Science.gov

Sample records for aerodigestive tract disease

  1. Aerodigestive tract burn from ingestion of microwaved food.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Michael; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Aerodigestive tract burns represent a rare but potentially devastating injury pattern throughout the world. Although the majority of these injuries do not require intervention, these burns have the potential for poor outcomes. Traditionally this disease has been caused by superheated gases found in explosions or fire-related injury. However, as technology advances, it brings novel methods for injury that require physician awareness of potential hazards. We describe a case of laryngeal and esophageal thermal burn caused by a microwave heated food bolus.

  2. [Recurrence of upper aerodigestive tract tumors].

    PubMed

    Martin, Laurent; Zoubir, Mustapha; Le Tourneau, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Recurrences of tumours of the upper aerodigestive tract are frequent despite the improvement of the primary treatment and they limit the rate of survival long-term. They occur in patients with multiple co-morbidities, often associated with sequelae or side effects of earlier treatments. The salvage treatment will add a cumulative toxicity and therapeutic options are limited. The choice will go from curator to palliative treatment. The report benefit-risk must be assessed in each case depending on the terrain and prognostic factors that have been identified, such as performance status, the time between initial disease and the recurrence, the site and the stratification of the recurrence. In operable non-metastatic recurrence surgery remains the treatment of choice. Multimodal treatment involving surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy in this context is being evaluated. Non-operable tumors have long been considered only in a palliative context. The evaluation of detailed irradiation as bifractionnated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy helped establish protocols allowing long-term survivals and consider these treatments as potentially curators. However, the toxicity of these treatments is important. That is why the technical innovations of the radiation and the development of new chemotherapeutic agents today offer opportunities remaining to assess. The use of irradiation targeted by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and stereotactic radiotherapy by decreasing the irradiated volume should decrease the toxicity. Generally better tolerated than conventional chemotherapy agents, targeted therapies also took their places associated with radiotherapy in the treatment of these patients already treated. Cetuximab was the first agent obtaining an indication. Other agents are being evaluated in metastatic recurrent tumors, including exploring the possibilities of radiopotentialisation nanoparticles and the inhibitors of apoptosis proteins.

  3. Condylomatous lesions of the upper aerodigestive tract.

    PubMed

    Nash, M; Lucente, F E; Srinivasan, K; Gould, W J

    1987-12-01

    Condyloma acuminatum is one of four types of common human verrucous lesions that are of viral etiology. Also known as "moist wart," condyloma acuminatum is most often seen on the mucosal surfaces of the anogenital area. However, occurrences in the mucosal lined areas of the head and neck region are quite rare. Since 1901, 30 cases of condylomatous lesions have been reported in the upper aerodigestive tract, occurring mainly in the various regions of the oral cavity. Eighteen of the cases were confirmed by histopathologic documentation, while the remainder were anecdotal. We have recently encountered six new cases of condyloma acuminatum, verified by histologic examination. One occurred on the tongue, another in the tonsillar fossa, one in the hypopharynx and three on the vocal cords. We present these cases and review the previously reported cases. In addition, we will discuss the differential diagnosis of these lesions, and their importance to the practicing otolaryngologist.

  4. Screening for cancer of the aerodigestive tract.

    PubMed

    Smart, C R

    1993-08-01

    In the United States, cancer of the oral cavity is the only region of the aerodigestive tract that lends itself to routine screening of the asymptomatic population older than 50 years. Although the incidence and mortality rate for oral cancer is nearly double that of cancer of the cervix (30,300 versus 13,500 and 7950 versus 4400, respectively), conducting a pelvic examination and Pap smear appears more acceptable than looking in the mouth. The inspection of the oral cavity should be part of every physical examination in the dentist's or the physician's office, particularly in patients older than 50 years who are heavy users of tobacco and alcohol. Ninety percent of all squamous cell cancers arise from the floor of the mouth, the ventrolateral aspect of the tongue, and the soft palate complex. The detection rate is increased from approximately 1 per 1000 in asymptomatic individuals older than 50 years to 1 per 200 in high-risk smokers and drinkers and to 1 in 7 for individuals once treated for oral cancer. Screening detects earlier stage cancers, for which treatment results in higher survival rates. While no randomized screening trials with a mortality end-point have been conducted (or are likely), there is evidence that population-based case-fatality rates are lower in races treated with earlier stages of oral cancer. This evidence is of little solace when the majority of patients are diagnosed with advanced disease when symptoms appear, rather than through screening at an earlier stage when asymptomatic. In one study, 94% of patients with oral cancer were seen by a doctor within the previous year. The average oral cancer patient had 10.7 physician encounters within 3 years of the diagnosis. In the United States, the early detection of cancers of the larynx and esophagus should be based upon early symptoms rather than on screening. A routine oral screening examination should be a part of every physical examination by a doctor or a dentist. It will detect earlier

  5. Concordance of Two Endoscopic Procedures for Diagnosis of Carcinoma of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-15

    Upper Aerodigestive Tract Lesions; Neoplasms, Oropharyngeal; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Neoplasms, Hypopharyngeal; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Head and Neck Neoplasms; UADT Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell; Papilloma

  6. Effects of air pollution on the upper aerodigestive tract.

    PubMed

    Holt, G R

    1996-02-01

    The main route of contamination of the human body with airborne pollutants is through the upper air and food passages. Because of the delicate balance of the mucous membranes and special sensory organs of these passages with respect to mucociliary activity, local and recruited immune responses, rapid uptake of chemicals, and carcinogenic potential, the ingestion or inhalation of pollutants in the air can be harmful to these internal body barriers. The particular target organs for air pollution effects on the upper aerodigestive tract include the mucosa, olfactory epithelium, auditory receptor cells, glottic epithelium, and adjacent neural and muscular tissues. Hearing loss caused by noise exposure may be aggravated by the concomitant inhalation of solvents. The strongest evidence for the carcinogenic effect of occupational inhalants in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is seen with exposure to hardwood dust, tobacco smoke, furniture making, and leather tanning. With the exception of tobacco smoke, which produces squamous cell carcinomas, the majority of the occupationally related cancers are adenocarcinomas, usually of the intestinal variety. Tobacco smoke, passive or active, may lead to end-artery obliteration at the level of the otic end organ, causing a progressive sensorineural hearing loss. Further environmental research in the upper aerodigestive tract should aim at developing biologic markers to determine early, premalignant tissue changes; identifying the effects of chronic, low-dose toxic exposure on mucous membranes and neurosensory organs; providing field-tested tools for the standardized screening of large at-risk populations.

  7. Cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract in Korea.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyung Ja; Khang, Shin Kwang; Lee, Seung Sook; Koh, Jae Soo; Chung, Jin Haeng; Lee, Yong Sik; Shim, Yoon Sang

    2002-01-01

    Cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) constitute 3.5-4% of all malignancies. Since the majority of cases are squamous cell carcinomas which are related with epidemiologic factors, a different pattern of UADT cancer might be present between the Western and Asian populations. We performed a pathology based statistical study on UADT cancers in Korean patients. Cases from Korea Cancer Center Hospital, from January 1, 1988 through December 31, 1998, were subjected to the study. Among 2,842 cases, epithelial malignancies accounted for 87.8%, with squamous cell carcinoma as the major type (76.5%). The larynx was the most commonly affected site (26%), followed by the oral cavity (25.1%), oropharynx (13%), nasopharynx (9%), hypopharynx (8.4%), paranasal sinuses (6.4%), nasal cavity (6%) and salivary glands (6.1%). The percentage of squamous cell carcinoma was highest (98.7%) at the hypopharynx, and lowest at the nasal cavity (42.3%), which showed the most diverse tumor entities. Korean patients with UADT cancers presented with a higher incidence of non-epidermoid malignancy including sarcoma (1.5%) and malignant melanoma (1.4%), and a higher frequency of involvement of the sinonasal tract, compared with the Western patients. PMID:11850583

  8. Button battery injuries in the pediatric aerodigestive tract.

    PubMed

    Ettyreddy, Abhinav R; Georg, Matthew W; Chi, David H; Gaines, Barbara A; Simons, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    Children with a button battery impaction present with nonspecific symptoms that may account for a delay in medical care. We conducted a retrospective study of the clinical presentation, management, and complications associated with button battery ingestion in the pediatric aerodigestive tract and to evaluate the associated long-term morbidity. We reviewed the medical records of 23 patients who were treated for button battery impaction at our tertiary care children's hospital from Jan. 1, 2000, through July 31, 2013. This population was made up of 14 boys and 9 girls, aged 7 days to 12 years (mean: 4 yr). Patients were divided into three groups based on the site of impaction; there were 9 impactions in the esophagus and 7 each in the nasal cavity and stomach. We compiled information on the type and size of each battery, the duration of the impaction, presenting symptoms, treatment, and outcomes. The mean duration of battery impaction was 40.6, 30.7, and 21.0 hours in the esophagus, nasal cavity, and stomach, respectively. We were able to identify the specific type of battery in 13 cases; 11 of these cases (85%) involved a 3-V 20-mm lithium ion battery, including all cases of esophageal impaction in which the type of battery was identified. The most common presenting signs and symptoms were vomiting (n = 7 [30%]), difficulty feeding (n = 5 [22%]), cough (n = 5), and bloody nasal discharge (n = 5); none of the presenting signs and symptoms predicted the severity of the injury or the outcome. The median length of hospital stay was far greater in the esophageal group (12 days) than in the nasal and stomach groups (1 day each; p = 0.006). Battery impaction in the esophagus for more than 15 hours was associated with a significantly longer postoperative hospital stay than impaction for less than 15 hours (p = 0.04). Esophageal complications included strictures (n = 5), perforation (n = 3), and tracheoesophageal fistula formation (n = 2). Clinicians should consider battery

  9. Epigenetic pathogenesis of human papillomavirus in upper aerodigestive tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Fazlur Rahman; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Laskar, Ruhina Shirin; Kannan, Ravi; Choudhury, Biswadeep; Bhowmik, Arup

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been recently associated with squamous cell carcinoma of upper aerodigestive tract (SCC of UADT), but its possible role in promoting aberrant methylation in these tumors has largely remained unexplored. Herein, we investigated the association of HPV with aberrant methylation in tumor-related genes/loci consisting of the classical CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) panel markers (p16, MLH1, MINT1, MINT2, and MINT31) and other frequently methylated cancer-related genes (DAPK1, GSTP1, BRCA1, ECAD, and RASSF1) and survival of UDAT cancers. The study includes 219 SCC of UADT patients from different hospitals of Northeast India. Detection of HPV and aberrant promoter methylation was performed by PCR and Methylation Specific PCR respectively. Association study was conducted by Logistic regression analysis and overall survival analysis was done by Kaplan-Meier plot. HPV was detected in 37% of cases, with HPV-18 as the major high-risk sub-type. Although HPV presence did not seem to affect survival in overall UADT cancers, but was associated with a favourable prognosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Hierarchical clustering revealed three distinct clusters with different methylation profile and HPV presence. Among these, the CIMP-high subgroup exhibited the highest HPV positive cases (66%). Furthermore, multivariate analysis revealed a strong synergistic association of HPV and tobacco towards modulating promoter hypermethylation in UADT cancer (OR = 27.50 [95% CI = 11.51-88.03] for CIMP-high vs. CIMP-low). The present study proposes a potential role of HPV in impelling aberrant methylation in specific tumor related loci, which might contribute in the initiation and progression of SCC of UADT. PMID:25213493

  10. Epigenetic pathogenesis of human papillomavirus in upper aerodigestive tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Fazlur Rahman; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Laskar, Ruhina Shirin; Kannan, Ravi; Choudhury, Biswadeep; Bhowmik, Arup

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been recently associated with squamous cell carcinoma of upper aerodigestive tract (SCC of UADT), but its possible role in promoting aberrant methylation in these tumors has largely remained unexplored. Herein, we investigated the association of HPV with aberrant methylation in tumor-related genes/loci consisting of the classical CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) panel markers (p16, MLH1, MINT1, MINT2, and MINT31) and other frequently methylated cancer-related genes (DAPK1, GSTP1, BRCA1, ECAD, and RASSF1) and survival of UDAT cancers. The study includes 219 SCC of UADT patients from different hospitals of Northeast India. Detection of HPV and aberrant promoter methylation was performed by PCR and Methylation Specific PCR respectively. Association study was conducted by Logistic regression analysis and overall survival analysis was done by Kaplan-Meier plot. HPV was detected in 37% of cases, with HPV-18 as the major high-risk sub-type. Although HPV presence did not seem to affect survival in overall UADT cancers, but was associated with a favourable prognosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Hierarchical clustering revealed three distinct clusters with different methylation profile and HPV presence. Among these, the CIMP-high subgroup exhibited the highest HPV positive cases (66%). Furthermore, multivariate analysis revealed a strong synergistic association of HPV and tobacco towards modulating promoter hypermethylation in UADT cancer (OR = 27.50 [95% CI = 11.51-88.03] for CIMP-high vs. CIMP-low). The present study proposes a potential role of HPV in impelling aberrant methylation in specific tumor related loci, which might contribute in the initiation and progression of SCC of UADT.

  11. Hyaluronic Acid: Perspectives in Upper Aero-Digestive Tract. A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Manuele; Moffa, Antonio; Sabatino, Lorenzo; Pace, Annalisa; Oliveto, Giuseppe; Vitali, Massimiliano; Baptista, Peter; Salvinelli, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, topical therapies guarantee a better delivery of high concentrations of pharmacologic agents to the mucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT). The use of topical drugs, which are able to reduce mucosal inflammation and to improve healing tissues, can represent a relevant therapeutic advance. Topical sodium hyaluronate (SH) has recently been recognized as adjuvant treatment in the chronic inflammatory disease of the UADT. Aims The aim of our work was to review the published literature regarding all the potential therapeutic effects of SH in the chronic inflammatory disease of UADT. Methods Relevant published studies were searched in Pubmed, Google Scholar, Ovid using keywords (“sodium hyaluronate” and “upper airways”) or Medical Subject Headings. Results At the end of our selection process, sixteen publications have been included. Six of them in the post-operative period of nasal-sinus surgery, 2 of them in pediatric patients affected by recurrent upper respiratory tract infections, 4 of them in reducing symptoms and preventing exacerbations of chronic upper airways in adult population, 4 of them in patients with chronic inflammatory disease of UADT, including gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Conclusions Topical administration of SH plays a pivotkey role in the postoperative phase of patients undergoing FESS and nasal surgery, and positive results are generally observed in all the patients suffering from UADT chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:26120837

  12. Impact of alcohol consumption and body mass index on mortality from nonneoplastic liver diseases, upper aerodigestive tract cancers, and alcohol use disorders in Korean older middle-aged men: Prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sang-Wook; Hong, Jae-Seok; Yi, Jee-Jeon; Ohrr, Heechoul

    2016-09-01

    Alcohol use is a leading risk factor for the global disease burden including liver diseases. However, the combined effect of alcohol use and body mass index (BMI) on alcohol-related diseases has seldom been examined. We examined whether alcohol consumption and BMI could act together to increase mortality from nonneoplastic liver diseases, upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancers, and alcohol use disorders (AUD) in middle-aged Korean men.107,735 men (mean age, 58.8 years) participated in a postal survey in 2004 and were followed until 2010, by linkage to national death records. Hazard ratios (HRs) of cause-specific death were calculated after adjustment for confounders.Each 5-drink (approximately 45 g alcohol) higher weekly alcohol consumption was associated with increased mortality, by approximately 70% for nonneoplastic liver disease mortality (HR = 1.70, P < 0.001), approximately 60% for UADT cancer mortality (HR = 1.64, P < 0.001), and approximately 70% for AUD mortality (HR = 1.71, P < 0.001). Generally, BMI was inversely associated with these alcohol-related diseases (HR per each 5 kg/m higher BMI = 0.18-0.46, P < 0.001 for each cause), while, in participants with BMI ≥25 kg/m, each 5 kg/m higher BMI was also associated with an elevated mortality from nonneoplastic liver diseases of approximately 150% (HR = 2.52, P = 0.001). Men with BMI < 21 kg/m and weekly alcohol consumption ≥14 drinks showed markedly higher mortality from nonneoplastic liver diseases (HR = 5.7), alcoholic liver diseases (HR = 9.3), UADT cancers (HR = 10.5), and esophageal cancer (HR = 15.5), compared to men drinking less than 1 drink/wk with BMI ≥25 kg/m. The combined effect of low BMI and high weekly alcohol consumption was 2.25- to 3.29-fold greater than the additive effect of each factor for these alcohol-related diseases (P < 0.05 for each cause).Alcohol consumption and low BMI were related to deaths from nonneoplastic liver diseases, UADT

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome caused by uncommon tumors of the upper aerodigestive tract

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shao-Jun; Wang, Qin-Ying; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Bao, Yang-Yang; Wang, Shen-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is always caused by anatomic abnormalities, including nasal cavity, pharynx, and neuromuscular dysfunctions, leading to airway narrowing. OSAS associated with a mass in the aerodigestive tract is rare. In the present study, we report OSAS caused by 9 cases of preoperative uncommon tumors in the aerodigestive tract. Two tumors in the parapharyngeal space were pleomorphic adenoma, one oropharyngeal tumor was mucoepidermoid carcinoma, one tumor in the right tonsil was schwannoma, and five tumors were non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Of the five NHL cases, one in the nasopharynx was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, two were mantle cell lymphoma, one was chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, and one was NHL. Tumors in the aerodigestive tract should be considered in the differential diagnosis of OSAS upon exacerbation of snoring or sudden gasping. Further examinations should be performed, including a routine workup (computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging) and positron emission tomography/CT. PMID:25400748

  14. ErbB receptors in the biology and pathology of the aerodigestive tract

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Sarah; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2009-02-15

    The most common sites of malignancies in the aerodigestive tract include the lung, head and neck and the esophagus. Esophageal adenocarcinomas (EA), esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC), and squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) are the primary focus of this review. Traditional treatment for aerodigestive tract cancers includes primary chemoradiotherapy (CRT) or surgical resection followed by radiation (or CRT). Recent developments in treatment have focused increasingly on molecular targeting strategies including cetuximab (a monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)). Cetuximab was FDA approved in 2006 for treatment of SCCHN, underscoring the importance of understanding the biology of these malignancies. EGFR is a member of the ErbB family of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases. The major pathways activated by ErbB receptors include Ras/Raf/MAPK; PI3K/AKT; PLC{gamma} and STATs, all of which lead to the transcription of target genes that may contribute to aerodigestive tumor progression. This review explores the expression of ErbB receptors in EA, ESCC and SCCHN and the signaling pathways of EGFR in SCCHN.

  15. A new endotracheal tube for carbon dioxide and KTP laser surgery of the aerodigestive tract.

    PubMed

    Ossoff, R H; Aly, A; Gonzales, D; Koriwchak, M J; Houchin, N

    1993-01-01

    We have tested the fire-resistance of a new endotracheal tube designed for use in laser surgery of the upper aerodigestive tract. This Teflon/metallic-wrapped silicone tube seems capable of withstanding occasional, accidental pulsed laser impact at power settings used clinically (1 to 10 watts) without fire. On rare occasions when continuous mode is used, the tube seems capable of withstanding at least several seconds of continuous irradiation at clinical power settings without igniting. When used with other recommended safety procedures, this tube should minimize the risk of endotracheal tube fire from accidental laser impact. PMID:8437882

  16. Tonsillar and other upper aerodigestive tract cancers among cervical cancer patients and their husbands.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, K; Dong, C; Frisch, M

    2000-12-01

    The study aimed at probing the possible role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract, with a special reference to tonsillar cancer. We used the Swedish Family Cancer Database to analyse second cancers in the upper aerodigestive tract of women first diagnosed with in-situ or invasive cervical cancer. First cancers of their husbands were also analysed. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for female and male cancers, adjusted for age at diagnosis, period, sex, socio-economic status and residential area. Among women, increases were observed at many sites, but tonsillar cancers were increased only among women aged 50 years or more at diagnosis of in-situ cervical cancer (SIR 2.58). The increases at these sites are probably ascribed to the effects HPV, smoking, alcohol or their interaction. Husbands of cervical cancer patients developed an excess (SIR over 2.00) of both tonsillar cancer (SIR 2.39 when wife with in-situ cancer and SIR 2.72 when wife with invasive cervical cancer) and cancer of the tongue. The excess of tonsillar cancer among husbands of women with HPV-associated neoplastic lesions of the cervix supports the a priori hypothesis that HPV may be involved in tonsillar carcinogenesis.

  17. Migrating foreign bodies in the upper aerodigestive tract: a surgical challenge.

    PubMed

    Shergill, Gurshinderpal Singh; Nayak, Dipak Ranjan; Dora, Asheesh; Shergill, Ankur Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Migrating foreign bodies in the aerodigestive tract are uncommon but can pose serious complications. Long-standing migrating foreign bodies can exist manifesting chronic and unusual symptoms such as chronic cough, recurrent episodes of dyspnoea and fever. Adverse body reactions to foreign objects such as adhesions can cause difficulty in their diagnosis, localisation and removal. A thorough clinical and radiographical approach is of immense value in such cases. We report two difficult cases of migrated foreign bodies: a 2-year-old child with a long-standing foreign body that migrated to the upper mediastinum, and an adult patient with a fish bone that migrated to the oropharyngeal muscles. Presentations of these cases were not alike, with chronic unusual recurrent symptoms in one and typical acute symptoms in the other. The diagnosis and precise localisation of both foreign bodies was challenging, and an open approach was employed to remove them.

  18. Rapid sequence treatment of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Moloy, P.J.; Moran, E.M.; Azawi, S. )

    1991-01-01

    A review of the literature suggested that prolonged treatment time may lessen the probability of cure for patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. To shorten treatment time, rapid sequence treatment (RST) was devised in which chemotherapy, surgery, and irradation were administered in a total treatment time of 8 weeks. Twelve patients were treated and followed 3 years or longer. Medical complications were minor. Osteonecrosis occurred in each of the first five patients and was the only major complication of the protocol. Surgical techniques were modified, and no additional patient developed osteonecrosis. No patient developed local or regional recurrence. Two patients developed distant metastases and three other patients developed second primaries. Absolute survival was 50%. Rapid sequence treatment is an aggressive and potentially hazardous protocol that yielded encouraging results in this pilot study.

  19. Jaw mobility changes in patients with upper aerodigestive tract cancer undergoing radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wienandts, Patrícia; Mozzini, Carolina; Pinto, Rosélie; da Motta, Neiro; Jotz, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiation therapy is a therapeutic modality widely used for treatment of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) neoplasms. However, its action is not restricted to tumor cells, and it may cause a variety of adverse reactions, including reduced jaw mobility. Material and Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted to assess changes in jaw mobility in patients with UADT cancer undergoing radiation therapy. Results Fifty-six patients completed the study. The results showed a significant reduction in mouth opening (p<0.001), right lateral excursion (p=0.038) and left lateral excursion (p=0.035) of the jaw, a significant increase in the presence (p<0.001) and severity of oral mucositis (p<0.001), and a significant decrease in performance status (p<0.001) after radiation therapy. Thirty-six patients (64.3%) exhibited reduction in mouth opening after treatment. The variables significantly associated with mouth opening reduction on bivariate analysis were: modification of diet (p=0.037), radiation field (p=0.024), presence of mucositis (p=0.003), and reduction in performance status (p=0.007). After adjustment by the multivariate model, the only variables that remained significantly associated with reduction in mouth opening were presence of mucositis (p=0.018) and reduction in performance status (p=0.47). Conclusions These findings indicate that patients with upper aerodigestive tract cancer experience reduced jaw mobility after radiation therapy, which is strongly correlated with mucositis and reduced functional ability. Key words:Head and neck neoplasms, vertical dimension, radiation therapy, mucositis, temporomandibular joint, joint range of motion, trismus. PMID:26449427

  20. Feasibility and Efficacy of an Addiction Treatment Program in Patients With Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer.

    PubMed

    Perney, Pascal; Duny, Yohan; Nalpas, Bertrand; Lallemant, Benjamin; Rigole, Hélène; Cartier, César; Garrel, Renaud; Azria, The Addict-Orl Study Group David; Blanc, François; Duhamel, Olivier; Neka, Meissa; Ichou, Marc; Le Bars, Yves; Pelletier, Stéphanie; Quantin, Xavier; Stoebner, Anne

    2013-08-01

    Background: Continuing to smoke or to drink after the treatment of an upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancer is known to worsen the prognosis. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of an addiction treatment program integrated into the cancer treatment. Method: In four units devoted to UADT tumors, we proposed an addiction treatment to all patients still drinking or smoking at the end of the cancer treatment; the abstinence rate was assessed 6 and 12 months later. Results: One hundred and sixteen patients were included. Among the 73 patients still drinking and/or smoking at the end of the cancer treatment, 46.6% accepted an addiction treatment. In the latter, abstinence rate was increased, 52.2% versus 31.03% ( p = .07) at M12. In patients both drinking and smoking, addiction treatment doubled the rate of abstinence of both products (31% vs. 14%). Conclusion: Offering addiction treatment to patients with UADT cancer improves abstinence rate and helps maintain long-term withdrawal.

  1. Curcumin Induces Apoptosis of Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer Cells by Targeting Multiple Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Amin, A. R. M. Ruhul; Haque, Abedul; Rahman, Mohammad Aminur; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Khuri, Fadlo Raja; Shin, Dong Moon

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a natural compound isolated from the Indian spice "Haldi" or "curry powder", has been used for centuries as a traditional remedy for many ailments. Recently, the potential use of curcumin in cancer prevention and therapy urges studies to uncover the molecular mechanisms associated with its anti-tumor effects. In the current manuscript, we investigated the mechanism of curcumin-induced apoptosis in upper aerodigestive tract cancer cell lines and showed that curcumin-induced apoptosis is mediated by the modulation of multiple pathways such as induction of p73, and inhibition of p-AKT and Bcl-2. Treatment of cells with curcumin induced both p53 and the related protein p73 in head and neck and lung cancer cell lines. Inactivation of p73 by dominant negative p73 significantly protected cells from curcumin-induced apoptosis, whereas ablation of p53 by shRNA had no effect. Curcumin treatment also strongly inhibited p-AKT and Bcl-2 and overexpression of constitutively active AKT or Bcl-2 significantly inhibited curcumin-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings suggest that curcumin-induced apoptosis is mediated via activating tumor suppressor p73 and inhibiting p-AKT and Bcl-2. PMID:25910231

  2. Early percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy insertion maintains nutritional state in patients with aerodigestive tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Beer, Karl T; Krause, Kerstin B; Zuercher, Theres; Stanga, Zeno

    2005-01-01

    Patients with upper aerodigestive tract (UAT) cancers often suffer from malnutrition and compromised functional ability. We compared clinical outcome with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube feeding begun at two different time points. The records of 151 patients with UAT carcinomas were reviewed retrospectively. We included patients undergoing radical radiochemotherapy and PEG tube feeding. Subjects were evaluated before PEG insertion and at the end of the treatment. Patients (n=15, 100%) were divided into two groups according to the presence (group A) or absence (group B) of mucositis. Group A (51.7% of patients) received early PEG: before or within 2 wk of radiotherapy. Group B (48.3%) received delayed PEG: between 2 wk and 3 mo after the start of radiotherapy. Mean weight loss was 1.03 kg in group A vs. 4.0 kg in group B, P=0.004. Treatment interruptions were significantly (P=0.01) more common in group B. Early PEG placement at the beginning of radiochemotherapy in patients with UAT tumors maintains the patient's nutritional state and reduces treatment interruptions.

  3. Immunophenotypic and Clinical Differences Between the Nasal and Extranasal Subtypes of Upper Aerodigestive Tract Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qing-Feng; Wang, Wei-Hu; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Huang, Wen-Ting; Lu, Ning; Zhou, Li-Qiang; Ouyang, Han; Jin, Jing; Li, Ye-Xiong

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate, in a large cohort of patients, the immunophenotypic and clinical differences of nasal and extranasal extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT-NKTCL) and examine the relevance of the immunophenotype on the clinical behavior, prognosis, and treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 231 patients with UADT-NKTCL were recruited. One hundred eighty-one patients had primary location in the nasal cavity (nasal UADT-NKTCL), and 50 patients had primary extranasal UADT-NKTCL. Results: Patients with extranasal UADT-NKTCL had more adverse clinical features, including advanced-stage disease, regional lymph node involvement, B symptoms, and poor performance status, than patients with nasal UADT-NKTCL. In addition, CD56 and granzyme B were less frequently expressed in extranasal UADT-NKTCL. The 5-year overall survival rate was 74.1% for the entire group and 76.0% for early-stage disease. The 5-year overall survival rate for extranasal UADT-NKTCL was similar or superior to that of nasal UADT-NKTCL for all disease stages (76.9% vs 73.4%, P=.465), stage I disease (75.9% vs 79.2%, P=.786), and stage II disease (83.3% vs 50.3%, P=.018). CD56 expression and a Ki-67 proliferation rate ≥50% predicted poorer survival for extranasal UADT-NKTCL but not for nasal UADT-NKTCL. Conclusions: Patients with nasal and extranasal UADT-NKTCL have significantly different clinical features, immunophenotypes, and prognosis. Extranasal UADT-NKTCL should be considered as a distinct subgroup apart from the most commonly diagnosed prototype of nasal UADT-NKTCL.

  4. Augmentation of Radiation Response by Panitumumab in Models of Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kruser, Tim J.; Armstrong, Eric A.; Ghia, Amol J.; Huang Shyhmin; Wheeler, Deric L.; Radinsky, Robert; Freeman, Daniel J.; Harari, Paul M.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the interaction between panitumumab, a fully human anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody, and radiation in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma and non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines and xenografts. Methods and Materials: The head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma lines UM-SCC1 and SCC-1483, as well as the non-small-cell lung cancer line H226, were studied. Tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice were used to assess the in vivo activity of panitumumab alone and combined with radiation. In vitro assays were performed to assess the effect of panitumumab on radiation-induced cell signaling, apoptosis, and DNA damage. Results: Panitumumab increased the radiosensitivity as measured by the clonogenic survival assay. Radiation-induced epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation and downstream signaling through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was inhibited by panitumumab. Panitumumab augmented radiation-induced DNA damage by 1.2-1.6-fold in each of the cell lines studied as assessed by residual {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX foci after radiation. Radiation-induced apoptosis was increased 1.4-1.9-fold by panitumumab, as evidenced by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate staining and flow cytometry. In vivo, the combination therapy of panitumumab and radiation was superior to panitumumab or radiation alone in the H226 xenografts (p = 0.01) and showed a similar trend in the SCC-1483 xenografts (p = 0.08). In vivo, immunohistochemistry demonstrated the ability of panitumumab to augment the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects of radiation. Conclusion: These studies have identified a favorable interaction in the combination of radiation and panitumumab in upper aerodigestive tract tumor models, both in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that clinical investigations examining the combination of radiation and panitumumab in the treatment of epithelial tumors warrant

  5. Optical detection of cancer and precancerous lesions of the upper aerodigestive tract: methods for assessment of vertical extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Marcel; Arens, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    Introduction: Endoscopic imaging can be used in the assessment of cancer and precancerous lesions of the upper aerodigestive tract. The objective of this presentation is to describe vertical imaging methods. Methods: The working principle and technique of optical coherence tomography (OCT) as well as endosonography (EUS) are briefly illustrated. Results: The main indications, normal and pathologic findings of each method, frequent pitfalls, and clinical results up to now are presented in detail. Conclusions: Endosonography helps in determining the exact extension of advanced carcinomas beyond 3 mm, while OCT, due to its better resolution, is superior in the assessment of precancerous and early cancerous lesions up to 2 mm thickness.

  6. Association between OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism and risk of upper aero-digestive tract and gastrointestinal cancers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Das, Sambuddha; Nath, Sayantan; Bhowmik, Aditi; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Choudhury, Yashmin

    2016-01-01

    Cancers of the upper aero-digestive and gastrointestinal tract are one of the major causes of mortality around the world. DNA repair genes play a vital role in preventing carcinogenesis by maintaining genomic integrity. Polymorphisms in the nucleotide sequence of DNA repair genes are often reported to be associated with an increased risk for different cancers. The OGG1 gene encodes the enzyme 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase which removes oxidatively damaged bases of DNA. Several studies report that the OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism increases the risk for cancers of the upper aero-digestive and gastrointestinal tract. However, other studies provide evidence that such an association does not exist. A meta-analysis to assess the role of OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism in the cancers of the upper aero-digestive and gastrointestinal tract was therefore undertaken in order to resolve this ambiguity. Seventeen studies were recruited for this meta-analysis after screening 58 articles with a total of 5533 cases and 6834 controls for which the odds ratio with 95 % confidence interval was calculated. Begg's funnel test and Egger's test were performed for calculating publication bias. Our study reveals an association between OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism and cancer susceptibility of the upper aero-digestive and gastrointestinal tract (CG + GG vs CC; odds ratio, OR 1.22; 95 % CI 1.05-1.41; GG vs CG + CC; OR 1.36; 95 % CI 1.09-1.70; GG vs CC; OR 1.46; 95 % CI 1.12-1.92). Subgroup analysis based on cancer types and ethnicity also revealed the association of OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism to the risk for upper aero-digestive and gastrointestinal tract cancers among both the Asian and the Caucasian populations. No risk was however observed for smoking habits and OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism. In conclusion, OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism may be associated with the increased risk for aero-digestive tract and gastro-intestinal cancers in both Asian and Caucasian populations. PMID:27026921

  7. The 12p13.33/RAD52 locus and genetic susceptibility to squamous cell cancers of upper aerodigestive tract.

    PubMed

    Delahaye-Sourdeix, Manon; Oliver, Javier; Timofeeva, Maria N; Gaborieau, Valérie; Johansson, Mattias; Chabrier, Amélie; Wozniak, Magdalena B; Brenner, Darren R; Vallée, Maxime P; Anantharaman, Devasena; Lagiou, Pagona; Holcátová, Ivana; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Barzan, Luigi; Canova, Cristina; Thakker, Nalin S; Conway, David I; Znaor, Ariana; Healy, Claire M; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Lissowska, Jolanta; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Ioan Nicolae; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Menezes, Ana; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Eluf-Neto, José; Boffetta, Paolo; Garrote, Leticia Fernández; Serraino, Diego; Lener, Marcin; Jaworowska, Ewa; Lubiński, Jan; Boccia, Stefania; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Samant, Tanuja A; Mahimkar, Manoj B; Matsuo, Keitaro; Franceschi, Silvia; Byrnes, Graham; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variants located within the 12p13.33/RAD52 locus have been associated with lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC). Here, within 5,947 UADT cancers and 7,789 controls from 9 different studies, we found rs10849605, a common intronic variant in RAD52, to be also associated with upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) squamous cell carcinoma cases (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.04-1.15, p = 6x10(-4)). We additionally identified rs10849605 as a RAD52 cis-eQTL inUADT(p = 1x10(-3)) and LUSC (p = 9x10(-4)) tumours, with the UADT/LUSC risk allele correlated with increased RAD52 expression levels. The 12p13.33 locus, encompassing rs10849605/RAD52, was identified as a significant somatic focal copy number amplification in UADT(n = 374, q-value = 0.075) and LUSC (n = 464, q-value = 0.007) tumors and correlated with higher RAD52 tumor expression levels (p = 6x10(-48) and p = 3x10(-29) in UADT and LUSC, respectively). In combination, these results implicate increased RAD52 expression in both genetic susceptibility and tumorigenesis of UADT and LUSC tumors.

  8. Roles of retinoids and their nuclear receptors in the development and prevention of upper aerodigestive tract cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Lotan, R

    1997-01-01

    Vitamin A analogs (retinoids) suppress oral and lung carcinogenesis in animal models and prevent the development of second primary tumors in head, neck, and lung cancer patients. These effects result from changes in the expression of genes that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Retinoic acid receptors (RARs; -alpha, -beta, and -gamma) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs; -alpha, -beta, and, -gamma) are retinoid-activated transcription factors, which mediate effects of retinoids on gene expression. Therefore, alterations in receptor expression or function could interfere with the retinoid signaling pathway and thereby enhance cancer development. We found that the expression of RAR beta was suppressed in more than 50% of oral and lung premalignant lesions in individuals without cancer and in dysplastic lesions adjacent to cancer and in malignant oral and lung carcinomas. The expression of the other receptors was not different among normal, dysplastic, and malignant oral tissues. However, the expression of RAR gamma and RXR beta was somewhat decreased in lung cancers. These results show that RAR beta expression is lost at early stages of carcinogenesis in the aerodigestive tract and support the hypothesis that the loss of RAR beta expression may facilitate the development of some of these cancers. PMID:9255592

  9. Unusual causes of fatal upper aerodigestive tract obstruction in wild Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops aduncus).

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W; Tomo, Ikuko; Kemper, Catherine M; Gibbs, Susan E; Bossley, Mike; Machado, Aaron; Hill, Mark

    2010-09-01

    Necropsy examination of dolphins living in Gulf St Vincent, Australia is routinely undertaken to enable the evaluation of disease processes and to provide rapid medicolegal assessment of any inflicted and/or accidental injuries. Two Indo-Pacific Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) are reported to demonstrate conditions that may result in unexpected death involving upper airway compromise by quite unusual mechanisms. In the first case an adult male was found with extensive soft tissue trauma suggesting human interaction. At necropsy, death was due instead to upper airway obstruction from an impacted Slender-spined Porcupine Fish (Diodon nichthemerus) in the posterior pharynx and upper esophagus. In the second case, an adult male dolphin was found to have died, following several weeks' illness, from upper airway obstruction due to extensive respiratory tract papillomatosis within the blowhole. Given the infectious etiology of this condition the local population will be monitored for similar lesions. These cases demonstrate rare causes of upper airway obstruction in wild dolphins that were identifiable only after detailed necropsy examination. The possibility of human involvement in the deaths could be excluded. PMID:20165933

  10. Radiotherapy in the treatment of mucosal melanoma of the upper aerodigestive tract: Analysis of 74 cases. A Rare Cancer Network study

    SciTech Connect

    Krengli, Marco . E-mail: krengli@tera.it; Masini, Laura; Kaanders, Johannes; Maingon, Philippe; Oei, Swan Bing; Zouhair, Abderrahim; Ozyar, Enis; Roelandts, Martine; Amichetti, Maurizio; Bosset, Mathieu; Mirimanoff, Rene-Olivier

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze a series of mucosal melanoma of the upper aerodigestive tract to determine the prognostic factors and contribute to understanding the role of radiotherapy in the therapeutic strategy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-four patients were analyzed. The most frequent locations were nasal and oral, in 31 patients (41.9%) and 12 patients (16.2%), respectively. Sixty-three patients (85.1%) were in Stage I, 5 (6.8%) in Stage II, and 6 (8.1%) in Stage III. Treatment consisted of surgery in 17 patients (23.0%), surgery and radiotherapy in 42 (56.8%), radiotherapy in 11 (14.9%), and chemo-immunotherapy in 4 (5.4%). Median follow-up was 20 months. Results: Local control at 3 years was 57% after surgery alone and 71% after surgery and radiotherapy. Overall and disease-free survival rates, respectively, were 41% and 31% at 3 years and 14% and 22% at 10 years. After univariate analysis, female gender, melanosis, tumor size {<=}3 cm, Stage I, postoperative radiotherapy, and complete remission were favorable prognostic factors. Stage I and melanosis were confirmed by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Local control was improved by postoperative radiotherapy, despite survival being as poor as in other published series. Stage I and melanosis at diagnosis were the most favorable prognostic factors.

  11. Associations of red and processed meat with survival among patients with cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract and lung.

    PubMed

    Miles, Fayth L; Chang, Shen-Chih; Morgenstern, Hal; Tashkin, Donald; Rao, Jian-Yu; Cozen, Wendy; Mack, Thomas; Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2016-06-01

    The effect of red and processed meats on cancer survival is unclear. We sought to examine the role of total and processed red meat consumption on all-cause mortality among patients with cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) and lung, in order to test our hypothesis that red or processed meat was associated with overall mortality in these patients. Using data from a population-based case-control study conducted in Los Angeles County, we conducted a case-only analysis to examine the association of red or processed meat consumption on mortality after 12 years of follow-up, using a diet history questionnaire. Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for potential confounders. Of 601 UADT cancer cases and 611 lung cancer cases, there were 248 and 406 deaths, respectively, yielding crude mortality rates of 0.07 and 0.12 deaths per year. Comparing the highest with lowest quartile of red meat consumption, the adjusted HR was 1.64 (95% CI, 1.04-2.57) among UADT cancer cases; for red or processed meat, the adjusted HR was 1.76 (95% CI, 1.10-2.82). A dose-response trend was observed. A weaker association was observed with red meat consumption and overall mortality among lung cancer cases. In conclusion, this case-only analysis demonstrated that increased consumption of red or processed meats was associated with mortality among UADT cancer cases and WAS weakly associated with mortality among lung cancer cases.

  12. Descriptive epidemiology of upper aerodigestive tract cancers in France: incidence over 1980-2005 and projection to 2010.

    PubMed

    Ligier, Karine; Belot, Aurélien; Launoy, Guy; Velten, Michel; Bossard, Nadine; Iwaz, Jean; Righini, Christian Adrien; Delafosse, Patricia; Guizard, Anne-Valérie

    2011-04-01

    Over the 1998-2002 period, some French Départements have been shown to have the world's highest incidence of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancers in men. The objectives were to describe the changes in UADT cancer incidence in France over the 1980-2005 period, present projections for 2010, and describe the anatomical and histological characteristics of these tumours. The trend of cancer-incidence over 1980-2005 and projection up to 2010 were obtained using age-period-cohort models (data from eleven cancer registries) and incidence/mortality ratios in the area covered by these registries. The description of UADT cancers by anatomical and histological characteristics concerned data collected between 1980 and 2004 in eleven cancer registries. In men, cancer incidence decreased in all cancer sites and the world-standardized incidence rates decreased by 42.9% for lip-oral cavity-pharynx (LOCP) cancers and 50.4% for larynx cancer. In women, the world-standardized incidence rates increased by 48.6% for LOCP cancers and 66.7% for larynx cancer. Incidence increased the most for oropharynx, palate, and hypopharynx cancers. Incidence analysis by one-year cohorts revealed a progressive shift of the incidence peak towards younger and younger generations, with no change as yet in the mean age at diagnosis. In France, the incidence of these cancers is still higher than in other European and North American countries. This urges actions towards reducing the major risk factors for those cancers, namely alcohol and tobacco consumption, especially among young people, and reducing exposure to risk factors due to social inequalities. PMID:21397551

  13. Genetic variants in DNA repair pathways and risk of upper aerodigestive tract cancers: combined analysis of data from two genome-wide association studies in European populations.

    PubMed

    Babron, Marie-Claude; Kazma, Rémi; Gaborieau, Valérie; McKay, James; Brennan, Paul; Sarasin, Alain; Benhamou, Simone

    2014-07-01

    DNA repair pathways are good candidates for upper aerodigestive tract cancer susceptibility because of their critical role in maintaining genome integrity. We have selected 13 pathways involved in DNA repair representing 212 autosomal genes. To assess the role of these pathways and their associated genes, two European data sets from the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium were pooled, totaling 1954 cases and 3121 controls, with documented demographic, lifetime alcohol and tobacco consumption information. We applied an innovative approach that tests single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-sets within DNA repair pathways and then within genes belonging to the significant pathways. We showed an association between the polymerase pathway and oral cavity/pharynx cancers (P-corrected = 4.45 × 10(-) (2)), explained entirely by the association with one SNP, rs1494961 (P = 2.65 × 10(-) (4)), a missense mutation V306I in the second exon of HELQ gene. We also found an association between the cell cycle regulation pathway and esophagus cancer (P-corrected = 1.48 × 10(-) (2)), explained by three SNPs located within or near CSNK1E gene: rs1534891 (P = 1.27 × 10(-) (4)), rs7289981 (P = 3.37 × 10(-) (3)) and rs13054361 (P = 4.09 × 10(-) (3)). As a first attempt to investigate pathway-level associations, our results suggest a role of specific DNA repair genes/pathways in specific upper aerodigestive tract cancer sites. PMID:24658182

  14. High-Resolution Optical Imaging of Benign and Malignant Mucosa in the Upper Aerodigestive Tract: An Atlas for Image-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Lauren L.; Vila, Peter M.; Park, Richard W.; Schwarz, Richard; Polydorides, Alexandros D.; Teng, Marita S.; Gurudutt, Vivek V.; Genden, Eric M.; Miles, Brett; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Sikora, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Background High-resolution optical imaging provides real-time visualization of mucosa in the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) which allows non-invasive discrimination of benign and neoplastic epithelium. The high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) utilizes a fiberoptic probe in conjunction with a tissue contrast agent to display nuclei and cellular architecture. This technology has broad potential applications to intraoperative margin detection and early cancer detection. Methods Our group has created an extensive image collection of both neoplastic and normal epithelium of the UADT. Here, we present and describe imaging characteristics of benign, dysplastic, and malignant mucosa in the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, and esophagus. Results There are differences in the nuclear organization and overall tissue architecture of benign and malignant mucosa which correlate with histopathologic diagnosis. Different anatomic subsites also display unique imaging characteristics. Conclusion HRME allows discrimination between benign and neoplastic mucosa, and familiarity with the characteristics of each subsite facilitates correct diagnosis. PMID:23641314

  15. Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogense-1B and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2, alcohol flushing, mean corpuscular volume, and aerodigestive tract neoplasia in Japanese drinkers.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Akira; Mizukami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase-1B (ADH1B) and aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) modulate exposure levels to ethanol/acetaldehyde. Endoscopic screening of 6,014 Japanese alcoholics yielded high detection rates of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; 4.1%) and head and neck SCC (1.0%). The risks of upper aerodigestive tract SCC/dysplasia, especially of multiple SCC/dysplasia, were increased in a multiplicative fashion by the presence of a combination of slow-metabolizing ADH1B*1/*1 and inactive heterozygous ALDH2*1/*2 because of prolonged exposure to higher concentrations of ethanol/acetaldehyde. A questionnaire asking about current and past facial flushing after drinking a glass (≈180 mL) of beer is a reliable tool for detecting the presence of inactive ALDH2. We invented a health-risk appraisal (HRA) model including the flushing questionnaire and drinking, smoking, and dietary habits. Esophageal SCC was detected at a high rate by endoscopic mass-screening in high HRA score persons. A total of 5.0% of 4,879 alcoholics had a history of (4.0%) or newly diagnosed (1.0%) gastric cancer. Their high frequency of a history of gastric cancer is partly explained by gastrectomy being a risk factor for alcoholism because of altered ethanol metabolism, e.g., by blood ethanol level overshooting. The combination of H. pylori-associated atrophic gastritis and ALDH2*1/*2 showed the greatest risk of gastric cancer in alcoholics. High detection rates of advanced colorectal adenoma/carcinoma were found in alcoholics, 15.7% of 744 immunochemical fecal occult blood test (IFOBT)-negative alcoholics and 31.5% of the 393 IFOBT-positive alcoholics. Macrocytosis with an MCV≥106 fl increased the risk of neoplasia in the entire aerodigestive tract of alcoholics, suggesting that poor nutrition as well as ethanol/acetaldehyde exposure plays an important role in neoplasia.

  16. Photodetection of early cancer in the upper aerodigestive tract and the bronchi using photofrin II and colorectal adenocarcinoma with fluoresceinated monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagnieres, Georges A.; Braichotte, Daniel; Chatelain, Andre; Depeursinge, Christian D.; Monnier, Philippe; Savary, Jean-Francois; Fontolliet, Charlotte; Calmes, J.-M.; Givel, Jean-Claude; Chapuis, G.; Folli, S.; Pelegrin, A.; Buchegger, F.; Mach, J.-P.; van den Bergh, Hubert

    1991-11-01

    The performance of a fluorescence endoscope for the detection of early cancer is clinically evaluated. the apparatus is based on the imaging of the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of a dye which localizes in the tumor after IV injection with a higher concentration than in the surrounding normal tissue. The tests are carried out in several of the hollow organs, such as the upper aerodigestive tract, the bronchi, and the colon. In the two former cases the dye used is photofrin II, whereas in the latter case conjugates between monoclonal antibodies (Mab) directed against carcinoembrionic antigen (CEA) and fluorescein molecules are injected. The fluorescence contrast between tumor and surrounding tissue is enhanced by real-time image processing which eliminates most of the tissue autofluorescence as well as the fluorescence due to the relatively small amount of dye localized in the normal tissue. This is done by recording the fluorescence image in two spectral domains, after which these two images are digitized and manipulated with a mathematical operator (lookup-table). The sources of false positives and false negatives are evaluated in terms of the fluorescent dye and tissue optical properties.

  17. Meat and heme iron intake and risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aero-digestive tract in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Annika; Bergmann, Manuela M.; Sánchez, María-José; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Jakszyn, Paula; Amiano, Pilar; Quirós, J. Ramón; Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte; Ferrari, Pietro; Romieu, Isabelle; Fedirko, Veronika; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B(as).; Siersema, Peter D.; Peeters, Petra HM; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Allen, Naomi E.; Crowe, Francesca L.; Skeie, Guri; Hallmanns, Göran; Johansson, Ingegerd; Borgquist, Signe; Ericson, Ulrika; Egeberg, Rikke; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Grote, Verena; Li, Kuanrong; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Oikonomidou, Despoina; Pantzalis, Menelaos; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Palli, Domenico; Krogh, Vittorio; Naccarati, Alessio; Mouw, Traci; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Norat, Teresa; Boeing, Heiner

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence from prospective studies on intake of meat and fish and risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) is scarce. We prospectively investigated the association of meat and fish intake with risk of SCC of the UADT and the possible mechanism via heme iron in the large multi-center European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Methods Multivariable proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks of SCC of the UADT in relation to intake of total meat, as well as subtypes of meat, fish and heme iron among 348,738 individuals from 7 European countries. Results During an average follow-up of 11.8 years, a total of 682 incident cases of UADT SCC were accrued. Intake of processed meat was positively associated with risk of SCC of the UADT in the total cohort (highest versus lowest quintile: RR=1.41; 95% CI=1.03-1.94), however, in stratified analyses, this association was confined to the group of current smokers (highest versus lowest quintile: RR=1.89; 95% CI=1.22-2.93). Red meat, poultry, fish and heme iron were not consistently related to UADT SCC. Conclusion Higher intake of processed meat was positively associated with SCC of the UADT among smokers. Although this finding was stable in various sensitivity analyses, we cannot rule out residual confounding by smoking. Confirmation in future studies and identification of biological mechanisms is warranted. Impact Smokers may further increase their risk for SCC of the UADT if they additionally consume large amounts of processed meat. PMID:23033453

  18. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase polymorphisms and a new strategy for prevention and screening for cancer in the upper aerodigestive tract in East Asians.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Akira; Omori, Tai; Yokoyama, Tetsuji

    2010-01-01

    The ethanol in alcoholic beverages and the acetaldehyde associated with alcohol consumption are Group 1 human carcinogens (WHO, International Agency for Research on Cancer). The combination of alcohol consumption, tobacco smoking, the inactive heterozygous aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 genotype (ALDH2*1/*2) and the less-active homozygous alcohol dehydrogenase-1B genotype (ADH1B*1/*1) increases the risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) in a multiplicative fashion in East Asians. In addition to being exposed to locally high levels of ethanol, the UADT is exposed to a very high concentration of acetaldehyde from a variety of sources, including that as an ingredient of alcoholic beverages per se and that found in tobacco smoke; acetaldehyde is also produced by salivary microorganisms and mucosal enzymes and is present as blood acetaldehyde. The inefficient degradation of acetaldehyde by weakly expressed ALDH2 in the UADT may be cri! tical to the local accumulation of acetaldehyde, especially in ALDH2*1/*2 carriers. ADH1B*1/*1 carriers tend to experience less intense alcohol flushing and are highly susceptible to heavy drinking and alcoholism. Heavy drinking by persons with the less-active ADH1B*1/*1 leads to longer exposure of the UADT to salivary ethanol and acetaldehyde. The ALDH2*1/*2 genotype is a very strong predictor of synchronous and metachronous multiple SCCs in the UADT. High red cell mean corpuscular volume (MCV), esophageal dysplasia, and melanosis in the UADT, all of which are frequently found in ALDH2*1/*2 drinkers, are useful for identifying high-risk individuals. We invented a simple flushing questionnaire that enables prediction of the ALDH2 phenotype. New health appraisal models that include ALDH2 genotype, the simple flushing questionnaire, or MCV are powerful tools for devising a new strategy for prevention and screening for UADT cancer in East Asians.

  19. Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland) can cause lower urinary tract disease in cats. Although they are much less common causes, FLUTD ... your veterinarian about the best diet for your cat. Many commercial diets are acceptable, but some urinary ...

  20. Deletion of inositol hexakisphosphate kinase 1 (IP6K1) reduces cell migration and invasion, conferring protection from aerodigestive tract carcinoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Jadav, Rathan S; Kumar, Dharmika; Buwa, Natasha; Ganguli, Shubhra; Thampatty, Sitalakshmi R; Balasubramanian, Nagaraj; Bhandari, Rashna

    2016-08-01

    Inositol hexakisphosphate kinases (IP6Ks), a family of enzymes found in all eukaryotes, are responsible for the synthesis of 5-diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (5-IP7) from inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6). Three isoforms of IP6Ks are found in mammals, and gene deletions of each isoform lead to diverse, non-overlapping phenotypes in mice. Previous studies show a facilitatory role for IP6K2 in cell migration and invasion, properties that are essential for the early stages of tumorigenesis. However, IP6K2 also has an essential role in cancer cell apoptosis, and mice lacking this protein are more susceptible to the development of aerodigestive tract carcinoma upon treatment with the oral carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). Not much is known about the functions of the equally abundant and ubiquitously expressed IP6K1 isoform in cell migration, invasion and cancer progression. We conducted a gene expression analysis on mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking IP6K1, revealing a role for this protein in cell receptor-extracellular matrix interactions that regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Consequently, cells lacking IP6K1 manifest defects in adhesion-dependent signaling, evident by lower FAK and Paxillin activation, leading to reduced cell spreading and migration. Expression of active, but not inactive IP6K1 reverses migration defects in IP6K1 knockout MEFs, suggesting that 5-IP7 synthesis by IP6K1 promotes cell locomotion. Actin cytoskeleton remodeling and cell migration support the ability of cancer cells to achieve their complete oncogenic potential. Cancer cells with lower IP6K1 levels display reduced migration, invasion, and anchorage-independent growth. When fed an oral carcinogen, mice lacking IP6K1 show reduced progression from epithelial dysplasia to invasive carcinoma. Thus, our data reveal that like IP6K2, IP6K1 is also involved in early cytoskeleton remodeling events during cancer progression. However, unlike IP6K2, IP6K1 is essential for 4NQO

  1. Deletion of inositol hexakisphosphate kinase 1 (IP6K1) reduces cell migration and invasion, conferring protection from aerodigestive tract carcinoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Jadav, Rathan S; Kumar, Dharmika; Buwa, Natasha; Ganguli, Shubhra; Thampatty, Sitalakshmi R; Balasubramanian, Nagaraj; Bhandari, Rashna

    2016-08-01

    Inositol hexakisphosphate kinases (IP6Ks), a family of enzymes found in all eukaryotes, are responsible for the synthesis of 5-diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (5-IP7) from inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6). Three isoforms of IP6Ks are found in mammals, and gene deletions of each isoform lead to diverse, non-overlapping phenotypes in mice. Previous studies show a facilitatory role for IP6K2 in cell migration and invasion, properties that are essential for the early stages of tumorigenesis. However, IP6K2 also has an essential role in cancer cell apoptosis, and mice lacking this protein are more susceptible to the development of aerodigestive tract carcinoma upon treatment with the oral carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). Not much is known about the functions of the equally abundant and ubiquitously expressed IP6K1 isoform in cell migration, invasion and cancer progression. We conducted a gene expression analysis on mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking IP6K1, revealing a role for this protein in cell receptor-extracellular matrix interactions that regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Consequently, cells lacking IP6K1 manifest defects in adhesion-dependent signaling, evident by lower FAK and Paxillin activation, leading to reduced cell spreading and migration. Expression of active, but not inactive IP6K1 reverses migration defects in IP6K1 knockout MEFs, suggesting that 5-IP7 synthesis by IP6K1 promotes cell locomotion. Actin cytoskeleton remodeling and cell migration support the ability of cancer cells to achieve their complete oncogenic potential. Cancer cells with lower IP6K1 levels display reduced migration, invasion, and anchorage-independent growth. When fed an oral carcinogen, mice lacking IP6K1 show reduced progression from epithelial dysplasia to invasive carcinoma. Thus, our data reveal that like IP6K2, IP6K1 is also involved in early cytoskeleton remodeling events during cancer progression. However, unlike IP6K2, IP6K1 is essential for 4NQO

  2. Evaluation with mTHPC of early squamous cell carcinomas of the cheek pouch mucosa of Golden Syrian hamsters as a model for clinical PDT of early cancers in the upper aerodigestive tract, the esophag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glanzmann, Thomas M.; Theumann, Jean-Francois; Forrer, Martin; Braichotte, Daniel; Wagnieres, Georges A.; van den Bergh, Hubert; Andrejevic-Blant, Snezana; Savary, Jean-Francois; Monnier, Philippe

    1995-03-01

    Golden Syrian hamsters are evaluated as an animal model for light induced fluorescence (LIF) photodetection and phototherapy of early squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract, the esophagus, and the traecheo-bronchial tree. Carcinomas of this type are induced on the hamster cheek pouch mucosa by the application of the carcinogen 7,12-DMBA. For phototherapeutic experiments on the animals we utilized meso-(tetrahydoxyphenyl) chlorin (mTHPC). This drug is currently in phase I and II clinical trials for ENT patients presenting superficial `early' squamous cell carcinomas. By means of LIF we measured in vivo the kinetics of the uptake and removal of mTHPC in the normal and tumoral cheek mucosa and in the skin. The photodynamic therapy (PDT) reaction of the tissue after excitation of the photosensitizer with laser light at 652 nm was studied. Both pharmacokinetics and PDT efficacy are compared between animal model and clinical results with special emphasis on selectivity between normal and tumoral mucosa. These first experiments show that this tumor model in the hamster cheek pouch seems to be suitable for testing new photosensitizers preceding their clinical application as well as for optimization of the multiple parameters of clinical PDT.

  3. Hydatid disease of the genitourinary tract.

    PubMed

    Halim, A; Vaezzadeh, K

    1980-04-01

    Seventeen patients were treated surgically for hydatid disease of the genitourinary tract. The diagnosis of echinococcosis was facilitated by a positive Casoni test with evidence suggestive of a cystic tumour following intravenous urography, angiography, ultrasound or renal scan. Barium enemas, cystography and cystoscopy were of great help in cases of lower urinary tract hydatid disease. Seven patients with hydatid disease of the kidney underwent nephrectomy. The other 6 patients with renal involvement had excision of the cysts only. Treatment of the 4 patients with lower genitourinary tract hydatid disease was on an individual basis. There was no mortality and no significant morbidity.

  4. [Phytotherapy of respiratory tract diseases].

    PubMed

    Bylka, Wiesława; Witkowska-Banaszczak, Ewa; Studzińska-Sroka, Elzbieta; Matławska, Irena

    2012-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been used in cough due to their antitussive and expectorant activity. Antitussives act either centrally on the cough center of the brain or peripherally on the cough receptors in the respiratory passages. The antitussive effect of many herbs results from the content of mucilage, which exerts protective and demulcent activity. The activity of expectorant herbs results primarily from their influence on the gastric mucose (saponins and ipec alkaloids). This proves reflex stimulation which leads to an increase in the secretion of bronchial glands. Volatile-oil type expectorant herbs exert a direct stimulatory effect on the bronchial glands by means of local irritation with antibacterial activity. In colds and flu, herbs containing volatile oil can be used; also, volatile oils are ingredients of syrups and liquids as well as external phytomedicines in the form of liniments, ointments, and inhalations. The paper shows the herbs and phytomedicines present on the Polish market used for the treatment of respiratory tract diseases. PMID:23289257

  5. Lower urinary tract development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Rasouly, Hila Milo; Lu, Weining

    2013-01-01

    Congenital Anomalies of the Lower Urinary Tract (CALUT) are a family of birth defects of the ureter, the bladder and the urethra. CALUT includes ureteral anomalies such as congenital abnormalities of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) and ureterovesical junction (UVJ), and birth defects of the bladder and the urethra such as bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC), prune belly syndrome (PBS), and posterior urethral valves (PUV). CALUT is one of the most common birth defects and is often associated with antenatal hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infections (UTI), chronic kidney disease and renal failure in children. Here, we discuss the current genetic and molecular knowledge about lower urinary tract development and genetic basis of CALUT in both human and mouse models. We provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the formation of the ureter, bladder, and urethra, and different genes and signaling pathways controlling these developmental processes. Human genetic disorders that affect the ureter, bladder and urethra and associated gene mutations are also presented. As we are entering the post-genomic era of personalized medicine, information in this article may provide useful interpretation for the genetic and genomic test results collected from patients with lower urinary tract birth defects. With evidence-based interpretations, clinicians may provide more effective personalized therapies to patients and genetic counseling for their families. PMID:23408557

  6. Gastrointestinal tract modelling in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Dong-Hua; Zhao, Jing-Bo; Gregersen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the system of organs within multi-cellular animals that takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining waste. The various patterns of GI tract function are generated by the integrated behaviour of multiple tissues and cell types. A thorough study of the GI tract requires understanding of the interactions between cells, tissues and gastrointestinal organs in health and disease. This depends on knowledge, not only of numerous cellular ionic current mechanisms and signal transduction pathways, but also of large scale GI tissue structures and the special distribution of the nervous network. A unique way of coping with this explosion in complexity is mathematical and computational modelling; providing a computational framework for the multilevel modelling and simulation of the human gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology. The aim of this review is to describe the current status of biomechanical modelling work of the GI tract in humans and animals, which can be further used to integrate the physiological, anatomical and medical knowledge of the GI system. Such modelling will aid research and ensure that medical professionals benefit, through the provision of relevant and precise information about the patient’s condition and GI remodelling in animal disease models. It will also improve the accuracy and efficiency of medical procedures, which could result in reduced cost for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19132766

  7. Congenital diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lentze, M

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid increase in knowledge on the genetic origin of diseases within the gastrointestinal tract the number of congenital diseases, which already manifest during childhood have drastically increased. Due to the large application of molecular genetics the number is steadily increasing. To make the access to these rare diseases fast and efficient the data base of the National Library of Medicine (Online Mendelian Inheritance of Man - OMIN) is a very helpful online tool, with which all these disease entities can be found easily (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim). Detailed tables are given to find most of the congenitally inherited disease, which affect the gastrointestinal tract. A variety of congenital diarrheas with disturbances of digestion, hydrolysis, absorption and secretion is described in detail: lactose intolerance, sucrose intolerance, glucose-galactose malabsorption, fructose malabsorption, trehalase and enterokinase deficiency, congenital chloride and sodium diarrhea, congenital hypomagnesaemia, primary bile acid malabsorption, acrodermatitis enteropathica and Menke's syndrome. Also described in detail are diseases with structural anomalies of the intestine like microvillous inclusion disease, congenital tufting enteropathy and IPEX syndrome. The diagnosis in the disturbances of carbohydrate hydrolysis or absorption can be established by H2-breath tests after appropriate sugar challenge. Treatment consists of elimination of the responsible sugar from the diet. The diagnosis of the congenital secretory diarrheas is established by investigation of electrolytes in blood and stool. Substitution of high doses of the responsible mineral can improve the clinical outcome. In acrodermatitis enteropathica low serum zinc level together with the typical skin lesions guide to the diagnosis. High doses of oral zinc aspartate can cure the symptoms of the disease. The diagnosis of structural congenital lesions of the intestine can be established by histology and

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and non-digestive tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying

    2015-05-01

    Over the past decade, incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) showed an increasing trend resulting from factors, including lifestyle and dietary habits; however, both etiology and pathological mechanisms remain controversial. GERD occurs as a result of a variety of mechanisms and there is no single factor. Symptoms of GERD are often non-typical, with a likelihood of being overlooked by non-gastroenterology professionals. Therefore, improving GERD awareness in non-gastroenterology practitioners, along with early diagnosis and treatment, provide potential benefit to clinicians and patients alike. Increasing evidence suggests GERD has specific connections with a variety of non-digestive tract conditions, may contribute an aggravating compounding effect on other diseases, prolong hospitalization, and increase subsequent medical costs. This review considers and emphasizes the association between GERD and non-digestive tract conditions, including atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, primary pulmonary fibrosis and energy metabolism related to diet.

  9. Spectrum of Renal and Urinary Tract Diseases in Kashmiri Children

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Virender; Bano, Rifat Ara; Wani, Khursheed Ahmed; Ahmed, Javed; Ahmed, Kaisar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Definite paucity of data pertaining to spectrum of renal and urinary tract diseases in our state and in various parts of India forms the basis of this study. Available data has emphasized more on specific clinical syndromes and chronic renal diseases rather than over all spectrums of renal and urinary tract diseases, that too in adult population. Aim The present study a retrospective analysis, forms one of the basic data of paediatric nephrology and urology related disorders in our state. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of the case records of all the hospitalized patients with renal and urinary tract diseases between 2012 and 2013 were performed. Case records were analysed and categorized into various groups like; Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), Acute Kidney Injury (AKI), Acute Glomerulonephritis (AGN), Nephrotic Syndrome (NS), haematuria, Polycystic Kidney Disease (PCKD), Posterior Urethral Valve (PUV), Vesicoureteric Reflux (VUR), Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Iract (CAKUT) and others. These groups were divided into subgroups to get more insight about the pattern of these diseases. Results Out of 28114 patients hospitalized between 2012 and 2013 years, 447 (232 males and 215 females) patients were diagnosed of renal and urinary tract diseases which forms 1.58% the total admitted patients. Among these patients 32.9% (147/447) were diagnosed Acute Kidney Injury (AKI); 24.1% (108/447): Urinary Tract Infection (UTI); 9.6% (43/447): Acute Glomerulonephritis (AGN); 5.6% (25/447): bilateral hydronephrosis with UTI; 4.47% (20/447): nephrotic syndrome (NS); 3.5% (16/447): haematuria; and 4% (18/447) were having CAKUT (Congenital Anomalies Of Kidney And Urinary Tract). In addition to this there were 17 cases of Renal Tubular Acidosis (RTA), 3 cases of Barter syndrome and one case of Liddle syndrome. Conclusion A substantial number of children are hospitalized with renal and urinary tract diseases with

  10. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  11. Update on viral diseases of the equine respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Gilkerson, James R; Bailey, Kirsten E; Diaz-Méndez, Andrés; Hartley, Carol A

    2015-04-01

    Many viral agents have been associated with respiratory disease of the horse. The most important viral causes of respiratory disease in horses are equine influenza and the equine alphaherpesviruses. Agents such as equine viral arteritis virus, African horse sickness virus, and Hendra virus establish systemic infections. Clinical signs of disease resulting from infection with these agents can manifest as respiratory disease, but the respiratory tract is not the major body system affected by these viruses. Treatment of viral respiratory disease is generally limited to supportive therapies, whereas targeted antimicrobial therapy is effective in cases of bacterial infection.

  12. A strategy for management of upper tract calculus disease.

    PubMed

    Payne, S R; Webb, D R; Wickham, J E

    1985-12-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy and ureterorenoscopy now mean that approximately 98% of all renal and 85% of all ureteric calculi can be treated effectively, without recourse to open operative intervention, in centres possessing the necessary equipment and expertise. Experience with these techniques allows us to propose a strategy for the surgical treatment of upper tract stone disease.

  13. Prefrontal cortex white matter tracts in prodromal Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Joy T.; Vaidya, Jatin G.; Wassermann, Demian; Kim, Regina Eunyoung; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Johnson, Hans J.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is most widely known for its selective degeneration of striatal neurons but there is also growing evidence for white matter (WM) deterioration. The primary objective of this research was to conduct a large-scale analysis using multisite diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tractography data to quantify diffusivity properties along major prefrontal cortex WM tracts in prodromal HD. Fifteen international sites participating in the PREDICT-HD study collected imaging and neuropsychological data on gene-positive HD participants without a clinical diagnosis (i.e. prodromal) and gene-negative control participants. The anatomical prefrontal WM tracts of the corpus callosum (PFCC), anterior thalamic radiations (ATR), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi (IFO), and uncinate fasciculi (UNC) were identified using streamline tractography of DWI. Within each of these tracts, tensor scalars for fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity coefficients were calculated. We divided prodromal HD subjects into three CAG-age product (CAP) groups having Low, Medium, or High probabilities of onset indexed by genetic exposure. We observed significant differences in WM properties for each of the four anatomical tracts for the High CAP group in comparison to controls. Additionally, the Medium CAP group presented differences in the ATR and IFO in comparison to controls. Furthermore, WM alterations in the PFCC, ATR, and IFO showed robust associations with neuropsychological measures of executive functioning. These results suggest long-range tracts essential for cross-region information transfer show early vulnerability in HD and may explain cognitive problems often present in the prodromal stage. PMID:26179962

  14. Prefrontal cortex white matter tracts in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Joy T; Vaidya, Jatin G; Wassermann, Demian; Kim, Regina Eunyoung; Magnotta, Vincent A; Johnson, Hans J; Paulsen, Jane S

    2015-10-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is most widely known for its selective degeneration of striatal neurons but there is also growing evidence for white matter (WM) deterioration. The primary objective of this research was to conduct a large-scale analysis using multisite diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tractography data to quantify diffusivity properties along major prefrontal cortex WM tracts in prodromal HD. Fifteen international sites participating in the PREDICT-HD study collected imaging and neuropsychological data on gene-positive HD participants without a clinical diagnosis (i.e., prodromal) and gene-negative control participants. The anatomical prefrontal WM tracts of the corpus callosum (PFCC), anterior thalamic radiations (ATRs), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi (IFO), and uncinate fasciculi (UNC) were identified using streamline tractography of DWI. Within each of these tracts, tensor scalars for fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity coefficients were calculated. We divided prodromal HD subjects into three CAG-age product (CAP) groups having Low, Medium, or High probabilities of onset indexed by genetic exposure. We observed significant differences in WM properties for each of the four anatomical tracts for the High CAP group in comparison to controls. Additionally, the Medium CAP group presented differences in the ATR and IFO in comparison to controls. Furthermore, WM alterations in the PFCC, ATR, and IFO showed robust associations with neuropsychological measures of executive functioning. These results suggest long-range tracts essential for cross-region information transfer show early vulnerability in HD and may explain cognitive problems often present in the prodromal stage. Hum Brain Mapp 36:3717-3732, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Caustic ingestion injury of the upper aerodigestive tract in adults

    PubMed Central

    Jaulim, A; Vaz, F; Sandhu, G; Wood, S; Birchall, M; Dawas, K

    2015-01-01

    Adult ingestion of caustic substances is an unusual but serious surgical problem, with injuries likely to be more extensive than those in the corresponding paediatric population. After initial stabilisation and airway management, clinicians are presented with a complex multisystemic problem, frequently requiring a multidisciplinary approach involving several surgical disciplines and associated therapies. A new multidisciplinary team was convened to discuss complex ingestion injury in adults and established techniques were used to bring forward a proposed treatment algorithm. An algorithm may potentially improve clinical efficacy and risk in the management of these complex patients. PMID:26263940

  16. Urinary tract stone disease: are all problems solved?

    PubMed

    Tiselius, Hans-Göran

    2013-02-01

    During the past four decades there have been dramatic developments in the methods used for active stone removal from the urinary tract, and the need for open surgery has been almost entirely replaced by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, percutaneous surgery, ureteroscopy and retrograde intrarenal surgery. Residual fragments and the pronounced risk of recurrent stone formation remain important problems for the future development of urolithology and for the optimal low-risk management of this large group of patients. It is emphasized that all aspects of the care of patients with stone disease are the responsibility of the urologist.

  17. Indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Anamarija M.; Warnke, Roger A.; Hu, Qinglong; Gaulard, Philippe; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Alkan, Serhan; Wang, Huan-You; Cheng, Jason X.; Bacon, Chris M.; Delabie, Jan; Ranheim, Erik; Kucuk, Can; Hu, XiaoZhou; Weisenburger, Dennis D.

    2013-01-01

    Primary gastrointestinal (GI) T-cell lymphoma is an infrequent and aggressive disease. However, rare indolent clonal T-cell proliferations in the GI tract have been described. We report 10 cases of GI involvement by an indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disease, including 6 men and 4 women with a median age of 48 years (range, 15-77 years). Presenting symptoms included abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, food intolerance, and dyspepsia. The lesions involved oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon. The infiltrates were dense, but nondestructive, and composed of small, mature-appearing lymphoid cells. Eight cases were CD4−/CD8+, 1 was CD4+/CD8−, and another was CD4−/CD8−. T-cell receptor-γ chain gene rearrangement identified a clonal population in all 10 cases. There was no evidence of STAT3 SH2 domain mutation or activation. Six patients received chemotherapy because of an initial diagnosis of peripheral T-cell lymphoma, with little or no response, whereas the other 4 were followed without therapy. After a median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9-175 months), 9 patients were alive with persistent disease and 1 was free of disease. We propose the name “indolent T-LPD of the GI tract” for these lesions that can easily be mistaken for intestinal peripheral T-cell lymphoma, and lead to aggressive therapy. PMID:24009234

  18. Molecular profiling of biliary tract cancer: a target rich disease

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Apurva

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are relatively uncommon orphan tumors that have an aggressive disease course and a poor clinical outcome. Surgery is the only curative treatment, but most patients present with advanced disease and therefore have a limited survival. Gemcitabine and cisplatin based chemotherapy has been the only widely accepted standard systemic therapy regimen in these patients but these tumors can be chemoresistant, further complicating their management. In recent times, there has been considerable research in the genetics of BTC and with the advent of new, advanced technologies like next-generation sequencing (NGS) we are achieving a greater understanding of its disease biology. With the help of NGS, we have now been able to identify actionable mutations such as in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), FGFR2, BRAF and HER2/neu genes for targeted therapeutics and correlate the genetic variations with distinct clinical prognoses. This recent genetic information has the potential to make precision medicine a part of routine clinical practice for the management of BTC patients. PMID:27747093

  19. Relationship between lower urinary tract abnormalities and disease-related parameters in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Koldewijn, E L; Hommes, O R; Lemmens, W A; Debruyne, F M; van Kerrebroeck, P E

    1995-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis affects the lower urinary tract in many patients. The relationship between lower urinary tract abnormalities and disease-related parameters of multiple sclerosis is not well described. We screened urologically and neurologically 212 patients according to a standard protocol. Micturition complaints were noted in 52% of the patients and urodynamic abnormalities were found in 64%. A statistical correlation was found between detrusor hyperactivity and detrusor hypoactivity with disease-related parameters, that is disease duration, disability status, myelin basic protein concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid and neurophysiological investigations. No relationship was found between detrusor hypersensibility or detrusor hyposensibility and the aforementioned disease-related parameters. In 1 patient upper urinary tract abnormalities were noted in combination with urodynamic abnormalities. We conclude that lower urinary tract abnormalities can be found in every patient with multiple sclerosis unrelated to the state of the disease. Severe upper urinary tract abnormalities are rare. PMID:7539859

  20. Probiotics, prebiotics and the gastrointestinal tract in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Vitetta, Luis; Briskey, David; Alford, Hollie; Hall, Sean; Coulson, Samantha

    2014-06-01

    The microbiome located in the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) comprises the largest community (diverse and dense) of bacteria, and in conjunction with a conducive internal milieu, promotes the development of regulated pro- and anti-inflammatory signals within the GIT that promotes immunological and metabolic tolerance. In addition, host-microbial interactions govern GIT inflammation and provide cues for upholding metabolic regulation in both the host and microbes. Failure to regulate inflammatory responses can increase the risk of developing inflammatory conditions in the GIT. Here, we review clinical studies regarding the efficacy of probiotics/prebiotics and the role they may have in restoring host metabolic homeostasis by rescuing the inflammatory response. The clinical studies reviewed included functional constipation, antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, Clostridium difficile diarrhoea, infectious diarrhoea/gastroenteritis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases and necrotizing enterocolitis. We have demonstrated that there was an overall reduction in risk when probiotics were administered over placebo in the majority of GIT inflammatory conditions. The effect size of a cumulative reduction in relative risk for the GIT conditions/diseases investigated was 0.65 (0.61-0.70) (z = 13.3); p < 0.0001 that is an average reduction in risk of 35 % in favour of probiotics. We also progress a hypothesis that the GIT comprises numerous micro-axes (e.g. mucus secretion, Th1/Th2 balance) that are in operational homeostasis; hence probiotics and prebiotics may have a significant pharmacobiotic regulatory role in maintaining host GIT homeostasis in disease states partially through reactive oxygen species signalling.

  1. Hydrogen Sulfide in Physiology and Diseases of the Digestive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudha B.; Lin, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a Janus-faced molecule. On one hand, several toxic functions have been attributed to H2S and exposure to high levels of this gas is extremely hazardous to health. On the other hand, H2S delivery based clinical therapies are being developed to combat inflammation, visceral pain, oxidative stress related tissue injury, thrombosis and cancer. Since its discovery, H2S has been found to have pleiotropic effects on physiology and health. H2S is a gasotransmitter that exerts its effect on different systems, such as gastrointestinal, neuronal, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and hepatic systems. In the gastrointestinal tract, in addition to H2S production by mammalian cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), H2S is also generated by the metabolic activity of resident gut microbes, mainly by colonic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria (SRB) via a dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) pathway. In the gut, H2S regulates functions such as inflammation, ischemia/ reperfusion injury and motility. H2S derived from gut microbes has been found to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and irritable bowel syndrome. This underscores the importance of gut microbes and their production of H2S on host physiology and pathophysiology.

  2. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia associated with gastrointestinal tract diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Ulas D; Bayraktar, Soley

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a common site of bleeding that may lead to iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Treatment of IDA depends on severity and acuity of patients’ signs and symptoms. While red blood cell transfusions may be required in hemodynamically unstable patients, transfusions should be avoided in chronically anemic patients due to their potential side effects and cost. Iron studies need to be performed after episodes of GI bleeding and stores need to be replenished before anemia develops. Oral iron preparations are efficacious but poorly tolerated due to non-absorbed iron-mediated GI side effects. However, oral iron dose may be reduced with no effect on its efficacy while decreasing side effects and patient discontinuation rates. Parenteral iron therapy replenishes iron stores quicker and is better tolerated than oral therapy. Serious hypersensitive reactions are very rare with new intravenous preparations. While data on worsening of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) activity by oral iron therapy are not conclusive, parenteral iron therapy still seems to be advantageous in the treatment of IDA in patients with IBD, because oral iron may not be sufficient to overcome the chronic blood loss and GI side effects of oral iron which may mimic IBD exacerbation. Finally, we believe the choice of oral vs parenteral iron therapy in patients with IBD should primarily depend on acuity and severity of patients’ signs and symptoms. PMID:20533591

  3. Hydrogen Sulfide in Physiology and Diseases of the Digestive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudha B.; Lin, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a Janus-faced molecule. On one hand, several toxic functions have been attributed to H2S and exposure to high levels of this gas is extremely hazardous to health. On the other hand, H2S delivery based clinical therapies are being developed to combat inflammation, visceral pain, oxidative stress related tissue injury, thrombosis and cancer. Since its discovery, H2S has been found to have pleiotropic effects on physiology and health. H2S is a gasotransmitter that exerts its effect on different systems, such as gastrointestinal, neuronal, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and hepatic systems. In the gastrointestinal tract, in addition to H2S production by mammalian cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), H2S is also generated by the metabolic activity of resident gut microbes, mainly by colonic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria (SRB) via a dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) pathway. In the gut, H2S regulates functions such as inflammation, ischemia/ reperfusion injury and motility. H2S derived from gut microbes has been found to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and irritable bowel syndrome. This underscores the importance of gut microbes and their production of H2S on host physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:27682122

  4. Diagnosis and management of common gastrointestinal tract infectious diseases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Landsman, Marc J; Sultan, Mohamed; Stevens, Michael; Charabaty, Aline; Mattar, Mark C

    2014-12-01

    Management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, stretches beyond control of flares. Some infections of the gastrointestinal tract are more commonly seen in patients with IBD. Work from the Human Microbiome Project has been instrumental in our understanding of the interplay between the vast gut microbiota and host immune responses. Patients with IBD may be more prone to infectious complications based on their underlying inflammatory disease and variations in their microbiome. Immunosuppressant medications commonly used to treat patients with Crohn's and colitis also play a role in predisposing these patients to acquire these infections. Here, we present a detailed review of the data focusing on the most common infections of the gastrointestinal tract in patients with IBD: Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) and cytomegalovirus (CMV). We will discuss appropriate diagnostic tools and treatment options for these infections. Other less common infections will also be reviewed briefly. Studying the various infections of the gastrointestinal tract in these patients could enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of IBD. PMID:25208106

  5. Diagnosis and management of common gastrointestinal tract infectious diseases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Landsman, Marc J; Sultan, Mohamed; Stevens, Michael; Charabaty, Aline; Mattar, Mark C

    2014-12-01

    Management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, stretches beyond control of flares. Some infections of the gastrointestinal tract are more commonly seen in patients with IBD. Work from the Human Microbiome Project has been instrumental in our understanding of the interplay between the vast gut microbiota and host immune responses. Patients with IBD may be more prone to infectious complications based on their underlying inflammatory disease and variations in their microbiome. Immunosuppressant medications commonly used to treat patients with Crohn's and colitis also play a role in predisposing these patients to acquire these infections. Here, we present a detailed review of the data focusing on the most common infections of the gastrointestinal tract in patients with IBD: Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) and cytomegalovirus (CMV). We will discuss appropriate diagnostic tools and treatment options for these infections. Other less common infections will also be reviewed briefly. Studying the various infections of the gastrointestinal tract in these patients could enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of IBD.

  6. An association between Helicobacter pylori and upper respiratory tract disease: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Kariya, Shin; Okano, Mitsuhiro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2014-02-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major cause of chronic gastritis and gastric ulcers and considerable evidence supports the notion that infection with this bacterium is also associated with gastric malignancy in addition to various other conditions including pulmonary, vascular and autoimmune disorders. Gastric juice infected with H. pylori might play an important role in upper respiratory tract infection. Although direct and/or indirect mechanisms might be involved in the association between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the etiological role of H. pylori in upper respiratory tract disorders has not yet been fully elucidated. Although various studies over the past two decades have suggested a relationship between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the findings are inconsistent. The present overview describes the outcomes of recent investigations into the impact of H. pylori on upper respiratory tract and adjacent lesions.

  7. [Biochemical features of gallbladder bile in biliary tract diseases].

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, E Iu; Aleksandrova, A Iu; Beloborodova, E I; Didlovslaia, N A

    2007-06-01

    Sixty-two and 58 patients with hypo- and hypermotor biliary tract dysfunction (BTD), respectively, as well as 59 patients with chronic acalculous cholecystitis (CAC) and 63 with opisthorchiasis-complicated CAC were examined. A control group comprised 33 patients of the same sex and age. All the patients underwent fractional duodenal intubation, followed by clinical, biochemical, and serological bile studies. All the examinees were found to increased gallbladder bile lithogenicity, minor changes being observed in biliary tract dysfunction and more pronounced ones being in opisthorchiasis. A biochemical study of gallbladder bile, followed by its lithogenicity correction, is recommended in the treatment of different forms of BTD. PMID:17682480

  8. Why are upper tract urothelial carcinoma two different diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Szarvas, Tibor; Módos, Orsolya; Horváth, András

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years growing evidence highlighted the differences between upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) and urothelial bladder carcinoma (UBC) which cannot be explained solely by their different anatomical location. The aim of this review was to summarize current progress in UTUC research and to underline the differences and similarities between UTUC and UBC by focusing on epidemiology, etiology, staging and risk factors as well as on surgical and medical management. UBC and UTUC sharing common risk factors such as smoking and aromatic amines, while aristolochic acid exposure or familiar Lynch syndrome are rather specific for UTUC. The grading of UBC and UTUC are identical, but inherent from their different anatomical locations, there are some differences between their stage classifications. As an example, in contrast to UBC where a clear recommendation for pT3 subclassification exists, in UTUC current research aims to define an adequate subclassification for pelvic pT3 cases aiming to provide a better risk stratification. The primary treatment for both UBC and UTUC is surgery. Similarly to UBC, UTUC patients at high risk of disease progression are treated by radical surgery. However, because of the inaccurate preoperative or transurethral staging of UTUC, many radical nephroureterectomies are performed unnecessarily. Preoperative prediction of pathological stage or patients’ prognosis may reduce this overtreatment by selecting patients for nephron-sparing surgery. To this end, predictive models combining histological and molecular features together with imaging data may be used. The antegrade or retrograde instillation of BCG or mitomycin C, as topical agents is feasible after conservative treatment of UTUC or for the treatment of CIS. However, the prognostic significance of lymph node positivity in UTUC seems to be similar to that of UBC, the therapeutic benefit of lymph node dissection (LND) in UTUC has not been firmly established yet. In addition

  9. Early adaptive immune responses in the respiratory tract of foot and mouth disease-infected cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease which affects both domestic and wildlife biungulate species. This acute disease, caused by the FMD virus (FMDV), usually includes an active replication phase in the respiratory tract up to 72 h post-infection followed by hematogenous ...

  10. Upper tract urothelial carcinomas in patients with chronic kidney disease: relationship with diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Jen; Lee, Shen-Yang; Teh, Bin Tean; Chuang, Cheng-Keng; Nortier, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease and upper tract urothelial carcinomas display a bidirectional relationship. Review of the literature indicates that early diagnosis and correct localization of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients are important but problematic. Urine cytology and cystoscopy have limited sensitivity for the diagnosis of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients. Enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could prove useful for the detection and staging of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients. Renal ultrasound can detect hydronephrosis caused by upper tract urothelial carcinomas in kidney transplant recipients but cannot visualize the carcinomas themselves. High detection rates for upper tract urothelial carcinomas in kidney transplant recipients have recently been demonstrated using computed tomography urography, which appears to be a promising tool. To detect carcinomas in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients as early as possible, regular screening in asymptomatic patients and diagnostic work-up in symptomatic patients should be performed using a combination of urological and imaging methods. Careful assessment of subsequent recurrence within the contralateral upper urinary tract and the urinary bladder is necessary for dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients with upper tract urothelial carcinomas.

  11. Somatostatin receptors in the gastrointestinal tract in health and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    The multiple actions of somatostatin are mediated by specific membrane-bound receptors present in all somatostatin target tissues, such as brain, pituitary, pancreas, and gastrointestinal tract. Three different types of tissues in the human gastrointestinal tract express somatostatin receptors: (1) the gastrointestinal mucosa, (2) the peripheral nervous system, and (3) the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, where the receptors are preferentially located in germinal centers. In all these cases, somatostatin binding is of high affinity and specific for bioactive somatostatin analogs. Somatostatin receptors are also expressed in pathological states, particularly in neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Ninety percent of the carcinoids and a majority of islet-cell carcinomas, including their metastases, usually have a high density of somatostatin receptors. Only 10 percent of the colorectal carcinomas and none of the exocrine pancreatic carcinomas, however, contain somatostatin receptors. The somatostatin receptors in tumors are identified with in vitro binding methods or with in vivo imaging techniques; the latter allow the precise localization of the tumors and their metastases in the patients. Since somatostatin receptors in gastroenteropancreatic tumors are functional, their identification can be used to assess the therapeutic efficacy of octreotide to inhibit excessive hormone release in the patients. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:1340064

  12. Effectiveness of prokinetic agents against diseases external to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Toru; Yoshihara, Masaharu; Tanaka, Shinji; Haruma, Ken; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2009-04-01

    Prokinetic agents are effective not only for disease of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract but also for those external to the GI tract such as the central nervous system, and the respiratory, urologic, and metabolic organs. This article reviews the effectiveness of prokinetic agents against diseases external to the GI tract. Studies were identified by computerized and manual searches of the available literature. A Medline search was performed (1975-July, 2008) using the following medical subject headings: prokinetic agent, metoclopramide, domperidone, trimebutine, cisapride, itopride, mosapride, tegaserod, and human. The identified diseases for which prokinetic agents may be effective are various: bronchial asthma, chronic cough, hiccup, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, cholelithiasis, diabetes mellitus, acute migraine, Parkinson's disease, anorexia nervosa, Tourette's disorder, urologic sequelae of spinal cord injury and of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer, laryngeal dysfunction and so on. These agents are also useful for prevention of aspiration pneumonia during anesthesia, and in tube-fed patients. Prokinetic agents should be a valuable addition to our currently limited pharmacological armamentarium not only for functional bowel disease, but also for diseases external to the GI tract. PMID:19220673

  13. Application of ultrasound technology in the diagnosis and treatment of digestive tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Fu, W-X; Wang, Q; Zhang, Y-S; Li, Y; Xu, T; He, S; Ren, H; Sun, T

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasound is commonly used in clinical examination which is economic, non-invasive and convenient. Ultrasound can be used for the examination of solid organs and hollow organs. Due to the presence of air, routine ultrasound examination of the digestive tract is not very appropriate, Because of the development of endosonography and its related technology, diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal diseases have been improved which is valuable in clinic. This review focused on the application of ultrasound technology in the diagnosis and treatment of digestive tract diseases.

  14. Validation of ultrasonography in detecting structural disease of the urogenital tract of the koala, Phascolarctos cinereus.

    PubMed

    Marschner, C; Flanagan, C; Higgins, D P; Krockenberger, M B

    2014-05-01

    A retrospective review of case records of ultrasonography and necropsy outcomes of 62 koalas was used to investigate the accuracy of ultrasonography in assessing koala urogenital tract structural disease at the Port Macquarie Koala Hospital. The results showed high concordance, supporting ultrasonography as an effective tool for evaluating structural disease of the koala urogenital tract, most commonly seen with chlamydiosis. The study also illustrates the advances benefiting animal welfare that can be made by wildlife carer groups through using a scientific, evidence-based approach.

  15. New endoscopic ultrasound techniques for digestive tract diseases: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fan-Sheng; Zhang, Zhao-Hong; Ji, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is one of the most important modalities for the diagnosis of digestive tract diseases. EUS has been evolving ever since it was introduced. New techniques such as elastography and contrast enhancement have emerged, increasing the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of EUS for the diagnosis of digestive tract diseases including pancreatic masses and lymphadenopathy. EUS-elastography evaluates tissue elasticity and therefore, can be used to differentiate various lesions. Contrast-enhanced EUS can distinguish benign from malignant pancreatic lesions and lymphadenopathy using the intravenous injection of contrast agents. This review discusses the principles and types of these new techniques, as well as their clinical applications and limitations. PMID:25944994

  16. [Endoluminal ultrasonography in diagnosing and treating upper urinary tract diseases].

    PubMed

    Martov, A G; Saliukova, Iu R; Saliukov, R V

    2002-01-01

    Endoluminal ultrasound scanning (EUS) of the upper urinary tracts (UUT) with intracavitary catheter sensor was performed in 15 patients (7 men and 8 women) aged 21 to 61 years. In 8 patients EUS was diagnostic (in one patient it was made twice, in 2 cases--in combination with ureteroscopy and biopsy), in 7 patients it was a diagnostic stage of the following surgical intervention, in 6--in combination with roentgenoendoscopic correction of strictures of the ureteropelvic segment (UPS) and in 1--in combination with transurethral pyelolithotripsy. A total of 16 procedures were made: 15 transurethral and 1--percutaneous. Endoluminal ultrasonography was conducted not only of the whole ureter but also of renal calycopelvic system (RAPS) which presented endosonographic semiotics of UUT. EUS has diagnosed urate concrement in 4 cases, "cross" vessels which narrowed UPS in 3 cases with late hydronephrotic transformation. In one patient EUS was carried out in combination with ureteroscopy and biopsy as a control examination 6 and 18 months after transurethral endoresection of ureteral tumor. In 6 patients with UPS strictures EUS was made for diagnosis of suspected cross vessels before endopyelotomy. No complications during EUS were encountered. Pilot experience with intracavitary ultrasonography of the UUT shows its high diagnostic potential and clinical value. This technique details inner structures of the ureter and RAPS with adjacent tissues due to minimal distance between the sensor and studied object.

  17. DIFFUSE AND FOCAL CORTICOSPINAL TRACT DISEASE AND ITS IMPACT ON PATIENT DISABILITY IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Evangelou, Iordanis E.; Chiu, Annie W.; Auh, Sungyoung; Chen, Christina; Ehrmantraut, Mary; Ohayon, Joan M.; Richert, Nancy; Bagnato, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated the impact of focal and diffuse corticospinal tracts damage on sensory-motor disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Methods Twenty-five MS patients underwent 3.0 Tesla (3T) magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the Timed 25-Foot Walk test (T25FW) quantified patient physical disability. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) of the corticospinal tracts, whole brain and corticospinal tracts lesion volume were also computed. Spearman rank correlation analyses measured the associations between DTI-derived metrics and other measures of disease. Partial correlation analyses between DTI and disability measures were performed and corrected for lesion volumes as appropriate. Results Significant associations were seen between FA of the corticospinal tracts and EDSS (r =−0.500, p =0.0011), motor-EDSS (r = −0.519, p=0.008), and T25WF (r=−0.637, p =0.001) scores and MD of the corticospinal tracts and motor-EDSS (r=0.469, p=0.018) and T25WF (r=0.428, p=0.033) scores. When correcting for lesion volumes, only the association between FA of the corticospinal tracts and EDSS (p≤0.01, r≤ −0.516) or motor-EDSS score (p=0.03, r=−0.468,) persisted. Conclusions DTI at 3T shows that the impact of diffuse corticospinal tracts disease on sensory-motor disability is greatly mediated by focal lesions in MS. PMID:25318661

  18. Predominant association of Raoultella bacteremia with diseases of the biliary tract.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Eefje; Erkens-Hulshof, Sandra; van der Velden, Lieven B J; Voss, Andreas; Bosboom, Ron; Hodiamont, Caspar J; Wever, Peter C; Rentenaar, Rob J; Sturm, Patrick D

    2014-02-01

    A case series of 14 patients with Raoultella bacteremia was compared with 28 Klebsiella oxytoca and 28 Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia cases. Forty-three percent of Raoultella bacteremia cases were associated with biliary tract disease, compared to 32% and 22% of patients with K. oxytoca and K. pneumoniae bacteremia, respectively.

  19. Risk and Surveillance of Cancers in Primary Biliary Tract Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hrad, Valery; Abebe, Yoftahe; Ali, Syed Haris; Velgersdyk, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary diseases have been associated in several studies with various malignancies. Understanding the risk and optimizing surveillance strategy of these malignancies in this specific subset of patients are an important facet of clinical care. For instance, primary sclerosing cholangitis is associated with an increased risk for cholangiocarcinoma (which is very challenging to diagnose) and when IBD is present for colorectal cancer. On the other hand, primary biliary cirrhosis patients with cirrhosis or not responding to 12 months of ursodeoxycholic acid therapy are at increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review we will discuss in detail the risks and optimal surveillance strategies for patients with primary biliary diseases. PMID:27413366

  20. Evaluation of biliary tract disease by ultrasonic B-mode scanning.

    PubMed

    Addison, N V; Follows, O J; Weedon, M R

    1976-10-01

    To establish the value of diagnostic ultrasound (sonar) in the diagnosis of bilitary tract disease, 140 patients were scanned and also had a plain film of the biliary tract. Of these, 105 had contrast radiography and 123 were subjected to laparotomy. The results obtained suggest that in the absence of jaundice, sonar compares well with oral cholecystography in demonstrating the gallbladder, but is not as good as intravenous cholangiography in showing the duct system. In the presence of jaundice, however, sonar is considered the imaging investigation of choice.

  1. A Rare Disease of the Digestive Tract: Esophageal Melanosis

    PubMed Central

    Destek, Sebahattin; Gul, Vahit Onur; Ahioglu, Serkan; Erbil, Yesim

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal melanosis which is characterized by melanocytic proliferation in the squamous epithelium of the esophagus and melanin accumulatin of esophageal mucosa (EM) is a rare disease of the digestive system. Although esophageal melanosis is considered to be a benign disease, its etiology is not cleared and has been reported to be the precursor lesion of esophageal primary melanomas. In this report, we aimed to note esophageal melanosis in a 55-year-old female case who applied to our clinic with difficulty in swallowing, burning behind the breastbone in the stomach, heartburn, indigestion, and pain in the upper abdomen after endoscopic and pathologic evaluation. Complaints dropped with anti-acid therapy and case was followed by intermittent endoscopic procedures because of precursor melanocytic lesions. PMID:27785326

  2. Allergic- and immune-associated diseases of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Nichols, R

    1994-07-01

    Glomerular injury has a decided immunologic basis. Any infectious, inflammatory, neoplastic, or degenerative processes capable of sustained antigenic stimulation can induce immune-mediated glomerular injury. A variety of conditions and antigens, both endogenous and exogenous, are known to initiate immunologic glomerular damage. In many clinical situations, however, the precise antigenic source is occult and unrecognizable, and the glomerular disease is referred to as idiopathic. PMID:7975046

  3. Strategic white matter tracts for processing speed deficits in age-related small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Duering, Marco; Gesierich, Benno; Seiler, Stephan; Pirpamer, Lukas; Gonik, Mariya; Hofer, Edith; Jouvent, Eric; Duchesnay, Edouard; Chabriat, Hugues; Ropele, Stefan; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Cerebral small vessel disease is the most common cause of vascular cognitive impairment and typically manifests with slowed processing speed. We investigated the impact of lesion location on processing speed in age-related small vessel disease. Methods: A total of 584 community-dwelling elderly underwent brain MRI followed by segmentation of white matter hyperintensities. Processing speed was determined by the timed measure of the Trail Making Test part B. The impact of the location of white matter hyperintensities was assessed by voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping and graph-based statistical models on regional lesion volumes in major white matter tracts. Results: Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping identified multiple voxel clusters where the presence of white matter hyperintensities was associated with slower performance on the Trail Making Test part B. Clusters were located bilaterally in the forceps minor and anterior thalamic radiation. Region of interest–based Bayesian network analyses on lesion volumes within major white matter tracts depicted the same tracts as direct predictors for an impaired Trail Making Test part B performance. Conclusions: Our findings highlight damage to frontal interhemispheric and thalamic projection fiber tracts harboring frontal-subcortical neuronal circuits as a predictor for processing speed performance in age-related small vessel disease. PMID:24793184

  4. Medical and alternative therapies in urinary tract stone disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuvanc, Ercan; Yilmaz, Erdal; Tuglu, Devrim; Batislam, Ertan

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a serious problem for both patients and the health system. Recurrence stands out as a significant problem in urinary system stone disease, the prevalence of which is increasing gradually. If recurrence is not prevented, patients may go through recurrent operations due to nephrolithiasis. While classical therapeutic options are available for all stone types, the number of randomized controlled studies and extensive meta-analyses focusing on their efficiency are inadequate. Various alternative therapeutic options to these medical therapies also stand out in recent years. The etiology of urolithiasis is multifactorial and not always related to nutritional factors. Nutrition therapy seems to be useful, either along with pharmacological therapy or as a monotherapy. General nutrition guidelines are useful in promoting public health and developing nutrition plans that reduce the risk or attenuate the effects of diseases affected by nutrition. Nutrition therapy involves the evaluation of a patient’s nutritional state and intake, the diagnosis of nutrition risk factors, and the organization and application of a nutrition program. The main target is the reduction or prevention of calculus formation and growth via decreasing lithogenic risk factors and increasing lithogenic inhibitors in urine. This review focuses briefly on classical medical therapy, along with alternative options, related diets, and medical expulsive therapy. PMID:26558186

  5. Predominant Corticospinal Tract Involvement in a Late Infant with Krabbe Disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ayumi; Kibe, Tetsuya; Irahara, Kaori; Sakai, Norio; Yokochi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    A case of late-infantile Krabbe disease in a patient who presented with developmental regression and spastic quadriplegia in late infancy is reported. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 11 months of age showed predominant corticospinal tract involvement, which usually appears in adult Krabbe disease. Galactocerebrosidase activity in lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts was very low. Genetic testing revealed compound heterozygous mutations of the galactocerebrosidase (GALC) gene, c.635_646 delinsCTC and c.1901T>C [p.L618S], both of which are known pathogenic mutations. It has been reported that the c.1901T>C [p.L618S] mutation is associated with the late-onset phenotype and, in a past case, a homozygous mutation at this location showed predominant corticospinal tract involvement on MRI. Although further analysis is needed to identify the pathophysiological mechanism, this combination of mutations is likely to be associated with this unusual MRI finding in late-infantile Krabbe disease. Because these types of mutations are common for Japanese patients, it is possible that there are more undiagnosed and late-diagnosed patients of late-infantile Krabbe disease who display limited lesions on MRI. Pediatricians should be aware that patients with late-infantile Krabbe disease can present with predominant corticospinal tract involvement on MRI. PMID:27679535

  6. Predominant Corticospinal Tract Involvement in a Late Infant with Krabbe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Ayumi; Kibe, Tetsuya; Irahara, Kaori; Sakai, Norio; Yokochi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    A case of late-infantile Krabbe disease in a patient who presented with developmental regression and spastic quadriplegia in late infancy is reported. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 11 months of age showed predominant corticospinal tract involvement, which usually appears in adult Krabbe disease. Galactocerebrosidase activity in lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts was very low. Genetic testing revealed compound heterozygous mutations of the galactocerebrosidase (GALC) gene, c.635_646 delinsCTC and c.1901T>C [p.L618S], both of which are known pathogenic mutations. It has been reported that the c.1901T>C [p.L618S] mutation is associated with the late-onset phenotype and, in a past case, a homozygous mutation at this location showed predominant corticospinal tract involvement on MRI. Although further analysis is needed to identify the pathophysiological mechanism, this combination of mutations is likely to be associated with this unusual MRI finding in late-infantile Krabbe disease. Because these types of mutations are common for Japanese patients, it is possible that there are more undiagnosed and late-diagnosed patients of late-infantile Krabbe disease who display limited lesions on MRI. Pediatricians should be aware that patients with late-infantile Krabbe disease can present with predominant corticospinal tract involvement on MRI. PMID:27679535

  7. Predominant Corticospinal Tract Involvement in a Late Infant with Krabbe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Ayumi; Kibe, Tetsuya; Irahara, Kaori; Sakai, Norio; Yokochi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    A case of late-infantile Krabbe disease in a patient who presented with developmental regression and spastic quadriplegia in late infancy is reported. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 11 months of age showed predominant corticospinal tract involvement, which usually appears in adult Krabbe disease. Galactocerebrosidase activity in lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts was very low. Genetic testing revealed compound heterozygous mutations of the galactocerebrosidase (GALC) gene, c.635_646 delinsCTC and c.1901T>C [p.L618S], both of which are known pathogenic mutations. It has been reported that the c.1901T>C [p.L618S] mutation is associated with the late-onset phenotype and, in a past case, a homozygous mutation at this location showed predominant corticospinal tract involvement on MRI. Although further analysis is needed to identify the pathophysiological mechanism, this combination of mutations is likely to be associated with this unusual MRI finding in late-infantile Krabbe disease. Because these types of mutations are common for Japanese patients, it is possible that there are more undiagnosed and late-diagnosed patients of late-infantile Krabbe disease who display limited lesions on MRI. Pediatricians should be aware that patients with late-infantile Krabbe disease can present with predominant corticospinal tract involvement on MRI.

  8. Pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis and drugs used in associated digestive tract diseases

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Adriana; Aragão, Giselle Gonçalves; Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho Garbi

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) causes chronic infections in the respiratory tract and alters the digestive tract. This paper reviews the most important aspects of drug treatment and changes in the digestive tract of patients with CF. This is a review of the literature, emphasizing the discoveries made within the last 15 years by analyzing scientific papers published in journals indexed in the Scientific Electronic Library Online, Sciences Information, United States National Library of Medicine and Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online databases, both in English and Portuguese, using the key words: cystic fibrosis, medication, therapeutic, absorption, digestion. Randomized, observational, experimental, and epidemiological clinical studies were selected, among others, with statistical significance of 5%. This review evaluates the changes found in the digestive tract of CF patients including pancreatic insufficiency, constipation and liver diseases. Changes in nutritional status are also described. Clinical treatment, nutritional supplementation and drug management were classified in this review as essential to the quality of life of CF patients, and became available through public policies for monitoring and treating CF. The information gathered on CF and a multi professional approach to the disease is essential in the treatment of these patients. PMID:24379572

  9. [Disturbances of gastrointestinal motility of the stomach in patients with chronic gastric erosions and biliary tract disease].

    PubMed

    Svintsitskyĭ, A S; Solovĭova, H A

    2012-12-01

    Article dwells on comparison data about motor function of the stomach in the three groups of patients: with gastric erosions and biliary tract diseases, duodenal ulcer disease, chronic gastritis. It is shown, that patients with gastric erosions and biliary tract diseases are characterized by slower evacuation function of the stomach, hypotonus of the stomach. Frequency of duodenal reflux in this group of patients is very high (85,9 %).

  10. Risk factors for developing a second upper aerodigestive cancer after radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in patients with head-and-neck cancers: An exploratory outcomes analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Taussky, Daniel . E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca; Rufibach, Kaspar M.Sc.; Huguenin, Pia; Allal, Abdelkarim S.

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: The objective was to assess the influence of treatment-related and patient-related factors on the risk of developing a second primary tumor (SPT) of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) in patients with locoregionally advanced nonmetastatic carcinomas of the head-and-neck region. Methods and Materials: The data of 521 patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year were pooled: 224 patients from the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (SAKK) 10/94 trial, treated with 1.2 Gy b.i.d. to 74.4 Gy, and randomized to receive or not to receive simultaneous chemotherapy with cisplatin (excluding nasopharyngeal and maxillary sinus carcinomas); and 297 patients from Geneva, all treated with accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant boost to 69.9 Gy and predominantly cisplatin-based concomitant chemotherapy in 33% of patients (including 21 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinomas). An exploratory analysis using competing risk methodology was performed. Results: A total of 65 SPT of the UADT were observed after a median observation time of 4.7 years. The overall risk of experiencing an SPT of the UADT at 10 years in the presence of all other possible events was estimated to be 33%. There were no SPTs after treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, there was no difference in occurrence of SPT at 3 years with respect to the administration of chemotherapy (p = 0.31), age (p 0.62), performance status (p = 0.61), gender (p = 0.27), presence of nodal disease (p = 0.51), or T stage (p = 0.72). However, patients treated with concomitant boost had fewer SPTs (p = 0.0093). Conclusions: Our data do not suggest that addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy influences the incidence of second cancers in patients with head-and-neck cancer. The difference in the incidence of SPT between the two radiotherapy schedule groups merits further exploration.

  11. [Bee products for treatment of diseases of mouth and upper respiratory tract].

    PubMed

    Gendrolis, Antanas; Ivanauskas, Liudas; Lukosius, Audronis; Brusokas, Valdemaras

    2004-01-01

    Production of spray (from bee products), which is used for mouth and upper respiratory tract disease treatment and prevention, is described in this article. The optimal technology of spray is prepared, and concentration of ethanol as extragent 70% and 15% of honey is determined. The preparation is called propomel. Methods of analysis were applied, investigations of stability were performed, time of suitableness was determined, as well as the normative and technical documentation was prepared. PMID:15299996

  12. The Association between Invasive Group A Streptococcal Diseases and Viral Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Andrea L.; Huber, Victor C.; Chaussee, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections of the upper respiratory tract are associated with a variety of invasive diseases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, the group A streptococcus, including pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome, and bacteremia. While these polymicrobial infections, or superinfections, are complex, progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of disease. Areas of investigation have included the characterization of virus-induced changes in innate immunity, differences in bacterial adherence and internalization following viral infection, and the efficacy of vaccines in mitigating the morbidity and mortality of superinfections. Here, we briefly summarize viral-S. pyogenes superinfections with an emphasis on those affiliated with influenza viruses. PMID:27047460

  13. The Association between Invasive Group A Streptococcal Diseases and Viral Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Andrea L; Huber, Victor C; Chaussee, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections of the upper respiratory tract are associated with a variety of invasive diseases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, the group A streptococcus, including pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome, and bacteremia. While these polymicrobial infections, or superinfections, are complex, progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of disease. Areas of investigation have included the characterization of virus-induced changes in innate immunity, differences in bacterial adherence and internalization following viral infection, and the efficacy of vaccines in mitigating the morbidity and mortality of superinfections. Here, we briefly summarize viral-S. pyogenes superinfections with an emphasis on those affiliated with influenza viruses. PMID:27047460

  14. Risk of Flood-Related Diseases of Eyes, Skin and Gastrointestinal Tract in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling-Ya; Wang, Yu-Chun; Wu, Chin-Ching; Chen, Yi-Chun; Huang, Yu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Floods are known to cause serious environmental damage and health impacts. Studies on flood-related diseases have been primarily on individual events, and limited evidence could be drawn on potential health impacts from floods using large population data. This study used reimbursement records of one million people of the Taiwan National Health Insurance program to compare incident diseases of the eyes, skin and gastrointestinal (GI) tract associated with floods. Incidence rates for the selected diseases were calculated according to outpatient/emergency visit data. The incidence rates were evaluated by flood status: in 10 days before floods, during floods and within 10 days after the floods receded. Outpatient/emergency visit rates for the eye, skin and GI tract diseases were highest after floods and lowest during floods. Results from multivariate Poisson regression analyses showed that, when compared with the incidence in 10 days before floods, the incidence rate ratios (IRR) of diseases within 10 days after floods were 1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10-1.20) for eyes, 1.08 (95% C.I. = 1.05-1.10) for skin, and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08-1.14) for GI tract, after controlling for covariates. All risks increased with ambient temperature. V-shaped trends were found between age and eye diseases, and between age and GI tract diseases. In contrast, the risk of skin diseases increased with age. In conclusion, more diseases of eyes, skin and GI tract could be diagnosed after the flood.

  15. Endocannabinoids and the Digestive Tract and Bladder in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Angelo A; Muccioli, Giulio G; Ruggieri, Michael R; Schicho, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Components of the so-called endocannabinoid system, i.e., cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoids, as well as enzymes involved in endocannabinoid synthesis and degradation, have been identified both in the gastrointestinal and in the urinary tract. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system is implicated in many gastrointestinal and urinary physiological and pathophysiological processes, including epithelial cell growth, inflammation, analgesia, and motor function. A pharmacological modulation of the endocannabinoid system might be beneficial for widespread diseases such as gastrointestinal reflux disease, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, colon cancer, cystitis, and hyperactive bladder. Drugs that inhibit endocannabinoid degradation and raise the level of endocannabinoids, non-psychotropic cannabinoids (notably cannabidiol), and palmitoylethanolamide, an acylethanolamide co-released with the endocannabinoid anandamide, are promising candidates for gastrointestinal and urinary diseases. PMID:26408170

  16. Tract-based analysis of white matter degeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-H; Coutu, J-P; Wilkens, P; Yendiki, A; Rosas, H D; Salat, D H

    2015-08-20

    Although much prior work has focused on the known cortical pathology that defines Alzheimer's disease (AD) histologically, recent work has additionally demonstrated substantial damage to the cerebral white matter in this condition. While there is large evidence of diffuse damage to the white matter in AD, it is unclear whether specific white matter tracts exhibit a more accelerated pattern of damage and whether the damage is associated with the classical neurodegenerative changes of AD. In this study, we investigated microstructural differences in the large fascicular bundles of the cerebral white matter of individuals with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), using recently developed automated diffusion tractography procedures in the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. Eighteen major fiber bundles in a total of 36 individuals with AD, 81 MCI and 60 control participants were examined with the TRActs Constrained by UnderLying Anatomy (TRACULA) procedure available as part of the FreeSurfer image processing software package. For each fiber bundle, the mean fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean, radial and axial diffusivities were calculated. Individuals with AD had increased diffusivities in both left and right cingulum-angular bundles compared to control participants (p<0.001). Individuals with MCI also had increased axial and mean diffusivities and increased FA in both cingulum-angular bundles compared to control participants (p<0.05) and decreased radial diffusivity compared to individuals with AD (p<0.05). We additionally examined how white matter deterioration relates to hippocampal volume, a traditional imaging measure of AD pathology, and found the strongest negative correlations in AD patients between hippocampal volume and the diffusivities of the cingulum-angular and cingulum-cingulate gyrus bundles and of the corticospinal tracts (p<0.05). However, statistically controlling for hippocampal volume did not remove all group

  17. Influenza A (H10N7) Virus Causes Respiratory Tract Disease in Harbor Seals and Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Herfst, Sander; Bodewes, Rogier; Pfankuche, Vanessa M.; van de Bildt, Marco W. G.; Seehusen, Frauke; Puff, Christina; Richard, Mathilde; Siebert, Ursula; Lehnert, Kristina; Bestebroer, Theo; Lexmond, Pascal; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Herbst, Werner; Koopmans, Marion; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses sporadically cross the species barrier to mammals, including humans, in which they may cause epidemic disease. Recently such an epidemic occurred due to the emergence of avian influenza virus of the subtype H10N7 (Seal/H10N7) in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina). This epidemic caused high mortality in seals along the north-west coast of Europe and represented a potential risk for human health. To characterize the spectrum of lesions and to identify the target cells and viral distribution, findings in 16 harbor seals spontaneously infected with Seal/H10N7 are described. The seals had respiratory tract inflammation extending from the nasal cavity to bronchi associated with intralesional virus antigen in respiratory epithelial cells. Virus infection was restricted to the respiratory tract. The fatal outcome of the viral infection in seals was most likely caused by secondary bacterial infections. To investigate the pathogenic potential of H10N7 infection for humans, we inoculated the seal virus intratracheally into six ferrets and performed pathological and virological analyses at 3 and 7 days post inoculation. These experimentally inoculated ferrets displayed mild clinical signs, virus excretion from the pharynx and respiratory tract inflammation extending from bronchi to alveoli that was associated with virus antigen expression exclusively in the respiratory epithelium. Virus was isolated only from the respiratory tract. In conclusion, Seal/H10N7 infection in naturally infected harbor seals and experimentally infected ferrets shows that respiratory epithelial cells are the permissive cells for viral replication. Fatal outcome in seals was caused by secondary bacterial pneumonia similar to that in fatal human cases during influenza pandemics. Productive infection of ferrets indicates that seal/H10N7 may possess a zoonotic potential. This outbreak of LPAI from wild birds to seals demonstrates the risk of such occasions for mammals and thus humans

  18. Influenza A (H10N7) Virus Causes Respiratory Tract Disease in Harbor Seals and Ferrets.

    PubMed

    van den Brand, Judith M A; Wohlsein, Peter; Herfst, Sander; Bodewes, Rogier; Pfankuche, Vanessa M; van de Bildt, Marco W G; Seehusen, Frauke; Puff, Christina; Richard, Mathilde; Siebert, Ursula; Lehnert, Kristina; Bestebroer, Theo; Lexmond, Pascal; Fouchier, Ron A M; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Herbst, Werner; Koopmans, Marion; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses sporadically cross the species barrier to mammals, including humans, in which they may cause epidemic disease. Recently such an epidemic occurred due to the emergence of avian influenza virus of the subtype H10N7 (Seal/H10N7) in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina). This epidemic caused high mortality in seals along the north-west coast of Europe and represented a potential risk for human health. To characterize the spectrum of lesions and to identify the target cells and viral distribution, findings in 16 harbor seals spontaneously infected with Seal/H10N7 are described. The seals had respiratory tract inflammation extending from the nasal cavity to bronchi associated with intralesional virus antigen in respiratory epithelial cells. Virus infection was restricted to the respiratory tract. The fatal outcome of the viral infection in seals was most likely caused by secondary bacterial infections. To investigate the pathogenic potential of H10N7 infection for humans, we inoculated the seal virus intratracheally into six ferrets and performed pathological and virological analyses at 3 and 7 days post inoculation. These experimentally inoculated ferrets displayed mild clinical signs, virus excretion from the pharynx and respiratory tract inflammation extending from bronchi to alveoli that was associated with virus antigen expression exclusively in the respiratory epithelium. Virus was isolated only from the respiratory tract. In conclusion, Seal/H10N7 infection in naturally infected harbor seals and experimentally infected ferrets shows that respiratory epithelial cells are the permissive cells for viral replication. Fatal outcome in seals was caused by secondary bacterial pneumonia similar to that in fatal human cases during influenza pandemics. Productive infection of ferrets indicates that seal/H10N7 may possess a zoonotic potential. This outbreak of LPAI from wild birds to seals demonstrates the risk of such occasions for mammals and thus humans

  19. Interactions between Cytokines, Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Tract and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Valério, Flávia Cordeiro; Vasconcelos, Mariana Affonso; Miranda, Débora Marques; Oliveira, Eduardo Araújo

    2013-01-01

    Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1–5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract anomalies among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, very expensive, and not sufficient to precisely define the best approach as well as the prognosis. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric urological diseases. In this regard, recent studies suggest a role for cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of CAKUT and for the progression to CKD. Some authors proposed that the evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help the management of postnatal uropathies and the detection of patients with high risk to developed chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of cytokines and the link between cytokines, CAKUT, and CKD by including experimental and clinical evidence. PMID:24066006

  20. The potential of methylxanthine-based therapies in pediatric respiratory tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Oñatibia-Astibia, Ainhoa; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Franco, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Caffeine, theophylline and theobromine are the most known methylxanthines as they are present in coffee, tea and/or chocolate. In the last decades, a huge experimental effort has been devoted to get insight into the variety of actions that these compounds exert in humans. From such knowledge it is known that methylxanthines have a great potential in prevention, therapy and/or management of a variety of diseases. The benefits of methylxanthine-based therapies in the apnea of prematurity and their translational potential in pediatric affections of the respiratory tract are here presented. PMID:26880379

  1. Surveillance of upper respiratory tract disease in owned cats in Australia, 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Wong, W T; Kelman, M; Ward, M P

    2013-10-01

    Reported cases of feline upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) - presumptively diagnosed as feline herpesvirus (FHV) or feline calicivirus (FCV) - throughout Australia (2010-2012) were obtained from Disease WatchDog, a companion animal disease surveillance system. This surveillance system is based on voluntary reporting of cases by veterinarians, using a web-based program. Animal factors, location and vaccination information are also reported. Cases reported were mapped and seasonal patterns were described. A total of 131 FHV cases and 120 FCV cases were reported. Excluding euthanasia, case fatality rates were 1.12% and 1.28%, respectively. The largest proportion of cases was reported in winter. Young cats (≤ 2 years), intact cats, unvaccinated cats and (for FHV) male cats appeared to be over-represented in the cases reported. The distributions of cases reported in this surveillance system provide information to aid the diagnosis of infectious feline URTD and to develop client educational programs. PMID:23910025

  2. Antimicrobial Use Guidelines for Treatment of Urinary Tract Disease in Dogs and Cats: Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Weese, J. Scott; Blondeau, Joseph M.; Boothe, Dawn; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Guardabassi, Luca; Hillier, Andrew; Lloyd, David H.; Papich, Mark G.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Turnidge, John D.; Sykes, Jane E.

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract disease is a common reason for use (and likely misuse, improper use, and overuse) of antimicrobials in dogs and cats. There is a lack of comprehensive treatment guidelines such as those that are available for human medicine. Accordingly, guidelines for diagnosis and management of urinary tract infections were created by a Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases. While objective data are currently limited, these guidelines provide information to assist in the diagnosis and management of upper and lower urinary tract infections in dogs and cats. PMID:21776346

  3. [Endoscopical features of precancer changes of the stomach in patients with chronic gastric erosions and biliary tract disease].

    PubMed

    Solovĭova, H A

    2012-01-01

    Frequency of the precancer changes of the stomach, diagnosed by using zoom-endoscopy, NBI, chromoscopy, in the three groups of patients: with gastric erosions and biliary tract diseases, with gastric erosions and duodenal ulcer disease, with gastric erosions and chronic gastritis is compared in the article. It is shown, that patients with gastric erosions and biliary tract diseases are characterized by bigger spreading of precancer changes: atrophy, intestinal metaplasia with predominant smalluently intestine in gastric body, intestine metaplasia in antral part of the stomach is revealed more freq in these category of patients. A strong correlation between endoscopical and morphological methods of investigation was demonstrated.

  4. Experimental reproduction of respiratory tract disease with bovine respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Ciszewski, D K; Baker, J C; Slocombe, R F; Reindel, J F; Haines, D M; Clark, E G

    1991-06-01

    An experiment was conducted to reproduce respiratory tract disease with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) in one-month-old, colostrum-fed calves. The hypothesized role of viral hypersensitivity and persistent infection in the pathogenesis of BRSV pneumonia was also investigated. For BRSV inoculation a field isolate of BRSV, at the fifth passage level in cell culture, was administered by a combined respiratory tract route (intranasal and intratracheal) for four consecutive days. Four groups of calves were utilized as follows: Group I, 6 calves sham inoculated with uninfected tissue culture fluid and necropsied 21 days after the last inoculation; Group II, 6 calves inoculated with BRSV and necropsied at the time of maximal clinical response (4-6 days after the last inoculation); Group III, 6 calves inoculated with BRSV and necropsied at 21 days after the last inoculation; Group IV, 6 calves inoculated with BRSV, rechallenged with BRSV 10 days after initial exposure, and necropsied at 21 days after the initial inoculation. Clinical response was evaluated by daily monitoring of body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, arterial blood gas tensions, hematocrit, total protein, white blood cell count, and fibrinogen. Calves were necropsied and pulmonary surface lesions were quantitated by computer digitization. Viral pneumonia was reporduced in each principal group. Lesions were most extensive in Group II. Disease was not apparent in Group I (controls). Significant differences (p less than 0.05) in body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, arterial oxygen tension, and pneumonic surface area were demonstrated between control and infected calves. Results indicate that severe disease and lesions can be induced by BRSV in one-month-old calves that were colostrum-fed and seropositive to BRSV. BRSV rechallenge had minimal effect on disease progression. Based on clinical and pathological response, results did not support viral hypersensitivity or persistent

  5. Mycoplasmosis and upper respiratory tract disease of tortoises: a review and update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Elliott R.; Brown, Mary B.; Wendland, Lori; Brown, Daniel R.; Klein, Paul A.; Christopher, Mary M.; Berry, Kristin H.

    2014-01-01

    Tortoise mycoplasmosis is one of the most extensively characterized infectious diseases of chelonians. A 1989 outbreak of upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in free-ranging Agassiz's desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) brought together an investigative team of researchers, diagnosticians, pathologists, immunologists and clinicians from multiple institutions and agencies. Electron microscopic studies of affected tortoises revealed a microorganism in close association with the nasal mucosa that subsequently was identified as a new species, Mycoplasma agassizii. Over the next 24 years, a second causative agent, Mycoplasma testudineum, was discovered, the geographic distribution and host range of tortoise mycoplasmosis were expanded, diagnostic tests were developed and refined for antibody and pathogen detection, transmission studies confirmed the pathogenicity of the original M. agassizii isolate, clinical (and subclinical) disease and laboratory abnormalities were characterized, many extrinsic and predisposing factors were found to play a role in morbidity and mortality associated with mycoplasmal infection, and social behavior was implicated in disease transmission. The translation of scientific research into management decisions has sometimes led to undesirable outcomes, such as euthanasia of clinically healthy tortoises. In this article, we review and assess current research on tortoise mycoplasmosis, arguably the most important chronic infectious disease of wild and captive North American and European tortoises, and update the implications for management and conservation of tortoises in the wild.

  6. Lower urinary tract disease: what are we trying to treat and in whom?

    PubMed

    Heaton, Jeremy P W

    2006-02-01

    The diseases of the lower urinary tract are traditionally divided into abnormalities of storage and abnormalities of emptying. The targets for therapy were the organs most responsible for influencing storage and emptying. Modern understanding places the symptomatic status of the patient as the overriding criterion for treatment. It also accommodates a broader understanding of multiple and overlapping systems. Symptoms of voiding dysfunction have been clearly shown to be associated with symptoms of other genitourinary disease, for example, erectile dysfunction (ED). Treatment of voiding dysfunction has also been shown to have effects (adverse or beneficial) in these other domains. Thus, the symptoms of lower urinary tract disease (LUTD) that have to be considered now as targets relevant to these therapies include ED, ejaculatory dysfunction, sexual desire, sexual pain disorders and female sexual dysfunction. The anatomic, neural and endocrine systems that support these symptomatic functions and dysfunctions span the range from the urogenital smooth muscle to the hypothalamus, the bladder sensory output to the micturition centre and growth factors to androgens. Potentially important targets also include vascular and spinal structures, sex hormones and nitric oxide as well as the obvious genes, enzymes and receptors. The epidemiological studies prove the convergence of LUTD when viewed through the lens of the current patient-related outcomes and problem constructs. This convergence serves as a clear guidance to include wide ranging outcome instruments in all future studies with compounds being investigated for the treatment of LUTD. Out of these will come evidence of expected and unexpected collateral effects. The convergence should open the possibility to a different business model for developing therapeutic concepts. The blockbuster drug for a monolithic indication may be supplemented by agents with single or multiple pathway activity with smaller parallel targets

  7. Clinical application of Patlak plot CT-GFR in animals with upper urinary tract disease.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kate; Dunn, Marilyn; Carmel, Eric Norman; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Del Castillo, Jérôme R E

    2010-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), an important parameter of renal function, is difficult to assess clinically. Serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen measurements lack sensitivity, whereas radionuclide determination of GFR is not always available and requires postinjection patient isolation. GFR can be determined using computed tomography (CT), most commonly via Patlak plot analysis. Four adult cats, two adult dogs, and a foal underwent abdominal CT under general anesthesia for various diseases of the upper urinary tract. CT-GFR was measured with a single-slice dynamic acquisition and Patlak plot analysis. In five animals, the total CT-GFR appeared to be below normal, corresponding with mild (two animals) and moderate (two animals) increases of serum creatinine in four. In the two animals with normal or increased CT-GFR, serum creatinine was within the reference values. A significant negative logarithmic relationship was found between CT-GFR and serum creatinine values (P = 0.008; r2 = 0.75). No complications occurred during or following CT-GFR. CT examination provided clinically relevant information in 3/5 patients with possible ureteral obstruction and in 3/3 patients with suspected ureteral calculi. Single-slice dynamic CT-GFR was practical and provided clinically useful information in this small series of patients undergoing CT of the upper urinary tract. There was a significant relationship between CT-GFR and serum creatinine values, which supports the clinical potential of CT-GFR and justifies further investigation of this technique. PMID:20806874

  8. Risk of Flood-Related Diseases of Eyes, Skin and Gastrointestinal Tract in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling-Ya; Wang, Yu-Chun; Wu, Chin-Ching; Chen, Yi-Chun; Huang, Yu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Floods are known to cause serious environmental damage and health impacts. Studies on flood-related diseases have been primarily on individual events, and limited evidence could be drawn on potential health impacts from floods using large population data. This study used reimbursement records of one million people of the Taiwan National Health Insurance program to compare incident diseases of the eyes, skin and gastrointestinal (GI) tract associated with floods. Incidence rates for the selected diseases were calculated according to outpatient/emergency visit data. The incidence rates were evaluated by flood status: in 10 days before floods, during floods and within 10 days after the floods receded. Outpatient/emergency visit rates for the eye, skin and GI tract diseases were highest after floods and lowest during floods. Results from multivariate Poisson regression analyses showed that, when compared with the incidence in 10 days before floods, the incidence rate ratios (IRR) of diseases within 10 days after floods were 1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10-1.20) for eyes, 1.08 (95% C.I. = 1.05-1.10) for skin, and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08-1.14) for GI tract, after controlling for covariates. All risks increased with ambient temperature. V-shaped trends were found between age and eye diseases, and between age and GI tract diseases. In contrast, the risk of skin diseases increased with age. In conclusion, more diseases of eyes, skin and GI tract could be diagnosed after the flood. PMID:27171415

  9. Risk of Flood-Related Diseases of Eyes, Skin and Gastrointestinal Tract in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ling-Ya; Wang, Yu-Chun; Wu, Chin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Floods are known to cause serious environmental damage and health impacts. Studies on flood-related diseases have been primarily on individual events, and limited evidence could be drawn on potential health impacts from floods using large population data. This study used reimbursement records of one million people of the Taiwan National Health Insurance program to compare incident diseases of the eyes, skin and gastrointestinal (GI) tract associated with floods. Incidence rates for the selected diseases were calculated according to outpatient/emergency visit data. The incidence rates were evaluated by flood status: in 10 days before floods, during floods and within 10 days after the floods receded. Outpatient/emergency visit rates for the eye, skin and GI tract diseases were highest after floods and lowest during floods. Results from multivariate Poisson regression analyses showed that, when compared with the incidence in 10 days before floods, the incidence rate ratios (IRR) of diseases within 10 days after floods were 1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10–1.20) for eyes, 1.08 (95% C.I. = 1.05–1.10) for skin, and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08–1.14) for GI tract, after controlling for covariates. All risks increased with ambient temperature. V-shaped trends were found between age and eye diseases, and between age and GI tract diseases. In contrast, the risk of skin diseases increased with age. In conclusion, more diseases of eyes, skin and GI tract could be diagnosed after the flood. PMID:27171415

  10. A new animal model for human respiratory tract disease due to adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Pacini, D L; Dubovi, E J; Clyde, W A

    1984-07-01

    Cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) were tested as a model for human respiratory tract infection due to adenovirus. After intranasal instillation of 10(6.1) 50% tissue culture infectious doses (TCID50) of adenovirus type 5 into one-month-old cotton rats, groups were killed at intervals for nasal and lung titration of virus and lung histopathology. In lung, eclipse occurred at 8 hr followed by peak viral titer (10(7.5) TCID50/g of lung) on day 5. Titers fell to 10(3.2) TCID50/g by day 10 and persisted at that level through the remainder of the study (day 28) despite appearance of serum neutralizing antibody after day 6. Interstitial pneumonia paralleled viral growth, and peribronchial mononuclear infiltration followed one to two days later. Titers in nasal mucosa peaked on day 3 but were undetectable beyond day 21. Pulmonary histopathology and viral replicative patterns paralleled findings in natural human disease.

  11. Topographic Diversity of the Respiratory Tract Mycobiome and Alteration in HIV and Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lijia; Lucht, Lorrie; Tipton, Laura; Rogers, Matthew B.; Fitch, Adam; Kessinger, Cathy; Camp, Danielle; Kingsley, Lawrence; Leo, Nicolas; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Fong, Serena; Stone, Stephen; Dermand, John C.; Kleerup, Eric C.; Huang, Laurence; Ghedin, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Microbiome studies typically focus on bacteria, but fungal species are common in many body sites and can have profound effects on the host. Wide gaps exist in the understanding of the fungal microbiome (mycobiome) and its relationship to lung disease. Objectives: To characterize the mycobiome at different respiratory tract levels in persons with and without HIV infection and in HIV-infected individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: Oral washes (OW), induced sputa (IS), and bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were collected from 56 participants. We performed 18S and internal transcribed spacer sequencing and used the neutral model to identify fungal species that are likely residents of the lung. We used ubiquity–ubiquity plots, random forest, logistic regression, and metastats to compare fungal communities by HIV status and presence of COPD. Measurements and Main Results: Mycobiomes of OW, IS, and BAL shared common organisms, but each also had distinct members. Candida was dominant in OW and IS, but BAL had 39 fungal species that were disproportionately more abundant than in the OW. Fungal communities in BAL differed significantly by HIV status and by COPD, with Pneumocystis jirovecii significantly overrepresented in both groups. Other fungal species were also identified as differing in HIV and COPD. Conclusions: This study systematically examined the respiratory tract mycobiome in a relatively large group. By identifying Pneumocystis and other fungal species as overrepresented in the lung in HIV and in COPD, it is the first to determine alterations in fungal communities associated with lung dysfunction and/or HIV, highlighting the clinical relevance of these findings. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00870857). PMID:25603113

  12. Flexible ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy for upper urinary tract stone disease in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tepeler, Abdulkadir; Sninsky, Brian C; Nakada, Stephen Y

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to present the outcomes of flexible ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy (URS) for upper urinary tract stone disease in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients performed by a single surgeon. A retrospective analysis was performed for SCI patients treated with flexible URS for proximal ureter and kidney stone disease by a single surgeon between 2003 and 2013. Patient characteristics, operative outcomes, metabolic evaluation, and stone analyses were assessed in detail. A total of 27 URS procedures were performed for urolithiasis in 21 renal units of 19 patients. The mean age was 52.1 ± 15.6 years (16-72) and mean BMI was 29.2 ± 7.3 kg/m(2) (20-45.7). Etiology of SCI was trauma (n: 10), multiple sclerosis (n: 6), cerebrovascular accident (n: 1), or undetermined (n: 2). The mean stone size was 15.9 ± 8.6 (6-40) mm. In the 27 URS procedures, stones were located in the ureter (n: 5), the kidney (n: 14), and both areas (n: 8). Mean hospitalization time was 2.0 ± 2.4 (0-10) days. Postoperative complications were observed in 6 cases (22.2%). Three major complications included urosepsis (n: 1) and respiratory failure (n: 2), that were observed postoperatively and required admission to the intensive care unit. The 2 minor complications were hypotension, fever and UTI, and required medical treatment. Fourteen (66.6%) of the 21 renal units were stone free. Calcium phosphate carbonate (n: 9) and struvite (n: 5) were the primary stone compositions detected. Hypocitraturia (n: 6), hypercalciuria (n: 5), hypernaturia (n: 5), hyperoxaluria (n: 4), and hyperuricosuria (n: 1) were common abnormalities in 24-h urine analysis. Ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy can be an effective treatment modality for SCI patients with upper urinary tract calculi.

  13. Lower Urinary Tract and Functional Bowel Symptoms in Women with Vulvar Diseases and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Carolyn W.; Menees, Stacy. B.; Haefner, Hope K.; Berger, Mitchell. B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to compare the prevalences of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and constipation in women with vulvar diseases to those from the general population. Methods Three groups of women were recruited from the University of Michigan Gynecology clinics, women with: 1) biopsy proven lichen sclerosus (LS), 2) non-LS vulvar diseases (vulvar controls, VC), and 3) presenting for annual exams (AE). All patients completed self-administered surveys and validated pelvic floor symptom questionnaires. Results 317 subjects were enrolled: 101 with LS, 86 VCs, and 130 AEs. Compared to women in the VC and AE groups, LS subjects were older and of higher parity, and also had a higher prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) and urinary incontinence. IBS was more common in the LS and VC groups compared to the AE group but no difference in constipation was seen. Similar results were found when all women with vulvar disease (LS and VC) were compared to the AEs. Age (adjusted OR 1.28, p=0.003) and IBS (adjusted OR 3.05, <0.001) were the two variables predictive of OAB. Urinary incontinence was predicted by age (adjusted OR 1.35, p=0.002), vulvar disease categorization (adjusted OR 2.31, p=0.004) and IBS (adjusted OR 4.51, p<0.001). Conclusions We find a significantly greater prevalence of LUTS and IBS in women with vulvar disease compared to women presenting for annual gynecologic exams, but no difference in constipation. Similar rates of LUTS, IBS and constipation were seen in women with LS and non-LS vulvar disease. PMID:26052645

  14. Oropharyngeal cancer: an emergent disease?

    PubMed

    Granados-García, Martín

    2016-04-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer incidence has recently increased, thereby attracting public attention. Akin to other malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract, it has been attributed to the carcinogenic effects of tobacco and alcohol use. However, recent evidence shows that a substantial increase in the disease is attributable to the effects of human papillomavirus (HPV). Marked progress has been made in relation to the knowledge of molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in the genesis and progression of these cancers. This has led to the development of new and promising therapies of a more specific and less toxic nature that have prolonged life and improved its quality. However, these therapies have failed to significantly increase the proportion of patients who are cured. To decrease the mortality associated with these neoplasms, it is necessary to adopt public health measures aimed at prevention and early diagnosis. PMID:27557387

  15. Transoral robotic surgery: role in the management of upper aerodigestive tract tumors.

    PubMed

    Genden, Eric M; O'Malley, Bert W; Weinstein, Gregory S; Stucken, Chaz L; Selber, Jesse C; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Hockstein, Neil G; Ozer, Enver; Mallet, Yann; Satava, Richard M; Moore, Eric J; Silver, Carl E; Ferlito, Alfio

    2012-06-01

    The toxicity associated with concomitant chemoradiation for the management of laryngeal and pharyngeal carcinoma has been well documented. Minimally invasive surgical techniques offer the potential to extirpate the malignancy as a single-modality therapy and provide essential information that may direct subsequent treatment. In selected patients, radiation doses may be reduced and systemic chemotherapy may be withheld after tumor extirpation. Transoral laser microsurgery has proven effective, although inability to manipulate and suture tissue by this modality limits ablation and reconstruction of extensive defects. Transoral robotic surgery is a relatively new technique that provides several unique advantages, which include a 3-dimensional magnified view, ability to see and work around curves or angles, and the availability of 2 or 3 robotic arms that can be used to reconstruct extensive defects using either local, regional, or free flaps. Preliminary data suggest that transoral robotic surgery may provide a technique for ablation and reconstruction of pharyngeal defects that may be superior to other transoral techniques. It may also provide a means for personalizing therapy for oropharyngeal and supraglottic carcinoma. PMID:22610591

  16. [Involvement of human papillomavirus in upper aero-digestive tracts cancers].

    PubMed

    Neufcoeur, P Ernoux; Arafa, M; Delvenne, P; Saussez, S

    2009-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common causes of sexually transmitted infection in the world. France and Belgium present one of the highest incidence of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) worldwide. Besides, considering only the male population, HNSCCs represent the fourth most frequent cancer after prostate, lung and colon cancers. Although the causal link between high-risk HPVs and cervical carcinoma is well established, the implication of this viral infection in HNSCC remains debatable. Here, we discuss current knowledge concerning the HPV implication in HNSCCs. Based on our literature review, 20 to 25% of HNSCCs could be associated with oncogenic HPVs, in particular HPV type 16. The oropharynx--more precisely the tonsil--is the head and neck location presenting the highest incidence of HPV infection. Moreover, a clear increase of tonsillar carcinoma incidence has been described. As observed in cervical carcinomas, HPV positive HNSCCs are sexually transmitted and characterized by alterations of p53 and pRb signalling pathways. Several studies have shown that HPV positive subgroup presented better prognosis particularly if these patients overexpressed p16INK4. New studies regarding HPV status in HNSCCs are warranted to provide a rationale for large scale HPV vaccination in young male populations.

  17. Microbial communities in the upper respiratory tract of patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Park, HeeKuk; Shin, Jong Wook; Park, Sang-Gue; Kim, Wonyong

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory infections are well-known triggers of chronic respiratory diseases. Recently, culture-independent tools have indicated that lower airway microbiota may contribute to pathophysiologic processes associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the relationship between upper airway microbiota and chronic respiratory diseases remains unclear. This study was undertaken to define differences of microbiota in the oropharynx of asthma and COPD patients relative to those in healthy individuals. To account for the qualitative and quantitative diversity of the 16S rRNA gene in the oropharynx, the microbiomes of 18 asthma patients, 17 COPD patients, and 12 normal individuals were assessed using a high-throughput next-generation sequencing analysis. In the 259,572 total sequence reads, α and β diversity measurements and a generalized linear model revealed that the oropharynx microbiota are diverse, but no significant differences were observed between asthma and COPD patients. Pseudomonas spp. of Proteobacteria and Lactobacillus spp. of Firmicutes were highly abundant in asthma and COPD. By contrast, Streptococcus, Veillonella, Prevotella, and Neisseria of Bacteroidetes dominated in the healthy oropharynx. These findings are consistent with previous studies conducted in the lower airways and suggest that oropharyngeal airway microbiota are important for understanding the relationships between the various parts of the respiratory tract with regard to bacterial colonization and comprehensive assessment of asthma and COPD.

  18. Relationship of reproductive hormones and neuromuscular disease of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Mathias, J R; Clench, M H

    1998-01-01

    Functional disorders of the gastrointestinal tract comprise a common but ill-defined group of diseases; they primarily afflict women. Although predominantly involving nerve and muscle, the cellular and molecular bases of the pathogenesis of these functional disorders are unknown. Clinical studies indicate that some result from neural dysfunction within the enteric nervous system, others may be due to muscular problems, and the causes of still others remain unknown. Laboratory studies have shown that ovarian products such as progesterone, luteinizing hormone, human chorionic gonadotropin, and relaxin (but not estrogen), are neural antagonists of gastrointestinal motility. The production and secretion of these ovarian substances are controlled by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) released from the hypothalamus; they probably act on gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors and alter chloride influx into the cell. GnRH analogs are effective drugs that downmodulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and inhibit the secretion of gonadal products involved in such hormone-dependent diseases as endometriosis and prostate cancer. Acting on the GnRH receptors (seven transmembrane domain receptors) on myenteric neurons, GnRH analogs are also effective neural modulators in such disorders as functional bowel disease. These analogs are a promising new group of compounds that may be used to treat difficult gastrointestinal problems.

  19. Metagenomic Sequencing of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Upper Bronchial Tract Microbiome Reveals Functional Changes Associated with Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Simon J S; Lewis, Keir E; Huws, Sharon A; Lin, Wanchang; Hegarty, Matthew J; Lewis, Paul D; Mur, Luis A J; Pachebat, Justin A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major source of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The microbiome associated with this disease may be an important component of the disease, though studies to date have been based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, and have revealed unequivocal results. Here, we employed metagenomic sequencing of the upper bronchial tract (UBT) microbiome to allow for greater elucidation of its taxonomic composition, and revealing functional changes associated with the disease. The bacterial metagenomes within sputum samples from eight COPD patients and ten 'healthy' smokers (Controls) were sequenced, and suggested significant changes in the abundance of bacterial species, particularly within the Streptococcus genus. The functional capacity of the COPD UBT microbiome indicated an increased capacity for bacterial growth, which could be an important feature in bacterial-associated acute exacerbations. Regression analyses correlated COPD severity (FEV1% of predicted) with differences in the abundance of Streptococcus pneumoniae and functional classifications related to a reduced capacity for bacterial sialic acid metabolism. This study suggests that the COPD UBT microbiome could be used in patient risk stratification and in identifying novel monitoring and treatment methods, but study of a longitudinal cohort will be required to unequivocally relate these features of the microbiome with COPD severity. PMID:26872143

  20. Metagenomic Sequencing of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Upper Bronchial Tract Microbiome Reveals Functional Changes Associated with Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Simon J. S.; Lewis, Keir E.; Huws, Sharon A.; Lin, Wanchang; Hegarty, Matthew J.; Lewis, Paul D.; Mur, Luis A. J.; Pachebat, Justin A.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major source of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The microbiome associated with this disease may be an important component of the disease, though studies to date have been based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, and have revealed unequivocal results. Here, we employed metagenomic sequencing of the upper bronchial tract (UBT) microbiome to allow for greater elucidation of its taxonomic composition, and revealing functional changes associated with the disease. The bacterial metagenomes within sputum samples from eight COPD patients and ten ‘healthy’ smokers (Controls) were sequenced, and suggested significant changes in the abundance of bacterial species, particularly within the Streptococcus genus. The functional capacity of the COPD UBT microbiome indicated an increased capacity for bacterial growth, which could be an important feature in bacterial-associated acute exacerbations. Regression analyses correlated COPD severity (FEV1% of predicted) with differences in the abundance of Streptococcus pneumoniae and functional classifications related to a reduced capacity for bacterial sialic acid metabolism. This study suggests that the COPD UBT microbiome could be used in patient risk stratification and in identifying novel monitoring and treatment methods, but study of a longitudinal cohort will be required to unequivocally relate these features of the microbiome with COPD severity. PMID:26872143

  1. Metagenomic Sequencing of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Upper Bronchial Tract Microbiome Reveals Functional Changes Associated with Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Simon J S; Lewis, Keir E; Huws, Sharon A; Lin, Wanchang; Hegarty, Matthew J; Lewis, Paul D; Mur, Luis A J; Pachebat, Justin A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major source of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The microbiome associated with this disease may be an important component of the disease, though studies to date have been based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, and have revealed unequivocal results. Here, we employed metagenomic sequencing of the upper bronchial tract (UBT) microbiome to allow for greater elucidation of its taxonomic composition, and revealing functional changes associated with the disease. The bacterial metagenomes within sputum samples from eight COPD patients and ten 'healthy' smokers (Controls) were sequenced, and suggested significant changes in the abundance of bacterial species, particularly within the Streptococcus genus. The functional capacity of the COPD UBT microbiome indicated an increased capacity for bacterial growth, which could be an important feature in bacterial-associated acute exacerbations. Regression analyses correlated COPD severity (FEV1% of predicted) with differences in the abundance of Streptococcus pneumoniae and functional classifications related to a reduced capacity for bacterial sialic acid metabolism. This study suggests that the COPD UBT microbiome could be used in patient risk stratification and in identifying novel monitoring and treatment methods, but study of a longitudinal cohort will be required to unequivocally relate these features of the microbiome with COPD severity.

  2. Effect of nasal noninvasive respiratory support methods on pharyngeal provocation-induced aerodigestive reflexes in infants.

    PubMed

    Jadcherla, Sudarshan R; Hasenstab, Kathryn A; Sitaram, Swetha; Clouse, Brian J; Slaughter, Jonathan L; Shaker, Reza

    2016-06-01

    The pharynx is a locus of provocation among infants with aerodigestive morbidities manifesting as dysphagia, life-threatening events, aspiration-pneumonia, atelectasis, and reflux, and such infants often receive nasal respiratory support. We determined the impact of different oxygen delivery methods on pharyngeal stimulation-induced aerodigestive reflexes [room air (RA), nasal cannula (NC), and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP)] while hypothesizing that the sensory motor characteristics of putative reflexes are distinct. Thirty eight infants (28.0 ± 0.7 wk gestation) underwent pharyngoesophageal manometry and respiratory inductance plethysmography to determine the effects of graded pharyngeal stimuli (n = 271) on upper and lower esophageal sphincters (UES, LES), swallowing, and deglutition-apnea. Comparisons were made between NC (n = 19), nCPAP (n = 9), and RA (n = 10) groups. Importantly, NC or nCPAP (vs. RA) had: 1) delayed feeding milestones (P < 0.05), 2) increased pharyngeal waveform recruitment and duration, greater UES nadir pressure, decreased esophageal contraction duration, decreased distal esophageal contraction amplitude, and decreased completely propagated esophageal peristalsis (all P < 0.05), and 3) similarly developed UES contractile and LES relaxation reflexes (P > 0.05). We conclude that aerodigestive reflexes were similarly developed in infants using noninvasive respiratory support with adequate upper and lower aerodigestive protection. Increased concern for GERD is unfounded in this population. These infants may benefit from targeted oromotor feeding therapies and safe pharyngeal bolus transit to accelerate feeding milestones. PMID:27012774

  3. [Current and future approaches for the treatment of inflammatory diseases of inferior respiratory tract].

    PubMed

    Guidos Fogelbach, Guillermo Arturo; Rodríguez Velasco, Jorge Gabriel; Almeida Arvizu, Victor Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Among the allergic disorders we emphasize the inflammatory diseases of the inferior respiratory tract by their incidence, repercussion in daily activities, and by their high cost of medical attention. For their treatment, they require more than one inhaled or systemic drug. Current medicines tend to have adverse or secondary effects, such as: osteoporosis, type 3 diabetes mellitus, tremor or tachycardia. New medicines are being developed with less adverse or secondary effects, and much more selective and specific in the molecules involved in the allergic disease's physiopathology. Among them we find pascolizumab, which inhibits the differentiation made to Th2, as well as the citokines production. Other drugs are: mepolizumab, monoclonal antibody antiCD23, and the selective inhibitor of IgE (AJP13358) Rhu-Mab-E25. Currently, they are being developed some new drugs, such as SB-207499 (SKB) and LAS 31025, which are selective inhibitors of fosfodiesterase. Within the currently studied medicines that offer high specificity to inhibit the synthesis of interleukines we emphasize the presence of humanized monoclonal antibodies antireceptor IL-4. The anti IL-5 (SB-240563) is administered in asthmatic patients to reduce eosinofilia in expectoration. Tosilate of suplatast is a selective IL-4 and IL-5 inhibitor. Ramatroban (BAY or 3405) is an antagonist of the tromboxane A2 receptor, which reduces the inflammatory process of the nasal mucose without hemodynamic effects. Immunotherapy with peptides avoids the response of IgE by the allergen, without mast cell degranulation.

  4. The upper respiratory tract microbiome and its potential role in bovine respiratory disease and otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Svetlana F.; Teixeira, Andre Gustavo V.; Higgins, Catherine H.; Lima, Fabio S.; Bicalho, Rodrigo C.

    2016-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract (URT) hosts a complex microbial community of commensal microorganisms and potential pathogens. Analyzing the composition and nature of the healthy URT microbiota and how it changes over time will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of pneumonia and otitis. A longitudinal study was conducted including 174 Holstein calves that were divided in four groups: healthy calves, calves diagnosed with pneumonia, otitis or both diseases. Deep pharyngeal swabs were collected on days 3, 14, 28, and 35 of life, and next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene as well as quantitative PCR was performed. The URT of Holstein dairy calves aged 3 to 35 days revealed to host a highly diverse bacterial community. The relative abundances of the bacterial genera Mannheimia, Moraxella, and Mycoplasma were significantly higher in diseased versus healthy animals, and the total bacterial load of newborn calves at day 3 was higher for animals that developed pneumonia than for healthy animals. Our results corroborate the existing knowledge that species of Mannheimia and Mycoplasma are important pathogens in pneumonia and otitis. Furthermore, they suggest that species of Moraxella can potentially cause the same disorders (pneumonia and otitis), and that high neonatal bacterial load is a key contributor to the development of pneumonia. PMID:27363739

  5. Discharge responses of the optic tract to flash stimuli in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takao; Katai, Satoshi; Goto, Tetsuya

    2014-04-01

    Dopamine has a significant role in retinal processing, and it has been demonstrated that retinal dopamine content is decreased in parkinsonian patients. We measured the latency of the evoked discharges in the optic tract (OT) to flash stimuli during stereotactic pallidal neurosurgery in 25 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) (13 women and 12 men, age 38-78 years, unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) Motor Score in the Off state 11-54, Hoehn and Yahr stage in the Off state 1.5-5) and investigated the effects of age at surgery, disease duration, levodopa dose, and severity of parkinsonian symptoms on the latency. OT discharges were evoked by monocular flash stimuli delivered from a flashlight with a krypton bulb with a tungsten filament. The luminance at the eye measured ∼4 × 10(4) cd/m(2). The light wavelength of the stimulus was composed of a wide spectrum with its peak at around 800 nm or longer. The latency of OT discharges ranged 49-79 msec, and there was a significant positive correlation between the latencies of evoked activities in the OT to a flashlight and age (r = 0.59, P < 0.001, by Pearson correlation), but no correlation between the latency and the severity of parkinsonian symptoms and between the latency and duration of illness. These results indicate that the delay in visual processing and conduction at the level of the retina and the OT are substantially derived from age-related degenerative changes in the retina and visual pathway which are apparently unrelated to the striatal dopamine deficiency in PD. PMID:25590042

  6. Impacts of upper respiratory tract disease on olfactory behavior of the Mojave desert tortoise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Germano, Jennifer; Van Zerr, Vanessa E.; Esque, Todd C.; Nussear, Ken E.; Lamberski, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) caused by Mycoplasma agassizii is considered a threat to desert tortoise populations that should be addressed as part of the recovery of the species. Clinical signs can be intermittent and include serous or mucoid nasal discharge and respiratory difficulty when nares are occluded. This nasal congestion may result in a loss of the olfactory sense. Turtles are known to use olfaction to identify food items, predators, and conspecifics; therefore, it is likely that URTD affects not only their physical well-being but also their behavior and ability to perform necessary functions in the wild. To determine more specifically the impact nasal discharge might have on free-ranging tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), we compared the responses of tortoises with and without nasal discharge and both positive and negative for M. agassizii antibodies to a visually hidden olfactory food stimulus and an empty control. We found that nasal discharge did reduce sense of smell and hence the ability to locate food. Our study also showed that moderate chronic nasal discharge in the absence of other clinical signs did not affect appetite in desert tortoises.

  7. Impacts of upper respiratory tract disease on olfactory behavior of the Mojave desert tortoise.

    PubMed

    Germano, Jennifer; Van Zerr, Vanessa E; Esque, Todd C; Nussear, Ken E; Lamberski, Nadine

    2014-04-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) caused by Mycoplasma agassizii is considered a threat to desert tortoise populations that should be addressed as part of the recovery of the species. Clinical signs can be intermittent and include serous or mucoid nasal discharge and respiratory difficulty when nares are occluded. This nasal congestion may result in a loss of the olfactory sense. Turtles are known to use olfaction to identify food items, predators, and conspecifics; therefore, it is likely that URTD affects not only their physical well-being but also their behavior and ability to perform necessary functions in the wild. To determine more specifically the impact nasal discharge might have on free-ranging tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), we compared the responses of tortoises with and without nasal discharge and both positive and negative for M. agassizii antibodies to a visually hidden olfactory food stimulus and an empty control. We found that nasal discharge did reduce sense of smell and hence the ability to locate food. Our study also showed that moderate chronic nasal discharge in the absence of other clinical signs did not affect appetite in desert tortoises.

  8. Micromachined polymerase chain reaction system for multiple DNA amplification of upper respiratory tract infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chia-Sheng; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Chang, Chih-Ching; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Huang, Fu-Chun; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2005-01-15

    This paper presents a micro polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for the DNA-based diagnosis of microorganism genes and the detection of their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The micro PCR chip comprises cheap biocompatible soda-lime glass substrates with integrated thin-film platinum resistors as heating/sensing elements, and is fabricated using micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) techniques in a reliable batch-fabrication process. The heating and temperature sensing elements are made of the same material and are located inside the reaction chamber in order to ensure a uniform temperature distribution. This study performs the detection of several genes associated with upper respiratory tract infection microorganisms, i.e. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemopilus influenze, Staphylococcu aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Neisseria meningitides, together with their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The lower thermal inertia of the proposed micro PCR chip relative to conventional bench-top PCR systems enables a more rapid detection operation with reduced sample and reagent consumption. The experimental data reveal that the high heating and cooling rates of the system (20 and 10 degrees C/s, respectively) permit successful DNA amplification within 15 min. The micro PCR chip is also capable of performing multiple DNA amplification, i.e. the simultaneous duplication of multiple genes under different conditions in separate reaction wells. Compared with the large-scale PCR system, it is greatly advantageous for fast diagnosis of multiple infectious diseases. Multiplex PCR amplification of two DNA segments in the same well is also feasible using the proposed micro device. The developed micro PCR chip provides a crucial tool for genetic analysis, molecular biology, infectious disease detection, and many other biomedical applications. PMID:15590288

  9. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction to correlate Chlamydia pecorum infectious load with ocular, urinary and reproductive tract disease in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Wan, C; Loader, J; Hanger, J; Beagley, Kw; Timms, P; Polkinghorne, A

    2011-10-01

    Complex interactions between Chlamydia pecorum infection, the immune response and disease exist in the koala. We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction to investigate the relationship between C. pecorum infectious load and ocular and urogenital tract disease. Chlamydia pecorum shedding was generally higher in animals with chronic, active disease than in animals with inactive disease. The absence of ocular disease was generally associated with low levels of shedding, but relatively high levels of shedding in the urogenital tract were detected in some koalas without clinical disease signs. These results suggest a complex disease pathogenesis and clinical course in C. pecorum-infected koalas.

  10. Tuberculosis DALY-Gap: Spatial and Quantitative Comparison of Disease Burden Across Urban Slum and Non-slum Census Tracts.

    PubMed

    Marlow, Mariel A; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia; Sales, Carolina Maia Martins; Gomes, Teresa; Snyder, Robert E; Daumas, Regina Paiva; Riley, Lee W

    2015-08-01

    To quantitatively assess disease burden due to tuberculosis between populations residing in and outside of urban informal settlements in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, we compared disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), or "DALY-gap." Using the 2010 Brazilian census definition of informal settlements as aglomerados subnormais (AGSN), we allocated tuberculosis (TB) DALYs to AGSN vs non-AGSN census tracts based on geocoded addresses of TB cases reported to the Brazilian Information System for Notifiable Diseases in 2005 and 2010. DALYs were calculated based on the 2010 Global Burden of Disease methodology. DALY-gap was calculated as the difference between age-adjusted DALYs/100,000 population between AGSN and non-AGSN. Total TB DALY in Rio in 2010 was 16,731 (266 DALYs/100,000). DALYs were higher in AGSN census tracts (306 vs 236 DALYs/100,000), yielding a DALY-gap of 70 DALYs/100,000. Attributable DALY fraction for living in an AGSN was 25.4%. DALY-gap was highest for males 40-59 years of age (501 DALYs/100,000) and in census tracts with <60% electricity (12,327 DALYs/100,000). DALY-gap comparison revealed spatial and quantitative differences in TB burden between slum vs non-slum census tracts that were not apparent using traditional measures of incidence and mortality. This metric could be applied to compare TB burden or burden for other diseases in mega-cities with large informal settlements for more targeted resource allocation and evaluation of intervention programs.

  11. Endoscopic laser surgery of patients with pretumoral diseases and tumors of the organs of respiration and gastro-intestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddubny, Boris K.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Efimov, Oleg N.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The result of treatment of 566 patients with precancerous diseases, cancer and benign tumors of respiratory and gastro-intestinal tract are presented. The `Raduga-1' as a source of laser radiation has been used. The wavelength of radiation 1060 nm. The maximum of basic radiation at the end of lightguide is 50 W. It is shown that the method of endoscopic laser destruction is a highly effective one and may be recommended for radical treatment.

  12. Seroepidemiology of upper respiratory tract disease in the desert tortoise of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Mary B.; Berry, Kristin H.; Schumacher, Isabella M.; Nagy, Kenneth A.; Christopher, Mary M.; Klein, Paul A.

    1999-01-01

    Several factors have combined with an upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) to produce declines on some population numbers of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) in the western USA. This study was designed to determine the seroepidemiology of URTD in a population of wild adult tortoises at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area (DTNA) study site in Kern County (California, USA). Prior to initiation of the study, there was a dramatic decline in the number of individuals in this population. At each individual time point, samples were obtained from 12 to 20 tortoises with radiotransmitters during winter, spring, summer, and fall from 1992 through 1995. During the course of the study, 35 animals were sampled at one or more times. Only 10 animals were available for consistent monitoring throughout the 4 yr period. Specific antibody (Ab) levels to Mycoplasma agassizii were determined for individual tortoises by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test. Specific Ab levels were not influenced by the gender of the tortoise. Levels of Ab and distribution of ELISA+, ELISA– and suspect animals were not consistently affected by season within a single year or for a season among the study years. Significantly more tortoises presented with clinical signs in 1992 and 1995. The profile of ELISA+ animals with clinical signs shifted from 5% (1992) to 42% (1995). In 1992, 52% of tortoises lacked clinical signs and were ELISA–. In 1995, this category accounted for only 19% of tortoises. Based on the results of this study, we conclude that URTD was present in this population as evidenced by the presence of ELISA+ individual animals, and that the infectious agent is still present as evidenced by seroconversion of previously ELISA– animals during the course of the study. There is evidence to suggest that animals may remain ELISA+ without showing overt disease, a clinical pattern consistent with the chronic nature of most mycoplasmal infections. Further, there are

  13. Epidemiologic approach for early detection and control of renal and urinary tract diseases in rural populations.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Hanan A; Hammam, Olfat; Sabry, Hoda; Akl, Maha; Amin, Tarek; El Lithy, Tarek; Roshdy, Mamdouh; El Ganzoury, Hossam

    2007-04-01

    The dipstick testing, microscopic examination of urine and urine cytology were performed for inhabitants from two rural villages (El Shobak El Sharki, V.1 & El Katta, V.2) in Giza G. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Schistosoma haematobium antigen were done by immuno-histochemical stain to confirm diagnosis. Also, they were subjected to medical questionnaire, clinical examination, ultra-sonography of kidneys and urinary tract. The results showed that V.2 had higher percentage of haematuria, proteinuria, glucosuria and lower urinary tract infection than V.1. Crystaluria was higher in V.1. Sensitivity of dipstick testing compared to microscopic examination was 26.6%, & specificity was 78.7%. Lower urinary tract infection cytologically detected was 44.2% sensitivity & 62.5% specificity compared to pyuria detected by microscopic examination of urine. Among those suffering variable urinary abnormalities, schistosome antigen was not detected in any fixed urine samples in comparison to corresponding confirmed positive controls. Urine cytology detected urinary tract infection, crystaluria, dysplasia and atypia, squamous metaplasia and transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). PCNA positivity was found in TCC (100%), dysplasia (50%) and squamous metaplasia (28.6%). So, microscopic examination of urine proved valuable for tract abnormalities as pyuria, haematuria and crystaluria. Also, urine cytology is a must for malignancy of urinary tract especially in adult males. PMID:17580586

  14. About the Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of lung and head and neck cancers, as well as new approaches to clinical prevention studies including cancer immunoprevention.Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials ProgramThe group jointly administers the Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program evaluating new agents, surrogate biomarkers, and technologies to identify premalignant lesions, and related cancers.  |

  15. 99mTc-HMPAO leucocyte scintigraphy fails to detect Crohn's disease in the proximal gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Davison, S; Chapman, S; Murphy, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the use of 99mTc-HMPAO (hexamethyl propylene amine oxime) leucocyte scintigraphy as a non-invasive screening test for inflammatory bowel disease.
PATIENTS—10 children with suspected Crohn's disease, in whom routine investigation using barium contrast radiology, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, colonoscopy, and mucosal biopsies had identified severe gastroduodenal and/or jejunal involvement.
DESIGN—99mTc-HMPAO leucocyte scintigraphic studies performed in each of these cases were assessed by a radiologist who was blinded to the disease distribution.
RESULTS—In nine cases there was no scintigraphic evidence of inflammation in the proximal gastrointestinal tract. The 10th child had both gastroduodenal and jejunal involvement, but scintigraphy only revealed faint jejunal positivity.
CONCLUSIONS—99mTc-HMPAO leucocyte scintigraphy should not be depended upon as a screening test for Crohn's disease. False negative results are likely in cases with Crohn's disease confined to the proximal gastrointestinal tract.

 PMID:11420197

  16. Upper Respiratory Tract Disease in the Gopher Tortoise Is Caused by Mycoplasma agassizii†

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. B.; McLaughlin, G. S.; Klein, P. A.; Crenshaw, B. C.; Schumacher, I. M.; Brown, D. R.; Jacobson, E. R.

    1999-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) has been observed in a number of tortoise species, including the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus). Clinical signs of URTD in gopher tortoises are similar to those in desert tortoises and include serous, mucoid, or purulent discharge from the nares, excessive tearing to purulent ocular discharge, conjunctivitis, and edema of the eyelids and ocular glands. The objectives of the present study were to determine if Mycoplasma agassizii was an etiologic agent of URTD in the gopher tortoise and to determine the clinical course of the experimental infection in a dose-response infection study. Tortoises were inoculated intranasally with 0.5 ml (0.25 ml/nostril) of either sterile SP4 broth (control group; n = 10) or 108 color-changing units (CCU) (total dose) of M. agassizii 723 (experimental infection group; n = 9). M. agassizii caused clinical signs compatible with those observed in tortoises with natural infections. Clinical signs of URTD were evident in seven of nine experimentally infected tortoises by 4 weeks postinfection (p.i.) and in eight of nine experimentally infected tortoises by 8 weeks p.i. In the dose-response experiments, tortoises were inoculated intranasally with a low (101 CCU; n = 6), medium (103 CCU; n = 6), or high (105 CCU; n = 5) dose of M. agassizii 723 or with sterile SP4 broth (n = 10). At all time points p.i. in both experiments, M. agassizii could be isolated from the nares of at least 50% of the tortoises. All of the experimentally infected tortoises seroconverted, and levels of antibody were statistically higher in infected animals than in control animals for all time points of >4 weeks p.i. (P < 0.0001). Control tortoises in both experiments did not show clinical signs, did not seroconvert, and did not have detectable M. agassizii by either culture or PCR at any point in the study. Histological lesions were compatible with those observed in tortoises with

  17. Early Adaptive Immune Responses in the Respiratory Tract of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus-Infected Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Pega, J.; Bucafusco, D.; Di Giacomo, S.; Schammas, J. M.; Malacari, D.; Capozzo, A. V.; Arzt, J.; Pérez-Beascoechea, C.; Maradei, E.; Rodríguez, L. L.; Borca, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease which affects both domestic and wild biungulate species. This acute disease, caused by the FMD virus (FMDV), usually includes an active replication phase in the respiratory tract for up to 72 h postinfection, followed by hematogenous dissemination and vesicular lesions at oral and foot epithelia. The role of the early local adaptive immunity of the host in the outcome of the infection is not well understood. Here we report the kinetics of appearance of FMDV-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC) in lymphoid organs along the respiratory tract and the spleen in cattle infected by aerosol exposure. While no responses were observed for up to 3 days postinfection (dpi), all animals developed FMDV-ASC in all the lymphoid organs studied at 4 dpi. Tracheobronchial lymph nodes were the most reactive organs at this time, and IgM was the predominant isotype, followed by IgG1. Numbers of FMDV-ASC were further augmented at 5 and 6 dpi, with an increasing prevalence in upper respiratory organs. Systemic antibody responses were slightly delayed compared with the local reaction. Also, IgM was the dominant isotype in serum at 5 dpi, coinciding with a sharp decrease of viral RNA detection in peripheral blood. These results indicate that following aerogenous administration, cattle develop a rapid and vigorous genuine local antibody response throughout the respiratory tract. Time course and isotype profiles indicate the presence of an efficient T cell-independent antibody response which drives the IgM-mediated virus clearance in cattle infected by FMDV aerosol exposure. PMID:23255811

  18. Progress in pediatrics in 2011. Choices in endocrinology, gastroenterology, hemato-oncology, infectious diseases, otolaryngology, pharmacotherapy and respiratory tract illnesses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Cesari, Silvia; Di Giorgio, Angela; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2012-06-08

    Main progresses in endocrinology, gastroenterology, hemato-oncology, infectious diseases, otolaryngology, pharmacotherapy, and respiratory tract illnesses selected from articles published in The Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2011 were reviewed. Risk factors for gastroenteritis and appendicitis in developing countries may be useful in improving our understanding of these diseases. Childhood hearing impairment is a world-wide problem which continues to have an high prevalence in newborns. Among the mechanisms of diseases, obese children often have asthma and high hepcidin levels that may reduce serum iron concentrations. In cystic fibrosis, 18q distal deletion has been described as a novel mutation. Hypothyroidism in children with central nervous system infections may increase mortality rates. Infrared tympanic thermometer (IRTT) in oral mode for the measurement of body temperature may be useful in fever screening in a busy setup. In newborns, the transmission of CMV infection through breast milk may be prevented through freezing or pasteurization. Recent advances in treatment of constipation, urinary tract infections, leukemia, pain in children with cancer, neonates with sepsis or difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation will likely contribute towards optimizing management of these common disorders. The work of the Family Pediatricians Medicines for Children Research Network aims to develop competence, infrastructure, networking and education for pediatric clinical trials.

  19. Elevated serum levels of a biliary glycoprotein (BGP I) in patients with liver or biliary tract disease.

    PubMed

    Svenberg, T; Wahren, B; Hammarström, S

    1979-05-01

    Human hepatic bile contains a glycoprotein (biliary glycoprotein I, BGP I) which cross-reacts with the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). A radioimmunoassay for BGP I was developed. The interference of CEA or 'non-specific cross-reacting antigen' (NCA) in the assay was small. The serum levels of BGP I were determined in healthy subjects, in patients with hepato-biliary diseases and in patients with various infectious or inflammatory disorders. Healthy individuals, including pregnant women, had a serum BGP I concentration of about 0.5-1 mg/l. Diseases of the liver or biliary tract (e.g. hepatitis A or B, cytomegalovirus hepatitis, obstructive jaundice or primary biliary cirrhosis) were associated with elevated serum levels of BGP I, as opposed to infectious diseases not affecting the liver mostly showing values within the normal range. Raised levels of serum BGP I activity may reflect biliary obstruction as a result of interference with normal BGP I secretion to the bile.

  20. HPV related diseases in males: a heavy vaccine-preventable burden.

    PubMed

    Canepa, P; Orsi, A; Martini, M; Icardi, G

    2013-06-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has a significant impact in male's health, as cause of clinical manifestations ranging from genital warts to several cancers of the anogenital and aero-digestive tract. HPV types which most frequently affect men are 6, 11, 16 and 18, included in the HPV quadrivalent vaccine, recently approved for use in males by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Although several data about the safety and efficacy of quadrivalent vaccine are available, the implementation of proper immunization plans dedicate to male's population cannot ignore the knowledge of the characteristics of the disease in men, which in some aspects should be clarify, in particular clearance of type-specific HPV infections and transmission dynamics. Purpose of this review is to summarise the main information about the burden and the natural history of the HPV related disease in males.

  1. Urinary tract disease in dogs: US findings. A mini-pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Robotti, G; Lanfranchi, D

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is the most commonly used imaging method for studying urinary tract disorders in dogs, as it is easy to perform, inexpensive and provides excellent contrast resolution in real-time. However, US examination of dogs presents a series of technical difficulties, and the US operator must therefore have a longstanding experience and access to high-quality equipment including a range of different probes to achieve a correct diagnosis. The aim of this mini-pictorial essay is to describe US findings and patterns which permit identification of the most common pathologies of the urinary tract in dogs. The technical difficulties that may be encountered are also evaluated as well as integration with other imaging modalities (traditional X-ray, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging).

  2. Ethanol and development of disease and injury to tha alimentary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Krawitt, E L

    1977-01-01

    Effects of ethanol on the gastrointestinal tract are reviewed, and an overview of possible mechanisms of ethanol damage to the alimentary tract is presented. Ethanol toxicity most commonly results in metabsorption. Mechanisms contributing to ethanol-induced calcium malabsorption are considered in detail as a prototype for problems encountered in evaluating effects of toxicants on intestinal function. Effects at the local level in the intestine must be differentiated from systemic effects. The mechanism of suppression of calcium absorption by chronic ethanol ingestion differs from that produced by acute administration. Effects of acute administration appear to be due to local mucosal damage and are reversed in 18 hr. Such damage is not present with chronic administration, which affects only duodenal transport. Treatment with vitamin D and its metabolites does not reverse the inhibition of calcium transport. The overall findings suggest that ethanol inhibition of calcium transport is mediated at the intestinal level, probably affecting vitamid D independent mechanisms. PMID:598353

  3. Ethanol and development of disease and injury to tha alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Krawitt, E L

    1977-10-01

    Effects of ethanol on the gastrointestinal tract are reviewed, and an overview of possible mechanisms of ethanol damage to the alimentary tract is presented. Ethanol toxicity most commonly results in metabsorption. Mechanisms contributing to ethanol-induced calcium malabsorption are considered in detail as a prototype for problems encountered in evaluating effects of toxicants on intestinal function. Effects at the local level in the intestine must be differentiated from systemic effects. The mechanism of suppression of calcium absorption by chronic ethanol ingestion differs from that produced by acute administration. Effects of acute administration appear to be due to local mucosal damage and are reversed in 18 hr. Such damage is not present with chronic administration, which affects only duodenal transport. Treatment with vitamin D and its metabolites does not reverse the inhibition of calcium transport. The overall findings suggest that ethanol inhibition of calcium transport is mediated at the intestinal level, probably affecting vitamid D independent mechanisms.

  4. Human cytomegalovirus induced pseudotumor of upper gastrointestinal tract mucosa: effects of long-term chronic disease?

    PubMed

    Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Barresi, Valeria; Bertani, Angela; Maccio, Livia; Palmiere, Cristian

    2015-06-01

    Human cytomegalovirus-induced lesions resembling malignancies have been described in the gastrointestinal tract and include ulcerated or exophytic large masses. The aim of this study was to review the cases registered in the databases of two academic hospitals and formulate a hypothesis concerning the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for cytomegalovirus-induced pseudotumor development. All the diagnoses of human cytomegalovirus infections of the upper gastrointestinal tract recorded from 1991 to 2013 were reviewed. Cases of mucosal alterations misdiagnosed endoscopically as malignancies were selected. Large ulcers occurring in the stomach (three cases) and an irregular exophytic mass at the gastro-jejunal anastomosis were misdiagnosed endoscopically as malignancies (4 cases out of 53). Histologically, all lesions reflected hyperplastic mucosal changes with a prevalence of epithelial and stroma infected cells, without signs of cell atypia. The hypothesis presented is that the development of human cytomegalovirus-induced pseudotumors may be the morphological expression of chronic mucosa damage underlying long-term infection.

  5. [Improvement of health care for patients with upper respiratory tract diseases associated with chlamydia infection].

    PubMed

    Kapustina, T A; Markina, A N; Parilova, O V

    2012-01-01

    At present the issues in regard to Chlamydia infection are not only limited by urogenital system. By the way optimal organization and non-urogenital chlamydiosis treatment strategy (with respiratory tract involvement in particular) have not been worked out yet and require immediate solutions. Due to new knowledge on respiratory chlamidiosis the authors discuss scientific background for future development of complex measures and main directions of health care support strategy for patients with upper respiratory associated with Chlamydia infection.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of changes in the selected white matter tracts using diffusion tensor imaging in patients with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Zimny, A; Szewczyk, P; Bladowska, J; Trypka, E; Wojtynska, R; Leszek, J; Sasiadek, M

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluated the damage to the extensive range of white matter tracts in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Thirty-four patients with AD (mean age 71.5 yrs, MMSE 17.6), 23 patients with MCI (mean age 66 yrs, MMSE 27.4) and 15 normal controls (mean age 69 yrs, MMSE 29.8) were enrolled. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed in 25 directions on 1.5 T MR scanner. Fractional anisotropy (FA) values were obtained with a small ROI method in several association tracts including posterior cingulum fibers, in commissural tracts (genu and splenium of corpus callosum) and projection tracts (middle cerebellar peduncles and posterior limbs of internal capsules). In MCI significant reductions of FA were found in the inferior longitudinal fascicles, left superior longitudinal fascicle and posterior cingulum fibers compared to normal controls. In AD significantly decreased FA values were detected in the same fascicles as in MCI and additionally in inferior fronto-occipital tracts and commissural tracts. In both AD and MCI the most severe changes were found within posterior cingulum fibers. No abnormalities were detected in projection tracts in both groups. Accuracy of DTI in detecting AD and MCI reached 0.95 and 0.79, respectively. FA measurements strongly correlated with neuropsychological tests. DTI is capable of depicting microstructural changes within white matter fiber tracts in dementia and may aid the differential diagnosis of AD and MCI. PMID:24028982

  7. Absence of bacterial DNA in culture-negative urine from cats with and without lower urinary tract disease.

    PubMed

    Lund, Heidi Sjetne; Skogtun, Gaute; Sørum, Henning; Eggertsdóttir, Anna Vigdís

    2015-10-01

    A diagnosis of bacterial cystitis commonly relies on a positive microbiological culture demonstrating the presence of a significant number of colony-forming units/ml urine, as urine within the upper urinary tract, bladder and proximal urethra generally is considered sterile. Recent studies from human and veterinary medicine indicate the presence of non-culturable bacteria in culture-negative urine samples. The aim of the present study was to determine the occurrence of bacterial DNA in culture-negative urine samples from cats with signs of feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD) and healthy control cats by 16S ribosomal DNA PCR and subsequent sequencing. The study sample included 38 culture-negative urine samples from cats with FLUTD and 43 culture-negative samples from control cats. Eight culture-positive urine samples from cats with FLUTD were included as external positive controls in addition to negative reaction controls. Of possible methodological limitations, degradation of DNA due to storage, the use of non-sedimented urine for DNA isolation and lack of internal positive reaction controls should be mentioned. The positive controls were recognised, but occurrence of bacterial DNA in culture-negative urine from cats with or without signs of lower urinary tract disease was not demonstrated. However, considering the possible methodological limitations, the presence of bacterial DNA in the urine of culture-negative FLUTD cats cannot be excluded based on the present results alone. Therefore, a prospective study reducing the possibility of degradation of DNA due to storage, in combination with modifications enhancing the chance of detecting even lower levels of bacterial DNA in culture-negative samples, seems warranted.

  8. Respiratory and allergic diseases: from upper respiratory tract infections to asthma.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Raja

    2002-06-01

    patient, mind-body interventions such as yoga, hypnosis, and biofeedback-assisted relaxation and breathing exercises are beneficial for stress reduction in general and may be helpful in further controlling asthma. Encouraging parents to learn how to massage their asthmatic children may appeal to some parents and provide benefits for parents and children alike. Acupuncture and chiropractic treatment cannot be recommended at this time, although some patients may derive benefit because of the placebo effect. For patients with allergic rhinitis, there are no good clinical research data on the use of quercetin and vitamin C. Similarly, freeze-dried stinging nettle leaves may be tried, but the applicable research evidence also is poor. Further studies are needed to assess the efficacy of these supplements and herbs. Homeopathic remedies based on extreme dilutions of the allergen may be beneficial in allergic rhinitis but require collaboration with an experienced homeopath. There are no research data on constitutional homeopathic approaches to asthma and allergic rhinitis. Patients with COPD are helped by exercise, pulmonary rehabilitation, and increased caloric protein and fat intake. Vitamin C and n-3 supplements are safe and reasonable; however, studies are needed to establish their efficacy in COPD. On the other hand, there are convincing data in favor of N-acetyl-cysteine supplementation for the patient with COPD at doses ranging between 400 and 1200 mg daily. Red blood cell magnesium levels may guide the use of magnesium replacement. The use of L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 in patients with COPD needs further study. The addition of essential oils to the dietary regimen of patients with chronic bronchitis is worth exploring. Patients with upper respiratory tract infections can expect a shorter duration of symptoms by taking high doses of vitamin C (2 g) with zinc supplements, preferably the nasal zinc gel, at the onset of their symptoms. Adding an herb such as echinacea or

  9. [Characteristics of eating behavior in overweight young people with biliary tract diseases among Bashkortostan population].

    PubMed

    Volevach, L V; Khismatullina, G Ia; Uliamaeva, V V; Gur'ev, R D; Kamalova, A A

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the present research was to study the types of nutritional behavior disturbances in overweight patients with the pathology biliary tract. 132 patients with chronic noncalculous cholecystitis aged from 18 to 35 were examined. The comprehensive clinical examination was conducted and types of eating behavior disturbances with the help DEBQ test (Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire) were examined. It was discovered that disturbances of eating behavior are observed in 82,9 percent of normal weight patients, in 100 percent of overweight and in 93,3 percent of patients with obesity. Restraint and emotional eating are more often observed in obesity. External eating is more often observed in overweight and normal weight persons than that emotional eating. Rational eating is rarely observed in all groups of examined persons. PMID:25842662

  10. Hodgkin’s disease presenting as discharging neck sinuses and a mediastinal mass

    PubMed Central

    Zolotar, Meira; Olaleye, Oladejo; Sherif, Ali; Howe, Rachael; Mathews, John

    2011-01-01

    A 23-year-old Asian lady presented with a hard indurated midline neck swelling of 2 months duration without any upper aerodigestive tract or systemic symptoms of note. Her inflammatory markers were elevated and she was commenced on antibiotics. Ultrasound scan and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) were inconclusive. A CT scan showed an ill-defined soft tissue mass anterior to and not well demarcated from the thyroid, and contiguous with a superior and anterior mediastinal mass. Incisional biopsy revealed necrosis and pockets of purulent material. Microbiology suggested a chronic pyogenic abscess negative for acid fast bacilli. She was treated with antituberculous therapy without resolution. She developed a discharging lateral neck mass with progressive increase of the mediastinal mass. She subsequently required a neck exploration and mediastinoscopy. Repeat mediastinal biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of Hodgkin’s disease and no organisms on culture. She was commenced on chemotherapeutic treatment with a satisfactory outcome. PMID:22689859

  11. Progress in pediatrics in 2013: choices in allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Dascola, Carlotta Povesi; Mirra, Virginia; Sperli, Francesco; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2014-07-12

    This review will provide new information related to pathophysiology and management of specific diseases that have been addressed by selected articles published in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2013, focusing on allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses in children. Recommendations for interpretation of skin prick test to foods in atopic eczema, management of allergic conjunctivitis, hypertension and breastfeeding in women treated with antiepileptic drugs and healthy breakfast have been reported. Epidemiological studies have given emphasis to high incidence of autoimmune disorders in patients with Turner syndrome, increasing prevalence of celiac disease, frequency of hypertension in adolescents, incidence and risk factor for retinopathy of prematurity. Advances in prevention include elucidation of the role of probiotics in reducing occurrence of allergies and feeding intolerance, and events of foetal life that influence later onset of diseases. Mechanistic studies suggested a role for vitamin D deficiency in asthma and type 1 diabetes and for reactivation of Varicella-Zoster virus in aseptic meningitis. Regarding diagnosis, a new mean for the diagnosis of hyperbilirubinaemia in newborns, a score for recognition of impaired nutritional status and growth and criteria for early Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome have been suggested. New therapeutic approaches consist of use of etanercept for reducing insulin dose in type 1 diabetes, probiotics in atopic eczema, and melatonin in viral infections.

  12. Effects of mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract disease on morbidity and mortality of gopher tortoises in northern and central Florida.

    PubMed

    Berish, Joan E Diemer; Wendland, Lori D; Kiltie, Richard A; Garrison, Elina P; Gates, Cyndi A

    2010-07-01

    Gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) populations on four tracts of public lands in northern and central Florida were studied from 1998 to 2001 to assess the effects of mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract disease (URTD). Adult gopher tortoises (n=205) were marked for identification, serum and nasal flush samples were obtained for mycoplasmal diagnostic assays, and clinical signs of URTD (nasal discharge, ocular discharge, palpebral edema, and conjunctivitis) were evaluated. A subset of tortoises (n=68) was radio-instrumented to facilitate repeated sampling and document potential mortality. Presence of serum antibody to Mycoplasma agassizii was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and mollicutes species were detected in nasal flushes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Antibody prevalence varied among sites and years but was highest in 1998, exceeding 70% at two sites. Only 11 tortoises (5%) were positive by PCR, and three species (M. agassizii, M. testudineum, and a nonpathogenic Acholeplasma) were identified in nasal flush specimens. Nasal discharge, though rare (6% of tortoises), was significantly correlated with higher ELISA ratios, study site, and positive PCR status. Mortality events (n=11) occurred on two of the three M. agassizii-positive sites; no mortality was observed on the M. agassizii-negative control site. However, none of the tested variables (ELISA result, study site, year, sex, presence of clinical signs, or carapace length) showed significant ability to predict the odds of death. Mycoplasmal URTD is believed to be a chronic disease with high morbidity but low mortality, and follow-up studies are needed to detect long-term effects. PMID:20688675

  13. Exposure of rhesus monkeys to cowpox virus Brighton Red by large-particle aerosol droplets results in an upper respiratory tract disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Reed F; Hammoud, Dima A; Perry, Donna L; Solomon, Jeffrey; Moore, Ian N; Lackemeyer, Matthew G; Bohannon, Jordan K; Sayre, Philip J; Minai, Mahnaz; Papaneri, Amy B; Hagen, Katie R; Janosko, Krisztina B; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E; Jahrling, Peter B

    2016-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that small-particle (0.5-3.0 µm) aerosol infection of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with cowpox virus (CPXV)-Brighton Red (BR) results in fulminant respiratory tract disease characterized by severe lung parenchymal pathology but only limited systemic virus dissemination and limited classic epidermal pox-like lesion development (Johnson et al., 2015). Based on these results, and to further develop CPXV as an improved model of human smallpox, we evaluated a novel large-particle aerosol (7.0-9.0 µm) exposure of rhesus monkeys to CPXV-BR and monitored for respiratory tract disease by serial computed tomography (CT). As expected, the upper respiratory tract and large airways were the major sites of virus-induced pathology following large-particle aerosol exposure. Large-particle aerosol CPXV exposure of rhesus macaques resulted in severe upper airway and large airway pathology with limited systemic dissemination. PMID:27166137

  14. Thermal water applications in the treatment of upper respiratory tract diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Keller, Sarah; König, Volker; Mösges, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Background. Thermal water inhalations and irrigations have a long tradition in the treatment of airway diseases. Currently there exists no systematic review or meta-analysis on the effectiveness of thermal water treatment in upper respiratory tract diseases. Methods. A systematic search in the databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, ISI Web of Science, and MedPilot was accomplished. Results. Eight evaluable outcome parameters from 13 prospective clinical studies were identified for 840 patients. Mucociliary clearance time improves significantly (P < 0.01) for the pooled thermal water subgroup and the sulphurous subgroup after 2 weeks (-6.69/minutes) and after 90 days (-8.33/minutes), not for isotonic sodium chloride solution (ISCS). Nasal resistance improved significantly after 2 weeks (Radon, ISCS, and placebo), after 30 days (sulphur and ISCS), and after 90 days (sulphur). Nasal flow improved significantly with the pooled thermal water, radon alone, and ISCS subgroups. For the IgE parameter only sulphurous thermal water (P < 0.01) and ISCS (P > 0.01) were analyzable. Adverse events of minor character were only reported for sulphurous treatment (19/370). Conclusion. Thermal water applications with radon or sulphur can be recommended as additional nonpharmacological treatment in upper airway diseases. Also in comparison to isotonic saline solution it shows significant improvements and should be investigated further.

  15. [Respiratory tract diseases caused by chemically irritating or toxic pollutants at the work site].

    PubMed

    Baur, X

    1995-05-01

    Update statistics of job-related diseases show there is still a high level in reported and also in recognised and financially compensated airway diseases caused by the action of chemically irritating or toxic substances during work. Most reported cases occur in the chemical and metal processing industries. Main triggering substances are said to be isocyanates, aerosols of pollutants produced during welding, cutting, casting or moulding (smoke), by solvents and hair dyes. Experiments prove that a variety of these noxious substances produce dose-dependent hypersensitivity of the bronchial system. Long-term monitoring of granary workers clearly points to both the possibility of and the need for early diagnosis followed by mandatory and immediate abstention from further exposure to avoid occurrence of irreversible disease patterns. Work-related health risks over and above job-conditioned diseases must be generally included in the protective measures in accordance with the new EC guidelines.

  16. Diseases of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Individuals Diagnosed as Children with Atypical Autism: A Danish Register Study Based on Hospital Diagnoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Isager, Torben; Rich, Bente

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the prevalence and types of diseases (International Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders, 10th Edition codes K20-K93) relating to the gastrointestinal tract in a clinical sample of 89 individuals diagnosed as children with atypical autism/pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified…

  17. Expression and Function of miR-155 in Diseases of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jianhua; Xia, Liang; Xu, Wenting; Lu, Nonghua

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a type of small noncoding RNA that can regulate the expression of target genes under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. miR-155 is a multifunctional miRNA with inflammation-related and oncogenic roles. In particular, the dysregulation of miR-155 has been strongly implicated in Helicobacter pylori-related gastric disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and colorectal cancer in addition to being involved in molecular changes of important targets and signaling pathways. This review focuses on the expression and function of miR-155 during inflammation and carcinogenesis and its potential use as an effective therapeutic target for certain gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27187359

  18. Fecal transplantation - the new, inexpensive, safe, and rapidly effective approach in the treatment of gastrointestinal tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Oprita, R; Bratu, M; Oprita, B; Diaconescu, B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Fecal transplantation was shown to effectively reduce the reoccurrence in patients with refractory Clostridium difficile infection. New data suggest that fecal transplantation could also be efficient in other gastrointestinal diseases, for instance in inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, but, there are also some data that could imply the efficacy outside the gastrointestinal tract. Fecal transplantation should be considered a unique agent, capable of treating severe diseases, with essentially no adverse reactions, presenting a cure rate of over 90%. Materials and methods. This prospective study included 33 patients, of whom 28 patients with recurrent or resistant Clostridium difficile infection, who failed to be treated with conventional therapy, which presupposed vancomycin administration and 5 patients with inflammatory bowel disease, more precisely with ulcerative colitis, refractory on biologic agents (infliximab and adalimumab). In most of the cases, fecal transplant was realized with the infusion of stool through colonoscopy. Results. Most of the patients from both groups (Clostridium difficile infection and Ulcerative Colitis) responded (31 patients) with a total relief of the symptoms, after 1 FMT for Clostridium difficile group and after more than one for the ulcerative colitis group. The so-called primary cure rate was 96.42% for Clostridium group. For ulcerative colitis, group 3 of the patients needed 3 or 4 infusions for symptom relief. One patient was categorized as non-responsive (patient with UC) and needed surgery. Due to non-fecal transplant related causes, one death was reported. Conclusions. Fecal transplant is highly effective, safe, with practically no adverse effects, inexpensive, a procedure easy to be done that could be introduced in Clostridium difficile treatment protocols. As for ulcerative colitis treatment with FMT, future randomized controlled trials are needed to prove its efficiency. PMID:27453747

  19. Surveillance for upper respiratory tract disease and Mycoplasma in free-ranging gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus) in Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jessica L; Smith, Lora L; Guyer, Craig; Lockhart, J Mitchell; Lee, Gregory W; Yabsley, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) is highly contagious and has been implicated in the reduction of populations throughout the range. With the exception of a few limited studies, the prevalence of URTD in Georgia, USA tortoise populations is poorly known. We found that exposure to Mycoplasma agassizii and Mycoplasma testudineum, associated with URTD, varied geographically among 11 Georgia tortoise populations. The prevalence of antibodies to M. agassizii in individual populations was either very low (0-3%, n=7 populations) or very high (96-100%, n=4 populations), whereas there was variation in the prevalence of antibodies to M. testudineum among populations (20-61%, n=10) with only one site being negative. Five sites had tortoises with antibodies to both pathogens, and these were the only sites where we observed tortoises with clinical signs consistent with URTD. We did not find tortoises with clinical signs of URTD at sites with tortoises with antibodies only to M. testudineum, which provides evidence that this organism may be of limited pathogenicity for gopher tortoises. Collectively, these data indicate that both M. agassizii and M. testudineum are present in Georgia populations of gopher tortoises and that clinical disease is apparent in populations where both pathogens are present. Additional research is needed to better understand the role of these two pathogens, and other potential pathogens, in the overall health of tortoise populations, especially if future conservation efforts involve translocation of tortoises. PMID:25098305

  20. Magnetic resonance cholangiography: applications in patients with calculus disease of the biliary tract.

    PubMed

    Liu, Terrence H; Organ, Claude H

    2004-04-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) is a non-invasive imaging modality that has become widely available. In the short time since its introduction, MRC has been shown to possess excellent accuracy for the diagnosis of various biliary pathologies, including choledocholithiasis. Investigations of the clinical applications of MRC are ongoing. This review summarizes the diagnostic capabilities of MRC and discusses its application in the management of patients with gallstone diseases.

  1. Relationship of Plummer-Vinson disease to cancer of the upper alimentary tract in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Larsson, L G; Sandström, A; Westling, P

    1975-11-01

    Sideropenic anemia with epithelial lesions (Plummer-Vinson syndrome) was previously very common among women in northern Sweden. The incidence of this condition is decreasing, however, because of better nutrition and improved health care. Plummer-Vinson syndrome as a sequela of previous sideropenic anemia still influences the pattern of hypopharyngeal and oral cancer in northern Sweden where the female/male ratio in these diseases is remarkably high and where cancer in the postcricoid part of the hypopharynx is relatively common. In Sweden as a whole, a decreasing trend in the incidence of hypopharyngeal cancer in women can be demonstrated, which is probably due to diminished prevalence of Plummer-Vinson syndrome.

  2. How I treat acute graft-versus-host disease of the gastrointestinal tract and the liver

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has evolved from a one-size-fits-all approach to a more nuanced strategy based on predicted outcomes. Lower and time-limited doses of immune suppression for patients predicted to have low-risk GVHD are safe and effective. In more severe GVHD, prolonged exposure to immunosuppressive therapies, failure to achieve tolerance, and inadequate clinical responses are the proximate causes of GVHD-related deaths. This article presents acute GVHD-related scenarios representing, respectively, certainty of diagnosis, multiple causes of symptoms, jaundice, an initial therapy algorithm, secondary therapy, and defining futility of treatment. PMID:26729898

  3. Activation of Helicobacter pylori causes either autoimmune thyroid diseases or carcinogenesis in the digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Astl, J; Šterzl, I

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in stimulation of immune system, development of autoimmune endocrinopathies as autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) and on other hand induction of immunosupresion activates gastric and extra-gastric diseases such as gastric ulcer or cancer. It causes persistent lifelong infection despite local and systemic immune response. Our results indicate that Helicobacter pylori might cause inhibition of the specific cellular immune response in Helicobacter pylori-infected patients with or without autoimmune diseases such as AT. We cannot also declare the carcinogenic effect in oropharynx. However the association of any infection agents and cancerogenesis exists. The adherence of Helicobacter pylori expression and enlargement of benign lymphatic tissue and the high incidence of the DNA of Helicobacter pylori in laryngopharyngeal and oropharyngeal cancer is reality. LTT appears to be a good tool for detection of immune memory cellular response in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection and AT. All these complications of Helicobacter pylori infection can be abrogated by successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

  4. Qualitative analysis of the vaginal microbiota of healthy cattle and cattle with genital-tract disease.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, N F; Kästle, J; Coutinho, T J D; Amorim, A T; Campos, G B; Santos, V M; Marques, L M; Timenetsky, J; de Farias, S T

    2015-06-12

    The microbial community of the reproductive appara-tus, when known, can provide information about the health of the host. Metagenomics has been used to characterize and obtain genetic infor-mation about microbial communities in various environments and can relate certain diseases with changes in this community composition. In this study, samples of vaginal surface mucosal secretions were col-lected from five healthy cows and five cows that showed symptoms of reproductive disorders. Following high-throughput sequencing of the isolated microbial DNA, data were processed using the Mothur soft-ware to remove low-quality sequences and chimeras, and released to the Ribosomal Database Project for classification of operational taxo-nomic units (OTUs). Local BLASTn was performed and results were loaded into the MEGAN program for viewing profiles and taxonomic microbial attributes. The control profile comprised a total of 15 taxa, with Bacteroides, Enterobacteriaceae, and Victivallis comprising the highest representation of OTUs; the reproductive disorder-positive profile comprised 68 taxa, with Bacteroides, Enterobacteriaceae, His-tophilus, Victivallis, Alistipes, and Coriobacteriaceae being the taxa with the most OTU representation. A change was observed in both the community composition as well as in the microbial attributes of the profiles, suggesting that a relationship might exist between the patho-gen and representative taxa, reflecting the production of metabolites to disease progression.

  5. Nuclear medicine and ultrasound; correlation in diagnosis of disease of liver and biliary tract.

    PubMed

    Lomonaco, A; Kline, P; Halpern, S; Leopold, G

    1975-10-01

    Even though the radiocolloid scan is nonspecific it will be approximately 70%-80% accurate in predicting the presence or absence of liver disease and somewhat less accurate than that in making statements as to the specific type of disease. This compares well with other modalities. The ability of nuclear medicine techniques to provide a correct diagnosis is improved when additional isotopic techniques such as hepatic blood flow studies and 131I-rose bengal and 67Ga scanning are performed. Ultrasound scanning is also non specific. To date, the major application of ultrasound in the study of the liver has been in deciphering puzzling contour abnormalities seen on nuclear medicine scans and in demonstrating fluid-filled abnormalities. Its usefulness in diffuse and solid focal lesions has been less dramatic. More recently, however, the development of gray scale has necessitated a reevaluation of the technique. Gray scale demonstrates a large number of intrahepatic interfaces that were previously invisible, and it has already been shown to demonstrate focal disorders such as metastasis more easily than the nongray-scale method. It can also demonstrate dilated biliary radicals, the gallbladder, and gallstones. In addition, while routinely studying the liver one can evaluate diaphragmatic motion and various retroperitoneal structures such as the pancreas, lymph nodes, and abdominal vascular structures.

  6. Respiratory and allergic diseases: from upper respiratory tract infections to asthma.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Raja

    2002-06-01

    patient, mind-body interventions such as yoga, hypnosis, and biofeedback-assisted relaxation and breathing exercises are beneficial for stress reduction in general and may be helpful in further controlling asthma. Encouraging parents to learn how to massage their asthmatic children may appeal to some parents and provide benefits for parents and children alike. Acupuncture and chiropractic treatment cannot be recommended at this time, although some patients may derive benefit because of the placebo effect. For patients with allergic rhinitis, there are no good clinical research data on the use of quercetin and vitamin C. Similarly, freeze-dried stinging nettle leaves may be tried, but the applicable research evidence also is poor. Further studies are needed to assess the efficacy of these supplements and herbs. Homeopathic remedies based on extreme dilutions of the allergen may be beneficial in allergic rhinitis but require collaboration with an experienced homeopath. There are no research data on constitutional homeopathic approaches to asthma and allergic rhinitis. Patients with COPD are helped by exercise, pulmonary rehabilitation, and increased caloric protein and fat intake. Vitamin C and n-3 supplements are safe and reasonable; however, studies are needed to establish their efficacy in COPD. On the other hand, there are convincing data in favor of N-acetyl-cysteine supplementation for the patient with COPD at doses ranging between 400 and 1200 mg daily. Red blood cell magnesium levels may guide the use of magnesium replacement. The use of L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 in patients with COPD needs further study. The addition of essential oils to the dietary regimen of patients with chronic bronchitis is worth exploring. Patients with upper respiratory tract infections can expect a shorter duration of symptoms by taking high doses of vitamin C (2 g) with zinc supplements, preferably the nasal zinc gel, at the onset of their symptoms. Adding an herb such as echinacea or

  7. [Risk of the incidence of urinary tract diseases in industrial centers of the Maritime Territory].

    PubMed

    Kiku, P F; Veremchuk, L V; Viazova, A V

    2003-01-01

    The study was undertaken to establish whether there is a relationship of the incidence of urinary diseases (UD) in the population of industrial towns in the Primorye Territory to the water basin. This evaluation was based on the principles of calculation and on the analysis of epidemiological and ecological risks. The environment in the Primorye Territory was found to be dangerous to human health and to affect the spread of UD; with varying social and natural conditions, specific features and amounts of discharged pollutants, the ecological risk exceeds the epidemiological one; there is a high association of the incidence of UD in the port towns and industrial centers where the enterprises of coal mining, chemical, and non-ferrous metallurgic industries are located.

  8. Gynecologic health and disease in relation to the microbiome of the female reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Green, Katherine A; Zarek, Shvetha M; Catherino, William H

    2015-12-01

    It is well established that the vagina is colonized by bacteria that serve important roles in homeostasis. Imbalances in the proportion of bacteria may lead to a predisposition to infection or reproductive complications. Molecular-based approaches demonstrated a greater degree of microbial diversity both within and between women than previously recognized. The vaginal microbiome may fluctuate during various states of health, such as during the menstrual cycle or after menopause, and there may be differences in the vaginal microbiome between women of different ethnicities. Furthermore, the specific composition of the vaginal microbiome may influence the predisposition to dysbiosis and the transmission of sexually transmitted infections. An understanding of the diversity of the vaginal microbial environment during states of health is essential for the identification of risk factors for disease and the development of appropriate treatment.

  9. Clinical management of HPV-related disease of the lower genital tract.

    PubMed

    Kyrgiou, M; Valasoulis, G; Founta, C; Koliopoulos, G; Karakitsos, P; Nasioutziki, M; Navrozoglou, I; Dalkalitsis, N; Paraskevaidis, E

    2010-09-01

    Cytology remains the mainstay for cervical screening. The need to achieve effective management, limit complications, and preserve reproductive function led to the popularity of local treatment. Although the cure rates for ablative and excisional methods are similar, the excisional method provides a more reliable histopathological diagnosis. Recent evidence revealed increased perinatal morbidity after treatment that appears to be related to the proportion of cervix removed. The human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test appears to enhance the detection of disease in primary screening, in the triage of minor cytological abnormalities, and in follow-up. Further research on the clinical application of a scoring system is ongoing. The vaccines are now available and appear to be safe, well tolerated, and highly efficacious in HPV naive women. A synergy of vaccination and screening will be required. Treatment for early cervical cancer is increasingly shifting toward more fertility-sparing surgical techniques. Careful selection of patients is essential. PMID:20840254

  10. Progress in Pediatrics in 2012: choices in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we summarize the progresses in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses that have been published in The Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2012. The induction of Treg activity by probiotics might be effective for promoting tolerance towards food allergens. Nasal cytology is useful in patients with rhinitis for diagnosing chronic non-allergic non-infectious diseases. Atopic eczema is associated both with an aberrant skin matrix and impaired systemic immune response. Therefore, isolated topical treatment may have suboptimal effect. Diagnostic work-up of exercise-induced anaphylaxis, including exercise challenge test, is necessary to reach a diagnosis. Studies may support a role for nutrition on prevention of asthma and cardiovascular diseases. Clinicians need to early identify adolescent menstrual abnormalities to minimize sequelae, and to promote health information. In Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B investigations include acetylcholinesterase study of rectal mucosa followed by the molecular analysis of RET mutation. Low adherence to gluten-free diet and osteopenia are common problems in children with diabetes mellitus type 1 and celiac disease. In infantile colic, laboratory tests are usually unnecessary and the treatment is based on reassurance. Prevalence of obesity and stunting is elucidated by several studies. Evidences are growing that dietetic measures are needed to prevent obesity in children with acute leukemia. Treatment studies for infectious diseases show promise for probiotics along with standard triple therapy in children with Helicobacter pilori infection, while zinc has no effect on pneumonia. Educational programs about the proper management of the febrile child are warranted. A new hour-specific total serum bilirubin nomogram has been shown to be able to predict newborns without hyperbilirubinemia after 48 to 72 hours of life. Newborns with

  11. Progress in Pediatrics in 2012: choices in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2013-05-08

    In this review, we summarize the progresses in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses that have been published in The Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2012. The induction of Treg activity by probiotics might be effective for promoting tolerance towards food allergens. Nasal cytology is useful in patients with rhinitis for diagnosing chronic non-allergic non-infectious diseases. Atopic eczema is associated both with an aberrant skin matrix and impaired systemic immune response. Therefore, isolated topical treatment may have suboptimal effect. Diagnostic work-up of exercise-induced anaphylaxis, including exercise challenge test, is necessary to reach a diagnosis. Studies may support a role for nutrition on prevention of asthma and cardiovascular diseases. Clinicians need to early identify adolescent menstrual abnormalities to minimize sequelae, and to promote health information. In Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B investigations include acetylcholinesterase study of rectal mucosa followed by the molecular analysis of RET mutation. Low adherence to gluten-free diet and osteopenia are common problems in children with diabetes mellitus type 1 and celiac disease. In infantile colic, laboratory tests are usually unnecessary and the treatment is based on reassurance. Prevalence of obesity and stunting is elucidated by several studies. Evidences are growing that dietetic measures are needed to prevent obesity in children with acute leukemia. Treatment studies for infectious diseases show promise for probiotics along with standard triple therapy in children with Helicobacter pilori infection, while zinc has no effect on pneumonia. Educational programs about the proper management of the febrile child are warranted. A new hour-specific total serum bilirubin nomogram has been shown to be able to predict newborns without hyperbilirubinemia after 48 to 72 hours of life. Newborns with

  12. Investigation of Motor Cortical Plasticity and Corticospinal Tract Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Patients with Parkinsons Disease and Essential Tremor.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Kuei; Chen, Chun-Ming; Duann, Jeng-Ren; Ziemann, Ulf; Chen, Jui-Cheng; Chiou, Shang-Ming; Tsai, Chon-Haw

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and essential tremor (ET) are characterized with motor dysfunctions. Motor circuit dysfunctions can be complementarily investigated by paired associative stimulation (PAS)-induced long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the corticospinal tract (CST). Three groups of twelve subjects with moderate severity PD, ET with intention tremor and healthy controls (HC) were studied. The primary motor cortex (M1) excitability, measured by motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude and by short-interval and long-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI and LICI) was compared between the three groups before and after PAS. The DTI measures of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were acquired. PAS effects and DTI data were simultaneously examined between groups. PAS increased MEP amplitude in HC but not in PD and ET. SICI and LICI were significantly reduced after PAS irrespective of groups. No significant differences of the mean FA and MD were found between groups. There was no significant correlation between the PAS effects and the DTI measures. Findings suggest that both PD and ET with intention tremor have impairment of the associative LTP-like corticospinal excitability change in M1. The microstructure of the CST is not relevant to the deficiency of M1 associative plasticity in PD and ET. PMID:27603204

  13. Near-infrared spectroscopy of the bladder: a new technique for studying lower urinary tract function in health and disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadgan, Babak; Afshar, Kourosh; Stothers, Lynn; Macnab, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    Background: Continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can monitor chromophore change in the bladder detrusor muscle during voiding; oxygenation and hemodynamic data derived differ in health and disease. Application of wireless NIRS for evaluation of voiding dysfunction would benefit children. Methods: Subjects: 20 children (4-17 yrs) [5 normal, 15 with urinary tract pathology]. Instrumentation: self-contained device weight 84 gm; 3 paired light emitting diodes (760/850 nm) in a spatially resolved configuration; source-detector separation distances (30, 35 and 40 mm); silicon photodiode detector; and Bluetooth®. Procedure: Transcutaneous monitoring (midline abdominal skin 2 cm above pubis) during spontaneous voiding (bladder contraction) of oxygenated (O2Hb), deoxygenated (HHb) and total hemoglobin (tHb) and tissue oxygen saturation index (TSI %) at 10 Hz. Results: All 20 trials produced clear graphic data with no movement effect evident. Comparison of patterns of chromophore change between normal and symptomatic subjects revealed trend differences in O2Hb and tHb. (Normal positive; Symptomatic negative, and TSI% fell in symptomatic group). Conclusions: Wireless NIRS is technically feasible in ambulant children. Negative trends in chromophore concentration and falls in TSI% suggest a hemodynamic impairment may underlie some forms of voiding dysfunction, with abnormal physiology involving the microcirculation possibly resulting in muscle fatigue during voiding.

  14. Investigation of Motor Cortical Plasticity and Corticospinal Tract Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Patients with Parkinsons Disease and Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Ming; Duann, Jeng-Ren; Ziemann, Ulf; Chen, Jui-Cheng; Chiou, Shang-Ming; Tsai, Chon-Haw

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) and essential tremor (ET) are characterized with motor dysfunctions. Motor circuit dysfunctions can be complementarily investigated by paired associative stimulation (PAS)-induced long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the corticospinal tract (CST). Three groups of twelve subjects with moderate severity PD, ET with intention tremor and healthy controls (HC) were studied. The primary motor cortex (M1) excitability, measured by motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude and by short-interval and long-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI and LICI) was compared between the three groups before and after PAS. The DTI measures of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were acquired. PAS effects and DTI data were simultaneously examined between groups. PAS increased MEP amplitude in HC but not in PD and ET. SICI and LICI were significantly reduced after PAS irrespective of groups. No significant differences of the mean FA and MD were found between groups. There was no significant correlation between the PAS effects and the DTI measures. Findings suggest that both PD and ET with intention tremor have impairment of the associative LTP-like corticospinal excitability change in M1. The microstructure of the CST is not relevant to the deficiency of M1 associative plasticity in PD and ET. PMID:27603204

  15. Assessment of co-existence of Helicobacter pylori and Candida fungi in diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Karczewska, E; Wojtas, I; Sito, E; Trojanowska, D; Budak, A; Zwolinska-Wcislo, M; Wilk, A

    2009-12-01

    Candida spp. were found in the gastric mucosa of 27 (17%) patients, out of whom 18 (11%) showed co-existence of the fungi with H. pylori. Analysis of relationship between selected disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract (non ulcer dyspepsia NUD, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer) and infection with H. pylori and/or Candida revealed a link between co-existence of H. pylori with Candida and gastric ulcers suggesting synergism of those microorganism in pathogenesis of the disease. On the contrary, according to quantitative studies performed, the fungi alone do not play a significant role in pathogenesis of the above mentioned disorders as they colonize only epithelium to the extent that is not pathologically significant (<10(3) CFU/ml). Genetical study was carried out on 57 Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from bioptates of the gastric mucosa. The genotypes of the strains (gene cagA and alleles of gene vacA - m1, m2, s1, s2) were determined using the PCR technique. As it was shown, the patients infected with H. pylori strains of genotype cagA+, vacA s1 are exposed to higher risk of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) as compared to the patients infected with cagA-, vacA s2 strains. In the case of the NUD patients a correlation with allele m2 was found only (p<0.001). This may suggest that in future some of the NUD patients infected with cagA+, vacA s1 strains will fall into the group at higher risk for PUD.

  16. Tracheal Endoscopic and Cytological Findings and Blood Examination Results in Thoroughbred Racehorses Suspected to have Lower Respiratory Tract Disease

    PubMed Central

    KUSANO, Kanichi; HOBO, Seiji; ODE, Hirotaka; ISHIKAWA, Yuhiro

    2009-01-01

    Cytology of tracheal aspirates, tracheal endoscopic and blood tests were carried out to 86 Thoroughbred racehorses presenting coughs or poor performance which were suspected to have lower respiratory tract disease (LRTD) to assess the conditions of the disorders. Racehorses were classified into coughing (66 horses) and non-coughing (20 horses) groups based on clinical symptoms. Nine Thoroughbred racehorses without respiratory abnormality were used as controls. Assessment of grades of airway mucus, cytology of tracheal aspirates and serum amyloid A (SAA), fibrinogen (Fbg) and pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D) measurements were performed. Relationships between age, gender and racing careers were also investigated to understand the characteristics of LRTD in racehorses. Mean age was significantly higher in non-coughing group compared to coughing group. Existence of racing career and number of starts were significantly greater in non-coughing group compared to coughing group. On the other hand, grades of airway mucus were significantly higher in coughing group compared to control group. Percentages of neutrophils in tracheal aspirates were significantly higher in coughing group compared to non-coughing and control groups. SAA, Fbg and SP-D were higher in coughing group compared to non-coughing and control groups indicating that condition of coughing group is in the acute phase. Positive rate of inflammatory airway disease was significantly higher in coughing and non-coughing groups compared to control group. It was concluded that carrying out comprehensive evaluation including investigation on SAA, Fbg and SP-D analysis with airway assessment to Thoroughbred racehorses which were suspected to have LRTD are useful procedure to understand the pathological condition which aid to initiate appropriate treatment, prognosis judgment or to advise trainers to consider altering training regimen. PMID:24833960

  17. Statistical Analysis Aiming at Predicting Respiratory Tract Disease Hospital Admissions from Environmental Variables in the City of São Paulo

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio Coêlho, Micheline; Luiz Teixeira Gonçalves, Fabio; do Rosário Dias de Oliveira Latorre, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study is aimed at creating a stochastic model, named Brazilian Climate and Health Model (BCHM), through Poisson regression, in order to predict the occurrence of hospital respiratory admissions (for children under thirteen years of age) as a function of air pollutants, meteorological variables, and thermal comfort indices (effective temperatures, ET). The data used in this study were obtained from the city of São Paulo, Brazil, between 1997 and 2000. The respiratory tract diseases were divided into three categories: URI (Upper Respiratory tract diseases), LRI (Lower Respiratory tract diseases), and IP (Influenza and Pneumonia). The overall results of URI, LRI, and IP show clear correlation with SO2 and CO, PM10 and O3, and PM10, respectively, and the ETw4 (Effective Temperature) for all the three disease groups. It is extremely important to warn the government of the most populated city in Brazil about the outcome of this study, providing it with valuable information in order to help it better manage its resources on behalf of the whole population of the city of Sao Paulo, especially those with low incomes. PMID:20706674

  18. [Gadolinium as an alternative radiocontrast agent in patients with allergy to iodine-based contrast provide for useful diagnostic imagings and safely treatment of biliary tract diseases].

    PubMed

    Natsume, Makoto; Sano, Hitoshi; Fukusada, Shigeki; Kachi, Kenta; Inoue, Tadahisa; Anbe, Kaiki; Nishie, Hirotada; Nishi, Yuji; Yoshimura, Norihiro; Mizushima, Takashi; Okumura, Fumihiro; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; Naitoh, Itaru; Hayashi, Kazuki; Nakazawa, Takahiro

    2013-05-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of biliary tract disease requires an intraductal radiocontrast agent. Although iodine-based contrast medium is commonly used, some patients show severe allergy to iodinated contrast agent. We have retrospectively reviewed the usefulness and safety of gadolinium as an alternative radiocontrast agent in 3 patients with allergy to iodine-based contrast medium in the diagnosis and treatment of biliary tract diseases. In case 1, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage and cholangiography were performed successfully and it was possible to visualize an intrahepatic bile duct stone. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopic lithotomy was performed and the intrahepatic bile duct stone was removed. In case 2, endoscopic biliary lithotripsy was performed. In case 3, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and cholangioscopy provided a diagnosis of moderately differentiated carcinoma. He underwent pancreatoduodenectomy. Postoperative cholangiograms were also obtained successfully. Gadolinium contrast agent is an alternative to iodine-based cholangiography for the patients with allergy to iodine.

  19. G-scores: a method for identifying disease-causing pathogens with application to lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Peng, Peichao; Wang, Lu; Kang, Yu

    2014-07-20

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) are well known for the lack of a good diagnostic method. The main difficulty lies in the fact that there are a variety of pathogens causing LRTIs, and their management and treatment are quite different. The development of quantitative real-time loop-mediated isothermal amplification (qrt-LAMP) made it possible to rapidly amplify and quantify multiple pathogens simultaneously. The question that remains to be answered is how accurate and reliable is this method? More importantly, how are qrt-LAMP measurements utilized to inform/suggest medical decisions? When does a pathogen start to grow out of control and cause infection? Answers to these questions are crucial to advise treatment guidance for LRTIs and also helpful to design phase I/II trials or adaptive treatment strategies. In this article, our main contributions include the following two aspects. First, we utilize zero-inflated mixture models to provide statistical evidence for the validity of qrt-LAMP being used in detecting pathogens for LRTIs without the presence of a gold standard test. Our results on qrt-LAMP suggest that it provides reliable measurements on pathogens of interest. Second, we propose a novel statistical approach to identify disease-causing pathogens, that is, distinguish the pathogens that colonize without causing problems from those that rapidly grow and cause infection. We achieve this by combining information from absolute quantities of pathogens and their symbiosis information to form G-scores. Change-point detection methods are utilized on these G-scores to detect the three phases of bacterial growth-lag phase, log phase, and stationary phase. PMID:24599506

  20. The role of glutamine supplementation in thoracic and upper aerodigestive malignancies.

    PubMed

    Papanikolopoulou, Amalia; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Drakoulis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    In cancer patients, marked glutamine (gln) depletion develops over time. Host tissues (epithelial cells and lymphocytes) that depend upon adequate stores of gln for optimal functioning can be negatively influenced. In addition, radiation and/or chemotherapy cause normal tissues damage that might be enhanced by this depletion effect. The present review evaluates in vivo clinical data about the potential beneficial role of gln administration in the prevention of host tissue toxicity, in a patient group with thoracic and upper aerodigestive malignancies (T&UAM) during cancer treatment. Publications were identified in a systematic review of MEDLINE Database from the last 2 decades (1994-2014) using key search terms and through manual searches. Overall, 13 clinical studies (9 oral/4 parenteral) evaluated the safety and tolerance of gln supply, showing a beneficial effect in the grade, duration of mucositis and esophagitis, decreased gut permeability, and weight loss. Only 1 Phase 1 clinical trial had negative results because the chemo-radiotherapy combined treatment was not feasible. The use of oral gln may especially have an important role in the prevention of acute radiation toxicities, the weight loss and the need for analgesics in patients with T&UAM, especially if the treatment plan includes combined modality therapy with chemo-radiation.

  1. Detection of feline upper respiratory tract disease pathogens using a commercially available real-time PCR test.

    PubMed

    Litster, A; Wu, C C; Leutenegger, C M

    2015-11-01

    Feline herpesvirus (FHV-1), feline calicivirus (FCV), Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bb), Chlamydia felis (Cf) and Mycoplasma felis (Mf) are common infectious agents identified in cats with upper respiratory tract disease (URTD). Each of these agents can either act as primary pathogens or cause subclinical infections, and pathogen identification can be used to prevent disease transmission in shelters, or to manage individual cats with recurrent URTD. The aim of this study was to compare pathogen detection rates using real-time PCR testing and virus isolation (VI) or bacterial culture in conjunctival, nasal and oropharyngeal swabs from 18 shelter-housed cats with clinical URTD. Co-infections were common; FHV-1 was most prevalent and Cf and FCV were least prevalent. Agents detected by PCR were FCV 2/18 (11%), FHV-1 17/18 (94%), Bb 8/18 (44%) and Mf 15/18 (83%). Agents detected by VI and bacterial culture were FCV 1/18 (6%), FHV-1 12/18 (67%), Bb 8/18 (44%) and Mf 12/18 (67%). Agreement between PCR results and the other two methods was: FHV-1, 57.4%; FCV, 98.1%; Bb, 75.0%; Mf, 60.0%. Discordancies included PCR-positive, VI-negative (FCV, n = 1/54, 1.9%; FHV-1, n = 23/54, 42.6%), PCR-positive, culture-negative (Bb, n = 6/36, 16.7%; Mf, n = 13/36, 36.1%) or PCR-negative, culture-positive (Bb, n = 3/36, 8.3%; Mf, n = 2/36, 5.6%) results. A combination of an oropharyngeal swab and either a conjunctival or a nasal swab submitted for PCR testing was able to detect all infectious agents tested for in each cat. PCR testing was a sensitive and convenient method of detection of infectious agents in cats with clinical signs of URTD. PMID:26324635

  2. The primacy of the gastrointestinal tract as a target organ of acute graft-versus-host disease: rationale for the use of cytokine shields in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hill, G R; Ferrara, J L

    2000-05-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the major complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), limits the application of this curative but toxic therapy. Studies of inflammatory pathways involved in GVHD in animals have shown that the gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a major role in the amplification of systemic disease. Damage to the GI tract increases the translocation of inflammatory stimuli such as endotoxin, which promotes further inflammation and additional GI tract damage. The GI tract is therefore critical to the propagation of the "cytokine storm" characteristic of acute GVHD. Experimental approaches to the prevention of GVHD include reducing the damage to the GI tract by fortification of the GI mucosal barrier through novel "cytokine shields" such as IL-11 or keratinocyte growth factor. Such strategies have reduced GVHD while preserving a graft-versus-leukemia effect in animal models, and they now deserve formal testing in carefully designed clinical trials. (Blood. 2000;95:2754-2759)

  3. Quantitative microscopy of the lung: a problem-based approach. Part 2: stereological parameters and study designs in various diseases of the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Mühlfeld, Christian; Ochs, Matthias

    2013-08-01

    Design-based stereology provides efficient methods to obtain valuable quantitative information of the respiratory tract in various diseases. However, the choice of the most relevant parameters in a specific disease setting has to be deduced from the present pathobiological knowledge. Often it is difficult to express the pathological alterations by interpretable parameters in terms of volume, surface area, length, or number. In the second part of this companion review article, we analyze the present pathophysiological knowledge about acute lung injury, diffuse parenchymal lung diseases, emphysema, pulmonary hypertension, and asthma to come up with recommendations for the disease-specific application of stereological principles for obtaining relevant parameters. Worked examples with illustrative images are used to demonstrate the work flow, estimation procedure, and calculation and to facilitate the practical performance of equivalent analyses. PMID:23709622

  4. Tract profiles of white matter properties: automating fiber-tract quantification.

    PubMed

    Yeatman, Jason D; Dougherty, Robert F; Myall, Nathaniel J; Wandell, Brian A; Feldman, Heidi M

    2012-01-01

    Tractography based on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) data is a method for identifying the major white matter fascicles (tracts) in the living human brain. The health of these tracts is an important factor underlying many cognitive and neurological disorders. In vivo, tissue properties may vary systematically along each tract for several reasons: different populations of axons enter and exit the tract, and disease can strike at local positions within the tract. Hence quantifying and understanding diffusion measures along each fiber tract (Tract Profile) may reveal new insights into white matter development, function, and disease that are not obvious from mean measures of that tract. We demonstrate several novel findings related to Tract Profiles in the brains of typically developing children and children at risk for white matter injury secondary to preterm birth. First, fractional anisotropy (FA) values vary substantially within a tract but the Tract FA Profile is consistent across subjects. Thus, Tract Profiles contain far more information than mean diffusion measures. Second, developmental changes in FA occur at specific positions within the Tract Profile, rather than along the entire tract. Third, Tract Profiles can be used to compare white matter properties of individual patients to standardized Tract Profiles of a healthy population to elucidate unique features of that patient's clinical condition. Fourth, Tract Profiles can be used to evaluate the association between white matter properties and behavioral outcomes. Specifically, in the preterm group reading ability is positively correlated with FA measured at specific locations on the left arcuate and left superior longitudinal fasciculus and the magnitude of the correlation varies significantly along the Tract Profiles. We introduce open source software for automated fiber-tract quantification (AFQ) that measures Tract Profiles of MRI parameters for 18 white matter tracts. With further validation, AFQ Tract

  5. The (CAG)n tract of Machado–Joseph Disease gene (ATXN3): a comparison between DNA and mRNA in patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Santos, Cristina; Montiel, Rafael; Kay, Teresa; Vasconcelos, João; Maciel, Patrícia; Lima, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    Machado–Joseph disease (MJD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder of late onset (occurring at a mean age of 40.2 years). The clinical manifestation of MJD is dependent on the presence of an expansion of the (CAG)n motif within exon 10 of the ATXN3 gene, located at 14q32.1. The variance in onset of MJD is only partially correlated (∼50–80%) with the extension of the CAG tract in genomic DNA (gDNA). The main aim of this work was to determine whether there are discrepancies in the size of the (CAG)n tract between gDNA and mRNA, and to establish whether there is a better association between age at onset and repeat size at the mRNA level. We typed gDNA and cDNA samples for the (CAG)n tract totalizing 108 wild-type and 52 expanded ATXN3 alleles. In wild-type alleles no differences were found between gDNA and cDNA. In expanded alleles, the CAG repeat size in gDNA was not always directly transcribed into the mRNA; on average there were differences of +1 repeat at the cDNA level. The slight discrepancies obtained were insufficient to cause significant differences in the distribution of the expanded alleles, and therefore no improvement in onset variance explanation was obtained with mRNA. PMID:19935829

  6. Influence of the estrous cycle on the development of upper genital tract pathology as a result of chlamydial infection in the guinea pig model of pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Rank, R G; Sanders, M M; Kidd, A T

    1993-04-01

    Guinea pigs were infected intravaginally with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis at varying times during the estrous cycle. Genital tract tissues were collected 30 days after infection and processed for histopathological analysis. No difference was seen in the course of lower genital tract infection. However, a significantly greater percentage of tissues from animals infected on day 11 of the cycle were found to have chronic inflammation and fibrosis in the mesosalpinx compared to those from animals infected on day 6 or day 16. In addition, a significantly greater percentage of oviduct tissues from day 11-infected guinea pigs had marked tubal dilatation when compared to oviducts from day 6-or day 16-infected animals. The increased incidence of pathological changes was also noted in the endocervix, uterine fundus, and uterine horns but not the exocervix. These data indicate that the time of the estrous cycle and the corresponding hormonal influences may be an important influence on the development of upper genital tract disease.

  7. [Troponin-I and creatinkinase-mb values for detection of cardiovascular system damage in children with recurrent respiratory tract disease].

    PubMed

    Tsabutashvili, A V; Barabadze, K N; Vekua, M V

    2007-05-01

    84 patients 3-15 years of age were observed at the department of cardio-rheumatology of the Research Institute of Pediatrics, the laboratory "Test" and the laboratory department of the clinic "Guli". The patients with tonsillitis and recurrent respiratory tract disease were investigated. The patients were divided into study and control groups; The study group included children with signs of cardiovascular system damage according to the clinical and instrumental findings. Cross-sectional study was conducted. Cardiac Troponin-I was measured in serum by ELISA. Ck-MB was measured by colorimetric method. In the cases of cardiovascular system damage significant rise of Tp-I levels in 48,2%; and Ck-MB levels in 36.5% has been found. In 39% of cases positive was only Tp-I, (Ck-MB was negative in this 39% of cases). The study allows to use investigated markers as the diagnostic criteria of cardiovascular damage, to reveal the high risk group in children with tonsillitis and recurrent respiratory tract disease, as they really represent the candidates for future meaningful damage to cardiovascular system, which will require itself further monitoring of clinical and laboratory parameters and including of prevention activities in their life style. PMID:17595456

  8. Chronic inflammatory and non-inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract in cats: diagnostic advantages of full-thickness intestinal and extraintestinal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, Sven; Harder, Jasmine; Nolte, Ingo; Marsilio, Sina; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion

    2010-02-01

    An evaluation of histological findings in full-thickness biopsies from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and extraintestinal samples of 43 cats with chronic GIT disease signs was performed. In the majority of cases (46.5%) inflammatory bowel disease, ie, lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis/colitis (32.6%), eosinophilic gastroenterocolitis (11.6%) and mixed inflammatory infiltration (2.3%), was diagnosed. Furthermore, in four animals non-inflammatory mucosal band-shaped fibrosis (9.3%), and in 10 cats (23.3%) a diffuse lymphoma, was found. Six cats displayed only a gastritis (7.0%) or lymphangiectasia (7.0%), respectively. In two cats a mast cell tumour (4.7%) was diagnosed. In one cat no histopathological lesions were found. The availability of transmural biopsies from all segments of the intestine and the collection of extraintestinal samples, especially mesenteric lymph nodes, is especially helpful for diagnosing intestinal tumours such as lymphomas and tumours of mast cell origin.

  9. Increased Upper and Lower Tract Urothelial Carcinoma in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Taiwan during 1997–2008

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo-Meng; Lai, Ming-Nan; Chen, Pau-Chung; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Lai, Ming-Kuen; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Wang, Jung-Der

    2014-01-01

    Background. Urothelial cancer (UC) is the leading cancer of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Taiwan. The aims of this study were to explore the time trends of UC incidences and propose possible etiologic factors. Methods. Abstracting from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), there were 90,477 newly diagnosed cases of ESRD between 1997 and 2008 covering the patients aged 40–85. Among them, 2,708 had developed UC after diagnosis of ESRD. The CIR40–85 (cumulative incidence rate) of upper tract UC (UTUC) and lower tract UC (LTUC) were calculated for ESRD patients and general population, as well as SIR40–85 (standardized incidence ratio) for comparison. Results. Female ESRD patients were found to have 9–18 times of elevated risks of UC, while those of males were increased up to 4–14 times. The time trends of CIR40–84 and SIR40–84 of UTUC in females appear to decline after calendar year 2000. These trends may be related to AA associated herbal products after 1998. Conclusions. Patients with ESRD are at increased risks for both LTUC and UTUC in Taiwan. We hypothesize that the time trends associate with the consumption of aristolochic acid in Chinese herbal products (female predominant). PMID:25025033

  10. Advances in pediatrics in 2014: current practices and challenges in allergy, gastroenterology, infectious diseases, neonatology, nutrition, oncology and respiratory tract illnesses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Cesari, Silvia; Sciorio, Elisa; Povesi-Dascola, Carlotta; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in the conduct of pediatric practice have been reported in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2014. This review highlights developments in allergy, gastroenterology, infectious diseases, neonatology, nutrition, oncology and respiratory tract illnesses. Investigations endorse a need to better educate guardians and improve nutritional management in food allergy. Management of hyperbilirubinemia in neonates and of bronchiolitis have been improved by position statements of scientific societies. Novel treatments for infant colic and inflammatory bowel diseases have emerged. Studies suggest the diagnostic utility of ultrasonography in diagnosing community-acquired pneumonia. Progress in infectious diseases should include the universal varicella vaccination of children. Recommendations on asphyxia and respiratory distress syndrome have been highlighted in neonatology. Studies have evidenced that malnutrition remains a common underestimated problem in developing countries, while exposure to cancer risk factors in children is not negligible in Western countries. Advances in our understanding of less common diseases such as cystic fibrosis, plastic bronchitis, idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis facilitate diagnosis and management. Researches have led to new therapeutic approaches in patent ductus arteriosus and pediatric malignancies.

  11. Urinary tract endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Koszczuk, J C; Foglietti, M; Perez, J F; Dono, F V; Thomas, R J

    1989-01-01

    Although endometriosis is a common gynecologic pathologic phenomenon, involvement of the urinary tract is relatively rare. The clinical presentation and course of urinary system disease is extremely variable, as illustrated by the seven cases presented in this report. Therapy primarily is surgical, but a thorough understanding of the disease process and a complete knowledge of the patient's history and desires for fertility conservation are necessary to plot the most appropriate treatment course. Bladder involvement is more common, and usually less devastating, than either ureteral or kidney involvement. No signs, symptoms, or physical findings are pathognomonic, and the clinician must maintain a high index of suspicion in all cases of advanced pelvic endometriosis.

  12. Mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract disease across the range of the threatened Mojave Desert tortoise: associations with thermal regime and natural antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sandmeier, Franziska C; Tracy, C Richard; Hagerty, Bridgette E; DuPré, Sally; Mohammadpour, Hamid; Hunter, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    Most research of upper respiratory tract disease (mycoplasmal URTD) in the threatened Mojave Desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) has worked under the hypothesis that the pathogen, Mycoplasma agassizii, has a relatively consistent and predictable effect on tortoise populations across their natural range. In contrast, we hypothesized that multiple factors influence the prevalence of disease and analyzed biological and environmental variables that vary significantly across the Mojave Desert. We used multiple regression models to analyze associations between mycoplasmal URTD and the genetic structure of 24 tortoise populations, levels of natural antibody (NAb) to M. agassizii in tortoises (one component of the innate immune system), precipitation, and colder thermal regimes. We detected a significant, positive association between mean levels of NAb and seroprevalence to M. agassizii. We hypothesized that NAbs may provide tolerance to mycoplasmal infections and that more tolerant populations may act as host reservoirs of disease. We also detected significant associations between colder winters and mycoplasmal URTD, suggesting that colder winters may depress tortoise immune resistance against M. agassizii or enhance conditions for the growth of M. agassizii.

  13. Biopsy - biliary tract

    MedlinePlus

    Cytology analysis - biliary tract; Biliary tract biopsy ... A sample for a biliary tract biopsy can be obtained in different ways. A needle biopsy can be done if you have a well-defined tumor. The biopsy site ...

  14. Predictors of severe disease in a hospitalized population of children with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Bernal, Angela M; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Acuña-Cordero, Ranniery

    2016-05-01

    Although predictors of severe viral acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) in children have been reported, there have been few research studies performed in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). The aim of the present study was to determine predictors of disease severity in a population of Colombian children <5 years of age with ALRI. In a prospective cohort study, we determined independent predictors of severe ALRI in a hospitalized population of children under 5 years old with ALRI during a 1-year period. We included both underlying disease conditions and the infecting respiratory viruses as predictor variables of severe disease. We defined severe disease as the necessity of pediatric intensive care unit admission. Of a total of 1,180 patients admitted with a diagnosis of ALRI, 416 (35.3%) were included because they were positive for any kind of respiratory virus. After controlling for potential confounders, it was found that a history of pulmonary hypertension (RR 3.62; CI 95% 2.38-5.52; P < 0.001) and a history of recurrent wheezing (RR 1.77; CI 95% 1.12-2.79; P = 0.015) were independent predictors of severe disease. The present study shows that respiratory viruses are significant causes of ALRI in infants and young children in Colombia, a typical tropical LMIC, especially during the rainy season. Additionally, the results of the present study show that clinical variables such as a history of pulmonary hypertension and a history of recurrent wheezing are more relevant for predicting ALRI severity than the infecting respiratory viruses.

  15. Predictors of severe disease in a hospitalized population of children with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Bernal, Angela M; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Acuña-Cordero, Ranniery

    2016-05-01

    Although predictors of severe viral acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) in children have been reported, there have been few research studies performed in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). The aim of the present study was to determine predictors of disease severity in a population of Colombian children <5 years of age with ALRI. In a prospective cohort study, we determined independent predictors of severe ALRI in a hospitalized population of children under 5 years old with ALRI during a 1-year period. We included both underlying disease conditions and the infecting respiratory viruses as predictor variables of severe disease. We defined severe disease as the necessity of pediatric intensive care unit admission. Of a total of 1,180 patients admitted with a diagnosis of ALRI, 416 (35.3%) were included because they were positive for any kind of respiratory virus. After controlling for potential confounders, it was found that a history of pulmonary hypertension (RR 3.62; CI 95% 2.38-5.52; P < 0.001) and a history of recurrent wheezing (RR 1.77; CI 95% 1.12-2.79; P = 0.015) were independent predictors of severe disease. The present study shows that respiratory viruses are significant causes of ALRI in infants and young children in Colombia, a typical tropical LMIC, especially during the rainy season. Additionally, the results of the present study show that clinical variables such as a history of pulmonary hypertension and a history of recurrent wheezing are more relevant for predicting ALRI severity than the infecting respiratory viruses. PMID:26403374

  16. Cranberries and lower urinary tract infection prevention.

    PubMed

    Hisano, Marcelo; Bruschini, Homero; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Srougi, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Lower urinary tract infections are very common diseases. Recurrent urinary tract infections remain challenging to treat because the main treatment option is long-term antibiotic prophylaxis; however, this poses a risk for the emergence of bacterial resistance. Some options to avoid this risk are available, including the use of cranberry products. This article reviews the key methods in using cranberries as a preventive measure for lower urinary tract infections, including in vitro studies and clinical trials.

  17. IgG4-Related Sclerosing Disease, an Emerging Entity: A Review of a Multi-System Disease

    PubMed Central

    Divatia, Mukul; Kim, Sun A

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related systemic disease (IgG4-RSD) is a recently defined emerging entity characterized by a diffuse or mass forming inflammatory reaction rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells associated with fibrosclerosis and obliterative phlebitis. IgG4-RSD usually affects middle aged and elderly patients, with a male predominance. It is associated with an elevated serum titer of IgG4, which acts as a marker for this recently characterized entity. The prototype is IgG4-related sclerosing pancreatitis or autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Other common sites of involvement are the hepatobiliary tract, salivary gland, orbit, and lymph node, however practically any organ can be involved, including upper aerodigestive tract, lung, aorta, mediastinum, retroperitoneum, soft tissue, skin, central nervous system, breast, kidney, and prostate. Fever or constitutional symptoms usually do not comprise part of the clinical picture. Laboratory findings detected include raised serum globulin, IgG and IgG4. An association with autoantibody detection (such as antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor) is seen in some cases. Steroid therapy comprises the mainstay of treatment. Disease progression with involvement of multiple organ-sites may be encountered in a subset of cases and may follow a relapsing-remitting course. The principal histopathologic findings in several extranodal sites include lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, lymphoid follicle formation, sclerosis and obliterative phlebitis, along with atrophy and destruction of tissues. Immunohistochemical staining shows increased IgG4+ cells in the involved tissues (>50 per high-power field, with IgG4/IgG ratio >40%). IgG4-RSD may potentially be rarely associated with the development of lymphoma and carcinoma. However, the nature and pathogenesis of IgG4-RSD are yet to be fully elucidated and provide immense scope for further studies. PMID:22187229

  18. Traditional and Modern Uses of Natural Honey in Human Diseases: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Eteraf-Oskouei, Tahereh; Najafi, Moslem

    2013-01-01

    Honey is a by-product of flower nectar and the upper aero-digestive tract of the honey bee, which is concentrated through a dehydration process inside the bee hive. Honey has a very complex chemical composition that varies depending on the botanical source. It has been used both as food and medicine since ancient times. Human use of honey is traced to some 8000 years ago as depicted by Stone Age paintings. In addition to important role of natural honey in the traditional medicine, during the past few decades, it was subjected to laboratory and clinical investigations by several research groups and it has found a place in modern medicine. Honey has been reported to have an inhibitory effect on around 60 species of bacteria, some species of fungi and viruses. Antioxidant capacity of honey is important in many disease conditions and is due to a wide range of compounds including phenolics, peptides, organic acids, enzymes, and Maillard reaction products. Honey has also been used in some gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, inflammatory and neoplastic states. This review covers the composition, physico-chemical properties and the most important uses of natural honey in human diseases. PMID:23997898

  19. Development of a zero-order sustained-release tablet containing mesalazine and budesonide intended to treat the distal gastrointestinal tract in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Gareb, Bahez; Eissens, Anko C; Kosterink, Jos G W; Frijlink, Hendrik W

    2016-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) are diseases affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Treatment depends on the severity of the disease, site of inflammation, and patient's response. The aim of this study was to develop a zero-order sustained-release tablet containing both the anti-inflammatory drugs mesalazine and budesonide as a new treatment option for ileo-colonic CD and UC. Tablets were attained by wet granulation with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and direct compression. Our newly developed tablet core was coated with different ColoPulse® coating thicknesses and the mesalazine and budesonide release profiles were investigated in a 600-min gastrointestinal simulation system (GISS) experiment, together with commercially available MMX®-mesalazine and MMX®-budesonide. Lag-time, release rate (k0), completeness of release, and zero-order correlation coefficient (R(2)0) could be manipulated by varying ColoPulse® coating thickness. Our newly developed combination preparation (C[4.92]) complied with all conducted European Pharmacopoeia tests as well as an accelerated 6-month stability test and had a lag-time of 250min (simulated ileum targeted), a linear release profile (mesalazine R(2)0=0.9002; budesonide R(2)0=0.9481), and drug release of 100% mesalazine and 77% budesonide. Like C[4.92], MMX®-mesalazine had a linear (R(2)0=0.9883) and complete release profile (96%). However, C[4.92] lag-time was longer (250 vs. 210min), assuring simulated ileum specificity. Remarkably, MMX®-budesonide lag-time was 480min and release was only 7% with a linear character (R(2)0=0.9906). The in vitro results suggest that MMX®-budesonide effectiveness may be improved if budesonide release in the aqueous phase would be increased and that C[4.92] is a potential, new treatment option for ileo-colonic CD and UC. PMID:27000751

  20. Acute viral infections of upper respiratory tract in elderly people living in the community: comparative, prospective, population based study of disease burden.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, K. G.; Kent, J.; Hammersley, V.; Cancio, E.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the disease burden of upper respiratory infections in elderly people living at home. DESIGN: Prospective surveillance of elderly people. INTERVENTION: None. SETTING: Leicestershire, England SUBJECTS: 533 subjects 60 to 90 years of age. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pathogens, symptoms, restriction of activity, duration of illness, medical consultations, interval between onset of illness and medical consultation, antibiotic use, admission to hospital, and death. RESULTS: 231 pathogens were identified for 211 (43%) of 497 episodes for which diagnostic specimens were available: 121 (52%) were rhinoviruses, 59 (26%) were coronaviruses, 22 (9.5%) were influenza A or B, 17 (7%) were respiratory syncytial virus, 7 (3%) were parainfluenza viruses, and 3 (1%) were Chlamydia species; an adenovirus and Mycoplasma pneumoniae caused one infection each. Infections occurred at a rate of 1.2 episodes per person per annum (95% confidence interval 1.0 to 1.7; range 0-10) and were clinically indistinguishable. Lower respiratory tract symptoms complicated 65% of upper respiratory infections and increased the medical consultation rate 2.4-fold (chi 2 test P < 0.001). The median interval between onset of illness and medical consultation was 3 days for influenza and 5 days for other infections. Rhinoviruses caused the greatest disease burden overall followed by episodes of unknown aetiology, coronaviruses, influenza A and B, and respiratory syncytial virus. CONCLUSIONS: Respiratory viruses cause substantial morbidity in elderly people. Although respiratory syncytial virus and influenza cause considerable individual morbidity, the burden of disease from rhinovirus infections and infections of unknown aetiology seems greater overall. The interval between onset of illness and consultation together with diagnostic difficulties raises concern regarding the role of antiviral drugs in treating influenza. PMID:9366736

  1. Evaluation of the rabbit as a model for Chagas disease-II. Histopathologic studies of the heart, digestive tract and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    da Silva, A M; Eduardo Ramirez, L; Vargas, M; Chapadeiro, E; Brener, Z

    1996-01-01

    In order to investigate the value of the rabbit as an experimental model for Chagas' disease, seventy one animals were inoculated with different Trypanosoma cruzi strains and routes. The rabbits were submitted to necropsy in acute (earlier than three months of infection), recent chronic (three to six months) and late chronic (later than six months) phases. Myocarditis, generally focal and endomysial, occurred in 94.1%, 66.7% and 70.8% of the infected rabbits respectively in the acute, recent chronic and late chronic phases. The myocardial inflammatory exudate was composed by mononuclear cells, and also polymorphonuclear cells in the acute phase. In most cases of the late chronic phase, the myocarditis was similar to that described in the indeterminate form of human chagasic patients. Initial fibrosis occurred in the three phases but was more severe and frequent in the early chronic. Advanced fibrosis occurred only in the late chronic phase. Tissue parasites occurred only in the acute phase. The digestive tract and skeletal muscles showed mild and occasional lesions. Our data indicate that experimentally infected chagasic rabbits repeat some lesions similar to that of humans chagasic patients, specially that of the indeterminate form. So, it may be a useful, however not an ideal, model.

  2. The role of host genetic factors in respiratory tract infectious diseases: systematic review, meta-analyses and field synopsis

    PubMed Central

    Patarčić, Inga; Gelemanović, Andrea; Kirin, Mirna; Kolčić, Ivana; Theodoratou, Evropi; Baillie, Kenneth J.; de Jong, Menno D.; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Polašek, Ozren

    2015-01-01

    Host genetic factors have frequently been implicated in respiratory infectious diseases, often with inconsistent results in replication studies. We identified 386 studies from the total of 24,823 studies identified in a systematic search of four bibliographic databases. We performed meta-analyses of studies on tuberculosis, influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, SARS-Coronavirus and pneumonia. One single-nucleotide polymorphism from IL4 gene was significant for pooled respiratory infections (rs2070874; 1.66 [1.29–2.14]). We also detected an association of TLR2 gene with tuberculosis (rs5743708; 3.19 [2.03–5.02]). Subset analyses identified CCL2 as an additional risk factor for tuberculosis (rs1024611; OR = 0.79 [0.72–0.88]). The IL4-TLR2-CCL2 axis could be a highly interesting target for translation towards clinical use. However, this conclusion is based on low credibility of evidence - almost 95% of all identified studies had strong risk of bias or confounding. Future studies must build upon larger-scale collaborations, but also strictly adhere to the highest evidence-based principles in study design, in order to reduce research waste and provide clinically translatable evidence. PMID:26524966

  3. Effects of mycoplasmal upper-respiratory-tract disease on movement and thermoregulatory behavior of gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus) in Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jessica L; Smith, Lora L; Guyer, Craig; Yabsley, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    Abstract From 2011-12, we studied a gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) population with a historically high prevalence of antibodies to Mycoplasma agassizii to assess long-term effects of upper-respiratory-tract disease (URTD) on tortoise behavior. We radiotracked 30 adult tortoises (16 males, 14 females) from a long-term study site with the use of mark-recapture methods to determine site fidelity and to compare home-range size to that of a study in 1997. An additional 10 tortoises (six males, four females) with severe clinical signs of URTD from elsewhere in the study area were radiotracked and compared to tortoises that were asymptomatic or had only mild clinical signs. We also monitored thermoregulatory behavior of tortoises with the use of data loggers affixed to the carapace. There was no significant difference in home-range size between the asymptomatic tortoises and those with mild symptoms. Home ranges of tortoises with severe URTD were significantly larger than asymptomatic or mildly affected tortoises. Tortoises with severe clinical signs moved long distances over short periods, contradicting a hypothesis that chronically infected tortoises are less likely to emigrate. Prevalence of M. agassizii antibodies was similar among the three groups (98% overall), but prevalence of antibodies to a second pathogen associated with URTD, Mycoplasma testudineum, was lower in the asymptomatic (n=14, 7%) and mild-symptoms (n=7, 14%) groups than the severe-symptoms group (n=8, 50%). Variation in the average carapacial temperatures of tortoises with severe URTD was significantly different from carapacial temperatures of mild and asymptomatic tortoises, suggesting differences in thermoregulatory behavior of severely ill tortoises. Our 15-yr recapture data suggest that, despite high prevalence of M. agassizii, population density has not decreased over time. However, emigration, especially of tortoises with severe clinical disease, may play an important role in dispersal

  4. Use of pentosan polysulphate in cats with idiopathic, non-obstructive lower urinary tract disease: a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wallius, Barbro M; Tidholm, Anna E

    2009-06-01

    Idiopathic feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD) is a common clinical entity where different treatments, for example glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as pentosan polysulphate (PPS), are advocated. However, few treatments have been investigated by well-controlled clinical trials. This paper compares the use of PPS in FLUTD compared to placebo. Of the 18 cats in the experiment, nine were treated with PPS and nine were treated with placebo with subcutaneous injections of 3mg/kg PPS or placebo day 1, 2, 5 and 10. The study was double-blind, randomised and placebo-controlled. Revaluation was performed after 5 and 10 days, 2 weeks, 2, 6 and 12 months. There were no statistically significant differences concerning clinical signs between groups during treatment or at re-evaluation, except for pretreatment stressful events where PPS-treated cats had experienced significantly more stressful events compared to cats treated with placebo before entering the study. Six cats (33%) showed recurrence of clinical signs during the entire study period, and only one of these cats had more than one recurrent episode. One cat (placebo) was euthanased 7 days after initial treatment because of recurrence of clinical signs. Another cat (placebo) was euthanased due to other reasons after 6 months. At 2 weeks two cats (placebo and PPS) showed clinical signs. At 2 months re-evaluation one cat showed mild clinical signs. At 6 and 12 months all remaining 16 cats were healthy. Idiopathic, non-obstructive FLUTD is a self-limiting disease with good short-term and excellent long-term prognosis without treatment. Whether or not PPS may be beneficial in a subpopulation of cats with continuous or frequently recurring clinical signs may be elucidated in forthcoming double-blind, randomised and placebo-controlled trials including only this subpopulation of cats.

  5. Extensive upper respiratory tract sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Soares, Mafalda Trindade; Sousa, Carolina; Garanito, Luísa; Freire, Filipe

    2016-04-18

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. It can affect any part of the organism, although the lung is the most frequently affected organ. Upper airway involvement is rare, particularly if isolated. Sarcoidosis is a diagnosis of exclusion, established by histological evidence of non-caseating granulomas and the absence of other granulomatous diseases. The authors report a case of a man with sarcoidosis manifesting as a chronic inflammatory stenotic condition of the upper respiratory tract and trachea.

  6. Photodynamic therapy and the treatment of neoplastic diseases of the larynx, pharynx, oral cavity, and tracheobronchial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, Merrill A.

    1994-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has the potential to treat and cure early carcinomas of the head and neck while preserving normal tissue. Fifty-three patients with neoplasia of the head and neck have been treated with PDT with follow-up to 40 months. Eight patients with T2-T4 carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract had a partial response. Eighteen patients with CIS and T1 carcinomas of the larynx obtained a complete response and are disease free. Eleven patients with T1 carcinomas of the tongue, floor of mouth, and nasal cavity obtained a complete response. Three patients with mucosal melanomas of the nasopharynx obtained a complete response and remain disease free. Two patients with Kaposi's sarcoma or the oral cavity were treated, one obtained a complete response. Five patients with juvenile laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis obtained a complete response, but all recurred within six months of treatment. PDT is a promising therapy for treatment of early neoplasia of the head and neck. There are, however limitations to this treatment based on tumor size and site. Methodology, clinical response, limitations and complications are discussed.

  7. Photodynamic therapy and the treatment of neoplastic diseases of the larynx, oral cavity, pharynx, and tracheobronchial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, Merrill A.

    1993-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy has the potential to treat and cure early carcinomas of the head and neck while preserving normal tissue. Thirty patients with neoplasia of the head and neck have been treated with PDT with follow-up to twenty nine months. Four patients with T3 and T4 carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract had a partial response. Eleven patients with T1 and T2 carcinomas of the larynx obtained a complete response and are disease free. Seven patients with T1 carcinomas of the tongue, floor of mouth, and nasal cavity obtained a complete response. Three patients with mucosal melanomas of the nasopharynx obtained a complete response and have remained disease free. Two patients with Kaposi's sarcoma of the oral cavity were treated. One obtained a complete response. Three patients with recurrent juvenile laryngotracheal papillomatosis obtained a complete response, but one recurred four months post-PDT. PDT is a promising therapy for treatment of early neoplasia of the head and neck. There are, however, limitations to this treatment based on tumor size and site. Methodology, clinical response, limitations, and complications will be discussed.

  8. Autofluorescence spectroscopy of normal and malignant tissues: both in-vivo and ex-vivo measurements in the upper aero-digestive tract and lung tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A'Amar, Ousama M.; Lignon, Dominique; Menard, O.; Begorre, Henri; Guillemin, Francois H.; Yvroud, Edouard

    1996-04-01

    A spectroscopic system with flexible three optical fiber sensor had been developed to study tissue fluorescence for a clinical use. Autofluorescence spectra at 413 nm and 10 mW excitation light power from different tissues in oral cavity had been measured in vivo in 25 subjects. The correlation coefficient in spectral shape between individual spectra and the mean emission spectrum of each site was about 0.9 and fluorescence intensity variation ranged between 20% and 45% according to the examined site. The variation in fluorescence intensity of the main emission wavelength at about 520 nm between spectra of the lower part of tongue, gingiva, lips, floor of cavity, cheek and palate was not statistically significant. But the spectrum of the upper part of tongue had been characterized by an additional peak around 635 nm. Otherwise, autofluorescence spectra at 410 nm and 0.5 mW excitation light power of 8 carcinoma of buccal and lung tissues were measured. The fluorescence ratio at 520 emission peak between normal tissue and carcinoma was evaluated at a maximum value of 13 for a lung cancer (ex vivo measurement) and a minimum of 3.3 for a cancer of the oro-pharynx (in vivo measurement). On the other hand, a fluorescence peak at 635 nm had characterized the carcinoma of the floor of cavity and the upper part of tongue.

  9. Late radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tract in the H2 and H5 EORTC Hodgkin's disease trials: emphasis on the role of exploratory laparotomy and fractionation.

    PubMed

    Cosset, J M; Henry-Amar, M; Burgers, J M; Noordijk, E M; Van der Werf-Messing, B; Meerwaldt, J H; van der Schueren, E

    1988-09-01

    Out of 516 patients who entered in the two successive EORTC trials H2 and H5 for supra-diaphragmatic stages I and II Hodgkin's disease (HD), and who received an infra-diaphragmatic irradiation, 36 (7%) developed late radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Twenty-five patients presented with ulcers (stomach or duodenum), 2 with severe gastritis, 6 with small bowel obstruction or perforation and 3 patients had both an ulcer and bowel obstruction. A previous laparotomy played an important role. While the complication rate was 2.7% without any previous abdominal surgery, it was 11.5% after laparotomy (p less than 0.001). Fractionation was also found to be of importance in the occurrence of complications: three different weekly schedules were used -5 x 2 Gy, 4 x 2.5 Gy and 3 x 3.3 Gy; the GIT complication rates were 4, 9 and 22%, respectively (p less than 0.001). When combining laparotomy and fractionation, we found that the patients who were treated using 5 weekly fractions of 2 Gy without any prior laparotomy had a very low rate of late digestive complications (1%), whereas the patients who received 3 weekly fractions of 3.3 Gy after laparotomy presented a 39% complication rate. The other subgroups of patients were at an intermediate risk (from 5 to 13%) of late digestive injuries. Since most patients received 40 Gy with only very small variations, the influence of the radiation dose could not be investigated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Phenotypical characterization, distribution and quantification of different mast cell subtypes in transmural biopsies from the gastrointestinal tract of cats with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, Sven; Harder, Jasmine; Nolte, Ingo; Marsilio, Sina; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion

    2010-10-15

    In this study subtypes, distribution and number of mast cells were investigated within mucosa and submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract of 24 cats with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in comparison to 11 control cats. Paraffin sections of formalin-fixed transmural gastrointestinal biopsies from stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon were examined. Mast cells were phenotyped and quantified based on their chymase and tryptase content, by applying a combined enzyme-histochemical and immunohistochemical double-labeling technique and on their heparin content by a metachromatic staining method (kresylecht-violet, MC(KEV)). Mast cells containing both chymase and tryptase were not found in any of the samples examined. Furthermore, in the stomach neither chymase (MC(C)) nor tryptase (MC(T)) bearing mast cells were detected. In cats with lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis or enterocolitis elevated numbers of MC(T) or MC(C) were identified in comparison to controls mainly located in the inflamed segments. The highest quantity of MC(C) was found in cats with eosinophilic gastroenterocolitis or enterocolitis in comparison to other IBD forms, but only minor numbers of MC(T) were detected in these cases. In cats with fibrosing enteropathy (FE) a decrease of MC(C) and mast cells containing heparin was detected in affected segments, while increased numbers of MC(T) were detected in all locations. The elevation in the number of MC(T) was higher in unaffected areas than in fibrotic regions. Regarding all IBD cases higher counts of MC(C) were found especially in the inflamed locations, whereas in unaffected segments increased numbers of MC(T) were detected. The clear predominance of MC(C) and MC(T) within the mucosa and of MC(KEV) within the submucosa of all cats examined possibly represents differences of the cytokine milieu within the intestinal layers. In FE, mast cells are possibly pivotal for the containment of the inflammatory process because of their antiinflammatory

  11. Etiologic Diagnosis of Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hoeprich, Paul D.

    1970-01-01

    Decision as to the role of infection in lower respiratory tract disease requires examination by culture of specimens known to be derived from the infra-laryngeal respiratory tract. Methods that involve the upper respiratory tract in collection of specimens entail the hazard of contamination by microbiota resident in the upper respiratory tract. The extrapulmonary approaches of cutting-needle biopsy and needle aspiration of intrathoracic disease have not been impressively productive of etiologic diagnosis of infections. While open-chest surgical biopsy has been a highly effective means to diagnosis, this approach does have special requirements in facilities and technical skills. Percutaneous transtracheal aspiration of tracheo-broncho-pulmonary secretions-exudates has been productive of useful information. Because of inherent simplicity and safety, transtracheal aspiration should precede resort to more demanding, difficult, dangerous procedures. PMID:5470140

  12. [Metagenomics in studying gastrointestinal tract microorganism].

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Yang, Yunjuan; Li, Junjun; Tang, Xianghua; Mu, Yuelin; Huang, Zunxi

    2013-12-01

    Animal gastrointestinal tract contains a complex community of microbes, whose composition ultimately reflects the co-evolution of microorganisms with their animal host. The gut microbial community of humans and animals has received significant attention from researchers because of its association with health and disease. The application of metagenomics technology enables researchers to study not only the microbial composition but also the function of microbes in the gastrointestinal tract. In this paper, combined with our own findings, we summarized advances in studying gastrointestinal tract microorganism with metagenomics and the bioinformatics technology.

  13. Advances in Urinary Tract Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Berent, Allyson C

    2016-01-01

    The use of endoscopy in veterinary medicine has become the mainstay of diagnosis and treatment in the subspecialty of small animal urology over the past decade. This subspecialty is termed endourology. With the common incidence of urinary tract obstructions, stones disease, renal disease, and urothelial malignancies, combined with the recognized invasiveness and morbidity associated with traditional surgical techniques, the use of endoscopic-assisted alternatives using interventional endoscopic techniques has become appealing to both owners and clinicians. This article provides a brief overview of some of the most common urologic procedures being performed in veterinary medicine. PMID:26440205

  14. A comparison of nimesulide and paracetamol in the treatment of fever due to inflammatory diseases of the upper respiratory tract in children.

    PubMed

    Polidori, G; Titti, G; Pieragostini, P; Comito, A; Scaricabarozzi, I

    1993-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of nimesulide were compared with those of paracetamol in a nonblind randomised study that recruited 110 children (64 males, 46 females; aged 3 to 6 years) with inflammation of the upper respiratory tract and fever. Nimesulide suspension (1.5 mg/kg 3 times daily) or paracetamol syrup (10 mg/kg 4 times daily) were administered orally until fever resolved. Body temperature was recorded and local pain and general discomfort assessed. Three patients treated with nimesulide and 6 patients treated with paracetamol withdrew from the study as a result of adverse events, and 1 paracetamol-treated patient discontinued because of a requirement for therapy with steroids. Nimesulide was as effective as paracetamol in reducing fever, local pain, and general discomfort. Nimesulide therefore appears to be at least as effective as paracetamol in terms of antipyretic and anti-inflammatory activity in children with inflammation of the upper respiratory tract and fever. PMID:7506180

  15. Congenital optic tract hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hatsukawa, Yoshikazu; Fujio, Takahiro; Nishikawa, Masanori; Taylor, David

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of isolated unilateral optic tract hypoplasia, described only twice previously. Bilateral optic disk hypoplasia was seen ophthalmoscopically and visual field studies showed an incongruous right homonymous hemianopia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral hypoplasia of both optic nerves and the left optic tract. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography mapping correlated well with the visual field studies. PMID:26228965

  16. IL-23 induces IL-22 and IL-17 production in response to Chlamydia muridarum genital tract infection, but the absence of these cytokines does not influence disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Lauren C.; Scurlock, Amy M.; Zurenski, Matthew A.; Riley, Melissa M.; Mintus, Margaret; Pociask, Derek A.; Sullivan, Jeanne E.; Andrews, Charles W.; Darville, Toni

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Chlamydia trachomatis Infections are a significant cause of reproductive tract pathology. Protective and pathologic immune mediators must be differentiated in order to design a safe and effective vaccine. METHODS Wild-type mice and mice deficient in IL-22 and IL-23 were infected intravaginally with Chlamydia muridarum and their course of infection and oviduct pathology were compared. Local genital tract and draining lymph node immune responses were also examined in IL-23 deficient mice. RESULTS IL-22 and IL-23 deficient mice exhibited normal susceptibility to infection and oviduct pathology. IL-23 was required for development of a Chlamydia-specific Th17 response in the lymph nodes and for production of IL-22 and IL-17 in the genital tract. However, influx of Th1 and innate immune cells was not compromised in the absence of IL-23. CONCLUSIONS IL-22 and IL-23 play either redundant or minimal roles in the pathogenesis of Chlamydia infection in the mouse model. Induction of Th17-associated cytokines by a Chlamydia vaccine should be avoided since these responses are not central to resolution of infection and have pathologic potential. PMID:24238108

  17. Diagnostic performance and application of a real-time PCR assay for the detection of Salmonella in fecal samples collected from hospitalized horses with or without signs of gastrointestinal tract disease.

    PubMed

    Ekiri, A B; Long, M T; Hernandez, J A

    2016-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of Salmonella in fecal samples collected from hospitalized horses with or without signs of gastrointestinal (GI) tract disease. The PCR assay used primers and a probe that targeted the invA gene of Salmonella. Assuming a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 96.6%, and a disease prevalence of 2%, 5%, and 10-15% in study horses, the PCR assay had a high (100%) negative predictive value, and a positive predictive value that ranged from 37% in horses without signs of GI disease that tested Salmonella culture-negative, to 60% in horses with signs of GI disease that tested Salmonella culture-negative, to 76-83% in horses with signs of GI disease that tested Salmonella culture-positive. This study provides evidence that the real-time PCR that targets the Salmonella invA gene can be used as a screening test for the detection of Salmonella in feces of hospitalized horses with signs of GI disease. Horses that test PCR-positive can be tested in series using bacteriologic culture to reduce false positive results or to provide additional data (e.g., antibiogram and serotyping data) that can be used to identify potential nosocomial Salmonella infections.

  18. ARTERIAL EPONYMS IN GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.

    PubMed

    Kutia, S A; Kiselev, V V; Lyashchenko, O I

    2015-01-01

    Eponym--name of the disease, certain structure or method after the person who usually first discovered and described them. Eponyms are widely spread in medicine which appeared to be in the area of a great interest for a lot of scientists. They can serve as a reflection of the evolution of the medical knowledge and making up the majority of anatomical terms. The article describes 12 arterial eponyms of the gastrointestinal tract giving a full anatomical description. It also gives an explanation of why and how those structures were named after certain scientists and what contribution they've made into the development of medicine. PMID:26817114

  19. A Proteomic Analysis of the Body Wall, Digestive Tract, and Reproductive Tract of Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Morris, C Paul; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Kropp, Laura E; Zweben, Jesse A; Meng, Zhaojing; Taylor, Rebekah T; Chan, King; Veenstra, Timothy D; Nutman, Thomas B; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Filarial worms are parasitic nematodes that cause devastating diseases such as lymphatic filariasis (LF) and onchocerciasis. Filariae are nematodes with complex anatomy including fully developed digestive tracts and reproductive organs. To better understand the basic biology of filarial parasites and to provide insights into drug targets and vaccine design, we conducted a proteomic analysis of different anatomic fractions of Brugia malayi, a causative agent of LF. Approximately 500 adult female B. malayi worms were dissected, and three anatomical fractions (body wall, digestive tract, and reproductive tract) were obtained. Proteins from each anatomical fraction were extracted, desalted, trypsinized, and analyzed by microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry. In total, we identified 4,785 B. malayi proteins. While 1,894 were identified in all three anatomic fractions, 396 were positively identified only within the digestive tract, 114 only within the body wall, and 1,011 only within the reproductive tract. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed a bias for transporters to be present within the digestive tract, suggesting that the intestine of adult filariae is functional and important for nutrient uptake or waste removal. As expected, the body wall exhibited increased frequencies of cytoskeletal proteins, and the reproductive tract had increased frequencies of proteins involved in nuclear regulation and transcription. In assessing for possible vaccine candidates, we focused on proteins sequestered within the digestive tract, as these could possibly represent "hidden antigens" with low risk of prior allergic sensitization. We identified 106 proteins that are enriched in the digestive tract and are predicted to localize to the surface of cells in the the digestive tract. It is possible that some of these proteins are on the luminal surface and may be accessible by antibodies ingested by the worm. A subset of 27 of these proteins appear

  20. Systemic foot-and-mouth disease vaccination in cattle promotes specific antibody secreting cells at the respiratory tract and triggers local anamnestic-compatible responses upon aerosol infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease affecting biungulate species. Commercial vaccines, formulated with inactivated whole FMD virus (FMDV) particles, are regularly used worldwide in regions recognized as free from the disease. Here, we studied the generation of antibody ...

  1. Genital tract infections and infertility.

    PubMed

    Pellati, Donatella; Mylonakis, Ioannis; Bertoloni, Giulio; Fiore, Cristina; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Armanini, Decio

    2008-09-01

    Infectious agents can impair various important human functions, including reproduction. Bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites are able to interfere with the reproductive function in both sexes. Infections of male genito-urinary tract account for about 15% of the case of male infertility. Infections can affect different sites of the male reproductive tract, such as the testis, epididymis and male accessory sex glands. Spermatozoa themselves subsequently can be affected by urogenital infections at different levels of their development, maturation and transport. Among the most common microorganisms involved in sexually transmitted infections, interfering with male fertility, there are the Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Less frequently male infertility is due to non-sexually transmitted epididymo-orchitis, mostly caused by Escherichia coli. In female, the first two microorganisms are certainly involved in cervical, tubal, and peritoneal damage, while Herpes simplex cervicitis is less dangerous. The overall importance of cervical involvement is still under discussion. Tubo-peritoneal damage seems to be the foremost manner in which microorganisms interfere with human fertility. C. trachomatis is considered the most important cause of tubal lacerations and obstruction, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and adhesions. N. gonorrhoeae, even though its overall incidence seems to decline, is still to be considered in the same sense, while bacterial vaginosis should not be ignored, as causative agents can produce ascending infections of the female genital tract. The role of infections, particularly co-infections, as causes of the impairment of sperm quality, motility and function needs further investigation. Tropical diseases necessitate monitoring as for their diffusion or re-diffusion in the western world. PMID:18456385

  2. Approach to urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Najar, M. S.; Saldanha, C. L.; Banday, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection experienced by humans after respiratory and gastro-intestinal infections, and also the most common cause of both community-acquired and nosocomial infections for patients admitted to hospitals. For better management and prognosis, it is mandatory to know the possible site of infection, whether the infection is uncomplicated or complicated, re-infection or relapse, or treatment failure and its pathogenesis and risk factors. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common in certain age groups and has different connotations. It needs to be treated and completely cured in pregnant women and preschool children. Reflux nephropathy in children could result in chronic kidney disease; otherwise, urinary tract infections do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of end-stage renal disease. Symptomatic urinary tract infections occur most commonly in women of child-bearing age. Cystitis predominates, but needs to be distinguished from acute urethral syndrome that affects both sexes and has a different management plan than UTIs. The prostatitis symptoms are much more common than bacterial prostatic infections. The treatment needs to be prolonged in bacterial prostatitis and as cure rates are not very high and relapses are common, the classification of prostatitis needs to be understood. The consensus conference convened by National Institute of Health added two more groups of patients, namely, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis, in addition to acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Although white blood cells in urine signify inflammation, they do not always signify UTI. Quantitative cultures of urine provide definitive evidence of UTI. Imaging studies should be done 3-6 weeks after cure of acute infection to identify abnormalities predisposing to infection or renal damage or which may affect management. Treatment of cystitis in women should be a three-day course and if

  3. "The choledocho-pancreatic long common channel disorders" in relation to the etiology of congenital biliary dilatation and other biliary tract disease.

    PubMed

    Miyano, T; Suruga, K; Suda, K

    1981-10-01

    The amylase level of bile and various cholangiograms was studied in 36 cases of congenital biliary dilatation. (C.B.D.) The amylase level above 10000 U/L was considered to suggest the existence of choledocho-pancreatic long common channel formation. Radiologically, the dilatation of intrahepatic bile duct was seen in 9 out of 19 (47%) Type I cases and in all (100%) Type II cases. The cystic dilatation of intrahepatic bile duct was seen in all Type I cases which have cystic choledochal dilatation. On the other hand, fusiform dilatation was seen in all Type II cases with fusiform choledochal dilatation. End to side Choledocho-pancreatic anastomosis was performed to produce an experimental model of human choledocho-pancreatic long common channel disorders, thus leading to the dilatation of the common bile duct as well as the reflux of pancreatic juice into the bile duct. The reflux of Pancreatic juice and congenital stricture due to the choledocho-pancreatic long common channel formation were considered to be the important causative factors in the etiology of C.B.D.. Furthermore, pathology of the choledocho-pancreatic long common channel disorders was found to be important in relation to the etiology of both C.B.D. and other lesions of the biliary tract and pancreas.

  4. Urinary Tract Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... body's drainage system for removing wastes and extra water. It includes two kidneys, two ureters, a bladder, and a urethra. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common type of infection in the body. You may have a UTI if you notice ...

  5. Digestive diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007447.htm Digestive diseases To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Digestive diseases are disorders of the digestive tract, which ...

  6. Urothelial cancer of the urinary bladder: can lessons learned be applied to the upper urinary tract?

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Laura M; Hutchinson, Ryan C; Margulis, Vitaly

    2016-08-01

    Even though urothelial cancer may occur anywhere in the urinary tract, it is most commonly found in the urinary bladder. Due to its higher incidence, this disease is studied in the bladder much more frequently than in the upper urinary tract. The question that arises is, to what extent can concepts and treatment paradigms derived from lower tract disease be applied to urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract? This review aims at providing an overview of established care concepts in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder and applicability of these findings to tumors of the upper urinary tract.

  7. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. And when you do, phew! Your pee smells bad. These changes occur because bacteria have caused an infection somewhere in your urinary tract. Let's find out more. What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys ...

  8. Cancers of the kidney and urinary tract in patients on dialysis for end-stage renal disease: analysis of data from the United States, Europe, and Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Stewart, John H; Buccianti, Gherardo; Agodoa, Lawrence; Gellert, Ryszard; McCredie, Margaret R E; Lowenfels, Albert B; Disney, Alex P S; Wolfe, Robert A; Boyle, Peter; Maisonneuve, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Patients on maintenance dialysis have increased risk for cancer, especially in the kidney and urinary tract. In a retrospective cohort of 831,804 patients starting dialysis during 1980 to 1994 in the United States, Europe, or Australia and New Zealand, standardized incidence ratios (SIR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for kidney and bladder cancers. Risks for cancers of the kidney (SIR 3.6; CI 3.5 to 3.8) and bladder (SIR 1.5; CI 1.4 to 1.6) were increased, relatively more in younger than older patients and more in female patients (kidney: SIR 4.6, CI 4.3 to 4.9; bladder: SIR 2.7, CI 2.4 to 2.9) than male patients (kidney: SIR 3.2, CI 3.0 to 3.4; bladder: SIR 1.3, CI 1.2 to 1.3). SIR for kidney cancer were raised in all categories of primary renal disease, and for bladder cancer in all but diabetes and familial, hereditary diseases. Notably high SIR occurred in toxic nephropathies (chiefly analgesic nephropathy) and miscellaneous conditions (a category that includes Balkan nephropathy), the excess of kidney cancer in these conditions being urothelial in origin. SIR for kidney cancer rose significantly, and those for bladder cancer fell (not reaching significance) with time on dialysis. There was no association with type of dialysis. The pattern of increased risk for renal parenchymal cancer in dialysis patients is consistent with causation through acquired renal cystic disease and of urothelial cancers of the kidney and bladder with the carcinogenic effects of certain primary renal diseases.

  9. What Is Crohn's Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... trial of experimental treatments. Interactive Disease Tracker Use GI Buddy to keep a daily log of your ... but the areas affected in the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract) are different. Crohn’s most commonly affects the ...

  10. Postcircumcision urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Cohen, H A; Drucker, M M; Vainer, S; Ashkenasi, A; Amir, J; Frydman, M; Varsano, I

    1992-06-01

    The possible association of urinary tract infection (UTI) with ritual circumcision on the eighth day of life was studied by analyzing the epidemiology of urinary tract infections during the first year of life in 169 children with UTI (56 males and 113 females) born in Israel from 1979 to 1984. Forty-eight percent of the episodes of UTI occurring in males appeared during the 12 days following circumcision, and the increased incidence during that period was highly significant. The median age of the males at the time of the UTI was 16 days, compared with seven months in females. Ritual Jewish circumcision as practiced in Israel may be a predisposing factor for UTI during the 12-day period following that procedure.

  11. Lower respiratory tract infections: prevention using vaccines.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Cynthia G; Harper, Scott A

    2004-12-01

    In summary, vaccines are available to prevent two of the most common and most deadly causes of lower respiratory tract infections: pneumococcal disease and influenza. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine prevents pneumococcal bacteremia; influenza vaccines prevent influenza as well as several complications of influenza. Despite all that is known about how well these vaccines work, influenza and pneumococcal vaccines are underused markedly, especially among some minority groups that are affected dis-proportionately by disease. Coverage also remains low among health care workers, although providing influenza vaccine to health care workers saves lives among patients. Tools such as standing orders can help clinicians increase vaccine coverage in their patient populations. While research for new and improved vaccines to prevent lower respiratory tract infections continues,focusing on simple measures for increasing vaccine use can help prevent morbidity and mortality now.

  12. [Effects of long-term exposure to street traffic exhaust on the development of skin and respiratory tract diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Ising, Hartmut; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Henning; Lieber, Gert-Friedhelm; Weinhold, Hubertus; Eilts, Manfred

    2003-01-01

    The pathogenesis of allergies can be stimulated by adjuvant effects--i.e. air pollutants such as NOx and particles from diesel engines as well as noise--the latter especially during night-time. During sleep, noise signals which are associated with danger (i.e. lorry noise) have the potential to trigger stress reactions even if the noise level is low. Increases of cortisol in the first half of the night seem to play an important role.--In a blind interview study, the combined effects of chronic exposure to traffic related air pollution and noise, upon the risk of skin and respiratory diseases in children were studied. All children between 5-12 years, who had consulted one of two participating pediatricians were included in the study. The pediatricians' diagnoses of 400 children were analysed together with their parents answers on the density of road traffic on their street and several confounding factors. Multiple regression analyses resulted in relative risks of asthma, chronic bronchitis and neurodermitis, which increased significantly with increasing traffic load. A comparison with the literature on such effects caused by air pollution alone, showed that traffic noise during the night might have an adjuvant effect on the pathogenesis of the mentioned diseases. PMID:14753026

  13. Biliary tract infections caused by Aeromonas species.

    PubMed

    Chao, C M; Lai, C C; Tang, H J; Ko, W C; Hsueh, P-R

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the clinical and microbiological characteristics of patients with Aeromonas infections of the biliary tract. Patients with bile cultures positive for Aeromonas species during the period July 2004 to December 2011 were identified from a computerized database of a hospital in Taiwan. Patients with Aeromonas infections of the biliary tract were further identified. During the study period, a total of 1,142 isolates of Aeromonas species were obtained from 750 patients. Of those patients, 91 (12.1 %) had Aeromonas infections of the biliary tract. The annual incidence (episodes per 10,000 patient-days) of biliary tract infections caused by all Aeromonas species was 0.31 in 2007, 0.12 in 2010, and 0.27 in 2011. A. hydrophila was the most common species isolated (n = 41, 45.1 %), followed by A. caviae (n = 30, 33.0 %), A. veronii biovar sobria (n = 15, 16.5 %), and A. veronii biovar veronii (n = 5, 5.5 %). The majority of patients (n = 77, 84.6 %) had polymicrobial infections. Hepatobiliary stones (n = 50, 54.9 %) and hepatobiliary cancer (n = 38, 41.8 %) were the most common underlying diseases, followed by diabetes mellitus (n = 29, 31.9 %) and liver cirrhosis (n = 7, 7.7 %). The in-hospital mortality rate was 8.8 %. Infection-related mortality was associated with underlying immunocompromised condition (p = 0.044) and use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.004), but was not associated with inappropriate antibiotic usage or concomitant bacteremia (n = 8, 8.8 %). In conclusion, biliary tract infections caused by Aeromonas species are not uncommon and can develop in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients; however, patients with underlying hepatobiliary diseases are particularly susceptible to these infections.

  14. Fistulas of the genitourinary tract: a radiologic review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nam C; Raman, Steven S; Patel, Monica; Barbaric, Zoran

    2004-01-01

    Fistulas of the genitourinary tract have diverse anatomic locations, causes, and clinical features. They can involve the upper urinary tract (kidney, ureter), the lower urinary tract (bladder, urethra), or the female reproductive tract (vagina, uterus). Causes include infection, inflammatory disease, neoplasms, congenital conditions, trauma, and iatrogenic injury. Diagnosis of genitourinary tract fistulas usually requires radiologic studies performed with fluoroscopic or cross-sectional modalities. Fistulography is the most direct means of visualizing a fistula and should be considered when feasible (eg, cutaneous fistulas). Intravenous urography and pyelography or ureterography are mainstays of investigation of the upper tract. Likewise, voiding cystourethrography and urethrography are central to study of the lower tract. Cross-sectional techniques, in particular computed tomography, are increasingly useful for diagnosis and are considered the primary test in some cases. Radiologists should be familiar with the radiologic features of genitourinary tract fistulas for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. Management approaches depend on the type of fistula, the degree of morbidity, and the overall functional status of the patient and vary from conservative observation to aggressive surgical repair. PMID:15371612

  15. Pkd1 is Required for Male Reproductive tract Development

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xuguang; Arend, Lois J.

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive tract abnormalities and male infertility have higher incidence in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients than in general population. In this work, we revealed that Pkd1, whose mutations account for 85% of ADPKD cases, is essential for male reproductive tract development. Disruption of Pkd1 caused a spectrum of defects in the murine male reproductive tract. The earliest visible defect in Pkd1-/- reproductive tract was cystic dilation of the efferent ducts, which are derivatives of the mesonephric tubules. Epididymis development was delayed or arrested in the Pkd1-/- mice. No sign of epididymal coiling was seen in the Pkd1 null mice. Disruption of Pkd1 in epithelia alone using the Pax2-cre mice was sufficient to cause efferent duct dilation and coiling defect in the epididymis, suggesting that Pkd1 is critical for epithelial development and maintenance in male reproductive tract. In-depth analysis showed that Pkd1 is required to maintain tubulin cytoskeleton and important for Tgf-β/Bmp signal transduction in the epithelia of male reproductive tract. Altogether, our results provide the first direct evidence for developmental roles of Pkd1 in male reproductive tract and provide new insights in reproductive tract abnormalities and infertility in ADPKD patients. PMID:23933588

  16. [Serial episodes of gastric and cecal perforation in a patient with Behcet's disease involving the whole gastrointestinal tract: a case report].

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Yeob; Cheon, Jae Hee; Park, Jae Jun; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Tae Il; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Won Ho

    2009-02-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) has been recognized as multi-systemic chronic vasculitic disorder of recurrent inflammation, characterized by the involvement of multiple organs and resulting in orogenital ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. Involvement of the central nervous system, vessels, and intestines in BD often leads to a poor prognosis. Digestive manifestations in BD have been reported in up to 1-60% of cases, although the rate varies in different countries. The most frequent extra-oral sites of gastrointestinal involvement are the ileocecal region and the colon. Gastric or esophageal involvement is reported to be very rare. Moreover, there have been no reports on the simultaneous involvement of the esophagus, stomach, ileum, and colon. Here, we present a 55-year-old Korean man with intestinal BD and multiple ileal and colonic ulcerations complicated by perforation, gastric ulcer with bleeding followed by perforation, and esophageal ulcers with bleeding.

  17. A Proteomic Analysis of the Body Wall, Digestive Tract, and Reproductive Tract of Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C. Paul; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Kropp, Laura E.; Zweben, Jesse A.; Meng, Zhaojing; Taylor, Rebekah T.; Chan, King; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Filarial worms are parasitic nematodes that cause devastating diseases such as lymphatic filariasis (LF) and onchocerciasis. Filariae are nematodes with complex anatomy including fully developed digestive tracts and reproductive organs. To better understand the basic biology of filarial parasites and to provide insights into drug targets and vaccine design, we conducted a proteomic analysis of different anatomic fractions of Brugia malayi, a causative agent of LF. Approximately 500 adult female B. malayi worms were dissected, and three anatomical fractions (body wall, digestive tract, and reproductive tract) were obtained. Proteins from each anatomical fraction were extracted, desalted, trypsinized, and analyzed by microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry. In total, we identified 4,785 B. malayi proteins. While 1,894 were identified in all three anatomic fractions, 396 were positively identified only within the digestive tract, 114 only within the body wall, and 1,011 only within the reproductive tract. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed a bias for transporters to be present within the digestive tract, suggesting that the intestine of adult filariae is functional and important for nutrient uptake or waste removal. As expected, the body wall exhibited increased frequencies of cytoskeletal proteins, and the reproductive tract had increased frequencies of proteins involved in nuclear regulation and transcription. In assessing for possible vaccine candidates, we focused on proteins sequestered within the digestive tract, as these could possibly represent “hidden antigens” with low risk of prior allergic sensitization. We identified 106 proteins that are enriched in the digestive tract and are predicted to localize to the surface of cells in the the digestive tract. It is possible that some of these proteins are on the luminal surface and may be accessible by antibodies ingested by the worm. A subset of 27 of these proteins

  18. Radionuclide imaging of the biliary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.E.; Daly, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cholescintigraphy with technetium-labeled biliary agents has great value in evaluation of the patient with suspected acute cholecystitis. Visualization of the gall bladder virtually excludes acute cholecystitis and obstruction of the cystic duct. Nonvisualization of the gall bladder, however, is not specific for acute cholecystitis and may also occur in some patients with chronic cholecystitis or pancreatitis. Interpretation of gall bladder nonvisualization, therefore, must be correlated with the clinical presentation. Biliary tract imaging is also useful in evaluation of some focal abnormalities within the liver, neonatal jaundice, detection of bile leaks or bile reflux, and biliary-enteric shunts. The role of technetium-labeled biliary agents in the evaluation of patients with jaundice is less clear. Excretion of tracer into the gut excludes complete biliary tract obstruction, but the test may be nonconclusive at higher serum bilirubin levels. If persistent common bile duct activity is observed with delayed excretion into the gut, the diagnosis of partial obstruction may be made, but this procedure will be inconclusive if the common bile duct is not visualized and/or significant hepatocellular disease is present. Ultrasonography and abdominal CT are the preferred tools for the diagnosis of biliary tract obstruction at present, but newer biliary tract agents which achieve better hepatic extraction and greater bile concentration at high serum bilirubin levels may improve the diagnostic efficacy of cholescintigraphy.

  19. Correlations of survival with progression-free survival, response rate, and disease control rate in advanced biliary tract cancer: a meta-analysis of randomised trials of first-line chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Toshikazu; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Gosho, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Mariko; Sugaya, Akinori; Yamada, Takeshi; Endo, Shinji; Hyodo, Ichinosuke

    2016-01-01

    Background: The need to promote novel drug development for advanced biliary tract cancer (ABTC) has emphasised the importance of determining whether various efficacy end points can act as surrogates for overall survival (OS). Methods: We conducted a literature search of randomised trials of first-line chemotherapy for ABTC and investigated correlations between efficacy end points and OS using weighted linear regression analysis. The ratios of the median OS, median progression-free survival (PFS), response rate, and disease control rate in each trial were used to summarise treatment effects. The surrogate threshold effect (STE), which was the minimum treatment effect on PFS required to predict a non-zero treatment effect on OS, was calculated. Results: Seventeen randomised trials with 36 treatment arms were identified, and a sample size of 2148 patients with 19 paired arms was analysed. The strongest correlation between all evaluated efficacy end points was observed between median OS and median PFS ratios (r2=0.66). In trials with gemcitabine-containing therapies and targeted agents, the r2-values were 0.78. The STE was estimated at 0.83 for all trials and 0.81 for trials with gemcitabine-containing therapies, and was not calculated for trials with targeted agents. Conclusions: The median PFS ratio correlated well with the median OS ratio, and may be useful for planning a clinical trial for novel drug development. PMID:27031848

  20. Urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Wang, Alina; Nizran, Parminder; Malone, Michael A; Riley, Timothy

    2013-09-01

    Clinical presentation helps differentiate between upper and lower urinary tract infections (UTIs). UTIs are classified as either complicated or uncomplicated. A complicated UTI is associated with an underlying condition that increases the risk of failing therapy. Primary laboratory tests for UTIs consist of urinalysis and urine culture. The most common pathogen for uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis is Escherichia coli. Nitrofurantoin, fosfomycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are first-line therapies for acute uncomplicated cystitis. Decisions regarding antibiotic agents should be individualized based on patients' allergies, tolerability, community resistance rates, cost, and availability.

  1. Cancer incidence among alcoholic liver disease patients in Finland: A retrospective registry study during years 1996-2013.

    PubMed

    Sahlman, Perttu; Nissinen, Markku; Pukkala, Eero; Färkkilä, Martti

    2016-06-01

    Both alcohol abuse and liver cirrhosis are known risk factors for various cancers. This article was aimed to assess the long-term risk of malignancies among patients with severe alcoholic liver disease (ALD), i.e., alcoholic liver cirrhosis and alcoholic hepatitis. A cohort of 8,796 male and 3,077 female ALD patients from 1996 to 2012 was identified from the Finnish National Hospital Discharge Register. This nationwide cohort was combined with the data from the Finnish Cancer Registry for incidence of malignancies during the years 1996-2013. The cancer cases diagnosed were compared with the number of cancers in the general population. The number of malignancies in our cohort was 1,052 vs. 368 expected. There was statistically significant excess of cancers of the liver, (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] 59.20; 95% CI 53.11-65.61), pancreas (SIR 3.71; 95% CI 2.72-4.94), pharynx (SIR 9.25; 95% CI 6.05-13.56), mouth (SIR 8.31; 95% CI 4.84-13,29), oesophagus (SIR 7.92; 95% CI 5.49-11.07), tongue (SIR 7,21; 95% CI 3.60-12.89), larynx (SIR 5.20; 95% CI 2.77-8.89), lung (SIR 2.77; 95% CI 2.27-3.32), stomach (SIR 2.76; 95% CI 1.79-4.07), kidney (SIR 2.69; 95% CI 1.84-3.79) and colon (SIR 2.33; 95% CI 1.70-3.11). There was no decreased risk of any cancer among ALD patients. Severe ALD is associated with markedly increased risk of malignancies. The risk is especially high for hepatocellular carcinoma, but also significantly increased for cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract, pancreas and kidneys, and warrants cancer surveillance in selected cases. PMID:26756434

  2. Motor neuron disease with pyramidal tract dysfunction involves the cortical generators of the early somatosensory evoked potential to tibial nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zanette, G; Tinazzi, M; Polo, A; Rizzuto, N

    1996-10-01

    We evaluated somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) to tibial nerve stimulation in 39 patients with sporadic motor neuron disease using multiple scalp derivations (earlobe reference). SEPs were altered in 22 of 29 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients, whereas they were unaffected in 10 progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) patients. The main changes involved the amplitude and the field distribution of the early P40 and N37 cortical potentials with different modalities varying from a selective loss of the P40 potential (33% of tested sides) to absence of all early cortical SEPs (22% of tested sides). The later components following N50 were generally spared. The commonly used Cz-Fz montage was inadequate for detecting these alterations. Central afferent conduction was slightly affected. The selective loss of cortical SEPs and their close correlation with clinicoelectrophysiologic evidence of central motor system involvement strongly support a cortical origin of the SEP alterations in ALS. We suggest that neuronal loss in the somatosensory cortex may selectively affect the generator sites of the cortical SEPs to lower limb stimulation. PMID:8857722

  3. Microbial Translocation Across the GI Tract*

    PubMed Central

    Brenchley, Jason M.; Douek, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    The lumen of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is home to an enormous quantity of different bacterial species, our microbiota, that thrive in an often symbiotic relationship with the host. Given that the healthy host must regulate contact between the microbiota and its immune system to avoid overwhelming systemic immune activation, humans have evolved several mechanisms to attenuate systemic microbial translocation (MT) and its consequences. However, several diseases are associated with the failure of one or more of these mechanisms, with consequent immune activation and deleterious effects on health. Here, we discuss the mechanisms underlying MT, diseases associated with MT, and therapeutic interventions that aim to decrease it. PMID:22224779

  4. Microbial translocation across the GI tract.

    PubMed

    Brenchley, Jason M; Douek, Daniel C

    2012-01-01

    The lumen of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is home to an enormous quantity of different bacterial species, our microbiota, that thrive in an often symbiotic relationship with the host. Given that the healthy host must regulate contact between the microbiota and its immune system to avoid overwhelming systemic immune activation, humans have evolved several mechanisms to attenuate systemic microbial translocation (MT) and its consequences. However, several diseases are associated with the failure of one or more of these mechanisms, with consequent immune activation and deleterious effects on health. Here, we discuss the mechanisms underlying MT, diseases associated with MT, and therapeutic interventions that aim to decrease it. PMID:22224779

  5. Recurrent respiratory tract infections in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Bellanti, J A

    1997-01-01

    Paediatric respiratory tract infections are one of the most common reasons for physician visits and hospitalisation, and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The role of physicians and other healthcare professionals has expanded from merely treating disease to implementing measures aimed at health maintenance and disease prevention. Therefore, children with recurrent respiratory tract infections represent a great challenge for the paediatrician, from both therapeutic and preventive standpoints. The paediatrician must first determine whether these recurrent infections are because of host-derived factors or are the result of increased environmental exposure. Host-derived factors may be nonimmunological or related to host immunodeficiency. The leading cause of recurrent respiratory tract infections throughout the world is increased environmental exposure in children attending nursery school or daycare centres. Acute otitis media in children is of particular concern because of its high incidence, frequent recurrence, and serious long term sequelae, e.g. hearing loss. The socioeconomic impact of these recurrent infections is staggering, and there remains much scope for devising methods for their treatment and prevention. Recent approaches have included the encouragement of breastfeeding, the use of intravenous immunoglobulin and respiratory syncytical virus immune globulin, as well as methods of stimulating immunity, such as ribosomal immunotherapy. PMID:9378072

  6. Allopregnanolone and neurogenesis in the nigrostriatal tract

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun Ming

    2014-01-01

    Reinstalling the neurobiological circuits to effectively change the debilitating course of neurodegenerative diseases is of utmost importance. This reinstallation requires generation of new cells which are able to differentiate into specific types of neurons and modification of the local environment suitable for integration of these new neurons into the neuronal circuits. Allopregnanolone (APα) seems to be involved in both of these processes, and therefore, is a potential neurotrophic agent. Loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) is one of the main pathological features of Parkinson’s and also in, at least, a subset of Alzheimer’s patients. Therefore, reinstallation of the dopamine neurons in nigrostriatal tract is of unique importance for these neurodegenerative diseases. However, for the neurogenic status and the roles of allopregnanolone in the nigrostriatal tract, the evidence is accumulating and debating. This review summarizes recent studies regarding the neurogenic status in the nigrostriatal tract. Furthermore, special attention is placed on evidence suggesting that reductions in allopregnenalone levels are one of the major pathological features in PD and AD. This evidence has also been confirmed in brains of mice that were lesioned with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) or those bearing neurodegenerative mutations. Lastly, we highlight studies showing that allopregnanalone can augment the number of total cells and dopaminergic neurons via peripheral exogenous administration. PMID:25161608

  7. White matter tracts of speech and language.

    PubMed

    Smits, Marion; Jiskoot, Lize C; Papma, Janne M

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been used to investigate the white matter (WM) tracts underlying the perisylvian cortical regions known to be associated with language function. The arcuate fasciculus is composed of 3 segments (1 long and 2 short) whose separate functions correlate with traditional models of conductive and transcortical motor or sensory aphasia, respectively. DTI mapping of language fibers is useful in presurgical planning for patients with dominant hemisphere tumors, particularly when combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging. DTI has found damage to language networks in stroke patients and has the potential to influence poststroke rehabilitation and treatment. Assessment of the WM tracts involved in the default mode network has been found to correlate with mild cognitive impairment, potentially explaining language deficits in patients with apparently mild small vessel ischemic disease. Different patterns of involvement of language-related WM structures appear to correlate with different clinical subtypes of primary progressive aphasias.

  8. Microbes and the developing gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Neu, Josef; Douglas-Escobar, Martha; Lopez, Mariela

    2007-04-01

    During the course of mammalian evolution, there has been a close relationship between microbes residing in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the mammalian host. Although the host provides the microbes with a warm environment and nutrients, they, in turn, undergo various metabolic processes that aid the host. The host has developed weapons against microbes that are considered foreign, as well as mechanisms to tolerate and live synergistically with most of the microbes in the GI tract. This relationship is proving to be important not only in the neonatal period and during infancy, but it is becoming increasingly evident that microbial colonization in early life may affect the individual's health throughout life. Here we will review this relationship in terms of health and disease, with a focus on the aspects of this relationship during maturation of the host. PMID:17374791

  9. Reproductive tract microbiome in assisted reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Franasiak, Jason M; Scott, Richard T

    2015-12-01

    The human microbiome has gained much attention recently for its role in health and disease. This interest has come as we have begun to scratch the surface of the complexity of what has been deemed to be our "second genome" through initiatives such as the Human Microbiome Project. Microbes have been hypothesized to be involved in the physiology and pathophysiology of assisted reproduction since before the first success in IVF. Although the data supporting or refuting this hypothesis remain somewhat sparse, thanks to sequencing data from the 16S rRNA subunit, we have begun to characterize the microbiome in the male and female reproductive tracts and understand how this may play a role in reproductive competence. In this review, we discuss what is known about the microbiome of the reproductive tract as it pertains to assisted reproductive technologies.

  10. Neonatal Staphylococcus lugdunensis urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Hataya, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Hanako; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a known pathogen of infective endocarditis, but not of urinary tract infection. We report a previously healthy neonate without congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract who developed urinary tract infection due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis, illustrating that Staphylococcus lugdunensis can cause urinary tract infection even in those with no urinary tract complications. PMID:26177232

  11. Urinary Tract Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Kołodziej, Anna; Krajewski, Wojciech; Dołowy, Łukasz; Hirnle, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Recently, occurrence of urinary tract endometriosis (UTE) is more frequently diagnosed. According to literature, it refers to approximately 0.3 to even 12% of all women with endometriosis. The pathogenesis of UTE has not been clearly explained so far. The actually proposed hypotheses include embryonic, migration, transplantation, and iatrogenic theory. Most frequently UTE affects bladder, less often ureters and kidneys. One-third of patients remains asymptomatic or exhibits only minor manifestations. In symptomatic patients main complaints include dysuria, urinary urgency, and/or frequency, painful micturition, and burning sensation in the urethra and discomfort in the retropubic area. Treatment of UTE is challenging and can be pharmacological, surgical or can be a combination of both methods. In this paper we present a review of the literature concerning the UTE, its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26341760

  12. Functional lumen imaging of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lottrup, Christian; Gregersen, Hans; Liao, Donghua; Fynne, Lotte; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum; Krogh, Klaus; Regan, Julie; Kunwald, Peter; McMahon, Barry P

    2015-10-01

    This nonsystematic review aims to describe recent developments in the use of functional lumen imaging in the gastrointestinal tract stimulated by the introduction of the functional lumen imaging probe. When ingested food in liquid and solid form is transported along the gastrointestinal tract, sphincters provide an important role in the flow and control of these contents. Inadequate function of sphincters is the basis of many gastrointestinal diseases. Despite this, traditional methods of sphincter diagnosis and measurement such as fluoroscopy, manometry, and the barostat are limited in what they can tell us. It has long been thought that measurement of sphincter function through resistance to distension is a better approach, now more commonly known as distensibility testing. The functional lumen imaging probe is the first medical measurement device that purports in a practical way to provide geometric profiling and measurement of distensibility in sphincters. With use of impedance planimetry, an axial series of cross-sectional areas and pressure in a catheter-mounted allantoid bag are used for the calculation of distensibility parameters. The technique has been trialed in many valvular areas of the gastrointestinal tract, including the upper esophageal sphincter, the esophagogastric junction, and the anorectal region. It has shown potential in the biomechanical assessment of sphincter function and characterization of swallowing disorders, gastroesophageal reflux disease, eosinophilic esophagitis, achalasia, and fecal incontinence. From this early work, the functional lumen imaging technique has the potential to contribute to a better and more physiological understanding of narrowing regions in the gastrointestinal tract in general and sphincters in particular. PMID:25980822

  13. Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk of urinary tract and other serious infections. Malnutrition or dehydration: People who have Alzheimer’s disease may ... swallow. It’s important to watch for signs of malnutrition. If you think that a loved one might ...

  14. Potential Misclassification of Urinary Tract-Related Bacteremia Upon Applying the 2015 Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Surveillance Definition From the National Healthcare Safety Network.

    PubMed

    Greene, M Todd; Ratz, David; Meddings, Jennifer; Fakih, Mohamad G; Saint, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently updated the surveillance definition of catheter-associated urinary tract infection to include only urine culture bacteria of at least 1 × 10(5) colony-forming units/mL. Our findings suggest that the new surveillance definition may fail to capture clinically meaningful catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

  15. Potential Misclassification of Urinary Tract-Related Bacteremia Upon Applying the 2015 Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Surveillance Definition From the National Healthcare Safety Network.

    PubMed

    Greene, M Todd; Ratz, David; Meddings, Jennifer; Fakih, Mohamad G; Saint, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently updated the surveillance definition of catheter-associated urinary tract infection to include only urine culture bacteria of at least 1 × 10(5) colony-forming units/mL. Our findings suggest that the new surveillance definition may fail to capture clinically meaningful catheter-associated urinary tract infections. PMID:26778287

  16. Particle size and pathogenicity in the respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Richard James

    2013-01-01

    Particle size dictates where aerosolized pathogens deposit in the respiratory tract, thereafter the pathogens potential to cause disease is influenced by tissue tropism, clearance kinetics and the host immunological response. This interplay brings pathogens into contact with a range of tissues spanning the respiratory tract and associated anatomical structures. In animal models, differential deposition within the respiratory tract influences infection kinetics for numerous select agents. Greater numbers of pathogens are required to infect the upper (URT) compared with the lower respiratory tract (LRT), and in comparison the URT infections are protracted with reduced mortality. Pathogenesis in the URT is characterized by infection of the URT lymphoid tissues, cervical lymphadenopathy and septicemia, closely resembling reported human infections of the URT. The olfactory, gastrointestinal, and ophthalmic systems are also infected in a pathogen-dependent manner. The relevant literature is reviewed with respect to particle size and infection of the URT in animal models and humans. PMID:24225380

  17. Cardiac outflow tract anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Neeb, Zachary; Lajiness, Jacquelyn D.; Bolanis, Esther; Conway, Simon J

    2014-01-01

    The mature outflow tract (OFT) is, in basic terms, a short conduit. It is a simple, although vital, connection situated between contracting muscular heart chambers and a vast embryonic vascular network. Unfortunately, it is also a focal point underlying many multifactorial congenital heart defects (CHDs). Through the use of various animal models combined with human genetic investigations, we are beginning to comprehend the molecular and cellular framework that controls OFT morphogenesis. Clear roles of neural crest cells (NCC) and second heart field (SHF) derivatives have been established during OFT formation and remodeling. The challenge now is to determine how the SHF and cardiac NCC interact, the complex reciprocal signaling that appears to be occurring at various stages of OFT morphogenesis, and finally how endocardial progenitors and primary heart field (PHF) communicate with both these colonizing extra-cardiac lineages. Although we are beginning to understand that this dance of progenitor populations is wonderfully intricate, the underlying pathogenesis and the spatiotemporal cell lineage interactions remain to be fully elucidated. What is now clear is that OFT alignment and septation are independent processes, invested via separate SHF and cardiac neural crest (CNC) lineages. This review will focus on our current understanding of the respective contributions of the SHF and CNC lineage during OFT development and pathogenesis. PMID:24014420

  18. Nosocomial urinary tract infections: A review.

    PubMed

    Iacovelli, Valerio; Gaziev, Gabriele; Topazio, Luca; Bove, Pierluigi; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Finazzi Agrò, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infections are a common complication in healthcare systems worldwide. A review of the literature was performed in June 2014 using the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) database, through either PubMed or Ovid as a search engine, to identify publications regarding nosocomial urinary tract infections (NUTIs) definition, epidemiology, etiology and treatment.According to current definitions, more than 30% of nosocomial infections are urinary tract infections (UTIs). A UTI is defined 'nosocomial' (NUTI) when it is acquired in any healthcare institution or, more generally, when it is related to patient management. The origin of nosocomial bacteria is endogenous (the patient's flora) in two thirds of the cases. Patients with indwelling urinary catheters, those undergoing urological surgery and manipulations, long-stay elderly male patients and patients with debilitating diseases are at high risk of developing NUTIs. All bacterial NUTIs should be treated, whether the patient is harboring a urinary catheter or not. The length of treatment depends on the infection site. There is abundance of important guidance which should be considered to reduce the risk of NUTIs (hand disinfection with instant hand sanitizer, wearing non-sterile gloves permanently, isolation of infected or colonized catheterized patients). Patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria can generally be treated initially with catheter removal or catheter exchange, and do not necessarily need antimicrobial therapy. Symptomatic patients should receive antibiotic therapy. Resistance of urinary pathogens to common antibiotics is currently a topic of concern. PMID:25451882

  19. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Pearson, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium which is well-known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls’-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  20. Neural Control of the Lower Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    de Groat, William C.; Griffiths, Derek; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes anatomical, neurophysiological, pharmacological, and brain imaging studies in humans and animals that have provided insights into the neural circuitry and neurotransmitter mechanisms controlling the lower urinary tract. The functions of the lower urinary tract to store and periodically eliminate urine are regulated by a complex neural control system in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral autonomic ganglia that coordinates the activity of smooth and striated muscles of the bladder and urethral outlet. The neural control of micturition is organized as a hierarchical system in which spinal storage mechanisms are in turn regulated by circuitry in the rostral brain stem that initiates reflex voiding. Input from the forebrain triggers voluntary voiding by modulating the brain stem circuitry. Many neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract exhibit switch-like patterns of activity that turn on and off in an all-or-none manner. The major component of the micturition switching circuit is a spinobulbospinal parasympathetic reflex pathway that has essential connections in the periaqueductal gray and pontine micturition center. A computer model of this circuit that mimics the switching functions of the bladder and urethra at the onset of micturition is described. Micturition occurs involuntarily in infants and young children until the age of 3 to 5 years, after which it is regulated voluntarily. Diseases or injuries of the nervous system in adults can cause the re-emergence of involuntary micturition, leading to urinary incontinence. Neuroplasticity underlying these developmental and pathological changes in voiding function is discussed. PMID:25589273

  1. Lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chang, Anne B; Chang, Christina C; O'Grady, K; Torzillo, P J

    2009-12-01

    Acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in young children worldwide. ALRIs are important indicators of the health disparities that persist between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children in developed countries. Bronchiolitis and pneumonia account for the majority of the ALRI burden. The epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of these diseases in Indigenous children are discussed. In comparison with non-Indigenous children in developing countries they have higher rates of disease, more complications, and their management is influenced by several unique factors including the epidemiology of disease and, in some remote regions, constraints on hospital referral and access to highly trained staff. The prevention of repeat infections and the early detection and management of chronic lung disease is critical to the long-term respiratory and overall health of these children.

  2. Low to medium WU-virus titers in young children with lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Kleines, Michael; Scheithauer, Simone; Hengst, Meike; Honnef, Dagmar; Ritter, Klaus; Mühler, Eberhard; Häusler, Martin; Rostamzadeh, Ayda

    2008-01-01

    The WU-virus (WUV), a novel polyomavirus, has recently been recovered from respiratory tract samples. Within a study collective of children with severe lower respiratory tract disease, 3% of the patients tested WUV positive. Viral loads ranged from 5 x 10(2) copies/ml to 1 x 10(4) copies/ml. The WUV genome-positive patients did not display specific clinical or radiological characteristics to be distinguished from other respiratory tract infections. PMID:19321930

  3. [Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. A vision for the paediatrician].

    PubMed

    Palacios Loro, M L; Segura Ramírez, D K; Ordoñez Álvarez, F A; Santos Rodríguez, F

    2015-12-01

    The congenital abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are disorders with a high prevalence in the general population, with urinary tract dilations being the most frequent. CAKUT also account for the most important cause of chronic kidney disease in childhood. This paper focuses on the role of the primary care paediatrician in the diagnosis, assessment, and follow-up of children with CAKUT, with special emphasis on the associated urinary tract infections, the progression toward chronic renal failure, and the genetic basis.

  4. Abdominal ultrasonography of the pediatric gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Heather I; Gee, Michael S; Westra, Sjirk J; Nimkin, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an invaluable imaging modality in the evaluation of pediatric gastrointestinal pathology; it can provide real-time evaluation of the bowel without the need for sedation or intravenous contrast. Recent improvements in ultrasound technique can be utilized to improve detection of bowel pathology in children: Higher resolution probes, color Doppler, harmonic and panoramic imaging are excellent tools in this setting. Graded compression and cine clips provide dynamic information and oral and intravenous contrast agents aid in detection of bowel wall pathology. Ultrasound of the bowel in children is typically a targeted exam; common indications include evaluation for appendicitis, pyloric stenosis and intussusception. Bowel abnormalities that are detected prenatally can be evaluated after birth with ultrasound. Likewise, acquired conditions such as bowel hematoma, bowel infections and hernias can be detected with ultrasound. Rare bowel neoplasms, vascular disorders and foreign bodies may first be detected with sonography, as well. At some centers, comprehensive exams of the gastrointestinal tract are performed on children with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease to evaluate for disease activity or to confirm the diagnosis. The goal of this article is to review up-to-date imaging techniques, normal sonographic anatomy, and characteristic sonographic features of common and uncommon disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract in children. PMID:27551336

  5. Abdominal ultrasonography of the pediatric gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Gale, Heather I; Gee, Michael S; Westra, Sjirk J; Nimkin, Katherine

    2016-07-28

    Ultrasound is an invaluable imaging modality in the evaluation of pediatric gastrointestinal pathology; it can provide real-time evaluation of the bowel without the need for sedation or intravenous contrast. Recent improvements in ultrasound technique can be utilized to improve detection of bowel pathology in children: Higher resolution probes, color Doppler, harmonic and panoramic imaging are excellent tools in this setting. Graded compression and cine clips provide dynamic information and oral and intravenous contrast agents aid in detection of bowel wall pathology. Ultrasound of the bowel in children is typically a targeted exam; common indications include evaluation for appendicitis, pyloric stenosis and intussusception. Bowel abnormalities that are detected prenatally can be evaluated after birth with ultrasound. Likewise, acquired conditions such as bowel hematoma, bowel infections and hernias can be detected with ultrasound. Rare bowel neoplasms, vascular disorders and foreign bodies may first be detected with sonography, as well. At some centers, comprehensive exams of the gastrointestinal tract are performed on children with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease to evaluate for disease activity or to confirm the diagnosis. The goal of this article is to review up-to-date imaging techniques, normal sonographic anatomy, and characteristic sonographic features of common and uncommon disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract in children. PMID:27551336

  6. Urinary tract infections in the infant.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Mehreen; Seed, Patrick C

    2015-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) in an infant may be the first indication of an underlying renal disorder. Early recognition and initiation of adequate therapy for UTI is important to reduce the risk of long-term renal scarring. Ampicillin and gentamicin are traditionally the empiric treatment of choice; however, local antibiotic resistance patterns should be considered. Maternal antibiotics during pregnancy also increase the risk of resistant pathogens during neonatal UTI. Long-term management after the first UTI in infants remains controversial because of lack of specific studies in this age group and the risk-benefit issues for antibiotic prophylaxis between reduced recurrent disease and emergent antibiotic resistance.

  7. Reconstruction and Visualization of Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rong-guo; Guo, Xu-dong; Xu, Changqing

    2012-01-01

    Background: Converting the two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional photographs into an intuitive three-dimensional (3D) model is a basic task for medical imaging data for auxiliary disease-linked diagnosis purpose. Methods: Reconstruction and visualization process of gastrointestinal cross-sectional photographs includes image preparation, image registration, image segmentation, 3D surface-rendering reconstruction, and implementation of 3D digital visualization. Results: Using the visualization toolkit (VTK), we implemented 3D digital reconstruction and visualization of gastrointestinal tract, whose visualized model can be zoomed, paned, and rotated, including the stomach, the small intestine, and the large intestine. PMID:23675253

  8. Abdominal tuberculosis of the gastrointestinal tract: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Debi, Uma; Ravisankar, Vasudevan; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal tuberculosis is an increasingly common disease that poses diagnostic challenge, as the nonspecific features of the disease which may lead to diagnostic delays and development of complications. This condition is regarded as a great mimicker of other abdominal pathology. A high index of suspicion is an important factor in early diagnosis. Abdominal involvement may occur in the gastrointestinal tract, peritoneum, lymphnodes or solid viscera. Various investigative methods have been used to aid in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis. Early diagnosis and initiation of antituberculous therapy and surgical treatment are essential to prevent morbidity and mortality. Most of the patients respond very well to standard antitubercular therapy and surgery is required only in a minority of cases. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis because early recognition of this condition is important. We reviewed our experience with the findings on various imaging modalities for diagnosis of this potentially treatable disease. PMID:25356043

  9. Biliary tract cancers: SEOM clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Benavides, M; Antón, A; Gallego, J; Gómez, M A; Jiménez-Gordo, A; La Casta, A; Laquente, B; Macarulla, T; Rodríguez-Mowbray, J R; Maurel, J

    2015-12-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is an uncommon and highly fatal malignancy. It is composed of three main different entities; Gall bladder carcinoma (GBC), intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCC) and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (eCC) sharing different genetic, risk factors and clinical presentation. Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP) are the more important diagnostic techniques. Surgery is the only potentially curative therapy but disease recurrence is frequent. Treatment with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or both has not demonstrated survival benefit in the adjuvant setting. Cisplatin plus gemcitabine constitutes the gold standard in metastatic disease. New ongoing studies mainly in the adjuvant and neoadjuvant setting along with molecular research will hopefully help to improve survival and quality of life of this disease. PMID:26607930

  10. Atrio-His bundle tracts.

    PubMed Central

    Brechenmacher, C

    1975-01-01

    The atrio-His bundle tracts are very rare; only two have been found in 687 hearts studied histologically. These tracts have a similar appearance to those of the atrioventricular bundle and form a complete bypass of the atrioventricular node. In their presence the electrocardiogram may show a short or normal PR interval. They may be responsible for some cases of very rapid ventricular response to supraventricular arrhythmias. Images PMID:1191446

  11. Hydrogen Sulfide and Urogenital Tract.

    PubMed

    di Villa Bianca, Roberta d'Emmanuele; Cirino, Giuseppe; Sorrentino, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter the role played by H2S in the physiopathology of urogenital tract revising animal and human data available in the current relevant literature is discussed. H2S pathway has been demonstrated to be involved in the mechanism underlying penile erection in human and experimental animal. Both cystathionine-β synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ lyase (CSE) are expressed in the human corpus cavernosum and exogenous H2S relaxes isolated human corpus cavernosum strips in an endothelium-independent manner. Hydrogen sulfide pathway also accounts for the direct vasodilatory effect operated by testosterone on isolated vessels. Convincing evidence suggests that H2S can influence the cGMP pathway by inhibiting the phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) activity. All these findings taken together suggest an important role for the H2S pathway in human corpus cavernosum homeostasis. However, H2S effect is not confined to human corpus cavernosum but also plays an important role in human bladder. Human bladder expresses mainly CBS and generates in vitro detectable amount of H2S. In addition the bladder relaxant effect of the PDE-5 inhibitor sildenafil involves H2S as mediator. In conclusion the H2S pathway is not only involved in penile erection but also plays a role in bladder homeostasis. In addition the finding that it involved in the mechanism of action of PDE-5 inhibitors strongly suggests that modulation of this pathway can represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and bladder diseases. PMID:26162831

  12. Combination of Anti-IGF-1R Antibody A12 and Ionizing Radiation in Upper Respiratory Tract Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Riesterer, Oliver; Yang Qiuan; Raju, Uma; Torres, Mylin; Molkentine, David; Patel, Nalini; Valdecanas, David; Milas, Luka; Ang, K. Kian

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The IGF1/IGF-1R signaling pathway has emerged as a potential determinant of radiation resistance in human cancer cell lines. Therefore we investigated the potency of monoclonal anti-IGF-1R antibody, A12, to enhance radiation response in upper respiratory tract cancers. Methods and Materials: Cell lines were assessed for IGF-1R expression and IGF1-dependent response to A12 or radiation using viability and clonogenic cancer cell survival assays. In vivo response of tumor xenografts to 10 or 20 Gy and A12 (0.25-2 mg x 3) was assessed using growth delay assays. Combined treatment effects were also analyzed by immunohistochemical assays for tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, and vascular endothelial growth factor expression at Days 1 and 6 after start of treatment. Results: A12 enhanced the radiosensitivity of HN5 and FaDu head-and-neck carcinomas in vitro (p < 0.05) and amplified the radioresponse of FaDu xenografts in a dose-dependent manner, with enhancement factors ranging from 1.2 to 1.8 (p < 0.01). Immunohistochemical analysis of FaDu xenografts demonstrated that A12 inhibited tumor cell proliferation (p < 0.05) and vascular endothelial growth factor expression. When A12 was combined with radiation, this resulted in apoptosis induction that persisted until 6 days from the start of treatment and in increased necrosis at Day 1 (p < 0.01, respectively). Combined treatment with A12 and radiation resulted in additive or subadditive growth delay in H460 or A549 xenografts, respectively. Conclusions: The results of this study strengthen the evidence for investigating how anti-IGF-1R strategies can be integrated into radiation and radiation-cetuximab regimen in the treatment of cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract cancers.

  13. Relationship Between Upper Respiratory Tract Influenza Test Result and Clinical Outcomes Among Critically Ill Influenza Patients.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Krishna P; Bajwa, Ednan K; Parker, Robert A; Onderdonk, Andrew B; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2016-01-01

    Among critically ill patients with lower respiratory tract (LRT)-confirmed influenza, we retrospectively observed worse 28-day clinical outcomes in upper respiratory tract (URT)-negative versus URT-positive subjects. This finding may reflect disease progression and highlights the need for influenza testing of both URT and LRT specimens to improve diagnostic yield and possibly inform prognosis. PMID:26966696

  14. Transversal mixing in the gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainchtein, Dmitri; Orthey, Perry; Parkman, Henry

    2015-11-01

    We discuss results of numerical simulations and analytical modeling of transversal intraluminal mixing in the GI tract produced by segmentation and peristaltic contractions. Particles that start in different parts of the small intestine are traced over several contractions and mixing is described using the particles' probability distribution function. We show that there is optimal set of parameters of contractions, such as the depth and frequency, that produces the most efficient mixing. We show that contractions create well-defined advection patterns in transversal direction. The research is inspired by several applications. First, there is the study of bacteria populating the walls of the intestine, which rely on fluid mixing for nutrients. Second, there are gastrointestinal diseases, such as Crohn's disease, which can be treated effectively using a drug delivery capsule through GI tract, for which it is needed to know how long it takes for a released drug to reach the intestinal wall. And finally, certain neurological and muscular deceases change the parameters of contractions, thus reducing the efficiency of mixing. Understanding an admissible range of the parameters (when mixing is still sufficient for biological purposes) may indicate when the medical action is required.

  15. Stenting of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Sabharwal, Tarun Adam, Andreas

    2010-08-15

    Minimally invasive image-guided insertion of self-expanding metal stents in the upper gastrointestinal tract is the current treatment of choice for palliation of malignant esophageal or gastroduodenal outlet obstructions. A concise review is presented of contemporary stenting practice of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and the procedures in terms of appropriate patient evaluation, indications, and contraindications for treatment are analyzed, along with available stent designs, procedural steps, clinical outcomes, inadvertent complications, and future technology. Latest developments include biodegradable polymeric stents for benign disease and radioactive or drug-eluting stents for malignant obstructions.

  16. Marijuana: respiratory tract effects.

    PubMed

    Owen, Kelly P; Sutter, Mark E; Albertson, Timothy E

    2014-02-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used drug of abuse in the USA. It is commonly abused through inhalation and therefore has effects on the lung that are similar to tobacco smoke, including increased cough, sputum production, hyperinflation, and upper lobe emphysematous changes. However, at this time, it does not appear that marijuana smoke contributes to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Marijuana can have multiple physiologic effects such as tachycardia, peripheral vasodilatation, behavioral and emotional changes, and possible prolonged cognitive impairment. The carcinogenic effects of marijuana are unclear at this time. Studies are mixed on the ability of marijuana smoke to increase the risk for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer. Some studies show that marijuana is protective for development of malignancy. Marijuana smoke has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the immune system. Components of cannabis are under investigation as treatment for autoimmune diseases and malignancy. As marijuana becomes legalized in many states for medical and recreational use, other forms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have been developed, such as food products and beverages. As most research on marijuana at this time has been on whole marijuana smoke, rather than THC, it is difficult to determine if the currently available data is applicable to these newer products. PMID:23715638

  17. Marijuana: respiratory tract effects.

    PubMed

    Owen, Kelly P; Sutter, Mark E; Albertson, Timothy E

    2014-02-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used drug of abuse in the USA. It is commonly abused through inhalation and therefore has effects on the lung that are similar to tobacco smoke, including increased cough, sputum production, hyperinflation, and upper lobe emphysematous changes. However, at this time, it does not appear that marijuana smoke contributes to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Marijuana can have multiple physiologic effects such as tachycardia, peripheral vasodilatation, behavioral and emotional changes, and possible prolonged cognitive impairment. The carcinogenic effects of marijuana are unclear at this time. Studies are mixed on the ability of marijuana smoke to increase the risk for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer. Some studies show that marijuana is protective for development of malignancy. Marijuana smoke has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the immune system. Components of cannabis are under investigation as treatment for autoimmune diseases and malignancy. As marijuana becomes legalized in many states for medical and recreational use, other forms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have been developed, such as food products and beverages. As most research on marijuana at this time has been on whole marijuana smoke, rather than THC, it is difficult to determine if the currently available data is applicable to these newer products.

  18. Gastrointestinal tract volume measurement method using a compound eye type endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Nishida, Tsutomu; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2015-03-01

    We propose an intestine volume measurement method using a compound eye type endoscope. This method aims at assessment of the gastrointestinal function. Gastrointestinal diseases are mainly based on morphological abnormalities. However, gastrointestinal symptoms are sometimes apparent without visible abnormalities. Such diseases are called functional gastrointestinal disorder, for example, functional dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome. One of the major factors for these diseases is abnormal gastrointestinal motility. For the diagnosis of the gastrointestinal tract, both aspects of organic and functional assessment is important. While endoscopic diagnosis is essential for assessment of organic abnormalities, three-dimensional information is required for assessment of the functional abnormalities. Thus, we proposed the three dimensional endoscope system using compound eye. In this study, we forces on the volume of gastrointestinal tract. The volume of the gastrointestinal tract is thought to related its function. In our system, we use a compound eye type endoscope system to obtain three-dimensional information of the tract. The volume can be calculated by integrating the slice data of the intestine tract shape using the obtained three-dimensional information. First, we evaluate the proposed method by known-shape tube. Then, we confirm that the proposed method can measure the tract volume using the tract simulated model. Our system can assess the wall of gastrointestinal tract directly in a three-dimensional manner. Our system can be used for examination of gastric morphological and functional abnormalities.

  19. Multi-scale characterization of white matter tract geometry.

    PubMed

    Savadjiev, Peter; Rathi, Yogesh; Bouix, Sylvain; Verma, Ragini; Westin, Carl-Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    The geometry of white matter tracts is of increased interest for a variety of neuroscientific investigations, as it is a feature reflective of normal neurodevelopment and disease factors that may affect it. In this paper, we introduce a novel method for computing multi-scale fibre tract shape and geometry based on the differential geometry of curve sets. By measuring the variation of a curve's tangent vector at a given point in all directions orthogonal to the curve, we obtain a 2D "dispersion distribution function" at that point. That is, we compute a function on the unit circle which describes fibre dispersion, or fanning, along each direction on the circle. Our formulation is then easily incorporated into a continuous scale-space framework. We illustrate our method on different fibre tracts and apply it to a population study on hemispheric lateralization in healthy controls. We conclude with directions for future work.

  20. Bovine coronaviruses from the respiratory tract: antigenic and genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Fulton, R W; Ridpath, J F; Burge, L J

    2013-01-30

    BoCV isolated from respiratory tract, nasal swab and broncho alveolar washing fluid samples were evaluated for genetic and antigenic differences. These BoCV from the respiratory tract of healthy and clinically ill cattle with BRD signs were compared to reference and vaccine strains based on Spike protein coding sequences and VNT using convalescent antisera. Based on this study, the BoCV isolates belong to one of two genomic clades (clade 1 and 2) which can be differentiated antigenically. The respiratory isolates from Oklahoma in this study were further divided by genetic differences into three subclades, 2a, 2b, and 2c. Reference enteric BoCV strains and a vaccine strain were in clade 1. Currently available vaccines designed to control enteric disease are based on viruses from one clade while viruses isolated from respiratory tracts, in this study, belong to the other clade. PMID:23246548

  1. Gas in the Digestive Tract

    MedlinePlus

    ... digestive tract when you swallow air and when bacteria in your large intestine break down certain undigested foods. ​​​​ Diagnosis of Gas Doctors may diagnose the causes of gas with a medical history and physical exam. If your doctor suspects you ...

  2. Human Bocavirus: Passenger or Pathogen in Acute Respiratory Tract Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Schildgen, Oliver; Müller, Andreas; Allander, Tobias; Mackay, Ian M.; Völz, Sebastian; Kupfer, Bernd; Simon, Arne

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a newly identified virus tentatively assigned to the family Parvoviridae, subfamily Parvovirinae, genus Bocavirus. HBoV was first described in 2005 and has since been detected in respiratory tract secretions worldwide. Herein we review the literature on HBoV and discuss the biology and potential clinical impact of this virus. Most studies have been PCR based and performed on patients with acute respiratory symptoms, from whom HBoV was detected in 2 to 19% of the samples. HBoV-positive samples have been derived mainly from infants and young children. HBoV DNA has also been detected in the blood of patients with respiratory tract infection and in fecal samples of patients with diarrhea with or without concomitant respiratory symptoms. A characteristic feature of HBoV studies is the high frequency of coinciding detections, or codetections, with other viruses. Available data nevertheless indicate a statistical association between HBoV and acute respiratory tract disease. We present a model incorporating these somewhat contradictory findings and suggest that primary HBoV infection causes respiratory tract symptoms which can be followed by prolonged low-level virus shedding in the respiratory tract. Detection of the virus in this phase will be facilitated by other infections, either simply via increased sample cell count or via reactivation of HBoV, leading to an increased detection frequency of HBoV during other virus infections. We conclude that the majority of available HBoV studies are limited by the sole use of PCR diagnostics on respiratory tract secretions, addressing virus prevalence but not disease association. The ability to detect primary infection through the development of improved diagnostic methods will be of great importance for future studies seeking to assign a role for HBoV in causing respiratory illnesses. PMID:18400798

  3. Smooth muscle tumours of the alimentary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, T.; Danton, M. H.; Parks, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Neoplasms arising from smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are uncommon, comprising only 1% of gastrointestinal tumours. A total of 51 cases of smooth muscle tumour of the GI tract were analysed; 44 leiomyomas and 7 leiomyosarcomas. Lesions occurred in all areas from the oesophagus to the rectum, the stomach being the commonest site. Thirty-six patients had clinical features referable to the tumour. The tumour was detected during investigation or management of an unrelated disease process in 15 patients. The clinical presentation varied depending on tumour location, but abdominal pain and GI bleeding were the commonest presenting symptoms. The lesion was demonstrated preoperatively, mainly by endoscopy and barium studies, in 27 patients. Surgical excision was the treatment of choice, where possible. There was no recurrence in the leiomyoma group but four patients died in the leiomyosarcoma group. Although rare, smooth muscle tumours should be considered in situations where clinical presentation and investigations are not suggestive of any common GI disorder. The preoperative assessment and diagnosis is difficult because of the variability in clinical features and their inaccessibility to routine GI investigation. It is recommended that, where possible, the lesion, whether symptomatic or discovered incidentally, should be excised completely to achieve a cure and prevent future complications. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2221768

  4. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-01

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:26819503

  5. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Kline, Kimberly A; Lewis, Amanda L

    2016-04-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary-tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI.

  6. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Kimberly A.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI. PMID:27227294

  7. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Kline, Kimberly A; Lewis, Amanda L

    2016-04-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary-tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI. PMID:27227294

  8. Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Upper GI Tract Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography or ... X-ray? What is Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract Radiography? Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography, also called an upper ...

  9. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography or ... Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract radiography, also ...

  10. Musculature of the alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Skandalakis, J E

    2000-04-01

    Leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas are derived from smooth muscle tissues. Smooth muscle cells also surround the blood vessels that supply the alimentary tract. These cells have at times been said to contribute to the formation of smooth muscle tumors in the alimentary canal. With such an abundance of smooth muscle, there is little reason at present to implicate the smooth muscle elements of blood vessel walls.

  11. Update on hidradenitis suppurativa: connecting the tracts

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Liza; Williams, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a debilitating skin disease characterized by recurrent abscesses, sinus tract formation, and scarring. Prevalence estimates range from 0.053% to 4.1%, although HS is likely an underdiagnosed disease. Although the first reports of HS date back to the mid-19th century, the disease continues to plague patients and physicians desperate for a definitive treatment. Advances in the understanding of the disease process include the possibility of a defective basement membrane at the sebofollicular junction of the folliculopilosebaceous unit (FPSU; that is, where the sebaceous gland empties into the hair follicle) as an initiating event followed by secondary bacterial colonization. New evidence suggests that bacteria living in a community, known as a biofilm, rather than single planktonic bacteria in HS lesions may explain why HS can be resistant to current antibiotic treatment regimens. Available treatment options have expanded to include triple-antibiotic therapy, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) inhibitors (biologics), laser therapy, and surgical excision, including the skin tissue-sparing excision with electrosurgical peeling procedure. Despite the array of treatments available, many patients continue to struggle with the embarrassment, pain, odor, and frustration that accompany this often isolating disease. Physicians should address comorbidities in HS, including the psychosocial issues patients with HS frequently encounter. Patients can be directed to HS support groups, where they can openly discuss their frustrations, share their experiences in dealing with HS, and band together to advocate for themselves. HS is misunderstood by both patients and physicians, often resulting in a delay in clinical presentation and diagnosis. Patients and physicians across multiple specialties must work together to expand awareness of and interest in HS, so that one day, individuals with HS can be freed from this crippling disease

  12. Immune Cells in the Female Reproductive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chul Jung; Kim, Dong-Jae; Kang, Jee-hyun

    2015-01-01

    The female reproductive tract has two main functions: protection against microbial challenge and maintenance of pregnancy to term. The upper reproductive tract comprises the fallopian tubes and the uterus, including the endocervix, and the lower tract consists of the ectocervix and the vagina. Immune cells residing in the reproductive tract play contradictory roles: they maintain immunity against vaginal pathogens in the lower tract and establish immune tolerance for sperm and an embryo/fetus in the upper tract. The immune system is significantly influenced by sex steroid hormones, although leukocytes in the reproductive tract lack receptors for estrogen and progesterone. The leukocytes in the reproductive tract are distributed in either an aggregated or a dispersed form in the epithelial layer, lamina propria, and stroma. Even though immune cells are differentially distributed in each organ of the reproductive tract, the predominant immune cells are T cells, macrophages/dendritic cells, natural killer (NK) cells, neutrophils, and mast cells. B cells are rare in the female reproductive tract. NK cells in the endometrium significantly expand in the late secretory phase and further increase their number during early pregnancy. It is evident that NK cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells are extremely important in decidual angiogenesis, trophoblast migration, and immune tolerance during pregnancy. Dysregulation of endometrial/decidual immune cells is strongly related to infertility, miscarriage, and other obstetric complications. Understanding the immune system of the female reproductive tract will significantly contribute to women's health and to success in pregnancy. PMID:25713505

  13. Environmentally mediated disorders of the respiratory tract

    SciTech Connect

    Utell, M.J.; Samet, J.M. )

    1990-03-01

    Although much of the evidence in environmental lung disease remains equivocal, some environmental exposures are known to be clinically relevant. Ambient air pollution remains of concern as a source of morbidity, particularly for susceptible populations such as persons with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or cardiac disease and the elderly. The adverse effects of several components of indoor air pollution have been established. Environmental tobacco smoke contributes to lower-respiratory illness in infants; office workers exposed to thermophilic actinomycetes contaminating ventilation systems have developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis; and in the home, components of house dust and fungus spores may provoke asthma via immediate hypersensitivity. The evidence is less compelling for a link between other exposures and disorders of the respiratory tract. For example, formaldehyde may be responsible for provoking vague respiratory symptoms and even nasal cancers; however, the associations are unproved. Likewise, the relation between low-level exposure to asbestos and the development of lung cancer, although a concern, is not conclusively established. The clinician should be aware of practical measures for patients who inquire about air cleaning. Often, relatively simple solutions are effective. A knowledge of sources and exposures as well as an understanding of the principles of inhalation lung injury should prove useful in directing patient care. 33 references.

  14. Analysis of the Upper Respiratory Tract Microbiotas as the Source of the Lung and Gastric Microbiotas in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bassis, Christine M.; Erb-Downward, John R.; Dickson, Robert P.; Freeman, Christine M.; Schmidt, Thomas M.; Young, Vincent B.; Beck, James M.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT No studies have examined the relationships between bacterial communities along sites of the upper aerodigestive tract of an individual subject. Our objective was to perform an intrasubject and intersite analysis to determine the contributions of two upper mucosal sites (mouth and nose) as source communities for the bacterial microbiome of lower sites (lungs and stomach). Oral wash, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, nasal swab, and gastric aspirate samples were collected from 28 healthy subjects. Extensive analysis of controls and serial intrasubject BAL fluid samples demonstrated that sampling of the lungs by bronchoscopy was not confounded by oral microbiome contamination. By quantitative PCR, the oral cavity and stomach contained the highest bacterial signal levels and the nasal cavity and lungs contained much lower levels. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicon libraries generated from these samples showed that the oral and gastric compartments had the greatest species richness, which was significantly greater in both than the richness measured in the lungs and nasal cavity. The bacterial communities of the lungs were significantly different from those of the mouth, nose, and stomach, while the greatest similarity was between the oral and gastric communities. However, the bacterial communities of healthy lungs shared significant membership with the mouth, but not the nose, and marked subject-subject variation was noted. In summary, microbial immigration from the oral cavity appears to be the significant source of the lung microbiome during health, but unlike the stomach, the lungs exhibit evidence of selective elimination of Prevotella bacteria derived from the upper airways. PMID:25736890

  15. Therapeutic upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy in Paediatric Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Imdadur; Patel, Praful; Boger, Philip; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Thomson, Mike; Afzal, Nadeem Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report of use of endoscopy in children in the 1970s, there has seen an exponential growth in published experience and innovation in the field. In this review article we focus on modern age therapeutic endoscopy practice, explaining use of traditional as well as new and innovative techniques, for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the paediatric upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25789087

  16. Altered tract-specific white matter microstructure is related to poorer cognitive performance: The Rotterdam Study.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Lotte G M; de Groot, Marius; Hofman, Albert; Krestin, Gabriel P; van der Lugt, Aad; Niessen, Wiro J; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M Arfan

    2016-03-01

    White matter microstructural integrity has been related to cognition. Yet, the potential role of specific white matter tracts on top of a global white matter effect remains unclear, especially when considering specific cognitive domains. Therefore, we determined the tract-specific effect of white matter microstructure on global cognition and specific cognitive domains. In 4400 nondemented and stroke-free participants (mean age 63.7 years, 55.5% women), we obtained diffusion magnetic resonance imaging parameters (fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity) in 14 white matter tracts using probabilistic tractography and assessed cognitive performance with a cognitive test battery. Tract-specific white matter microstructure in all supratentorial tracts was associated with poorer global cognition. Lower fractional anisotropy in association tracts, primarily the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and higher mean diffusivity in projection tracts, in particular the posterior thalamic radiation, most strongly related to poorer cognition. Altered white matter microstructure related to poorer information processing speed, executive functioning, and motor speed, but not to memory. Tract-specific microstructural changes may aid in better understanding the mechanism of cognitive impairment and neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Altered tract-specific white matter microstructure is related to poorer cognitive performance: The Rotterdam Study.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Lotte G M; de Groot, Marius; Hofman, Albert; Krestin, Gabriel P; van der Lugt, Aad; Niessen, Wiro J; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M Arfan

    2016-03-01

    White matter microstructural integrity has been related to cognition. Yet, the potential role of specific white matter tracts on top of a global white matter effect remains unclear, especially when considering specific cognitive domains. Therefore, we determined the tract-specific effect of white matter microstructure on global cognition and specific cognitive domains. In 4400 nondemented and stroke-free participants (mean age 63.7 years, 55.5% women), we obtained diffusion magnetic resonance imaging parameters (fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity) in 14 white matter tracts using probabilistic tractography and assessed cognitive performance with a cognitive test battery. Tract-specific white matter microstructure in all supratentorial tracts was associated with poorer global cognition. Lower fractional anisotropy in association tracts, primarily the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and higher mean diffusivity in projection tracts, in particular the posterior thalamic radiation, most strongly related to poorer cognition. Altered white matter microstructure related to poorer information processing speed, executive functioning, and motor speed, but not to memory. Tract-specific microstructural changes may aid in better understanding the mechanism of cognitive impairment and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26923407

  18. Pyramidal tract mapping by diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis: improving correlations with disability

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M; Tench, C; Morgan, P; Blumhardt, L

    2003-01-01

    Background: Current magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcome measures such as T2 lesion load correlate poorly with disability in multiple sclerosis. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the brain can provide unique information regarding the orientation and integrity of white matter tracts in vivo. Objective: To use this information to map the pyramidal tracts of patients with multiple sclerosis, investigate the relation between burden of disease in the tracts and disability, and compare this with more global magnetic resonance estimates of disease burden. Methods: 25 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 17 healthy volunteers were studied with DTI. An algorithm was used that automatically produced anatomically plausible maps of white matter tracts. The integrity of the pyramidal tracts was assessed using relative anisotropy and a novel measure (Lt) derived from the compounded relative anisotropy along the tracts. The methods were compared with both traditional and more recent techniques for measuring disease burden in multiple sclerosis (T2 lesion load and "whole brain" diffusion histograms). Results: Relative anisotropy and Lt were significantly lower in patients than controls (p < 0.05). Pyramidal tract Lt in the patients correlated significantly with both expanded disability status scale (r = -0.48, p < 0.05), and to a greater degree, the pyramidal Kurtzke functional system score (KFS-p) (r = -0.75, p < 0.0001). T2 lesion load and diffusion histogram parameters did not correlate with disability. Conclusions: Tract mapping using DTI is feasible and may increase the specificity of MRI in multiple sclerosis by matching appropriate tracts with specific clinical scoring systems. These techniques may be applicable to a wide range of neurological conditions. PMID:12531950

  19. Urinary tract infections and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract candidiasis is known as the most frequent nosocomial fungal infection worldwide. Candida albicans is the most common cause of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infections; however, a rapid change in the distribution of Candida species is undergoing. Simultaneously, the increase of urinary tract candidiasis has led to the appearance of antifungal resistant Candida species. In this review, we have an in depth look into Candida albicans uropathogenesis and distribution of the three most frequent Candida species contributing to urinary tract candidiasis in different countries around the world. Material and methods For writing this review, Google Scholar –a scholarly search engine– (http://scholar.google.com/) and PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) were used. The most recently published original articles and reviews of literature relating to the first three Candida species causing urinary tract infections in different countries and the pathogenicity of Candida albicans were selected and studied. Results Although some studies show rapid changes in the uropathogenesis of Candida species causing urinary tract infections in some countries, Candida albicans is still the most important cause of candidal urinary tract infections. Conclusions Despite the ranking of Candida albicans as the dominant species for urinary tract candidiasis, specific changes have occurred in some countries. At this time, it is important to continue the surveillance related to Candida species causing urinary tract infections to prevent, control and treat urinary tract candidiasis in future. PMID:25914847

  20. Plumbing the depths of urinary tract obstruction by using murine models

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract obstruction leads to obstructive nephropathy, which in turn, frequently results in renal failure. Congenital urinary tract obstruction can be traced back to errors during the organogenesis of the urinary system. A fundamental understanding of the causes of urinary tract obstruction and the developmental processes involved are critical for improving the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for this disease. A number of laboratories, including ours, have been using genetically engineered and spontaneously occurring mouse models to study the primary causes and the pathogenesis of urinary tract obstruction. These studies have shown that urinary tract obstruction is a very heterogeneous disease that can be caused by a diverse set of factors targeting multiple levels of the urinary system. Accumulating evidence also indicates that the development of the urinary tract requires the integration of progenitor cells of diverse embryonic origins, leading to the formation of multiple junctions prone to developmental errors. In addition, the high sensitivity of the pyeloureteral peristaltic machinery to disturbance affecting the structural or functional integrity of its components also contributes to the high incidence rate of urinary tract obstruction. PMID:19568351

  1. Changes to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    This article explores changes in the ageing gastrointestinal tract, including: » Diminished sense of taste and smell. » Shrinking of the maxillary and mandibular bones in the jaw. » Slowing of oesophageal peristalsis giving a feeling that something is 'stuck in the throat'. » Relaxation of the lower sphincter leading to gastro-oesophageal reflux. » Reduction in gastric bicarbonate and prostaglandin in mucus increasing susceptibility to stomach ulcers. » Changes in villi in the small intestine reducing the area for absorption. » Overpopulation of bacteria in the small intestine leading to decreased absorption of folic acid and minerals. PMID:27573953

  2. Changes to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    This article explores changes in the ageing gastrointestinal tract, including: » Diminished sense of taste and smell. » Shrinking of the maxillary and mandibular bones in the jaw. » Slowing of oesophageal peristalsis giving a feeling that something is 'stuck in the throat'. » Relaxation of the lower sphincter leading to gastro-oesophageal reflux. » Reduction in gastric bicarbonate and prostaglandin in mucus increasing susceptibility to stomach ulcers. » Changes in villi in the small intestine reducing the area for absorption. » Overpopulation of bacteria in the small intestine leading to decreased absorption of folic acid and minerals.

  3. [Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. A vision for the paediatrician].

    PubMed

    Palacios Loro, M L; Segura Ramírez, D K; Ordoñez Álvarez, F A; Santos Rodríguez, F

    2015-12-01

    The congenital abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are disorders with a high prevalence in the general population, with urinary tract dilations being the most frequent. CAKUT also account for the most important cause of chronic kidney disease in childhood. This paper focuses on the role of the primary care paediatrician in the diagnosis, assessment, and follow-up of children with CAKUT, with special emphasis on the associated urinary tract infections, the progression toward chronic renal failure, and the genetic basis. PMID:26497631

  4. [The Urinary Tract Diseases Dispensary and Clinic of the Instituto Rubio (1885). 1st hospital service specializing in urologic pathology in the history of Spanish medicine. 1st period. The Instituto Rubio in Hospital de la Princesa (1880-1896).(I)].

    PubMed

    Maganto Pavón, E

    1998-01-01

    In May 1880, a royal decree signed by the Minister of the Interior, F. Romero Robledo, created the Institute of Operative Therapy under the gratuitous direction of Dr. Federico Rubio y Gali. Although it was located at the Hospital de la Princesa of Madrid, it was not dependent on the Institutions of Charity. According to the royal decree, major surgical procedures and specialized operative techniques would be performed at this Institute. Thus, the first teaching hospital was created in Spain, with operating rooms, dispensaries and polyclinics dedicated primarily to surgical specialties which were established at the Institute after 1880. The Institute's section for Diseases of the Urinary Tract, created in October 1885, was entrusted to the Madrid citizen Enrique Suender Rodríguez (1829-1897), the leading specialist in urology in our country at that time (his 100th death anniversary was commemorated last year) and whose assistant was Luis González Bravo y Serrano.

  5. Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction Caused by Isolated Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Abu Saleh, Walid K; Lin, Chun Huie; Reardon, Michael J; Ramlawi, Basel

    2016-08-01

    Isolated sinus of Valsalva aneurysm is a rare occurrence, with an incidence of <1.5% among congenital heart disease repairs in the world. We recount the case of a 64-year-old man who presented with right-sided heart failure symptoms caused by a severely dilated right coronary sinus of Valsalva aneurysm that substantially obstructed the right ventricular outflow tract. Successful surgical repair involved right ventricular outflow tract resection and subcoronary patch repair. PMID:27547152

  6. Treatment of urinary tract stones.

    PubMed

    Wickham, J E

    1993-11-27

    Replacement of open surgery with minimally invasive techniques for treating stones in the renal tract has greatly reduced patients' morbidity and mortality and the period of hospitalisation and convalescence. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy does not require anaesthesia and requires little analgesia so that treatment can be given on an outpatient basis, and there is no wound to heal. Only a small puncture site is needed for percutaneous endoscopic lithotomy, and with the advent of prophylactic antibiotics there are few complications. Of renal stones, about 85% can now be successfully treated by extracorporeal lithotripsy alone, and almost all of the stones too large or hard for lithotripsy can be treated endoscopically, with ultrasonic or electrohydraulic probes being used to fragment the stone. Stones in the upper and lower thirds of the ureter can be treated by extracorporeal lithotripsy, but stones in the middle third, which cannot normally be visualised to allow focusing of the shockwaves, usually require ureteroscopy. Nearly all bladder stones can be treated by transurethral endoscopy with an electrohydraulic probe. Only the largest renal tract stones still require open surgery.

  7. Urinary tract infections in adults

    PubMed Central

    Wei Tan, Chee; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr

    2016-01-01

    A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a collective term for infections that involve any part of the urinary tract. It is one of the most common infections in local primary care. The incidence of UTIs in adult males aged under 50 years is low, with adult women being 30 times more likely than men to develop a UTI. Appropriate classification of UTI into simple or complicated forms guides its management and the ORENUC classification can be used. Diagnosis of a UTI is based on a focused history, with appropriate investigations depending on individual risk factors. Simple uncomplicated cystitis responds very well to oral antibiotics, but complicated UTIs may require early imaging, and referral to the emergency department or hospitalisation to prevent urosepsis may be warranted. Escherichia coli remains the predominant uropathogen in acute community-acquired uncomplicated UTIs and amoxicillin-clavulanate is useful as a first-line antibiotic. Family physicians are capable of managing most UTIs if guided by appropriate history, investigations and appropriate antibiotics to achieve good outcomes and minimise antibiotic resistance. PMID:27662890

  8. Urinary tract infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chee Wei; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr

    2016-09-01

    A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a collective term for infections that involve any part of the urinary tract. It is one of the most common infections in local primary care. The incidence of UTIs in adult males aged under 50 years is low, with adult women being 30 times more likely than men to develop a UTI. Appropriate classification of UTI into simple or complicated forms guides its management and the ORENUC classification can be used. Diagnosis of a UTI is based on a focused history, with appropriate investigations depending on individual risk factors. Simple uncomplicated cystitis responds very well to oral antibiotics, but complicated UTIs may require early imaging, and referral to the emergency department or hospitalisation to prevent urosepsis may be warranted. Escherichia coli remains the predominant uropathogen in acute community-acquired uncomplicated UTIs and amoxicillin-clavulanate is useful as a first-line antibiotic. Family physicians are capable of managing most UTIs if guided by appropriate history, investigations and appropriate antibiotics to achieve good outcomes and minimise antibiotic resistance. PMID:27662890

  9. Right ventricular outflow tract tachycardia worsened during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kambiré, Yibar; Konaté, Lassina; Millogo, Georges Rosario Christian; Sib, Elodie; Amoussou, Myriam; Nebié, Lucie Valérie Adélaïde; Niakara, Ali

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 35 years old woman without underlying heart disease who was diagnosed with a right ventricular outflow tract tachycardia worsened during pregnancy. The diagnosis of ventricular tachycardia was made early in her pregnancy course but the patient had symptoms three months earlier. Her disease course was marked by rhythmic storms during the second trimester of pregnancy that led to three hospitalizations accounting for about two weeks in total. The combination of nadolol 80 mg and flecainide tablets 150 mg improved her rhythmic storms. Radiofrequency allowed a radical cure of this ventricular tachycardia. The patient is now asymptomatic 27 months after radiofrequency treatment. PMID:26090018

  10. [Association between chronic urinary tract infection and primary biliary cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Wang, J B; Wang, S

    2016-06-01

    The etiology of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) remains unclear, and at present, this disease is considered to be caused by the combined effect of genetic factors, infection, autoimmunity, and environmental factors. Since infection is the major cause for PBC, scholars have been focusing on the association between chronic microbial infection. Studies have shown that Escherichia coli is the most common bacterium for urinary tract infection (UTI), and recurrent UTI has been confirmed to be a risk factor for the development and progression of autoimmune liver diseases and is closely associated with PBC. This article investigates the association between UTI and PBC and possible mechanisms. PMID:27465958

  11. Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Amichetti, M; Chiappe, E; Mussari, S; Busana, L; Caffo, O; Botto, F; Galligioni, E; Tomio, L

    1999-01-01

    Genital tract lymphoma is a rare disease; information on diagnosis, treatment and outcome are limited. We report on eight patients affected by non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the genital tract, five from the cervix, two from the vagina and one from the vulva collected between 1987 and 1998. Age at presentation ranged from 36 to 82 (median 67) years. The commonest initial symptom was vaginal bleeding, post coital in 1 patient. Three patients complained of vescical symptoms. Ann Arbor classification was stage IAE for 6 patients. Histology, according to the IWF, was either intermediate grade (4 patients), or high grade (3 patients), not evaluable in one case. Seven patients were treated with chemotherapy (anthracycline based in four) followed by pelvic radiotherapy in five; one patient received irradiation alone. Five patients are currently alive and free of disease with follow-up ranging from 8 to 126 months. Based on our experience in this series, we support a management scheme of combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the genital tract.

  12. Covert operations of uropathogenic Escherichia coli within the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Bower, Jean M; Eto, Danelle S; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2005-01-01

    Entry into host cells is required for many bacterial pathogens to effectively disseminate within a host, avoid immune detection and cause disease. In recent years, many ostensibly extracellular bacteria have been shown to act as opportunistic intracellular pathogens. Among these are strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the primary causative agents of urinary tract infections (UTIs). UPEC are able to transiently invade, survive and multiply within the host cells and tissues constituting the urinary tract. Invasion of host cells by UPEC is promoted independently by distinct virulence factors, including cytotoxic necrotizing factor, Afa/Dr adhesins, and type 1 pili. Here we review the diverse mechanisms and consequences of host cell invasion by UPEC, focusing also on the impact of these processes on the persistence and recurrence of UTIs.

  13. Covert Operations of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli within the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Jean M.; Eto, Danelle S.; Mulvey, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Entry into host cells is required for many bacterial pathogens to effectively disseminate within a host, avoid immune detection and cause disease. In recent years, many ostensibly extracellular bacteria have been shown to act as opportunistic intracellular pathogens. Among these are strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the primary causative agents of urinary tract infections (UTIs). UPEC are able to transiently invade, survive and multiply within the host cells and tissues constituting the urinary tract. Invasion of host cells by UPEC is promoted independently by distinct virulence factors, including cytotoxic necrotizing factor, Afa/Dr adhesins, and type 1 pili. Here we review the diverse mechanisms and consequences of host cell invasion by UPEC, focusing also on the impact of these processes on the persistence and recurrence of UTIs. PMID:15569242

  14. 30 CFR 281.15 - Tract size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tract size. 281.15 Section 281.15 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Leasing Procedures § 281.15 Tract size. The...

  15. An analog integrated-circuit vocal tract.

    PubMed

    Keng Hoong Wee; Turicchia, L; Sarpeshkar, R

    2008-12-01

    We present the first experimental integrated-circuit vocal tract by mapping fluid volume velocity to current, fluid pressure to voltage, and linear and nonlinear mechanical impedances to linear and nonlinear electrical impedances. The 275 muW analog vocal tract chip includes a 16-stage cascade of two-port pi-elements that forms a tunable transmission line, electronically variable impedances, and a current source as the glottal source. A nonlinear resistor models laminar and turbulent flow in the vocal tract. The measured SNR at the output of the analog vocal tract is 64, 66, and 63 dB for the first three formant resonances of a vocal tract with uniform cross-sectional area. The analog vocal tract can be used with auditory processors in a feedback speech locked loop-analogous to a phase locked loop-to implement speech recognition that is potentially robust in noise. Our use of a physiological model of the human vocal tract enables the analog vocal tract chip to synthesize speech signals of interest, using articulatory parameters that are intrinsically compact and linearly interpolatable. PMID:23853134

  16. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  17. Haemophilus influenzae: comparison of respiratory tract isolates with genitourinary tract isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Albritton, W L; Brunton, J L; Meier, M; Bowman, M N; Slaney, L A

    1982-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae isolates recovered from the genitourinary (GU) tract were shown to have a significantly different biotype distribution compared with respiratory tract isolates. Biotype IV strains were recovered more commonly from the GU tract, and most strains were non-serotypable. Antibiotic-susceptible strains isolated from the GU tract more frequently harbored plasmids of less than 10 megadaltons than did antibiotic-susceptible respiratory tract strains. One 2.8-megadalton plasmid resident in a GU tract isolate and one 1.8-megadalton plasmid resident in a respiratory tract isolate were shown to be related to the small ampicillin resistance plasmids previously described in H. influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Haemophilus ducreyi, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This supports the suggestion that these ampicillin resistance plasmids originated by transposition or recombination of the ampicillin transposon (TnA) with cryptic endogenous Haemophilus plasmids. Images PMID:6984048

  18. Pythiosis of the digestive tract in sheep.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Clarice R M; Riet-Correa, Franklin; Pimentel, Luciano A; Garino, Felício; Dantas, Antônio F M; Kommers, Glaucia D; Tabosa, Ivon M; Reis-Júnior, Janildo L

    2012-11-01

    Cutaneous and rhinofacial infections by Pythium insidiosum have previously been reported in sheep in Brazil. In the current study, a new form of pythiosis involving the alimentary tract of 2 nursing lambs from 2 different farms in the semiarid region of Brazil is described. The first lamb showed food regurgitation, lethargy, and anorexia, and died 5 days after the presentation of clinical signs. The second lamb had no history of gastrointestinal disease before death. Necropsy findings were similar in both lambs. The mucosa of the esophagus, reticulum, rumen, omasum, and abomasum showed ulcerated areas covered by yellowish caseous granular exudate. The lesions were transmural and extended to the serosal surfaces, and adhesions were observed between the serosa of the forestomachs and abomasum to the liver and diaphragm. Histologic lesions consisted of pyogranulomatous necrotizing transmural esophagitis, rumenitis, reticulitis, omasitis, and abomasitis with vascular thrombosis and intralesional hyphae. Pythium insidiosum was confirmed as the etiology by immunohistochemistry and culture. The presence of sheep in the vicinity of water ponds during the hot, dry season when forage is not available in the pastures seems to be the main predisposing factor for the occurrence of pythiosis in sheep in the Brazilian semiarid region. PMID:23051827

  19. The Importance of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shboul, Othman A.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility function and its regulation is a complex process involving collaboration and communication of multiple cell types such as enteric neurons, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), and smooth muscle cells. Recent advances in GI research made a better understanding of ICC function and their role in the GI tract, and studies based on different types of techniques have shown that ICC, as an integral part of the GI neuromuscular apparatus, transduce inputs from enteric motor neurons, generate intrinsic electrical rhythmicity in phasic smooth muscles, and have a mechanical sensation ability. Absence or improper function of these cells has been linked to some GI tract disorders. This paper provides a general overview of ICC; their discovery, subtypes, function, locations in the GI tract, and some disorders associated with their loss or disease, and highlights some controversial issues with regard to the importance of ICC in the GI tract. PMID:23319032

  20. Clear cell carcinoma of the female genital tract (not everything is as clear as it seems).

    PubMed

    Offman, Saul L; Longacre, Teri A

    2012-09-01

    Clear cell carcinoma has a storied history in the female genital tract. From the initial designation of ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma as "mesonephroma" to the linkage between vaginal clear cell carcinoma and diethylstilbestrol exposure in utero, gynecologic tract clear cell tumors have puzzled investigators, posed therapeutic dilemmas for oncologists, and otherwise presented major differential diagnostic challenges for pathologists. One of the most common errors in gynecologic pathology is misdiagnosis of clear cell carcinoma, on both frozen section and permanent section. Given the poor response to platinum-based chemotherapy for advanced-stage disease and increased risk of thromboembolism, accurate diagnosis of clear cell carcinoma is important in the female genital tract. This review (1) presents the clinical and pathologic features of female genital tract clear cell carcinomas; (2) highlights recent molecular developments; (3) identifies areas of potential diagnostic confusion; and (4) presents solutions for these diagnostic problems where they exist.

  1. Metastatic Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lanka, Padmavathy; Lanka, Lakshmana Rao; Sylvester, N; Lakshmi, M Dhana; Ethirajan, N

    2014-01-01

    Crohn's disease, first described in 1922, is characterized by segmental granulomatous inflammation of the intestinal tract and frequently involves the cutaneous tissues as well. Cutaneous Crohn's disease (CCD) is synonymous with metastatic Crohn's disease (MSD). A case of CCD, without any gastrointestinal involvement is reported for its rarity.

  2. The effect of vitamin D on lower respiratory tract infections in children

    PubMed Central

    Şişmanlar, Tuğba; Aslan, Ayşe Tana; Gülbahar, Özlem; Özkan, Seçil

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Lower respiratory tract infections including mainly pneumonia represent an important public health problem leading to high mortality and mobidity rates in children aged below five years in developing countries including our country. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with increased risk of rickets/osteomalacia, various cancers, autoimmune diseases, hyperproliferative skin diseases, cardiovascular system diseases and infectious diseases. Vitamin D has an important role in cellular and humoral immunity and pulmonary functions. Vitamin D deficiency and lower respiratory tract infection are common health problems in children in our country and no clinical study investigating the relationship between these problems has been conducted so far. In this case-control study, we aimed to assess the association between vitamin D level and lower respiratory tract infection in children. Material and Methods: Sixty-three children aged between six months and five years with lower respiratory infections and 59 age-matched children who had no history of respiratory symptoms in the last month and no accompanying chronic disease were compared in terms of vitamin D levels. The children in the patient group were also evaluated by the clinical picture. Results: No significant correlation was found between vitamin D levels and lower respiratory tract infection in terms of disease and its severity. However, it was found that vitamin D deficiency/ insufficiency was observed with a high rate in all children included in the study. Conclusions: Although no correlation was found between vitamin D level and lower respiratory tract infection, it is recommended that vitamin D level should be measured in children with lower respiratory tract infection and vitamin D supplementation should be given to all children especially in winter months based on the fact that the level of vitamin D was lower than normal in approximately half of the children included in the study and considering the

  3. Spontaneous Reproductive Tract Lesions in Aged Captive Chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Chaffee, B K; Beck, A P; Owston, M A; Kumar, S; Baze, W B; Magden, E R; Dick, E J; Lammey, M; Abee, C R

    2016-03-01

    Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) have served as an important model for studies of reproductive diseases and aging-related disorders in humans. However, limited information is available about spontaneously occurring reproductive tract lesions in aging chimpanzees. In this article, the authors present histopathologic descriptions of lesions identified in the reproductive tract, including the mammary gland, of 33 female and 34 male aged chimpanzees from 3 captive populations. The most common findings in female chimpanzees were ovarian atrophy, uterine leiomyoma, adenomyosis, and endometrial atrophy. The most common findings in male chimpanzees were seminiferous tubule degeneration and lymphocytic infiltrates in the prostate gland. Other less common lesions included an ovarian granulosa cell tumor, cystic endometrial hyperplasia, an endometrial polyp, uterine artery hypertrophy and mineralization, atrophic vaginitis, mammary gland inflammation, prostatic epithelial hyperplasia, dilated seminal vesicles, a sperm granuloma, and lymphocytic infiltrates in the epididymis. The findings in this study closely mimic changes described in the reproductive tract of aged humans, with the exception of a lack of malignant changes observed in the mammary gland and prostate gland. PMID:26823448

  4. Vesicoureteric reflux and urinary tract infection in children

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, I

    2006-01-01

    An association between vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and renal damage was found in 1960. In 1973, the term reflux nephropathy (RN) was first used to describe the renal damage caused by VUR. Follow up studies show that about 10%–20% of children with RN develop hypertension or end stage renal disease. It is now evident that there is a sex difference in the development of RN. In most males with RN, the kidneys are congenitally abnormal. In females it is an acquired condition, the most severe damage being sustained by recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). The purpose of current UTI guidelines is to identify VUR or any other abnormality of the urinary tract. Since the advent of routine antenatal ultrasonography, there is no longer a need to identify an abnormality of the urinary tract after the first reported UTI. Routine investigations are not required. Recurrent UTIs and a family history of VUR need further evaluation. There is also an urgent need to establish the long term value of prophylactic antibiotics in children with VUR. PMID:16397077

  5. The Gastrointestinal Tract: an Initial Organ of Metabolic Hypertension?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiming; Xiong, Shiqiang; Liu, Daoyan

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is an important global public-health challenge because of its high prevalence and concomitant risks for cardiovascular and kidney diseases. More than 60% of the risk factors for hypertension are associated with metabolic disorders. Furthermore, many metabolic risk factors can directly cause the vascular dysfunction and the elevated blood pressure. Metabolic disorders not only increase the risk for hypertension but also participate in the development of hypertension. Thus, some types of hypertension induced by metabolic disturbances can be defined as metabolic hypertension. However, the pathogenesis of metabolic hypertension remains largely unknown. The gastrointestinal tract is a unique gate through which external food, metabolites, and microbes enter the human body. Thus, metabolism-related risk factors may affect blood pressure through the gastrointestinal tract and alter processes such as taste perception, mucosal absorption, gut hormone homeostasis, GI nerve activity, and gut microbiota. Meanwhile, gastrointestinal intervention through dietary approaches, gut microbiota modification, and metabolic surgery could profoundly improve or remit the vascular dysfunction and metabolic hypertension. It suggests that the GI tract could be an initial organ of metabolic hypertension. However, more clinical and basic studies are necessary to further validate this novel concept. PMID:27160520

  6. Role of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Resected Extrahepatic Biliary Tract Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae Lee, Woo Jin; Woo, Sang Myung; Moon, Sung Ho; Yoo, Tae; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Seong Hoon; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) on locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) for patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer treated with curative resection. Methods and Materials: The study involved 168 patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer undergoing curative resection between August 2001 and April 2009. Of the 168 patients, 115 received adjuvant CRT (CRT group) and 53 did not (no-CRT group). Gender, age, tumor size, histologic differentiation, pre- and postoperative carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level, resection margin, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, T stage, N stage, overall stage, and the use of adjuvant CRT were analyzed to identify the prognostic factors associated with LRC, DFS, and OS. Results: For all patients, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rate was 54.8%, 30.6%, and 33.9%, respectively. On univariate analysis, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rates in the CRT group were significantly better than those in the no-CRT group (58.5% vs. 44.4%, p = .007; 32.1% vs. 26.1%, p = .041; 36.5% vs. 28.2%, p = .049, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that adjuvant CRT was a significant independent prognostic factor for LRC, DFS, and OS (p < .05). Conclusion: Our results have suggested that adjuvant CRT helps achieve LRC and, consequently, improves DFS and OS in patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer.

  7. The postural function of the iliotibial tract.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P.

    1979-01-01

    A new definition of the iliotibial tract is made. Its anatomical and physical characteristics are summarised and its known functions discussed. The various postures adopted by standing Man are looked at and one resting posture is closely analysed. Hence a new role is proposed for the iliotibial tract. In the hip bone a new bony effect of the iliotibial tract is proposed. The presence of this structure is traced in the fossil record and linked to the anthropological evidence of upright posture. Images FIG. 1-8 FIG. 9-16 FIG. 17-25 FIG. 26-34 PMID:475270

  8. Executive summary. Management of urinary tract infection in solid organ transplant recipients: Consensus statement of the Group for the Study of Infection in Transplant Recipients (GESITRA) of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) and the Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI).

    PubMed

    Vidal, Elisa; Cervera, Carlos; Cordero, Elisa; Armiñanzas, Carlos; Carratalá, Jordi; Cisneros, José Miguel; Fariñas, M Carmen; López-Medrano, Francisco; Moreno, Asunción; Muñoz, Patricia; Origüen, Julia; Sabé, Núria; Valerio, Maricela; Torre-Cisneros, Julián

    2015-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are one of the most common infections in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. A systematic review was performed to assess the management of UTI in SOT recipients. Recommendations are provided on the management of asymptomatic bacteriuria, and prophylaxis and treatment of UTI in SOT recipients. The diagnostic-therapeutic management of recurrent UTI and the role of infection in kidney graft rejection or dysfunction are reviewed. Finally, recommendations on antimicrobials and immunosuppressant interactions are also included.

  9. Digestive-tract sarcoidosis: French nationwide case-control study of 25 cases.

    PubMed

    Ghrenassia, Etienne; Mekinian, Arsene; Chapelon-Albric, Catherine; Levy, Pierre; Cosnes, Jacques; Sève, Pascal; Lefèvre, Guillaume; Dhôte, Robin; Launay, David; Prendki, Virginie; Morell-Dubois, Sandrine; Sadoun, Danielle; Mehdaoui, Anas; Soussan, Michael; Bourrier, Anne; Ricard, Laure; Benamouzig, Robert; Valeyre, Dominique; Fain, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Digestive tract sarcoidosis (DTS) is rare and case-series are lacking. In this retrospective case-control study, we aimed to compare the characteristics, outcome, and treatment of patients with DTS, nondigestive tract sarcoidosis (NDTS), and Crohn disease.We included cases of confirmed sarcoidosis, symptomatic digestive tract involvement, and noncaseating granuloma in any digestive tract. Each case was compared with 2 controls with sarcoidoisis without digestive tract involvement and 4 with Crohn disease.We compared 25 cases of DTS to 50 controls with NDTS and 100 controls with Crohn disease. The major digestive clinical features were abdominal pain (56%), weight loss (52%), nausea/vomiting (48%), diarrhea (32%), and digestive bleeding (28%). On endoscopy of DTS, macroscopic lesions were observed in the esophagus (9%), stomach (78%), duodenum (9%), colon, (25%) and rectum (19%). As compared with NDTS, DTS was associated with weight loss (odds ratio [OR] 5.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-23.3) and the absence of thoracic adenopathy (OR 5.0; 95% CI 1.03-25). As compared with Crohn disease, DTS was associated with Afro-Caribbean origin (OR 27; 95% CI 3.6-204) and the absence of ileum or colon macroscopic lesions (OR 62.5; 95% CI 10.3-500). On the last follow-up, patients with DTS showed no need for surgery (versus 31% for patients with Crohn disease; P = 0.0013), and clinical digestive remission was frequent (76% vs. 35% for patients with Crohn disease; P = 0.0002).The differential diagnosis with Crohn disease could be an issue with DTS. Nevertheless, the 2 diseases often have different clinical presentation and outcome. PMID:27442665

  10. Upper tract urothelial carcinoma: epidemiology, high risk populations and detection.

    PubMed

    Redrow, Grant P; Matin, Surena F

    2016-08-01

    Upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is a rare but highly morbid genitourinary malignancy. In 2014 approximately 15,000 new cases were diagnosed in the United States. It accounts for approximately 5-10% of all urothelial cell carcinomas, and 10% of renal tumors. Recent research has increased understanding of the epidemiology of this disease, including several high-risk populations. Environmental exposure to tobacco as well as aristolochic acid, and other carcinogens significantly increase the development of UTUC. Additionally, the genetic condition of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC), also known as Lynch Syndrome (LS) is linked to development of UTUC. Advances in imaging, ureteroscopy, cytological techniques and pathological recognition have allowed for improved detection of primary tumors and recurrent disease. Non-invasive imaging with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now represent the gold standard in imaging detection and surveillance, while technological advances in ureteroscopy allow for minimally invasive approaches to obtain pathologic diagnosis anywhere within the upper tracts. This review will highlight these recent improvements to allow better understanding of who is affected by this rare and morbid disease, as well as the latest developments in detection and surveillance. PMID:27008468

  11. The use of optical imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Beg, Sabina; Wilson, Ana; Ragunath, Krish

    2016-01-01

    With significant advances in the management of gastrointestinal disease there has been a move from diagnosing advanced pathology, to detecting early lesions that are potentially amenable to curative endoscopic treatment. This has required an improvement in diagnostics, with a focus on identifying and characterising subtle mucosal changes. There is great interest in the use of optical technologies to predict histology and enable the formulation of a real-time in vivo diagnosis, a so-called ‘optical biopsy’. The aim of this review is to explore the evidence for the use of the current commercially available imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27429735

  12. Cellular Organization of Neuroimmune Interactions in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Kara Gross; Gershon, Michael David; Bogunovic, Milena

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the largest immune organ; in vertebrates, it is the only organ whose function is controlled by its own intrinsic enteric nervous system (ENS), but it is additionally regulated by extrinsic (sympathetic and parasympathetic) innervation. The GI nervous and immune systems are highly integrated in their common goal, which is to unite digestive functions with protection from ingested environmental threats. This review discusses the physiological relevance of enteric neuroimmune integration by summarizing the current knowledge of evolutionary and developmental pathways, cellular organization, and molecular mechanisms of neuroimmune interactions in health and disease. PMID:27289177

  13. Contemporary Evaluation and Management of Upper Tract Urothelial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mandalapu, Rao S; Matin, Surena F

    2016-08-01

    Radical nephroureterectomy with en bloc bladder cuff excision and regional lymphadenectomy is the gold standard for the management of high-grade and high-risk upper tract urothelial carcinomas. There are a few prospective randomized controlled studies in this uncommon and often aggressive disease to support level-1 management guidelines. However, recent developments in imaging, minimally invasive techniques, lymphatic dissemination, and bladder cancer prevention raise the hope for improved risk stratification and treatments without compromising, and hopefully improving, oncological outcomes. Multimodality approaches in terms of neoadjuvant, adjuvant topical, and systemic chemotherapeutic regimens are promising, with 2 prospective trials either open or in development.

  14. Urinary tract complications with rectal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Beahrs, J R; Beahrs, O H; Beahrs, M M; Leary, F J

    1978-01-01

    The possibility of urinary tract injury should always be considered in the course of anterior resection or combined abdominoperineal resection of the lower colon and rectum. Controlled studies of ureteral and other injuries and fistulas cannot be made; but fortunately, unanticipated damage to the lower urinary tract does not occur often. The surgeon operating in the pelvis should be aware of the problems rarely encountered and should be capable of their management. If a urologic surgeon is available, consultation often is desirable. Prompt intraoperative recognition is most important so remedial procedures can be carried out immediately. Delay in recognition and treatment jeopardizes the patient's course and the function of the urinary tract. Postoperative urinary tract infections should be diagnosed early so prompt treatment can be instituted. PMID:646493

  15. Structural and functional changes of neuronal and glial components of the feline enteric nervous system in cats with chronic inflammatory and non-inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, Sven; Nolte, Ingo; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion

    2011-12-01

    Immunohistochemical examinations of the enteric nervous system (ENS) were performed on biopsies of healthy cats and compared to findings in cats suffering from inflammatory bowel disease or intestinal lymphoma. In lymphocytic-plasmacytic enterocolitis all affected samples had significant reductions in glial fibrillary acidic protein and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and mostly of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) possibly reflecting alterations in enteric glial cells and neurons. In cases with eosinophilic gastroenterocolitis significantly reduced phosphorylated neurofilament (PN) expression was present suggesting a disturbance in neuronal cytoskeleton, whereas cats with fibrosing enteropathy had reduced expression of NSE, non-phosphorylated neurofilaments (NPN), PN and VIP, possibly reflecting neuronal disturbances. In cases with intestinal lymphoma only the reduction in PN and the increase in NPN were obvious suggesting direct damage or interference of neoplastic cells with enteric neurons. In conclusion, structural and functional alterations of the ENS may contribute to clinically evident signs of vomiting and/or diarrhea.

  16. Comparing between results and complications of doing voiding cystourethrogram in the first week following urinary tract infection and in 2-6 weeks after urinary tract infection in children referring to a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Dorreh, Fatemeh; Shahsavari, Someyeh; Pakniyat, Abdolghader

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Urinary tract infection is the most common genitourinary disease in children so about 40% of the children with urinary tract infection suffering from reflux that caused some consequences such as pyelonephritis and kidney parenchymal injury. Objectives: This research was conducted to compare the timing of voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) in children with urinary tract infection in first week and after the first week of urinary tract infection. Patients and Methods: This research is a case-control study that both case and control groups include 208 children from 1 month to 12 years old with the complain of urinary tract infection. In case group, the VCUG was performed at the first week of infection and in control group, the VCUG was performed after the first week of infection. Results: complication such as dysuria was observed in two-thirds of children who VCUG was performed during first week after urinary tract infection. Parents stress in case group was more than the other (P=0.015). For overall, the incidence of reflux in case and control groups was 49.5% and 50%, respectively. The mean of reflux grading in right kidney in case group was lower than control group resulting in significant differences between two groups. Conclusion: According to higher grade of stress in parents and complications due to VCUG at the first week of urinary tract infection, it is suggested that VCUG be conducted on selective patients in the hospital at the first week of urinary tract infection and during hospitalization. PMID:27689111

  17. Role of the Zinc Uptake ABC Transporter of Moraxella catarrhalis in Persistence in the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, Aimee L.; Kirkham, Charmaine; Johnson, Antoinette; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We have identified and characterized a zinc uptake ABC transporter that is present in all strains of M. catarrhalis tested. A mutant in which the znu gene cluster is knocked out shows markedly impaired growth compared to the wild type in medium that contains trace zinc; growth is restored to wild-type levels by supplementing medium with zinc but not with other divalent cations. Thermal-shift assays showed that the purified recombinant substrate binding protein ZnuA binds zinc but does not bind other divalent cations. Invasion assays with human respiratory epithelial cells demonstrated that the zinc ABC transporter of M. catarrhalis is critical for invasion of respiratory epithelial cells, an observation that is especially relevant because an intracellular reservoir of M. catarrhalis is present in the human respiratory tract and this reservoir is important for persistence. The znu knockout mutant showed marked impairment in its capacity to persist in the respiratory tract compared to the wild type in a mouse pulmonary clearance model. We conclude that the zinc uptake ABC transporter mediates uptake of zinc in environments with very low zinc concentrations and is critical for full virulence of M. catarrhalis in the respiratory tract in facilitating intracellular invasion of epithelial cells and persistence in the respiratory tract. PMID:23817618

  18. PABPN1 polyalanine tract deletion and long expansions modify its aggregation pattern and expression.

    PubMed

    Klein, Arnaud F; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Alexander, Christine; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Langelier, Yves; Rouleau, Guy A; Brais, Bernard

    2008-05-01

    Expansions of a (GCN)10/polyalanine tract in the Poly(A) Binding Protein Nuclear 1 (PABPN1) cause autosomal dominant oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). In OPMD muscles, as in models, PABPN1 accumulates in intranuclear inclusions (INIs) whereas in other diseases caused by similar polyalanine expansions, the mutated proteins have been shown to abnormally accumulate in the cytoplasm. This study presents the impact on the subcellular localization of PABPN1 produced by large expansions or deletion of its polyalanine tract. Large tracts of more than 24 alanines result in the nuclear accumulation of PABPN1 in SFRS2-positive functional speckles and a significant decline in cell survival. These large expansions do not cause INIs formation nor do they lead to cytoplasmic accumulation. Deletion of the polyalanine tract induces the formation of aggregates that are located on either side and cross the nuclear membrane, highlighting the possible role of the N-terminal polyalanine tract in PABPN1 nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. We also show that even though five other proteins with polyalanine tracts tend to aggregate when over-expressed they do not co-aggregate with PABPN1 INIs. This study presents the first experimental evidence that there may be a relative loss of function in OPMD by decreasing the availability of PABPN1 through an INI-independent mechanism.

  19. PABPN1 polyalanine tract deletion and long expansions modify its aggregation pattern and expression

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Arnaud F.; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Alexander, Christine; Dicaire, Marie-Josee; Sasseville, A. Marie-Josee; Langelier, Yves; Rouleau, Guy A.; Brais, Bernard

    2008-05-01

    Expansions of a (GCN){sub 10}/polyalanine tract in the Poly(A) Binding Protein Nuclear 1 (PABPN1) cause autosomal dominant oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). In OPMD muscles, as in models, PABPN1 accumulates in intranuclear inclusions (INIs) whereas in other diseases caused by similar polyalanine expansions, the mutated proteins have been shown to abnormally accumulate in the cytoplasm. This study presents the impact on the subcellular localization of PABPN1 produced by large expansions or deletion of its polyalanine tract. Large tracts of more than 24 alanines result in the nuclear accumulation of PABPN1 in SFRS2-positive functional speckles and a significant decline in cell survival. These large expansions do not cause INIs formation nor do they lead to cytoplasmic accumulation. Deletion of the polyalanine tract induces the formation of aggregates that are located on either side and cross the nuclear membrane, highlighting the possible role of the N-terminal polyalanine tract in PABPN1 nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. We also show that even though five other proteins with polyalanine tracts tend to aggregate when over-expressed they do not co-aggregate with PABPN1 INIs. This study presents the first experimental evidence that there may be a relative loss of function in OPMD by decreasing the availability of PABPN1 through an INI-independent mechanism.

  20. Filobacterium rodentium gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of Filobacteriaceae fam. nov. within the phylum Bacteroidetes; includes a microaerobic filamentous bacterium isolated from specimens from diseased rodent respiratory tracts.

    PubMed

    Ike, Fumio; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Kajita, Ayako; Matsushita, Satoru; Kokubo, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Strain SMR-CT, which was originally isolated from rats as the SMR strain, had been named 'cilia-associated respiratory bacillus' ('CAR bacillus'). 'CAR bacillus' was a Gram-stain-negative, filamentous argentophilic bacterium without flagella. SMR-CT grew at 37 °C under microaerobic conditions, showed gliding activity, hydrolysed urea and induced chronic respiratory diseases in rodents. The dominant cellular fatty acids detected were iso-C15 : 0 and anteiso-C15 : 0. The DNA G+C content was 47.7 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed SMR-CT and other strains of 'CAR bacillus' isolated from rodents all belonged to the phylum Bacteroidetes. The nearest known type strain, with 86 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, was Chitinophaga pinensis DSM 2588T in the family Chitinophagaceae. Strain SMR-CT and closely related strains of 'CAR bacillus' rodent-isolates formed a novel family-level clade in the phylum Bacteroidetes with high bootstrap support (98-100 %). Based on these results, we propose a novel family, Filobacteriaceae fam. nov., in the order Sphingobacteriales as well as a novel genus and species, Filobacterium rodentium gen. nov., sp. nov., for strain SMR-CT. The type strain is SMR-CT ( = JCM 19453T = DSM 100392T).

  1. Filobacterium rodentium gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of Filobacteriaceae fam. nov. within the phylum Bacteroidetes; includes a microaerobic filamentous bacterium isolated from specimens from diseased rodent respiratory tracts.

    PubMed

    Ike, Fumio; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Kajita, Ayako; Matsushita, Satoru; Kokubo, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Strain SMR-CT, which was originally isolated from rats as the SMR strain, had been named 'cilia-associated respiratory bacillus' ('CAR bacillus'). 'CAR bacillus' was a Gram-stain-negative, filamentous argentophilic bacterium without flagella. SMR-CT grew at 37 °C under microaerobic conditions, showed gliding activity, hydrolysed urea and induced chronic respiratory diseases in rodents. The dominant cellular fatty acids detected were iso-C15 : 0 and anteiso-C15 : 0. The DNA G+C content was 47.7 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed SMR-CT and other strains of 'CAR bacillus' isolated from rodents all belonged to the phylum Bacteroidetes. The nearest known type strain, with 86 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, was Chitinophaga pinensis DSM 2588T in the family Chitinophagaceae. Strain SMR-CT and closely related strains of 'CAR bacillus' rodent-isolates formed a novel family-level clade in the phylum Bacteroidetes with high bootstrap support (98-100 %). Based on these results, we propose a novel family, Filobacteriaceae fam. nov., in the order Sphingobacteriales as well as a novel genus and species, Filobacterium rodentium gen. nov., sp. nov., for strain SMR-CT. The type strain is SMR-CT ( = JCM 19453T = DSM 100392T). PMID:26476525

  2. [Nitrofurantoin--clinical relevance in uncomplicated urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2014-07-01

    The nitrofuran derivative nitrofurantoin has been used for more than 60 years for the antibacterial therapy of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). Despite its long application, this antibiotic retained good activity against Escherichia coli and some other pathogens of uncomplicated urinary tract infections such as Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterococcus species. Nitrofurantoin therapy has been shown to be accompanied by numerous adverse drug effects. Among these, there are also serious side effects such as pulmonary reactions and polyneuropathy, which mainly occur in long-term use. Recent studies, however, have shown a good efficacy and tolerability of short-term nitrofurantoin therapy comparable to previous established standard therapeutic regimens applying cotrimoxazole or quinolones. Because of these data and the alarming resistance rates of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to cotrimoxazole and quinolones that have been increased markedly in several countries, the clinical significance ofnitrofurantoin has been raised again. In many current treatment guidelines, e. g., the international clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, nitrofurantoin has been recommended as one first-line antibiotic of empiric antibacterial treatment of uncomplicated cystitis in otherwise healthy women. In Germany, however, nitrofurantoin should only be applied if more effective and less risky antibiotics cannot be used. Nitrofurantoin is contraindicated in the last three months of pregnancy and in patients suffering from renal impairment of each degree. Despite compatibility concerns, nitrofurantoin has also been recommended for the re-infection prophylaxis of recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in Germany and several other countries.

  3. Enterococcal urinary tract infections in a university hospital: clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Barros, Milton; Martinelli, Reinaldo; Rocha, Heonir

    2009-08-01

    Although urinary tract infections (UTI) represent the most common infection caused by enterococci, some aspects remain to be fully clarified. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics present in UTI caused by Enterococcus spp. in patients followed up at the Prof. Edgard Santos Teaching Hospital of the Federal University of Bahia. All patients consecutively examined between 1997 and 2005, who received a diagnosis of UTI caused by Enterococcus spp. were included in the study. UTI was defined as the presence of > or = 10(5) colony-forming units per mL of urine. Standard microbiological techniques were used. During the study period, 6.2% of the urine cultures were positive for Enterococcus spp. The mean age of the patients was 48.9 years and 57% were male. At initial evaluation, 13% of the patients had complaints suggestive of UTI. Nineteen patients had a history consistent with obstructive uropathy and 26 with neurogenic bladder. At final evaluation, UTI was the diagnosis in 48 patients. In 36 patients (29%), the primary diagnosis was related to urogenital diseases, consisting of obstructive uropathy in 23 of these cases, while in 32 patients (25.8%) primary diagnosis was related to neurologic diseases, frequently neurogenic bladder. UTI caused by Enterococcus spp. is not infrequent, is usually associated with few or no symptoms and occurs in sick patients who have anatomical or functional obstructive uropathy associated or not with urinary tract catheterization or instrumentation. The diagnosis of enterococcal UTI may indicate a urinary tract abnormality yet to be diagnosed. PMID:20231994

  4. [Nitrofurantoin--clinical relevance in uncomplicated urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2014-07-01

    The nitrofuran derivative nitrofurantoin has been used for more than 60 years for the antibacterial therapy of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). Despite its long application, this antibiotic retained good activity against Escherichia coli and some other pathogens of uncomplicated urinary tract infections such as Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterococcus species. Nitrofurantoin therapy has been shown to be accompanied by numerous adverse drug effects. Among these, there are also serious side effects such as pulmonary reactions and polyneuropathy, which mainly occur in long-term use. Recent studies, however, have shown a good efficacy and tolerability of short-term nitrofurantoin therapy comparable to previous established standard therapeutic regimens applying cotrimoxazole or quinolones. Because of these data and the alarming resistance rates of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to cotrimoxazole and quinolones that have been increased markedly in several countries, the clinical significance ofnitrofurantoin has been raised again. In many current treatment guidelines, e. g., the international clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, nitrofurantoin has been recommended as one first-line antibiotic of empiric antibacterial treatment of uncomplicated cystitis in otherwise healthy women. In Germany, however, nitrofurantoin should only be applied if more effective and less risky antibiotics cannot be used. Nitrofurantoin is contraindicated in the last three months of pregnancy and in patients suffering from renal impairment of each degree. Despite compatibility concerns, nitrofurantoin has also been recommended for the re-infection prophylaxis of recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in Germany and several other countries. PMID:25065160

  5. Aspartame, low-calorie sweeteners and disease: regulatory safety and epidemiological issues.

    PubMed

    Marinovich, Marina; Galli, Corrado L; Bosetti, Cristina; Gallus, Silvano; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    Aspartame is a synthetic sweetener that has been used safely in food for more than 30 years. Its safety has been evaluated by various regulatory agencies in accordance with procedures internationally recognized, and decisions have been revised and updated regularly. The present review summarizes the most relevant conclusions of epidemiological studies concerning the use of low-calorie sweeteners (mainly aspartame), published between January 1990 and November 2012. In the Nurses' Health study and the Health Professionals Followup study some excess risk of Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma was found in men but not in women; no association was found with leukemia. In the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, there was no association between aspartame and haematopoietic neoplasms. US case-control studies of brain and haematopoietic neoplasms also showed no association. The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study and case-control studies from California showed no association with pancreatic cancer, and a case-control study from Denmark found no relation with breast cancer risk. Italian case-control studies conducted in 1991-2008 reported no consistent association for cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract, digestive tract, breast, endometrium, ovary, prostate, and kidney. Low calorie sweeteners were not consistently related to vascular events and preterm deliveries.

  6. [Urinary tract infections in pregnancy: when to treat, how to treat, and what to treat with].

    PubMed

    Kladenský, J

    2012-04-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) in pregnant women are a relatively frequent occurrence and the spectrum of these infections ranges from lower urinary tract disease (asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis) to upper urinary tract disease (acute pyelonephritis). Anatomical and functional changes in the urinary tract in pregnancy result in significantly higher susceptibility to progression of the infection from asymptomatic bacteriuria to the stage of acute pyelonephritis. Untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy leads, in as much as 40%, to the development of acute pyelonephritis with all the subsequent negative effects not only for the woman herself, but particularly for the fetus. Bacteriuria in pregnancy accounts for a significantly higher number of newborns with a low birth weight, low gestational age and higher neonatal mortality rate. Therefore, it is necessary to perform screening for bacteriuria in pregnant women and, when the finding is positive, to treat this bacteriuria. The selection of an appropriate antimicrobial agent to treat urinary tract infection in pregnancy is limited by the safety of a given drug not only for the woman, but particularly for the fetus. The article provides an overview of medications that can be safely used throughout the pregnancy or only in certain stages of pregnancy. The selection of an appropriate antibiotic should always be preceded by the result of urine culture. The article presents the principles and rules for treating asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis and acute pyelonephritis in pregnant women. PMID:22702077

  7. The otolaryngologic manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): a clinical investigation of 225 patients using ambulatory 24-hour pH monitoring and an experimental investigation of the role of acid and pepsin in the development of laryngeal injury.

    PubMed

    Koufman, J A

    1991-04-01

    Occult (silent) gastroesophageal reflux disease (GER, GERD) is believed to be an important etiologic factor in the development of many inflammatory and neoplastic disorders of the upper aerodigestive tract. In order ot test this hypothesis, a human study and an animal study were performed. The human study consisted primarily of applying a new diagnostic technique (double-probe pH monitoring) to a population of otolaryngology patients with GERD to determine the incidence of overt and occult GERD. The animal study consisted of experiments to evaluate the potential damaging effects of intermittent GER on the larynx. Two hundred twenty-five consecutive patients with otolaryngologic disorders having suspected GERD evaluated from 1985 through 1988 are reported. Ambulatory 24-hour intraesophageal pH monitoring was performed in 197; of those, 81% underwent double-probe pH monitoring, with the second pH probe being placed in the hypopharynx at the laryngeal inlet. Seventy percent of the patients also underwent barium esophagography with videofluoroscopy. The patient population was divided into seven diagnostic subgroups: carcinoma of the larynx (n = 31), laryngeal and tracheal stenosis (n = 33), reflux laryngitis (n = 61), globus pharyngeus (n = 27), dysphagia (n = 25), chronic cough (n = 30), and a group with miscellaneous disorders (n = 18). The most common symptoms were hoarseness (71%), cough (51%), globus (47%), and throat clearing (42%). Only 43% of the patients had gastrointestinal symptoms (heartburn or acid regurgitation). Thus, by traditional symptomatology, GER was occult or silent in the majority of the study population. Twenty-eight patients (12%) refused or could not tolerate pH monitoring. Of the patients undergoing diagnostic pH monitoring, 62% had abnormal esophageal pH studies, and 30% demonstrated reflux into the pharynx. The results of diagnostic pH monitoring for each of the subgroups were as follows (percentage with abnormal studies): carcinoma (71

  8. Isolation and characterization of an atypical Listeria monocytogenes associated with a canine urinary tract infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes, a well-described cause of encephalitis and abortion in ruminants and of food-borne illness in humans, is rarely associated with disease in companion animals. A case of urinary tract infection associated with an atypical, weakly hemolytic L. monocytogenes strain is described i...

  9. [Physiology of microflora in the digestive tract].

    PubMed

    Zboril, V

    2002-01-01

    The microflora of the digestive tract is a complex microbial ecosystem, well balanced, which in an aboral direction undergoes specific changes as to the ratio of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms the functions of which supplement each other--the aerobes ensure for the whole ecosystem the scavenger effect. The microbial profile of the digestive tract is typical by the absence of anaerobic microorganisms in the stomach and conversely their absolute predominance in the distal colon. The basic physiological functions of the microflora of the digestive tract can be characterized as follows: 1. microbial barrier against pathogens and potential pathogens, 2. formation of products of the microflora and their influence on the blood supply of the intestinal mucosa and peristaltics, 3. stimulation of the immune system in the gut, 4. reduction of bacterial translocation, 5. production of vitamins. To this problem in the world literature, contrary to ours, deserved attention has been paid for many years. Knowledge of the problem opens the door to expedient manipulation with the microbial flora of the digestive tract by the use of diet or prebiotics, probiotics as well as antibiotic treatment. The author presents a summary of basic findings which developed on the subject of physiological microflora of the digestive tract successively up to their present shape.

  10. Tools for the tract: understanding the functionality of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Venema, Koen; de Vos, Willem M; Smidt, Hauke

    2009-07-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract comprises a series of complex and dynamic organs ranging from the stomach to the distal colon, which harbor immense microbial assemblages that are known to be vital for human health. Until recently, most of the details concerning our gut microbiota remained obscure. Over the past several years, however, a number of crucial technological and conceptual innovations have been introduced to shed more light on the composition and functionality of human gut microbiota. Recently developed high throughput approaches, including next-generation sequencing technologies and phylogenetic microarrays targeting ribosomal RNA gene sequences, allow for comprehensive analysis of the diversity and dynamics of the gut microbiota composition. Nevertheless, most of the microbes especially in the human large intestine still remain uncultured, and the in situ functions of distinct groups of the gut microbiota are therefore largely unknown, but pivotal to the understanding of their role in human physiology. Apart from functional and metagenomics approaches, stable isotope probing is a promising tool to link the metabolic activity and diversity of microbial communities, including yet uncultured microbes, in a complex environment. Advancements in current stable isotope probing approaches integrated with the application of high-throughput diagnostic microarray-based phylogenetic profiling and metabolic flux analysis should facilitate the understanding of human microbial ecology and will enable the development of innovative strategies to treat or prevent intestinal diseases of as yet unknown etiology.

  11. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Axiotis, C A; Merino, M J; Duray, P H

    1991-03-15

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) of the female genital tract is rare. Four new cases are reported, and there is a review of the 38 cases in the literature. This disease may involve the vulva, vagina, cervix, endometrium, and ovary. Four distinct patient groups, segregated on the basis of initial presentation and subsequent anatomic extent of disease, were categorized as follows: (1) "pure" genital LCH, (2) genital LCH with subsequent multi-organ involvement, (3) oral or cutaneous LCH with subsequent genital and multi-organ involvement, and (4) diabetes insipidus with subsequent genital and multi-organ disease. Although involvement of the genital tract can occur at any age, it is most common in young adulthood. Clinically, LCH may mimic either primary neoplasia or various inflammatory lesions; the major pathologic differential diagnosis is venereal and other inflammatory diseases. The pure genital form may have a distinct nosologic position in the spectrum of LCH similar to the "pure," self-limited cutaneous histiocytosis seen in infants. There is no correlation between histologic findings and the outcome of the genital lesions. There is also no correlation between clinical presentation and/or the extent of involvement and outcome of genital lesions; complete regression, partial improvement, persistent lesions, and recurrences were seen in all four groups of patients. The treatment of genital LCH is not well defined and is highly individualized. Therapy has included surgery, radiation, topical corticosteroids, topical nitrogen mustard, systemic chemotherapy, and combination therapy; mixed results were obtained with all treatment modalities. Although no modality has been shown to yield a superior outcome, complete surgical excision is advocated as initial therapy.

  12. [Ultrasound diagnostics of upper urinary tract calculi].

    PubMed

    Belyĭ, L E

    2006-01-01

    The review is dedicated to ultrasonography of the upper urinary tract in patients with nephrolithiasis. Ultrasonographic semiotics of urolithiasis, the ability of unlrasonography to detect nephrolithiasis, and methods of the optimization of these diagnostic techniques in patients with upper urinary tract calculi are covered. The author discusses difficulties that may be faced while differentiating between nephrolithiasis and such conditions as spongious kidney, nephrocalcinosis, calcification of renal papillae, cysts, tumors, and vascular walls, as well as other kinds of renal calcification, associated with ultrasonographic acoustic path phenomenon. The advantages and disadvantages of ultrasonography in cases of X-ray urolithiasis are evaluated in the paper. The article describes hardships in ultrasound visualization of ureteral calculi causing acute upper urinary tract obstruction, and the ways of getting over them.

  13. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin for upper tract urothelial cancer: is there a role?

    PubMed

    Rastinehad, Ardeshir R; Smith, Arthur D

    2009-04-01

    Since the first reported case of using adjuvant topical immunotherapy utilizing bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) was published by Herr and associates, several institutions have utilized numerous agents for topical infusion therapies (BCG, Mitomycin, Epirubicin, Thiotepa or combination therapy of BCG/INF) as adjuncts in the treatment of upper tract papillary transitional cell carcinoma. A comprehensive review of the current data in the treatment of upper tract transitional cell carcinoma (Ta/T1 disease) with adjuvant BCG therapy was completed. Currently, the efficacy of adjuvant BCG therapy was not demonstrated.

  14. Animal Models for Studying Female Genital Tract Infection with Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Kalmar, Isabelle; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen. It is the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted disease in the world, with more than 100 million new cases of genital tract infections with C. trachomatis occurring each year. Animal models are indispensable for the study of C. trachomatis infections and the development and evaluation of candidate vaccines. In this paper, the most commonly used animal models to study female genital tract infections with C. trachomatis will be reviewed, namely, the mouse, guinea pig, and nonhuman primate models. Additionally, we will focus on the more recently developed pig model. PMID:23836817

  15. How botulinum toxin in neurogenic detrusor overactivity can reduce upper urinary tract damage?

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Maximilien; Grise, Philippe; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin are the cornerstone of medical treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The primary aim of this treatment is to ensure a low pressure regimen in the urinary bladder, but the mechanisms leading to long-term protection of the urinary tract remain poorly understood. In this paper, we highlight the potential benefits of intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin regarding local effects on the bladder structures, urinary tract infections, stone disease, vesico ureteral reflux, hydronephrosis, renal function based on a comprehensive literature review. PMID:26981445

  16. Botulinum toxin for the lower urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Kuo, Hann-Chorng; Chancellor, Michael B

    2010-04-01

    Botulinum toxins (BoNTs) are known for their ability to potently and selectively modulate neurotransmission for successful long-term treatment of muscle hypercontractility. Recent studies suggest that BoNT has effects on modulation of sensory processing, inflammation and glandular function. Urologists and urogynaecologists have become interested in the potential application of BoNTs in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms, including detrusor and sphincter overactivity, bladder hypersensitivity, interstitial cystitis/painful bladder symptoms and benign prostatic hyperplasia. We review the biological action of BoNT in bladder and prostate, and present the techniques and results of the clinical studies with BoNT in the lower urinary tract.

  17. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections Management in Women

    PubMed Central

    Al-Badr, Ahmed; Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most frequent clinical bacterial infections in women, accounting for nearly 25% of all infections. Around 50–60% of women will develop UTIs in their lifetimes. Escherichia coli is the organism that causes UTIs in most patients. Recurrent UTIs (RUTI) are mainly caused by reinfection by the same pathogen. Having frequent sexual intercourse is one of the greatest risk factors for RUTIs. In a subgroup of individuals with coexisting morbid conditions, complicated RUTIs can lead to upper tract infections or urosepsis. Although the initial treatment is antimicrobial therapy, use of different prophylactic regimens and alternative strategies are available to reduce exposure to antibiotics. PMID:23984019

  18. Urinary tract infections: treatment/comparative therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Olin, Shelly J; Bartges, Joseph W

    2015-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) occurs when there is compromise of host defense mechanisms and a virulent microbe adheres, multiplies, and persists in a portion of the urinary tract. Most commonly, UTI is caused by bacteria, but fungi and viruses are possible. Urine culture and sensitivity are the gold standards for diagnosis of bacterial UTI. Identifying the location of infection (eg, bladder, kidney, prostate) as well as comorbidities (eg, diabetes mellitus, immunosuppression) is essential to guide the diagnostic and therapeutic plan. Antimicrobial agents are the mainstay of therapy for bacterial UTI and selected ideally based on culture and sensitivity.

  19. Papillomaviral Infections of the Female Genital Tract

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Malcolm G.

    1992-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common organism to infect the human genital tract, affecting as much as half, or more, of the sexually active population. This virus has become widely recognized through the well publicized relationship with genital tract neoplasia and through new diagnostic technologies, such as monoclonal antibody analysis, DNA hybridization, and the polymerase chain reaction. This paper describes the full spectrum of HPV infections, starting with pathogenesis and continuing to clinical manifestations, and discusses significance, diagnosis, and management. PMID:21221347

  20. Management of biliary tract stones in heart transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Milas, M; Ricketts, R R; Amerson, J R; Kanter, K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report their experience with biliary tract stones in adult and pediatric heart transplant patients, and review the current literature relative to this problem. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Prior studies in adults have noted that heart transplant patients frequently have cholelithiasis, but offer no consensus about treatment strategy. Few studies exist for pediatric heart transplant patients. A higher rate of hemolysis and cyclosporine-induced changes in bile metabolism may contribute to lithogenesis in this population. METHODS: A chart review was conducted for 211 patients who had heart transplants between January 1988 and September 1994 to determine prevalence of biliary tract stones, management strategies used, and outcome. RESULTS: Of 175 long-term heart transplant survivors, 52 (29.7%) had stones detected: 32.8% of adults (47/143) and 15.6% of children (5/32). The majority of patients (31) were diagnosed 4 months (mean) after transplantation; cholelithiasis developed in 10 of these patients (32%) within 11 months (median) after a negative ultrasound. Symptoms developed in 45% of patients. All patients underwent either elective (36) or urgent (6) cholecystectomy via an open (32) or laparoscopic (10) approach, or endoscopy for common bile duct stones (2). There were no deaths or complications during a follow-up period of up to 7 years. CONCLUSION: Heart transplant patients have a high prevalence of symptomatic biliary tract stone disease. They can be treated safely via an open or laparoscopic approach after transplantation. The authors recommend routine gallbladder ultrasound screening and elective cholecystectomy in the post-transplant period if stones are detected. Images Figure 4. PMID:8645048

  1. MEF2C regulates outflow tract alignment and transcriptional control of Tdgf1.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Ralston M; Harris, Ian S; Jaehnig, Eric J; Sauls, Kimberly; Sinha, Tanvi; Rojas, Anabel; Schachterle, William; McCulley, David J; Norris, Russell A; Black, Brian L

    2016-03-01

    Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defects in humans, and those that affect the proper alignment of the outflow tracts and septation of the ventricles are a highly significant cause of morbidity and mortality in infants. A late differentiating population of cardiac progenitors, referred to as the anterior second heart field (AHF), gives rise to the outflow tract and the majority of the right ventricle and provides an embryological context for understanding cardiac outflow tract alignment and membranous ventricular septal defects. However, the transcriptional pathways controlling AHF development and their roles in congenital heart defects remain incompletely elucidated. Here, we inactivated the gene encoding the transcription factor MEF2C in the AHF in mice. Loss of Mef2c function in the AHF results in a spectrum of outflow tract alignment defects ranging from overriding aorta to double-outlet right ventricle and dextro-transposition of the great arteries. We identify Tdgf1, which encodes a Nodal co-receptor (also known as Cripto), as a direct transcriptional target of MEF2C in the outflow tract via an AHF-restricted Tdgf1 enhancer. Importantly, both the MEF2C and TDGF1 genes are associated with congenital heart defects in humans. Thus, these studies establish a direct transcriptional pathway between the core cardiac transcription factor MEF2C and the human congenital heart disease gene TDGF1. Moreover, we found a range of outflow tract alignment defects resulting from a single genetic lesion, supporting the idea that AHF-derived outflow tract alignment defects may constitute an embryological spectrum rather than distinct anomalies. PMID:26811383

  2. Expanded HOXA13 polyalanine tracts in a monotreme.

    PubMed

    Lehoczky, Jessica A; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2008-01-01

    The N-terminal region of human HOXA13 has seven discrete polyalanine tracts. Our previous analysis of these tracts in multiple major vertebrate clades suggested that three are mammal-specific. We now report the N-terminal HOXA13 repetitive tract structures in the monotreme Tachyglossus aculeatus (echidna). Contrary to our expectations, echidna HOXA13 possesses a unique set of polyalanine tracts and an unprecedented polyglycine tract. The data support the conclusion that the emergence of expanded polyalanine tracts in proteins occurred very early in the stem lineage that gave rise to mammals, between 162 and 315 Ma. PMID:18638320

  3. NUT midline carcinomas of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A; Westra, William H

    2012-08-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a highly lethal tumor defined by translocations involving the NUT gene on chromosome 15q14. NMC involves midline structures including the sinonasal tract, but its overall incidence at this midline site and its full morphologic profile are largely unknown because sinonasal tumors are not routinely tested for the NUT gene translocation. The recent availability of an immunohistochemical probe for the NUT protein now permits a more complete characterization of sinonasal NMCs. The archival files of The Johns Hopkins Hospital Surgical Pathology were searched for all cases of primary sinonasal carcinomas diagnosed from 1995 to 2011. Tissue microarrays were constructed, and NUT immunohistochemical analysis was performed. All NUT-positive cases underwent a more detailed microscopic and immunohistochemical analysis. Among 151 primary sinonasal carcinomas, only 3 (2%) were NUT positive. NUT positivity was detected in 2 of 13 (15%) carcinomas diagnosed as sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma and in 1 of 87 (1%) carcinomas diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. All occurred in men (26, 33, and 48 y of age). The NMCs grew as nests and sheets of cells with a high mitotic rate and extensive necrosis. Two were entirely undifferentiated, and 1 tumor showed abrupt areas of squamous differentiation. Each case had areas of cell spindling, and 2 were heavily infiltrated by neutrophils. Immunohistochemical staining was observed for cytokeratins (3 of 3), epithelial membrane antigen (3 of 3), p63 (2 of 3), CD34 (1 of 3), and synaptophysin (1 of 3). All patients died of the disease (survival time range, 8 to 16 mo; mean, 12 mo) despite combined surgery and chemoradiation. NMC represents a rare form of primary sinonasal carcinoma, but its incidence is significantly increased in those carcinomas that exhibit an undifferentiated component. Indiscriminant analysis for evidence of the NUT translocation is unwarranted. Instead, NUT analysis can be restricted to

  4. Trial of Postoperative Radiation, Cisplatin, and Panitumumab in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Cancer of Head; Cancer of Head and Neck; Cancer of Neck; Cancer of the Head; Cancer of the Head and Neck; Cancer of the Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Head Cancer; Head Neoplasms; Head, Neck Neoplasms; Neck Cancer; Neck Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Head; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Neoplasms, Neck; Neoplasms, Upper Aerodigestive Tract; UADT Neoplasms; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Neoplasms

  5. Metachronous urothelial carcinoma of whole urinary tract in a dialysis-dependent patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YIMIN; JIN, BAIYE; YAO, XIAOLIN

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported an association between end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and malignancy. The predominant malignant tumor that occurs in patients with ESRD in Asian countries is urothelial carcinoma (UC). According to recent research, cases of UC in dialysis-dependent patients are associated with higher recurrence rates and more aggressive biological behavior compared with patients without ESRD. The necessity of 1-step total urinary tract exenteration for dialysis-dependent patients with UC is advocated by certain studies. The current study reports a case of metachronous bladder cancer and bilateral upper urinary tract tumor in a dialysis-dependent patient. Three separate surgeries were performed to remove the bladder, and left and right urinary tract, respectively. The question of whether the stepwise strategy or the 1-step surgery should be selected for such special cases remains in debate. PMID:27313734

  6. Revision of the ICRP dosimetric model for the human respiratory tract

    SciTech Connect

    Bair, W.J.

    1990-12-01

    Although the dosimetric model of the respiratory tract used in ICRP Publication 30 had not been shown to be seriously deficient for the purpose of calculating Annual Limits on Intake (ALIs) for workers, the availability of new information led the ICRP in 1984 to create a special Task Group to review the dosimetric model of the respiratory tract and, if justified, propose revisions or a new model. The Task Group directed its efforts toward improving the model used in Publication 30 rather than developing a completely new model. The objective was a model that would facilitate calculation of biologically meaningful doses; be consistent with morphological, physiological, and radiobiological characteristics of the respiratory tract; incorporate current knowledge; meet all radiation protection needs; be user friendly by not being unnecessarily sophisticated; be adaptable to development of computer software for calculation of relevant radiation doses from knowledge of a few readily measured exposure parameters; be equally useful for assessment purposes as for calculating ALIs; be applicable to all members of the world population; and consider the influence of smoking, air pollutants, and diseases of the inhalation, deposition, and clearance of radioactive particles from the respiratory tract. The model provides for calculation of a committed dose equivalent for each region, adjusted for the relative cancer sensitivity of that region, and for the summing of these to yield a committed dose equivalent for the entire respiratory tract. 3 figs.

  7. Recurrent urinary tract infections in children.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. W.; Lirenman, D. S.; Anderson, J. D.; Nielsen, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are common in children and present in various ways. Diagnosis is based on findings of pyuria and bacteriuria. Management includes adequate and timely investigation, appropriate antibiotics, treatment of underlying contributing factors, and follow-up advice. Images p1625-a p1628-a p1629-a PMID:8348023

  8. 30 CFR 281.15 - Tract size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tract size. 281.15 Section 281.15 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF...

  9. Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs is limited. In order to investigate archaeal community structure, samples were taken from the cecum and proximal colon of finishing pigs (24) fed diets with either corn or solvent extracted corn germ meal (CGM). Corn germ meal feeding began in w...

  10. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery for biliary tract disease

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Shu-Hung; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS), or laparoendoscopic single-site surgery, has been employed in various fields to minimize traumatic effects over the last two decades. Single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC) has been the most frequently studied SILS to date. Hundreds of studies on SILC have failed to present conclusive results. Most randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been small in scale and have been conducted under ideal operative conditions. The role of SILC in complicated scenarios remains uncertain. As common bile duct exploration (CBDE) methods have been used for more than one hundred years, laparoscopic CBDE (LCBDE) has emerged as an effective, demanding, and infrequent technique employed during the laparoscopic era. Likewise, laparoscopic biliary-enteric anastomosis is difficult to carry out, with only a few studies have been published on the approach. The application of SILS to CBDE and biliary-enteric anastomosis is extremely rare, and such innovative procedures are only carried out by a number of specialized groups across the globe. Herein we present a thorough and detailed analysis of SILC in terms of operative techniques, training and learning curves, safety and efficacy levels, recovery trends, and costs by reviewing RCTs conducted over the past three years and two recently updated meta-analyses. All existing literature on single-incision LCBDE and single-incision laparoscopic hepaticojejunostomy has been reviewed to describe these two demanding techniques. PMID:26811621

  11. Endoscopic electrosurgical papillotomy and manometry in biliary tract disease.

    PubMed

    Geenen, J E; Hogan, W J; Shaffer, R D; Stewart, E T; Dodds, W J; Arndorfer, R C

    1977-05-01

    Endoscopic papillotomy was performed in 13 patients after cholecystectomy for retained or recurrent common bile duct calculi (11 patients) and a clinical picture suggesting papillary stenosis (two patients). Following endoscopic papillotomy, ten of the 11 patients spontaneously passed common bile duct (CBD) stones verified on repeated endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) study. One patient failed to pass a large CBD calculus; one patient experienced cholangitis three months after in inadequate papillotomy and required operative intervention. Endoscopic papillotomy substantially decreased the pressure gradient existing between the CBD and the duodenum in all five patients studied with ERCP manometry. Endoscopic papillotomy is a relatively safe and effective procedure for postcholecystectomy patients with retained or recurrent CBD stones. The majority of CBD stones will pass spontaneously if the papillotomy is adequate.

  12. Radiology and treatment of urinary tract stone disease.

    PubMed

    Bush, W H

    1992-04-01

    Renal and ureteral calculi are treated primarily using extracorporeal lithotripsy, with percutaneous nephrostolithotomy retaining an important role for the treatment of large stones and complex situations. Aspects of pretherapy evaluation are reviewed. The vast majority of calculi 5 mm or less in diameter in the mid and lower ureter will pass spontaneously; in patients with acute ureteral obstruction, lower-osmolar nonionic contrast for urography caused as much discomfort as conventional high-osmolar contrast. Treatment planning for extracorporeal lithotripsy has changed in that internal stenting is no longer routinely recommended. Milk-of-calcium and calyceal diverticular stones respond poorly to extracorporeal lithotripsy. The access route used for percutaneous stone removal varies among investigators. Some advocate an intercostal approach for up to one third of patients; substantial complications occur with placement of a track above the 11th rib. Sepsis develops after percutaneous nephrostomy in up to 21% of patients, but the risk of sepsis can be decreased significantly by the administration of antibiotics during and after the procedure. Complications of extracorporeal lithotripsy include renal hematoma (especially if the patient is hypertensive or is taking aspirin), regional organ injury, and bacteremia. Although originally feared to occur frequently, hypertension occurring after or caused by extracorporeal lithotripsy was not confirmed to be a major problem. The incidence in a 2-year postlithotripsy follow-up was no greater than that for control subjects. PMID:1554585

  13. Diseases of the digestive tract: is prevention possible and feasible?

    PubMed

    Malagelada, Juan-R

    2011-01-01

    Prevention is and will remain a major goal of medicine and gastroenterology. Economics will have a major influence. Preventive approaches will need to prove a favorable cost-benefit ratio before they are authorized for broad implementation. Personalized medicine is just starting, but undoubtedly it will accelerate, gain relevance and become an integral part of our clinical practice. Physicians in general and gastroenterologists specifically will need to seriously contemplate retraining/refocusing to gain competence in genetic/proteomic evaluation of individuals, or risk a significant degree of obsolescence. PMID:21734393

  14. [Respiratory tract diseases in coal miners. I. Pneumoconiosis].

    PubMed

    Szymczykiewicz, K

    1979-01-01

    In two mines, "A"--in Lower Silesia with low, inclined coal seam and lesser degree of output mechanization and "B"--in the Silesia-Dabrowa Basin with high coal seams and a great degree of output mechanization), work conditions were examined (dust concentration, chemical composition of dust, and microclimate) and medical examinations of underground miners were done. The examinations involved: mine "A"--2094 miners, mine "B"--1846 miners. The two examined populations were almost identical as regards age and length of employment. The number of miners working in bad conditions in the "A" mine was twice as great as that of miners working in bad conditions in the "B" mine. In dust collected on work--stands in the "A" mine the amount of copper, chromium and vanadium was 3 times that in the "B" mine and in the "A" mine approximately 40% more nickel was found in the dust than in the "B" mine. Average dust concentration on work stands was 10 times greater in the "B" mine than in the "A" mine. The rate of pneumoconiosis was on average 3.7% in both populations, in the "A" mine--6.2% and in the "B" mine--0.8%. In currently working miners no nodular changes, like PMF, were found. The rate of pneumoconiosis significantly varied with the length of employment. In 71.7% miners changes in EKG were found, in the "B" mine the number of those with changes being about 10% greater than in those in the "A" mine. In miners from the "A" mine, mostly changes in conduction (17.1%) were found; in the "B" mine these changes were twice less frequent.

  15. Microphysiological modeling of the reproductive tract: a fertile endeavor

    PubMed Central

    Eddie, Sharon L.; Kim, J. Julie; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Burdette, Joanna E.

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical toxicity testing in animal models is a cornerstone of the drug development process, yet it is often unable to predict adverse effects and tolerability issues in human subjects. Species-specific responses to investigational drugs has led researchers to utilize human tissues and cells to better estimate human toxicity. Unfortunately, human cell-derived models are imperfect because toxicity is assessed in isolation, removed from the normal physiologic microenvironment. Microphysiological modeling, often referred to as ‘organ-on-a-chip’ or ‘human-on-a-chip’ places human tissue into a microfluidic system that mimics the complexity of human in vivo physiology, thereby allowing for toxicity testing on several cell types, tissues, and organs within a more biologically relevant environment. Here we describe important concepts when developing a repro-on-a-chip model. The development of female and male reproductive microfluidic systems is critical to sex-based in vitro toxicity and drug testing. This review addresses the biological and physiological aspects of the male and female reproductive systems in vivo and what should be considered when designing a microphysiological human-on-a-chip model. Additionally, interactions between the reproductive tract and other systems are explored, focusing on the impact of factors and hormones produced by the reproductive tract and disease pathophysiology. PMID:24737736

  16. Localization of influenza virus sialoreceptors in equine respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Scocco, Paola; Pedini, Vera

    2008-08-01

    This study was performed to identify the equine respiratory tract areas which express the specific receptor for equine influenza virus; findings may be useful to provide new ways to treat the infectious disease. The present work aims to visualize in situ the presence of sialoderivatives in the horse respiratory tract in order to localize sialoderivatives acting as influenza virus receptors. To this purpose, nasal mucosae, trachea, bronchus and lung parenchyma were removed from 8 mature horses of both sexes. We performed sialic acid characterization by means of mild and strong periodate oxidation and saponification, combined with lectin histochemistry and sialidase digestion, in addition to the direct evidentiation of sialic acid residues. No differences were shown between sexes. Sialic acid residues are present in the nasal mucous cell secretion, where they are linked to galactose by means of alpha2-3 linkage and are mainly C9 acetylated, and in the nasal and tracheal epithelial lining, where they are represented by periodate labile residues (alpha2-3)- and/or (alpha2-6)- linked to galactose. Specific receptors for equine influenza viruses are present at the nasal and tracheal epithelial lining cell coat levels, and in some trachea epithelial cells, but the horse possesses a preventive defence, which consists of the secretion of a mucous layer at nasal level, which could specifically inactivate the hemagglutinins of equine influenza virus; in addition, it expresses other sialoreceptors which can mask the influenza specific ones.

  17. Human papillomavirus-related carcinomas of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A; Guo, Theresa W; Smith, David F; Wang, Hao; Ogawa, Takenori; Pai, Sara I; Westra, William H

    2013-02-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is an established cause of head and neck carcinomas arising in the oropharynx. The presence of HPV has also been reported in some carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract, but little is known about their overall incidence or their clinicopathologic profile. The surgical pathology archives of The Johns Hopkins Hospital were searched for all carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract from 1995 to 2011, and tissue microarrays were constructed. p16 immunohistochemical analysis and DNA in situ hybridization for high-risk types of HPV were performed. Demographic and clinical outcome data were extracted from patient medical records. Of 161 sinonasal carcinomas, 34 (21%) were positive for high-risk HPV DNA, including type 16 (82%), type 31/33 (12%), and type 18 (6%). HPV-positive carcinomas consisted of 28 squamous cell carcinomas and variants (15 nonkeratinizing or partially keratinizing, 4 papillary, 5 adenosquamous, 4 basaloid), 1 small cell carcinoma, 1 sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma, and 4 carcinomas that were difficult to classify but exhibited adenoid cystic carcinoma-like features. Immunohistochemistry for p16 was positive in 59/161 (37%) cases, and p16 expression strongly correlated with the presence of HPV DNA: 33 of 34 (97%) HPV-positive tumors exhibited high p16 expression, whereas only 26 of 127 (20%) HPV-negative tumors were p16 positive (P<0.0001). The HPV-related carcinomas occurred in 19 men and 15 women ranging in age from 33 to 87 years (mean, 54 y). A trend toward improved survival was observed in the HPV-positive group (hazard ratio=0.58, 95% confidence interval [0.26, 1.28]). The presence of high-risk HPV in 21% of sinonasal carcinomas confirms HPV as an important oncologic agent of carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract. Although nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma is the most common histologic type, there is a wide morphologic spectrum of HPV-related disease that includes a variant that resembles

  18. Optimal approach to obtaining mucosal biopsies for assessment of inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Yantiss, Rhonda K; Odze, Robert D

    2009-03-01

    Endoscopic evaluation and mucosal biopsy analysis have assumed important roles in the clinical management of patients with symptoms related to the gastrointestinal tract. Several common inflammatory diseases, including eosinophilic esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, Helicobacter pylori infection, celiac disease, lymphocytic colitis, collagenous colitis, and inflammatory bowel disease, may display a patchy or discontinuous distribution and, thus, multiple mucosal samples may be required to obtain diagnostic tissue in some cases. Not surprisingly, clinicians and pathologists are increasingly challenged to determine the optimum number of procedures and tissue samples necessary to detect, or exclude, the presence of inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Unfortunately, clinical practice varies widely with respect to tissue sample procurement in the evaluation of these disorders, particularly when the endoscopic appearance of the gastrointestinal mucosa is normal or shows only minimal changes. Guidelines concerning the appropriate number of tissue samples are well established for some diseases, such as Barrett's esophagus and chronic gastritis, but are not clear in other instances. The purpose of this review is to discuss the available literature pertaining to appropriate endoscopic sampling in the assessment of medical diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, and to develop recommendations regarding the clinical evaluation of common gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:19209164

  19. Crohn disease

    PubMed Central

    Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Rioux, John D.; Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Huett, Alan; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Wileman, Tom; Mizushima, Noboru; Carding, Simon; Akira, Shizuo; Parkes, Miles; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic and debilitating inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract.1 Prevalence in western populations is 100–150/100,000 and somewhat higher in Ashkenazi Jews. Peak incidence is in early adult life, although any age can be affected and a majority of affected individuals progress to relapsing and chronic disease. Medical treatments rely significantly on empirical corticosteroid therapy and immunosuppression, and intestinal resectional surgery is frequently required. Thus, 80% of patients with CD come to surgery for refractory disease or complications. It is hoped that an improved understanding of pathogenic mechanisms, for example by studying the genetic basis of CD and other forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), will lead to improved therapies and possibly preventative strategies in individuals identified as being at risk. PMID:20729636

  20. Metastatic Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Sangüeza, O P; Davis, L S; Gourdin, F W

    1997-09-01

    Metastatic Crohn's disease is the term used for granulomatous lesions of Crohn's disease involving sites other than the gastrointestinal tract. Metastatic Crohn's disease has been considered uncommon, when in actuality it may simply be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed since the clinical findings can be different. We report on three patients with this condition: one with generalized plaques, another with perineal and perianal ulcerations, and a third with a painless forearm nodule. PMID:9305298

  1. Mechanisms of disease: defensins in gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Wehkamp, Jan; Fellermann, Klaus; Herrlinger, Klaus R; Bevins, Charles L; Stange, Eduard F

    2005-09-01

    Defensins are endogenous antibiotics with microbicidal activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa. In the gastrointestinal tract, defensins help regulate the composition and number of colonizing microbes, and protect the host from food-borne and water-borne pathogens. In health, the normal host relationship with the commensal luminal microbiota is beneficial, but the same commensal bacteria could have a pathogenic role in inflammatory diseases. A disturbance in antimicrobial defense, as provided by Paneth cells of the small intestine, seems to be a critical factor in the pathogenesis of ileal Crohn's disease, an inflammatory disease of the intestinal tract. The disruption of the critical balance between antimicrobial peptides and luminal bacteria might also explain other gastrointestinal infections and diseases. Elucidating the underlying mechanisms involved in the regulation and biology of defensins could open up new therapeutic avenues.

  2. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy of the urinary tract: the technique.

    PubMed

    Chang, Timothy C; Liu, Jen-Jane; Liao, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    .e. photodynamic diagnosis) and narrow band imaging are additional endoscope-based optical imaging modalities that can be combined with CLE to achieve multimodal imaging of the urinary tract. In the future, CLE may be coupled with molecular contrast agents such as fluorescently labeled peptides and antibodies for endoscopic imaging of disease processes with molecular specificity.

  3. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy of the urinary tract: the technique.

    PubMed

    Chang, Timothy C; Liu, Jen-Jane; Liao, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    .e. photodynamic diagnosis) and narrow band imaging are additional endoscope-based optical imaging modalities that can be combined with CLE to achieve multimodal imaging of the urinary tract. In the future, CLE may be coupled with molecular contrast agents such as fluorescently labeled peptides and antibodies for endoscopic imaging of disease processes with molecular specificity. PMID:23354133

  4. Uroplakin 1b is critical in urinary tract development and urothelial differentiation and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Ashley R; Becknell, M Brian; Ching, Christina B; Cuaresma, Edward J; Chen, Xi; Hains, David S; McHugh, Kirk M

    2016-03-01

    Proper development and maintenance of urothelium is critical to its function. Uroplakins are expressed in developing and mature urothelium where they establish plaques associated with the permeability barrier. Their precise functional role in development and disease is unknown. Here, we disrupted Upk1b in vivo where its loss resulted in urothelial plaque disruption in the bladder and kidney. Upk1b(RFP/RFP) bladder urothelium appeared dysplastic with expansion of the progenitor cell markers, Krt14 and Krt5, increased Shh expression, and loss of terminal differentiation markers Krt20 and uroplakins. Upk1b(RFP/RFP) renal urothelium became stratified with altered cellular composition. Upk1b(RFP/RFP) mice developed age-dependent progressive hydronephrosis. Interestingly, 16% of Upk1b(RFP/RFP) mice possessed unilateral duplex kidneys. Our study expands the role of uroplakins, mechanistically links plaque formation to urinary tract development and function, and provides a tantalizing connection between congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract along with functional deficits observed in a variety of urinary tract diseases. Thus, kidney and bladder urothelium are regionally distinct and remain highly plastic, capable of expansion through tissue-specific progenitor populations. Furthermore, Upk1b plays a previously unknown role in early kidney development representing a novel genetic target for congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. PMID:26880456

  5. Stenting of the Lower Gastrointestinal Tract: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Sabharwal, Tarun Adam, Andreas

    2011-06-15

    Colon obstruction due to colorectal cancer is a major surgical emergency. Patients with acute bowel obstruction are usually poor surgical candidates with 10-20% operative mortality and 40-50% operative morbidity rates. Colorectal stenting is an image-guided, minimally invasive procedure, and typical indications include either palliation of inoperable malignant disease or temporary bowel decompression as a bridge to surgery. Colorectal stenting allows the patient to recover before definite elective surgical resection, reducing perioperative morbidity and mortality, overall hospital stay, and associated health care costs. Palliative stenting improves quality of life compared to surgery. A concise review is provided of contemporary stenting practice of the lower gastrointestinal tract, the colon in particular, and both palliative and preoperative adjuvant procedures are evaluated in terms of relevant patient oncology, insertion technique, available stent designs, technical and clinical outcomes, associated complications, and cost-benefit analysis.

  6. Prognostic Genetic Signatures in Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Bagrodia, Aditya; Cha, Eugene K; Coleman, Jonathan A

    2016-02-01

    Urothelial carcinoma is a highly heterogeneous disease that can arise throughout the entire urothelial lining from the renal pelvis to the proximal urethra. Upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is rare, and while it shares many similarities with urothelial carcinoma of bladder (UCB), there are also significant differences between UTUC and UCB regarding clinical management and outcomes. No major advances have been made recently in the development of new systemic therapies for urothelial carcinoma, partly due to the lack of understanding of underlying molecular pathogenetic mechanisms. In the past decade, the emergence of next-generation sequencing has greatly enabled genomic characterization of tumor samples. Researchers are currently exploring a personalized approach to augment traditional clinical decision-making based on genetic alterations. In the present review, we summarize current genomic advances in UTUC and discuss the potential implications of these developments for developing prognostic and predictive biomarkers. PMID:26757906

  7. Vaccination approaches for the prevention of urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Moriel, Danilo G; Schembri, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common infectious diseases of humans, with approximately 150 million cases estimated to occur globally every year. UTIs usually start as a bladder infection (cystitis), but can develop into acute kidney infection (pyelonephritis) and even infection of the bloodstream (urosepsis). The high frequency of UTIs in community and nosocomial settings places an enormous burden on healthcare systems worldwide. Multiple different pathogens cause UTI, with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) the most common etiological agent. UTIs caused by these pathogens are increasingly associated with antibiotic resistance, thus severely reducing treatment options and significantly increasing UTI-associated morbidity and mortality. In this review we present an overview of the recent advances in vaccine research targeted towards the prevention of UPEC-mediated UTI. In the context of multidrug resistance, we conclude that vaccination represents a viable approach for the prevention of chronic and recurrent UTI.

  8. Treatment and Prophylaxis in Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nickavar, Azar; Sotoudeh, Kambiz

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common serious bacterial infection in early life. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment prevent complications such as hypertension, proteinuria and end stage renal disease. A computerized search of MEDLINE, Embase and other databases was done to find the latest results about the treatment and prevention in pediatric UTI. Randomized control trials, systematic reviews and original articles were assessed. Search terms were “UTI, treatment, prophylaxis, prevention, and children”. All children with complicated or simple UTI were included in our search study from neonatal period to late childhood and medical aspects of treatment were reviewed. Recently, treatment approaches have been changed by simplification of drug administration. Oral treatment is recommended especially in older infants and children instead of strict intravenous treatment and patient admission. In addition, prophylactic treatment becomes easier and limited to certain cases. In this article, we review the recent information and approaches in this setting. PMID:21448397

  9. Surgical management of neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lyen C; Poultsides, George A; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2011-08-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (islet cell tumors) and of the luminal gastrointestinal tract (carcinoids) are a heterogeneous group of epithelial neoplasms that share certain common characteristics. First, they are similar histologically and are difficult to distinguish under light microscopy. Second, they can be associated with hypersecretory syndromes. Third, they are generally slow-growing and have a better prognosis than adenocarcinomas at the same site; however, they do become incurable when they progress to unresectable metastatic disease. Surgery is the only curative treatment and is recommended for most patients for whom cross-sectional imaging suggests that complete resection is possible. This article reviews the surgical management of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors, including the preoperative control of hormonal symptoms, extent of resection required, postoperative outcomes, and differing management strategies as determined by whether the tumor has arisen sporadically or as part of a familial disorder, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). PMID:21936439

  10. Disorders of the optic tract, radiation, and occipital lobe.

    PubMed

    Fraser, J Alexander; Newman, Nancy J; Biousse, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    Disorders of the optic tract, lateral geniculate nucleus, optic radiation, and occipital lobe - collectively called the retrochiasmal visual pathways - are commonly encountered in neurological practice, and may result from a number of causes. The major visual morbidity of retrochiasmal disease is the homonymous visual field defect, which is found in approximately 8% of stroke patients. A homonymous visual field defect may have profound legal, occupational, and financial consequences for patients, with many patients unable to read, drive, or return to work after sustaining retrochiasmal damage. Some homonymous hemianopias may improve, usually within days of a cerebral infarction, but remain stable after 3 months. Although treatment options are limited to those of the underlying cause, appropriate counseling and low-vision rehabilitation may be helpful.

  11. Listeria monocytogenes: survival and adaptation in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Gahan, Cormac G. M.; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has the capacity to survive and grow in a diverse range of natural environments. The transition from a food environment to the gastrointestinal tract begins a process of adaptation that may culminate in invasive systemic disease. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of how L. monocytogenes adapts to the gastrointestinal environment prior to initiating systemic infection. We will discuss mechanisms used by the pathogen to survive encounters with acidic environments (which include the glutamate decarboxylase and arginine deiminase systems), and those which enable the organism to cope with bile acids (including bile salt hydrolase) and competition with the resident microbiota. An increased understanding of how the pathogen survives in this environment is likely to inform the future design of novel prophylactic approaches that exploit specific pharmabiotics; including probiotics, prebiotics, or phages. PMID:24551601

  12. [The current diagnosis of tumors of the upper urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Saltirov, I; Terziev, T; Genadiev, Ts

    1997-01-01

    The treatment results and survivorship of patients with upper urinary tract tumors (UUTT) are largely dependent on the early diagnosis of the lesions. Twenty-eight patients presenting UUTT are studied and treated in the Clinic of Urology over the period 1987 through 1995. The diagnostic protocol includes both standard radiographic and cytological techniques, and endoscopic methods allowing for visualization and histopathological characterization of the neoplasm. The diagnostic relevance of the various methods and their efficacy are assayed, with emphasis on the necessity of their use in the differential diagnosis. The diagnostic approach described contributes to mace precise early diagnosis with preoperative determination of the degree of tumor differentiation which has an essential practical bearing on the choice of operative procedure and prognosis of the disease.

  13. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children].

    PubMed

    Privorotskiĭ, V F; Luppova, N E; Gerasimova, T A; Romaniuk, F P; Antonova, E A

    2011-01-01

    The last decade is characterized by increasing of the pathology of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in both adults and children. Among this diseases the first place according to frequency and variety of diseased organs and systems is at the acid developed diseases as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In this article provided comments to existing classifications of GERD in children, questions about diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of children with gastroesophageal reflux disease according to our large clinical experience.

  14. Bifidobacteria in the digestive tract of bumblebees.

    PubMed

    Killer, Jirí; Kopecný, Jan; Mrázek, Jakub; Rada, Vojtech; Dubná, Sona; Marounek, Milan

    2010-04-01

    Bifidobacteria and other bacterial groups (lactobacilli, facultative anaerobes, anaerobes) from the digestive tract of three bumblebee species (Bombus lucorum (34 samples), Bombus pascuorum (18 samples) and Bombus lapidarius (9 samples)) were enumerated and characterised. Counts of facultative anaerobic bacteria and lactobacilli (5.41+/-2.92 and 2.69+/-3.02 log CFU/g of digestive tract content) were lower than those of anaerobes (7.66+/-0.86 log CFU/g). Counts of bifidobacteria were determined using two selective media: MTPY (Modified Trypticase Phytone Yeast extract agar) and a new medium with pollen extract. There was no significant difference between the counts of bifidobacteria from both media, 5.00+/-2.92 log CFU/g on MTPY and 5.00+/-2.87 on the pollen medium. Subsequently, 187 bacterial strains of the family Bifidobacteriaceae (fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase-positive) were isolated from three different localities and from all three species of bumblebees. Bifidobacteria were found in 42 out of 61 specimens (69%). Twenty-three (38%) specimens had counts of bifidobacteria higher than 7.0 log CFU/g. Bifidobacteria represented the dominant group of anaerobes (>70% of total anaerobes), i.e., the principal group of bacteria in the bumblebee digestive tract, in only fourteen specimens (23% of total). For the first time, bifidobacteria were isolated from the digestive tract of bumblebees. In addition, we suggest, on the basis of biochemical tests (API 50 CHL and RAPID ID 32) and genetic methods (PCR and DGGE), that these bacteria may represent new species within the family of Bifidobacteriaceae.

  15. Computed tomography of the genitourinary tract.

    PubMed

    Stanley, R J; Sagel, S S; Fair, W R

    1978-06-01

    Eighteen months of experience with computed body tomography have revealed that this radiologic modality is useful in the diagnostic evaluation and management of urologic patients. Renal masses, perirenal lesions, poorly functioning kidneys, pelvic tumors and associated retroperitoneal nodal spread and other diagnostic problems related to the urinary tract have been imaged successfully with computed body tomography. Accuracy is high in the differentiation of benign renal cysts from renal neoplasms. Tumor staging and computed body tomography is being explored currently.

  16. Postoperative Morganella morganii endophthalmitis associated with subclinical urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Tsanaktsidis, Gina; Agarwal, Smita A; Maloof, Anthony J; Chandra, Jay; Mitchell, Paul

    2003-05-01

    We report a case of Morganella morganii acute endophthalmitis following clear corneal phacoemulsification cataract surgery in which a coincident asymptomatic chronic urinary tract infection was detected postoperatively. Morganella morganii is a gram-negative bacillus that inhabits the gastrointestinal tract and is part of the normal fecal flora. It is an opportunistic pathogen usually encountered in postoperative and nosocomial settings, causing urinary tract and wound infections. Chronic urinary tract infection may be a risk factor for postoperative endophthalmitis. A dipstick urinalysis before elective cataract surgery in elderly patients with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections may be considered.

  17. Fourier Tract Sampling (FouTS): A framework for improved inference of white matter tracts from diffusion MRI by explicitly modelling tract volume.

    PubMed

    Close, Thomas G; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Johnston, Leigh A; Calamante, Fernando; Mareels, Iven; Connelly, Alan

    2015-10-15

    Diffusion MRI tractography algorithm development is increasingly moving towards global techniques to incorporate "downstream" information and conditional probabilities between neighbouring tracts. Such approaches also enable white matter to be represented more tangibly than the abstract lines generated by the most common approaches to fibre tracking. However, previously proposed algorithms still use fibre-like models of white matter corresponding to thin strands of white matter tracts rather than the tracts themselves, and therefore require many components for accurate representations, which leads to poorly constrained inverse problems. We propose a novel tract-based model of white matter, the 'Fourier tract', which is able to represent rich tract shapes with a relatively low number of parameters, and explicitly decouples the spatial extent of the modelled tract from its 'Apparent Connection Strength (ACS)'. The Fourier tract model is placed within a novel Bayesian framework, which relates the tract parameters directly to the observed signal, enabling a wide range of acquisition schemes to be used. The posterior distribution of the Bayesian framework is characterised via Markov-chain Monte-Carlo sampling to infer probable values of the ACS and spatial extent of the imaged white matter tracts, providing measures that can be directly applied to many research and clinical studies. The robustness of the proposed tractography algorithm is demonstrated on simulated basic tract configurations, such as curving, twisting, crossing and kissing tracts, and sections of more complex numerical phantoms. As an illustration of the approach in vivo, fibre tracking is performed on a central section of the brain in three subjects from 60 direction HARDI datasets.

  18. Fourier Tract Sampling (FouTS): A framework for improved inference of white matter tracts from diffusion MRI by explicitly modelling tract volume.

    PubMed

    Close, Thomas G; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Johnston, Leigh A; Calamante, Fernando; Mareels, Iven; Connelly, Alan

    2015-10-15

    Diffusion MRI tractography algorithm development is increasingly moving towards global techniques to incorporate "downstream" information and conditional probabilities between neighbouring tracts. Such approaches also enable white matter to be represented more tangibly than the abstract lines generated by the most common approaches to fibre tracking. However, previously proposed algorithms still use fibre-like models of white matter corresponding to thin strands of white matter tracts rather than the tracts themselves, and therefore require many components for accurate representations, which leads to poorly constrained inverse problems. We propose a novel tract-based model of white matter, the 'Fourier tract', which is able to represent rich tract shapes with a relatively low number of parameters, and explicitly decouples the spatial extent of the modelled tract from its 'Apparent Connection Strength (ACS)'. The Fourier tract model is placed within a novel Bayesian framework, which relates the tract parameters directly to the observed signal, enabling a wide range of acquisition schemes to be used. The posterior distribution of the Bayesian framework is characterised via Markov-chain Monte-Carlo sampling to infer probable values of the ACS and spatial extent of the imaged white matter tracts, providing measures that can be directly applied to many research and clinical studies. The robustness of the proposed tractography algorithm is demonstrated on simulated basic tract configurations, such as curving, twisting, crossing and kissing tracts, and sections of more complex numerical phantoms. As an illustration of the approach in vivo, fibre tracking is performed on a central section of the brain in three subjects from 60 direction HARDI datasets. PMID:26070265

  19. Vocal Tract Articulation in Zebra Finches

    PubMed Central

    Ohms, Verena R.; Snelderwaard, Peter Ch.; ten Cate, Carel; Beckers, Gabriël J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Birdsong and human vocal communication are both complex behaviours which show striking similarities mainly thought to be present in the area of development and learning. Recent studies, however, suggest that there are also parallels in vocal production mechanisms. While it has been long thought that vocal tract filtering, as it occurs in human speech, only plays a minor role in birdsong there is an increasing number of studies indicating the presence of sound filtering mechanisms in bird vocalizations as well. Methodology/Principal Findings Correlating high-speed X-ray cinematographic imaging of singing zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) to song structures we identified beak gape and the expansion of the oropharyngeal-esophageal cavity (OEC) as potential articulators. We subsequently manipulated both structures in an experiment in which we played sound through the vocal tract of dead birds. Comparing acoustic input with acoustic output showed that OEC expansion causes an energy shift towards lower frequencies and an amplitude increase whereas a wide beak gape emphasizes frequencies around 5 kilohertz and above. Conclusion These findings confirm that birds can modulate their song by using vocal tract filtering and demonstrate how OEC and beak gape contribute to this modulation. PMID:20689831

  20. Antimicrobial Stewardship and Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Abbo, Lilian M.; Hooton, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are the most common bacterial infections encountered in ambulatory and long-term care settings in the United States. Urine samples are the largest single category of specimens received by most microbiology laboratories and many such cultures are collected from patients who have no or questionable urinary symptoms. Unfortunately, antimicrobials are often prescribed inappropriately in such patients. Antimicrobial use, whether appropriate or inappropriate, is associated with the selection for antimicrobial-resistant organisms colonizing or infecting the urinary tract. Infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant organisms are associated with higher rates of treatment failures, prolonged hospitalizations, increased costs and mortality. Antimicrobial stewardship consists of avoidance of antimicrobials when appropriate and, when antimicrobials are indicated, use of strategies to optimize the selection, dosing, route of administration, duration and timing of antimicrobial therapy to maximize clinical cure while limiting the unintended consequences of antimicrobial use, including toxicity and selection of resistant microorganisms. This article reviews successful antimicrobial stewardship strategies in the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections. PMID:27025743

  1. Pharmacology of the lower urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Hennenberg, Martin; Stief, Christian G.; Gratzke, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacology of the lower urinary tract provides the basis for medical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Therapy of LUTS addresses obstructive symptoms (frequently explained by increased prostate smooth muscle tone and prostate enlargement) in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and storage symptoms in patients with overactive bladder (OAB). Targets for medical treatment include G protein-coupled receptors (α1-adrenoceptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, β3-adrenoceptors) or intracellular enzymes (5α-reductase; phosphodiesterase-5, PDE5). Established therapies of obstructive symptoms aim to induce prostate smooth muscle relaxation by α1-blockers or PDE5 inhibitors, or to reduce prostate growth and volume with 5α-reductase inhibitors. Available options for treatment of OAB comprise anitmuscarinics, β3-adrenoceptor agonists, and botulinum toxin A, which improve storage symptoms by inhibition of bladder smooth muscle contraction. With the recent approval of β3-antagonists, PDE inhibitors, and silodosin for therapy of LUTS, progress from basic research of lower urinary tract pharmacology was translated into new clinical applications. Further targets are in preclinical stages of examination, including modulators of the endocannabinoid system and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. PMID:24744518

  2. Congenital urinary tract obstruction: the long view.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Robert L

    2015-07-01

    Maldevelopment of the collecting system resulting in urinary tract obstruction (UTO) is the leading identifiable cause of CKD in children. Specific etiologies are unknown; most cases are suspected by discovering hydronephrosis on prenatal ultrasonography. Congenital UTO can reduce nephron number and cause bladder dysfunction, which contribute to ongoing injury. Severe UTO can impair kidney growth in utero, and animal models of unilateral ureteral obstruction show that ischemia and oxidative stress cause proximal tubular cell death, with later development of interstitial fibrosis. Congenital obstructive nephropathy, therefore, results from combined developmental and obstructive kidney injury. Because of inadequacy of available biomarkers, criteria for surgical correction of upper tract obstruction are poorly established. Lower tract obstruction requires fetal or immediate postnatal intervention, and the rate of progression of CKD is highly variable. New biomarkers based on proteomics and determination of glomerular number by magnetic resonance imaging should improve future care. Angiotensin inhibitors have not been effective in slowing progression, although avoidance of nephrotoxins and timely treatment of hypertension are important. Because congenital UTO begins in fetal life, smooth transfer of care from perinatologist to pediatric and adult urology and nephrology teams should optimize quality of life and ultimate outcomes for these patients. PMID:26088076

  3. Long-Term Lithium Use and Risk of Renal and Upper Urinary Tract Cancers.

    PubMed

    Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, Jesper; Jensen, Boye L; Madsen, Kirsten; Friis, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Lithium induces proliferation in the epithelium of renal collecting ducts. A recent small-scale cohort study reported a strong association between use of lithium and increased risk of renal neoplasia. We therefore conducted a large-scale pharmacoepidemiologic study of the association between long-term use of lithium and risk of upper urinary tract cancer, including renal cell cancer and cancers of the renal pelvis or ureter. We identified all histologically verified upper urinary tract cancer cases in Denmark between 2000 and 2012 from the Danish Cancer Registry. A total of 6477 cases were matched by age and sex to 259,080 cancer-free controls. Data on lithium use from 1995 to 2012 were obtained from the Danish Prescription Registry. We estimated the association between long-term use of lithium (≥5 years) and risk of upper urinary tract cancer using conditional logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. Long-term use of lithium was observed among 0.22% of cases and 0.17% of controls. This yielded an overall nonsignificant adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.3 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.8-2.2) for upper urinary tract cancer associated with long-term use of lithium. Analyses stratified by stage and subtype of upper urinary tract cancer revealed slight but nonsignificant increases in the ORs for localized disease (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.8-3.0) and for renal pelvis/ureter cancers (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 0.5-5.4). In conclusion, in our nationwide case-control study, use of lithium was not associated with an increased risk of upper urinary tract cancer.

  4. Intestinal reconstruction of the lower urinary tract as a prerequisite for renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Djakovic, Nenad; Wagener, Nina; Adams, Judith; Gilfrich, Christian; Haferkamp, Axel; Pfitzenmaier, Jesco; Toenshoff, Burkhard; Schmidt, Jan; Hohenfellner, Markus

    2009-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To report a two-stage protocol for children in whom bladder reconstruction was followed by kidney transplantation, as about a quarter of children requiring a kidney transplantation show significant lower urinary tract dysfunction, and consequently their bladder is unsuitable for a kidney transplant. PATIENTS AND METHODS Twelve children (median age 9.5 years, range 4.2-16.8) with end-stage renal disease had a lower urinary tract reconstruction before kidney transplantation. The cause of bladder dysfunction and renal failure included posterior urethral valves in five, neuropathic bladder in two, prune-belly syndrome in two, anal-rectum and urethral atresia syndrome in one, primary obstructive uropathy in one and caudal regression syndrome in one. Two children were diverted with an ileal conduit; four had a bladder augmentation, and four had a bladder augmentation with additional continent cutaneous stoma. A continent urinary reservoir was constructed in one boy, and one boy had a Mitrofanoff-only procedure. Subsequently, 11 children were transplanted. RESULTS The graft survival rate was 11 of 12 at 1 year and eight of 12 at 5 years. No patient lost the graft related to the reconstructed lower urinary tract. During the median (range) follow-up of 5.4 (1.6-12.5) years all but one child had free drainage of the upper urinary tract. All 10 children who did not have an ileal conduit are continent. CONCLUSION Reconstruction of the lower urinary tract followed by renal transplantation is a safe and efficient approach. It has the advantage of restoring the lower urinary tract before immunosuppressive therapy, and supplies the best possible reservoir for a transplanted kidney. PMID:19076129

  5. Effect of DSS on Bacterial Growth in Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Hlinková, J; Svobodová, H; Brachtlová, T; Gardlík, R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an idiopathic autoimmune disorder that is mainly divided into ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Probiotics are known for their beneficial effect and used as a treatment option in different gastrointestinal problems. The aim of our study was to find suitable bacterial vectors for gene therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 were investigated as potential vectors. Our results show that the growth of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 was inhibited in the majority of samples collected from dextran sodium sulphate-treated animals compared with control growth in phosphate-buffered saline. The growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 in all investigated samples was enhanced or unaffected in comparison with phosphate-buffered saline; however, it did not reach the growth rates of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. Dextran sodium sulphate treatment had a stimulating effect on the growth of both strains in homogenates of distant small intestine and proximal colon samples. The gastrointestinal tract contents and tissue homogenates did not inhibit growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 in comparison with the negative control, and provided more suitable environment for growth compared to Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. We therefore conclude that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 is a more suitable candidate for a potential bacterial vector, even though it has no known probiotic properties. PMID:27085009

  6. The role of sonography in imaging of the biliary tract.

    PubMed

    Foley, W Dennis; Quiroz, Francisco A

    2007-06-01

    Sonography is the recommended initial imaging test in the evaluation of patients presenting with right upper quadrant pain or jaundice. Dependent upon clinical circumstances, the differential diagnosis includes choledocholithiasis, biliary stricture, or tumor. Sonography is very sensitive in detection of mechanical biliary obstruction and stone disease, although less sensitive for detection of obstructing tumors, including pancreatic carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. In patients with sonographically documented cholelithiasis and choledocholithiasis, laparoscopic cholecystectomy with operative clearance of the biliary stone disease is usually performed. In patients with clinically suspected biliary stone disease, without initial sonographic documentation of choledocholithiasis, endoscopic ultrasound or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is the next logical imaging step. Endoscopic ultrasound documentation of choledocholithiasis in a postcholecystectomy patient should lead to retrograde cholangiography, sphincterotomy, and clearance of the ductal calculi by endoscopic catheter techniques. In patients with clinical and sonographic findings suggestive of malignant biliary obstruction, a multipass contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) examination to detect and stage possible pancreatic carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, or periductal neoplasm is usually recommended. Assessment of tumor resectability and staging can be performed by CT or a combination of CT and endoscopic ultrasound, the latter often combined with fine needle aspiration biopsy of suspected periductal tumor. In patients whose CT scan suggests hepatic hilar or central intrahepatic biliary tumor, percutaneous cholangiography and transhepatic biliary stent placement is usually followed by brushing or fluoroscopically directed fine needle aspiration biopsy for tissue diagnosis. Sonography is the imaging procedure of choice for biliary tract intervention, including cholecystostomy, guidance for

  7. Upper respiratory tract infections in children: antibiotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, P; Principi, N

    1987-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections, particularly pharyngitis and acute otitis media (AOM) are the commonest diseases in children. Although viruses are the main causative agents, bacteria may play an important role. With regard to antibiotic therapy, clinicians must solve two problems: differentiation between viral and bacterial aetiology and choice of the optimal drug for each bacterial disease. In patients with pharyngitis the identification of group A haemolytic streptococci as the causative agent may be very difficult if only clinical and haematological data are considered. Throat culture is time consuming and difficult to perform in ambulatory practice; the recent techniques for rapid detection of streptococcal antigens are a possible answer to this problem. In bacterial pharyngitis a single injection of benzathine penicillin is considered to be first choice. However local pain and the significant increase of the relative risk of allergic problems in comparison with the decrease of incidence of rheumatic fever may shift therapeutic preference towards macrolides. The recently marketed ones, especially miocamycin, seem to offer easier administration, fewer side-effects and better efficacy. With regard to AOM, the differentiation between bacterial and viral disease is less important because over 70% of cases are of bacterial origin. Besides, an exact aetiological diagnosis is possible only by tympanocentesis, an invasive method. In Italy amoxicillin is still the drug of choice: a twice-daily regimen has been demonstrated to be as effective as the traditional thrice-daily schedule.

  8. Along-tract statistics allow for enhanced tractography analysis

    PubMed Central

    Colby, John B.; Soderberg, Lindsay; Lebel, Catherine; Dinov, Ivo D.; Thompson, Paul M.; Sowell, Elizabeth R.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion imaging tractography is a valuable tool for neuroscience researchers because it allows the generation of individualized virtual dissections of major white matter tracts in the human brain. It facilitates between-subject statistical analyses tailored to the specific anatomy of each participant. There is prominent variation in diffusion imaging metrics (e.g., fractional anisotropy, FA) within tracts, but most tractography studies use a “tract-averaged” approach to analysis by averaging the scalar values from the many streamline vertices in a tract dissection into a single point-spread estimate for each tract. Here we describe a complete workflow needed to conduct an along-tract analysis of white matter streamline tract groups. This consists of 1) A flexible MATLAB toolkit for generating along-tract data based on B-spline resampling and compilation of scalar data at different collections of vertices along the curving tract spines, and 2) Statistical analysis and rich data visualization by leveraging tools available through the R platform for statistical computing. We demonstrate the effectiveness of such an along-tract approach over the tract-averaged approach in an example analysis of 10 major white matter tracts in a single subject. We also show that these techniques easily extend to between-group analyses typically used in neuroscience applications, by conducting an along-tract analysis of differences in FA between 9 individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) and 11 typically-developing controls. This analysis reveals localized differences between FASD and control groups that were not apparent using a tract-averaged method. Finally, to validate our approach and highlight the strength of this extensible software framework, we implement 2 other methods from the literature and leverage the existing workflow tools to conduct a comparison study. PMID:22094644

  9. Partial volume effect of cingulum tract in diffusion-tensor MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ning; Gold, Brian T.; Zhang, Jun

    2008-03-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) represents a promising tool for the early diagnosis of certain brain diseases. Many DTI studies have compared differences in local diffusivity in specific region-of- interest (ROI) between patient and control groups to find possible disease markers. However, local diffusivity results may be influenced by partial volume effects (PVE), particularly in small white matter tracts that border grey matter tissue. Here, we investigated the influence of PVE on local diffusivity measurements in a small but critical white matter tract, the cingulum. Results demonstrated significant variability in PVE that contribute to local diffusivity in the cingulum. Our results highlight the need for careful consideration of PVE when computing diffusivity of small tissues.

  10. An efficient nano-based theranostic system for multi-modal imaging-guided photothermal sterilization in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Jianhua; Wang, Rui; Du, Yingda; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-07-01

    Since understanding the healthy status of gastrointestinal tract (GI tract) is of vital importance, clinical implementation for GI tract-related disease have attracted much more attention along with the rapid development of modern medicine. Here, a multifunctional theranostic system combining X-rays/CT/photothermal/photoacoustic mapping of GI tract and imaging-guided photothermal anti-bacterial treatment is designed and constructed. PEGylated W18O49 nanosheets (PEG-W18O49) are created via a facile solvothermal method and an in situ probe-sonication approach. In terms of excellent colloidal stability, low cytotoxicity, and neglectable hemolysis of PEG-W18O49, we demonstrate the first example of high-performance four-modal imaging of GI tract by using these nanosheets as contrast agents. More importantly, due to their intrinsic absorption of NIR light, glutaraldehyde-modified PEG-W18O49 are successfully applied as fault-free targeted photothermal agents for imaging-guided killing of bacteria on a mouse infection model. Critical to pre-clinical and clinical prospects, long-term toxicity is further investigated after oral administration of these theranostic agents. These kinds of tungsten-based nanomaterials exhibit great potential as multi-modal contrast agents for directed visualization of GI tract and anti-bacterial agents for phothothermal sterilization. PMID:25934293

  11. Repertoire of Chemokine Receptor Expression in the Female Genital Tract

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Bruce K.; Landay, Alan; Andersson, Jan; Brown, Clark; Behbahani, Homira; Jiyamapa, Dan; Burki, Zareefa; Stanislawski, Donna; Czerniewski, Mary Ann; Garcia, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases, genital ulcer disease, and progesterone therapy increase susceptibility to lentivirus transmission. Infection of cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is dependent on expression of specific chemokine receptors known to function as HIV co-receptors. Quantitative kinetic reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was developed to determine the in vivo expression levels of CCR5, CXCR4, CCR3, CCR2b, and the cytomegalovirus-encoded US28 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cervical biopsies from 12 women with and without sexually transmitted diseases, genital ulcer disease, and progesterone-predominant conditions. Our data indicate that CCR5 is the major HIV co-receptor expressed in the female genital tract, and CXCR4 is the predominantly expressed HIV co-receptor in peripheral blood. CCR5 mRNA expression in the ectocervix was 10-fold greater than CXCR4, 20-fold greater than CCR2b, and 100-fold greater than CCR3. In peripheral blood, CXCR4 expression was 1.5-fold greater than CCR5, 10-fold greater than CCR2b, and 15-fold greater than CCR3. US28 was not expressed in cervical tissue despite expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from five individuals. CCR5 was significantly increased (p < 0.02) in biopsies from women with sexually transmitted diseases and others who were progesterone predominant. In vitro studies demonstrate that progesterone increases CCR5, CXCR4, and CCR3 expression and decreases CCR2b expression in lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Characterization of chemokine receptors at the tissue level provides important information in identifying host determinants of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:9708808

  12. [Sudden drop out of school due to psychic stress after repeated urinary tract surgery].

    PubMed

    Haapasalo-Pesu, Kirsi-Maria

    2012-01-01

    A 15-year old boy dropped out of school, withdrew into his home and, on inquiry upon the matter, threatened with suicide. Upon disentangling the issue it turned out that the boy perceived his urinary tract disease and associated pediatric surgery procedures so shameful and distressing that they had eventually exceeded his psychic ability. The mental state of the boy improved with therapeutic discussions and adolescent psychiatric rehabilitation.

  13. Expectoration in the gastrointestinal tract. A diagnostic problem in In-111 granulocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Schifter, S.; Madsen, J.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Scintigraphic detection of infectious foci with In-111 labeled granulocytes or leukocytes is a well-established technique in nuclear medicine. The technique is commonly used to demonstrate inflammatory activity in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Its application, however, may be influenced by infectious expectoration located within the gastrointestinal tract. In performing this technique, it is important to have this differential diagnostic possibility in mind; it can be clarified by repeated imaging.

  14. Human bocavirus infection in young children with acute respiratory tract infection in Lanzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-shu; Yuan, Xin-hui; Xie, Zhi-ping; Jin, Yu; Gao, Han-chun; Song, Jing-rong; Zhang, Rong-fang; Xu, Zi-qian; Hou, Yun-de; Duan, Zhao-jun

    2010-02-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a recognized human parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract infection. However, HBoV has yet to be established as a causative agent of respiratory disease. In this study, the epidemiological and virological characteristics of HBoV infection were studied in children with acute respiratory tract infection in China. In total, 406 children younger than 14 years of age with acute respiratory tract infection were included in this prospective 1-year study. HBoV was detected in 29 (7.1%) of the 406 children. No clear seasonal fluctuation was observed in infection rates of HBoV. Of the 29 children infected with HBoV, 16 (55.2%) were coinfected with other respiratory viruses, most commonly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Viral coinfection with HBoV did not affect the severity of the respiratory disease (P = 0.291). The number of HBoV genome copies ranged from 5.80 x 10(2) to 9.72 x 10(8) copies/ml in nasopharyngeal aspirates among HBoV-positive specimens by real-time PCR, and neither coinfection nor the severity of disease correlated with the viral load (P = 0.148, P = 0.354, respectively). The most common clinical features were cough and acute upper respiratory infection, and acute bronchopneumonia. Additionally, the NP-1 gene of HBoV showed minimal sequence variation. These data suggest that HBoV is frequent in young children with acute respiratory tract infection in Lanzhou, China, and RSV is the most common coinfecting virus. There was no apparent association between the viral load of HBoV and coinfection or disease severity. The NP-1 gene was highly conserved in HBoV. PMID:20029808

  15. Heavy Chain Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells often prevents proper absorption of nutrients from food (malabsorption), resulting in severe diarrhea and weight loss. A rare form that affects the respiratory tract also exists. Blood tests are done when alpha heavy chain disease is suspected. Serum protein electrophoresis, measurement of ...

  16. The Genetics of Urinary Tract Infections and the Innate Defense of the Kidney and Urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Ambite, Ines; Rydstrom, Gustav; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Hains, David S

    2016-03-01

    The urinary tract is a sterile organ system. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common and often serious infections. Research has focused on uropathogen, environment, and host factors leading to UTI pathogenesis. A growing body of evidence exists implicating genetic factors that can contribute to UTI risks. In this review, we highlight genetic variations in aspects of the innate immune system critical to the host response to uropathogens. This overview includes genetic variations in pattern recognition receptor molecules, chemokines/cytokines, and neutrophil activation. We also comprehensively cover murine knockout models of UTI, genetic variations involved in renal scarring as a result of ascending UTIs, and asymptomatic bacteriuria. PMID:27617139

  17. Prognostic value of procalcitonin in hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Nobre, Vandack; Borges, Isabela

    2016-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections are common and potentially lethal conditions and are a major cause of inadequate antibiotic prescriptions. Characterization of disease severity and prognostic prediction in affected patients can aid disease management and can increase accuracy in determining the need for and place of hospitalization. The inclusion of biomarkers, particularly procalcitonin, in the decision taken process is a promising strategy. This study aims to present a narrative review of the potential applications and limitations of procalcitonin as a prognostic marker in hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections. The studies on this topic are heterogeneous with respect to procalcitonin measurement techniques, cutoff values, clinical settings, and disease severity. The results show that procalcitonin delivers moderate performance for prognostic prediction in patients with lower respiratory tract infections; its predictive performance was not higher than that of classical methods, and knowledge of procalcitonin levels is most useful when interpreted together with other clinical and laboratory results. Overall, repeated measurement of the procalcitonin levels during the first days of treatment provides more prognostic information than a single measurement; however, information on the cost-effectiveness of this procedure in intensive care patients is lacking. The results of studies that evaluated the prognostic value of initial procalcitonin levels in patients with community-acquired pneumonia are more consistent and have greater potential for practical application; in this case, low procalcitonin levels identify those patients with a low risk of adverse outcomes. PMID:27305038

  18. A probabilistic gastrointestinal tract dosimetry model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Chulhaeng

    In internal dosimetry, the tissues of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract represent one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body with the hematopoietic bone marrow. Endoscopic ultrasound is a unique tool to acquire in-vivo data on GI tract wall thicknesses of sufficient resolution needed in radiation dosimetry studies. Through their different echo texture and intensity, five layers of differing echo patterns for superficial mucosa, deep mucosa, submucosa, muscularis propria and serosa exist within the walls of organs composing the alimentary tract. Thicknesses for stomach mucosa ranged from 620 +/- 150 mum to 1320 +/- 80 mum (total stomach wall thicknesses from 2.56 +/- 0.12 to 4.12 +/- 0.11 mm). Measurements made for the rectal images revealed rectal mucosal thicknesses from 150 +/- 90 mum to 670 +/- 110 mum (total rectal wall thicknesses from 2.01 +/- 0.06 to 3.35 +/- 0.46 mm). The mucosa thus accounted for 28 +/- 3% and 16 +/- 6% of the total thickness of the stomach and rectal wall, respectively. Radiation transport simulations were then performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP) 4C transport code to calculate S values (Gy/Bq-s) for penetrating and nonpenetrating radiations such as photons, beta particles, conversion electrons and auger electrons of selected nuclides, I123, I131, Tc 99m and Y90 under two source conditions: content and mucosa sources, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate generally good agreement with published data for the stomach mucosa wall. The rectal mucosa data are consistently higher than published data compared with the large intestine due to different radiosensitive cell thicknesses (350 mum vs. a range spanning from 149 mum to 729 mum) and different geometry when a rectal content source is considered. Generally, the ICRP models have been designed to predict the amount of radiation dose in the human body from a "typical" or "reference" individual in a given population. The study has been performed to

  19. Endemic Poultry Viral Diseases 2016 Research Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral infections of the avian gastrointestinal tract negatively impact poultry production; however, determining the complex etiologies of the viral enteric diseases in poultry has been difficult. Project scientists are continuing to investigate the species specificity, molecular phylogenetics, and p...

  20. [ENDOCYTOSCOPY--NEW TYPE OF ENDOSCOPIC EXAMINATION OF LOWER GASTROINTESTINAL AND RESPIRATORY TRACT].

    PubMed

    Pirogov, S S; Sokolov, V V; Kaprin, A D; Sokolov, D V; Volchenko, N N; Karpova, E S; Pavlov, P V; Telegina, L V; Sukhin, D G; Pogorelov, N N; Ryabov, A B; Khomyakov, V M; Chulikov, I A

    2015-01-01

    Majority of published data describing endocytoscopic examination of upper gastrointestinal tract mucosa, but in recent publications, it is reported, that endocytoscopy is suitable for small bowel, colon, respiratory tract and even peritoneum "optical biopsy". In number of articles possibilities of celiac sprue diagnostics with endocytoscopy is discussed, but small-bowel endocytoscopy is limited, due to absence of endocytoscopes, compatible with enteroscopes. More widely endocytoscopy is used in colon, mostly in lateral-spreading adenomas diagnostics. Prof. S-E. Kudo developed endocytoscopic classification of colonic mucosa changes, used for differential diagnostics and lesion mapping, describing hyperplasia, adenomas with different grades of intraepithelial neoplasia, non-invasive and invasive cancer. Some authors reported about good possibilities of endocytoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease diagnostics. Most of data, related to respiratory tract endocytoscopic examination, focused on precancerous conditions and early pharyngeal and lung cancer, and the preliminary results are promising, but, unfortunately, for now, endocytoscopy in bronchial tree is limited, due to lack of thin endocytoscopes. According to some article data, it is possible to use endocytoscopy not only in gastrointestinal and respiratory tract, but also in optical confirmation of peritoneal tumor dissemination in gastric and ovarian cancer patients, and--in bladder mucosa examination. PMID:26387172

  1. Current Concepts for Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection: Diagnostics and Pathogenesis of Genital Tract Shedding.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christine; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is a DNA virus that is efficiently transmitted through intimate genital tract contact and causes persistent infection that cannot be eliminated. HSV-2 may cause frequent, symptomatic self-limited genital ulcers, but in most persons infection is subclinical. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the virus is frequently shed from genital surfaces even in the absence of signs or symptoms of clinical disease and that the virus can be transmitted during these periods of shedding. Furthermore, HSV-2 shedding is detected throughout the genital tract and may be associated with genital tract inflammation, which likely contributes to increased risk of HIV acquisition. This review focuses on HSV diagnostics, as well as what we have learned about the importance of frequent genital HSV shedding for (i) HSV transmission and (ii) genital tract inflammation, as well as (iii) the impact of HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition and transmission. We conclude with discussion of future areas of research to push the field forward.

  2. Non-toxic lead sulfide nanodots as efficient contrast agents for visualizing gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Ran, Xiang; Liu, Jianhua; Du, Yingda; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive imaging of gastrointestinal (GI) tract using novel but efficient contrast agents is of the most important issues in the diagnosis and prognosis of GI diseases. Here, for the first time, we reported the design and synthesis of biothiol-decorated lead sulfide nanodots, as well as their usages in functional dual-modality imaging of GI tract in vivo. Due to the presence of glutathione on the surface of the nanodots, these well-prepared contrast agents could decrease the unwanted ion leakage, withstand the harsh conditions in GI tract, and avoid the systemic absorption after oral administration. Compared with clinical barium meal and iodine-based contrast agents, these nanodots exhibited much more significant enhancement in contrast efficiency during both 2D X-ray imaging and 3D CT imaging. Different from some conventional invasive imaging modalities, such as gastroscope and enteroscope, non-invasive imaging strategy by using glutathione modified PbS nanodots as contrast agents could reduce the painfulness towards patients, facilitate the imaging procedure, and economize the manipulation period. Moreover, long-term toxicity and bio-distribution of these nanodots after oral administration were evaluated in detail, which indicated their overall safety. Based on our present study, these nanodots could act as admirable contrast agents to integrate X-ray imaging and CT imaging for the direct visualization of GI tract.

  3. Biliary tract obstruction secondary to cancer: management guidelines and selected literature review.

    PubMed

    Lokich, J J; Kane, R A; Harrison, D A; McDermott, W V

    1987-06-01

    Malignant biliary tract obstruction (MBTO) due to either primary biliary tract cancer or metastasis to the porta hepatis is a common clinical problem. The most common metastatic tumors causing MBTO in order of frequency are gastric, colon, breast, and lung cancers. Radiographic diagnostic procedures should proceed in a cost-effective sequence from ultrasonography, computerized tomography (CT), percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC), and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography with the goal of establishing the site of the biliary tract obstruction. The identification of the site of obstruction could be established by ultrasound 70% to 80%, CT scan 80% to 90%, PTHC 100%, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) 85%. Therapeutic intervention by radiographic decompression (PTHC or endoscopic prosthesis), surgical bypass, or radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy may be selectively used based on (1) the site of obstruction; (2) the type of primary tumor; and (3) the presence of specific symptoms related to the obstruction. ("Prophylactic" biliary tract decompression to prevent ascending cholangitis is not supported by the literature in that the frequency of sepsis in the face of malignant obstruction is small (in contrast to sepsis associated with stone disease). Furthermore, PTHC with drainage as a long-term procedure is associated with a substantial frequency of sepsis and is unnecessary and possibly problematic as a preoperative procedure simply to reduce the bilirubin level. The use of radiation therapy in conjunction with chemotherapy for patients not deemed suitable for a surgical bypass because of the presence of proximal obstruction is an important alternative to PTHC.

  4. Biliary tract obstruction secondary to cancer: management guidelines and selected literature review.

    PubMed

    Lokich, J J; Kane, R A; Harrison, D A; McDermott, W V

    1987-06-01

    Malignant biliary tract obstruction (MBTO) due to either primary biliary tract cancer or metastasis to the porta hepatis is a common clinical problem. The most common metastatic tumors causing MBTO in order of frequency are gastric, colon, breast, and lung cancers. Radiographic diagnostic procedures should proceed in a cost-effective sequence from ultrasonography, computerized tomography (CT), percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC), and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography with the goal of establishing the site of the biliary tract obstruction. The identification of the site of obstruction could be established by ultrasound 70% to 80%, CT scan 80% to 90%, PTHC 100%, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) 85%. Therapeutic intervention by radiographic decompression (PTHC or endoscopic prosthesis), surgical bypass, or radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy may be selectively used based on (1) the site of obstruction; (2) the type of primary tumor; and (3) the presence of specific symptoms related to the obstruction. ("Prophylactic" biliary tract decompression to prevent ascending cholangitis is not supported by the literature in that the frequency of sepsis in the face of malignant obstruction is small (in contrast to sepsis associated with stone disease). Furthermore, PTHC with drainage as a long-term procedure is associated with a substantial frequency of sepsis and is unnecessary and possibly problematic as a preoperative procedure simply to reduce the bilirubin level. The use of radiation therapy in conjunction with chemotherapy for patients not deemed suitable for a surgical bypass because of the presence of proximal obstruction is an important alternative to PTHC. PMID:3295131

  5. Clinicopathological prognostic factors for upper tract urothelial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Timev, Alexander; Dimitrov, Plamen; Vasilev, Vasil; Krastanov, Alexander; Georgiev, Marincho; Yanev, Krasimir; Simeonov, Peter; Panchev, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of clinicopathological factors including age, gender, tumor grade, tumor stage, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), tumor necrosis and previous history of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer on outcomes of patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) treated with radical nephroureterectomy (RNU). Material and methods A total of 60 patients who underwent radical nephroureterectomy for upper tract urothelial carcinoma at our institute between 2005 to 2012 were included in our study. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method, log rank statistics, the chi-square test and Cox regression models. Results The mean length of follow-up time was 33.3 months. There were 27 (45%) patients alive with the disease, whereas 33 (55%) were dead. In 19 cases (31.7%) the tumor grade was low, while in 41 cases (68.3%) it was high. Lymphovascular invasion was observed in 28 (46.7%) cases. Tumor necrosis was registered in 14 patients (23.3%). From the patients with LVI, 3 (9.6%) were alive, whereas from the patients negative for LVI, 75% were alive. Significant relationship was found between gender and grading and between positive LVI and low grading. Conclusions Day case Variables such as gender, grading, tumor stage, LVI and tumor necrosis were all demonstrated to be significant independent prognostic factors for the overall survival. On the multivariate analysis only LVI remained statistically significant, which may explain the different clinical course in patients and could be considered as a part of pathological reporting and treatment planning for the future. PMID:27123328

  6. Management of lower respiratory tract infections in out-patients.

    PubMed

    Woodhead, M

    1997-10-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) are one of the most frequent medical conditions seen in out-patients. They all cause morbidity, and although most are minor some may be life-threatening, thus appropriate disease management is important. Clinical features are usually used to classify LRTIs, but this approach may be inaccurate. It may therefore be simpler to describe a patient's symptoms without applying a label, such as "bronchitis", since the latter means different things to different people. Classification of LRTIs should aim to aid management. The two main management decisions are: whether to manage the patient at home; and whether to prescribe antibiotics. Investigations are carried out in the hospital environment to aid these decisions, however in the community investigation in only a minority of cases are done as they are costly and impractical. Markers of severity of LRTI have been identified in a number of studies and their value in clinical practice is now being assessed, however most studies suggest that severely ill patients are correctly identified and admitted to hospital. Currently, antibiotics are used liberally for lower respiratory tract infections. However most infections are not bacterial in origin and will not be affected by such therapy. The idea that antibiotics are harmless placebos for such illnesses is no longer tenable since the appearance and rapid spread of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Only in community-acquired pneumonia and some patients with exacerbations of chronic bronchitis do antibiotics actually alter the course of the illness. In those groups antibiotics should be targetted at the casual pathogens and in other groups such therapy should be avoided. Much current research interest is focused on determining which (if any) is the best antibiotic in these situations. PMID:9510671

  7. Assessment of infective urinary tract disorders.

    PubMed

    Sixt, R; Stokland, E

    1998-06-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in children, particularly in the youngest age groups. There is a risk for progressive deterioration of renal function in these children if aggravating factors such as gross reflux and/or outflow obstruction of the urinary tract are present. In this review the pros and cons of available scintigraphic and radiological imaging techniques for the work-up of these children are presented. Ultrasound can be used in the acute phase to exclude obstruction but can not reliably show transient or permanent parenchymal lesions. The presence of reflux can be established with X-ray or direct nuclide cystography. The X-ray technique gives good morphological information and has a grading system with prognostic relevance. Both techniques are invasive and great care must be taken to keep the radiation burden down with the X-ray technique. Indirect nuclide cystography following a renographic study is non-invasive but has a lower sensitivity than direct techniques. More experience is needed with the indirect technique to evaluate the consequences of its apparently low sensitivity. Urography has a limited place in the acute work-up of urinary tract infection but can be used to look for renal scarring 1-2 years after an acute pyelonephritis. The 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan can be used during the acute UTI to show pyelonephritic lesions with good accuracy and/or during the follow-up after six months to show permanent lesions. The acute DMSA scan can be omitted. An early treatment is more important than an early scan! PMID:9695664

  8. Eosinophils in Gastrointestinal Disorders: Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Diseases, Celiac Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, and Parasitic Infections.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Pooja; Furuta, Glenn T

    2015-08-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract provides an intriguing organ for considering the eosinophil's role in health and disease. The normal GI tract, except for the esophagus, is populated by eosinophils that are present throughout the mucosa, raising the possibility that eosinophils participate in innate mechanisms of defense. However, data from clinical studies associates increased numbers of eosinophils with inflammatory GI diseases, prompting concerns that eosinophils may have a deleterious effect on the gut. We present clinical features of 4 disease processes that have been associated with eosinophilia and suggest areas requiring investigation as to their clinical significance and scientific relevance.

  9. Nitrogen partitioning along the equine digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Glade, M J

    1983-10-01

    Twelve adult horses were fed a corn-oats-timothy hay diet containing 2.87% nitrogen (N) for 4 wk and were then killed. Fresh digesta samples were immediately harvested from the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, large colon, small colon, rectum and feces. Total N content of the digesta (on a dry matter basis) increased from the stomach (2.74%) to the duodenum (5.58%; P less than .01), decreased in the cecum (3.10%, P less than .01), remained constant through the large intestine and decreased in the feces (2.10%; P less than .01). High-speed centrifugation of wet digesta and low-speed centrifugation following tungstic acid treatment of wet digesta were comparable in their effectiveness in separating water soluble N-containing compounds (S-N) from insoluble N-containing compounds (P-N). The P-N was further partitioned into neutral detergent soluble (NDS-N) and neutral detergent insoluble (NDF-N) fractions. The NDF-N constituted from 6 to 17% of the total digesta N at any location along the digestive tract. The S-N constituted about 20% of the total digesta N in the stomach, increased to about 80% at mid-jejunum (P less than .01), decreased to 30% in the cecum (P less than .01) and increased throughout the large intestine. The calculation of cumulative apparent digestibilities indicated that total digesta N underwent net disappearance along the entire tract, except in the duodenum. Dietary NDF-N underwent net disappearance throughout the digestive tract. The NDS-N portion of the P-N disappeared in the duodenum, jejunum and small colon, but underwent net appearance in the ileum, cecum and large colon. There was a net appearance of S-N in the duodenum and net disappearances in the ileum and cecum. The shifts in N partitioning along the lower digestive tract and the decreases in N concentrations suggest that the jejunum, ileum, cecum and small colon are major sites of the net absorption of N and that much of the N absorbed in the small colon was supplied by the

  10. [Progresses on macrophages of male reproductive tract].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Jing; Wang, Tao; Wang, Geng-Xin

    2002-12-01

    The review summarized the recent progress on macrophages of male reproductive tract and the action of macrophages on male reproductive physiology and pathology. The close correlation and effect between testicular macrophages and Leydig cells, Sertoli cells, germ cells, hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis were introduced, respectively. At the same time, it pointed out the changes of macrophages' morphology and function in immune orchitis, and their regulation on the development of orchitis. So the complex immune regulation network in testes and testicular macrophages playing an important role on spermatogenesis and the stableness of spermatogenetic microenvironment in testes were further illuminated, which can provide theoretical basis for clinic therapy.

  11. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. PMID:26475949

  12. Endoscopic management of upper urinary tract stones.

    PubMed Central

    Tolley, D. A.; Buist, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    In a two year period from March 1983, 157 patients with upper urinary tract stones were managed primarily by endoscopy. Of 90 patients with renal stones, extraction was achieved in 91% of patients with complete extraction in 76%. Of the remaining patients with ureteric stones, successful extraction was achieved in 75%. Ten patients required open surgery which was for failed extraction in 9. Morbidity is low with a mean hospital stay of 4.7 days for patients with kidney stones, and of 3.7 days for patients undergoing extraction of ureteric stones. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3954313

  13. Urinary tract infections in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Alangaden, George

    2007-11-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infectious complication after renal transplantation. Although Escherichia coli remains the most common cause of UTI, Enterococcus spp and drug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae have emerged as important uropathogens in these patients. As a result, symptomatic UTIs warrant pathogen-specific antibiotic therapy guided by culture and susceptibility data. In the early transplant period, prophylaxis of UTI with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is generally effective. Until the natural history and optimal management of asymptomatic bacteruria are better defined, therapy of asymptomatic bacteruria is generally unnecessary. PMID:17999883

  14. Reducing urinary tract infections in catheterised patients.

    PubMed

    Howe, Pam; Adams, John

    2015-01-20

    Urinary tract infections in catheterised patients continue to present a challenge in reducing healthcare-associated infection. In this article, an infection prevention and control team in one NHS trust reports on using audit results to focus attention on measures to reduce bacterial infections. Educational initiatives have an important role in reducing infection, but there is no single solution to the problem. Practice can be improved using a multi-targeted approach, peer review and clinical audit to allow for shared learning and experiences. These, along with informal education in the clinical area and more formal classroom lectures, can ultimately lead to improved patient outcomes.

  15. Radionuclide imaging of the urinary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1985-11-01

    This article describes the role of nuclear medicine in the evaluation of the genitourinary tract. The technical aspects of radionuclide imaging (radiopharmaceuticals, radiation dosimetry, instrumentation, and method) are briefly presented, and each of the indications for renal scintigraphy--including the evaluation of differential renal function, hypertension, obstruction, renal transplants, masses, trauma, congenital anomalies, vesicoureteral reflux, and infection--are discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide imaging with respect to alternative radiographic examinations (such as intravenous urography, ultrasonography, CT, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging) are emphasized wherever applicable. 136 references.

  16. Select Neoplasms of the Sinonasal Tract.

    PubMed

    García, Joaquín J; Wenig, Bruce M

    2011-12-01

    The sinonasal tract (SNT) includes the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses (maxillary, ethmoid, frontal, and sphenoid) and may give rise to a variety of nonneoplastic and neoplastic proliferations, including benign and malignant neoplasms. The benign neoplasms of the SNT include epithelial neoplasms of surface epithelial origin, minor salivary gland origin, and mesenchymal origin. The spectrum of malignant neoplasms of the SNT includes epithelial malignancies, sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma, malignant salivary gland neoplasms, neuroectodermal neoplasms, neuroendocrine neoplasms, melanocytic neoplasm, and sarcomas. This article concentrates on some of the more common types of benign and malignant neoplasms.

  17. Gastrointestinal disease and its management.

    PubMed

    Jergens, A E

    1997-11-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) diseases involving the alimentary tract and hepatobiliary system are common in geriatric dogs and cats. Inflammatory disorders predominate, but motility disturbances and degenerative lesions may also cause GI signs in affected animals. Treatment is directed at correction of the underlying cause and often requires tissue biopsy. The prognosis is good in many diseases with appropriate drug nutritional, and/or surgical therapy.

  18. Mycoplasmas isolated from the respiratory tract of horses.

    PubMed Central

    Allam, N. M.; Lemcke, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Ten mycoplasmas were isolated from 130 nasopharyngeal swabs from thoroughbred horses with acute respiratory disease and three from 198 apparently normal horses. Two mycoplasmas were isolated from 21 tracheal swabs taken at necropsy. These mycoplasmas, together with six isolated from the equine respiratory tract by other workers, were subjected to biochemical and serological tests. Other properties examined in certain representative strains were appearance under the electron microscope, ability to adsorb or agglutinate the erythrocytes of various animal species and the electrophoretic pattern of the cell proteins. On the basis of these test, mycoplasmas from the equine respiratory tract were divided into seven species. Three species belonged to the genus Acholeplasma, members of which do not require sterol for growth, and were identified as A. laidlawii, A. oculi (formerly A. oculusi) originally isolated from the eyes of goats, and a recently named species A. equifoetale, previously isolated from aborted equine fetuses. Of the four sterol-dependent Mycoplasma species, one was indentified as M. pulmonis, a common rodent pathogen. Another cross-reacted serologically with M. felis and should probably be classified as that species. The other two species probably represent new species peculiar to the horse. One of these, represented by the strains N3 and N11, ferments glucose and is serologically distinct from 19 recognized species of glucose-utilizing mycoplasmas and from two species which do not metabolize either glucose or arginine. The other species, represented by four strains, hydrolyses arginine and, because it is serologically distinct from all the named arginine-hydrolysing Mycoplasma species, the name M. equirhinis sp.nov. is proposed for it. Of the seven species, only M. pulmonis and the glucose-utilizing species represented by N3 and N11 were found exclusively in horses with acute respiratory disease. A. oculi was isolated from an apparently normal horse. The

  19. Maturation Along White Matter Tracts in Human Brain Using a Diffusion Tensor Surface Model Tract-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhang; Zhang, Hui; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Liu, Min; Beaulieu, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Previous diffusion tensor imaging tractography studies have demonstrated exponential patterns of developmental changes for diffusion parameters such as fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) averaged over all voxels in major white matter (WM) tracts of the human brain. However, this assumes that the entire tract is changing in unison, which may not be the case. In this study, a surface model based tract-specific analysis was applied to a cross-sectional cohort of 178 healthy subjects (83 males/95 females) aged from 6 to 30 years to spatially characterize the age-related changes of FA and MD along the trajectory of seven major WM tracts – corpus callosum (CC) and six bilateral tracts. There were unique patterns of regions that showed different exponential and linear rates of increasing FA or decreasing MD and age at which FA or MD levels off along each tract. Faster change rate of FA was observed in genu of CC and frontal-parietal part of superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). Inferior corticospinal tract (CST), posterior regions of association tracts such as inferior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior frontal occipital fasciculus and uncinate fasciculus also displayed earlier changing patterns for FA. MD decreases with age also exhibited this posterior-to-anterior WM maturation pattern for most tracts in females. Both males and females displayed similar FA/MD patterns of change with age along most large tracts; however, males had overall reached the FA maxima or MD minima later compared with females in most tracts with the greater differences occurring in the CST and frontal-parietal part of SLF for MD. Therefore, brain WM development has spatially varying trajectories along tracts that depend on sex and the tract. PMID:26909027

  20. Histamine H4 receptors in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Deiteren, A; De Man, J G; Pelckmans, P A; De Winter, B Y

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a well-established mediator involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms and exerts its effect through activation of four histamine receptors (H1–H4). The histamine H4 receptor is the newest member of this histamine receptor family, and is expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract as well as in the liver, pancreas and bile ducts. Functional studies using a combination of selective and non-selective H4 receptor ligands have rapidly increased our knowledge of H4 receptor involvement in gastrointestinal processes both under physiological conditions and in models of disease. Strong evidence points towards a role for H4 receptors in the modulation of immune-mediated responses in gut inflammation such as in colitis, ischaemia/reperfusion injury, radiation-induced enteropathy and allergic gut reactions. In addition, data have emerged implicating H4 receptors in gastrointestinal cancerogenesis, sensory signalling, and visceral pain as well as in gastric ulceration. These studies highlight the potential of H4 receptor targeted therapy in the treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome and cancer. PMID:25363289

  1. Oxidative status parameters in children with urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Petrovic, Stanislava; Bogavac-Stanojevic, Natasa; Kotur-Stevuljevic, Jelena; Peco-Antic, Amira; Ivanisevic, Ivana; Ivanisevic, Jasmina; Paripovic, Dusan; Jelic-Ivanovic, Zorana

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infectious diseases in children. The aim of this study was to determine the total prooxidant and antioxidant capacity of children with UTI, as well as changes of oxidative status parameters according to acute inflammation persistence and acute kidney injury (AKI) development. Materials and methods: The patients enrolled in the study comprised 50 Caucasian children (median age was 6 months) with UTI. Total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant status (TAS), oxidative stress index (OSI), inflammation marker C-reactive protein (CRP) and renal function parameters urea and creatinine were analyzed in patient’s serums. Results: According to duration of inflammation during UTI, TAS values were significantly higher (0.99 vs. 0.58 mmol/L, P = 0.017) and OSI values were significantly lower (0.032 vs. 0.041 AU, P = 0.037) in the subjects with longer duration of inflammation than in the subjects with shorter duration of inflammation. We did not find significant difference in basal values of oxidative status parameters according to AKI development. Conclusions: OSI values could detect the simultaneous change of TAS and TOS due to change in the oxidative-antioxidant balance during the recovery of children with UTI. TAS and OSI as markers of oxidative stress during UTI are sensitive to accompanying inflammatory condition. Further investigations are needed to evaluate whether TAS, TOS and OSI could be used to monitor disease severity in children with UTI. PMID:24969920

  2. Gastrointestinal Tract Perforation in the Newborn and Child: Imaging Assessment.

    PubMed

    Schooler, Gary R; Davis, Joseph T; Lee, Edward Y

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal tract perforation can arise from various underlying etiologies ranging from congenital causes to ingested foreign bodies in the pediatric patient population. Imaging assessment in patients with suspected gastrointestinal tract perforation plays a central role in making the diagnosis and follow-up evaluation. This article reviews the more common etiologies of gastrointestinal tract perforation in pediatric patients, their imaging manifestations, and strategies for imaging assessment to assist the radiologist in arriving at a timely and accurate diagnosis. PMID:26827739

  3. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt perforations of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Thiong'o, Grace Muthoni; Luzzio, Christopher; Albright, A Leland

    2015-07-01

    OBJECT The purposes of this study were to evaluate the frequency with which children presented with ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt perforations of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, to determine the type of shunts that caused the perforations, and to compare the stiffness of perforating catheters with the stiffness of catheters from other manufacturers. METHODS Medical records were reviewed of 197 children who were admitted with VP shunt malfunction. Catheter stiffness was evaluated by measuring relative resistance to cross-sectional compression, resistance to column buckling, and elasticity in longitudinal bending. Catheter frictional force was measured per unit length. RESULTS Six children were identified whose VP shunts had perforated the GI tract; 2 shunts subsequently protruded through the anal orifice, 1 protruded through the oral cavity, and 3 presented with subcutaneous abscesses that tracked upward from the intestine to the chest. All perforating shunts were Chhabra shunts. Catheter stiffness and resistance to bending were greatest with a Medtronic shunt catheter, intermediate with a Codman catheter, and least with a Chhabra catheter. Frictional force was greatest with a Chhabra catheter and least with a Medtronic catheter. CONCLUSIONS The frequency of perforations by Chhabra shunts appears to be higher than the frequency associated with other shunts. The increased frequency does not correlate with their stiffness but may reflect their greater frictional forces.

  4. Urinary tract infection following ritual Jewish circumcision.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M; Barr, J; Bistritzer, T; Aladjem, M

    1996-11-01

    Circumcision seems to reduce the overall incidence of urinary tract infections (UTI), although a few studies have suggested that ritual circumcision may be a predisposing factor for UTI within the first 2 weeks following the procedure. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible causal relationship between ritual circumcision and UTI. The study comprised 82 infants with UTI, 55 females and 27 males under the age of 1 year. All males were circumcised on the eighth day of life. The median age of infection was 0.75 and 7.0 months for males and females, respectively. Fifty-two percent (14/27) of UTI episodes were diagnosed within the 2 weeks following circumcision. A significantly lower incidence in Escherichia coli-induced UTI was observed in males compared to females, 67% and 93%, respectively. Similarly, the incidence of E. coli-induced UTI was also significantly lower in males presenting within 2 weeks following circumcision (57%) compared to infants presenting prior or more than 2 weeks following the procedure (92%). Positive blood cultures of an identical microorganism were observed in 6/27 males compared to 2/55 females. The incidence of urinary tract malformations and their severity were similar in both sexes. We conclude that the high incidence of UTI following a ritual Jewish circumcision, as well as the relatively high preponderance of bacteria other than E. coli, may suggest a causal relationship between circumcision and UTI.

  5. Neurotransmitters of the retino-hypothalamic tract.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Jens

    2002-07-01

    The brain's biological clock, which, in mammals, is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), generates circadian rhythms in behaviour and physiology. These biological rhythms are adjusted daily (entrained) to the environmental light/dark cycle via a monosynaptic retinofugal pathway, the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). In this review, the anatomical and physiological evidence for glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) as principal transmitters of the RHT will be considered. A combination of immunohistochemistry at both the light- and electron-microscopic levels and tract-tracing studies have revealed that these two transmitters are co-stored in a subpopulation of retinal ganglion cells projecting to the retino-recipient zone of the ventral SCN. The PACAP/glutamate-containing cells, which constitute the RHT, also contain a recently identified photoreceptor protein, melanopsin, which may function as a "circadian photopigment". In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that glutamate and glutamate agonists such as N-methyl- D-aspartate mimic light-induced phase shifts and that application of glutamate antagonists blocks light-induced phase shifts at subjective night indicating that glutamate mediates light signalling to the clock. PACAP in nanomolar concentrations has similar phase-shifting capacity as light and glutamate, whereas PACAP in micromolar concentrations modulates glutamate-induced phase shifts. Possible targets for PACAP and glutamate are the recently identified clock genes Per1 and Per2, which are induced in the SCN by light, glutamate and PACAP at night.

  6. [Carcinosarcomas in female genital tracts: general review].

    PubMed

    Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Casteillo, François; Forest, Fabien; Pacaut, Cécile; Moncharmont, Coralie; Espenel, Sophie; Vallard, Alexis; Langrand Escure, Julien; Collard, Olivier; Peoc'h, Michel; Magné, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Carcinosarcoma, also known as mixed mesodermal tumor or malignant mixed Mullerian tumor (MMMT) is a pathological entity combining a sarcomatous and a carcinomatous component. Found in thoracic, digestive, genitourinary, liver or skin locations, the most common location is the female genital tract. In gynecological tumors, carcinosarcoma accounts for about 2-5% of endometrial cancers, and 1% of ovarian cancers. To date, there is no consensus on the therapeutic strategy. It relies mostly on maximum cytoreductive surgery. Adjuvant therapy remains controversial, and few prospective studies investigating its interest. Retrospective studies show the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy based on platinum in most cases. Radiation therapy has a place in the adjuvant situations of endometrial and cervical carcinosarcoma. A more detailed pathological knowledge, and the use of targeted therapies may be promising in this histological subtype whose prognosis remains very poor. The objective of this study is to present the main principles of carcinosarcoma management in female genital tracts, describing pathological and prognostic features at the same time.

  7. Botulinum Toxin and Gastrointestinal Tract Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Kirsten; Kennedy, Abigail

    2008-01-01

    The history of botulinum toxin is fascinating. First recognized as the cause of botulism nearly 200 years ago, it was originally feared as a deadly poison. Over the last 30 years, however, botulinum toxin has been transformed into a readily available medication used to treat a variety of medical disorders. Interest in the use of botulinum toxin has been particularly strong for patients with spastic smooth muscle disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Patients with achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, gastroparesis, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, and anal fissures have all been treated with botulinum toxin injections, often with impressive results. However, not all patients respond to botulinum toxin therapy, and large randomized controlled trials are lacking for many conditions commonly treated with botulinum toxin. This paper reviews the history, microbiology, and pharmacology of botulinum toxin, discusses its mechanism of action, and then presents recent evidence from the literature regarding the use of botulinum toxin for the treatment of a variety of gastrointestinal tract disorders. PMID:21960915

  8. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The current literature regarding the effects of the gaseous signal molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the gastrointestinal system is reviewed. Bacterial, host and pharmaceutical-derived H2S are all considered and presented according to the physiological or pathophysiological effects of the gaseous signal molecule. These subjects include the toxicology of intestinal H2S with emphasis on bacterial-derived H2S, especially from sulfate-reducing bacteria, the role of endogenous and exogenous H2S in intestinal inflammation, and the roles of H2S in gastrointestinal motility, secretion and nociception. Recent Advances: While its pro- and anti-inflammatory, smooth muscle relaxant, prosecretory, and pro- and antinociceptive actions continue to remain the major effects of H2S in this system; recent findings have expanded the potential molecular targets for H2S in the gastrointestinal tract. Critical Issues: Numerous discrepancies remain in the literature, and definitive molecular targets in this system have not been supported by the use of competitive antagonism. Future Directions: Future work will hopefully resolve discrepancies in the literature and identify molecular targets and mechanisms of action for H2S. It is clear from the current literature that the long-appreciated relationship between H2S and the gastrointestinal tract continues to be strong as we endeavor to unravel its mysteries. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 818–830. PMID:23582008

  9. Estrogens and Male Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wynder, Jalissa L.; Nicholson, Tristan M.; DeFranco, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology and affect the majority of men at some time during their lives. The development of BPH/LUTS is associated with an increased ratio of estrogen to androgen levels, and this ratio, when mimicked in a variety of animals, induces BPH and lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, estrogens have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Numerous endogenous and exogenous estrogens exist in humans. These estrogens act via multiple estrogen receptors to promote or inhibit prostatic hyperplasia and other BPH-associated processes. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue, and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of estrogen action directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area and remains to be elucidated. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation illustrating their potential roles in the development of BPH as therapy. More work will be required to identify estrogen signaling pathways associated with LUTD in order to develop more efficacious drugs for BPH treatment and prevention. PMID:26156791

  10. Lower urinary tract symptoms in men

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, John M

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a highly prevalent and costly condition that affects older men worldwide. Many affected men develop lower urinary tract symptoms, which can have a negative impact on their quality of life. In the past, transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was the mainstay of treatment. However, several efficacious drug treatments have been developed, which have transformed BPH from an acute surgical entity to a chronic medical condition. Specifically, multiple clinical trials have shown that α adrenoceptor antagonists can significantly ameliorate lower urinary tract symptoms. Moreover, 5α reductase inhibitors, alone or combined with an α adrenoceptor antagonist, can reverse the natural course of BPH, reducing the risk of urinary retention and the need for surgical intervention. Newer medical regimens including the use of antimuscarinic agents or phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, have shown promise in men with predominantly storage symptoms and concomitant erectile dysfunction, respectively. For men who do not adequately respond to conservative measures or pharmacotherapy, minimally invasive surgical techniques (such as transurethral needle ablation, microwave thermotherapy, and prostatic urethral lift) may be of benefit, although they lack the durability of TURP. A variety of laser procedures have also been introduced, whose improved hemostatic properties abrogate many of the complications associated with traditional surgery. PMID:25125424

  11. Toward tetherless insufflation of the GI Tract.

    PubMed

    Toennies, Jenna L; Ciuti, Gastone; Smith, Byron F; Menciassi, Arianna; Valdastri, Pietro; Webster, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Toward increasing the diagnostic ability of wireless capsule endoscopy, we propose a method to wirelessly insufflate the Gastrointestinal Tract. By increasing the viewable surface area, it appears likely that capsule-based insufflation may reduce the number of false negative diagnoses made by endoscopic capsules. Our approach to wireless insufflation is to utilize controlled phase transition of a small volume of fluid stored onboard the capsule to a large volume of gas that is then emitted into the intestine. We begin by describing experiments designed to evaluate the amount of gas a capsule must produce to have a beneficial impact on visualization in the colon. We then describe experiments evaluating how much gas can be generated from a given volume of fluid, using Hydrogen Peroxide as our working fluid. We also evaluate thermal effects of the Hydrogen Peroxide reaction. The cumulative result of these experiments is an illustration of the feasibility of carrying a sufficient volume of fluid onboard a wireless capsule to generate a beneficial enhancement in visualization of the interior of the Gastrointestinal Tract, and specifically the colon.

  12. Origin of the Cheney-Palouse Scabland tract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patton, P. C.; Baker, V. R.

    1978-01-01

    The Cheney-Palouse tract of the channeled scabland is the largest continuous tract of scabland in eastern Washington. The tract is composed of a varied assortment of bedrock erosional forms, loess islands, and gravel bars. Prominent bedrock longitudinal grooves and inner channels formed by macroturbulent plucking erosion of the jointed rock. Loess island forms vary as a function of their position within the flow. The three major types (submerged, partially submerged, and subaerially exposed) created sedimentologic conditions and resulting bar forms distinct from one another. Other bar forms, notably expansion bars, account for most of the sedimentation in the tract.

  13. Susceptibility of turkeys to pandemic-H1N1 virus by reproductive tract insemination.

    PubMed

    Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Wasilenko, Jamie L; Spackman, Erica; Suarez, David L; Swayne, David E

    2010-02-03

    The current pandemic influenza A H1N1 2009 (pH1N1) was first recognized in humans with acute respiratory diseases in April 2009 in Mexico, in swine in Canada in June, 2009 with respiratory disease, and in turkeys in Chile in June 2009 with a severe drop in egg production. Several experimental studies attempted to reproduce the disease in turkeys, but failed to produce respiratory infection in turkeys using standard inoculation routes. We demonstrated that pH1N1 virus can infect the reproductive tract of turkey hens after experimental intrauterine inoculation, causing decreased egg production. This route of exposure is realistic in modern turkey production because turkey hens are handled once a week for intrauterine insemination in order to produce fertile eggs. This understanding of virus exposure provides an improved understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease and can improve poultry husbandry to prevent disease outbreaks.

  14. T/NK cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, P; Donnelly, M; O'Reilly, S; Murphy, M

    2001-12-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the sinonasal tract is now recognized as an important cause of destructive midfacial lesions formally designated as idiopathic inflammatory processes, and commonly treated with local radiotherapy in a bid to halt the destructive process. However, left untreated, the natural history of this disease remains largely unknown. We report a case which demonstrates the slow and apparently indolent natural course that these lymphomas, if left untreated, may display, before finally evolving into overwhelming and fatal disease. We also take the opportunity to present a brief synopsis of the evolution of our understanding of this condition and to review the modern literature on it. PMID:11779343

  15. The role of multiplex PCR test in identification of bacterial pathogens in lower respiratory tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Ozlem; Aydemir, Yusuf; Ozdemir, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Lower respiratory tract infection is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality. However establishing a microbial diagnosis for patients with lower respiratory tract infection is still challenging and is often achieved in only half of cases by conventional methods. This study was designed to compare the fast responsive PCR method with the culture method in lower respiratory tract infections and to evaluate the reliability of multiplex PCR method. Methods: One hundred ninety seven patients with the symptoms of acute lower respiratory tract infection, and diagnosed with community-acquired pneumonia, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and exacerbations of bronchiectasis were included in the study. Both culture and PCR methods was performed for the isolation of most commonly seen bacteria, from sputum, nasopharyngeal swabs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples. Results: While at least one bacterial isolation was determined in 62 (31.5%) of all patients with culture method, this number increased to 125 (63.5%) with multiplex PCR. The bacteria most commonly identified by PCR were S. pneumoniae (32%) and H. influenzae (31%). There was a significant difference between PCR and culture in terms of multi-factor detection rates (p<0.005). Multiple bacteria were detected in only two cases in cultures; however, multiple pathogens were detected in 47 cases with PCR. Conclusions: Conventional methods, such as culture and serology are not always adequate to detect the pathogens in lower respiratory tract. Real-time PCR assays proved highly sensitive and rapid. The prevalence of bacteria and multiple agent detected by real-time PCR compared with culture was substantially higher. Widespread use of PCR methods, by providing the immediate and appropriate ''agent specific antibiotic treatment'' of LRTI, will help reduce failure and contributes to a reduction in antibiotic resistance. PMID:25225517

  16. Frontal White Matter Tracts Sustaining Speech Production in Primary Progressive Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Caverzasi, Eduardo; Binney, Richard J.; Henry, Maya L.; Lobach, Iryna; Block, Nikolas; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Dronkers, Nina; Miller, Bruce L.; Henry, Roland G.; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    In primary progressive aphasia (PPA), speech and language difficulties are caused by neurodegeneration of specific brain networks. In the nonfluent/agrammatic variant (nfvPPA), motor speech and grammatical deficits are associated with atrophy in a left fronto-insular-striatal network previously implicated in speech production. In vivo dissection of the crossing white matter (WM) tracts within this “speech production network” is complex and has rarely been performed in health or in PPA. We hypothesized that damage to these tracts would be specific to nfvPPA and would correlate with differential aspects of the patients' fluency abilities. We prospectively studied 25 PPA and 21 healthy individuals who underwent extensive cognitive testing and 3 T MRI. Using residual bootstrap Q-ball probabilistic tractography on high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (HARDI), we reconstructed pathways connecting posterior inferior frontal, inferior premotor, insula, supplementary motor area (SMA) complex, striatum, and standard ventral and dorsal language pathways. We extracted tract-specific diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics to assess changes across PPA variants and perform brain–behavioral correlations. Significant WM changes in the left intrafrontal and frontostriatal pathways were found in nfvPPA, but not in the semantic or logopenic variants. Correlations between tract-specific DTI metrics with cognitive scores confirmed the specific involvement of this anterior–dorsal network in fluency and suggested a preferential role of a posterior premotor-SMA pathway in motor speech. This study shows that left WM pathways connecting the speech production network are selectively damaged in nfvPPA and suggests that different tracts within this system are involved in subcomponents of fluency. These findings emphasize the emerging role of diffusion imaging in the differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25031413

  17. Proteolytic activity and immunogenicity of oral bromelain within the gastrointestinal tract of mice.

    PubMed

    Hale, Laura P

    2004-02-01

    Bromelain is a mixture of proteinases derived from pineapple stem that is marketed by health food stores as a "digestive aid". A number of studies suggest that bromelain may also have anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, including an anecdotal report describing potential efficacy in inflammatory bowel disease. We and others have previously shown that proteolytically active bromelain removes certain cell surface molecules and affects leukocyte migration, activation, and production of cytokines and inflammatory mediators in vitro. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ingested bromelain retains proteolytic activity within the murine gastrointestinal tract in vivo. The proteolytic activity of bromelain was determined in vitro using model substrates or immunofluorescence assays after administration of various doses and formulations orally to mice. Immune responses against bromelain were detected by enzyme immunoassays. When formulated in antacid, oral bromelain retained substantial proteolytic activity throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Bromelain concentrations within the colon were dependent on both dose and formulation and were sufficient to remove bromelain-sensitive molecules from both leukocytes and colon epithelial cells. Peak activity in the stool was observed 4 h after oral dosing. Although anti-bromelain IgG was detected in both serum and stool after long-term oral therapy, these antibodies did not prevent bromelain proteolytic activity within the gastrointestinal tract. These studies demonstrate that bromelain enzymes can remain intact and proteolytically active within the murine gastrointestinal tract. They provide further support for the hypothesis that oral bromelain may potentially modify inflammation within the gastrointestinal tract via local proteolytic activity within the colonic microenvironment.

  18. Bacterial flora of the lower respiratory tract in children with bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Fayon, M; Just, J; Thien, H V; Chiba, T; Pascual, L; Sandouk, G; Grimfeld, A

    1999-11-01

    The aims of this retrospective study were to (i) determine the risk of contamination of lower respiratory tract samples obtained during fiberoscopy in children; (ii) determine the incidence and profile of the bacterial flora of the lower respiratory tract in a selected group of asthmatic children at high risk for bacterial infection; and (iii) identify risk markers for such findings. In 29 asthmatic children, comparison of bacterial cultures of specimens obtained from the upper and, lower respiratory tracts showed that contamination was a possibility in only 3.4% (1/29) of cases. The results from bacterial samples obtained via flexible bronchoscopy in a further 273 consecutively investigated physician-diagnosed asthmatic children were analysed. Patients were selected for bronchoscopy if they had severe chronic asthma or in order to exclude other diseases able to provoke wheezing. Their mean (SD) and median ages were 32.2 (38.3) and 17.5 mo, respectively. The incidence of positive bacterial cultures was 12.1% (33/273 patients). Bacterial flora included H. influenzae (39.5%, 15/38), B. catarrhalis (23.7%, 9/38), Neisseria species (7.9%, 3/38), M. pneumoniae (7.9%, 3/38), P. non-aeruginosa (5.3%, 2/38) and P. aeruginosa (2.6%, 1/38). No clinical or radiological markers were significantly associated with lower respiratory tract bacterial infection. Large quantities of bacteria were present in the lower respiratory tracts of a substantial number of children (1/8) in this selected group of asthmatics. For the moment, however, the clinical implications of this finding remain unclear.

  19. A longitudinal functional analysis framework for analysis of white matter tract statistics.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Gilmore, John H; Geng, Xiujuan; Styner, Martin A; Chen, Kehui; Wang, Jane-Ling; Zhu, Hongtu

    2013-01-01

    Many longitudinal imaging studies have been/are being widely conducted to use diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to better understand white matter maturation in normal controls and diseased subjects. There is an urgent demand for the development of statistical methods for analyzing diffusion properties along major fiber tracts obtained from longitudinal DTI studies. Jointly analyzing fiber-tract diffusion properties and covariates from longitudinal studies raises several major challenges including (i) infinite-dimensional functional response data, (ii) complex spatial-temporal correlation structure, and (iii) complex spatial smoothness. To address these challenges, this article is to develop a longitudinal functional analysis framework (LFAF) to delineate the dynamic changes of diffusion properties along major fiber tracts and their association with a set of covariates of interest (e.g., age and group status) and the structure of the variability of these white matter tract properties in various longitudinal studies. Our LFAF consists of a functional mixed effects model for addressing all three challenges, an efficient method for spatially smoothing varying coefficient functions, an estimation method for estimating the spatial-temporal correlation structure, a test procedure with a global test statistic for testing hypotheses of interest associated with functional response, and a simultaneous confidence band for quantifying the uncertainty in the estimated coefficient functions. Simulated data are used to evaluate the finite sample performance of LFAF and to demonstrate that LFAF significantly outperforms a voxel-wise mixed model method. We apply LFAF to study the spatial-temporal dynamics of white-matter fiber tracts in a clinical study of neurodevelopment.

  20. FMEM: functional mixed effects modeling for the analysis of longitudinal white matter Tract data.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Gilmore, John H; Geng, Xiujuan; Martin, Styner; Chen, Kehui; Wang, Jane-ling; Zhu, Hongtu

    2014-01-01

    Many longitudinal imaging studies have collected repeated diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging data to understand white matter maturation and structural connectivity pattern in normal controls and diseased subjects. There is an urgent demand for the development of statistical methods for the analysis of diffusion properties along fiber tracts and clinical data obtained from longitudinal studies. Jointly analyzing repeated fiber-tract diffusion properties and covariates (e.g., age or gender) raises several major challenges including (i) infinite-dimensional functional response data, (ii) complex spatial-temporal correlation structure, and (iii) complex spatial smoothness. To address these challenges, this article is to develop a functional mixed effects modeling (FMEM) framework to delineate the dynamic changes of diffusion properties along major fiber tracts and their association with a set of covariates of interest and the structure of the variability of these white matter tract properties in various longitudinal studies. Our FMEM consists of a functional mixed effects model for addressing all three challenges, an efficient method for spatially smoothing varying coefficient functions, an estimation method for estimating the spatial-temporal correlation structure, a test procedure with local and global test statistics for testing hypotheses of interest associated with functional response, and a simultaneous confidence band for quantifying the uncertainty in the estimated coefficient functions. Simulated data are used to evaluate the finite sample performance of FMEM and to demonstrate that FMEM significantly outperforms the standard pointwise mixed effects modeling approach. We apply FMEM to study the spatial-temporal dynamics of white-matter fiber tracts in a clinical study of neurodevelopment.

  1. [Consensus statement haemorrhoidal disease].

    PubMed

    Aigner, Felix; Conrad, Friedrich; Haunold, Ingrid; Pfeifer, Johann; Salat, Andreas; Wunderlich, Max; Fortelny, Rene; Fritsch, Helga; Glöckler, Markus; Hauser, Hubert; Heuberger, Andreas; Karner-Hanusch, Judith; Kopf, Christoph; Lechner, Peter; Riss, Stefan; Roka, Sebastian; Scheyer, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Haemorrhoidal disease belongs to the most common benign disorders in the lower gastrointestinal tract. Treatment options comprise conservative as well as surgical therapy still being applied arbitrarily in accordance with the surgeon's expertise. The aim of this consensus statement was therefore to assess a stage-dependent approach for treatment of haemorrhoidal disease to derive evidence-based recommendations for clinical routine. The most common methods are discussed with respect of haemorrhoidal disease in extraordinary conditions like pregnancy or inflammatory bowel disease and recurrent haemorrhoids. Tailored haemorrhoidectomy is preferable for individualized treatment with regard to the shortcomings of the traditional Goligher classification in solitary or circular haemorrhoidal prolapses.

  2. Tract Specific Reproducibility of Tractography Based Morphology and Diffusion Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Besseling, René M. H.; Jansen, Jacobus F. A.; Overvliet, Geke M.; Vaessen, Maarten J.; Braakman, Hilde M. H.; Hofman, Paul A. M.; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Backes, Walter H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The reproducibility of tractography is important to determine its sensitivity to pathological abnormalities. The reproducibility of tract morphology has not yet been systematically studied and the recently developed tractography contrast Tract Density Imaging (TDI) has not yet been assessed at the tract specific level. Materials and Methods Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and probabilistic constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) tractography are performed twice in 9 healthy subjects. Tractography is based on common space seed and target regions and performed for several major white matter tracts. Tractograms are converted to tract segmentations and inter-session reproducibility of tract morphology is assessed using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The coefficient of variation (COV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) are calculated of the following tract metrics: fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), volume, and TDI. Analyses are performed both for proximal (deep white matter) and extended (including subcortical white matter) tract segmentations. Results Proximal DSC values were 0.70–0.92. DSC values were 5–10% lower in extended compared to proximal segmentations. COV/ICC values of FA, ADC, volume and TDI were 1–4%/0.65–0.94, 2–4%/0.62–0.94, 3–22%/0.53–0.96 and 8–31%/0.48–0.70, respectively, with the lower COV and higher ICC values found in the proximal segmentations. Conclusion For all investigated metrics, reproducibility depended on the segmented tract. FA and ADC had relatively low COV and relatively high ICC, indicating clinical potential. Volume had higher COV but its moderate to high ICC values in most tracts still suggest subject-differentiating power. Tract TDI had high COV and relatively low ICC, which reflects unfavorable reproducibility. PMID:22485157

  3. Kinetics of DNA duplex formation: A-tracts versus AT-tracts.

    PubMed

    Wyer, Jean Ann; Kristensen, Mads Bejder; Jones, Nykola C; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2014-09-21

    The hybridisation and melting of DNA strands are critical steps in many biological processes, but still a deeper understanding of the kinetics is lacking. This is evident from the absence of a clear correlation between rate constants for duplex formation and the number of bases in the strand or the sequence. Here we have probed differences between formation times of A-tracts and AT-tracts by studying complementary model strands mainly comprised of adenine (A) and thymine (T) in stopped-flow (SF) experiments. These strands are relevant as DNA replication begins in regions with a large number of AT base pairs. Interpretation of our results is aided by secondary-structure modelling where both the fractions of the different types of structures and the number of paired bases in the lowest-energy ones are determined. The model is based on calculation of free energies using fixed values for enthalpies and entropies associated with base pairing and a stochastic sampling of the possible structures. We find that the strand length affects rates: the activation energy for the formation of short (16-base pairs) A-tracts is larger than that for longer ones (20-base pairs). Activation energies for the formation of AT-tracts are an order of magnitude larger, and larger for shorter strands than for long ones. These higher activation energies are in agreement with the fact that the fraction of unpaired bases in the constituent AT-tract strands is less than in those which comprise the A-tracts. That the pre-structures of the single strands significantly affect rates is also used to rationalise the results obtained for two pairs of complementary 12-mer strands that have the same bases but in a different sequence; we report here similar activation energies as reported earlier and that these are strongly sequence dependent. Finally, we demonstrate that SF can be coupled with the measurement of circular dichroism (CD) in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region, taking advantage of a

  4. Dysbiosis of upper respiratory tract microbiota in elderly pneumonia patients.

    PubMed

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Huijskens, Elisabeth G W; Wyllie, Anne L; Biesbroek, Giske; van den Bergh, Menno R; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Wang, Xinhui; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Bonten, Marc J; Rossen, John W A; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. We hypothesize that dysbiosis between regular residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiome, that is balance between commensals and potential pathogens, is involved in pathogen overgrowth and consequently disease. We compared oropharyngeal microbiota of elderly pneumonia patients (n=100) with healthy elderly (n=91) by 16S-rRNA-based sequencing and verified our findings in young adult pneumonia patients (n=27) and young healthy adults (n=187). Microbiota profiles differed significantly between elderly pneumonia patients and healthy elderly (PERMANOVA, P<0.0005). Highly similar differences were observed between microbiota profiles of young adult pneumonia patients and their healthy controls. Clustering resulted in 11 (sub)clusters including 95% (386/405) of samples. We observed three microbiota profiles strongly associated with pneumonia (P<0.05) and either dominated by lactobacilli (n=11), Rothia (n=51) or Streptococcus (pseudo)pneumoniae (n=42). In contrast, three other microbiota clusters (in total n=183) were correlated with health (P<0.05) and were all characterized by more diverse profiles containing higher abundances of especially Prevotella melaninogenica, Veillonella and Leptotrichia. For the remaining clusters (n=99), the association with health or disease was less clear. A decision tree model based on the relative abundance of five bacterial community members in URT microbiota showed high specificity of 95% and sensitivity of 84% (89% and 73%, respectively, after cross-validation) for differentiating pneumonia patients from healthy individuals. These results suggest that pneumonia in elderly and young adults is associated with dysbiosis of the URT microbiome with bacterial overgrowth of single species and absence of distinct anaerobic bacteria. Whether the observed microbiome changes are a cause or a consequence of the development of pneumonia or merely coincide with

  5. Individualized medicine and the microbiome in reproductive tract

    PubMed Central

    Braundmeier, Andrea G.; Lenz, Katherine M.; Inman, Kristin S.; Chia, Nicholas; Jeraldo, Patricio; Walther-António, Marina R. S.; Berg Miller, Margret E.; Yang, Fang; Creedon, Douglas J.; Nelson, Heidi; White, Bryan A.

    2015-01-01

    Humans have evolved along with the millions of microorganisms that populate their bodies. These microbes (1014) outnumber human cells by 10 to 1 and account for 3 × 106 genes, more than ten times the 25,000 human genes. This microbial metagenome acts as our “other genome” and like our own genes, is unique to the individual. Recent international efforts such as the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) and the MetaHIT Project have helped catalog these microbial genomes using culture-independent, high-throughput, next-generation sequencing. This manuscript will describe recent efforts to define microbial diversity in the female reproductive tract because of the impact that microbial function has on reproductive efficiency. In this review, we will discuss current evidence that microbial communities are critical for maintaining reproductive health and how perturbations of microbial community structures can impact reproductive health from the aspect of infection, reproductive cyclicity, pregnancy, and disease states. Investigations of the human microbiome are propelling interventional strategies from treating medical populations to treating individual patients. In particular, we highlight how understanding and defining microbial community structures in different disease and physiological states have lead to the discovery of biomarkers and, more importantly, the development and implementation of microbial intervention strategies (probiotics) into modern day medicine. Finally this review will conclude with a literature summary of the effectiveness of microbial intervention strategies that have been implemented in animal and human models of disease and the potential for integrating these microbial intervention strategies into standard clinical practice. PMID:25883569

  6. Dysbiosis of upper respiratory tract microbiota in elderly pneumonia patients.

    PubMed

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Huijskens, Elisabeth G W; Wyllie, Anne L; Biesbroek, Giske; van den Bergh, Menno R; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Wang, Xinhui; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Bonten, Marc J; Rossen, John W A; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. We hypothesize that dysbiosis between regular residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiome, that is balance between commensals and potential pathogens, is involved in pathogen overgrowth and consequently disease. We compared oropharyngeal microbiota of elderly pneumonia patients (n=100) with healthy elderly (n=91) by 16S-rRNA-based sequencing and verified our findings in young adult pneumonia patients (n=27) and young healthy adults (n=187). Microbiota profiles differed significantly between elderly pneumonia patients and healthy elderly (PERMANOVA, P<0.0005). Highly similar differences were observed between microbiota profiles of young adult pneumonia patients and their healthy controls. Clustering resulted in 11 (sub)clusters including 95% (386/405) of samples. We observed three microbiota profiles strongly associated with pneumonia (P<0.05) and either dominated by lactobacilli (n=11), Rothia (n=51) or Streptococcus (pseudo)pneumoniae (n=42). In contrast, three other microbiota clusters (in total n=183) were correlated with health (P<0.05) and were all characterized by more diverse profiles containing higher abundances of especially Prevotella melaninogenica, Veillonella and Leptotrichia. For the remaining clusters (n=99), the association with health or disease was less clear. A decision tree model based on the relative abundance of five bacterial community members in URT microbiota showed high specificity of 95% and sensitivity of 84% (89% and 73%, respectively, after cross-validation) for differentiating pneumonia patients from healthy individuals. These results suggest that pneumonia in elderly and young adults is associated with dysbiosis of the URT microbiome with bacterial overgrowth of single species and absence of distinct anaerobic bacteria. Whether the observed microbiome changes are a cause or a consequence of the development of pneumonia or merely coincide with

  7. Unraveling the Mystery of an Environmental Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur Grollman

    2008-05-15

    For many years, residents of farming villages along the Danube River basin suffered from a fatal kidney disease and an associated urinary tract cancer. The cause of the disease remained a mystery for more than 50 years. Recently, however, Arthur Grollman and his colleagues have determined that home-baked bread is implicated in the disease, known as Balkan endemic nephropathy.

  8. A Review of Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, C D W; Bholah, R; Bunchman, T E

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is complex in both adults and children, but the disease is far from the same between these populations. Here we review the marked differences in etiology, comorbidities, impact of disease on growth and quality of life, issues unique to adolescents and transitions to adult care, and special considerations of congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies for transplantation. PMID:26766175

  9. [Mucolytics in acute and chronic respiratory tract disorders. I. Pathophysiology and mechanisms of action].

    PubMed

    Kupczyk, Maciej; Kuna, Piotr

    2002-03-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is a cardinal sign of both acute and chronic pulmonary diseases. Normally, mucus protects respiratory tract, but its overproduction leads to airway obstruction and promotes bacterial colonization. In the first part of our review we outlined the possible factors responsible for mucus hypersecretion and clinical consequences of this process. Mucolytic agents such as Ambroxol and N-acetylcysteine are able to alter the secretion of mucus and its physical properties which results in improvement of mucociliary clearance. Mechanisms of action and indications for use of mucolytics are presented. Mucolytics have been shown to have a role in improving lung functions and patients' quality of life. Undoubtedly they are useful as an adjunctive therapy of respiratory tract disorders. PMID:12053600

  10. The role of micronutrients in the risk of urinary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bukowczan, Jakub; Sobczynski, Robert; Leszczyszyn, Jaroslaw; Chlosta, Piotr L.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate, bladder and kidney cancers remain the most common urological malignancies worldwide, and the prevention and treatment of these diseases pose a challenge to clinicians. In recent decades, many studies have been conducted to assess the association between supplementation with selected vitamins and elements and urinary tract tumour initiation and development. Here, we review the relationship between vitamins A, B, D, and E, in addition to calcium, selenium, and zinc, and the risk of developing prostate, kidney and bladder cancer. A relatively consistent body of evidence suggests that large daily doses of calcium (> 2,000 mg/day) increase the risk of prostate cancer. Similarly, supplementation with 400 IU/day of vitamin E carries a significant risk of prostate cancer. However, there have been many conflicting results regarding the effect of these nutrients on kidney and bladder neoplasms. Moreover, the role of other compounds in urinary tract carcinogenesis needs further clarification. PMID:27186192

  11. Escherichia coli mediated urinary tract infections: are there distinct uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) pathotypes?

    PubMed

    Marrs, Carl F; Zhang, Lixin; Foxman, Betsy

    2005-11-15

    A variety of virulence genes are associated with Escherichia coli mediated urinary tract infections. Particular sets of virulence factors shared by bacterial strains directing them through a particular pathogenesis process are called a "pathotype." Comparison of co-occurrence of potential urinary tract infection (UTI) virulence genes among different E. coli isolates from fecal and UTI collections provides evidence for multiple pathotypes of uropathogenic E. coli, but current understanding of critical genetic differences defining the pathotypes is limited. Discovery of additional E. coli genes involved in uropathogenesis and determination of their distribution and co-occurrences will further define UPEC pathotypes and allow for a more detailed analysis of how these pathotypes might differ in how they cause disease.

  12. Updating the ICRP human respiratory tract model.

    PubMed

    Bailey, M R; Ansoborlo, E; Guilmette, R A; Paquet, F

    2007-01-01

    The ICRP Task Group on Internal Dosimetry is developing new Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides (OIR) documents. Application of the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) requires a review of the lung-to-blood absorption characteristics of inhaled compounds of importance in radiological protection. Where appropriate, material-specific absorption parameter values will be given, and for other compounds, assignments to default Types will be made on current information. Publication of the OIR provides an opportunity for updating the HRTM in the light of experience and new information. The main possibilities under consideration relate to the two main clearance pathways. Recent studies provide important new data on rates of particle transport from the nasal passages, bronchial tree (slow phase) and alveolar region. The review of absorption rates provides a database of parameter values from which consideration can be given to deriving typical values for default Types F, M and S materials, and element-specific rapid dissolution rates. PMID:18192668

  13. Leukaemic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Cornes, J. S.; Jones, T. Gwynfor; Fisher, Gloria B.

    1962-01-01

    This study is based on the clinical records and post-mortem findings of 264 patients with leukaemia. Gross leukaemic lesions in the gastrointestinal tract were found in 39 patients, an overall incidence of 14·8%. The incidence in all types of acute leukaemia was 18·4%, in chronic leukaemias 9·6%, and in myeloid leukaemia 10·9%. The ileum, stomach, and proximal colon were the sites most commonly affected. Four types of lesion were found: raised leukaemic nodules, leukaemic plaques, diffuse infiltrations with a convoluted brain-like appearance of the mucosal folds, and a multiple leukaemic polyposis. The clinical and pathological features of these lesions are described, and references are given to similar cases reported in the literature. Images PMID:13881389

  14. Do cranberries help prevent urinary tract infections?

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Janet

    Cranberries are widely used in the treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and for those at risk of such infections. With the growing resistance to antibiotics, cranberries can be viewed as a useful non-pharmaceutical remedy (Lavender, 2000). The initial studies that looked at the effects of cranberries on urine showed that the excretion of hippuric acid from the berries helped the urine to remain acidic, which could explain why they could be used to treat and prevent infection (Harkin, 2000). Recent studies argue that cranberries prevent Escherichia coli (E. coli) from adhering to uroepithelial cells in the bladder (Howell and Foxman, 2002). Cranberries contain a group of compounds, called proanthocyanidins, which are condensed tannins (Gray, 2002; Lowe and Fagelman, 2001; Kuzminski, 1996). These are thought to be the key factors in inhibiting E. coli adherence.

  15. Physiologic Status Monitoring via the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, S.; Hughes, T.; Boettcher, T.; Barman, R.; Langer, R.; Swiston, A.

    2015-01-01

    Reliable, real-time heart and respiratory rates are key vital signs used in evaluating the physiological status in many clinical and non-clinical settings. Measuring these vital signs generally requires superficial attachment of physically or logistically obtrusive sensors to subjects that may result in skin irritation or adversely influence subject performance. Given the broad acceptance of ingestible electronics, we developed an approach that enables vital sign monitoring internally from the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report initial proof-of-concept large animal (porcine) experiments and a robust processing algorithm that demonstrates the feasibility of this approach. Implementing vital sign monitoring as a stand-alone technology or in conjunction with other ingestible devices has the capacity to significantly aid telemedicine, optimize performance monitoring of athletes, military service members, and first-responders, as well as provide a facile method for rapid clinical evaluation and triage. PMID:26580216

  16. Physiologic Status Monitoring via the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Traverso, G; Ciccarelli, G; Schwartz, S; Hughes, T; Boettcher, T; Barman, R; Langer, R; Swiston, A

    2015-01-01

    Reliable, real-time heart and respiratory rates are key vital signs used in evaluating the physiological status in many clinical and non-clinical settings. Measuring these vital signs generally requires superficial attachment of physically or logistically obtrusive sensors to subjects that may result in skin irritation or adversely influence subject performance. Given the broad acceptance of ingestible electronics, we developed an approach that enables vital sign monitoring internally from the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report initial proof-of-concept large animal (porcine) experiments and a robust processing algorithm that demonstrates the feasibility of this approach. Implementing vital sign monitoring as a stand-alone technology or in conjunction with other ingestible devices has the capacity to significantly aid telemedicine, optimize performance monitoring of athletes, military service members, and first-responders, as well as provide a facile method for rapid clinical evaluation and triage.

  17. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Patient Received Combination Chemotherapy Gemcitabine, Cisplatin, and 5-FU for Biliary Tract Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aznab, Mozaffar; Khazaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome has been an acute, usually self-limiting disease of the skin and mucous membranes. This case report has presented an evidence of the development Stevens - Johnson syndrome associated with combination chemotherapy administration of 5FU, gemcitabin and cisplatin in a patient with biliary tract cancer. Our case was a 54-year-old woman patient, a case of biliary tract cancer who has developed more severe symptoms of Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Diagnosis has confirmed by skin biopsy of an affected area .The patient has improved with supportive care, and during 25 day occurred recovery. Although Stevens-Johnson syndrome has been a rare toxicity, physicians should pay a special attention to the monitoring of biliary tract cancer patients on combination chemotherapy with 5FU, cisplatin and gemcitabin.

  18. Managing lower urinary tract symptoms in men.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Kenneth R; Aning, Jonathan J

    2016-04-01

    Male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common and increase in prevalence with age. Up to 90% of men aged 50 to 80 may suffer from troublesome LUTS. Men may attend expressing direct concern about micturition, describing one or more LUTS and the related impact on their quality of life. Frequently men may present for other medical or urological reasons such as concern regarding their risk of having prostate cancer or erectile dysfunction but on taking a history bothersome LUTS are identified. Men may present late in the community with urinary retention: the inability to pass urine. A thorough urological history is essential to inform management. It is important to determine whether men have storage or voiding LUTS or both. All patients must have a systematic comprehensive examination including genitalia and a digital rectal examination. Investigations performed in primary care should be guided by the history and examination findings, taking into account the impact of the LUTS on the individual's quality of life. Current NICE guidelines recommend the following to be performed at initial assessment: frequency volume chart (FVC); urine dipstick to detect blood, glucose, protein, leucocytes and nitrites; and prostate specific antigen. Men should be referred for urological review if they have: bothersome LUTS which have not responded to conservative management or medical therapy; LUTS in association with recurrent or persistent UTIs; urinary retention; renal impairment suspected to be secondary to lower urinary tract dysfunction; or suspected urological malignancy. All patients not meeting criteria for immediate referral to urology can be managed initially in primary care. Based on history, examination and investigation findings an individualised management plan should be formulated. Basic lifestyle advice should be given regarding reduction or avoidance of caffeinated products and alcohol. The FVC should guide advice regarding fluid intake management and all

  19. Myocardialization of the cardiac outflow tract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van den Hoff, M. J.; Moorman, A. F.; Ruijter, J. M.; Lamers, W. H.; Bennington, R. W.; Markwald, R. R.; Wessels, A.

    1999-01-01

    During development, the single-circuited cardiac tube transforms into a double-circuited four-chambered heart by a complex process of remodeling, differential growth, and septation. In this process the endocardial cushion tissues of the atrioventricular junction and outflow tract (OFT) play a crucial role as they contribute to the mesenchymal components of the developing septa and valves in the developing heart. After fusion, the endocardial ridges in the proximal portion of the OFT initially form a mesenchymal outlet septum. In the adult heart, however, this outlet septum is basically a muscular structure. Hence, the mesenchyme of the proximal outlet septum has to be replaced by cardiomyocytes. We have dubbed this process "myocardialization." Our immunohistochemical analysis of staged chicken hearts demonstrates that myocardialization takes place by ingrowth of existing myocardium into the mesenchymal outlet septum. Compared to other events in cardiac septation, it is a relatively late process, being initialized around stage H/H28 and being basically completed around stage H/H38. To unravel the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the induction and regulation of myocardialization, an in vitro culture system in which myocardialization could be mimicked and manipulated was developed. Using this in vitro myocardialization assay it was observed that under the standard culture conditions (i) whole OFT explants from stage H/H20 and younger did not spontaneously myocardialize the collagen matrix, (ii) explants from stage H/H21 and older spontaneously formed extensive myocardial networks, (iii) the myocardium of the OFT could be induced to myocardialize and was therefore "myocardialization-competent" at all stages tested (H/H16-30), (iv) myocardialization was induced by factors produced by, most likely, the nonmyocardial component of the outflow tract, (v) at none of the embryonic stages analyzed was ventricular myocardium myocardialization-competent, and finally

  20. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Humberto R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥103 CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5–14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  1. The effect of spaceflight on retino-hypothalamic tract development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, D. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Tang, I. H.; Fuller, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers examined the effect of late prenatal exposure to microgravity on the development of the retina, retinohypothalamic tract, geniculo-hypothalamic tract, and suprachiasmatic nucleus. Results indicate an effect on c-fos activity in the intergeniculate leaflet between gestational day 20 and postnatal day 8, suggesting a delay in development of the circadian timing system.

  2. Reproductive tract infections in northern Vietnam: health providers' diagnostic dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, My Hu'o'ng; Gammeltoft, Tine; Christoffersen, Sarah Vigh; Tran, Thu Thuy; Rasch, Vibeke

    2009-01-01

    Research was conducted on reproductive tract infections among women obtaining induced abortions at Ph[image omitted]-[image omitted] hospital in Haiphong City, a major maternity hospital in northern Vietnam. The research aimed to explore how clinicians and lab-technicians diagnose reproductive tract infections and the difficulties they experience in establishing exact diagnoses. A combination of both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies was employed. The quantitative research involved 748 abortion-seeking women; the qualitative research was conducted with 10 doctors and 10 lab-technicians providing reproductive health services. A marked tendency was observed among both clinicians and lab-technicians to overdiagnose reproductive tract infections and to prescribe antibiotics routinely. Social, cultural, and clinical factors associated with the tendency to overdiagnose reproductive tract infections included: inadequate training of health staff, lack of equipment, and cultural assumptions regarding the overwhelming prevalence of reproductive tract infections in Vietnamese women, especially among those who receive abortion services. Misconceptions of reproductive tract infections led to substantial over-diagnosis and unnecessary treatment of reproductive tract infections in this hospital. To enhance reproductive tract infection care, providers need to be sensitized to the social and medical consequences of their own cultural perceptions and to increase their awareness of the risks associated with overuse of antibiotics. PMID:19533512

  3. Bovine coronaviruses from the respiratory tract: Antigenic and genetic diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine corona viruses (BoCV) isolated from respiratory tract, nasal swab and broncho alveolar washing fluid samples were evaluated for genetic and antigenic differences. These BoCV from the respiratory tract of healthy and clinically ill cattle with BRD signs were compared to reference and vaccine ...

  4. MicroRNA 141 Expression Is a Potential Prognostic Marker of Biliary Tract Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaihwan; Ryu, Ji Kon; Lee, Sang Hyub; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims In recent years, a large number of micro-ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) have been identified as putative prognostic biomarkers for solid cancers because of their role in controlling the expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The aim of this study was to verify the utility of miRNA 141 as a prognostic biomarker of biliary tract cancers. Methods From June 2010 to June 2012, common bile duct cancer tissue samples and matched noncancerous tissues from the ampulla of Vater were obtained from patients with biliary tract cancer undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays, we measured the mean relative expression levels of miRNA 141 in both groups of tissues. Overexpression of miRNA 141 was defined as a greater than 2-fold increase in expression levels as determined by the 2−ΔΔCt method. Results In a cohort of 38 patients with biliary tract cancers (seven gallbladder, 13 hilar, and 18 distal bile duct cancers), 26 patients (68.4%) were male, and the median age was 69.5 (52 to 85) years. Nineteen patients (50%) had undergone R0 resection procedures, including three Whipple operations, seven pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomies, six bile duct resections, and three extended lobectomies. Among the patients who had undergone R0 resection, the overexpression of miRNA 141 was significantly associated with shorter disease-free survival and a greater risk of angiolymphatic invasion. Among the patients who did not undergo R0 resection, miRNA 141 overexpression was significantly associated with reduced overall survival. Conclusions Overexpression of miRNA 141 is an indicator of a poor prognosis in patients with biliary tract cancer, suggesting that miRNA 141 may be a valuable prognostic biomarker of this disease. PMID:27172928

  5. Pathophysiological and disease constraints on aerosol delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrity, T.R.

    1989-01-01

    The dose of inhaled particles to the respiratory tract depends upon many factors. These factors include the size of the particles, the pattern of breathing (flow and tidal volume), the physical properties of the articles (hygroscopic or non-hygroscopic), anatomy of the respiratory tract, and the pathophysiologic status of the respiratory tract. In addition to these factors, which are primarily related to the deposition of particles, the rate of particle clearance from the respiratory tract also influences the dose of particles. The paper is a review of the various factors influencing dose of inhaled particles to the respiratory tract. The emphasis of the paper is on therapeutic aerosol particles, though the principals discussed also apply to toxic particles as well. An important area of consideration is the influence of disease on the delivery of particle dose. From the point of view of toxic particles this is important when considering potential susceptible populations.

  6. Development and Morphology of the Ventricular Outflow Tracts.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert H; Mori, Shumpei; Spicer, Diane E; Brown, Nigel A; Mohun, Timothy J

    2016-09-01

    It is customary, at the current time, to consider many, if not most, of the lesions involving the ventricular outflow tract in terms of conotruncal malformations. This reflects the introduction, in the early 1940s, of the terms conus and truncus to describe the components of the developing outflow tract. The definitive outflow tracts in the postnatal heart, however, possess three, rather than two, components. These are the intrapericardial arterial trunks, the arterial roots, and the subvalvar ventricular outflow tracts. Congenital lesions afflicting the arterial roots, however, are not currently considered to be conotruncal malformations. This suggests a lack of logic in the description of cardiac development and its use as a means of categorizing congenital malformations. It is our belief that the developing outflow tract, like the postnatal outflow tracts, can readily be described in tripartite fashion, with its distal, intermediate, and proximal components forming the primordiums of the postnatal parts. In this review, we present evidence obtained from developing mice and human hearts to substantiate this notion. We show that the outflow tract, initially with a common lumen, is divided into its aortic and pulmonary components by a combination of an aortopulmonary septum derived from the dorsal wall of the aortic sac and outflow tract cushions that spiral through its intermediate and proximal components. These embryonic septal structures, however, subsequently lose their septal functions as the outflow tracts develop their own discrete walls. We then compare the developmental findings with the anatomic arrangements seen postnatally in the normal human heart. We show how correlations with the embryologic findings permit logical analysis of the congenital lesions involving the outflow tracts. PMID:27587491

  7. Development and Morphology of the Ventricular Outflow Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shumpei; Spicer, Diane E.; Brown, Nigel A.; Mohun, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    It is customary, at the current time, to consider many, if not most, of the lesions involving the ventricular outflow tract in terms of conotruncal malformations. This reflects the introduction, in the early 1940s, of the terms conus and truncus to describe the components of the developing outflow tract. The definitive outflow tracts in the postnatal heart, however, possess three, rather than two, components. These are the intrapericardial arterial trunks, the arterial roots, and the subvalvar ventricular outflow tracts. Congenital lesions afflicting the arterial roots, however, are not currently considered to be conotruncal malformations. This suggests a lack of logic in the description of cardiac development and its use as a means of categorizing congenital malformations. It is our belief that the developing outflow tract, like the postnatal outflow tracts, can readily be described in tripartite fashion, with its distal, intermediate, and proximal components forming the primordiums of the postnatal parts. In this review, we present evidence obtained from developing mice and human hearts to substantiate this notion. We show that the outflow tract, initially with a common lumen, is divided into its aortic and pulmonary components by a combination of an aortopulmonary septum derived from the dorsal wall of the aortic sac and outflow tract cushions that spiral through its intermediate and proximal components. These embryonic septal structures, however, subsequently lose their septal functions as the outflow tracts develop their own discrete walls. We then compare the developmental findings with the anatomic arrangements seen postnatally in the normal human heart. We show how correlations with the embryologic findings permit logical analysis of the congenital lesions involving the outflow tracts. PMID:27587491

  8. Psoriasis, the liver, and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Gisondi, Paolo; Del Giglio, Micol; Cozzi, Alessandra; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2010-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory, immune-mediated skin disease that is frequently associated with comorbidities including psoriatic arthropathy, chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, and cardio-metabolic disorders. In particular, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease affects about half of patients, Crohn's disease 0.5% and celiac disease 0.2-4.3% of patients with psoriasis. Some shared genetic traits as well as common inflammatory pathways may underlie these associations. The presence of comorbidities has important implications in the global approach to patients. In particular, traditional systemic antipsoriatic agents could negatively affect cardio-metabolic comorbidities as well as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and may have important interactions with drugs commonly used by psoriasis patients. Moreover, patients with psoriasis should be encouraged to drastically correct their modifiable cardiovascular and liver risk factors, in particular obesity, alcohol consumption, and smoking habit, because this could positively affect both psoriasis and their life expectance.

  9. Electrical management of neurogenic lower urinary tract disorders.

    PubMed

    Joussain, C; Denys, P

    2015-09-01

    Management of lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) in neurological diseases remains a priority because it leads to many complications such as incontinence, renal failure and decreased quality of life. A pharmacological approach remains the first-line treatment for patients with neurogenic LUTD, but electrical stimulation is a well-validated and recommended second-line treatment. However, clinicians must be aware of the indications, advantages and side effects of the therapy. This report provides an update on the 2 main electrical stimulation therapies for neurogenic LUTD - inducing direct bladder contraction with the Brindley procedure and modulating LUT physiology (sacral neuromodulation, tibial posterior nerve stimulation or pudendal nerve stimulation). We also describe the indications of these therapies for neurogenic LUTD, following international guidelines, as illustrated by their efficacy in patients with neurologic disorders. Electrical stimulation could be proposed for neurogenic LUTD as second-line treatment after failure of oral pharmacologic approaches. Nevertheless, further investigations are needed for a better understanding of the mechanisms of action of these techniques and to confirm their efficacy. Other electrical investigations, such as deep-brain stimulation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, or improved sacral anterior root stimulation, which could be associated with non-invasive and highly specific deafferentation of posterior roots, may open new fields in the management of neurogenic LUTD. PMID:26321622

  10. Effects of occupational stress on the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Franco, María-Raquel; Vargas-Luna, Miguel; Tienda, Paola; Delgadillo-Holtfort, Isabel; Balleza-Ordaz, Marco; Flores-Hernandez, Corina

    2013-11-15

    The aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the relationship between occupational stress and gastrointestinal alterations. The International Labour Organization suggests occupational health includes psychological aspects to achieve mental well-being. However, the definition of health risks for an occupation includes biological, chemical, physical and ergonomic factors but does not address psychological stress or other affective disorders. Nevertheless, multiple investigations have studied occupational stress and its physiological consequences, focusing on specific risk groups and occupations considered stressful. Among the physiological effects of stress, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) alterations are highly prevalent. The relationship between occupational stress and GIT diseases is evident in everyday clinical practice; however, the usual strategy is to attack the effects but not the root of the problem. That is, in clinics, occupational stress is recognized as a source of GIT problems, but employers do not ascribe it enough importance as a risk factor, in general, and for gastrointestinal health, in particular. The identification, stratification, measurement and evaluation of stress and its associated corrective strategies, particularly for occupational stress, are important topics to address in the near future to establish the basis for considering stress as an important risk factor in occupational health.

  11. Focal Hyperhidrosis Associated with Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Dina; Madhwapathi, Vidya; Ladoyanni, Evmorfia

    2016-01-01

    Hyperhidrosis affects almost 3% of the population and is characterized by sweating that occurs in excess of that needed for normal thermoregulation. It can occur as a primary disease or secondary to underlying clinical conditions. Hyperhidrosis can stem from neurogenic sympathetic over activity involving normal eccrine glands. We report the interesting case of a 75-year-old male patient with a 6-month history of new onset secondary focal hyperhidrosis of buttocks, pelvis, and upper thighs. Each time his symptoms worsened he was found to have culture positive urine samples for Escherichia coli (E. coli). He underwent urological investigation and was found to have urethral strictures and cystitis. The hyperhidrosis improved each time his urinary tract infection (UTI) was treated with antibiotics and continued to remain stable with a course of prophylactic trimethoprim. We hypothesize that the patient's urethral strictures led to inhibition in voiding which in turn increased the susceptibility to UTIs. Accumulation of urine and increased bladder pressure in turn raised sympathetic nerve discharge leading to excessive sweating. We recommend that a urine dip form part of the routine assessment of patients presenting with new onset focal hyperhidrosis of pelvis, buttocks, and upper thighs. Timely urological referral should be made for all male patients with recurrent UTI. To the authors' knowledge, there have been no other reports of UTI-associated focal hyperhidrosis. PMID:27379188

  12. Effects of occupational stress on the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Franco, María-Raquel; Vargas-Luna, Miguel; Tienda, Paola; Delgadillo-Holtfort, Isabel; Balleza-Ordaz, Marco; Flores-Hernandez, Corina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the relationship between occupational stress and gastrointestinal alterations. The International Labour Organization suggests occupational health includes psychological aspects to achieve mental well-being. However, the definition of health risks for an occupation includes biological, chemical, physical and ergonomic factors but does not address psychological stress or other affective disorders. Nevertheless, multiple investigations have studied occupational stress and its physiological consequences, focusing on specific risk groups and occupations considered stressful. Among the physiological effects of stress, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) alterations are highly prevalent. The relationship between occupational stress and GIT diseases is evident in everyday clinical practice; however, the usual strategy is to attack the effects but not the root of the problem. That is, in clinics, occupational stress is recognized as a source of GIT problems, but employers do not ascribe it enough importance as a risk factor, in general, and for gastrointestinal health, in particular. The identification, stratification, measurement and evaluation of stress and its associated corrective strategies, particularly for occupational stress, are important topics to address in the near future to establish the basis for considering stress as an important risk factor in occupational health. PMID:24244879

  13. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Is Associated With Genital Tract Mucosal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mhatre, Mohak; McAndrew, Thomas; Carpenter, Colleen; Burk, Robert D.; Einstein, Mark H.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical studies demonstrate increased prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated disease in HIV-infected individuals and an increased risk of HIV acquisition in HPV-infected individuals. The mechanisms underlying this synergy are not defined. We hypothesize that women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) will exhibit changes in soluble mucosal immunity that may promote HPV persistence and facilitate HIV infection. Methods The concentrations of immune mediators and endogenous anti-Escherichia coli activity in genital tract secretions collected by cervicovaginal lavage were compared in HIV-negative women with high-risk HPV-positive (HRHPV+) CIN-3 (n = 37), HRHPV+ CIN-1 (n = 12), or PAP-negative control subjects (n = 57). Results Compared with control subjects, women with CIN-3 or CIN-1 displayed significantly higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8 (P < 0.002) and significantly lower levels of anti-inflammatory mediators and antimicrobial peptides, including IL-1 receptor antagonist, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (P < 0.01), and human β defensins 2 and 3 (P < 0.02). There was no significant difference in endogenous anti-E. coli activity after controlling for age and sample storage time. Conclusion HRHPV+ CIN is characterized by changes in soluble mucosal immunity that could contribute to HPV persistence. The observed mucosal inflammation suggests a mechanism that may also contribute to the epidemiologic link between persistent HPV and HIV. PMID:22801340

  14. Focal Hyperhidrosis Associated with Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Madhwapathi, Vidya; Ladoyanni, Evmorfia

    2016-01-01

    Hyperhidrosis affects almost 3% of the population and is characterized by sweating that occurs in excess of that needed for normal thermoregulation. It can occur as a primary disease or secondary to underlying clinical conditions. Hyperhidrosis can stem from neurogenic sympathetic over activity involving normal eccrine glands. We report the interesting case of a 75-year-old male patient with a 6-month history of new onset secondary focal hyperhidrosis of buttocks, pelvis, and upper thighs. Each time his symptoms worsened he was found to have culture positive urine samples for Escherichia coli (E. coli). He underwent urological investigation and was found to have urethral strictures and cystitis. The hyperhidrosis improved each time his urinary tract infection (UTI) was treated with antibiotics and continued to remain stable with a course of prophylactic trimethoprim. We hypothesize that the patient's urethral strictures led to inhibition in voiding which in turn increased the susceptibility to UTIs. Accumulation of urine and increased bladder pressure in turn raised sympathetic nerve discharge leading to excessive sweating. We recommend that a urine dip form part of the routine assessment of patients presenting with new onset focal hyperhidrosis of pelvis, buttocks, and upper thighs. Timely urological referral should be made for all male patients with recurrent UTI. To the authors' knowledge, there have been no other reports of UTI-associated focal hyperhidrosis. PMID:27379188

  15. A Phase II Trial of the Proteasome Inhibitor Bortezomib in Patients with Advanced Biliary Tract Cancers*

    PubMed Central

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Meropol, Neal J.; Li, Tianyu; Lewis, Nancy L.; Engstrom, Paul F.; Weiner, Louis M.; Cheng, Jonathan D.; Alpaugh, R. Katherine; Cooper, Harry; Wright, John J.; Cohen, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with advanced biliary tract cancers have limited therapeutic options. Preclinical data suggest proteasome inhibition may be an effective therapeutic strategy. We thus evaluated the clinical efficacy of bortezomib in advanced biliary tract cancers. Patients and Methods Patients with locally advanced or metastatic cholangiocarcinoma or gallbladder adenocarcinoma who had received 0–2 prior therapies received bortezomib 1.3 mg/m2 days 1, 4, 8, and 11 of a 21-day cycle. The primary endpoint was objective response rate. A Simon two-stage design was employed (null response rate of < 5% and response rate of ≥ 20% of interest). Results Twenty patients enrolled: bile duct/gallbladder cancer (14/6), prior treatments 0/1/2 (10/6/3). The trial was discontinued early due to lack of confirmed partial responses. No unanticipated adverse events were noted. There was one unconfirmed partial response. Ten patients achieved stable disease as best response. Median time to progression was 5.8 months (95% CI 0.7–77.6 months). Median survival was 9 months (95% CI 4.6–18.5 months). The 6-month and 1-year survival rates were 70% and 38%. There was no difference in survival based on primary disease site. Conclusions Single agent bortezomib does not result in objective responses in biliary tract cancers. However, the rate of stable disease and time to progression benchmark is encouraging. Further development of bortezomib in combination with other therapies in this disease setting should be considered. PMID:24512954

  16. Lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction: are these conditions related to vascular dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Shogo; Tsounapi, Panagiota; Shimizu, Takahiro; Honda, Masashi; Inoue, Keiji; Dimitriadis, Fotios; Saito, Motoaki

    2014-09-01

    Although the pathogenesis of lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction is poorly understood and thought to be multifactorial, it has been traditionally recognized that these conditions increase with age. There is increasing evidence that there is an association between cardiovascular disease and lower urinary tract symptoms as well as benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction in elderly patients. Age might activate systemic vascular risk factors, resulting in disturbed blood flow. Hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis are also linked to the etiology of lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction. In the present review, we discuss the relationship between decreased pelvic blood flow and lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction. Furthermore, we suggest possible common mechanisms underlining these urological conditions.

  17. Respiratory System Disease.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Danielle M; Singh, Shipra

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory system involvement in cystic fibrosis is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene throughout the sinopulmonary tract result in recurrent infections with a variety of organisms including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Lung disease occurs earlier in life than once thought and ideal methods of monitoring lung function, decline, or improvement with therapy are debated. Treatment of sinopulmonary disease may include physiotherapy, mucus-modifying and antiinflammatory agents, antimicrobials, and surgery. In the new era of personalized medicine, CFTR correctors and potentiators may change the course of disease. PMID:27469180

  18. Population-Based Case–Control Study of Chinese Herbal Products Containing Aristolochic Acid and Urinary Tract Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ming-Nan; Chen, Pau-Chung; Chen, Ya-Yin

    2010-01-01

    Background Consumption of Chinese herbs that contain aristolochic acid (eg, Mu Tong) has been associated with an increased risk of urinary tract cancer. Methods We conducted a population-based case–control study in Taiwan to examine the association between prescribed Chinese herbal products that contain aristolochic acid and urinary tract cancer. All patients newly diagnosed with urinary tract cancer (case subjects) from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2002, and a random sample of the entire insured population from January 1, 1997, to December 31, 2002 (control subjects), were selected from the National Health Insurance reimbursement database. Subjects who were ever prescribed more than 500 pills of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or acetaminophen were excluded, leaving 4594 case patients and 174 701 control subjects in the final analysis. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by using multivariable logistic regression models for the association between prescribed Chinese herbs containing aristolochic acid and the occurrence of urinary tract cancer. Models were adjusted for age, sex, residence in a township where black foot disease was endemic (an indicator of chronic arsenic exposure from drinking water [a risk factor for urinary tract cancer]), and history of chronic urinary tract infection. Statistical tests were two-sided. Results Having been prescribed more than 60 g of Mu Tong and an estimated consumption of more than 150 mg of aristolochic acid were independently associated with an increased risk for urinary tract cancer in multivariable analyses (Mu Tong: at 61–100 g, OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.3 to 2.1, and at >200 g, OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.3 to 3.4; aristolochic acid: at 151–250 mg, OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.1 to 1.8, and at >500 mg, OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.4 to 2.9). A statistically significant linear dose–response relationship was observed between the prescribed dose of Mu Tong or the estimated cumulative dose

  19. Vocal tract resonances in speech, singing, and playing musical instruments.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Joe; Garnier, Maëva; Smith, John

    2009-01-01

    IN BOTH THE VOICE AND MUSICAL WIND INSTRUMENTS, A VALVE (VOCAL FOLDS, LIPS, OR REED) LIES BETWEEN AN UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM DUCT: trachea and vocal tract for the voice; vocal tract and bore for the instrument. Examining the structural similarities and functional differences gives insight into their operation and the duct-valve interactions. In speech and singing, vocal tract resonances usually determine the spectral envelope and usually have a smaller influence on the operating frequency. The resonances are important not only for the phonemic information they produce, but also because of their contribution to voice timbre, loudness, and efficiency. The role of the tract resonances is usually different in brass and some woodwind instruments, where they modify and to some extent compete or collaborate with resonances of the instrument to control the vibration of a reed or the player's lips, andor the spectrum of air flow into the instrument. We give a brief overview of oscillator mechanisms and vocal tract acoustics. We discuss recent and current research on how the acoustical resonances of the vocal tract are involved in singing and the playing of musical wind instruments. Finally, we compare techniques used in determining tract resonances and suggest some future developments.

  20. Vocal tract resonances in speech, singing, and playing musical instruments

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Joe; Garnier, Maëva; Smith, John

    2009-01-01

    In both the voice and musical wind instruments, a valve (vocal folds, lips, or reed) lies between an upstream and downstream duct: trachea and vocal tract for the voice; vocal tract and bore for the instrument. Examining the structural similarities and functional differences gives insight into their operation and the duct-valve interactions. In speech and singing, vocal tract resonances usually determine the spectral envelope and usually have a smaller influence on the operating frequency. The resonances are important not only for the phonemic information they produce, but also because of their contribution to voice timbre, loudness, and efficiency. The role of the tract resonances is usually different in brass and some woodwind instruments, where they modify and to some extent compete or collaborate with resonances of the instrument to control the vibration of a reed or the player’s lips, and∕or the spectrum of air flow into the instrument. We give a brief overview of oscillator mechanisms and vocal tract acoustics. We discuss recent and current research on how the acoustical resonances of the vocal tract are involved in singing and the playing of musical wind instruments. Finally, we compare techniques used in determining tract resonances and suggest some future developments. PMID:19649157