND CAPABILITIES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McRight, P. S.; Sheehy, J. A.; Blevins, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is well known for its contributions to large ascent propulsion systems such as the Saturn V rocket and the Space Shuttle external tank, solid rocket boosters, and main engines. This paper highlights a lesser known but very rich side of MSFC-its heritage in the development of in-space chemical propulsion systems and its current capabilities for spacecraft propulsion system development and chemical propulsion research. The historical narrative describes the flight development activities associated with upper stage main propulsion systems such as the Saturn S-IVB as well as orbital maneuvering and reaction control systems such as the S-IVB auxiliary propulsion system, the Skylab thruster attitude control system, and many more recent activities such as Chandra, the Demonstration of Automated Rendezvous Technology (DART), X-37, the X-38 de-orbit propulsion system, the Interim Control Module, the US Propulsion Module, and multiple technology development activities. This paper also highlights MSFC s advanced chemical propulsion research capabilities, including an overview of the center s Propulsion Systems Department and ongoing activities. The authors highlight near-term and long-term technology challenges to which MSFC research and system development competencies are relevant. This paper concludes by assessing the value of the full range of aforementioned activities, strengths, and capabilities in light of NASA s exploration missions.

  7. A constrained approach to multiscale stochastic simulation of chemically reacting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotter, Simon L.; Zygalakis, Konstantinos C.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Erban, Radek

    2011-09-01

    Stochastic simulation of coupled chemical reactions is often computationally intensive, especially if a chemical system contains reactions occurring on different time scales. In this paper, we introduce a multiscale methodology suitable to address this problem, assuming that the evolution of the slow species in the system is well approximated by a Langevin process. It is based on the conditional stochastic simulation algorithm (CSSA) which samples from the conditional distribution of the suitably defined fast variables, given values for the slow variables. In the constrained multiscale algorithm (CMA) a single realization of the CSSA is then used for each value of the slow variable to approximate the effective drift and diffusion terms, in a similar manner to the constrained mean-force computations in other applications such as molecular dynamics. We then show how using the ensuing Fokker-Planck equation approximation, we can in turn approximate average switching times in stochastic chemical systems.

  8. Nonequilibrium thermodynamic formalism of nonlinear chemical reaction systems with Waage-Guldberg's law of mass action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Macroscopic entropy production rate σ (tot) in the general nonlinear isothermal chemical reaction system with mass action kinetics is decomposed into a free energy dissipation rate and a house-keeping heat dissipation rate: σ (tot) =σ (fd) +σ (hk) ; σ (fd) = -d A /d t , where A is a generalized free energy function. This yields a novel nonequilibrium free energy balance equation d A /d t = -σ (tot) +σ (hk) , which is on a par with celebrated entropy balance equation d S /d t =σ (tot) +η (ex) where η (ex) is the rate of entropy exchange with the environment. For kinetic systems with complex balance, σ (fd) and σ (hk) are the macroscopic limits of stochastic free energy dissipation rate and house-keeping heat dissipation rate, which are both nonnegative, in the Delbrück-Gillespie description of the stochastic chemical kinetics. A full kinetic and thermodynamic theory of chemical reaction systems that transcends mesoscopic and macroscopic levels emerges.

  9. Chemical/hydrogen energy storage systems. Annual report, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The progress made in 1979 in the Chemical/Hydrogen Energy Storage Systems Program is described. The program is managed by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Division of Energy Storage Systems of the Department of Energy. The program consists of research and development activities in the areas of Hydrogen Production, Storage and Materials, End-Use Applications/Systems Studies, and in Chemical Heat Pumps. The report outlines the progress made by key industrial contractors such as General Electric in the development of SPE water electrolyzers; INCO in the studies of surface poisoning (and reactivation) of metal hydrides; and Air Products and Chemicals in the evaluation of hydrogen production at small hydropower sites. The BNL in-house supporting research, as well as that at universities and other national laboratories for which BNL has technical oversight, is also described.

  10. Competition between charge exchange and chemical reaction - The D2/+/ + H system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, R. K.; Cross, R. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Study of the special features of molecular charge exchange and its competition with chemical reaction in the case of the D2(+) + H system. The trajectory surface hopping (TSH) model proposed by Tully and Preston (1971) is used to study this competition for a number of reactions involving the above system. The diatomics-in-molecules zero-overlap approximation is used to calculate the three adiabatic surfaces - one triplet and two singlet - which are needed to describe this system. One of the significant results of this study is that the chemical reaction and charge exchange are strongly coupled. It is also found that the number of trajectories passing into the chemical regions of the three surfaces depends very strongly on the surface crossings.-

  11. Slurry-Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Semelsberger, Troy; Simmons, Kevin L.; Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2014-05-30

    In this paper, the system designs for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen materials in an 80 kWe fuel cell, light-duty vehicle are described. Ammonia borane and alane are used for these designs to represent the general classes of exothermic and endothermic materials. The designs are then compared to the USDRIVE/DOE developed set of system level targets for on-board storage. While most of the DOE targets are predicted to be achieved based on the modeling, the system gravimetric and volumetric densities were more challenging and became the focus of this work. The resulting system evaluation determined that the slurry is majority of the system mass. Only modest reductions in the system mass can be expected with improvements in the balance of plant components. Most of the gravimetric improvements will require developing materials with higher inherent storage capacity or by increasing the solids loading of the chemical hydrogen storage material in the slurry.

  12. Slurry-based chemical hydrogen storage systems for automotive fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Semelsberger, Troy A.; Simmons, Kevin L.; van Hassel, Bart

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the system designs for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen materials in an 80-kWe fuel cell, light-duty vehicle are described. Ammonia borane and alane are used for these designs to represent the general classes of exothermic and endothermic materials. The designs are then compared to the USDRIVE/DOE-developed set of system-level targets for onboard storage. While most DOE targets are predicted to be achieved based on the modeling, the system gravimetric and volumetric densities were more challenging and became the focus of this work. The resulting system evaluation determined that the slurry accounts for the majority of the system mass. Only modest reductions in the system mass can be expected with improvements in the balance-of-plant components. Most of the gravimetric improvements will require developing materials with higher inherent storage capacity or by increasing the solids loading of the chemical hydrogen storage material in the slurry.

  13. Biodegradation of organic chemicals in soil/water microcosms system: Model development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, L.; Tindall, J.A.; Friedel, M.J.; Zhang, W.

    2007-01-01

    The chemical interactions of hydrophobic organic contaminants with soils and sediments may result in strong binding and slow subsequent release rates that significantly affect remediation rates and endpoints. In order to illustrate the recalcitrance of chemical to degradation on sites, a sorption mechanism of intraparticle sequestration was postulated to operate on chemical remediation sites. Pseudo-first order sequestration kinetics is used in the study with the hypothesis that sequestration is an irreversibly surface-mediated process. A mathematical model based on mass balance equations was developed to describe the fate of chemical degradation in soil/water microcosm systems. In the model, diffusion was represented by Fick's second law, local sorption-desorption by a linear isotherm, irreversible sequestration by a pseudo-first order kinetics and biodegradation by Monod kinetics. Solutions were obtained to provide estimates of chemical concentrations. The mathematical model was applied to a benzene biodegradation batch test and simulated model responses correlated well compared to measurements of biodegradation of benzene in the batch soil/water microcosm system. A sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the effects of several parameters on model behavior. Overall chemical removal rate decreased and sequestration increased quickly with an increase in the sorption partition coefficient. When soil particle radius, a, was greater than 1 mm, an increase in radius produced a significant decrease in overall chemical removal rate as well as an increase in sequestration. However, when soil particle radius was less than 0.1 mm, an increase in radius resulted in small changes in the removal rate and sequestration. As pseudo-first order sequestration rate increased, both chemical removal rate and sequestration increased slightly. Model simulation results showed that desorption resistance played an important role in the bioavailability of organic chemicals in porous

  14. Effect of water treatment chemicals on limestone/sulfur dioxide reaction in flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dille, E.R.; Gaikwad, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    A simple laboratory test has been developed which simulates the reaction between limestone/water and sulfur dioxide in flue gas desulfurization systems. By adding various chemicals, in differing concentrations, to the limestone/water mixture, the quantitative impact on the sulfur dioxide/limestone reaction can be qualified and quantified. This paper will present the impact of several water treatment chemicals on the reaction of limestone and sulfur dioxide. An attempt has been made to predict the effect through mathematical correlations. All of the additive chemicals tend to decrease the rate of dissolution of limestone to various degrees. Some of the chemicals retard crystal growth thus adversely impacting solids separation in the thickener. The physical appearance of the crystal growth retarded limestone absorber slurry approaches a colloidal suspension.

  15. Chemical equilibrium. [maximizing entropy of gas system to derive relations between thermodynamic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The entropy of a gas system with the number of particles subject to external control is maximized to derive relations between the thermodynamic variables that obtain at equilibrium. These relations are described in terms of the chemical potential, defined as equivalent partial derivatives of entropy, energy, enthalpy, free energy, or free enthalpy. At equilibrium, the change in total chemical potential must vanish. This fact is used to derive the equilibrium constants for chemical reactions in terms of the partition functions of the species involved in the reaction. Thus the equilibrium constants can be determined accurately, just as other thermodynamic properties, from a knowledge of the energy levels and degeneracies for the gas species involved. These equilibrium constants permit one to calculate the equilibrium concentrations or partial pressures of chemically reacting species that occur in gas mixtures at any given condition of pressure and temperature or volume and temperature.

  16. Spacecraft Chemical Propulsion Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center: Heritage and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McRight, Patrick S.; Sheehy, Jeffrey A.; Blevins, John A.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is well known for its contributions to large ascent propulsion systems such as the Saturn V and the Space Shuttle. This paper highlights a lesser known but equally rich side of MSFC - its heritage in spacecraft chemical propulsion systems and its current capabilities for in-space propulsion system development and chemical propulsion research. The historical narrative describes the efforts associated with developing upper-stage main propulsion systems such as the Saturn S-IVB as well as orbital maneuvering and reaction control systems such as the S-IVB auxiliary propulsion system, the Skylab thruster attitude control system, and many more recent activities such as Chandra, the Demonstration of Automated Rendezvous Technology, X-37, the X-38 de-orbit propulsion system, the Interim Control Module, the US Propulsion Module, and several technology development activities. Also discussed are MSFC chemical propulsion research capabilities, along with near- and long-term technology challenges to which MSFC research and system development competencies are relevant.

  17. Systems Toxicology of Male Reproductive Development: Profiling 774 Chemicals for Molecular Targets and Adverse Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Maxwell C.K.; Phuong, Jimmy; Baker, Nancy C.; Sipes, Nisha S.; Klinefelter, Gary R.; Martin, Matthew T.; McLaurin, Keith W.; Setzer, R. Woodrow; Darney, Sally Perreault; Judson, Richard S.; Knudsen, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Trends in male reproductive health have been reported for increased rates of testicular germ cell tumors, low semen quality, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias, which have been associated with prenatal environmental chemical exposure based on human and animal studies. Objective: In the present study we aimed to identify significant correlations between environmental chemicals, molecular targets, and adverse outcomes across a broad chemical landscape with emphasis on developmental toxicity of the male reproductive system. Methods: We used U.S. EPA’s animal study database (ToxRefDB) and a comprehensive literature analysis to identify 774 chemicals that have been evaluated for adverse effects on male reproductive parameters, and then used U.S. EPA’s in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) database (ToxCastDB) to profile their bioactivity across approximately 800 molecular and cellular features. Results: A phenotypic hierarchy of testicular atrophy, sperm effects, tumors, and malformations, a composite resembling the human testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) hypothesis, was observed in 281 chemicals. A subset of 54 chemicals with male developmental consequences had in vitro bioactivity on molecular targets that could be condensed into 156 gene annotations in a bipartite network. Conclusion: Computational modeling of available in vivo and in vitro data for chemicals that produce adverse effects on male reproductive end points revealed a phenotypic hierarchy across animal studies consistent with the human TDS hypothesis. We confirmed the known role of estrogen and androgen signaling pathways in rodent TDS, and importantly, broadened the list of molecular targets to include retinoic acid signaling, vascular remodeling proteins, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and cytochrome P450s. Citation: Leung MC, Phuong J, Baker NC, Sipes NS, Klinefelter GR, Martin MT, McLaurin KW, Setzer RW, Darney SP, Judson RS, Knudsen TB. 2016. Systems toxicology of male

  18. Reconstitution of a chemical defense signaling pathway in a heterologous system.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Staci A Padove; Hatt, Hanns; Kubanek, Julia; McCarty, Nael A

    2008-02-01

    Chemical signaling plays an important role in ecological interactions, such as communication and predator-prey dynamics. Since sessile species cannot physically escape predators, many contain compounds that deter predation; however, it is largely unknown how predators physiologically detect deterrent chemicals. Few studies have investigated ecologically relevant aversive taste responses in any predator. Our objective was to determine if a signaling pathway for detecting marine sponge-derived deterrent compounds could be reconstituted in a heterologous expression system to ultimately facilitate investigation of the molecular mechanism of such an aversive behavioral response. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) rejected artificial diets laced with sponge chemical defense compounds that were previously shown to deter a generalist marine predator, Thalassoma bifasciatum, suggesting that zebrafish can recognize deterrent compounds relevant to coral reef systems. Transcripts made from a zebrafish cDNA library were expressed in a heterologous system, Xenopus laevis oocytes, and tested for chemoreceptor activation via electrophysiology, using the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) as a reporter. Oocytes expressing gene sequences from the library and CFTR exhibited a CFTR-like electrophysiological response to formoside and ectyoplasides A and B, sponge defense compounds. Therefore, the chemical defense-activated signaling pathway can be reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes. Kinetics of the responses suggested that the responses to formoside and ectyoplasides A and B were receptor-mediated and capable of using the G(alphas) signaling pathway in this system. This bioassay has the potential to lead to the identification of genes that encode receptors capable of interacting with deterrent chemicals, which would enable understanding of predator detection of chemical defenses. PMID:18245637

  19. A Fibre-Optic Based System For Chemical In Vivo Mapping Of The Human Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hougham, B.; Brown, R. S.; Krull, U. J.

    1987-01-01

    In vivo chemical mapping of the human body could be very useful in the treatment of patients undergoing surgery such as heart surgery, with acute conditions such as hepatitis, or chronic conditions such as diabetes. Chemical mapping would be a continuous analytical profile of physical parameters such as blood pressure, chemical parameters such as pH, pCO2 and p02, simple molecules such as glucose and large biomolecules such as serum glutamate-oxoloacetate trans-aminase (SGOT), serum glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) and billirubin. The advantage of a particular mapping strategy employing fibre-optic sensors is that all these different chemical signals arriving from different sensors can be multiplexed and detected concurrently. Although physical sensors for parameters such as temperature, pressure and blood viscosity have not yet found their way into routine use, those which employ fibre-optics do already exist. Fibre-optic chemical sensors (FOCS) have been developed for pH, pCO2, p02 and 3lucose (for review see Ref. 1). The existing FOCS utilize absorption, reflectance and fluorescence spectro-photometry. An integrated system for chemical mapping could utilize FOCS which exclusively use fluorescence probes which have a high signal to noise ratio and are sensitive to trace amounts of chemicals and biochemicals. One proposed strategy for detecting physiological analytes is the use of fluorescently labelled immunochemicals. These are useful in that the antibodies can be tailored to selectively bind almost any antigen conceivable (2) but are limited in that these reactions are mainly irreversible which is an important consideration for in vivo probes. A second strategy proposed is a receptor-based system (3). While agonist-receptor systems are slightly less selective than antigen-antibody systems, these reactions are reversible which is an important consideration for in vivo probes. Using existing FOCS and a new family of fluorescent chemical sensors that use

  20. The expert system for toxicity prediction of chemicals based on structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed Central

    Nakadate, M; Hayashi, M; Sofuni, T; Kamata, E; Aida, Y; Osada, T; Ishibe, T; Sakamura, Y; Ishidate, M

    1991-01-01

    The prediction systems of chemical toxicity has been developed by means of structure-activity relationship based on the computerized fact database (BL-DB). Numbers and ratio of elements, side chains, bonding, position, and microenvironment of side chains were used as structural factors of the chemical for the prediction. Such information was obtained from the BL-DB database by Wiswesser line-formula chemical notation. In the present study, the Salmonella/microsome assay was chosen as indicative of the target toxicity of chemicals. A set of chemicals specified with mutagenicity data was retrieved, and necessary information was extracted and transferred to the working file. Rules of the relations between characteristics of chemical structure and the assay result are extracted as parameters for rules by experts on the rearranged data set. These were analyzed statistically by the discriminant analysis and the prediction with the rules were evaluated by the elimination method. Eight kinds of rules to predict Salmonella/microsome assay were constructed, and currently results of the assay on aliphatic and heterocyclic compounds can be predicted as accurately as +90%. PMID:1820282

  1. Recent advances in microbial production of fuels and chemicals using tools and strategies of systems metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Cho, Changhee; Choi, So Young; Luo, Zi Wei; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-11-15

    The advent of various systems metabolic engineering tools and strategies has enabled more sophisticated engineering of microorganisms for the production of industrially useful fuels and chemicals. Advances in systems metabolic engineering have been made in overproducing natural chemicals and producing novel non-natural chemicals. In this paper, we review the tools and strategies of systems metabolic engineering employed for the development of microorganisms for the production of various industrially useful chemicals belonging to fuels, building block chemicals, and specialty chemicals, in particular focusing on those reported in the last three years. It was aimed at providing the current landscape of systems metabolic engineering and suggesting directions to address future challenges towards successfully establishing processes for the bio-based production of fuels and chemicals from renewable resources. PMID:25450194

  2. REBURNING THERMAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN A TWO-DIMENSIONAL PILOT-SCALE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes an experimental investigation of the thermal and chemical processes influencing NOx reduction by natural gas reburning in a two-dimensional pilot-scale combustion system. Reburning effectiveness for initial NOx levels of 50-500 ppm and reburn stoichiometric ra...

  3. Chemical migration by contact metamorphism between granite and silt/carbonate system

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Papike, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    Comparison of trace element signatures between the metamorphosed and unmetamorphosed samples from granite-silt/carbonate system suggests that some elements do migrate during contact metamorphism. The relative degree of migration varies depending on the element. The evidence of chemical migration in silt and carbonate is convincing on a several-meter scale.

  4. ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL EFFECTS ON NEURONAL DIFFERENTIATION USING THE ARRAYSCAN HIGH CONTENT SCREENING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of alternative methods for toxicity testing is driven by the need for scientifically valid data that can be obtained in a rapid and cost-efficient manner. In vitro systems provide a model in which chemical effects on cellular events can be examined using technique...

  5. Silica Retention and Enrichment in Open-System Chemical Weathering on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, A. S.; Ming, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Clark, B. C.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Thompson, L. M.; Berger, J.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical signatures of weathering are evident in the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) datasets from Gusev Crater, Meridiani Planum, and Gale Crater. Comparisons across the landing sites show consistent patterns indicating silica retention and/or enrichment in open-system aqueous alteration.

  6. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: X*TRAX MODEL 200 THERMAL DESORPTION SYSTEMS - CHEMICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The X*TRAX™ Mode! 200 Thermal Desorption System developed by Chemical Waste Management, Inc. (CWM), is a low-temperature process designed to separate organic contaminants from soils, sludges, and other solid media. The X*TRAX™ Model 200 is fully transportable and consists of thre...

  7. Chemical Transformation System: Cloud Based Cheminformatic Services to Support Integrated Environmental Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM) systems that account for the fate/transport of organics frequently require physicochemical properties as well as transformation products. A myriad of chemical property databases exist but these can be difficult to access and often do not co...

  8. A line-scan hyperspectral system for high-throughput Raman chemical imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A line-scan hyperspectral system was developed to enable Raman chemical imaging for large sample areas. A custom-designed 785 nm line-laser, based on a scanning mirror, serves as an excitation source. A 45° dichroic beamsplitter reflects the laser light to form a 24 cm × 1 mm excitation line normall...

  9. Electronic Structure of Pi Systems: Part III--Applications in Spectroscopy and Chemical Reactivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Marye Anne; Matsen, F. A.

    1985-01-01

    Shows that electronic structure diagrams make more accurate predictions of spectral properties and chemical reactivity for simple pi systems than do either Huckel molecular orbital or valence bond theory alone. Topics addressed include absorption and photoelectron spectra, spin density distribution in radicals, and several problems regarding…

  10. Proceedings of the DOE chemical/hydrogen energy contractor review systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Chemical/hydrogen energy system contracts were reviewed. The review served as an effective means to (1) give all contracts an insight into the background and objectives of thirty-nine hydrogen-related tasks, (2) show the status of the studies or technical effort, (3) relate any problems that had impeded the progress, and (4) state projected solutions for resolving the identified problems.

  11. 78 FR 5794 - Occidental Chemical Corporation v. Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator, Inc.; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Occidental Chemical Corporation v. Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator, Inc.; Notice of Complaint and Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice that on January 17, 2013, pursuant to section 206 and 306...

  12. Flow Injection Analysis and Liquid Chromatography for Multifunctional Chemical Analysis (MCA) Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ana V.; Loegel, Thomas N.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Danielson, Neil D.

    2013-01-01

    The large class sizes of first-year chemistry labs makes it challenging to provide students with hands-on access to instrumentation because the number of students typically far exceeds the number of research-grade instruments available to collect data. Multifunctional chemical analysis (MCA) systems provide a viable alternative for large-scale…

  13. The mass balance approach: application to interpreting the chemical evolution of hydrologic systems.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L.N.; Back, W.

    1980-01-01

    Mass balance calculations are applied to observed chemical and isotopic data of three natural water systems involving carbonate reactions in order to define mineral stoichiometry of reactants and products, relative rates of reactions, and mass transfer. One study evaluates reactions in a lagoon on the east coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.- from Authors

  14. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE CHEMICAL EFFECTS IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS (CEBS) TOXICOGENOMICS KNOWLEDGE BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conceptual Framework for the Chemical Effects in Biological Systems (CEBS) T oxicogenomics Knowledge Base

    Abstract
    Toxicogenomics studies how the genome is involved in responses to environmental stressors or toxicants. It combines genetics, genome-scale mRNA expressio...

  15. APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE REACTOR SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report details the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation of Eco Logic International's gas-phase chemical reduction process, with an emphasis on their Reactor System. he Eco Logic process employees a high temperature reactor filled with hydrogen gas as the means to destr...

  16. Distribution of chemical and microbial pesticides delivered through drip irrigation systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientific information is needed on distribution uniformity and mobility of environmental-friendly pest control agents through drip irrigation system and in the soil to help improve soil insect control efficiency. The uniformity and recovery rate of water soluble and insoluble materials of chemical ...

  17. EVALUATION OF REAL-TIME INNOVATIVE BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL MONITORING SYSTEMS TO PROTECT SOURCE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of Real-Time Innovative Biological and Chemical Monitoring Systems
    To Protect Source Waters

    Drinking water supplies have in recent years come under increasing pressure from regulatory concerns regarding TMDL designations and restoration strategies as well ...

  18. Quantum chemical methods for the investigation of photoinitiated processes in biological systems: theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Dreuw, Andreas

    2006-11-13

    With the advent of modern computers and advances in the development of efficient quantum chemical computer codes, the meaningful computation of large molecular systems at a quantum mechanical level became feasible. Recent experimental effort to understand photoinitiated processes in biological systems, for instance photosynthesis or vision, at a molecular level also triggered theoretical investigations in this field. In this Minireview, standard quantum chemical methods are presented that are applicable and recently used for the calculation of excited states of photoinitiated processes in biological molecular systems. These methods comprise configuration interaction singles, the complete active space self-consistent field method, and time-dependent density functional theory and its variants. Semiempirical approaches are also covered. Their basic theoretical concepts and mathematical equations are briefly outlined, and their properties and limitations are discussed. Recent successful applications of the methods to photoinitiated processes in biological systems are described and theoretical tools for the analysis of excited states are presented. PMID:17009357

  19. Microcavity array plasma system for remote chemical processing at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Sung; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Sakai, Osamu; Park, Sung-Jin; Eden, J. Gary

    2012-06-01

    A microplasma system designed for chemical processing at atmospheric pressure is fabricated and characterized with flowing He/O2 gas mixtures. At the heart of this microcavity dielectric barrier discharge (MDBD) system are two arrays of half-ellipsoidal microcavities engraved by micropowder blasting into dielectric surfaces facing a flowing, low-temperature plasma. Experiments demonstrate that the ignition voltage is reduced, and the spatially averaged optical emission is doubled, for an MDBD flowing plasma array relative to an equivalent system having no microcavities. As an example of the potential of flowing atmospheric microplasma systems for chemical processing, the decomposition of methylene blue (as evidenced by decoloration at 650.2 nm) is shown to proceed at a rate as much as a factor of two greater than that for a non-microcavity equivalent.

  20. DAWN (Design Assistant Workstation) for advanced physical-chemical life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudokas, Mary R.; Cantwell, Elizabeth R.; Robinson, Peter I.; Shenk, Timothy W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a project supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (NASA-OAST) under the Advanced Life Support Development Program. It is an initial attempt to integrate artificial intelligence techniques (via expert systems) with conventional quantitative modeling tools for advanced physical-chemical life support systems. The addition of artificial intelligence techniques will assist the designer in the definition and simulation of loosely/well-defined life support processes/problems as well as assist in the capture of design knowledge, both quantitative and qualitative. Expert system and conventional modeling tools are integrated to provide a design workstation that assists the engineer/scientist in creating, evaluating, documenting and optimizing physical-chemical life support systems for short-term and extended duration missions.

  1. COMBINED USE OF A WATER-INSOLUBLE CHEMICAL DELIVERY SYSTEM AND A METABOLIC ACTIVATION SYSTEM IN WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated water insoluble chemical delivery/metabolic activation/rat embryo culture system is described. In initial studies corn oil was used as the solvent and diallate as the substrate. Increasing concentrations of diallate dissolved in corn oil caused embryonic growth reta...

  2. Optical methods for creating delivery systems of chemical compounds to plant roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Pavel E.; Rogacheva, Svetlana M.; Arefeva, Oksana A.; Minin, Dmitryi V.; Tolmachev, Sergey A.; Kupadze, Machammad S.

    2004-08-01

    Spectrophotometric and fluorescence methods have been used for creation and investigation of various systems of target delivery of chemical compounds to roots of plants. The possibility of using liposomes, incrusted by polysaccharides of the external surface of nitrogen-fixing rizospheric bacteria Azospirillum brasilense SP 245, and nanoparticles incrusted by polysaccharides of wheat roots, as the named systems has been shown. The important role of polysaccharide-polysaccharide interaction in the adsorption processes of bacteria on wheat roots has been demonstrated.

  3. A Novel Water Delivery System for Administering Volatile Chemicals while Minimizing Chemical Waste in Rodent Toxicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent toxicity studies typically use water bottles to administer test chemicals via drinking water. However, water bottles provide inconsistent exposure of volatile chemicals due to varying headspace, as well as lead to excessive waste of test material. In order to refine drin...

  4. A novel water delivery system for administering volatile chemicals while minimizing chemical waste in rodent toxicity sutdies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent toxicity studies typically use water bottles to administer test chemicals via drinking water. However, water bottles provide inconsistent exposure of volatile chemicals due to varying headspace, as well as lead to excessive waste of test material. In order to refine drinki...

  5. Problems in the development of autonomous mobile laser systems based on a cw chemical DF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, B P; Bashkin, A S; Beznozdrev, V N; Parfen'ev, M V; Pirogov, N A; Semenov, S N

    2003-01-31

    The problems involved in designing autonomous mobile laser systems based on high-power cw chemical DF lasers, whose mass and size parameters would make it possible to install them on various vehicles, are discussed. The need for mobility of such lasers necessitates special attention to be paid to the quest for ways and means of reducing the mass and size of the main laser systems. The optimisation of the parameters of such lasers is studied for various methods of scaling their systems. A complex approach to analysis of the optical scheme of the laser system is developed. (special issue devoted to the 80th anniversary of academician n g basov's birth)

  6. Chemical effects in ion mixing of a ternary system (metal-SiO2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banwell, T.; Nicolet, M.-A.; Sands, T.; Grunthaner, P. J.

    1987-01-01

    The mixing of Ti, Cr, and Ni thin films with SiO2 by low-temperature (- 196-25 C) irradiation with 290 keV Xe has been investigated. Comparison of the morphology of the intermixed region and the dose dependences of net metal transport into SiO2 reveals that long range motion and phase formation probably occur as separate and sequential processes. Kinetic limitations suppress chemical effects in these systems during the initial transport process. Chemical interactions influence the subsequent phase formation.

  7. Final Report: Technical Support for Innovative Energy Systems the U.S. Chemical Industry -- Innovative Energy Systems Pilot Project - Chemicals Project Integrator

    SciTech Connect

    John Cuttica - Principal Investigator; Dr Steffen Mueller - Lead Engineer

    2008-10-30

    The University of Illinois at Chicago Energy Resources Center (UIC/ERC) was originally selected to carry out the role of project integrator for a planned solicitation calling for proposals for innovative concepts for energy efficient systems in the chemical industry. The selection was made as a result of a DOE Announcement of Funding Opportunity issued by the DOE Golden Field Office. The U.S. DOE, due to funding constraints, decided to change the role of project integrator into one of technical support to DOE and the Vision 2020 Steering Committee in carrying out the oversight and management of the projects selected from the planned innovative concepts solicitation. This project, initiated in April, 2005, was established to provide that technical support to the U.S. DOE Innovative Energy Systems Pilot Project for the US Chemical Industry. In the late summer of 2006, and as a continuation of the baseline technology analysis conducted by UIC/ERC under this project, DOE requested that UIC/ERC assist in the development of “technology briefs” in support of the DOE Save Energy Now program. The 100 technology briefs developed under this contract were utilized by the Energy Experts as part of their Energy Saving Assessments (ESA).

  8. CHAWS (Chemical Hazard Warning System) user's guide: System description and standard operating procedures, Lexington-Blue Grass Army Depot

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, J.H.; Novo, M.G.

    1988-03-01

    The Chemical HAzard Warning System (CHAWS) has been designed to collect meteorological data and to display, in real time, hazardous chemical dispersion as a result of an accidental release. Meteorological sensors are placed strategically around each installation and are used to calculate direction and hazard distance for the release. These data are then graphically displayed on a computer screen showing a site map and arrows depicting the release direction and distance traveled. A regular workday at a Chemical Hazard Warning System (CHAWS) site consists of many activities. This chapter gives a brief overview of what is necessary to run the system on a daily basis. Other chapters of this manual present more details of the hardware and software found at the CHAWS sites so that troubleshooting and maintenance can be performed on the system. Also, manuals have been provided for the hardware manufactured by HANDAR and the computer companies. This manual is meant to serve as a supplement to those hardware manuals. Personnel operating the CHAWS system should be familiar with the MS-DOS system.

  9. Chemical sensing system for classification of mine-like objects by explosives detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, W.B.; Rodacy, P.J.; Jones, E.E.; Gomez, B.J.; Woodfin, R.L.

    1998-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has conducted research in chemical sensing and analysis of explosives for many years. Recently, that experience has been directed towards detecting mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) by sensing the low-level explosive signatures associated with these objects. The authors focus has been on the classification of UXO in shallow water and anti-personnel/anti tank mines on land. The objective of this work is to develop a field portable chemical sensing system which can be used to examine mine-like objects (MLO) to determine whether there are explosive molecules associated with the MLO. Two sampling subsystems have been designed, one for water collection and one for soil/vapor sampling. The water sampler utilizes a flow-through chemical adsorbent canister to extract and concentrate the explosive molecules. Explosive molecules are thermally desorbed from the concentrator and trapped in a focusing stage for rapid desorption into an ion-mobility spectrometer (IMS). The authors describe a prototype system which consists of a sampler, concentrator-focuser, and detector. The soil sampler employs a light-weight probe for extracting and concentrating explosive vapor from the soil in the vicinity of an MLO. The chemical sensing system is capable of sub-part-per-billion detection of TNT and related explosive munition compounds. They present the results of field and laboratory tests on buried landmines which demonstrate their ability to detect the explosive signatures associated with these objects.

  10. METHODOLOGY FOR EXAMINING SYSTEM AGING DUE TO INTERACTIONS BETWEEN CHEMICALLY INCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    J. DENINGER; J. TANSKI

    1999-04-01

    We start with a stored and unused population of fielded engineered units that are composed of chemically incompatible materials. The units age primarily through heterogeneous chemical reactions between the materials resulting in possible degradation in performance. The engineered units are unused in storage, but may be called into actual service at any time. We sample several units from the population per year and perform a number of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, such as radiography, low-frequency vibration analysis, and ultrasonic imaging on the selected units. From those units, some are selected for destructive testing (D-test) involving disassembly and testing of internal parts and components. Chemical analyses, mechanical properties measurements and other tests are performed. All of the above steps provide information that is used in the system simulation mathematical model. The system simulation model incorporates chemical reactions and gas-solid transport processes, along with changes in both the surface and bulk properties of the solids. Model results are used to suggest improvements in NDE analyses of the units and improvements in component and material analyses. Model results give trending indications of individual component and overall system changes over time, plus some understanding of the mechanisms involved which allow science-based predictions of the aged state of the units in future times. The NDE, D-test, and model results can also be used to assess statistically the reliability and performance of the overall aging population of units.

  11. Chemical sensing system for classification of minelike objects by explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, William B.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Jones, Edwin E.; Gomez, Bernard J.; Woodfin, Ronald L.

    1998-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has conducted research in chemical sensing and analysis of explosives for many years. Recently, that experience has been directed towards detecting mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) by sensing the low-level explosive signatures associated with these objects. Our focus has been on the classification of UXO in shallow water and anti-personnel/anti tank mines on land. The objective of this work is to develop a field portable chemical sensing system which can be used to examine mine-like objects (MLO) to determine whether there are explosive molecules associated with the MLO. Two sampling subsystems have been designed, one for water collection and one for soil/vapor sampling. The water sampler utilizes a flow-through chemical adsorbent canister to extract and concentrate the explosive molecules. Explosive molecules are thermally desorbed from the concentrator and trapped in a focusing stage for rapid desorption into an ion-mobility spectrometer (IMS). We will describe a prototype system which consists of a sampler, concentrator-focuser, and detector. The soil sampler employs a light-weight probe for extracting and concentrating explosive vapor from the soil in the vicinity of an MLO. The chemical sensing system is capable of sub-part-per-billion detection of TNT and related explosive munition compounds. We will present the results of field and laboratory tests on buried landmines, which demonstrate our ability to detect the explosive signatures associated with these objects.

  12. Entropy production in a mesoscopic chemical reaction system with oscillatory and excitable dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ting; Xiao, Tiejun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2011-06-01

    Stochastic thermodynamics of chemical reaction systems has recently gained much attention. In the present paper, we consider such an issue for a system with both oscillatory and excitable dynamics, using catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide on the surface of platinum crystal as an example. Starting from the chemical Langevin equations, we are able to calculate the stochastic entropy production P along a random trajectory in the concentration state space. Particular attention is paid to the dependence of the time-averaged entropy production P on the system size N in a parameter region close to the deterministic Hopf bifurcation (HB). In the large system size (weak noise) limit, we find that P ˜ Nβ with β = 0 or 1, when the system is below or above the HB, respectively. In the small system size (strong noise) limit, P always increases linearly with N regardless of the bifurcation parameter. More interestingly, P could even reach a maximum for some intermediate system size in a parameter region where the corresponding deterministic system shows steady state or small amplitude oscillation. The maximum value of P decreases as the system parameter approaches the so-called CANARD point where the maximum disappears. This phenomenon could be qualitatively understood by partitioning the total entropy production into the contributions of spikes and of small amplitude oscillations.

  13. Research on the chemical mechanism in the polyacrylate latex modified cement system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Min; Wang, Rumin; Zheng, Shuirong; Farhan, Shameel; Yao, Hao; Jiang, Hao

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the chemical mechanism in the polyacrylate latex modified cement system was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and compact pH meter. All results have shown that the chemical reactions in the polyacrylate modified system can be divided into three stages. The hydration reactions of cement can produce large amounts of Ca(OH){sub 2} (calcium hydroxide) and lead the whole system to be alkali-rich and exothermic at the first stage. Subsequently, this environment can do great contributions to the hydrolysis of ester groups in the polyacrylate chains, resulting in the formation of carboxyl groups at the second stage. At the third stage, the final crosslinked network structure of the product was obtained by the reaction between the carboxyl groups in the polyacrylate latex chains and Ca(OH){sub 2}.

  14. Impact of solar system exploration on theories of chemical evolution and the origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincenzi, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The impact of solar system exploration on theories regarding chemical evolution and the origin of life is examined in detail. Major findings from missions to Mercury, Venus, the moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan are reviewed and implications for prebiotic chemistry are discussed. Among the major conclusions are: prebiotic chemistry is widespread throughout the solar system and universe; chemical evolution and the origin of life are intimately associated with the origin and evolution of the solar system; the rate, direction, and extent of prebiotic chemistry is highly dependent upon planetary characteristics; and continued exploration will increase understanding of how life originated on earth and allow better estimates of the likelihood of similar processes occurring elsewhere.

  15. Modeling Chemical Detection Sensitivities of Active and Passive Remote Sensing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlemann, E T

    2003-07-28

    During nearly a decade of remote sensing programs under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), LLNL has developed a set of performance modeling codes--called APRS--for both Active and Passive Remote Sensing systems. These codes emphasize chemical detection sensitivity in the form of minimum detectable quantities with and without background spectral clutter and in the possible presence of other interfering chemicals. The codes have been benchmarked against data acquired in both active and passive remote sensing programs at LLNL and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The codes include, as an integral part of the performance modeling, many of the data analysis techniques developed in the DOE's active and passive remote sensing programs (e.g., ''band normalization'' for an active system, principal component analysis for a passive system).

  16. Magneto-Chemical Systems Under Strong Magnetic Fields:. Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Yamamoto, I.

    2005-07-01

    Magnetic field-induced effects were investigated for two extreme cases of strongly ferromagnetic and weakly diamagnetic chemical systems. The thermodynamic quantities of a chemical reaction were changed by applied magnetic fields. The magnetic effects were systematically formulated as the magneto-thermodynamic effects and experimentally verified by applying fields of 10-30 T to a ferromagnetic system. Agarose gels, as weakly diamagnetic systems, were magnetically aligned by fields of 2 - 10 T. This magnetic alignment was confirmed by optical measurements. The magnetically aligned agarose gel was used as the matrix for DNA electrophoresis. The electrophoretic velocity of DNA varied with the aligned or random structure of the matrix gel, as well as the structure of the DNA, itself. Utilizing the aligned gel provides a new method for separating DNAs at high resolutions.

  17. Neuropsychological evaluation for detecting alterations in the central nervous system after chemical exposure.

    PubMed

    Bolla, K I

    1996-08-01

    Individuals with multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) report decreased attention/concentration, memory loss, disorientation, confusion, fatigue, depression, irritability, decreased libido, sleep disturbances, headaches, and weakness. These neurobehavioral symptoms represent possible alterations in the central nervous system (CNS). The evaluation of neurobehavioral functioning using neuropsychological techniques provides an indirect method for determining the integrity of the CNS. However, caution must be used in interpreting neuropsychological test results, since this technique is extremely sensitive but is not specific. Clinically significant aberrant test performance may be noted after chemical exposure as well as with other diseases of the CNS. In addition, neuropsychiatric conditions such as anxiety and depression are often manifested as cognitive difficulties that are similar in pattern to the cognitive dysfunction caused by toxic chemicals. Herein, limitations and cautions in the interpretations of neuropsychological test results are discussed. PMID:8921555

  18. Integrated chemical and biological systems in nanowire structures towards nano-scale sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Rose M.

    Nanowires composed of metal and conducting polymers with integrated proteins and chemical systems have been investigated as building blocks for next-generation nano-scale sensors and assemblies. These nanowires were fabricated by combining chemical and electrochemical methods of synthesis of gold and conducting polymers in nanopores of anodized alumina membranes. Polymer nanowires were synthesized from buffer solutions as a mean to promote a biocompatible environment for the incorporation of proteins. A variety of proteins were incorporated into the polymer matrix by entrapment during polymerization that imparted the polymer material with biological functionality. Another class of composite nanowires containing electro-active conducting polymer junctions was developed for applications in chemical sensor arrays. The methodologies described in this thesis provide an inexpensive and straightforward approach to the synthesis of anisotropic nanoparticles incorporating a variety of biological and inorganic species that can be integrated to current microelectronic technologies for the development of nano-scale sensor arrays.

  19. [Globally harmonized system of classification and labelling of chemicals (GHS) and its implementation in Japan].

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Muneyuki

    2010-01-01

    The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) is a set of recommendations by the United Nations, first issued in 2003 as a communication tool for the sound management of chemicals, comprising harmonized classification criteria for physical, health and environmental hazards, a unified format for material safety data sheets (MSDS), and labeling elements including pictograms and hazard statements preassigned to each classification category. The GHS has been introduced into Japan and implemented in the regulatory framework for chemical safety. The Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS) adopted the GHS, and the GHS-based JIS rules have become the Japanese standards for labels and MSDS. The use of the JIS format for labels and MSDS is recommended by several competent authorities in Japan although mostly on a voluntary basis. In the workplace, however, GHS-based JIS labels and MSDS have become legal requirements by the Industrial Safety and Health Law since 2006; namely, issuing MSDS in such a format is mandatory for the 640 specified chemicals and also labeling for the 99 targeted chemicals*. Although the GHS provides definitions and classification criteria for 10 classes of health hazards (acute toxicity, skin and eye corrosion/irritation, sensitization, germ cell mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity, specific target organ toxicity single/repeated exposures, and aspiration hazard), it does not provide actual classification of chemicals, so that competent authorities and industries need to classify a number of chemicals and/or mixtures. Weight-of-evidence judgment and/or expert judgment would be necessary in many cases. In this paper, the outline of the GHS classification is described and problems of the GHS and its implementation are discussed. PMID:20134103

  20. In situ combined chemical and biological assessment of estrogenic pollution in a water recycling system.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yulang; Huang, Qiansheng; Zhang, Huanteng; Chen, Yajie; Dong, Sijun

    2016-05-01

    Estrogenic pollution and its control in aquatic systems have drawn substantial attention around the world. The chemical and biological assessment approaches currently utilized in the laboratory or field cannot give an integrated assessment of the pollution when used separately. In this study, in situ chemical and biological methods were combined to detect pollution in a water recycling system. Data for the water quality index (WQI) demonstrated that the water treatment resulted in the decline of pollution from upstream to downstream. Wild male Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, was sampled in June and September. The concentrations of four common endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) were determined in the tilapia liver by chromatographic analysis methods. The level of 17β-estradiol (E2) declined from upstream to downstream in both months. In contrast, the levels of bisphenol A (BPA), di-(2-ethylhcxyl) phthalate (DEHP), and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) did not display this declining tendency. The highest relative expression of vitellogenin 1 (VTG1) was observed in tilapia from upstream, then the level significantly decreased along the water system. The relative expression levels of CYP1A1 in the water system were also significantly higher than that of the control. However, no declining trend could be observed along the water system. The change of VTG1 expression corresponded well with that of E2 levels in the tilapia liver. Overall, our study assessed the pollution by endocrine disruptors using chemical and biological data with good correspondence. This study also demonstrated the effectiveness of the water recycling system in eliminating estrogen pollution in municipal sewage. PMID:27155427

  1. Affordable Launch Services using the Sport Orbit Transfer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    Despite many advances in small satellite technology, a low-cost, reliable method is needed to place spacecraft in their de- sired orbits. AeroAstro has developed the Small Payload ORbit Transfer (SPORTTM) system to provide a flexible low-cost orbit transfer capability, enabling small payloads to use low-cost secondary launch opportunities and still reach their desired final orbits. This capability allows small payloads to effectively use a wider variety of launch opportunities, including nu- merous under-utilized GTO slots. Its use, in conjunction with growing opportunities for secondary launches, enable in- creased access to space using proven technologies and highly reliable launch vehicles such as the Ariane family and the Starsem launcher. SPORT uses a suite of innovative technologies that are packaged in a simple, reliable, modular system. The command, control and data handling of SPORT is provided by the AeroAstro BitsyTM core electronics module. The Bitsy module also provides power regulation for the batteries and optional solar arrays. The primary orbital maneuvering capability is provided by a nitrous oxide monopropellant propulsion system. This system exploits the unique features of nitrous oxide, which in- clude self-pressurization, good performance, and safe handling, to provide a light-weight, low-cost and reliable propulsion capability. When transferring from a higher energy orbit to a lower energy orbit (i.e. GTO to LEO), SPORT uses aerobraking technol- ogy. After using the propulsion system to lower the orbit perigee, the aerobrake gradually slows SPORT via atmospheric drag. After the orbit apogee is reduced to the target level, an apogee burn raises the perigee and ends the aerobraking. At the conclusion of the orbit transfer maneuver, either the aerobrake or SPORT can be shed, as desired by the payload. SPORT uses a simple design for high reliability and a modular architecture for maximum mission flexibility. This paper will discuss the launch

  2. In vitro model systems for studying the impact of organic chemicals on the skin barrier lipids.

    PubMed

    Groen, Daniël; Berthaud, Fabienne; Bouwstra, Joke A; Chapuis, Christian; Gooris, Gert S; Boncheva, Mila

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes two synthetic lipid models designed to replace human stratum corneum (SC) in studies of the impact of volatile organic chemicals on the molecular organization of the skin barrier lipids. The models built upon previously developed self-assembled lipid membranes which have composition and 3D organization similar to those of the lipid matrix in SC. In one model the target chemicals were incorporated in the lipids before their self-assembly, and in the other one they were applied on top of a preformed lipid membrane. The chemicals could be incorporated within the model membranes in quantities close to those reached within human SC upon heavy surface loading. The dose-dependent effects of the chemicals on the lateral molecular organization in the models were qualitatively identical to those observed by infrared spectroscopy in human SC. The models facilitated the interpretation of X-ray diffraction profiles used to determine the nature of the interactions between the chemicals and the lipid lamellae and the position of the exogenous molecules within the unit cell of the lipid phases. These model systems are suitable for in vitro studies in the areas of skin biophysics, dermatology, transdermal drug delivery, and risk assessment. PMID:24125684

  3. Membrane filtration coupled with chemical precipitation to treat recirculating aquaculture system effluents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ling; Zhou, Hongde; Moccia, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Effluents from recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) contain high concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorous wastes and thus often require proper treatment to prevent potential detrimental impacts on receiving water bodies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of membrane filtration coupled with chemical precipitation as a pretreatment step with emphasis on phosphorus removal from RAS effluents. Chemical precipitation tests were conducted by adding magnesium chloride and alum at different chemical concentrations and pH values, respectively. Crossflow, flat-sheet membrane filtration modules were used to examine the effects of transmembrane pressure and crossflow velocity in terms of solid/liquid separation efficiency and permeate flux decline. The results showed that membrane filtration can effectively separate the phosphorus precipitates after chemical precipitation. The total phosphorus in the treated effluent was reduced to less than 0.05 mg L(-1) with a removal efficiency of more than 90%. However, much lower removal efficiencies were obtained for total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen, and turbidity. It was concluded that membrane filtration coupled with chemical precipitation can become an effective, compact treatment technology to meet the stringent regulatory requirements for RAS effluent discharge. PMID:17071913

  4. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Chemical and Isotopic Tracers for Characterization Of Groundwater Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J E; Singleton, M J; Carle, S F; Esser, B K

    2007-09-13

    In many regions, three dimensional characterization of the groundwater regime is limited by coarse well spacing or borehole lithologic logs of low quality. However, regulatory requirements for drinking water or site remediation may require collection of extensive chemical and water quality data from existing wells. Similarly, for wells installed in the distant past, lithologic logs may not be available, but the wells can be sampled for chemical and isotopic constituents. In these situations, a thorough analysis of trends in chemical and isotopic constituents can be a key component in characterizing the regional groundwater system. On a basin or subbasin scale, especially in areas of intensive groundwater management where artificial recharge is important, introduction of an extrinsic tracer can provide a robust picture of groundwater flow. Dissolved gases are particularly good tracers since a large volume of water can be tagged, there are no real or perceived health risks associated with the tracer, and a very large dynamic range allows detection of a small amount of tagged water in well discharge. Recent applications of the application of extrinsic tracers, used in concert with intrinsic chemical and isotopic tracers, demonstrate the power of chemical analyses in interpreting regional subsurface flow regimes.

  5. Validation of CHEMEST, an on-line system for the estimation of chemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Boethling, R.S.; Campbell, S.E.; Lynch, D.G.; LaVeck, G.D.

    1988-02-01

    CHEMEST is an on-line system for estimating physical/chemical properties important in the assessment of environmental fate of chemicals. Measured values of boiling point, melting point, vapor pressure, water solubility, and soil organic carbon partition coefficient (Koc) were compared to values estimated by CHEMEST, for more than 170 chemicals. The chemicals were composed of seven classes: alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, amines, carbamates, esters, ethers, and phenols. Mean errors for boiling and melting point were 22.6 and 36.2 degrees C, respectively, with relatively little variability among classes. Carbamates were an exception, accuracy being much lower for both properties. Vapor pressures were quite accurately estimated, measured and estimated values generally differing by less than a factor of two. Mean error factors for water solubility and Koc were somewhat higher, but nevertheless better than the order of magnitude accuracy commonly assumed. Solubility was very inaccurately estimated for the phenols, however. The results indicate that, for the chemicals and properties studied, estimated values were sufficiently accurate for screening-level fate assessment. TSTCHEM, a revised version of CHEMEST, out-performed the latter with respect to the accuracy of solubility and vapor pressure estimates.

  6. Feasibility study of a novel pressure recovery system for CO2-COIL based on chemical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingwei; Jin, Yuqi; Geng, Zicai; Li, Yongzhao; Zhang, Yuelong; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    A chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is an electronic transition, low pressure, high throughput system. The use of this laser demands a suitable pressure recovery system. This paper proposed a novel pressure recovery system based on chemical absorption and the feasibility for COIL with CO2 as buffer gas (CO2-COIL) was investigated. The novel pressure recovery system works by chemisorbing the CO2-COIL effluents into two fixed-beds maintained at initial temperature of around 293-323K. Compared with the cryosorption system for N2-COIL based on physical absorption, the novel chemisorptions based pressure recovery system has a simpler logistics and a shorter run-to-run preparation time. Two kinds of solid chemo-sorbents were designed and synthesized. One was used for chemisorbing the oxidizing gases such as O2 ,Cl2 and I2, another was used for chemisorbing the acidic gas such as CO2. The capacities of the two sorbents were measured to be 3.12 mmol(O2)/g and 3.84 mmol (CO2) /g, respectively. It indicated that the synthesized sorbents could effectively chemosorb the CO2-COIL effluents. Secondly, analog test equipment was set up and used to study the feasibility of the novel pressure recovery system used for CO2-COIL. The test results showed that the novel pressure recovery system could maintain the pressure under 6 Torr for tens seconds under the continuous gas flow. It showed that the novel pressure recovery system for CO2-COIL based on chemical absorption is feasible.

  7. Innovative permeable cover system to reduce risks at a chemical munitions burial site

    SciTech Connect

    Powels, C.C.; Bon, I.; Okusu, N.M.

    1997-12-31

    An innovative permeable sand cover with various integrated systems has been designed to contain and treat the Old O-Field chemical munitions landfill at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The 18,200 m{sup 2} (4.5 acre) landfill was used from the mid 1930s to the mid 1950s for the disposal of chemical, incendiary, and explosive munitions from domestic and foreign origins, together with contaminated wastes associated with the development and production of chemical warfare agents (CWA). The site is suspected to be contaminated with white phosphorous (WP) (which when dry, spontaneously burns when exposed to air), shock sensitive picric acid fuses and has the potential to contain large quantities of CWA-filled munitions. Historically, one to three explosions or fires occurred per ten-year period at the landfill. Such events have the potential to cause a CWA release to the environment, which could potentially affect densely populated areas. Recovery and decontamination projects conducted at the site in the late 1940s and early 1950s used large amounts of decontamination chemicals (containing solvents) and fuels which further contaminated the area. The groundwater downgradient of the landfill is contaminated with volatile organic compounds, metals, explosives and CWA degradation compounds and is currently being contained by a groundwater extraction and treatment system. This report describes a remedial action program for the site.

  8. The Trouble with Chemical Energy: Why Understanding Bond Energies Requires an Interdisciplinary Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Klymkowsky, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Helping students understand “chemical energy” is notoriously difficult. Many hold inconsistent ideas about what energy is, how and why it changes during the course of a chemical reaction, and how these changes are related to bond energies and reaction dynamics. There are (at least) three major sources for this problem: 1) the way biologists talk about chemical energy (which is also the way we talk about energy in everyday life); 2) the macroscopic approach to energy concepts that is common in physics and physical sciences; and 3) the failure of chemistry courses to explicitly link molecular with macroscopic energy ideas. From a constructivist perspective, it is unlikely that students can, without a coherent understanding of such a central concept, attain a robust and accurate understanding of new concepts. However, changes are on the horizon, guided by the increasing understanding that difficult concepts require coherent, well-designed learning progressions and the new National Research Council Framework for K–12 Science Education. We provide supporting evidence for our assertions and suggestions for an interdisciplinary learning progression designed to better approach the concept of bond energies, a first step in an understanding chemical energy and behavior of reaction systems that is central to biological systems. PMID:23737636

  9. The trouble with chemical energy: why understanding bond energies requires an interdisciplinary systems approach.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Melanie M; Klymkowsky, Michael W

    2013-06-01

    Helping students understand "chemical energy" is notoriously difficult. Many hold inconsistent ideas about what energy is, how and why it changes during the course of a chemical reaction, and how these changes are related to bond energies and reaction dynamics. There are (at least) three major sources for this problem: 1) the way biologists talk about chemical energy (which is also the way we talk about energy in everyday life); 2) the macroscopic approach to energy concepts that is common in physics and physical sciences; and 3) the failure of chemistry courses to explicitly link molecular with macroscopic energy ideas. From a constructivist perspective, it is unlikely that students can, without a coherent understanding of such a central concept, attain a robust and accurate understanding of new concepts. However, changes are on the horizon, guided by the increasing understanding that difficult concepts require coherent, well-designed learning progressions and the new National Research Council Framework for K-12 Science Education. We provide supporting evidence for our assertions and suggestions for an interdisciplinary learning progression designed to better approach the concept of bond energies, a first step in an understanding chemical energy and behavior of reaction systems that is central to biological systems. PMID:23737636

  10. Chemical Dimerizers in Three-Hybrid Systems for Small Molecule-Target Protein Profiling.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Dries J H; Tavernier, Jan; Lievens, Sam; Van Calenbergh, Serge

    2016-08-19

    The identification of the molecular targets and mechanisms underpinning the beneficial or detrimental effects of small-molecule leads and drugs constitutes a crucial aspect of current drug discovery. Over the last two decades, three-hybrid (3H) systems have progressively taken an important position in the armamentarium of small molecule-target protein profiling technologies. Yet, a prerequisite for successful 3H analysis is the availability of appropriate chemical inducers of dimerization. Herein, we present a comprehensive and critical overview of the chemical dimerizers specifically applied in both yeast and mammalian three-hybrid systems for small molecule-target protein profiling within the broader scope of target deconvolution and drug discovery. Furthermore, examples and alternative suggestions for typical components of chemical dimerizers for 3H systems are discussed. As illustrated, more tools have become available that increase the sensitivity and efficiency of 3H-based screening platforms. Hence, it is anticipated that the great potential of 3H systems will further materialize in important contributions to drug discovery. PMID:27267544

  11. A CRF-based system for recognizing chemical entity mentions (CEMs) in biomedical literature

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background In order to improve information access on chemical compounds and drugs (chemical entities) described in text repositories, it is very crucial to be able to identify chemical entity mentions (CEMs) automatically within text. The CHEMDNER challenge in BioCreative IV was specially designed to promote the implementation of corresponding systems that are able to detect mentions of chemical compounds and drugs, which has two subtasks: CDI (Chemical Document Indexing) and CEM. Results Our system processing pipeline consists of three major components: pre-processing (sentence detection, tokenization), recognition (CRF-based approach), and post-processing (rule-based approach and format conversion). In our post-challenge system, the cost parameter in CRF model was optimized by 10-fold cross validation with grid search, and word representations feature induced by Brown clustering method was introduced. For the CEM subtask, our official runs were ranked in top position by obtaining maximum 88.79% precision, 69.08% recall and 77.70% balanced F-measure, which were improved further to 88.43% precision, 76.48% recall and 82.02% balanced F-measure in our post-challenge system. Conclusions In our system, instead of extracting a CEM as a whole, we regarded it as a sequence labeling problem. Though our current system has much room for improvement, our system is valuable in showing that the performance in term of balanced F-measure can be improved largely by utilizing large amounts of relatively inexpensive un-annotated PubMed abstracts and optimizing the cost parameter in CRF model. From our practice and lessons, if one directly utilizes some open-source natural language processing (NLP) toolkits, such as OpenNLP, Standford CoreNLP, false positive (FP) rate may be very high. It is better to develop some additional rules to minimize the FP rate if one does not want to re-train the related models. Our CEM recognition system is available at: http

  12. Development of a biofluid chemical measurement system using liquid core optical fiber Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dahu

    Near Infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy can provide compositional information about chemicals dissolved in biological fluids. The Raman intensity is proportional to the amount of chemicals. It has been developed for years as a tool to measure biofluid chemical concentrations by illuminating sample and collecting Raman intensity holding the sample in a cuvette geometry. It has been found that the Raman intensity can be enhanced by increasing the excitation and collection sample volume in a liquid core optical fiber (LCOF) geometry. In this thesis, we present a biofluid chemical concentration measurement system using LCOF Raman spectroscopy. A home-built LCOF Raman spectroscopy system designed for this purpose using 830 nm illumination is described in the thesis. The system is switchable between LCOF and traditional cuvette geometry. The system was characterized using aqueous solutions. The Raman intensities of aqueous solutions from the two geometries were compared in both theory and experiment. The results agreed well with each other. As high as 15 fold Raman enhancement was observed. The Raman spectra of biological chemicals in aqueous solution and spiked urine samples were acquired from LCOF and cuvette geometries. The concentrations were predicted using partial least squares (PLS) leave one out cross validation. The results from the two geometries were compared. Concentrations of creatinine were measured in both setups. The LCOF geometry had an advantage at shorter integration times because of Raman enhancement while the cuvette geometry gave better results at longer integration times due to a better system reproducibility. The LCOF Raman intensity varies from sample to sample with sample absorption coefficient as well as the chemical concentration. This effect can add uncertainty to the concentration measurement. Biofluid samples from multiple patients vary a lot in absorption coefficient, which could cause as much as 20% uncertainty in concentration measurement

  13. Integrated Baseline System (IBS), Version 1.03. User guide: Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, B.M.; Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Matsumoto, S.W.; Schrank, E.E.; Williams, J.R.; Winters, C.

    1993-01-01

    The Integrated Baseline System (IBS), operated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), is a system of computerized tools for emergency planing and analysis. This document is the user guide for the IBS and explains how to operate the IBS system. The fundamental function of the IBS is to provide tools that civilian emergency management personnel can use in developing emergency plans and in supporting emergency management activities to cope with a chemical-releasing event at a military chemical stockpile. Emergency management planners can evaluate concepts and ideas using the IBS system. The results of that experience can then be factored into refining requirements and plans. This document provides information for the general system user, and is the primary reference for the system features of the IBS. It is designed for persons who are familiar with general emergency management concepts, operations, and vocabulary. Although the IBS manual set covers basic and advanced operations, it is not a complete reference document set. Emergency situation modeling software in the IBS is supported by additional technical documents. Some of the other LBS software is commercial software for which more complete documentation is available. The IBS manuals reference such documentation where necessary. IBS is a dynamic system. Its capabilities are in a state of continuing expansion and enhancement.

  14. Integrated Baseline System (IBS), Version 1. 03. [Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, B.M.; Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Matsumoto, S.W.; Schrank, E.E.; Williams, J.R.; Winters, C.

    1993-01-01

    The Integrated Baseline System (IBS), operated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), is a system of computerized tools for emergency planing and analysis. This document is the user guide for the IBS and explains how to operate the IBS system. The fundamental function of the IBS is to provide tools that civilian emergency management personnel can use in developing emergency plans and in supporting emergency management activities to cope with a chemical-releasing event at a military chemical stockpile. Emergency management planners can evaluate concepts and ideas using the IBS system. The results of that experience can then be factored into refining requirements and plans. This document provides information for the general system user, and is the primary reference for the system features of the IBS. It is designed for persons who are familiar with general emergency management concepts, operations, and vocabulary. Although the IBS manual set covers basic and advanced operations, it is not a complete reference document set. Emergency situation modeling software in the IBS is supported by additional technical documents. Some of the other LBS software is commercial software for which more complete documentation is available. The IBS manuals reference such documentation where necessary. IBS is a dynamic system. Its capabilities are in a state of continuing expansion and enhancement.

  15. Chemically Functionalized Arrays Comprising Micro and Nano-Electro-Mechanizal Systems for Reliable and Selective Characterization of Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Sepaniak

    2008-10-08

    Innovative technology of sensory and selective chemical monitoring of hazardous wastes present in storage tanks are of continued importance to the environment. This multifaceted research program exploits the unique characteristics of micro and nano-fabricated cantilever-based, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMES) and nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) in chemical sensing.

  16. Single-molecule Spectroscopy: Exploring Heterogeneity in Chemical and Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shirsendu; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-04-01

    Many chemical and biological systems are heterogeneous in the molecular length scale (∼ 1 nm). Heterogeneity in many chemical systems and organized assemblies may be monitored using single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS). In SMS, the size of the focal spot (i.e., the smallest region to be probed) is nearly half of the excitation wavelength (λ/2, i.e., 200-375 nm) for visible light (400-750 nm). We discuss how one can get spatial resolutions better than 200 nm using molecules as nanometric probes. We show that polymer hydrogels, lipid vesicles, room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), and binary liquid mixtures exhibit such heterogeneity. Another important observation is solute-dependent friction in RTILs. In an RTIL, diffusion of an ionic solute is slower than that of a neutral solute. PMID:26814020

  17. Chemical reaction of hexagonal boron nitride and graphite nanoclusters in mechanical milling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Y.; Grush, M.; Callcott, T.A.

    1997-04-01

    Synthesis of boron-carbon-nitride (BCN) hybrid alloys has been attempted extensively by many researchers because the BCN alloys are considered an extremely hard material called {open_quotes}super diamond,{close_quotes} and the industrial application for wear-resistant materials is promising. A mechanical alloying (MA) method of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with graphite has recently been studied to explore the industrial synthesis of the BCN alloys. To develop the MA method for the BCN alloy synthesis, it is necessary to confirm the chemical reaction processes in the mechanical milling systems and to identify the reaction products. Therefore, the authors have attempted to confirm the chemical reaction process of the h-BN and graphite in mechanical milling systems using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) methods.

  18. Green light radiation effects on free radicals inhibition in cellular and chemical systems.

    PubMed

    Comorosan, Sorin; Polosan, Silviu; Jipa, Silviu; Popescu, Irinel; Marton, George; Ionescu, Elena; Cristache, Ligia; Badila, Dumitru; Mitrica, Radu

    2011-01-10

    Free radicals generation is inhibited through green light (GL) irradiation in cellular systems and in chemical reactions. Standard melanocyte cultures were UV-irradiated and the induced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were quantified by the fluorescence technique. The same cell cultures, previously protected by a 24h GL exposure, displayed a significantly lower ROS production. A simple chemical reaction is subsequently chosen, in which the production of free radicals is well defined. Paraffin wax and mineral oil were GL irradiated during thermal degradation and the oxidation products checked by chemiluminescence [CL] and Fourier transform infrared spectra [FT-IR]. The same clear inhibition of the radical oxidation of alkanes is recorded. A quantum chemistry modeling of these results is performed and a mechanism involving a new type of Rydberg macromolecular systems with implications for biology and medicine is suggested. PMID:20934350

  19. The chemical behavior of transuranium elements and barrier functions in natural aquifer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Il

    1993-12-31

    The chemical behavior of transuranium elements in natural aquifer systems is governed by a variety of geochemical reactions, such as dissolution reaction (solubility), hydrolysis, complexation with inorganics or organics, redox reaction, colloid formation, geochemical interaction with surfaces of various minerals, coprecipitation, mineralization, etc. This paper reviews the present state of knowledge on some of these particular reactions. The emphasis here is on how the individual reactions can be appraised for long-term prediction of the geochemical behavior of transuranium elements in the natural environment. Of the various possible reactions, the primary thermodynamic processes are discussed with notable examples: dissolution of transuranium compounds in aquatic solution; complexation with important anions present in groundwater; and colloid generation. Various laser spectroscopic methods in use for chemical speciation are mentioned briefly for their spectroscopic capability, as well as for their applicability. The present paper attempts to better understand the migration behavior of transuranium elements in natural aquifer systems.

  20. Chemical and microbiological experimentation for development of environmental control and life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, G. A.; Wilson, M. E.; Cole, H. E.; Traweek, M.

    1992-01-01

    Microbiological techniques are under study with a view to the identification of viable microorganisms in liquid cultures, improve the identification of stressed organisms, and determine the biocidal activity of iodine and other chemicals on isolates from recycled water. A quality-assurance program has been implemented to validate data employed in making decisions concerning engineering and human health and safety. Analytical laboratory refinements will strongly aid the development of environmental control and life-support systems.