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Sample records for aerodigestive tract uadt

  1. Concordance of Two Endoscopic Procedures for Diagnosis of Carcinoma of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-15

    Upper Aerodigestive Tract Lesions; Neoplasms, Oropharyngeal; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Neoplasms, Hypopharyngeal; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Head and Neck Neoplasms; UADT Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell; Papilloma

  2. DNA methylation changes associated with risk factors in tumors of the upper aerodigestive tract

    PubMed Central

    Cuenin, Cyrille; Zaridze, David; Balassiano, Karen; Lima, Sheila CS; Matos, Elena; Daudt, Alexander; Koifman, Sergio; Filho, Victor Wunsch; Menezes, Ana MB; Curado, Maria Paula; Ferro, Gilles; Vaissière, Thomas; Sylla, Bakary S; Tommasino, Massimo; Pinto, Luis Felipe Ribeiro; Boffetta, Paolo; Hainaut, Pierre; Brennan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) are common forms of malignancy associated with tobacco and alcohol exposures, although human papillomavirus and nutritional deficiency are also important risk factors. While somatically acquired DNA methylation changes have been associated with UADT cancers, what triggers these events and precise epigenetic targets are poorly understood. In this study, we applied quantitative profiling of DNA methylation states in a panel of cancer-associated genes to a case-control study of UADT cancers. Our analyses revealed a high frequency of aberrant hypermethylation of several genes, including MYOD1, CHRNA3 and MTHFR in UADT tumors, whereas CDKN2A was moderately hypermethylated. Among differentially methylated genes, we identified a new gene (the nicotinic acetycholine receptor gene) as target of aberrant hypermethylation in UADT cancers, suggesting that epigenetic deregulation of nicotinic acetycholine receptors in non-neuronal tissues may promote the development of UADT cancers. Importantly, we found that sex and age is strongly associated with the methylation states, whereas tobacco smoking and alcohol intake may also influence the methylation levels in specific genes. This study identifies aberrant DNA methylation patterns in UADT cancers and suggests a potential mechanism by which environmental factors may deregulate key cellular genes involved in tumor suppression and contribute to UADT cancers. PMID:22430803

  3. DNA methylation changes associated with risk factors in tumors of the upper aerodigestive tract.

    PubMed

    Mani, Samson; Szymańska, Katarzyna; Cuenin, Cyrille; Zaridze, David; Balassiano, Karen; Lima, Sheila C S; Matos, Elena; Daudt, Alexander; Koifman, Sergio; Filho, Victor Wunsch; Menezes, Ana M B; Curado, Maria Paula; Ferro, Gilles; Vaissière, Thomas; Sylla, Bakary S; Tommasino, Massimo; Pinto, Luis Felipe Ribeiro; Boffetta, Paolo; Hainaut, Pierre; Brennan, Paul; Herceg, Zdenko

    2012-03-01

    Cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) are common forms of malignancy associated with tobacco and alcohol exposures, although human papillomavirus and nutritional deficiency are also important risk factors. While somatically acquired DNA methylation changes have been associated with UADT cancers, what triggers these events and precise epigenetic targets are poorly understood. In this study, we applied quantitative profiling of DNA methylation states in a panel of cancer-associated genes to a case-control study of UADT cancers. Our analyses revealed a high frequency of aberrant hypermethylation of several genes, including MYOD1, CHRNA3 and MTHFR in UADT tumors, whereas CDKN2A was moderately hypermethylated. Among differentially methylated genes, we identified a new gene (the nicotinic acetycholine receptor gene) as target of aberrant hypermethylation in UADT cancers, suggesting that epigenetic deregulation of nicotinic acetycholine receptors in non-neuronal tissues may promote the development of UADT cancers. Importantly, we found that sex and age is strongly associated with the methylation states, whereas tobacco smoking and alcohol intake may also influence the methylation levels in specific genes. This study identifies aberrant DNA methylation patterns in UADT cancers and suggests a potential mechanism by which environmental factors may deregulate key cellular genes involved in tumor suppression and contribute to UADT cancers. PMID:22430803

  4. Immunophenotypic and Clinical Differences Between the Nasal and Extranasal Subtypes of Upper Aerodigestive Tract Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qing-Feng; Wang, Wei-Hu; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Huang, Wen-Ting; Lu, Ning; Zhou, Li-Qiang; Ouyang, Han; Jin, Jing; Li, Ye-Xiong

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate, in a large cohort of patients, the immunophenotypic and clinical differences of nasal and extranasal extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT-NKTCL) and examine the relevance of the immunophenotype on the clinical behavior, prognosis, and treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 231 patients with UADT-NKTCL were recruited. One hundred eighty-one patients had primary location in the nasal cavity (nasal UADT-NKTCL), and 50 patients had primary extranasal UADT-NKTCL. Results: Patients with extranasal UADT-NKTCL had more adverse clinical features, including advanced-stage disease, regional lymph node involvement, B symptoms, and poor performance status, than patients with nasal UADT-NKTCL. In addition, CD56 and granzyme B were less frequently expressed in extranasal UADT-NKTCL. The 5-year overall survival rate was 74.1% for the entire group and 76.0% for early-stage disease. The 5-year overall survival rate for extranasal UADT-NKTCL was similar or superior to that of nasal UADT-NKTCL for all disease stages (76.9% vs 73.4%, P=.465), stage I disease (75.9% vs 79.2%, P=.786), and stage II disease (83.3% vs 50.3%, P=.018). CD56 expression and a Ki-67 proliferation rate ≥50% predicted poorer survival for extranasal UADT-NKTCL but not for nasal UADT-NKTCL. Conclusions: Patients with nasal and extranasal UADT-NKTCL have significantly different clinical features, immunophenotypes, and prognosis. Extranasal UADT-NKTCL should be considered as a distinct subgroup apart from the most commonly diagnosed prototype of nasal UADT-NKTCL.

  5. Hyaluronic Acid: Perspectives in Upper Aero-Digestive Tract. A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Manuele; Moffa, Antonio; Sabatino, Lorenzo; Pace, Annalisa; Oliveto, Giuseppe; Vitali, Massimiliano; Baptista, Peter; Salvinelli, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, topical therapies guarantee a better delivery of high concentrations of pharmacologic agents to the mucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT). The use of topical drugs, which are able to reduce mucosal inflammation and to improve healing tissues, can represent a relevant therapeutic advance. Topical sodium hyaluronate (SH) has recently been recognized as adjuvant treatment in the chronic inflammatory disease of the UADT. Aims The aim of our work was to review the published literature regarding all the potential therapeutic effects of SH in the chronic inflammatory disease of UADT. Methods Relevant published studies were searched in Pubmed, Google Scholar, Ovid using keywords (“sodium hyaluronate” and “upper airways”) or Medical Subject Headings. Results At the end of our selection process, sixteen publications have been included. Six of them in the post-operative period of nasal-sinus surgery, 2 of them in pediatric patients affected by recurrent upper respiratory tract infections, 4 of them in reducing symptoms and preventing exacerbations of chronic upper airways in adult population, 4 of them in patients with chronic inflammatory disease of UADT, including gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Conclusions Topical administration of SH plays a pivotkey role in the postoperative phase of patients undergoing FESS and nasal surgery, and positive results are generally observed in all the patients suffering from UADT chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:26120837

  6. A Rare Truncating BRCA2 Variant and Genetic Susceptibility to Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Delahaye-Sourdeix, Manon; Anantharaman, Devasena; Timofeeva, Maria N.; Gaborieau, Valérie; Chabrier, Amélie; Vallée, Maxime P.; Lagiou, Pagona; Holcátová, Ivana; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Macfarlane, Tatiana V.; Barzan, Luigi; Canova, Cristina; Thakker, Nalin S.; Conway, David I.; Znaor, Ariana; Healy, Claire M.; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Lissowska, Jolanta; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Ioan Nicolae; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Menezes, Ana; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Eluf-Neto, José; Boffetta, Paolo; Fernández Garrote, Leticia; Polesel, Jerry; Lener, Marcin; Jaworowska, Ewa; Lubiński, Jan; Boccia, Stefania; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Samant, Tanuja A.; Mahimkar, Manoj B.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Franceschi, Silvia; Byrnes, Graham; Brennan, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Deleterious BRCA2 genetic variants markedly increase risk of developing breast cancer. A rare truncating BRCA2 genetic variant, rs11571833 (K3326X), has been associated with a 2.5-fold risk of lung squamous cell carcinoma but only a modest 26% increase in breast cancer risk. We analyzed the association between BRCA2 SNP rs11571833 and upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancer risk with multivariable unconditional logistic regression adjusted by sex and combinations of study and country for 5942 UADT squamous cell carcinoma case patients and 8086 control patients from nine different studies. All statistical tests were two-sided. rs11571833 was associated with UADT cancers (odds ratio = 2.53, 95% confidence interval = 1.89 to 3.38, P = 3x10-10) and was present in European, Latin American, and Indian populations but extremely rare in Japanese populations. The association appeared more apparent in smokers (current or former) compared with never smokers (P het = .026). A robust association between a truncating BRCA2 variant and UADT cancer risk suggests that treatment strategies orientated towards BRCA2 mutations may warrant further investigation in UADT tumors. PMID:25838448

  7. A rare truncating BRCA2 variant and genetic susceptibility to upper aerodigestive tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Delahaye-Sourdeix, Manon; Anantharaman, Devasena; Timofeeva, Maria N; Gaborieau, Valérie; Chabrier, Amélie; Vallée, Maxime P; Lagiou, Pagona; Holcátová, Ivana; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Barzan, Luigi; Canova, Cristina; Thakker, Nalin S; Conway, David I; Znaor, Ariana; Healy, Claire M; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Lissowska, Jolanta; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Ioan Nicolae; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Menezes, Ana; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Eluf-Neto, José; Boffetta, Paolo; Fernández Garrote, Leticia; Polesel, Jerry; Lener, Marcin; Jaworowska, Ewa; Lubiński, Jan; Boccia, Stefania; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Samant, Tanuja A; Mahimkar, Manoj B; Matsuo, Keitaro; Franceschi, Silvia; Byrnes, Graham; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D

    2015-05-01

    Deleterious BRCA2 genetic variants markedly increase risk of developing breast cancer. A rare truncating BRCA2 genetic variant, rs11571833 (K3326X), has been associated with a 2.5-fold risk of lung squamous cell carcinoma but only a modest 26% increase in breast cancer risk. We analyzed the association between BRCA2 SNP rs11571833 and upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancer risk with multivariable unconditional logistic regression adjusted by sex and combinations of study and country for 5942 UADT squamous cell carcinoma case patients and 8086 control patients from nine different studies. All statistical tests were two-sided. rs11571833 was associated with UADT cancers (odds ratio = 2.53, 95% confidence interval = 1.89 to 3.38, P = 3x10(-10)) and was present in European, Latin American, and Indian populations but extremely rare in Japanese populations. The association appeared more apparent in smokers (current or former) compared with never smokers (P het = .026). A robust association between a truncating BRCA2 variant and UADT cancer risk suggests that treatment strategies orientated towards BRCA2 mutations may warrant further investigation in UADT tumors. PMID:25838448

  8. The 12p13.33/RAD52 locus and genetic susceptibility to squamous cell cancers of upper aerodigestive tract.

    PubMed

    Delahaye-Sourdeix, Manon; Oliver, Javier; Timofeeva, Maria N; Gaborieau, Valérie; Johansson, Mattias; Chabrier, Amélie; Wozniak, Magdalena B; Brenner, Darren R; Vallée, Maxime P; Anantharaman, Devasena; Lagiou, Pagona; Holcátová, Ivana; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Barzan, Luigi; Canova, Cristina; Thakker, Nalin S; Conway, David I; Znaor, Ariana; Healy, Claire M; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Lissowska, Jolanta; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Ioan Nicolae; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Menezes, Ana; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Eluf-Neto, José; Boffetta, Paolo; Garrote, Leticia Fernández; Serraino, Diego; Lener, Marcin; Jaworowska, Ewa; Lubiński, Jan; Boccia, Stefania; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Samant, Tanuja A; Mahimkar, Manoj B; Matsuo, Keitaro; Franceschi, Silvia; Byrnes, Graham; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variants located within the 12p13.33/RAD52 locus have been associated with lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC). Here, within 5,947 UADT cancers and 7,789 controls from 9 different studies, we found rs10849605, a common intronic variant in RAD52, to be also associated with upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) squamous cell carcinoma cases (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.04-1.15, p = 6x10(-4)). We additionally identified rs10849605 as a RAD52 cis-eQTL inUADT(p = 1x10(-3)) and LUSC (p = 9x10(-4)) tumours, with the UADT/LUSC risk allele correlated with increased RAD52 expression levels. The 12p13.33 locus, encompassing rs10849605/RAD52, was identified as a significant somatic focal copy number amplification in UADT(n = 374, q-value = 0.075) and LUSC (n = 464, q-value = 0.007) tumors and correlated with higher RAD52 tumor expression levels (p = 6x10(-48) and p = 3x10(-29) in UADT and LUSC, respectively). In combination, these results implicate increased RAD52 expression in both genetic susceptibility and tumorigenesis of UADT and LUSC tumors. PMID:25793373

  9. The 12p13.33/RAD52 Locus and Genetic Susceptibility to Squamous Cell Cancers of Upper Aerodigestive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Delahaye-Sourdeix, Manon; Oliver, Javier; Timofeeva, Maria N.; Gaborieau, Valérie; Johansson, Mattias; Chabrier, Amélie; Wozniak, Magdalena B.; Brenner, Darren R.; Vallée, Maxime P.; Anantharaman, Devasena; Lagiou, Pagona; Holcátová, Ivana; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Macfarlane, Tatiana V.; Barzan, Luigi; Canova, Cristina; Thakker, Nalin S.; Conway, David I.; Znaor, Ariana; Healy, Claire M.; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Lissowska, Jolanta; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Ioan Nicolae; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Menezes, Ana; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Eluf-Neto, José; Boffetta, Paolo; Garrote, Leticia Fernández; Serraino, Diego; Lener, Marcin; Jaworowska, Ewa; Lubiński, Jan; Boccia, Stefania; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Samant, Tanuja A.; Mahimkar, Manoj B.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Franceschi, Silvia; Byrnes, Graham; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variants located within the 12p13.33/RAD52 locus have been associated with lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC). Here, within 5,947 UADT cancers and 7,789 controls from 9 different studies, we found rs10849605, a common intronic variant in RAD52, to be also associated with upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) squamous cell carcinoma cases (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.04–1.15, p = 6x10−4). We additionally identified rs10849605 as a RAD52 cis-eQTL inUADT(p = 1x10−3) and LUSC (p = 9x10−4) tumours, with the UADT/LUSC risk allele correlated with increased RAD52 expression levels. The 12p13.33 locus, encompassing rs10849605/RAD52, was identified as a significant somatic focal copy number amplification in UADT(n = 374, q-value = 0.075) and LUSC (n = 464, q-value = 0.007) tumors and correlated with higher RAD52 tumor expression levels (p = 6x10−48 and p = 3x10−29 in UADT and LUSC, respectively). In combination, these results implicate increased RAD52 expression in both genetic susceptibility and tumorigenesis of UADT and LUSC tumors. PMID:25793373

  10. Inverse association between yoghurt intake and upper aerodigestive tract cancer risk in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Kawakita, Daisuke; Sato, Fumihito; Hosono, Satoyo; Ito, Hidemi; Oze, Isao; Watanabe, Miki; Hanai, Nobuhiro; Hatooka, Shunzo; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Shinoda, Masayuki; Tajima, Kazuo; Murakami, Shingo; Tanaka, Hideo; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2012-09-01

    Although the combination of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking account for approximately 80% of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancer risk, the role of dietary factors, including dairy products, in the risk of these cancers remains controversial. We aimed to evaluate the association between dairy product intake and UADT cancer risk in a Japanese population. We conducted a case-control study in 959 patients with UADT cancer and 2877 sex- and age-matched noncancer control subjects who visited the Aichi Cancer Center in Nagoya, Japan. Data on lifestyle factors, including diet, were obtained by self-administered questionnaire. Associations were assessed by multivariate logistic regression models that considered potential confounders. We found a significant inverse association between yoghurt intake and UADT cancer risk with multivariate-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for <1 time/week, ≥ 1 time/week and <1 time/day, and ≥ 1 time/day consumption of yoghurt of 0.70 (95% confidence interval: 0.54-0.91), 0.67 (0.54-0.84), and 0.73 (0.55-0.95) relative to nonconsumers (P trend=0.005). When stratified by primary tumor site, this association was significant among patients with hypopharyngeal, laryngeal, and esophageal cancer. However, we saw no significant association between milk or butter intake and UADT cancer risk. In this study, we found that a high intake of yoghurt may lower the risk of developing UADT cancer in a Japanese population. Further investigation of this association is warranted. PMID:22179690

  11. Quantitative Expression and Immunogenicity of MAGE-3 and -6 in Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andrade Filho, Pedro A.; López-Albaitero, Andrés; Xi, Liqiang; Gooding, William; Godfrey, Tony; Ferris, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    The MAGE antigens are frequently expressed cancer vaccine targets. However, quantitative analysis of MAGE expression in upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) tumor cells and its association with T cell recognition has not been performed, hindering the selection of appropriate candidates for MAGE specific immunotherapy. Using quantitative RT-PCR (QRT-PCR), we evaluated the expression of MAGE-3/6 in 65 UADT cancers, 48 normal samples from tumor matched sites and 7 HLA-A*0201+squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) cell lines. Expression results were confirmed using western blot. HLA-A*0201:MAGE-3(271–279) specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (MAGE-CTL) from SCCHN patients and healthy donors showed that MAGE-3/6 expression was highly associated with CTL recognition in vitro. Based on MAGE-3/6 expression we could identify 31 (47%) of the 65 UADT tumors which appeared to express MAGE-3/6 at levels that correlated with efficient CTL recognition. To confirm that the level of MAGE-3 expression was responsible for CTL recognition, two MAGE-3/6 mRNAhigh SCCHN cell lines, PCI-13 and PCI-30, were subjected to MAGE-3/6 specific knockdown. RNAi–transfected cells showed that MAGE expression, and MAGE-CTL recognition, were significantly reduced. Furthermore, treatment of cells expressing low MAGE-3/6 mRNA with a demethylating agent, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC), increased the expression of MAGE-3/6 and CTL recognition. Thus, using QRT-PCR UADT cancers frequently express MAGE-3/6 at levels sufficient for CTL recognition, supporting the use of a QRT-PCR based assay for the selection of candidates likely to respond to MAGE-3/6 immunotherapy. Demethylating agents could increase the number of patients amenable for targeting epigenetically modified tumor antigens in vaccine trials. PMID:19610063

  12. Quantitative expression and immunogenicity of MAGE-3 and -6 in upper aerodigestive tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Filho, Pedro A Andrade; López-Albaitero, Andrés; Xi, Liqiang; Gooding, William; Godfrey, Tony; Ferris, Robert L

    2009-10-15

    The MAGE antigens are frequently expressed cancer vaccine targets. However, quantitative analysis of MAGE expression in upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) tumor cells and its association with T-cell recognition has not been performed, hindering the selection of appropriate candidates for MAGE-specific immunotherapy. Using quantitative RT-PCR (QRT-PCR), we evaluated the expression of MAGE-3/6 in 65 UADT cancers, 48 normal samples from tumor matched sites and 7 HLA-A*0201+ squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) cell lines. Expression results were confirmed using Western blot. HLA-A*0201:MAGE-3- (271-279) specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (MAGE-CTL) from SCCHN patients and healthy donors showed that MAGE-3/6 expression was highly associated with CTL recognition in vitro. On the basis of the MAGE-3/6 expression, we could identify 31 (47%) of the 65 UADT tumors, which appeared to express MAGE-3/6 at levels that correlated with efficient CTL recognition. To confirm that the level of MAGE-3 expression was responsible for CTL recognition, 2 MAGE-3/6 mRNA(high) SCCHN cell lines, PCI-13 and PCI-30, were subjected to MAGE-3/6-specific knockdown. RNAi-transfected cells showed that MAGE expression and MAGE-CTL recognition were significantly reduced. Furthermore, treatment of cells expressing low MAGE-3/6 mRNA with a demethylating agent, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC), increased the expression of MAGE-3/6 and CTL recognition. Thus, using QRT-PCR UADT cancers frequently express MAGE-3/6 at levels sufficient for CTL recognition, supporting the use of a QRT-PCR-based assay for the selection of candidates likely to respond to MAGE-3/6 immunotherapy. Demethylating agents could increase the number of patients amenable for targeting epigenetically modified tumor antigens in vaccine trials. PMID:19610063

  13. Occupation and risk of upper aerodigestive tract cancer: the ARCAGE study.

    PubMed

    Richiardi, Lorenzo; Corbin, Marine; Marron, Manuela; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Lagiou, Pagona; Minaki, Ploumitsa; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsague, Xavier; Slamova, Alena; Schejbalova, Miriam; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Barzan, Luigi; Talamini, Renato; Macfarlane, Gary J; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Canova, Cristina; Simonato, Lorenzo; Conway, David I; McKinney, Patricia A; Sneddon, Linda; Thomson, Peter; Znaor, Ariana; Healy, Claire M; McCartan, Bernard E; Benhamou, Simone; Bouchardy, Christine; Hashibe, Mia; Brennan, Paul; Merletti, Franco

    2012-05-15

    We investigated the association between occupational history and upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancer risk in the ARCAGE European case-control study. The study included 1,851 patients with incident cancer of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx or esophagus and 1,949 controls. We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for ever employment in 283 occupations and 172 industries, adjusting for smoking and alcohol. Men (1,457 cases) and women (394 cases) were analyzed separately and we incorporated a semi-Bayes adjustment approach for multiple comparisons. Among men, we found increased risks for occupational categories previously reported to be associated with at least one type of UADT cancer, including painters (OR = 1.74, 95% CI: 1.01-3.00), bricklayers (1.58, 1.05-2.37), workers employed in the erection of roofs and frames (2.62, 1.08-6.36), reinforced concreters (3.46, 1.11-10.8), dockers (2.91, 1.05-8.05) and workers employed in the construction of roads (3.03, 1.23-7.46), general construction of buildings (1.44, 1.12-1.85) and cargo handling (2.60, 1.17-5.75). With the exception of the first three categories, risks both increased when restricting to long duration of employment and remained elevated after semi-Bayes adjustment. Increased risks were also found for loggers (3.56, 1.20-10.5) and cattle and dairy farming (3.60, 1.15-11.2). Among women, there was no clear evidence of increased risks of UADT cancer in association with occupations or industrial activities. This study provides evidence of an association between some occupational categories and UADT cancer risk among men. The most consistent findings, also supported by previous studies, were obtained for specific workers employed in the construction industry. PMID:21671472

  14. Mediterranean diet and upper aerodigestive tract cancer: the Greek segment of the Alcohol-Related Cancers and Genetic Susceptibility in Europe study.

    PubMed

    Samoli, Evangelia; Lagiou, Areti; Nikolopoulos, Elias; Lagogiannis, Georgios; Barbouni, Anastasia; Lefantzis, Dimitrios; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Brennan, Paul; Lagiou, Pagona

    2010-11-01

    Several dietary factors have been associated with the occurrence of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, larynx and oesophagus, collectively called upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancers, but the evidence is considered as inconclusive. We hypothesised that the traditional Mediterranean dietary pattern may be more strongly inversely associated with UADT cancer risk than individual dietary components, and may explain the unexpectedly low incidence of these cancers in Greece. In the context of the European alcohol-related cancers and genetic susceptibility in Europe project, we have conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Athens, Greece, comparing 239 incident UADT cases and 194 hospital controls with admission diagnoses unrelated to tobacco, alcohol or diet. Adherence to Mediterranean diet was assessed through a widely used score, which ranges from 0 (minimal adherence) to 9 (maximal adherence) and increases with high consumption of plant foods and olive oil and low consumption of meat, dairy products and saturated lipids. Stricter adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with a substantial and significant decrease in UADT cancer risk (30 % for a two-unit increase in score), whereas after mutual adjustment, no individual dietary component of this diet was significantly associated with this risk. Adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced risk of UADT cancers, and may explain the lower incidence of UADT cancers in Greece, in spite of the smoking and drinking habits of this population. PMID:20500931

  15. Jaw mobility changes in patients with upper aerodigestive tract cancer undergoing radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wienandts, Patrícia; Mozzini, Carolina; Pinto, Rosélie; da Motta, Neiro; Jotz, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiation therapy is a therapeutic modality widely used for treatment of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) neoplasms. However, its action is not restricted to tumor cells, and it may cause a variety of adverse reactions, including reduced jaw mobility. Material and Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted to assess changes in jaw mobility in patients with UADT cancer undergoing radiation therapy. Results Fifty-six patients completed the study. The results showed a significant reduction in mouth opening (p<0.001), right lateral excursion (p=0.038) and left lateral excursion (p=0.035) of the jaw, a significant increase in the presence (p<0.001) and severity of oral mucositis (p<0.001), and a significant decrease in performance status (p<0.001) after radiation therapy. Thirty-six patients (64.3%) exhibited reduction in mouth opening after treatment. The variables significantly associated with mouth opening reduction on bivariate analysis were: modification of diet (p=0.037), radiation field (p=0.024), presence of mucositis (p=0.003), and reduction in performance status (p=0.007). After adjustment by the multivariate model, the only variables that remained significantly associated with reduction in mouth opening were presence of mucositis (p=0.018) and reduction in performance status (p=0.47). Conclusions These findings indicate that patients with upper aerodigestive tract cancer experience reduced jaw mobility after radiation therapy, which is strongly correlated with mucositis and reduced functional ability. Key words:Head and neck neoplasms, vertical dimension, radiation therapy, mucositis, temporomandibular joint, joint range of motion, trismus. PMID:26449427

  16. A sex-specific association between a 15q25 variant and upper aerodigestive tract cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dan; Truong, Therese; Gaborieau, Valerie; Byrnes, Graham; Chabrier, Amelie; Chuang, Shu-chun; Olshan, Andrew F.; Weissler, Mark C.; Luo, Jingchun; Romkes, Marjorie; Buch, Shama; Nukui, Tomoko; Franceschi, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Talamini, Renato; Kelsey, Karl T; Christensen, Brock; McClean, Mike; Lacko, Martin; Manni, Johannes J; Peters, Wilbert H. M.; Lubiński, Jan; Trubicka, Joanna; Lener, Marcin; Muscat, Joshua E.; Lazarus, Philip; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M.; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Chang, Shen-Chih; Wang, Renyi; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Chen, Chu; Benhamou, Simone; Lagiou, Pagona; Holcátová, Ivana; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Macfarlane, Tatiana V.; Barzan, Luigi; Canova, Cristina; Thakker, Nalin S; Conway, David I; Znaor, Ariana; Healy, Claire M.; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Fabianova, Eleonora; Bucur, Alexandru; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Menezes, Ana; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Neto, José Eluf; Fernandez, Leticia; Boccia, Stefania; Hashibe, Mia; Hayes, Richard B.; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Sequence variants located at 15q25 have been associated with lung cancer and propensity to smoke. We recently reported an association between rs16969968 and risk of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancers (oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx and esophagus) in women (odds ratio (OR) =1.24, P=0.003) with little effect in men (OR=1.04, P=0.35). Methods In a coordinated genotyping study within the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium, we have sought to replicate these findings in an additional 4,604 cases and 6,239 controls from 10 independent UADT cancer case-control studies. Results rs16969968 was again associated with UADT cancers in women (OR=1.21, 95% confidence interval(CI)=1.08–1.36, P=0.001) and a similar lack of observed effect in men (OR=1.02, 95%CI=0.95–1.09, P=0.66) (P-heterogeneity=0.01). In a pooled analysis of the original and current studies, totaling 8,572 UADT cancer cases and 11,558 controls, the association was observed among females (OR=1.22, 95%CI=1.12–1.34, P=7×10−6) but not males (OR=1.02, 95%CI=0.97–1.08, P=0.35) (P-heterogeneity=6×10−4). There was little evidence for a sex difference in the association between this variant and cigarettes smoked per day, with male and female rs16969968 variant carriers smoking approximately the same amount more in the 11,991 ever smokers in the pooled analysis of the 14 studies (P-heterogeneity=0.86). Conclusions This study has confirmed a sex difference in the association between the 15q25 variant rs16969968 and UADT cancers. Impact Further research is warranted to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these observations. PMID:21335511

  17. Associations of red and processed meat with survival among patients with cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract and lung.

    PubMed

    Miles, Fayth L; Chang, Shen-Chih; Morgenstern, Hal; Tashkin, Donald; Rao, Jian-Yu; Cozen, Wendy; Mack, Thomas; Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2016-06-01

    The effect of red and processed meats on cancer survival is unclear. We sought to examine the role of total and processed red meat consumption on all-cause mortality among patients with cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) and lung, in order to test our hypothesis that red or processed meat was associated with overall mortality in these patients. Using data from a population-based case-control study conducted in Los Angeles County, we conducted a case-only analysis to examine the association of red or processed meat consumption on mortality after 12 years of follow-up, using a diet history questionnaire. Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for potential confounders. Of 601 UADT cancer cases and 611 lung cancer cases, there were 248 and 406 deaths, respectively, yielding crude mortality rates of 0.07 and 0.12 deaths per year. Comparing the highest with lowest quartile of red meat consumption, the adjusted HR was 1.64 (95% CI, 1.04-2.57) among UADT cancer cases; for red or processed meat, the adjusted HR was 1.76 (95% CI, 1.10-2.82). A dose-response trend was observed. A weaker association was observed with red meat consumption and overall mortality among lung cancer cases. In conclusion, this case-only analysis demonstrated that increased consumption of red or processed meats was associated with mortality among UADT cancer cases and WAS weakly associated with mortality among lung cancer cases. PMID:27188908

  18. High-Resolution Optical Imaging of Benign and Malignant Mucosa in the Upper Aerodigestive Tract: An Atlas for Image-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Lauren L.; Vila, Peter M.; Park, Richard W.; Schwarz, Richard; Polydorides, Alexandros D.; Teng, Marita S.; Gurudutt, Vivek V.; Genden, Eric M.; Miles, Brett; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Sikora, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Background High-resolution optical imaging provides real-time visualization of mucosa in the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) which allows non-invasive discrimination of benign and neoplastic epithelium. The high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) utilizes a fiberoptic probe in conjunction with a tissue contrast agent to display nuclei and cellular architecture. This technology has broad potential applications to intraoperative margin detection and early cancer detection. Methods Our group has created an extensive image collection of both neoplastic and normal epithelium of the UADT. Here, we present and describe imaging characteristics of benign, dysplastic, and malignant mucosa in the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, and esophagus. Results There are differences in the nuclear organization and overall tissue architecture of benign and malignant mucosa which correlate with histopathologic diagnosis. Different anatomic subsites also display unique imaging characteristics. Conclusion HRME allows discrimination between benign and neoplastic mucosa, and familiarity with the characteristics of each subsite facilitates correct diagnosis. PMID:23641314

  19. Upper aerodigestive tract disorders and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Bianchini, Chiara; Zuolo, Michele; Feo, Carlo Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of symptoms and diseases of the upper aerodigestive tract are associated to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). These disorders comprise a large variety of conditions such as asthma, chronic otitis media and sinusitis, chronic cough, and laryngeal disorders including paroxysmal laryngospasm. Laryngo-pharyngeal reflux disease is an extraoesophageal variant of GORD that can affect the larynx and pharynx. Despite numerous research efforts, the diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux often remains elusive, unproven and controversial, and its treatment is then still empiric. Aim of this paper is to review the current literature on upper aerodigestive tract disorders in relation to pathologic gastro-oesophageal reflux, focusing in particular on the pathophysiology base and results of the surgical treatment of GORD. PMID:25685756

  20. Tobacco Smoking, NBS1 Polymorphisms, and Survival in Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancers with Semi-Bayes Adjustment for Hazard-ratio Variation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tingting; Chang, Po-Yin; Park, Sungshim Lani; Bastani, Delara; Chang, Shen-Chih; Morgenstern, Hal; Tashkin, Donald P.; Mao, Jenny T.; Papp, Jeanette C.; Rao, Jian-Yu; Cozen, Wendy; Mack, Thomas M.; Greenland, Sander; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of NBS1 have been associated with susceptibility to lung and upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancers, their relations to cancer survival and measures of effect are largely unknown. Methods Using follow-up data from 611 lung-cancer cases and 601 UADT-cancer cases from a population-based case-control study in Los Angeles, we prospectively evaluated associations of tobacco smoking and 5 NBS1 SNPs with all-cause mortality. Mortality data were obtained from the Social Security Death Index. We used Cox regression to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for main effects and ratios of hazard ratios (RHR) derived from product terms to assess hazard-ratio variations by each SNP. Bayesian methods were used to account for multiple comparisons. Results We observed 406 (66%) deaths in lung-cancer cases and 247 (41%) deaths in UADT-cancer cases with median survival of 1.43 and 1.72 years, respectively. Ever tobacco smoking was positively associated with mortality for both cancers. We observed an upward dose-response association between smoking pack-years and mortality in UADT squamous cell carcinoma. The adjusted HR relating smoking to mortality in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was greater for cases with the GG genotype of NBS1 rs1061302 than for cases with AA/AG genotypes (semi-Bayes adjusted RHR = 1.97; 95% limits = 1.14, 3.41). Conclusions A history of tobacco smoking at cancer diagnosis was associated with mortality among patients with lung cancer or UADT squamous cell carcinoma. The HR relating smoking to mortality appeared to vary with the NBS1 rs1061302 genotype among NSCLC cases. PMID:24166361

  1. Descriptive epidemiology of upper aerodigestive tract cancers in France: incidence over 1980-2005 and projection to 2010.

    PubMed

    Ligier, Karine; Belot, Aurélien; Launoy, Guy; Velten, Michel; Bossard, Nadine; Iwaz, Jean; Righini, Christian Adrien; Delafosse, Patricia; Guizard, Anne-Valérie

    2011-04-01

    Over the 1998-2002 period, some French Départements have been shown to have the world's highest incidence of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancers in men. The objectives were to describe the changes in UADT cancer incidence in France over the 1980-2005 period, present projections for 2010, and describe the anatomical and histological characteristics of these tumours. The trend of cancer-incidence over 1980-2005 and projection up to 2010 were obtained using age-period-cohort models (data from eleven cancer registries) and incidence/mortality ratios in the area covered by these registries. The description of UADT cancers by anatomical and histological characteristics concerned data collected between 1980 and 2004 in eleven cancer registries. In men, cancer incidence decreased in all cancer sites and the world-standardized incidence rates decreased by 42.9% for lip-oral cavity-pharynx (LOCP) cancers and 50.4% for larynx cancer. In women, the world-standardized incidence rates increased by 48.6% for LOCP cancers and 66.7% for larynx cancer. Incidence increased the most for oropharynx, palate, and hypopharynx cancers. Incidence analysis by one-year cohorts revealed a progressive shift of the incidence peak towards younger and younger generations, with no change as yet in the mean age at diagnosis. In France, the incidence of these cancers is still higher than in other European and North American countries. This urges actions towards reducing the major risk factors for those cancers, namely alcohol and tobacco consumption, especially among young people, and reducing exposure to risk factors due to social inequalities. PMID:21397551

  2. Biomarkers in upper aerodigestive tract tumorigenesis: a review.

    PubMed

    Shin, D M; Hittelman, W N; Hong, W K

    1994-12-01

    Because therapeutic efforts such as surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy have only marginally improved the 5-year survival rate from cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (including head and neck and lung cancers) over the past 2 decades, chemoprevention has become an important strategy in reducing the rates of incidence and mortality of these cancers. However, chemoprevention trials have been hampered by serious feasibility problems; they require large numbers of subjects and long-term follow-up for accurate determination of cancer incidence and they are very costly. Because the use of intermediate end points would reduce the duration and costs of these studies, biomarkers that could serve as such end points have recently become a subject of great interest. With the strengthening of the assumption that tumorigenesis is a multistep process of transformation from normal tissues to malignant lesions, there has been a great effort to examine each of these steps for genetic and/or phenotypic alterations that might be candidates for such biomarkers. These candidates include genomic markers, certain specific gene alterations, such as tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, growth factors and their receptors, proliferation markers, and differentiation markers. In this review, we describe several genomic markers, including micronuclei, chromosomal alterations, and specific genetic markers, e.g., the ras gene family, erb B1, int-2/hst-1, and p53 tumor suppressor gene. We also review the proliferation markers, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and squamous cell differentiation markers, including keratins, involucrin, and transglutaminase 1. These biomarker candidates have the potential to be important adjuncts to the development of new chemopreventive agents and to the rational design of future intervention trials. However, we can not overemphasize that these markers need to be validated in clinical trials; only then can they replace cancer incidence as the sole

  3. Association between the Cyclin D1 G870A polymorphism and the susceptibility to and prognosis of upper aerodigestive tract squamous cell carcinomas: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yichen; Zhang, Chenglin; Zhou, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Several publications have investigated the association between the Cyclin D1 G to A substitution at nucleotide 870 (CCND1 G870A) polymorphism and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT), but their conclusions still remain controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis to precisely evaluate this association. Patients and methods We electronically searched the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, PubMed, and Embase (up to January 2015) databases for case–control studies on the association between the CCND1 G870A polymorphism and SCC of the UADT, and 23 studies were included in total. Results The meta-analysis results showed that there was a significant association between the CCND1 G870A polymorphism and the risk of SCC of the UADT (AA vs GG: odds ratio [OR] =1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.01–1.74, P<0.001 for heterogeneity; GA/AA vs GG: OR =1.24, 95% CI =1.01–1.51, P<0.001 for heterogeneity; AA vs GA/GG: OR =1.16, 95% CI =0.97–1.39, P<0.001 for heterogeneity; allele A vs allele G: OR =1.14, 95% CI =1.00–1.30, P<0.001 for heterogeneity; GA vs GG: OR =1.18, 95% CI =0.98–1.42, P<0.001 for heterogeneity). However, when analyzing prognosis, allele G was a potential risk factor for poor tumor differentiation (AA vs GA/GG: OR =2.60, 95% CI =1.15–5.86, P=0.836 for heterogeneity) and reduced disease-free intervals (OR =2.08, 95% CI =1.17–3.69, P=0.134 for heterogeneity). In the subgroup analysis, the cancer susceptibility of Asian groups, population-based control groups, nasopharyngeal cancer groups, and esophageal SCC groups were more likely to be affected by the CCND1 G870A polymorphism. No significant publication bias was found in our analysis (P=0.961 for Egger’s test and P=0.245 for Begg’s test). Conclusion The results of the present meta-analysis suggest that the variant CCND1 870A allele might confer an elevated risk of SCC of the UADT, particularly among Asians and individuals who have esophageal or

  4. ErbB receptors in the biology and pathology of the aerodigestive tract

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Sarah; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2009-02-15

    The most common sites of malignancies in the aerodigestive tract include the lung, head and neck and the esophagus. Esophageal adenocarcinomas (EA), esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC), and squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) are the primary focus of this review. Traditional treatment for aerodigestive tract cancers includes primary chemoradiotherapy (CRT) or surgical resection followed by radiation (or CRT). Recent developments in treatment have focused increasingly on molecular targeting strategies including cetuximab (a monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)). Cetuximab was FDA approved in 2006 for treatment of SCCHN, underscoring the importance of understanding the biology of these malignancies. EGFR is a member of the ErbB family of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases. The major pathways activated by ErbB receptors include Ras/Raf/MAPK; PI3K/AKT; PLC{gamma} and STATs, all of which lead to the transcription of target genes that may contribute to aerodigestive tumor progression. This review explores the expression of ErbB receptors in EA, ESCC and SCCHN and the signaling pathways of EGFR in SCCHN.

  5. Photodynamic therapy--1994: treatment of benign and malignant upper aerodigestive tract disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Vanessa G.

    1995-03-01

    From 1983 to 1994 Phase II and III clinical studies at Henry Ford Hospital demonstrated complete or partial responses in 46 of 47 patients treated with hematoporphyrin-derivative photodynamic therapy (HPD-PDT) for a variety of benign and malignant upper aerodigestive tract disease: (1) superficial `condemned mucosa' or `field cancerization' of the oral cavity; (2) stage III/IV head and neck cancer; (3) mucocutaneous AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma of the upper aerodigestive tract; (4) recurrent laryngotracheal papillomatosis; (5) severe dysplasia/adenocarcinoma in situ in Barrett's esophagus; (6) partial or completely obstructing terminal esophageal cancer. HPD-PDT produced complete responses in 19 patients (follow up 6 months to 8 years) with `field cancerization' (CIS, T1) of the oral cavity and larynx (6), adenocarcinoma in situ in Barrett's esophagus (2), mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma (9), obstructing esophageal carcinoma (1), and stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx (1). PDT treatment protocols, results, complications, and application as adjunct or primary oncologic therapy for head and neck disease are reviewed.

  6. Rapid sequence treatment of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Moloy, P.J.; Moran, E.M.; Azawi, S. )

    1991-01-01

    A review of the literature suggested that prolonged treatment time may lessen the probability of cure for patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. To shorten treatment time, rapid sequence treatment (RST) was devised in which chemotherapy, surgery, and irradation were administered in a total treatment time of 8 weeks. Twelve patients were treated and followed 3 years or longer. Medical complications were minor. Osteonecrosis occurred in each of the first five patients and was the only major complication of the protocol. Surgical techniques were modified, and no additional patient developed osteonecrosis. No patient developed local or regional recurrence. Two patients developed distant metastases and three other patients developed second primaries. Absolute survival was 50%. Rapid sequence treatment is an aggressive and potentially hazardous protocol that yielded encouraging results in this pilot study.

  7. Therapeutic approaches to the treatment of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis of the aerodigestive tract (a clinical study)

    PubMed Central

    Avramov, Toma; Vetckova, Evelina; Nikolova, Maria; Valev, Dinko; Manolova, Antoaneta; Tafradgiiska, Maya; Kostadinov, Dimitar; Tchalacov, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a rare disease, characterized by recurrent proliferation of benign squamous cell papillomas in the larynx as well as in the other parts of the aerodigestive tract. We have compared different treatment options for RRP of the aerodigestive tract including surgical, conservative and combined approaches. A total of 43 patients with papillomatosis that received a combined therapy were followed in the period from 2009 to 2013. The treatment included electrosurgery and CO2 laser surgery alongside with either immunotherapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) (Calgevax) or α-interferon. In the control group without immunotherapy (n = 16) we used conventional microlaryngeal surgery. During the follow-up, relapse occurred in two patients for the CO2 laser surgery with Calgevax immunotherapy group (n = 16). In the group treated with α-interferon preceded by CO2 laser surgery (n = 9) and electrosurgery (n = 2), relapse had occurred in three patients. Among the control group, recurrence was observed in six patients. This required re-operation. Our data showed a three times more frequent relapses among patients who were operated with conventional surgery as compared to those operated with CO2 laser surgery and Calgevax immunotherapy, and two times more often relapses in patients operated with conventional surgery as compared to those with electrosurgery and CO2 laser surgery and application of α-interferon therapy. Conventional and laser surgeries have a palliative effect, though playing an important role in ensuring the airway patency. While specific antivirus treatment for human papilloma viruses does not exist, the immune modulation with Calgevax considerably reduces the frequency of relapses, by stimulating cellular immune effector mechanisms. The combined protocol allows rarefication of relapses and improvement of patients’ quality of life, but not complete healing. PMID:26692782

  8. Site specific effect of tobacco addiction in upper aerodigestive tract tumors: a retrospective clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, Amita; Ahlawat, Babita; Sharma, Sonam

    2014-01-01

    An institutional study was carried out in 102 patients to investigate the site specific effect of addictions, that is, tobacco smoking and tobacco chewing (smokeless), both independently and synergistically in development of malignancies in upper aerodigestive tract through retrograde questionnaire. The histopathologically proven cases were interviewed regarding different forms of addictions followed by clinical examination and investigations for grading (according to Modified Broadmann's method) and TNM staging (according to UICC) according to the tumor site. Statistical analysis was done by Pearson test. Out of all proven cases of cancers, 29.4% were only tobacco chewers (smokeless), 25.5% were only smokers, 42.2% were having both types of tobacco addictions (smoke and smokeless), and only 2.9% were having no addiction. Out of only tobacco chewers (smokeless), 83.3% were of oral cavity cancers, 6.7% were of oro- and hypopharynx and the rest were of others. Among only smokers, 69.2% cases were of laryngeal and oro- and hypopharynx as compared to 11.5% of oral cavity cancers (nearly 6 times). Tobacco (smokeless) chewing is associated with oral cancers whereas tobacco smoking is associated with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinoma. Both smoking and smokeless tobacco act in synergy with each other. PMID:25431788

  9. Minor Salivary Gland Tumours of Upper Aerodigestive Tract: A Clinicopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Wyszyńska-Pawelec, Grażyna; Gontarz, Michał; Zapała, Jan; Szuta, Mariusz

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study of 56 patients with minor salivary gland tumours (MSGTs) of the upper aerodigestive tract is to present demographic features, distribution of tumours as well as methods and results of treatment performed in our institution over a 10-year period. Of 221 patients with salivary gland tumours, 56 patients with MSGT were selected. There were 36 female and 20 male patients aged from 8 to 81 years. Male-to-female ratio was 1 : 2 in the group of benign MSGT and 1 : 1.7 in the group of malignant tumours. The palate was the most frequent site of MSGT (45.6%), followed by buccal mucosa (19.3%). Of all MSGTs 63.2% were malignant, and 36.8% were benign. Adenoid cystic carcinoma was the most common neoplasm (31.6%), followed by pleomorphic adenoma (29.8%). Surgery was the method of choice in the treatment of patients with MSGT. Postoperative defects were reconstructed by prosthetic obturators, local flaps, and free radial forearm flap. Relative survival for patients with malignant MSGT was 88% at three years and 71.5% at five years. MSGTs are more frequent in females and predominantly affect the palate. Malignant MSGTs are more common than benign. PMID:22675346

  10. A Model for Predicting Gastrostomy Tube Placement in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Upper Aerodigestive Tract Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Ashley C.; Moustafa, Farah; Worley, Mitch; Waltonen, Joshua D.; D'Agostino, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Identifying high-risk patients in the preoperative period can allow physicians to optimize nutritional status early for better outcomes after head and neck cancer resections. OBJECTIVE To develop a model to predict preoperatively the need for gastrostomy tube (G-tube) placement in patients undergoing surgery of the upper aerodigestive tract. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This retrospective medical record review included all adult patients diagnosed with head and neck cancers who underwent tumor resection from 2007 through 2012 at Wake Forest Baptist Health, a level 1 tertiary care center. Records were screened for patient demographics, tumor characteristics, surgical treatment type, and postoperative placement of G-tube. A total of 743 patients underwent resection of head and neck tumors. Of these, 203 were excluded for prior G-tube placement, prior head and neck resection, G-tube placement for chemoradiotherapy, and resection for solely nodal disease, leaving 540 patients for analysis. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Placement of postoperative G-tube. RESULTS Of the 540 included patients, 23% required G-tube placement. The following variables were significant and independent predictors of G-tube placement: preoperative irradiation (odds ratio [OR], 4.1; 95% CI, 2.4–6.9; P < .001), supracricoid laryngectomy (OR, 26.0; 95% CI, 4.9–142.9; P < .001), tracheostomy tube placement (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.5–4.4; P < .001), clinical node stage N0 vs N2 (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4–4.2; P = .01), clinical node stage N1 vs N2 (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.8–3.3; P = .01), preoperative weight loss (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.2–3.2; P = .004), dysphagia (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.2–3.2; P = .005), reconstruction type (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1–2.9; P = .02), and tumor stage (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1–2.9; P = .03). A predictive model was developed based on these variables. In the validation analysis, we found that the average predicted score for patients who received G-tubes was statistically

  11. Augmentation of Radiation Response by Panitumumab in Models of Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kruser, Tim J.; Armstrong, Eric A.; Ghia, Amol J.; Huang Shyhmin; Wheeler, Deric L.; Radinsky, Robert; Freeman, Daniel J.; Harari, Paul M.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the interaction between panitumumab, a fully human anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody, and radiation in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma and non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines and xenografts. Methods and Materials: The head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma lines UM-SCC1 and SCC-1483, as well as the non-small-cell lung cancer line H226, were studied. Tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice were used to assess the in vivo activity of panitumumab alone and combined with radiation. In vitro assays were performed to assess the effect of panitumumab on radiation-induced cell signaling, apoptosis, and DNA damage. Results: Panitumumab increased the radiosensitivity as measured by the clonogenic survival assay. Radiation-induced epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation and downstream signaling through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was inhibited by panitumumab. Panitumumab augmented radiation-induced DNA damage by 1.2-1.6-fold in each of the cell lines studied as assessed by residual {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX foci after radiation. Radiation-induced apoptosis was increased 1.4-1.9-fold by panitumumab, as evidenced by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate staining and flow cytometry. In vivo, the combination therapy of panitumumab and radiation was superior to panitumumab or radiation alone in the H226 xenografts (p = 0.01) and showed a similar trend in the SCC-1483 xenografts (p = 0.08). In vivo, immunohistochemistry demonstrated the ability of panitumumab to augment the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects of radiation. Conclusion: These studies have identified a favorable interaction in the combination of radiation and panitumumab in upper aerodigestive tract tumor models, both in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that clinical investigations examining the combination of radiation and panitumumab in the treatment of epithelial tumors warrant

  12. Alcohol consumption in upper aerodigestive tract cancer: Role of head and neck surgeons' recommendations.

    PubMed

    López-Pelayo, Hugo; Miquel, Laia; Altamirano, José; Blanch, José Luís; Gual, Antoni; Lligoña, Anna

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to describe the prevalence of alcohol consumption in patients diagnosed with an upper aerodigestive tract cancer (UADTC) and evaluate the clinical impact of head and neck surgeons' recommendations on alcohol intake. An observational, retrospective, and cross-sectional study was conducted. Socio-demographic data, type of cancer, psychiatric history, substance-use history, and DSM-IV-TR criteria for alcohol dependence were recorded. Patients were asked to report their alcohol consumption before UADTC diagnosis and during their follow-up. All patients were asked if they had received from the specialist any recommendation to reduce or stop their alcohol consumption. One hundred ninety-one patients were included. Laryngeal cancer was the most frequent. 85.3% of patients were alcohol consumers before being diagnosed, 39.8% were risky drinkers, and 13.1% had alcohol dependence. The prevalence of alcohol use decreased by 16.7% after the UADTC was diagnosed. The proportion of risky drinkers decreased from 46.6% to 24.5%. Almost half of the patients did not recall having received any recommendation regarding alcohol consumption. Receiving a recommendation was independently associated with a positive response (reduced or stopped alcohol consumption) with an Odds Ratio 3.7; p < 0.001. Prevalence of alcohol dependence and risky drinking (39.8%) is high in UADTC patients, compared to the general population. Otorhinolaryngologists and head and neck surgeons frequently provide recommendations about alcohol consumption, which has a relevant impact on the reduction of alcohol intake. Further prospective studies focused on brief advice should be performed in order to demonstrate effectiveness in this population. PMID:26992700

  13. Potential Benefits of Edible Berries in the Management of Aerodigestive and Gastrointestinal Tract Cancers: Preclinical and Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Bishayee, Anupam; Haskell, Yennie; Do, Chau; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Mohandas, Nima; Sethi, Gautam; Stoner, Gary D

    2016-07-26

    Epidemiological reports as well as experimental studies have demonstrated the significant health benefits provided by regular berry consumption. Berries possess both prophylactic and therapeutic potential against several chronic illnesses, such as cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic diseases. Berries owe their health benefits to phytoconstituents, such as polyphenolic anthocyanins, ellagic acid, and a diverse array of phytochemicals bestowed with potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects as well as the ability to engage a multitude of signaling pathways. This review highlights the principal chemical constituents present in berries and their primary molecular targets. The article presents and critically analyzes the chemopreventive and therapeutic potential of berry extracts, fractions, and bioactive components on various cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), including esophageal, stomach, intestinal, and colorectal cancers as well as cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract, such as oral cancer. The current status of clinical studies evaluating berry products in several aforementioned cancers is presented. Various emerging issues including dose-ranging and dosage forms, the role of synergy and the usage of combination therapy as well as other relevant areas essential for the development of berry phytoconstituents as mainstream chemopreventive and therapeutic agents against aerodigestive and GIT cancers are critically discussed. PMID:25781639

  14. Roles of retinoids and their nuclear receptors in the development and prevention of upper aerodigestive tract cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Lotan, R

    1997-01-01

    Vitamin A analogs (retinoids) suppress oral and lung carcinogenesis in animal models and prevent the development of second primary tumors in head, neck, and lung cancer patients. These effects result from changes in the expression of genes that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Retinoic acid receptors (RARs; -alpha, -beta, and -gamma) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs; -alpha, -beta, and, -gamma) are retinoid-activated transcription factors, which mediate effects of retinoids on gene expression. Therefore, alterations in receptor expression or function could interfere with the retinoid signaling pathway and thereby enhance cancer development. We found that the expression of RAR beta was suppressed in more than 50% of oral and lung premalignant lesions in individuals without cancer and in dysplastic lesions adjacent to cancer and in malignant oral and lung carcinomas. The expression of the other receptors was not different among normal, dysplastic, and malignant oral tissues. However, the expression of RAR gamma and RXR beta was somewhat decreased in lung cancers. These results show that RAR beta expression is lost at early stages of carcinogenesis in the aerodigestive tract and support the hypothesis that the loss of RAR beta expression may facilitate the development of some of these cancers. PMID:9255592

  15. Alpha-Synuclein Pathology in Sensory Nerve Terminals of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract of Parkinson’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Liancai; Chen, Jingming; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Nyirenda, Themba; Benson, Brian; Gupta, Fiona; Sanders, Ira; Adler, Charles H.; Caviness, John N.; Shill, Holly A.; Sabbagh, Marwan; Samanta, Johan E.; Sue, Lucia I.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia is common in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and causes significant morbidity and mortality. PD dysphagia has usually been explained as dysfunction of central motor control, much like other motor symptoms that are characteristic of the disease. However, PD dysphagia does not correlate with severity of motor symptoms nor does it respond to motor therapies. It is known that PD patients have sensory deficits in the pharynx, and that impaired sensation may contribute to dysphagia. However, the underlying cause of the pharyngeal sensory deficits in PD is not known. We hypothesized that PD dysphagia with sensory deficits may be due to degeneration of the sensory nerve terminals in the upper aerodigestive tract (UAT). We have previously shown that Lewy-type synucleinopathy (LTS) is present in the main pharyngeal sensory nerves of PD patients, but not in controls. In this study, the sensory terminals in UAT mucosa were studied to discern the presence and distribution of LTS. Whole-mount specimens (tongue-pharynx-larynx-upper esophagus) were obtained from 10 deceased human subjects with clinically diagnosed and neuropathologically confirmed PD (five with dysphagia and five without) and four age-matched healthy controls. Samples were taken from six sites and immunostained for phosphorylated α-synuclein (PAS). The results showed the presence of PAS-immunoreactive (PAS-ir) axons in all the PD subjects and in none of the controls. Notably, PD patients with dysphagia had more PAS-ir axons in the regions that are critical for initiating the swallowing reflex. These findings suggest that Lewy pathology affects mucosal sensory axons in specific regions of the UAT and may be related to PD dysphagia. PMID:26041249

  16. Photodynamic Therapy for 101 Early Cancers of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract, the Esophagus, and the Bronchi: A Single-Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Grosjean, P.; Fontolliet, Ch.; Wagnieres, G.; Woodtli, A.; Bergh, H. Van Den; Monnier, Ph.

    1999-01-01

    Cancer, when detected at an early stage, has a very good probability of being eradicated by surgery or radiotherapy. However, less aggressive treatments also tend to provide high rates of cure without the side effects of radical therapy. We report on the results of our clinical experience with photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of early carcinomas in the upper aerodigestive tract, the esophagus, and the tracheobronchial tree. Sixty-four patients with 101 squamous cell carcinomas were treated with three different photosensitizers: hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD), Photofrin II, and tetra (m-hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC). Seventy-seven (76%) tumors showed a complete rsponse with no recurrence after a mean follow-up period of 27 months. There was no significant difference in terms of cure rates among the three dyes. However, mTHPC has a stronger phototoxicity and induces a shorter skin photosensitization than either of the other photosensitizers. There were eight major complications: three esophagotracheal fistulae after illumination with red light in the esophagus, two esophageal stenoses following 360° circumferential irradiation, and three bronchial stenoses. Illumination with the less penetrating green light and the use of a 180° or 240° windowed cylindrical light distributor render the risk of complications in the esophagus essentially impossible, without reducing the efficacy of the treatment. Therefore, PDT may be considered as a safe and effective treatment for early carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract, the esophagus, and the tracheobronchial tree. PMID:18493496

  17. Genetic variants in DNA repair pathways and risk of upper aerodigestive tract cancers: combined analysis of data from two genome-wide association studies in European populations.

    PubMed

    Babron, Marie-Claude; Kazma, Rémi; Gaborieau, Valérie; McKay, James; Brennan, Paul; Sarasin, Alain; Benhamou, Simone

    2014-07-01

    DNA repair pathways are good candidates for upper aerodigestive tract cancer susceptibility because of their critical role in maintaining genome integrity. We have selected 13 pathways involved in DNA repair representing 212 autosomal genes. To assess the role of these pathways and their associated genes, two European data sets from the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium were pooled, totaling 1954 cases and 3121 controls, with documented demographic, lifetime alcohol and tobacco consumption information. We applied an innovative approach that tests single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-sets within DNA repair pathways and then within genes belonging to the significant pathways. We showed an association between the polymerase pathway and oral cavity/pharynx cancers (P-corrected = 4.45 × 10(-) (2)), explained entirely by the association with one SNP, rs1494961 (P = 2.65 × 10(-) (4)), a missense mutation V306I in the second exon of HELQ gene. We also found an association between the cell cycle regulation pathway and esophagus cancer (P-corrected = 1.48 × 10(-) (2)), explained by three SNPs located within or near CSNK1E gene: rs1534891 (P = 1.27 × 10(-) (4)), rs7289981 (P = 3.37 × 10(-) (3)) and rs13054361 (P = 4.09 × 10(-) (3)). As a first attempt to investigate pathway-level associations, our results suggest a role of specific DNA repair genes/pathways in specific upper aerodigestive tract cancer sites. PMID:24658182

  18. A prognostic model based on pretreatment platelet lymphocyte ratio for stage IE/IIE upper aerodigestive tract extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-feng; Chang, Bo-yang; Chen, Xiao-qin; Liu, Pan-pan; Wuxiao, Zhi-jun; Wang, Zhi-hui; Li, Su; Jiang, Wen-qi; Xia, Zhong-jun

    2014-12-01

    Patients with stage IE/IIE natural killer T (NK/T) cell lymphomas have discrepant survival outcome. This study aims to establish a prognostic model based on the pretreatment platelet lymphocyte ratio (PLR) specifically for localized extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma to guide the therapy. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 252 patients with early-stage upper aerodigestive tract NK/T cell lymphoma. The 5-year overall survival rate in 252 patients was 67.1%. Prognostic factors for survival were female (P = 0.025; relative risk, 0.51; 95% CI 0.28-0.92), older age (P = 0.000; relative risk, 3.34; 95% CI 1.94-5.75), stage II(P = 0.020; relative risk, 1.79; 95% CI 1.10-2.91), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level (P = 0.009; relative risk, 2.00; 95% CI 1.19-3.35), and PLR (P = 0.020; relative risk, 1.77; 95% CI 1.10-2.87). Based on these five parameters, we identified three different risk groups: group 1(106 cases, 43.4%), no or one adverse factor; group 2(85 cases, 34.8%), two factors; group 3(53 cases, 21.7%), three to five factors. Five-year overall survival was 83.3% for group 1, 62.2% for group 2, and 43.1% for group 3 (P = 0.000). Compared with International Prognostic Index and Korean Prognostic Index, the new model has a better prognostic discrimination for the patients of stage IE/IIE upper aerodigestive tract NK/T cell lymphoma. The PLR-based prognosis model is useful to stratify patients with localized extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma into different risk groups and guide the treatment modalities selection. PMID:25377661

  19. Cetuximab Resistance in Squamous Carcinomas of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract Is Driven by Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Plasticity: Potential for mAb Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kjær, Ida; Lindsted, Trine; Fröhlich, Camilla; Olsen, Jesper Velgaard; Horak, Ivan David; Kragh, Michael; Pedersen, Mikkel Wandahl

    2016-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) arising in upper parts of the aerodigestive tract are among the leading causes of death worldwide. EGFR has been found to play an essential role in driving the malignancy of SCC of the upper aerodigestive tract (SCCUAT), but, despite this, clinical results using a range of different EGFR-targeted agents have been disappointing. Cetuximab is currently the only EGFR-targeted agent approved by the FDA for treatment of SCCUAT. However, intrinsic and acquired cetuximab resistance is a major problem for effective therapy. Thus, a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for cetuximab resistance is valuable for development of the next generation of antibody therapeutics. In order to better understand the underlying mechanisms of cetuximab resistance in SCCUAT, we established from cetuximab-sensitive models cell lines with acquired resistance to cetuximab by continuous selective pressure in vitro and in vivo Our results show that resistant clones maintain partial dependency on EGFR and that receptor tyrosine kinase plasticity mediated by HER3 and IGF1R plays an essential role. A multitarget mAb mixture against EGFR, HER3, and IGF1R was able to overcome cetuximab resistance in vitro To our surprise, these findings could be extended to include SCCUAT cell lines with intrinsic resistance to cetuximab, suggesting that the triad consisting of EGFR, HER3, and IGF1R plays a key role in SCCUAT. Our results thus provide a rationale for simultaneous targeting of EGFR, HER3, and IGF1R in SCCUAT. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1614-26. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196767

  20. Risk factors for developing a second upper aerodigestive cancer after radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in patients with head-and-neck cancers: An exploratory outcomes analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Taussky, Daniel . E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca; Rufibach, Kaspar M.Sc.; Huguenin, Pia; Allal, Abdelkarim S.

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: The objective was to assess the influence of treatment-related and patient-related factors on the risk of developing a second primary tumor (SPT) of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) in patients with locoregionally advanced nonmetastatic carcinomas of the head-and-neck region. Methods and Materials: The data of 521 patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year were pooled: 224 patients from the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (SAKK) 10/94 trial, treated with 1.2 Gy b.i.d. to 74.4 Gy, and randomized to receive or not to receive simultaneous chemotherapy with cisplatin (excluding nasopharyngeal and maxillary sinus carcinomas); and 297 patients from Geneva, all treated with accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant boost to 69.9 Gy and predominantly cisplatin-based concomitant chemotherapy in 33% of patients (including 21 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinomas). An exploratory analysis using competing risk methodology was performed. Results: A total of 65 SPT of the UADT were observed after a median observation time of 4.7 years. The overall risk of experiencing an SPT of the UADT at 10 years in the presence of all other possible events was estimated to be 33%. There were no SPTs after treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, there was no difference in occurrence of SPT at 3 years with respect to the administration of chemotherapy (p = 0.31), age (p 0.62), performance status (p = 0.61), gender (p = 0.27), presence of nodal disease (p = 0.51), or T stage (p = 0.72). However, patients treated with concomitant boost had fewer SPTs (p = 0.0093). Conclusions: Our data do not suggest that addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy influences the incidence of second cancers in patients with head-and-neck cancer. The difference in the incidence of SPT between the two radiotherapy schedule groups merits further exploration.

  1. Radiotherapy in the treatment of mucosal melanoma of the upper aerodigestive tract: Analysis of 74 cases. A Rare Cancer Network study

    SciTech Connect

    Krengli, Marco . E-mail: krengli@tera.it; Masini, Laura; Kaanders, Johannes; Maingon, Philippe; Oei, Swan Bing; Zouhair, Abderrahim; Ozyar, Enis; Roelandts, Martine; Amichetti, Maurizio; Bosset, Mathieu; Mirimanoff, Rene-Olivier

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze a series of mucosal melanoma of the upper aerodigestive tract to determine the prognostic factors and contribute to understanding the role of radiotherapy in the therapeutic strategy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-four patients were analyzed. The most frequent locations were nasal and oral, in 31 patients (41.9%) and 12 patients (16.2%), respectively. Sixty-three patients (85.1%) were in Stage I, 5 (6.8%) in Stage II, and 6 (8.1%) in Stage III. Treatment consisted of surgery in 17 patients (23.0%), surgery and radiotherapy in 42 (56.8%), radiotherapy in 11 (14.9%), and chemo-immunotherapy in 4 (5.4%). Median follow-up was 20 months. Results: Local control at 3 years was 57% after surgery alone and 71% after surgery and radiotherapy. Overall and disease-free survival rates, respectively, were 41% and 31% at 3 years and 14% and 22% at 10 years. After univariate analysis, female gender, melanosis, tumor size {<=}3 cm, Stage I, postoperative radiotherapy, and complete remission were favorable prognostic factors. Stage I and melanosis were confirmed by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Local control was improved by postoperative radiotherapy, despite survival being as poor as in other published series. Stage I and melanosis at diagnosis were the most favorable prognostic factors.

  2. Is aspiration as detected on pretreatment video fluorography, a harbinger of poor quality of life and early mortality in cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract treated with radiotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Punita; Nautiyal, Vipul; Chaudhuri, Tamojit; Verma, Mranalini; Das, Koilpillai Joseph; Kumar, Shaleen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (head and neck cancer (HNC)) tend to aspirate, either due to disease or treatment. The association of aspiration (documented on video fluorography (VFG)) with quality of life (QOL) and unexpected mortality was studied prospectively in patients treated with simultaneous integrated boost technique of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT). Materials and Methods: Moderately advanced (stage III/IV) HNC were treated by SIB-IMRT delivering 66 Gy/30 fr, 60 Gy/30 fr, and 54 Gy/30 fr to high, intermediate, and low risk volumes, respectively. They underwent serial VFG and QOL assessments (Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (QLQ-C30) and head and neck-35 (HN35) European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) tools) at 0, 3, and 6 months. Pharyngeal musculature (PM) was additionally delineated on planning computed tomography (CT) scans as potential organs at risk (OARs). Results: Between November 2009 and May 2011, 20 HNC were treated as per protocol. All patients were fit (Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥ 80). Based on VFG findings, seven patients (4/9 oropharynx and 3/11 laryngopharynx) were grouped as aspirators (A) and remaining 13 as non-aspirators (NA). The QOL study showed that pretreatment coughing and swallowing difficulties were greater in group A versus NA and remained persistently higher. In group A, deaths attributable to aspiration were seen in 3/7 patients, while none occurred in the NA group (Fisher's exact P = 0.03). The mean PM dose was 60 Gy in both the groups and mean V60 was similar at 69 and 67% in A and NA groups, respectively. Conclusions: VFG helps identify patients who aspirate and are at risk of premature death due to its complications, alerting caregivers to direct attention appropriately. PMID:25422806

  3. Deletion of inositol hexakisphosphate kinase 1 (IP6K1) reduces cell migration and invasion, conferring protection from aerodigestive tract carcinoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Jadav, Rathan S; Kumar, Dharmika; Buwa, Natasha; Ganguli, Shubhra; Thampatty, Sitalakshmi R; Balasubramanian, Nagaraj; Bhandari, Rashna

    2016-08-01

    Inositol hexakisphosphate kinases (IP6Ks), a family of enzymes found in all eukaryotes, are responsible for the synthesis of 5-diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (5-IP7) from inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6). Three isoforms of IP6Ks are found in mammals, and gene deletions of each isoform lead to diverse, non-overlapping phenotypes in mice. Previous studies show a facilitatory role for IP6K2 in cell migration and invasion, properties that are essential for the early stages of tumorigenesis. However, IP6K2 also has an essential role in cancer cell apoptosis, and mice lacking this protein are more susceptible to the development of aerodigestive tract carcinoma upon treatment with the oral carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). Not much is known about the functions of the equally abundant and ubiquitously expressed IP6K1 isoform in cell migration, invasion and cancer progression. We conducted a gene expression analysis on mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking IP6K1, revealing a role for this protein in cell receptor-extracellular matrix interactions that regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Consequently, cells lacking IP6K1 manifest defects in adhesion-dependent signaling, evident by lower FAK and Paxillin activation, leading to reduced cell spreading and migration. Expression of active, but not inactive IP6K1 reverses migration defects in IP6K1 knockout MEFs, suggesting that 5-IP7 synthesis by IP6K1 promotes cell locomotion. Actin cytoskeleton remodeling and cell migration support the ability of cancer cells to achieve their complete oncogenic potential. Cancer cells with lower IP6K1 levels display reduced migration, invasion, and anchorage-independent growth. When fed an oral carcinogen, mice lacking IP6K1 show reduced progression from epithelial dysplasia to invasive carcinoma. Thus, our data reveal that like IP6K2, IP6K1 is also involved in early cytoskeleton remodeling events during cancer progression. However, unlike IP6K2, IP6K1 is essential for 4NQO

  4. Evaluation with mTHPC of early squamous cell carcinomas of the cheek pouch mucosa of Golden Syrian hamsters as a model for clinical PDT of early cancers in the upper aerodigestive tract, the esophag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glanzmann, Thomas M.; Theumann, Jean-Francois; Forrer, Martin; Braichotte, Daniel; Wagnieres, Georges A.; van den Bergh, Hubert; Andrejevic-Blant, Snezana; Savary, Jean-Francois; Monnier, Philippe

    1995-03-01

    Golden Syrian hamsters are evaluated as an animal model for light induced fluorescence (LIF) photodetection and phototherapy of early squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract, the esophagus, and the traecheo-bronchial tree. Carcinomas of this type are induced on the hamster cheek pouch mucosa by the application of the carcinogen 7,12-DMBA. For phototherapeutic experiments on the animals we utilized meso-(tetrahydoxyphenyl) chlorin (mTHPC). This drug is currently in phase I and II clinical trials for ENT patients presenting superficial `early' squamous cell carcinomas. By means of LIF we measured in vivo the kinetics of the uptake and removal of mTHPC in the normal and tumoral cheek mucosa and in the skin. The photodynamic therapy (PDT) reaction of the tissue after excitation of the photosensitizer with laser light at 652 nm was studied. Both pharmacokinetics and PDT efficacy are compared between animal model and clinical results with special emphasis on selectivity between normal and tumoral mucosa. These first experiments show that this tumor model in the hamster cheek pouch seems to be suitable for testing new photosensitizers preceding their clinical application as well as for optimization of the multiple parameters of clinical PDT.

  5. Localization of tetra(m-hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (Foscan) in human healthy tissues and squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aero-digestive tract, the esophagus and the bronchi: a fluorescence microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Andrejevic Blant, S; Grosjean, P; Ballini, J P; Wagnières, G; van den Bergh, H; Fontolliet, C; Monnier, P

    2001-08-15

    To date, little is known about precise time-dependent distribution and histological localization of tetra(m-hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC) in human healthy tissues and squamous cell malignancies in the upper aero-digestive tract. A fluorescence microscopy study was performed on 50 healthy tissue biopsies and on 13 tumors (graded from Tis to T1 SCC) from 30 patients. Tissue samples were taken between 4 h and 11 days following injection of 0.15 mg/kg mTHPC. A fairly comparable distribution pattern in various tissues was observed over time in different patients. Vascular localization of mTHPC fluorescence predominates at a short delay, whereas the dye is essentially located in the tumoral and healthy mucosa after longer delays. A much lower uptake and retention of mTHPC fluorescence was noted in striated muscle and cartilage as compared to neoplastic lesions. No significant selectivity was found between healthy and tumoral mucosa. The obtained data are important to confirm drug-light interval that have been selected for effective PDT for early SCC malignancies while minimizing the risks of over- or under-treatment. The low fluorescence level in striated muscle provides the opportunity to develop interstitial PDT as a treatment modality for invasive SCC of unfavorable locations in the oral cavity or pharynx, such as the base of the tongue. PMID:11485842

  6. [Salvage surgery for upper aerodigestive tract tumours].

    PubMed

    Dolivet, Gilles; Cortese, Sophie; Mastronicola, Romina; Phulpin, Bérengère; Kaminski, Marie-Christine; Mecellem, Hinda; Gillon, Véronique; Gangloff, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Salvage surgeries of head and neck tumors are considered as poor satisfactory either for disease control results or for aesthetic and functional outcomes. Several improvements have been made possible since few years in all fields of oncologic treatments. A new approach must be initiated in that context, moreover since take in charge for head and neck region (exclusive initial medical treatment) let us consider an increasement of clinical situations for which a salvage therapy could be performed. The new surgery techniques have to be considered, reconstructive and guided by systems, which can improve surgical skills (navigation, robotic, sentinel node procedure, nervous detection and so on), the help of reirradiation techniques, the use of medical therapy during surgical procedure, the photodynamic therapy and all the help provided by new medical imaging and modern biology, which can determine more precisely the status of the cancer when it is taken in charge. The mastery of those techniques improvements must follow on an evolution of the concepts in the field of combined salvage treatments performed by multidisciplinary teams. Those treatments have to be realized in structures, which have the techniques and the multiple skills for allowing increasement of outcomes of those severe diseases. PMID:21591296

  7. Trial of Postoperative Radiation, Cisplatin, and Panitumumab in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Cancer of Head; Cancer of Head and Neck; Cancer of Neck; Cancer of the Head; Cancer of the Head and Neck; Cancer of the Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Head Cancer; Head Neoplasms; Head, Neck Neoplasms; Neck Cancer; Neck Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Head; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Neoplasms, Neck; Neoplasms, Upper Aerodigestive Tract; UADT Neoplasms; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Neoplasms

  8. Aerodigestive Foreign Bodies in Adult Ethiopian Patients: A Prospective Study at Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bekele, Abebe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Foreign bodies (FBs) in the aerodigestive tract are important causes of morbidity and mortality and pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The best method of removal of an esophageal and tracheobronchial FB is endoscopic guided extraction. Objective. To present our experience of the removal of aerodigestive FBs in adult Ethiopian patients using rigid endoscopes. Methods. A hospital-based prospective study, at Tikur Anbessa Referral and Teaching Hospital, from January 2011 to December 2012 (over two years). Results. A total of 32 patients (18 males and 14 females) with a mean age of 28.0 ± 12.74 years were treated for FB ingestion and aspiration at Tikur Anbessa Hospital. The FBs were impacted at the esophagus in 18 (56.2%) patients, at the pharynx in 7 (21.8%), and at the air way in 7 (21.8%) patients. Pieces of bones were the commonest objects found in the esophagus (17/18 of the cases) and the pharynx (4/7), while fractured tracheostomy tubes and needles were frequently seen in the air way (3/7 cases each). The foreign bodies were visible in plain radiographs of 26 (81.2%) patients. Successful extraction of FBs was achieved by using Mc gill forceps in 11 cases, rigid esophagoscopes in 9 patients, and bronchoscopes in 4 cases. Four cases required open surgery to remove the foreign bodies. Two complications (one pneumothorax and one esophageal perforation) occurred. All patients were discharged cured. Discussion and Recommendations. Aerodigestive FBs are not so rare in the hospital and timely diagnosis and removal of accidentally ingested and aspirated foreign body should be performed so as to avoid the potentially lethal complications associated. Rigid esophagoscopy requires general anesthesia and is associated with its own complications, but our experience and outcome of its use are encouraging. PMID:24834074

  9. Changes in the trend of alcohol-related cancers: perspectives on statistical trends.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Jyoti; Praud, Delphine; Boffetta, Paolo

    2015-09-21

    Alcohol is a major risk factor for cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) including oral, pharyngeal, laryngeal, and esophageal cancers. Our present study aims at comparing the effect of alcohol consumption trends on UADT cancer incidence and mortality in four countries: USA, France, Sweden, and UK (Scotland). Analogous to the decline in alcohol consumption in the countries being studied, incidence and mortality rates for UADT cancers were also noted to stabilize or decline over time. Factors such as tobacco use and HPV infection may have confounded our findings. PMID:26178266

  10. [Epidemiology of cancers of the upper respiratory and digestive tracts].

    PubMed

    Lefèbvre, J L; Adenis, L

    1995-04-01

    Tumours of the upper aerodigestive tract affect mainly industrial countries. Squamous cell carcinomas of the pharynx and larynx are linked to alcohol and tobacco abuse. Other factors (such as poor dental or nutritional status, viral or genetic or occupational factors) are, by far, of less importance. Glandular tumours of the ethmoid are, undoubtedly, due to wood dust exposure. Undifferentiated carcinoma of nasopharynx are associated with Epstein-Barr virus exposure, genetic profiles and diet behaviour. PMID:7761748

  11. Transoral robotic surgery: role in the management of upper aerodigestive tract tumors.

    PubMed

    Genden, Eric M; O'Malley, Bert W; Weinstein, Gregory S; Stucken, Chaz L; Selber, Jesse C; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Hockstein, Neil G; Ozer, Enver; Mallet, Yann; Satava, Richard M; Moore, Eric J; Silver, Carl E; Ferlito, Alfio

    2012-06-01

    The toxicity associated with concomitant chemoradiation for the management of laryngeal and pharyngeal carcinoma has been well documented. Minimally invasive surgical techniques offer the potential to extirpate the malignancy as a single-modality therapy and provide essential information that may direct subsequent treatment. In selected patients, radiation doses may be reduced and systemic chemotherapy may be withheld after tumor extirpation. Transoral laser microsurgery has proven effective, although inability to manipulate and suture tissue by this modality limits ablation and reconstruction of extensive defects. Transoral robotic surgery is a relatively new technique that provides several unique advantages, which include a 3-dimensional magnified view, ability to see and work around curves or angles, and the availability of 2 or 3 robotic arms that can be used to reconstruct extensive defects using either local, regional, or free flaps. Preliminary data suggest that transoral robotic surgery may provide a technique for ablation and reconstruction of pharyngeal defects that may be superior to other transoral techniques. It may also provide a means for personalizing therapy for oropharyngeal and supraglottic carcinoma. PMID:22610591

  12. Effect of nasal noninvasive respiratory support methods on pharyngeal provocation-induced aerodigestive reflexes in infants.

    PubMed

    Jadcherla, Sudarshan R; Hasenstab, Kathryn A; Sitaram, Swetha; Clouse, Brian J; Slaughter, Jonathan L; Shaker, Reza

    2016-06-01

    The pharynx is a locus of provocation among infants with aerodigestive morbidities manifesting as dysphagia, life-threatening events, aspiration-pneumonia, atelectasis, and reflux, and such infants often receive nasal respiratory support. We determined the impact of different oxygen delivery methods on pharyngeal stimulation-induced aerodigestive reflexes [room air (RA), nasal cannula (NC), and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP)] while hypothesizing that the sensory motor characteristics of putative reflexes are distinct. Thirty eight infants (28.0 ± 0.7 wk gestation) underwent pharyngoesophageal manometry and respiratory inductance plethysmography to determine the effects of graded pharyngeal stimuli (n = 271) on upper and lower esophageal sphincters (UES, LES), swallowing, and deglutition-apnea. Comparisons were made between NC (n = 19), nCPAP (n = 9), and RA (n = 10) groups. Importantly, NC or nCPAP (vs. RA) had: 1) delayed feeding milestones (P < 0.05), 2) increased pharyngeal waveform recruitment and duration, greater UES nadir pressure, decreased esophageal contraction duration, decreased distal esophageal contraction amplitude, and decreased completely propagated esophageal peristalsis (all P < 0.05), and 3) similarly developed UES contractile and LES relaxation reflexes (P > 0.05). We conclude that aerodigestive reflexes were similarly developed in infants using noninvasive respiratory support with adequate upper and lower aerodigestive protection. Increased concern for GERD is unfounded in this population. These infants may benefit from targeted oromotor feeding therapies and safe pharyngeal bolus transit to accelerate feeding milestones. PMID:27012774

  13. About the Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of lung and head and neck cancers, as well as new approaches to clinical prevention studies including cancer immunoprevention.Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials ProgramThe group jointly administers the Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program evaluating new agents, surrogate biomarkers, and technologies to identify premalignant lesions, and related cancers.  |

  14. Association between Socioeconomic Factors and Cancer Risk: A Population Cohort Study in Scotland (1991-2006)

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Katharine H.; McMahon, Alex D.; Raab, Gillian M.; Brewster, David H.; Conway, David I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lung and upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancer risk are associated with low socioeconomic circumstances and routinely measured using area socioeconomic indices. We investigated effect of country of birth, marital status, one area deprivation measure and individual socioeconomic variables (economic activity, education, occupational social class, car ownership, household tenure) on risk associated with lung, UADT and all cancer combined (excluding non melanoma skin cancer). Methods We linked Scottish Longitudinal Study and Scottish Cancer Registry to follow 203,658 cohort members aged 15+ years from 1991–2006. Relative risks (RR) were calculated using Poisson regression models by sex offset for person-years of follow-up. Results 21,832 first primary tumours (including 3,505 lung, 1,206 UADT) were diagnosed. Regardless of cancer, economically inactivity (versus activity) was associated with increased risk (male: RR 1.14, 95% CI 1.10–1.18; female: RR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02–1.11). For lung cancer, area deprivation remained significant after full adjustment suggesting the area deprivation cannot be fully explained by individual variables. No or non degree qualification (versus degree) was associated with increased lung risk; likewise for UADT risk (females only). Occupational social class associations were most pronounced and elevated for UADT risk. No car access (versus ownership) was associated with increased risk (excluding all cancer risk, males). Renting (versus home ownership) was associated with increased lung cancer risk, UADT cancer risk (males only) and all cancer risk (females only). Regardless of cancer group, elevated risk was associated with no education and living in deprived areas. Conclusions Different and independent socioeconomic variables are inversely associated with different cancer risks in both sexes; no one socioeconomic variable captures all aspects of socioeconomic circumstances or life course. Association of multiple

  15. Effect of Aging on Hypopharyngeal Safe Volume and the Aerodigestive Reflexes Protecting the Airways

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Kulwinder S.; Surapaneni, Sri Naveen; Kuribayashi, Shiko; Hafeezullah, Mohammed; Shaker, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Studies on young volunteers have shown that aerodigestive reflexes are triggered before the maximum volume of fluid that can safely collect in the hypopharynx before spilling into the larynx is exceeded (hypopharyngeal safe volume [HPSV]). The objective of this study was to determine the influence of aging on HPSV and pharyngoglottal closure reflex (PGCR), pharyngo-UES contractile reflex (PUCR), and reflexive pharyngeal swallow (RPS). Study Design Comparison between two groups of different age ranges. Methods Ten young (25 ±3 standard deviation [SD] years) and 10 elderly (77 ±3 SD years) subjects were studied. PGCR, PUCR, and RPS were elicited by perfusing water into the pharynx rapidly and slowly. HPSV was determined by abolishing RPS with pharyngeal anesthesia. Results Frequency–elicitation of PGCR and PUCR were significantly lower in the elderly compared to the young during slow water perfusion (47% vs. 97% and 40% vs. 90%, respectively, P <.001). RPS was absent in five of the 30 (17%) slow injections in the elderly group. In these elderly subjects, HPSV was exceeded and laryngeal penetration of the water was seen. The threshold volume to elicit PGCR, PUCR, and RPS was significantly lower than the HPSV during rapid injections. Except for RPS, these volumes were also significantly lower than HPSV during slow injections. Conclusions PGCR, PUCR, and RPS reflexes are triggered at a threshold volume significantly lower than the HPSV in both young and elderly subjects. Lower frequency–elicitation of PGCR, PUCR, and RPS in the elderly can predispose them to the risks of aspiration. PMID:24281906

  16. Biopsy - biliary tract

    MedlinePlus

    Cytology analysis - biliary tract; Biliary tract biopsy ... A sample for a biliary tract biopsy can be obtained in different ways. A needle biopsy can be done if you have a well-defined tumor. The biopsy site ...

  17. Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Our ePublications > Urinary tract infection fact sheet ePublications Urinary tract infection fact sheet Print this fact sheet Urinary tract ... a doctor find out if I have a urinary tract infection (UTI)? To find out if you have a ...

  18. Autofluorescence spectroscopy of normal and malignant tissues: both in-vivo and ex-vivo measurements in the upper aero-digestive tract and lung tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A'Amar, Ousama M.; Lignon, Dominique; Menard, O.; Begorre, Henri; Guillemin, Francois H.; Yvroud, Edouard

    1996-04-01

    A spectroscopic system with flexible three optical fiber sensor had been developed to study tissue fluorescence for a clinical use. Autofluorescence spectra at 413 nm and 10 mW excitation light power from different tissues in oral cavity had been measured in vivo in 25 subjects. The correlation coefficient in spectral shape between individual spectra and the mean emission spectrum of each site was about 0.9 and fluorescence intensity variation ranged between 20% and 45% according to the examined site. The variation in fluorescence intensity of the main emission wavelength at about 520 nm between spectra of the lower part of tongue, gingiva, lips, floor of cavity, cheek and palate was not statistically significant. But the spectrum of the upper part of tongue had been characterized by an additional peak around 635 nm. Otherwise, autofluorescence spectra at 410 nm and 0.5 mW excitation light power of 8 carcinoma of buccal and lung tissues were measured. The fluorescence ratio at 520 emission peak between normal tissue and carcinoma was evaluated at a maximum value of 13 for a lung cancer (ex vivo measurement) and a minimum of 3.3 for a cancer of the oro-pharynx (in vivo measurement). On the other hand, a fluorescence peak at 635 nm had characterized the carcinoma of the floor of cavity and the upper part of tongue.

  19. Chemopreventive effects of the polyunsaturated fatty acids omega-3 on the carcinogenesis process of the upper aerodigestive tract induced by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide in Swiss mice

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Ricardo Ribeiro; Giovanini, Allan; de Rosa, Fernanda Scarmato; Ogata, Daniel Cury; de Oliveira, André Luiz Vettore; Cardoso Costa, Ana Flávia; Talini, Carolina; Feniman, Denise; Kamei, Douglas; Júnior, Celso Felipe; Coco, Allan; Carvalho, André Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the potential chemopreventive effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids omega-3 in Swiss mice submitted to oral and oesophageal carcinogenesis induction by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO). Study design: The animals underwent carcinogenesis induction with 50 µg/mL 4-NQO for eight weeks. The animals were divided into groups: Group I—4-NQO induction without chemoprevention, Group II—chemoprevention with the addition of 5% fish oil (FO) in their diet after 4-NQO carcinogenesis induction, and Group III—chemoprevention with 5% FO in their diet during and after 4-NQO carcinogenesis induction. Results: The incidence of invasive oral carcinoma was: Group I (72.9%), Group II (84.2%), and Group III (64.7%); p = 0.34. The difference in the incidence of invasive oesophageal carcinoma was statistically significant: Group I (37.8%), Group II (68.4%), and Group III (29.4%); p = 0.02. Conclusions: 4-NQO induction led to cancer in the majority of animals. Chemoprevention with FO brought no benefit in preventing the carcinogenesis process initiated by 4-NQO for oral cancer. The suggestive pro-tumour action of FO when given after tumour post-initiation seems to demonstrate that this fatty acid can potentialise the action of 4-NQO in the oesophagus carcinogenesis of the Swiss mice. PMID:24605132

  20. A method of producing carcinoma in upper aerodigestive tree and esophagus of the Syrian golden hamster using wounding and instillation of N-methylnitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Estensen, Richard D; Anderson, W Robert; Galbraith, Arthur R; Hartle, Donna E; Jordan, Margaret M; Ondrey, Frank G; Wattenberg, Lee W

    2007-08-01

    Details of a method for producing carcinoma of the aerodigestive tree of the Syrian golden hamster and the use of this model to evaluate putative agents for chemoprevention of these carcinomas are described. The method produces a majority of squamous carcinomas of the trachea and glottis that follow squamous metaplasia of respiratory epithelium. In addition, seen are adenocarcinomas arising in glands of the respiratory tree. Squamous carcinomas of the digestive epithelium arise in primary squamous epithelium. These tumors of digestive epithelium have a growth pattern that differs from that of the respiratory epithelium in that they grow and invade without filling the epithelial layer with tumor cells. PMID:17684140

  1. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and ... To protect the kidneys from damage – By preventing urinary tract infections (UTI) – By identifying and treating vesicoureteral remux (VUR). ...

  2. Urinary Tract Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... can usually be found and treated before the kidneys become infected. If your doctor treats a urinary tract infection early and ... Tips on preventing urinary tract infections Drink plenty of water to flush out bacteria. Drinking cranberry juice may also help ...

  3. Urinary Tract Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tract Health Overview Condition Information What is a UTI? What is UI? What causes it? How many ... Staff Directory Overview Condition Information What is a UTI? What is UI? What causes it? How many ...

  4. Urinary Tract Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidneys, two ureters, a bladder, and a urethra. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common type of infection in the body. You may have a UTI if you notice Pain or burning when you ...

  5. Upper respiratory tract (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The major passages and structures of the upper respiratory tract include the nose or nostrils, nasal cavity, mouth, throat (pharynx), and voice box (larynx). The respiratory system is lined with a mucous membrane that ...

  6. [Recurrent urinary tract infection].

    PubMed

    Ali, Adel Ben; Bagnis, Corinne Isnard

    2014-09-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infection involves mainly women and exhibits an ecological as well as economical risk. 4% of all urinary tract infection are recurrent and usually secondary to general or local abnormalities. A multidisciplinary medical and surgical team (urology, nephrology, bacteriology, infectious disease) best performs diagnosis and treatment as well as rules out reversible etiology. Treatment relies on behavioral changes before offering cranberry products and/or antibioprophylaxis if necessary. PMID:25362782

  7. Aerodigestive cancers: oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Haws, Luke; Haws, Bryn Taylor

    2014-09-01

    Worldwide, approximately 260,000 new cases of oral cancer occur, and more than 125,000 mortalities are attributed to oral cancers each year. Oral cancers most commonly arise in the tongue, followed by the floor of the mouth and the lower gum. Tobacco and alcohol use are the major risk factors, although human papillomavirus has been identified as an etiology in a small percentage of oral squamous cell cancers. Although the evidence to support routine annual screening for oral cancers is inconclusive, family physicians and dental practitioners should be attentive to precursor lesions, such as leukoplakia and erythroplakia, and strongly consider obtaining or referring for biopsy patients with suspicious lesions. Depending on stage, management of oral cancers often involves surgery, with or without postoperative radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Patients who have been treated for these cancers should undergo close surveillance by otolaryngology subspecialists, but their family physicians primarily will be responsible for their long-term care. Complications relating to management, including difficulties with speech, swallowing, and chewing, will need to be addressed. For patients with advanced-stage disease, family physicians also may be responsible for palliative and end-of-life care. PMID:25198382

  8. [Urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Hörl, W H

    2011-09-01

    Urinary tract infections occur very frequently in the community and in hospitalized patients and are mainly caused by Escherichia (E.) coli. Depending on virulence determinants of uropathogenic microorganisms and host-specific defense mechanisms, urinary tract infections can manifest as cystitis, pyelonephritis (bacterial interstitial nephritis), bacteremia or urosepsis. Uncomplicated urinary tract infections in otherwise healthy women should be treated for 3-7 days depending on the antibiotic therapy chosen, even if spontaneous remission rates of up to 40% have been reported. Antibiotics of the first choice for empirical treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infection are fluoroquinolones, pivmecillinam and fosfomycin. A huge problem is the increasing antimicrobial resistance of uropathogenic microorganisms. Complicated urinary tract infections associated with anatomical and/or functional abnormalities of the urinary tract and/or comorbidities such as diabetes or immunosuppressive therapy, need longer antibiotic treatment (e.g. 10-14 days) as well as interdisciplinary diagnostic procedures. Treatment of community acquired urosepsis includes cephalosporins of the third generation, piperacillin/tazobactam or ciprofloxacin. For nosocomial urosepsis the combination with an aminoglycoside or a carbapenem is recommended. PMID:21850538

  9. Cigarette smoking, educational level and total and site-specific cancer: a cohort study in men in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Everatt, Rūta; Kuzmickienė, Irena; Virvičiūtė, Dalia; Tamošiūnas, Abdonas

    2014-11-01

    Smoking is an established risk factor for cancer. However, most studies have been carried out on western populations, and less is known about the impact in central and eastern Europe. Our objective was to investigate the association between cigarette smoking, educational level and risk of cancer in a Lithuanian population-based cohort study. The study included 6976 men initially free from cancer. During the follow-up (1978-2008), 1780 cancer cases were identified. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). In addition, the burden of cancer attributable to smoking was assessed by the population attributable fraction. Following adjustment for age, education, alcohol consumption and BMI, for current compared with never smokers, highly significant and strongly elevated estimates were found for total (HR=1.79, 95% CI 1.59-2.02), tobacco-related (HR=2.52, 95% CI 2.16-2.95), upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) (HR=5.77, 95% CI 2.73-12.21), lung (HR=10.47, 95% CI 6.74-16.25), bladder (HR=3.31, 95% CI 1.71-6.41) and liver (HR=4.64, 95% CI 1.53-14.08) cancer. Findings suggest a lower risk of prostate cancer in current smokers. In addition, the occurrence of lung and UADT cancer was significantly elevated in men in the lowest educational attainment category. If smoking had not occurred, ∼23% of total cancer, 37% of tobacco-related, 77% of lung, 58% of UADT, 43% of liver and 45% of bladder cancer cases could have been prevented in this cohort of men. Cancer-control strategies focused on reducing smoking should be a public health priority. PMID:24589745

  10. Urinary Tract Infections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on urinary tract infections is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are…

  11. Urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Wang, Alina; Nizran, Parminder; Malone, Michael A; Riley, Timothy

    2013-09-01

    Clinical presentation helps differentiate between upper and lower urinary tract infections (UTIs). UTIs are classified as either complicated or uncomplicated. A complicated UTI is associated with an underlying condition that increases the risk of failing therapy. Primary laboratory tests for UTIs consist of urinalysis and urine culture. The most common pathogen for uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis is Escherichia coli. Nitrofurantoin, fosfomycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are first-line therapies for acute uncomplicated cystitis. Decisions regarding antibiotic agents should be individualized based on patients' allergies, tolerability, community resistance rates, cost, and availability. PMID:23958364

  12. Neonatal Staphylococcus lugdunensis urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Hataya, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Hanako; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a known pathogen of infective endocarditis, but not of urinary tract infection. We report a previously healthy neonate without congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract who developed urinary tract infection due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis, illustrating that Staphylococcus lugdunensis can cause urinary tract infection even in those with no urinary tract complications. PMID:26177232

  13. Urinary Tract Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Kołodziej, Anna; Krajewski, Wojciech; Dołowy, Łukasz; Hirnle, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Recently, occurrence of urinary tract endometriosis (UTE) is more frequently diagnosed. According to literature, it refers to approximately 0.3 to even 12% of all women with endometriosis. The pathogenesis of UTE has not been clearly explained so far. The actually proposed hypotheses include embryonic, migration, transplantation, and iatrogenic theory. Most frequently UTE affects bladder, less often ureters and kidneys. One-third of patients remains asymptomatic or exhibits only minor manifestations. In symptomatic patients main complaints include dysuria, urinary urgency, and/or frequency, painful micturition, and burning sensation in the urethra and discomfort in the retropubic area. Treatment of UTE is challenging and can be pharmacological, surgical or can be a combination of both methods. In this paper we present a review of the literature concerning the UTE, its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26341760

  14. Biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, E K; Vauthey, J N

    2001-09-01

    Advances in cellular and molecular biology of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder adenocarcinoma are providing innovative means for the diagnosis and treatment of biliary tract cancer. Similarly, refinements in noninvasive studies--including helical computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic ultrasonography--are enabling more accurate diagnosis, staging, and treatment planning for these tumors. Complete resection remains the only means for cure, and recent reports from major hepatobiliary centers support aggressive wide resection for bile duct and gallbladder cancer. Palliation of malignant strictures has improved with advanced endoscopic techniques, newer polyurethane-covered stents, endoscopic microwave coagulation therapy, and radiofrequency intraluminal endohyperthermia. The preliminary data on such minimally invasive techniques suggest an improvement in quality of life and survival for selected patients. PMID:17031200

  15. Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland) can cause lower urinary tract disease in cats. Although they are much less common causes, FLUTD ... your veterinarian about the best diet for your cat. Many commercial diets are acceptable, but some urinary ...

  16. Urinary Tract Infections in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... that obstructs the flow of urine—a kidney stone or enlarged prostate, for example—is at risk ... the urinary tract, such as an obstructive kidney stone or prostate enlargement that squeezes the urethra. Health ...

  17. Combination of Anti-IGF-1R Antibody A12 and Ionizing Radiation in Upper Respiratory Tract Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Riesterer, Oliver; Yang Qiuan; Raju, Uma; Torres, Mylin; Molkentine, David; Patel, Nalini; Valdecanas, David; Milas, Luka; Ang, K. Kian

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The IGF1/IGF-1R signaling pathway has emerged as a potential determinant of radiation resistance in human cancer cell lines. Therefore we investigated the potency of monoclonal anti-IGF-1R antibody, A12, to enhance radiation response in upper respiratory tract cancers. Methods and Materials: Cell lines were assessed for IGF-1R expression and IGF1-dependent response to A12 or radiation using viability and clonogenic cancer cell survival assays. In vivo response of tumor xenografts to 10 or 20 Gy and A12 (0.25-2 mg x 3) was assessed using growth delay assays. Combined treatment effects were also analyzed by immunohistochemical assays for tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, and vascular endothelial growth factor expression at Days 1 and 6 after start of treatment. Results: A12 enhanced the radiosensitivity of HN5 and FaDu head-and-neck carcinomas in vitro (p < 0.05) and amplified the radioresponse of FaDu xenografts in a dose-dependent manner, with enhancement factors ranging from 1.2 to 1.8 (p < 0.01). Immunohistochemical analysis of FaDu xenografts demonstrated that A12 inhibited tumor cell proliferation (p < 0.05) and vascular endothelial growth factor expression. When A12 was combined with radiation, this resulted in apoptosis induction that persisted until 6 days from the start of treatment and in increased necrosis at Day 1 (p < 0.01, respectively). Combined treatment with A12 and radiation resulted in additive or subadditive growth delay in H460 or A549 xenografts, respectively. Conclusions: The results of this study strengthen the evidence for investigating how anti-IGF-1R strategies can be integrated into radiation and radiation-cetuximab regimen in the treatment of cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract cancers.

  18. TRACTS: A program to map oligopurine.oligopyrimidine and other binary DNA tracts.

    PubMed

    Gal, Moshe; Katz, Tzvi; Ovadia, Amir; Yagil, Gad

    2003-07-01

    A program to map the locations and frequencies of DNA tracts composed of only two bases ('Binary DNA') is described. The program, TRACTS (URL http://bioportal.weizmann.ac.il/tracts/tracts.html and/or http://bip.weizmann.ac.il/miwbin/servers/tracts) is of interest because long tracts composed of only two bases are highly over-represented in most genomes. In eukaryotes, oligopurine.oligopyrimidine tracts ('R.Y tracts') are found in the highest excess. In prokaryotes, W tracts predominate (A,T 'rich'). A pre-program, ANEX, parses database annotation files of GenBank and EMBL, to produce a convenient one-line list of every gene (exon, intron) in a genome. The main unit lists and analyzes tracts of the three possible binary pairs (R.Y, K.M and S;W). As an example, the results of R.Y tract mapping of mammalian gene p53 is described. PMID:12824393

  19. Gas in the Digestive Tract

    MedlinePlus

    ... digestive tract when you swallow air and when bacteria in your large intestine break down certain undigested foods. ​​​​ Diagnosis of Gas Doctors may diagnose the causes of gas with a medical history and physical exam. If your doctor suspects you ...

  20. NASAL TRACT UPTAKE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current Agency default procedures proscribed in the inhalation RfC Methodology (U.S. EPA, 1994)for interspecies adjustment of inhaled gases are nonempirical deterministic projections based on surface area of various regions of the respiratory tract (such as the extrathoracic or E...

  1. Body Mass Index and Cancer Mortality Among Korean Older Middle-Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae-Seok; Yi, Sang-Wook; Yi, Jee-Jeon; Hong, Seri; Ohrr, Heechoul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The association of body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) with overall and site-specific cancer mortality in Asians is not well understood. A total of 113,478 men from the Korean Veterans Health Study who returned a postal survey in 2004 were followed up until 2010. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of cancer mortality were calculated using a Cox model. During 6.4 years of follow-up, 3478 men died from cancer. A reverse J-curve association with a nadir at 25.0 to 27.4 kg/m2 was observed. Below 25 kg/m2, the HRs of death for each 5 kg/m2 decrease in BMI were 1.72 (95% confidence interval = 1.57–1.90) for overall cancer; 3.63 (2.57–5.12) for upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancers, including oral cavity and larynx [HR = 4.21 (2.18–8.12)] and esophagus [HR = 2.96 (1.82–4.81)] cancers; 1.52 (1.35–1.71) for non-UADT and non-lung cancers, including stomach [HR = 2.72 (2.13–3.48)] and large intestine [HR = 1.68 (1.20–2.36)] cancers; and 1.93 (1.59–2.34) for lung cancer. In the range of 25 to 47 kg/m2, the HRs for each 5 kg/m2 increase in BMI were 1.27 (1.03–1.56) for overall cancer mortality and 1.57 (1.02–2.43) for lung cancer mortality. In individuals <25 kg/m2, inverse associations with mortality from overall cancer and non-UADT and non-lung cancer were stronger in never-smokers than in current smokers. Both low and high BMI were strong predictors of mortality from overall and several site-specific cancers in Korean men. Further research is needed to evaluate whether interventions involving weight change (loss or gain) reduce the risk of cancer or improve the survival. PMID:27227928

  2. Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Upper GI Tract Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography or ... X-ray? What is Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract Radiography? Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography, also called an upper ...

  3. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography or ... Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract radiography, also ...

  4. Extensive upper respiratory tract sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Soares, Mafalda Trindade; Sousa, Carolina; Garanito, Luísa; Freire, Filipe

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. It can affect any part of the organism, although the lung is the most frequently affected organ. Upper airway involvement is rare, particularly if isolated. Sarcoidosis is a diagnosis of exclusion, established by histological evidence of non-caseating granulomas and the absence of other granulomatous diseases. The authors report a case of a man with sarcoidosis manifesting as a chronic inflammatory stenotic condition of the upper respiratory tract and trachea. PMID:27090537

  5. Hyperammonemia in Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kenzaka, Tsuneaki; Kato, Ken; Kitao, Akihito; Kosami, Koki; Minami, Kensuke; Yahata, Shinsuke; Fukui, Miho; Okayama, Masanobu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The present study investigated the incidence of hyperammonemia in urinary tract infections and explored the utility of urinary obstruction relief and antimicrobial administration to improve hyperammonemia. Methods This was an observational study. Subjects were patients who were diagnosed with urinary tract infection and hospitalized between June 2008 and June 2009. We measured plasma ammonia levels on admission in patients who were clinically diagnosed with urinary tract infection and hospitalized. We assessed each patient's level of consciousness on admission using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and performed urine and blood cultures. We also assessed hearing prior to hospitalization using the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG-PS). In cases with high ammonia levels on admission, plasma ammonia and GCS were measured 24 hours and 5–7 days later. Results Sixty-seven candidates were enrolled; of these, 60 cases (89.6%) with bacterial cell counts ≥104 CFU/mL were studied. Five cases (8.3%) presented with high plasma ammonia levels. Cases with hyperammonemia were significantly more likely to present with low GCS scores and urinary retention rate. All five cases received antimicrobial therapy with an indwelling bladder catheter to relieve urinary retention. The case 5 patient died shortly after admission due to complicated aspiration pneumonia; in the remaining cases, plasma ammonia levels were rapidly normalized and the level of consciousness improved. Conclusions The occurrence of hyperammonemia in urinary tract infections is not rare. The cause of hyperammonemia is urinary retention obstruction. Therefore, along with antimicrobial administration, relief of obstruction is important for the treatment of hyperammonemia caused by this mechanism. PMID:26292215

  6. Immune cells in the female reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ki; Kim, Chul Jung; Kim, Dong-Jae; Kang, Jee-Hyun

    2015-02-01

    The female reproductive tract has two main functions: protection against microbial challenge and maintenance of pregnancy to term. The upper reproductive tract comprises the fallopian tubes and the uterus, including the endocervix, and the lower tract consists of the ectocervix and the vagina. Immune cells residing in the reproductive tract play contradictory roles: they maintain immunity against vaginal pathogens in the lower tract and establish immune tolerance for sperm and an embryo/fetus in the upper tract. The immune system is significantly influenced by sex steroid hormones, although leukocytes in the reproductive tract lack receptors for estrogen and progesterone. The leukocytes in the reproductive tract are distributed in either an aggregated or a dispersed form in the epithelial layer, lamina propria, and stroma. Even though immune cells are differentially distributed in each organ of the reproductive tract, the predominant immune cells are T cells, macrophages/dendritic cells, natural killer (NK) cells, neutrophils, and mast cells. B cells are rare in the female reproductive tract. NK cells in the endometrium significantly expand in the late secretory phase and further increase their number during early pregnancy. It is evident that NK cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells are extremely important in decidual angiogenesis, trophoblast migration, and immune tolerance during pregnancy. Dysregulation of endometrial/decidual immune cells is strongly related to infertility, miscarriage, and other obstetric complications. Understanding the immune system of the female reproductive tract will significantly contribute to women's health and to success in pregnancy. PMID:25713505

  7. Urinary tract infections and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract candidiasis is known as the most frequent nosocomial fungal infection worldwide. Candida albicans is the most common cause of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infections; however, a rapid change in the distribution of Candida species is undergoing. Simultaneously, the increase of urinary tract candidiasis has led to the appearance of antifungal resistant Candida species. In this review, we have an in depth look into Candida albicans uropathogenesis and distribution of the three most frequent Candida species contributing to urinary tract candidiasis in different countries around the world. Material and methods For writing this review, Google Scholar –a scholarly search engine– (http://scholar.google.com/) and PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) were used. The most recently published original articles and reviews of literature relating to the first three Candida species causing urinary tract infections in different countries and the pathogenicity of Candida albicans were selected and studied. Results Although some studies show rapid changes in the uropathogenesis of Candida species causing urinary tract infections in some countries, Candida albicans is still the most important cause of candidal urinary tract infections. Conclusions Despite the ranking of Candida albicans as the dominant species for urinary tract candidiasis, specific changes have occurred in some countries. At this time, it is important to continue the surveillance related to Candida species causing urinary tract infections to prevent, control and treat urinary tract candidiasis in future. PMID:25914847

  8. Genital tract infections and infertility.

    PubMed

    Pellati, Donatella; Mylonakis, Ioannis; Bertoloni, Giulio; Fiore, Cristina; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Armanini, Decio

    2008-09-01

    Infectious agents can impair various important human functions, including reproduction. Bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites are able to interfere with the reproductive function in both sexes. Infections of male genito-urinary tract account for about 15% of the case of male infertility. Infections can affect different sites of the male reproductive tract, such as the testis, epididymis and male accessory sex glands. Spermatozoa themselves subsequently can be affected by urogenital infections at different levels of their development, maturation and transport. Among the most common microorganisms involved in sexually transmitted infections, interfering with male fertility, there are the Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Less frequently male infertility is due to non-sexually transmitted epididymo-orchitis, mostly caused by Escherichia coli. In female, the first two microorganisms are certainly involved in cervical, tubal, and peritoneal damage, while Herpes simplex cervicitis is less dangerous. The overall importance of cervical involvement is still under discussion. Tubo-peritoneal damage seems to be the foremost manner in which microorganisms interfere with human fertility. C. trachomatis is considered the most important cause of tubal lacerations and obstruction, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and adhesions. N. gonorrhoeae, even though its overall incidence seems to decline, is still to be considered in the same sense, while bacterial vaginosis should not be ignored, as causative agents can produce ascending infections of the female genital tract. The role of infections, particularly co-infections, as causes of the impairment of sperm quality, motility and function needs further investigation. Tropical diseases necessitate monitoring as for their diffusion or re-diffusion in the western world. PMID:18456385

  9. Advances in Urinary Tract Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Berent, Allyson C

    2016-01-01

    The use of endoscopy in veterinary medicine has become the mainstay of diagnosis and treatment in the subspecialty of small animal urology over the past decade. This subspecialty is termed endourology. With the common incidence of urinary tract obstructions, stones disease, renal disease, and urothelial malignancies, combined with the recognized invasiveness and morbidity associated with traditional surgical techniques, the use of endoscopic-assisted alternatives using interventional endoscopic techniques has become appealing to both owners and clinicians. This article provides a brief overview of some of the most common urologic procedures being performed in veterinary medicine. PMID:26440205

  10. ARTERIAL EPONYMS IN GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.

    PubMed

    Kutia, S A; Kiselev, V V; Lyashchenko, O I

    2015-01-01

    Eponym--name of the disease, certain structure or method after the person who usually first discovered and described them. Eponyms are widely spread in medicine which appeared to be in the area of a great interest for a lot of scientists. They can serve as a reflection of the evolution of the medical knowledge and making up the majority of anatomical terms. The article describes 12 arterial eponyms of the gastrointestinal tract giving a full anatomical description. It also gives an explanation of why and how those structures were named after certain scientists and what contribution they've made into the development of medicine. PMID:26817114

  11. Changes to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    This article explores changes in the ageing gastrointestinal tract, including: » Diminished sense of taste and smell. » Shrinking of the maxillary and mandibular bones in the jaw. » Slowing of oesophageal peristalsis giving a feeling that something is 'stuck in the throat'. » Relaxation of the lower sphincter leading to gastro-oesophageal reflux. » Reduction in gastric bicarbonate and prostaglandin in mucus increasing susceptibility to stomach ulcers. » Changes in villi in the small intestine reducing the area for absorption. » Overpopulation of bacteria in the small intestine leading to decreased absorption of folic acid and minerals. PMID:27573953

  12. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy in head and neck malignancies: early preclinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englhard, Anna; Girschick, Susanne; Mack, Brigitte; Volgger, Veronika; Gires, Oliver; Conderman, Christian; Stepp, Herbert; Betz, Christian Stephan

    2013-06-01

    Background: Malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) are conventionally diagnosed by white light endoscopy, biopsy and histopathology. Probe-based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (pCLE) is a novel non-invasive technique which offers in vivo surface and sub-surface imaging of tissue. It produces pictures of cellular architecture comparable to histology without the need for biopsy. It has already been successfully used in different clinical subspecialties to help in the diagnosis and treatment planning of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. PCLE needs to be used in combination with specific or non-specific contrast agents. In this study we evaluated the potential use of pCLE in combination with non-specific and specific contrast agents to distinguish between healthy mucosa and invasive carcinoma. Methods: Tissue samples from healthy mucosa and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were taken during surgery. After topical application of three different contrast agents, samples were examined using different pCLE-probes and a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM). Images were then compared to the corresponding histological slides and cryosections. Results: Initial results show that pCLE in combination with fluorophores allows visualization of cellular and structural components. Imaging of different layers was possible using three distinct pCLEprobes. Conclusion: pCLE is a promising non-invasive technique that may be a useful adjunct in the evaluation, diagnosis and treatment planning of head and neck malignancies.

  13. Cranberries and lower urinary tract infection prevention

    PubMed Central

    Hisano, Marcelo; Bruschini, Homero; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Srougi, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Lower urinary tract infections are very common diseases. Recurrent urinary tract infections remain challenging to treat because the main treatment option is long-term antibiotic prophylaxis; however, this poses a risk for the emergence of bacterial resistance. Some options to avoid this risk are available, including the use of cranberry products. This article reviews the key methods in using cranberries as a preventive measure for lower urinary tract infections, including in vitro studies and clinical trials. PMID:22760907

  14. Cranberry Juice for Urinary Tract Infection?

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_157466.html Cranberry Juice for Urinary Tract Infection? Specialist says grocery-store varieties aren't strong ... popular belief, cranberry juice does not cure a urinary tract infection, a doctor says. Many people drink cranberry juice ...

  15. 30 CFR 281.15 - Tract size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tract size. 281.15 Section 281.15 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Leasing Procedures § 281.15 Tract size. The...

  16. Urinary tract infection in girls - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI) should begin to improve within 1 to 2 days in most girls. The advice below may not ... Elder JS. Urinary tract infections. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, ... NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  17. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  18. An update on lower urinary tract tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wise, Gilbert J; Shteynshlyuger, Alex

    2008-07-01

    Tuberculosis of the genitourinary tract presents with atypical manifestations. Only 20% to 30% of patients with genitourinary tuberculosis have a history of pulmonary infection. Tuberculosis often affects the lower genitourinary system rather than the kidney. Tuberculosis of the lower genitourinary tract most commonly affects the epididymis and the testis, followed by bladder, ureter, prostate, and penis. Use of bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy for bladder cancer can cause symptomatic tubercular infections of the lower genitourinary tract. Tuberculosis of the lower genitourinary tract can present with irritative voiding symptoms, hematuria, epididymo-orchitis, prostatitis, and fistulas. Tuberculosis of the seminal vesicles, vas, fallopian tubes, and the uterus can cause infertility. Urinalysis may demonstrate sterile pyuria, hematuria, or albuminuria. Identification of acid-fast bacilli in culture or tissue or by polymerase chain reaction studies is diagnostic. Medical treatment may not result in resolution of symptoms. Surgical intervention and reconstruction of the urinary tract are frequently indicated. PMID:18765130

  19. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tract Infection” What is “catheter-associated urinary tract infection”? A urinary tract infection (also called “UTI”) is an infection in the urinary system, which includes the bladder (which stores the ...

  20. Cannabinoids and the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    PERTWEE, R

    2001-01-01

    found to induce "withdrawal" contractions in cannabinoid tolerant guinea pig ileal MPLM. Further research is required to investigate the role both of endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists and of non-CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract. The extent to which the effects on gastrointestinal function of cannabinoid receptor agonists or antagonists/inverse agonists can be exploited therapeutically has yet to be investigated as has the extent to which these drugs can provoke unwanted effects in the gastrointestinal tract when used for other therapeutic purposes.

 PMID:11358910

  1. Investigation of the dilated urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Parkhouse, H F; Barratt, T M

    1988-01-01

    Dilatation of the urinary tract does not necessarily imply obstruction, and other factors may be operative: maldevelopment, infection, reflux, and polyuria. Obstruction of the urinary tract in intra-uterine life is associated with renal dysplasia: the original obstructive lesion may be transient but the consequent dysplasia and dilatation may be permanent. Routine antenatal ultrasound identifies a new population of infants with urinary tract dilatation, many of whom remain asymptomatic and would not otherwise have come to medical attention: the natural history and appropriate schedules of investigation and management of this group are still being evaluated. Anatomical imaging by ultrasound establishes the presence and extent of dilatation. Micturating cystourethrography, intravenous urography and antegrade pyelography establish the site but not the functional significance of an obstructive lesion. Isotope renal scanning with 99mTc-DTPA may identify an acutely obstructed kidney with a decrease renal uptake, prolonged parenchymal transit time, and delayed clearance of the isotope from the renal pelvis after furosemide. However, such analyses often give equivocal results in infants with poor renal function and markedly dilated urinary tracts. Obstructive uropathy should be seen as a disturbance of the normal pressure-flow relationships in the urinary tract, and be defined and investigated as such. Antegrade perfusion with renal pelvic pressure measurements has technical pitfalls, but is the definitive method of establishing upper tract obstruction. Videocystourethrography is the established method of investigating the lower urinary tract in older children but needs further development to be applicable to infants. PMID:3153000

  2. Soft tissue tumors of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Johncilla, Melanie; Jo, Vickie Y

    2016-03-01

    Primary soft tissue tumors arising in the sinonasal tract are rare. While many mesenchymal neoplasms have been reported in the nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx, few are distinctive to this anatomic region. Some tumor types are relatively more common in this area, such as schwannoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and sinonasal hemangiopericytoma are unique entities of the sinonasal tract, as well as the recently characterized biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma. This review discusses the clinical, morphologic, and immunohistochemical features and currently known molecular data of the more frequently encountered soft tissue tumors of the sinonasal tract. PMID:26472693

  3. Urinary tract stones in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Swanson, S K; Heilman, R L; Eversman, W G

    1995-02-01

    The presence of stones during an otherwise uneventful pregnancy is a dramatic and potentially serious issue for the mother, the fetus, and the treating physicians alike. The incidence and predisposing factors are generally the same as in nonpregnant, sexually active, childbearing women. Unique metabolic effects in pregnancy such as hyperuricuria and hypercalciuria, changes in inhibitors of lithiasis formation, stasis, relative dehydration, and the presence of infection all have an impact on stone formation. The anatomic changes and physiologic hydronephrosis of pregnancy make the diagnosis and treatment more challenging. Presenting signs and symptoms include colic, flank pain, hematuria, urinary tract infection, irritative voiding, fever, premature onset or cessation of labor, and pre-eclampsia. The initial evaluation and treatment are again similar to those used for the nonpregnant population. The most appropriate first-line test is renal ultrasonography, which may, by itself, allow the diagnosis to be made and provide enough information for treatment. Radiographic studies, including an appropriately performed excretory urogram, give specific information as to size and location of the stones, location of the kidneys, and differential renal function and can be used safely, but the ionizing radiation risks should be considered. All forms of treatment with the exception of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and some medical procedures are appropriate in the pregnant patient. Close coordination by the urologist, the obstetrician, the pediatrician, the anesthesiologist, and the radiologist is required for the appropriate care of these patients. PMID:7855714

  4. Catheter associated urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributable to these infections. Catheter-acquired urinary infection is the source for about 20% of episodes of health-care acquired bacteremia in acute care facilities, and over 50% in long term care facilities. The most important interventions to prevent bacteriuria and infection are to limit indwelling catheter use and, when catheter use is necessary, to discontinue the catheter as soon as clinically feasible. Infection control programs in health care facilities must implement and monitor strategies to limit catheter-acquired urinary infection, including surveillance of catheter use, appropriateness of catheter indications, and complications. Ultimately, prevention of these infections will require technical advances in catheter materials which prevent biofilm formation. PMID:25075308

  5. Routine fetal genitourinary tract screening.

    PubMed

    Arger, P H; Coleman, B G; Mintz, M C; Snyder, H P; Camardese, T; Arenson, R L; Gabbe, S G; Aquino, L

    1985-08-01

    To evaluate routine fetal genitourinary tract obstetrical ultrasound screening, and to determine what size renal pelvis is indicative of significant renal disease, we reviewed 4,832 examinations, which had been performed over 2 years, of 3,530 consecutive obstetrical patients. Any fetus that had a renal pelvis greater than 5 mm or a definable cystic area was identified for follow-up. The fetuses of 39 patients (1.1%) who underwent 112 examinations fulfilled these criteria and constitute the basis of this report. A variety of examination criteria were recorded and analyzed in relationship to the follow-up, which ranged from 2-3 days to 21 months. The fetuses of the 39 patients were grouped into three categories: those with renal pelves between 5 and 9 mm in size; those with renal pelves larger than 10 mm; and those with cystic abnormalities. Those with renal pelves larger than 10 mm had either an obstructing lesion or exceptional extrarenal pelves. The clinical and pathologic aspects of these three groups are detailed, discussed, and analyzed. Criteria for significant fetal renal hydronephrosis and aspects of a loculated appearance are given. PMID:3892578

  6. [Phytotherapy of respiratory tract diseases].

    PubMed

    Bylka, Wiesława; Witkowska-Banaszczak, Ewa; Studzińska-Sroka, Elzbieta; Matławska, Irena

    2012-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been used in cough due to their antitussive and expectorant activity. Antitussives act either centrally on the cough center of the brain or peripherally on the cough receptors in the respiratory passages. The antitussive effect of many herbs results from the content of mucilage, which exerts protective and demulcent activity. The activity of expectorant herbs results primarily from their influence on the gastric mucose (saponins and ipec alkaloids). This proves reflex stimulation which leads to an increase in the secretion of bronchial glands. Volatile-oil type expectorant herbs exert a direct stimulatory effect on the bronchial glands by means of local irritation with antibacterial activity. In colds and flu, herbs containing volatile oil can be used; also, volatile oils are ingredients of syrups and liquids as well as external phytomedicines in the form of liniments, ointments, and inhalations. The paper shows the herbs and phytomedicines present on the Polish market used for the treatment of respiratory tract diseases. PMID:23289257

  7. BAIRD TRACT WETLAND HYDROPERIOD RESTORATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Baird Tract is located in Sumter County, Florida (northeast of Tampa), within the Withlacoochee State Forest and includes areas of the Withlacoochee and Green Swamp drainage basins. Restoration includes plugging ditches, installing additional culverts and geoweb crossings, r...

  8. Urinary tract complications with rectal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Beahrs, J R; Beahrs, O H; Beahrs, M M; Leary, F J

    1978-01-01

    The possibility of urinary tract injury should always be considered in the course of anterior resection or combined abdominoperineal resection of the lower colon and rectum. Controlled studies of ureteral and other injuries and fistulas cannot be made; but fortunately, unanticipated damage to the lower urinary tract does not occur often. The surgeon operating in the pelvis should be aware of the problems rarely encountered and should be capable of their management. If a urologic surgeon is available, consultation often is desirable. Prompt intraoperative recognition is most important so remedial procedures can be carried out immediately. Delay in recognition and treatment jeopardizes the patient's course and the function of the urinary tract. Postoperative urinary tract infections should be diagnosed early so prompt treatment can be instituted. PMID:646493

  9. Anatomic Problems of the Lower GI Tract

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems may occur any time after birth—from infancy into adulthood. The GI tract is a series ... than girls to be diagnosed with malrotation during infancy, but problems identified later in childhood are equally ...

  10. Lower urinary tract development and disease.

    PubMed

    Rasouly, Hila Milo; Lu, Weining

    2013-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the lower urinary tract (CALUT) are a family of birth defects of the ureter, the bladder, and the urethra. CALUT includes ureteral anomaliesc such as congenital abnormalities of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) and ureterovesical junction (UVJ), and birth defects of the bladder and the urethra such as bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC), prune belly syndrome (PBS), and posterior urethral valves (PUVs). CALUT is one of the most common birth defects and is often associated with antenatal hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infections (UTI), chronic kidney disease, and renal failure in children. Here, we discuss the current genetic and molecular knowledge about lower urinary tract development and genetic basis of CALUT in both human and mouse models. We provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the formation of the ureter, the bladder, and the urethra, and different genes and signaling pathways controlling these developmental processes. Human genetic disorders that affect the ureter, the bladder and the urethra and associated gene mutations are also presented. As we are entering the postgenomic era of personalized medicine, information in this article may provide useful interpretation for the genetic and genomic test results collected from patients with lower urinary tract birth defects. With evidence-based interpretations, clinicians may provide more effective personalized therapies to patients and genetic counseling for their families. PMID:23408557

  11. Metabolism and Fitness of Urinary Tract Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Alteri, Christopher J; Mobley, Harry L T

    2015-06-01

    Among common infections, urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most frequently diagnosed urologic disease. The majority of UTIs are caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli. The primary niche occupied by E. coli is the lower intestinal tract of mammals, where it resides as a beneficial component of the commensal microbiota. Although it is well-known that E. coli resides in the human intestine as a harmless commensal, specific strains or pathotypes have the potential to cause a wide spectrum of intestinal and diarrheal diseases. In contrast, extraintestinal E. coli pathotypes reside harmlessly in the human intestinal microenvironment but, upon access to sites outside of the intestine, become a major cause of human morbidity and mortality as a consequence of invasive UTI (pyelonephritis, bacteremia, or septicemia). Thus, extraintestinal pathotypes like uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) possess an enhanced ability to cause infection outside of the intestinal tract and colonize the urinary tract, the bloodstream, or cerebrospinal fluid of human hosts. Due to the requirement for these E. coli to replicate in and colonize both the intestine and extraintestinal environments, we posit that physiology and metabolism of UPEC strains is paramount. Here we discuss that the ability to survive in the urinary tract depends as much on bacterial physiology and metabolism as it does on the well-considered virulence determinants. PMID:26185076

  12. Lower urinary tract development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Rasouly, Hila Milo; Lu, Weining

    2013-01-01

    Congenital Anomalies of the Lower Urinary Tract (CALUT) are a family of birth defects of the ureter, the bladder and the urethra. CALUT includes ureteral anomalies such as congenital abnormalities of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) and ureterovesical junction (UVJ), and birth defects of the bladder and the urethra such as bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC), prune belly syndrome (PBS), and posterior urethral valves (PUV). CALUT is one of the most common birth defects and is often associated with antenatal hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infections (UTI), chronic kidney disease and renal failure in children. Here, we discuss the current genetic and molecular knowledge about lower urinary tract development and genetic basis of CALUT in both human and mouse models. We provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the formation of the ureter, bladder, and urethra, and different genes and signaling pathways controlling these developmental processes. Human genetic disorders that affect the ureter, bladder and urethra and associated gene mutations are also presented. As we are entering the post-genomic era of personalized medicine, information in this article may provide useful interpretation for the genetic and genomic test results collected from patients with lower urinary tract birth defects. With evidence-based interpretations, clinicians may provide more effective personalized therapies to patients and genetic counseling for their families. PMID:23408557

  13. A Proteomic Analysis of the Body Wall, Digestive Tract, and Reproductive Tract of Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Morris, C Paul; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Kropp, Laura E; Zweben, Jesse A; Meng, Zhaojing; Taylor, Rebekah T; Chan, King; Veenstra, Timothy D; Nutman, Thomas B; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Filarial worms are parasitic nematodes that cause devastating diseases such as lymphatic filariasis (LF) and onchocerciasis. Filariae are nematodes with complex anatomy including fully developed digestive tracts and reproductive organs. To better understand the basic biology of filarial parasites and to provide insights into drug targets and vaccine design, we conducted a proteomic analysis of different anatomic fractions of Brugia malayi, a causative agent of LF. Approximately 500 adult female B. malayi worms were dissected, and three anatomical fractions (body wall, digestive tract, and reproductive tract) were obtained. Proteins from each anatomical fraction were extracted, desalted, trypsinized, and analyzed by microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry. In total, we identified 4,785 B. malayi proteins. While 1,894 were identified in all three anatomic fractions, 396 were positively identified only within the digestive tract, 114 only within the body wall, and 1,011 only within the reproductive tract. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed a bias for transporters to be present within the digestive tract, suggesting that the intestine of adult filariae is functional and important for nutrient uptake or waste removal. As expected, the body wall exhibited increased frequencies of cytoskeletal proteins, and the reproductive tract had increased frequencies of proteins involved in nuclear regulation and transcription. In assessing for possible vaccine candidates, we focused on proteins sequestered within the digestive tract, as these could possibly represent "hidden antigens" with low risk of prior allergic sensitization. We identified 106 proteins that are enriched in the digestive tract and are predicted to localize to the surface of cells in the the digestive tract. It is possible that some of these proteins are on the luminal surface and may be accessible by antibodies ingested by the worm. A subset of 27 of these proteins appear

  14. Pivmecillinam treatment of chronic urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Kalager, T; Bøe, E; Digranes, A; Høisaether, P; Solberg, C O

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with chronic urinary tract infections were treated with 400 mg pivmecillinam orally three times daily for 10 to 15 days. The diagnosis was confirmed by a history of cystitis or cystopyelitis four to six times annually, microscopy of urine sediment, and growth of pathogens in urine specimens obtained by suprapubic bladder puncture. Three days, three and six weeks after completion of therapy the success rates were 24/28, 20/28 and 19/28 respectively. Pivmecillinam was well tolerated. Two patients developed nausea and vomiting. Other side-effects were not observed. Pivmecillinam is a useful drug in the treatment of chronic urinary tract infections. PMID:204581

  15. Diagnostic imaging of lower urinary tract disease.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Silke

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic imaging is routinely performed in small animals with lower urinary tract disease. Survey radiographs allow identification of radiopaque calculi, gas within the urinary tract, and lymph node or bone metastases. Cystography and urethrography remain useful in the evaluation of bladder or urethral rupture, abnormal communication with other organs, and lesions of the pelvic or penile urethra. Ultrasonography is the modality of choice for the diagnosis of most disorders. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful in evaluating the ureterovesical junction and intrapelvic lesions, monitoring the size of lesions, and evaluating lymph nodes and osseous structures for metastases. PMID:25813401

  16. Immunohistochemical features of the gastrointestinal tract tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hannah H.

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract tumors include a wide variety of vastly different tumors and on a whole are one of the most common malignancies in western countries. These tumors often present at late stages as distant metastases which are then biopsied and may be difficult to differentiate without the aid of immunohistochemical stains. With the exception of pancreatic and biliary tumors where there are no distinct immunohistochemical patterns, most gastrointestinal tumors can be differentiated by their unique immunohistochemical profile. As the size of biopsies decrease, the role of immunohistochemical stains will become even more important in determining the origin and differentiation of gastrointestinal tract tumors. PMID:22943017

  17. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections Management in Women

    PubMed Central

    Al-Badr, Ahmed; Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most frequent clinical bacterial infections in women, accounting for nearly 25% of all infections. Around 50–60% of women will develop UTIs in their lifetimes. Escherichia coli is the organism that causes UTIs in most patients. Recurrent UTIs (RUTI) are mainly caused by reinfection by the same pathogen. Having frequent sexual intercourse is one of the greatest risk factors for RUTIs. In a subgroup of individuals with coexisting morbid conditions, complicated RUTIs can lead to upper tract infections or urosepsis. Although the initial treatment is antimicrobial therapy, use of different prophylactic regimens and alternative strategies are available to reduce exposure to antibiotics. PMID:23984019

  18. Hematolymphoid lesions of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Crane, Genevieve M; Duffield, Amy S

    2016-03-01

    Various hematolymphoid lesions involve the sinonasal tract, including aggressive B, T, and NK-cell neoplasms; myeloid sarcoma; low-grade lymphomas; indolent T-lymphoblastic proliferations; and Rosai-Dorfman disease. Differentiating aggressive lymphomas from non-hematopoietic neoplasms such as poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, olfactory neuroblastoma, or sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma may pose diagnostic challenges. In addition, the necrosis, vascular damage, and inflammatory infiltrates that are associated with some hematolymphoid disorders can result in misdiagnosis as infectious, autoimmune, or inflammatory conditions. Here, we review hematolymphoid disorders involving the sinonasal tract including their key clinical and histopathologic features. PMID:26472692

  19. Expanded HOXA13 polyalanine tracts in a monotreme.

    PubMed

    Lehoczky, Jessica A; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2008-01-01

    The N-terminal region of human HOXA13 has seven discrete polyalanine tracts. Our previous analysis of these tracts in multiple major vertebrate clades suggested that three are mammal-specific. We now report the N-terminal HOXA13 repetitive tract structures in the monotreme Tachyglossus aculeatus (echidna). Contrary to our expectations, echidna HOXA13 possesses a unique set of polyalanine tracts and an unprecedented polyglycine tract. The data support the conclusion that the emergence of expanded polyalanine tracts in proteins occurred very early in the stem lineage that gave rise to mammals, between 162 and 315 Ma. PMID:18638320

  20. Best pharmacological practice: urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay

    2003-05-01

    Urinary tract infection is the most frequent bacterial infection. Acute uncomplicated urinary infection and acute non-obstructive pyelonephritis occur in young women with normal genitourinary tracts. Empirical short-course therapy is preferred for the management of acute cystitis, but evolving resistance requires continuing reassessment of optimal antimicrobial selection. Empirical trimethoprim or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole has been recommended, but increasing resistance to these agents suggests that pivmecillinam, nitrofurantoin and perhaps fosfomycin trometamol should be considered. Although flouroquinolones are effective as short-course therapy, widespread empirical use of these agents should be discouraged because of potential promotion of resistance. For acute non-obstructive pyelonephritis, flouroquinolones are the empirical oral treatment of choice, although urine culture results should direct continuing therapy. Complicated urinary tract infection occurs in men or women of all ages with underlying abnormalities of the genitourinary tract. Treatment of complicated urinary infection is individualised, taking into consideration the underlying abnormality and susceptibilities of the infecting organism. Asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be treated except in pregnant women, in patients prior to undergoing an invasive surgical procedure, or renal transplant recipients in the early postrenal transplant period. PMID:12739995

  1. [Ketamine-associated urinary tract damage].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-hao; Guan, Zhi-chen

    2011-08-18

    Ketamine is widely used as an anesthetic during surgical procedures in both animals and humans. As its unique effects of inducing the dissociative hallucinatory,vivid dreams, out-of-body experiences, and delirium, it has diverted from legitimate uses to the illicit drug market, and abusing ketamine has become a serious social problem. The abusers may use ketamine alone or mixe it with other drugs to get an intense pleasure. There are case reports from all over the world in recent years that abusing ketamine may induce severe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), and a variety of anatomical and functional lesions can be found in the urinary tract if further examinations are administrated. There is no universally recognized treatment protocols for this syndrome. Ketamine cessation or even reduction is the most effective treatment to prevent deterioration of the urinary tract, and intravesical instillation of hyaluranic acid (cystitstat) and oral pentosan polysulphate (elmiron) may take effect. The pathogenesis of ketamine-associated urinary tract destruction is unclear, and further study is needed. PMID:21844983

  2. Mechanisms of infection in the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, A

    1981-12-01

    Related to its potential vulnerability the respiratory tract has a very complex and effective defence apparatus. The interaction between these defence mechanisms and certain characteristics of aetiological agents results in a pattern in which initial infections by these agents tend to occur at specific sites in the tract. Infections in which the primary portal of entry is in the upper respiratory tract include Bordetella bronchiseptica and Haemophilus spp in pigs; Pasteurella spp in cattle, sheep, pigs; Mycoplasma spp in cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry; equine herpesvirus 1 in horses; infectious bovine rhinotracheitis in cattle; parainfluenza 3 in cattle and sheep; infectious laryngo-tracheitis and infectious bronchitis in poultry; feline viral rhinotracheitis and calicivirus in cats; Aujeszky's disease virus and swine influenza in pigs; and equine influenza in horses. Infections in which the primary portal of entry is in the lower respiratory tract include Aspergillus fumigatus in poultry and mammals, respiratory syncytial virus in cattle, distemper virus in dogs and adenovirus in cattle and dogs. A fuller understanding of the interactions between an agent and the host at the point of entry would make it much easier to develop effective vaccines and therapeutic agents. PMID:16030806

  3. Gastrointestinal tract modelling in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Dong-Hua; Zhao, Jing-Bo; Gregersen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the system of organs within multi-cellular animals that takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining waste. The various patterns of GI tract function are generated by the integrated behaviour of multiple tissues and cell types. A thorough study of the GI tract requires understanding of the interactions between cells, tissues and gastrointestinal organs in health and disease. This depends on knowledge, not only of numerous cellular ionic current mechanisms and signal transduction pathways, but also of large scale GI tissue structures and the special distribution of the nervous network. A unique way of coping with this explosion in complexity is mathematical and computational modelling; providing a computational framework for the multilevel modelling and simulation of the human gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology. The aim of this review is to describe the current status of biomechanical modelling work of the GI tract in humans and animals, which can be further used to integrate the physiological, anatomical and medical knowledge of the GI system. Such modelling will aid research and ensure that medical professionals benefit, through the provision of relevant and precise information about the patient’s condition and GI remodelling in animal disease models. It will also improve the accuracy and efficiency of medical procedures, which could result in reduced cost for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19132766

  4. 30 CFR 281.15 - Tract size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tract size. 281.15 Section 281.15 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... unknown and additional prospecting is needed to discover and delineate OCS minerals, the size of...

  5. Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs is limited. In order to investigate archaeal community structure, samples were taken from the cecum and proximal colon of finishing pigs (24) fed diets with either corn or solvent extracted corn germ meal (CGM). Corn germ meal feeding began in w...

  6. Radionuclide imaging of the biliary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.E.; Daly, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cholescintigraphy with technetium-labeled biliary agents has great value in evaluation of the patient with suspected acute cholecystitis. Visualization of the gall bladder virtually excludes acute cholecystitis and obstruction of the cystic duct. Nonvisualization of the gall bladder, however, is not specific for acute cholecystitis and may also occur in some patients with chronic cholecystitis or pancreatitis. Interpretation of gall bladder nonvisualization, therefore, must be correlated with the clinical presentation. Biliary tract imaging is also useful in evaluation of some focal abnormalities within the liver, neonatal jaundice, detection of bile leaks or bile reflux, and biliary-enteric shunts. The role of technetium-labeled biliary agents in the evaluation of patients with jaundice is less clear. Excretion of tracer into the gut excludes complete biliary tract obstruction, but the test may be nonconclusive at higher serum bilirubin levels. If persistent common bile duct activity is observed with delayed excretion into the gut, the diagnosis of partial obstruction may be made, but this procedure will be inconclusive if the common bile duct is not visualized and/or significant hepatocellular disease is present. Ultrasonography and abdominal CT are the preferred tools for the diagnosis of biliary tract obstruction at present, but newer biliary tract agents which achieve better hepatic extraction and greater bile concentration at high serum bilirubin levels may improve the diagnostic efficacy of cholescintigraphy.

  7. Computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Fishman, E.K.; Jones, B.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters and five case studies. Some of the chapter titles are: CT of the Stomach; CT and Other Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Evaluation of Crohn's Disease; Periotoneal Metastasis; CT and MRI Correlation of the Gastrointestinal Tract; CT of Acute Gastrointestinal Abnormlities; and CT of Colorectal Cancer.

  8. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tract delineation. 3922.40 Section 3922.40 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing § 3922.40...

  9. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tract delineation. 3922.40 Section 3922.40 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing §...

  10. Diseases of the respiratory tract of chelonians.

    PubMed

    Origgi, F C; Jacobson, E R

    2000-05-01

    Diseases of the respiratory tract commonly occur in captive chelonians, and several diseases also have occurred in wild chelonians. Infectious causes include viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Herpesviruses have surfaced as important pathogens of the oral cavity and respiratory tract in Hermann's tortoise (Testudo hermanii), spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca), and other tortoises in Europe and the United States. Herpesvirus-associated respiratory diseases also have been reported in the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, in mariculture in the Cayman Islands. Of diseases caused by bacteria, an upper respiratory tract disease caused by Mycoplasma sp has been reported in free-hanging and captive gopher tortoises in the southeastern United States and in desert tortoises in the Mojave Desert of the southwestern United States. Mycotic pulmonary disease is commonly reported in captive chelonians, especially in those maintained at suboptimal temperatures. An intranuclear coccidia has been seen in several species of captive tortoises in the United States, and, in one case, a severe proliferative pneumonia was associated with organisms in the lung. The most common noninfectious cause of respiratory disease in chelonians results from trauma to the carapace. Although pulmonary fibromas commonly occur in green turtles with fibropapillomatosis, for the most part, tumors of the respiratory tract are uncommon in chelonians. PMID:11228895

  11. Dangerous Urinary Tract Infections Common in Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159308.html Dangerous Urinary Tract Infections Common in Nursing Homes Study found 1 in 20 residents developed ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in nursing home residents can often have serious effects, including ...

  12. 36 CFR 254.42 - Valuation of tracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Valuation of tracts. 254.42 Section 254.42 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LANDOWNERSHIP ADJUSTMENTS Conveyance of Small Tracts § 254.42 Valuation of tracts. (a) Approximately equal value shall...

  13. A Proteomic Analysis of the Body Wall, Digestive Tract, and Reproductive Tract of Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C. Paul; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Kropp, Laura E.; Zweben, Jesse A.; Meng, Zhaojing; Taylor, Rebekah T.; Chan, King; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Filarial worms are parasitic nematodes that cause devastating diseases such as lymphatic filariasis (LF) and onchocerciasis. Filariae are nematodes with complex anatomy including fully developed digestive tracts and reproductive organs. To better understand the basic biology of filarial parasites and to provide insights into drug targets and vaccine design, we conducted a proteomic analysis of different anatomic fractions of Brugia malayi, a causative agent of LF. Approximately 500 adult female B. malayi worms were dissected, and three anatomical fractions (body wall, digestive tract, and reproductive tract) were obtained. Proteins from each anatomical fraction were extracted, desalted, trypsinized, and analyzed by microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry. In total, we identified 4,785 B. malayi proteins. While 1,894 were identified in all three anatomic fractions, 396 were positively identified only within the digestive tract, 114 only within the body wall, and 1,011 only within the reproductive tract. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed a bias for transporters to be present within the digestive tract, suggesting that the intestine of adult filariae is functional and important for nutrient uptake or waste removal. As expected, the body wall exhibited increased frequencies of cytoskeletal proteins, and the reproductive tract had increased frequencies of proteins involved in nuclear regulation and transcription. In assessing for possible vaccine candidates, we focused on proteins sequestered within the digestive tract, as these could possibly represent “hidden antigens” with low risk of prior allergic sensitization. We identified 106 proteins that are enriched in the digestive tract and are predicted to localize to the surface of cells in the the digestive tract. It is possible that some of these proteins are on the luminal surface and may be accessible by antibodies ingested by the worm. A subset of 27 of these proteins

  14. The digestive tract of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, Bruno; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The digestive tract plays a central role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients. Far from being a passive tube, it provides the first line of defense against pathogens and maintains energy homeostasis by exchanging neuronal and endocrine signals with other organs. Historically neglected, the gut of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has recently come to the forefront of Drosophila research. Areas as diverse as stem cell biology, neurobiology, metabolism, and immunity are benefitting from the ability to study the genetics of development, growth regulation, and physiology in the same organ. In this review, we summarize our knowledge of the Drosophila digestive tract, with an emphasis on the adult midgut and its functional underpinnings. PMID:24016187

  15. Herpes simplex virus and the alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Eric A; Coyle, Walter J

    2008-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is well known as a sexually transmitted disease. However, relatively little has been published concerning the presentations and treatment of HSV infection within the gastrointestinal tract, where HSV most commonly affects the esophagus in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. HSV proctitis is not uncommon and occurs primarily in males having sex with males. In patients with normal immune systems, gastrointestinal HSV infections are generally self-limited and rarely require antiviral therapy. Treatment of infection is suggested for immunocompromised patients, though no large randomized controlled trials have been performed. This article reviews the manifestations of HSV infection within the luminal gastrointestinal tract and options for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:18627656

  16. Tumours of the upper alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Head, K W

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the oropharynx of domestic animals are common in most parts of the world, but squamous cell carcinoma of the upper alimentary tract shows differences in prevalence in different geographical areas and occurs at different sites in the various species. Oral tumours of the melanogenic system are more common in dogs than in man. The following main histological categories, which broadly correspond to those used in the classification of tumours of man, are described: papilloma; squamous cell carcinoma; salivary gland tumours; malignant melanoma; tumours of soft (mesenchymal) tissues; tumours of the facial bones; tumours of haematopoietic and related tissues; and odontogenic tumours and jaw cysts. Papilloma, squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma, fibroma, and fibrosarcoma account for about 80% of the tumours that occur in the upper alimentary tract of domestic animals. PMID:1086147

  17. Water channel proteins in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Laforenza, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    Water transport through the human digestive system is physiologically crucial for maintaining body water homeostasis and ensure digestive and absorptive functions. Within the gastrointestinal tract, water recirculates, being secreted with the digestive juices and then almost entirely absorbed by the small and large intestine. The importance of aquaporins (AQPs), transmembrane water channel proteins, in the rapid passage of water across plasma membranes in the gastrointestinal tract appears immediately evident. Several AQP isoforms are found in gastrointestinal epithelia, with AQP1, 3, 7, 10 and 11 being the most abundantly expressed in the whole gut. On the other hand, AQP4 and 8 are located selectively in the stomach and colon, respectively. Here we review AQP expression and localization at the tissue, cellular and subcellular level in gastrointestinal epithelia, and their modification in various gut diseases. PMID:22465691

  18. Reproductive tract microbiome in assisted reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Franasiak, Jason M; Scott, Richard T

    2015-12-01

    The human microbiome has gained much attention recently for its role in health and disease. This interest has come as we have begun to scratch the surface of the complexity of what has been deemed to be our "second genome" through initiatives such as the Human Microbiome Project. Microbes have been hypothesized to be involved in the physiology and pathophysiology of assisted reproduction since before the first success in IVF. Although the data supporting or refuting this hypothesis remain somewhat sparse, thanks to sequencing data from the 16S rRNA subunit, we have begun to characterize the microbiome in the male and female reproductive tracts and understand how this may play a role in reproductive competence. In this review, we discuss what is known about the microbiome of the reproductive tract as it pertains to assisted reproductive technologies. PMID:26597628

  19. Experienced saxophonists learn to tune their vocal tracts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jer Ming; Smith, John; Wolfe, Joe

    2008-02-01

    Acousticians have long debated whether and how the resonances of the vocal tract are involved in the playing of clarinet and saxophone. We measured the resonances of saxophonists' vocal tracts directly while they played. Over most of the instrument's range, there is no simple relation between tract resonances and the note played, and the tract resonances varied among players. In the high (altissimo) range, a strong resonance of the tracts of professional saxophonists was systematically tuned slightly above the desired note. Amateurs, who did not tune a strong resonance, were unable to play notes in the altissimo range. PMID:18258908

  20. Fourier Tract Sampling (FouTS): A framework for improved inference of white matter tracts from diffusion MRI by explicitly modelling tract volume.

    PubMed

    Close, Thomas G; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Johnston, Leigh A; Calamante, Fernando; Mareels, Iven; Connelly, Alan

    2015-10-15

    Diffusion MRI tractography algorithm development is increasingly moving towards global techniques to incorporate "downstream" information and conditional probabilities between neighbouring tracts. Such approaches also enable white matter to be represented more tangibly than the abstract lines generated by the most common approaches to fibre tracking. However, previously proposed algorithms still use fibre-like models of white matter corresponding to thin strands of white matter tracts rather than the tracts themselves, and therefore require many components for accurate representations, which leads to poorly constrained inverse problems. We propose a novel tract-based model of white matter, the 'Fourier tract', which is able to represent rich tract shapes with a relatively low number of parameters, and explicitly decouples the spatial extent of the modelled tract from its 'Apparent Connection Strength (ACS)'. The Fourier tract model is placed within a novel Bayesian framework, which relates the tract parameters directly to the observed signal, enabling a wide range of acquisition schemes to be used. The posterior distribution of the Bayesian framework is characterised via Markov-chain Monte-Carlo sampling to infer probable values of the ACS and spatial extent of the imaged white matter tracts, providing measures that can be directly applied to many research and clinical studies. The robustness of the proposed tractography algorithm is demonstrated on simulated basic tract configurations, such as curving, twisting, crossing and kissing tracts, and sections of more complex numerical phantoms. As an illustration of the approach in vivo, fibre tracking is performed on a central section of the brain in three subjects from 60 direction HARDI datasets. PMID:26070265

  1. Reactive Arthritis Caused by Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Yuji; Yamagami, Shinichiro; Inoue, Hisashi; Uehara, Yuki; Kobayashi, Shigeto; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 58-year-old man presenting with chest pain who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The patient subsequently developed a fever over 38°C, pain on micturition, and cloudy urine 3 days following PCI. Urine cultures were positive for Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis, whereas blood cultures were negative. Arthritis occurred two weeks following urinary tract infection (UTI). We herein present a rare case of reactive arthritis caused by UTI following PCI. PMID:27150879

  2. Functional lumen imaging of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lottrup, Christian; Gregersen, Hans; Liao, Donghua; Fynne, Lotte; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum; Krogh, Klaus; Regan, Julie; Kunwald, Peter; McMahon, Barry P

    2015-10-01

    This nonsystematic review aims to describe recent developments in the use of functional lumen imaging in the gastrointestinal tract stimulated by the introduction of the functional lumen imaging probe. When ingested food in liquid and solid form is transported along the gastrointestinal tract, sphincters provide an important role in the flow and control of these contents. Inadequate function of sphincters is the basis of many gastrointestinal diseases. Despite this, traditional methods of sphincter diagnosis and measurement such as fluoroscopy, manometry, and the barostat are limited in what they can tell us. It has long been thought that measurement of sphincter function through resistance to distension is a better approach, now more commonly known as distensibility testing. The functional lumen imaging probe is the first medical measurement device that purports in a practical way to provide geometric profiling and measurement of distensibility in sphincters. With use of impedance planimetry, an axial series of cross-sectional areas and pressure in a catheter-mounted allantoid bag are used for the calculation of distensibility parameters. The technique has been trialed in many valvular areas of the gastrointestinal tract, including the upper esophageal sphincter, the esophagogastric junction, and the anorectal region. It has shown potential in the biomechanical assessment of sphincter function and characterization of swallowing disorders, gastroesophageal reflux disease, eosinophilic esophagitis, achalasia, and fecal incontinence. From this early work, the functional lumen imaging technique has the potential to contribute to a better and more physiological understanding of narrowing regions in the gastrointestinal tract in general and sphincters in particular. PMID:25980822

  3. Urinary tract infections in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Santos, J F M; Ribeiro, R M; Rossi, P; Haddad, J M; Guidi, H G C; Pacetta, A M; Pinotti, J A

    2002-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are of great importance during pregnancy owing to undesirable complications such as fetal and maternal morbidity. This paper describes the functional alterations that occur in this condition and predispose to infection. Clinical presentation and subsidiary diagnosis are discussed, including asymptomatic bacteriuria, cystitis and pyelonephritis. In addition, the authors report drug options, and their safety and duration of treatment during pregnancy. PMID:12140719

  4. Sinus tracts: an online study guide.

    PubMed

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will cover articles related to endodontic sinus tracts. PMID:18457701

  5. [Laparoscopy of the upper urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Stepushkin, S P; Chebanov, K O; Chaĭkovskiĭ, V P; Sokolenko, R V; Novikov, S P; Novikov, V O

    2014-01-01

    The upper urinary tract is a wide field for using of laparoscopy. The aim of this work was to analyze retrospectively our experience in the development of laparoscopic techniques of surgical treatment of upper urinary tract pathology. 137 patients with pathology of the upper urinary tract were operated laparoscopically in our department during three years (July 2010 - July 2013). There were performed: nephrectomy--75 (54.7%, nephroureterectomy--3, 2.2%, partial nephrectomy--12 (8.7%), adrenalectomy--11 (8%), resection of the adrenal gland--2 (1.5%), cystectomy--10 : (7.3%) ureterolithotomy--15 (11%) pelviolithotomy--3 (2.2%), pyeloplasty--4 (2.9%) nephropexy--2 (14%). The results were evaluated by the comparative analysis of laparoscopic surgery and similar open interventions that were performed in our clinic. The mean operative time after laparoscopic nephrectomy was 180 min (80-220), the mean blood loss during surgery was 150 ml (50-370). The patients discharged at 4-5 days after operation. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy was performed at an average tumor size 2.7 cm (1.5-3.5). We used warm ischemia in 75% of cases. Its average time was 27 min (9-39), which was significantly greater than in the open resection--17 min (10-27). At the beginning of the development of laparoscopic adrenalectomy the average operative time was 140 min (110-270). In the future, as we got experience, it declined to 70 min (60-90) min. The mean blood loss was 70 ml (range 20-400). After laparoscopic cystectomy, ureterolithotomy, pelviolithotomy and pyeloplastic the patients discharged at 2-3 days. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were not noted. Laparoscopic surgery for treatment of pathology of the upper urinary tract is an alternative to the operations performed by the open approach. The oncological outcomes, functional results and complication rates are comparable for both types of surgery. PMID:25286605

  6. Biliary tract cancer and occupation in Sweden.

    PubMed Central

    Malker, H S; McLaughlin, J K; Malker, B K; Stone, B J; Weiner, J A; Ericsson, J L; Blot, W J

    1986-01-01

    Using the Cancer-Environment Registry, which links the incidence of cancer (1961-79) and the 1960 census data on industry and occupation for all employed individuals in Sweden, the occurrence of biliary tract cancer (ICD 7th rev 155.1-.9) was systematically assessed according to occupational and industrial classifications. Data are presented separately for cancer of the gall bladder (ICD 155.1) and other cancers of the biliary tract (ICD 155.2-.9) including cancers of the extrahepatic bile ducts, ampulla of Vater, and unspecified bile passages. Statistically significant increased risks for cancer of the gall bladder were observed for men employed in petroleum refining, papermills, chemical processing, shoemaking, and repairing, and for both men and women employed in textile work. A significant increase in the incidence of other cancers of the biliary tract (mostly cancers of the bile duct) was found for such asbestos related employment as shipbuilding and in the wholesale construction materials industry and among insulation workers. These findings should be considered only as clues to aetiological factors, although several are consistent with earlier observations from other countries. PMID:3964574

  7. Distribution of tract deficits in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gray and white matter brain changes have been found in schizophrenia but the anatomical organizing process underlying these changes remains unknown. We aimed to identify gray and white matter volumetric changes in a group of patients with schizophrenia and to quantify the distribution of white matter tract changes using a novel approach which applied three complementary analyses to diffusion imaging data. Methods 21 patients with schizophrenia and 21 matched control subjects underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging. Gray and white matter volume differences were investigated using Voxel-based Morphometry (VBM). White matter diffusion changes were located using Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) and quantified within a standard atlas. Tracts where significant regional differences were located were examined using fiber tractography. Results No significant differences in gray or white matter volumetry were found between the two groups. Using TBSS the schizophrenia group showed significantly lower fractional anisotropy (FA) compared to the controls in regions (false discovery rate <0.05) including the genu, body and splenium of the corpus callosum and the left anterior limb of the internal capsule (ALIC). Using fiber tractography, FA was significantly lower in schizophrenia in the corpus callosum genu (p = 0.003). Conclusions In schizophrenia, white matter diffusion deficits are prominent in medial frontal regions. These changes are consistent with the results of previous studies which have detected white matter changes in these areas. The pathology of schizophrenia may preferentially affect the prefrontal-thalamic white matter circuits traversing these regions. PMID:24693962

  8. Nosocomial urinary tract infections: A review.

    PubMed

    Iacovelli, Valerio; Gaziev, Gabriele; Topazio, Luca; Bove, Pierluigi; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Finazzi Agrò, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infections are a common complication in healthcare systems worldwide. A review of the literature was performed in June 2014 using the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) database, through either PubMed or Ovid as a search engine, to identify publications regarding nosocomial urinary tract infections (NUTIs) definition, epidemiology, etiology and treatment.According to current definitions, more than 30% of nosocomial infections are urinary tract infections (UTIs). A UTI is defined 'nosocomial' (NUTI) when it is acquired in any healthcare institution or, more generally, when it is related to patient management. The origin of nosocomial bacteria is endogenous (the patient's flora) in two thirds of the cases. Patients with indwelling urinary catheters, those undergoing urological surgery and manipulations, long-stay elderly male patients and patients with debilitating diseases are at high risk of developing NUTIs. All bacterial NUTIs should be treated, whether the patient is harboring a urinary catheter or not. The length of treatment depends on the infection site. There is abundance of important guidance which should be considered to reduce the risk of NUTIs (hand disinfection with instant hand sanitizer, wearing non-sterile gloves permanently, isolation of infected or colonized catheterized patients). Patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria can generally be treated initially with catheter removal or catheter exchange, and do not necessarily need antimicrobial therapy. Symptomatic patients should receive antibiotic therapy. Resistance of urinary pathogens to common antibiotics is currently a topic of concern. PMID:25451882

  9. Neural Control of the Lower Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    de Groat, William C.; Griffiths, Derek; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes anatomical, neurophysiological, pharmacological, and brain imaging studies in humans and animals that have provided insights into the neural circuitry and neurotransmitter mechanisms controlling the lower urinary tract. The functions of the lower urinary tract to store and periodically eliminate urine are regulated by a complex neural control system in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral autonomic ganglia that coordinates the activity of smooth and striated muscles of the bladder and urethral outlet. The neural control of micturition is organized as a hierarchical system in which spinal storage mechanisms are in turn regulated by circuitry in the rostral brain stem that initiates reflex voiding. Input from the forebrain triggers voluntary voiding by modulating the brain stem circuitry. Many neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract exhibit switch-like patterns of activity that turn on and off in an all-or-none manner. The major component of the micturition switching circuit is a spinobulbospinal parasympathetic reflex pathway that has essential connections in the periaqueductal gray and pontine micturition center. A computer model of this circuit that mimics the switching functions of the bladder and urethra at the onset of micturition is described. Micturition occurs involuntarily in infants and young children until the age of 3 to 5 years, after which it is regulated voluntarily. Diseases or injuries of the nervous system in adults can cause the re-emergence of involuntary micturition, leading to urinary incontinence. Neuroplasticity underlying these developmental and pathological changes in voiding function is discussed. PMID:25589273

  10. [Urinary tract abnormalities associated with anorectal malformations].

    PubMed

    Tohda, A; Hosokawa, S; Shimada, K

    1995-08-01

    Anorectal malformation (ARM) is often associated with urological problems such as congenital urogenital anomalies, recto-urinary fistula, neurogenic bladder due to vertebral anomalies and operative complications. We analyzed 57 cases of ARM and discussed about the management of associated urogenital anomalies during neonatal and infantile period. The incidence of urogenital anomalies was 85.7% in high type, 65.5% in intermediate type and 38.1% in low type. Among these urinary tract anomalies, VUR was most common and was documented in 38.6% of ARM patients. Renal dysplasia, PUJ stenosis, megaureter and urethral stenosis was also common in these patients. Renal dysfunction was documented in 5 cases (2 in high type, 2 in intermediate and 1 in low type), mainly due to VUR and renal aplasia. These results show the need for evaluation of urinary tract during the neonatal and early infantile period even in low type ARM. The management of urinary tract anomalies associated with ARM is firmly related with the management of ARM itself, and we must be closely in co-operation with pediatric surgeons. PMID:7474624

  11. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Pearson, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium which is well-known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls’-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  12. Antimicrobial Stewardship and Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Abbo, Lilian M.; Hooton, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are the most common bacterial infections encountered in ambulatory and long-term care settings in the United States. Urine samples are the largest single category of specimens received by most microbiology laboratories and many such cultures are collected from patients who have no or questionable urinary symptoms. Unfortunately, antimicrobials are often prescribed inappropriately in such patients. Antimicrobial use, whether appropriate or inappropriate, is associated with the selection for antimicrobial-resistant organisms colonizing or infecting the urinary tract. Infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant organisms are associated with higher rates of treatment failures, prolonged hospitalizations, increased costs and mortality. Antimicrobial stewardship consists of avoidance of antimicrobials when appropriate and, when antimicrobials are indicated, use of strategies to optimize the selection, dosing, route of administration, duration and timing of antimicrobial therapy to maximize clinical cure while limiting the unintended consequences of antimicrobial use, including toxicity and selection of resistant microorganisms. This article reviews successful antimicrobial stewardship strategies in the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections. PMID:27025743

  13. Impact of Inflammation on Male Reproductive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Azenabor, Alfred; Ekun, Ayodele Oloruntoba; Akinloye, Oluyemi

    2015-01-01

    Fertility in the male is dependent on the proper production of sperm cells. This process, called spermatogenesis is very complex and involves the synchronization of numerous factors. The presence of pro–inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF–α), interleukin–1 alpha (IL–1 α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL–1 β) cytokines in the male reproductive tract (testis, epididymis and sperm) may have certain physiological functions. However, when the levels of these cytokines are higher than normal, as seen in conditions of inflammation, they become very harmful to sperm production. Moreover, inflammation is also associated with oxidative stress and the latter is well known to impair sperm function. Epidemiological studies regarding male infertility have revealed that more and more infertile men suffer from acute or chronic inflammation of the genitourinary tract, which often occurs without any symptoms. The inflammatory reactions within the male genital tract are inevitably connected with oxidative stress. Oxidative stress, especially in sperm, is harmful because it damages sperm DNA and causes apoptosis in sperm. This article reviewed the suggested mechanisms and contribution of inflammation to male infertility. In addition, the review was further strengthened by discussing how inflammation affects both fertility and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). PMID:26913230

  14. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Jessica N; Pearson, Melanie M

    2015-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium and is well known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls'-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition, which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  15. The ectodysplasin pathway in feather tract development.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Leslie; Lindon, Catherine; Morgan, Bruce A

    2005-03-01

    The ectodysplasin pathway, comprising the ligand ectodysplasin, its receptor Edar and a dedicated death domain adaptor protein Edaradd, plays an important role in epidermal organ formation in mammals. Mutations in the genes encoding these proteins cause dysplasia or absence of teeth, sweat glands and hair follicles. However, the relative position of this pathway in the regulatory hierarchy directing follicle formation remains unclear. In this work, the chicken orthologs of Eda, Edar and Edaradd were cloned to exploit the temporal precision of the feather tract system in order to study the role of the ectodysplasin pathway. We find that these genes are expressed in a similar pattern during feather and hair development, with the notable difference that the ligand Eda, which is expressed in the epidermis of the mouse, is expressed in the dermis of the feather tract. Contrary to conclusions reached from the analysis of mutant mice, we find that localization of Edar expression to the nascent placode is coincident or subsequent to the local expression of other markers of placodal differentiation, and not an upstream event in tract patterning. Furthermore, forced expression of BMP and activated beta-catenin demonstrate that local expression of Edar is dictated by the interaction between these two pathways. These results suggest that activation of the ectodysplasin pathway may be permissive for activating signals to overcome signals that inhibit placode formation, but the function of this pathway in the specification of follicle initiation lies downstream of other patterning events. PMID:15673574

  16. Vocal Tract Articulation in Zebra Finches

    PubMed Central

    Ohms, Verena R.; Snelderwaard, Peter Ch.; ten Cate, Carel; Beckers, Gabriël J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Birdsong and human vocal communication are both complex behaviours which show striking similarities mainly thought to be present in the area of development and learning. Recent studies, however, suggest that there are also parallels in vocal production mechanisms. While it has been long thought that vocal tract filtering, as it occurs in human speech, only plays a minor role in birdsong there is an increasing number of studies indicating the presence of sound filtering mechanisms in bird vocalizations as well. Methodology/Principal Findings Correlating high-speed X-ray cinematographic imaging of singing zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) to song structures we identified beak gape and the expansion of the oropharyngeal-esophageal cavity (OEC) as potential articulators. We subsequently manipulated both structures in an experiment in which we played sound through the vocal tract of dead birds. Comparing acoustic input with acoustic output showed that OEC expansion causes an energy shift towards lower frequencies and an amplitude increase whereas a wide beak gape emphasizes frequencies around 5 kilohertz and above. Conclusion These findings confirm that birds can modulate their song by using vocal tract filtering and demonstrate how OEC and beak gape contribute to this modulation. PMID:20689831

  17. Congenital urinary tract obstruction: the long view.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Robert L

    2015-07-01

    Maldevelopment of the collecting system resulting in urinary tract obstruction (UTO) is the leading identifiable cause of CKD in children. Specific etiologies are unknown; most cases are suspected by discovering hydronephrosis on prenatal ultrasonography. Congenital UTO can reduce nephron number and cause bladder dysfunction, which contribute to ongoing injury. Severe UTO can impair kidney growth in utero, and animal models of unilateral ureteral obstruction show that ischemia and oxidative stress cause proximal tubular cell death, with later development of interstitial fibrosis. Congenital obstructive nephropathy, therefore, results from combined developmental and obstructive kidney injury. Because of inadequacy of available biomarkers, criteria for surgical correction of upper tract obstruction are poorly established. Lower tract obstruction requires fetal or immediate postnatal intervention, and the rate of progression of CKD is highly variable. New biomarkers based on proteomics and determination of glomerular number by magnetic resonance imaging should improve future care. Angiotensin inhibitors have not been effective in slowing progression, although avoidance of nephrotoxins and timely treatment of hypertension are important. Because congenital UTO begins in fetal life, smooth transfer of care from perinatologist to pediatric and adult urology and nephrology teams should optimize quality of life and ultimate outcomes for these patients. PMID:26088076

  18. Congenital Urinary Tract Obstruction: The Long View

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Maldevelopment of the collecting system resulting in urinary tract obstruction (UTO) is the leading identifiable cause of CKD in children. Specific etiologies are unknown; most cases are suspected by discovering hydronephrosis on prenatal ultrasonography. Congenital UTO can reduce nephron number and cause bladder dysfunction, which contribute to ongoing injury. Severe UTO can impair kidney growth in utero, and animal models of unilateral ureteral obstruction show that ischemia and oxidative stress cause proximal tubular cell death, with later development of interstitial fibrosis. Congenital obstructive nephropathy therefore results from combined developmental and obstructive renal injury. Due to inadequacy of available biomarkers, criteria for surgical correction of upper tract obstruction are poorly established. Lower tract obstruction requires fetal or immediate postnatal intervention, and the rate of progression of CKD is highly variable. New biomarkers based on proteomics and determination of glomerular number by MRI should improve future care. Angiotensin inhibitors have not been effective in slowing progression, although avoidance of nephrotoxins and timely treatment of hypertension are important. Because congenital UTO begins in fetal life, smooth transfer of care from perinatologist to pediatric and adult urology and nephrology teams should optimize quality of life and ultimate outcomes for these patients. PMID:26088076

  19. Long-term outcomes of urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E. U.; Singh, Gurpreet

    2013-01-01

    The advent of specialized spinal units and better understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction has made long-term survival of these patients a reality. This has, in turn, led to an increase in quality and choice of management modalities offered to these patients including complex anatomic urinary tract reconstructive procedures tailored to the unique needs of each individual with variable outcomes. We performed a literature review evaluating the long-term outcomes of these reconstructive procedures. To achieve this, we conducted a world-wide electronic literature search of long-term outcomes published in English. As the premise of this review is long-term outcomes, we have focused on pathologies where evidence of long-term outcome is available such as patients with spinal injuries and spina bifida. Therapeutic success following urinary tract reconstruction is usually measured by preservation of renal function, improvement in quality-of-life, the satisfactory achievement of agreed outcomes and the prevention of serious complications. Prognostic factors include neuropathic detrusor overactivity; sphincter dyssynergia; bladder over distension; high pressure storage and high leak point pressures; vesicoureteric reflex, stone formation and urinary tract infections. Although, the past decade has witnessed a reduction in the total number of bladder reconstructive surgeries in the UK, these procedures are essentially safe and effective; but require long-term clinical and functional follow-up/monitoring. Until tissue engineering and gene therapy becomes more mainstream, we feel there is still a place for urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:24235796

  20. The Genetics of Urinary Tract Infections and the Innate Defense of the Kidney and Urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Ambite, Ines; Rydstrom, Gustav; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Hains, David S

    2016-03-01

    The urinary tract is a sterile organ system. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common and often serious infections. Research has focused on uropathogen, environment, and host factors leading to UTI pathogenesis. A growing body of evidence exists implicating genetic factors that can contribute to UTI risks. In this review, we highlight genetic variations in aspects of the innate immune system critical to the host response to uropathogens. This overview includes genetic variations in pattern recognition receptor molecules, chemokines/cytokines, and neutrophil activation. We also comprehensively cover murine knockout models of UTI, genetic variations involved in renal scarring as a result of ascending UTIs, and asymptomatic bacteriuria. PMID:27617139

  1. A probabilistic gastrointestinal tract dosimetry model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Chulhaeng

    In internal dosimetry, the tissues of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract represent one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body with the hematopoietic bone marrow. Endoscopic ultrasound is a unique tool to acquire in-vivo data on GI tract wall thicknesses of sufficient resolution needed in radiation dosimetry studies. Through their different echo texture and intensity, five layers of differing echo patterns for superficial mucosa, deep mucosa, submucosa, muscularis propria and serosa exist within the walls of organs composing the alimentary tract. Thicknesses for stomach mucosa ranged from 620 +/- 150 mum to 1320 +/- 80 mum (total stomach wall thicknesses from 2.56 +/- 0.12 to 4.12 +/- 0.11 mm). Measurements made for the rectal images revealed rectal mucosal thicknesses from 150 +/- 90 mum to 670 +/- 110 mum (total rectal wall thicknesses from 2.01 +/- 0.06 to 3.35 +/- 0.46 mm). The mucosa thus accounted for 28 +/- 3% and 16 +/- 6% of the total thickness of the stomach and rectal wall, respectively. Radiation transport simulations were then performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP) 4C transport code to calculate S values (Gy/Bq-s) for penetrating and nonpenetrating radiations such as photons, beta particles, conversion electrons and auger electrons of selected nuclides, I123, I131, Tc 99m and Y90 under two source conditions: content and mucosa sources, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate generally good agreement with published data for the stomach mucosa wall. The rectal mucosa data are consistently higher than published data compared with the large intestine due to different radiosensitive cell thicknesses (350 mum vs. a range spanning from 149 mum to 729 mum) and different geometry when a rectal content source is considered. Generally, the ICRP models have been designed to predict the amount of radiation dose in the human body from a "typical" or "reference" individual in a given population. The study has been performed to

  2. PopTract: Population-Based Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Pew-Thian; Gilmore, John H.; Lin, Weili

    2016-01-01

    White matter fiber tractography plays a key role in the in vivo understanding of brain circuitry. For tract-based comparison of a population of images, a common approach is to first generate an atlas by averaging, after spatial normalization, all images in the population, and then perform tractography using the constructed atlas. The reconstructed fiber trajectories form a common geometry onto which diffusion properties of each individual subject can be projected based on the corresponding locations in the subject native space. However, in the case of high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), where modeling fiber crossings is an important goal, the above-mentioned averaging method for generating an atlas results in significant error in the estimation of local fiber orientations and causes a major loss of fiber crossings. These limitatitons have significant impact on the accuracy of the reconstructed fiber trajectories and jeopardize subsequent tract-based analysis. As a remedy, we present in this paper a more effective means of performing tractography at a population level. Our method entails determining a bipolar Watson distribution at each voxel location based on information given by all images in the population, giving us not only the local principal orientations of the fiber pathways, but also confidence levels of how reliable these orientations are across subjects. The distribution field is then fed as an input to a probabilistic tractography framework for reconstructing a set of fiber trajectories that are consistent across all images in the population. We observe that the proposed method, called PopTract, results in significantly better preservation of fiber crossings, and hence yields better trajectory reconstruction in the atlas space. PMID:21571607

  3. The Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiota and Allergic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kyburz, Andreas; Müller, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract microbiota is required for optimal digestion of foods, for the development of resistance against pathogens (termed colonization resistance), for the development of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, and for local as well as systemic immune homeostasis. Certain constituents of the GI tract microbiota are widely recognized as critical regulators and modulators of their host's immune response. These include bacterial members of the microbiota as well as parasitic nematodes. Immune regulation by immunomodulatory members of the GI microbiota primarily serves to subvert host antimicrobial immune defenses and promote persistent colonization, but as a side effect may prevent or suppress immunological disorders resulting from inappropriate responses to harmless antigens, such as allergy, colitis or autoimmunity. Many of the best understood GI-resident immunomodulatory species have co-evolved with their mammalian hosts for tens of thousands of years and masterfully manipulate host immune responses. In this review, we discuss the epidemiological evidence for the role of the GI tract microbiota as a whole, and of specific members, in protection against allergic and other immunological disorders. We then focus on the mechanistic basis of microbial immunomodulation, which is presented using several well-understood paradigmatic examples, that is, helminths, Helicobacter pylori, Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli. In a final chapter, we highlight past and ongoing attempts at harnessing the immunomodulatory properties of GI microbiota species and their secreted products for intervention studies and describe the promises and limitations of these experimental approaches. The effects of pro- and prebiotics, bacterial lysates, as well as of fecal microbiota transplantation are presented and compared. PMID:27028536

  4. Assessment of infective urinary tract disorders.

    PubMed

    Sixt, R; Stokland, E

    1998-06-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in children, particularly in the youngest age groups. There is a risk for progressive deterioration of renal function in these children if aggravating factors such as gross reflux and/or outflow obstruction of the urinary tract are present. In this review the pros and cons of available scintigraphic and radiological imaging techniques for the work-up of these children are presented. Ultrasound can be used in the acute phase to exclude obstruction but can not reliably show transient or permanent parenchymal lesions. The presence of reflux can be established with X-ray or direct nuclide cystography. The X-ray technique gives good morphological information and has a grading system with prognostic relevance. Both techniques are invasive and great care must be taken to keep the radiation burden down with the X-ray technique. Indirect nuclide cystography following a renographic study is non-invasive but has a lower sensitivity than direct techniques. More experience is needed with the indirect technique to evaluate the consequences of its apparently low sensitivity. Urography has a limited place in the acute work-up of urinary tract infection but can be used to look for renal scarring 1-2 years after an acute pyelonephritis. The 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan can be used during the acute UTI to show pyelonephritic lesions with good accuracy and/or during the follow-up after six months to show permanent lesions. The acute DMSA scan can be omitted. An early treatment is more important than an early scan! PMID:9695664

  5. Interventional Radiology of the Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Berent, Allyson C

    2016-05-01

    Minimally invasive treatment options using interventional radiology and interventional endoscopy for urologic disease have become more common over the past decade in veterinary medicine. Urinary tract obstructions and urinary incontinence are the most common reasons for urinary interventions. Ureteral obstructions are underdiagnosed and a common clinical problem in veterinary medicine. Ureteral obstructions should be considered an emergency, and decompression should be performed as quickly as possible. Diagnostic imaging is the mainstay in diagnosing a ureteral obstruction and has changed in the last few years, with ultrasound and radiographs being the most sensitive tools in making this diagnosis preoperatively. PMID:26920646

  6. Reducing urinary tract infections in catheterised patients.

    PubMed

    Howe, Pam; Adams, John

    2015-01-20

    Urinary tract infections in catheterised patients continue to present a challenge in reducing healthcare-associated infection. In this article, an infection prevention and control team in one NHS trust reports on using audit results to focus attention on measures to reduce bacterial infections. Educational initiatives have an important role in reducing infection, but there is no single solution to the problem. Practice can be improved using a multi-targeted approach, peer review and clinical audit to allow for shared learning and experiences. These, along with informal education in the clinical area and more formal classroom lectures, can ultimately lead to improved patient outcomes. PMID:25585767

  7. Radionuclide imaging of the urinary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1985-11-01

    This article describes the role of nuclear medicine in the evaluation of the genitourinary tract. The technical aspects of radionuclide imaging (radiopharmaceuticals, radiation dosimetry, instrumentation, and method) are briefly presented, and each of the indications for renal scintigraphy--including the evaluation of differential renal function, hypertension, obstruction, renal transplants, masses, trauma, congenital anomalies, vesicoureteral reflux, and infection--are discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide imaging with respect to alternative radiographic examinations (such as intravenous urography, ultrasonography, CT, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging) are emphasized wherever applicable. 136 references.

  8. Urinary tract infections in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Alangaden, George

    2007-11-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infectious complication after renal transplantation. Although Escherichia coli remains the most common cause of UTI, Enterococcus spp and drug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae have emerged as important uropathogens in these patients. As a result, symptomatic UTIs warrant pathogen-specific antibiotic therapy guided by culture and susceptibility data. In the early transplant period, prophylaxis of UTI with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is generally effective. Until the natural history and optimal management of asymptomatic bacteruria are better defined, therapy of asymptomatic bacteruria is generally unnecessary. PMID:17999883

  9. [Catheter-associated urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Liedl, B

    2015-09-01

    In patients with indwelling urethral catheters significant bacteriuria develops within 4 weeks of indwelling time in practically 100% of the cases. Catheter encrustation and obstruction can occur in approximately 40% of patients. Symptomatic ascending urinary tract infections, urethral complications and urolithiasis can occur in significant numbers in the long term. Regular educational and surveillance programs in nursing homes, hospitals and in home care are important to instruct personnel in hygiene procedures, to learn the indications for catheterization, to keep the indwelling time of catheters as short as possible, to detect any complications early and to initiate appropriate diagnostics and therapy by the urologist. PMID:26275988

  10. Urinary Tract Infections in the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2016-08-01

    Urinary infection is the most common bacterial infection in elderly populations. The high prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in both men and women is benign and should not be treated. A diagnosis of symptomatic infection for elderly residents of long-term care facilities without catheters requires localizing genitourinary findings. Symptomatic urinary infection is overdiagnosed in elderly bacteriuric persons with nonlocalizing clinical presentations, with substantial inappropriate antimicrobial use. Residents with chronic indwelling catheters experience increased morbidity from urinary tract infection. Antimicrobial therapy is selected based on clinical presentation, patient tolerance, and urine culture results. PMID:27394021

  11. Reconstruction and Visualization of Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rong-guo; Guo, Xu-dong; Xu, Changqing

    2012-01-01

    Background: Converting the two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional photographs into an intuitive three-dimensional (3D) model is a basic task for medical imaging data for auxiliary disease-linked diagnosis purpose. Methods: Reconstruction and visualization process of gastrointestinal cross-sectional photographs includes image preparation, image registration, image segmentation, 3D surface-rendering reconstruction, and implementation of 3D digital visualization. Results: Using the visualization toolkit (VTK), we implemented 3D digital reconstruction and visualization of gastrointestinal tract, whose visualized model can be zoomed, paned, and rotated, including the stomach, the small intestine, and the large intestine. PMID:23675253

  12. Microbial Translocation Across the GI Tract*

    PubMed Central

    Brenchley, Jason M.; Douek, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    The lumen of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is home to an enormous quantity of different bacterial species, our microbiota, that thrive in an often symbiotic relationship with the host. Given that the healthy host must regulate contact between the microbiota and its immune system to avoid overwhelming systemic immune activation, humans have evolved several mechanisms to attenuate systemic microbial translocation (MT) and its consequences. However, several diseases are associated with the failure of one or more of these mechanisms, with consequent immune activation and deleterious effects on health. Here, we discuss the mechanisms underlying MT, diseases associated with MT, and therapeutic interventions that aim to decrease it. PMID:22224779

  13. Recently described neoplasms of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A

    2016-03-01

    Surgical pathology of the sinonasal region (i.e., nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses) is notoriously difficult, due in part to the remarkable diversity of neoplasms that may be encountered in this area. In addition, a number of neoplasms have been only recently described in the sinonasal tract, further compounding the difficulty for pathologists who are not yet familiar with them. This manuscript will review the clinicopathologic features of some of the recently described sinonasal tumor types: NUT midline carcinoma, HPV-related carcinoma with adenoid cystic-like features, SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma, biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma, and adamantinoma-like Ewing family tumor. PMID:26776744

  14. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. PMID:26475949

  15. Embryological observations on the female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Acién, P

    1992-04-01

    The embryology of the genital tract and urinary system is described, and the hypothesis is advanced that the vagina is an organ embryologically derived from the mesonephric or Wolffian ducts in addition to the Müllerian tubercle. This is based on experimental studies and case reports in the literature and our own cases of genital malformations, especially in patients with unilateral renal agenesis and an ipsilateral blind vagina. The importance of the mesonephric ducts as guides or 'inductor' elements for adequate Müllerian development is emphasized. A new embryological classification of female genital malformations is proposed, based on these embryological concepts. PMID:1522183

  16. Maturation Along White Matter Tracts in Human Brain Using a Diffusion Tensor Surface Model Tract-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhang; Zhang, Hui; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Liu, Min; Beaulieu, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Previous diffusion tensor imaging tractography studies have demonstrated exponential patterns of developmental changes for diffusion parameters such as fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) averaged over all voxels in major white matter (WM) tracts of the human brain. However, this assumes that the entire tract is changing in unison, which may not be the case. In this study, a surface model based tract-specific analysis was applied to a cross-sectional cohort of 178 healthy subjects (83 males/95 females) aged from 6 to 30 years to spatially characterize the age-related changes of FA and MD along the trajectory of seven major WM tracts – corpus callosum (CC) and six bilateral tracts. There were unique patterns of regions that showed different exponential and linear rates of increasing FA or decreasing MD and age at which FA or MD levels off along each tract. Faster change rate of FA was observed in genu of CC and frontal-parietal part of superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). Inferior corticospinal tract (CST), posterior regions of association tracts such as inferior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior frontal occipital fasciculus and uncinate fasciculus also displayed earlier changing patterns for FA. MD decreases with age also exhibited this posterior-to-anterior WM maturation pattern for most tracts in females. Both males and females displayed similar FA/MD patterns of change with age along most large tracts; however, males had overall reached the FA maxima or MD minima later compared with females in most tracts with the greater differences occurring in the CST and frontal-parietal part of SLF for MD. Therefore, brain WM development has spatially varying trajectories along tracts that depend on sex and the tract. PMID:26909027

  17. The management of urinary tract infections in octogenarian women.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Dudley; Giarenis, Ilias; Cardozo, Linda

    2015-07-01

    Urinary Tract Infections are common in women of all ages and the incidence increases with age. Whilst they are a common cause of lower urinary tract symptoms in all women they may be associated with increased morbidity in the elderly. Appropriate investigation and treatment in primary and secondary care are essential to effectively manage urinary tract infection and decrease morbidity and hospitalisation rates. Loss of endogenous oestrogen at the time of the menopause is associated with the urogenital atrophy and an increased incidence of urinary tract infection. Consequently vaginal oestrogen therapy may offer a rationale for treatment and prevent of urinary tract infection. The aim of this paper is to review the clinical management of elderly women presenting with primary and recurrent urinary tract infection. PMID:26006302

  18. Gastrointestinal Tract Perforation in the Newborn and Child: Imaging Assessment.

    PubMed

    Schooler, Gary R; Davis, Joseph T; Lee, Edward Y

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal tract perforation can arise from various underlying etiologies ranging from congenital causes to ingested foreign bodies in the pediatric patient population. Imaging assessment in patients with suspected gastrointestinal tract perforation plays a central role in making the diagnosis and follow-up evaluation. This article reviews the more common etiologies of gastrointestinal tract perforation in pediatric patients, their imaging manifestations, and strategies for imaging assessment to assist the radiologist in arriving at a timely and accurate diagnosis. PMID:26827739

  19. Tumours of the upper alimentary tract

    PubMed Central

    Head, K. W.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the oropharynx of domestic animals are common in most parts of the world, but squamous cell carcinoma of the upper alimentary tract shows differences in prevalence in different geographical areas and occurs at different sites in the various species. Oral tumours of the melanogenic system are more common in dogs than in man. The following main histological categories, which broadly correspond to those used in the classification of tumours of man, are described: papilloma; squamous cell carcinoma; salivary gland tumours; malignant melanoma; tumours of soft (mesenchymal) tissues; tumours of the facial bones; tumours of haematopoietic and related tissues; and odontogenic tumours and jaw cysts. Papilloma, squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma, fibroma, and fibrosarcoma account for about 80% of the tumours that occur in the upper alimentary tract of domestic animals. ImagesFig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 37Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 29Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 33Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 21Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 1 PMID:1086147

  20. Abdominal ultrasonography of the pediatric gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Heather I; Gee, Michael S; Westra, Sjirk J; Nimkin, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an invaluable imaging modality in the evaluation of pediatric gastrointestinal pathology; it can provide real-time evaluation of the bowel without the need for sedation or intravenous contrast. Recent improvements in ultrasound technique can be utilized to improve detection of bowel pathology in children: Higher resolution probes, color Doppler, harmonic and panoramic imaging are excellent tools in this setting. Graded compression and cine clips provide dynamic information and oral and intravenous contrast agents aid in detection of bowel wall pathology. Ultrasound of the bowel in children is typically a targeted exam; common indications include evaluation for appendicitis, pyloric stenosis and intussusception. Bowel abnormalities that are detected prenatally can be evaluated after birth with ultrasound. Likewise, acquired conditions such as bowel hematoma, bowel infections and hernias can be detected with ultrasound. Rare bowel neoplasms, vascular disorders and foreign bodies may first be detected with sonography, as well. At some centers, comprehensive exams of the gastrointestinal tract are performed on children with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease to evaluate for disease activity or to confirm the diagnosis. The goal of this article is to review up-to-date imaging techniques, normal sonographic anatomy, and characteristic sonographic features of common and uncommon disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract in children. PMID:27551336

  1. Lower urinary tract symptoms in men

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, John M

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a highly prevalent and costly condition that affects older men worldwide. Many affected men develop lower urinary tract symptoms, which can have a negative impact on their quality of life. In the past, transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was the mainstay of treatment. However, several efficacious drug treatments have been developed, which have transformed BPH from an acute surgical entity to a chronic medical condition. Specifically, multiple clinical trials have shown that α adrenoceptor antagonists can significantly ameliorate lower urinary tract symptoms. Moreover, 5α reductase inhibitors, alone or combined with an α adrenoceptor antagonist, can reverse the natural course of BPH, reducing the risk of urinary retention and the need for surgical intervention. Newer medical regimens including the use of antimuscarinic agents or phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, have shown promise in men with predominantly storage symptoms and concomitant erectile dysfunction, respectively. For men who do not adequately respond to conservative measures or pharmacotherapy, minimally invasive surgical techniques (such as transurethral needle ablation, microwave thermotherapy, and prostatic urethral lift) may be of benefit, although they lack the durability of TURP. A variety of laser procedures have also been introduced, whose improved hemostatic properties abrogate many of the complications associated with traditional surgery. PMID:25125424

  2. Transversal mixing in the gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainchtein, Dmitri; Orthey, Perry; Parkman, Henry

    2015-11-01

    We discuss results of numerical simulations and analytical modeling of transversal intraluminal mixing in the GI tract produced by segmentation and peristaltic contractions. Particles that start in different parts of the small intestine are traced over several contractions and mixing is described using the particles' probability distribution function. We show that there is optimal set of parameters of contractions, such as the depth and frequency, that produces the most efficient mixing. We show that contractions create well-defined advection patterns in transversal direction. The research is inspired by several applications. First, there is the study of bacteria populating the walls of the intestine, which rely on fluid mixing for nutrients. Second, there are gastrointestinal diseases, such as Crohn's disease, which can be treated effectively using a drug delivery capsule through GI tract, for which it is needed to know how long it takes for a released drug to reach the intestinal wall. And finally, certain neurological and muscular deceases change the parameters of contractions, thus reducing the efficiency of mixing. Understanding an admissible range of the parameters (when mixing is still sufficient for biological purposes) may indicate when the medical action is required.

  3. Upper respiratory tract illnesses and accidents.

    PubMed

    Smith, A P; Harvey, I; Richmond, P; Peters, T J; Thomas, M; Brockman, P

    1994-07-01

    Anecdotal accounts suggest that colds and influenza may increase human error. This view is supported by laboratory studies of the effects of upper respiratory tract illnesses (URTIs) on performance efficiency, which have shown that both experimentally induced and naturally occurring URTIs reduce aspects of performance efficiency. The present research examined the relationship between accidents and URTIs by studying 923 patients attending an Accident and Emergency department at a time of year when upper respiratory tract viruses were circulating. The results revealed no significant associations between URTIs and workplace accidents, and, similarly, no significant associations emerged when all accidents were compared with other attenders. The only effect which was close to statistical significance was a protective effect of influenza against workplace accidents, which could be explained in terms of a person with influenza or who has recently had influenza being less likely to work and therefore less likely to be at risk of experiencing a workplace accident. Further research must examine this topic with different methodologies, such as selecting controls from fellow workers of the index case, and these studies will provide us with a clearer view as to whether or not there is an association between URTIs and workplace accidents. PMID:7919298

  4. A murine model of urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chia-Suei; Dodson, Karen W; Hultgren, Scott J

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) inflict extreme pain and discomfort to those affected and have profound medical and socioeconomic impact. Although acute UTIs are often treatable with antibiotics, a large proportion of patients suffer from multiple recurrent infections. Here, we describe and provide a protocol for a robust murine UTI model that allows for the study of uropathogens in an ideal setting. The infections in the urinary tract can be monitored quantitatively by determining the bacterial loads at different times post-infection. In addition, the simple bladder architecture allows observation of disease progression and the uropathogenic virulence cascade using a variety of microscopic techniques. This mouse UTI model is extremely flexible, allowing the study of different bacterial strains and species of uropathogens in a broad range of mouse genetic backgrounds. We have used this protocol to identify important aspects of the host-pathogen interaction that determine the outcome of infection. The time required to complete the entire procedure will depend on the number of bacterial strains and mice included in the study. Nevertheless, one should expect 4 h of hands-on time, including inoculum preparation on the day of infection, transurethral inoculation, tissue harvest and post-harvest processing for a small group of mice (e.g., 5 mice). PMID:19644462

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The current literature regarding the effects of the gaseous signal molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the gastrointestinal system is reviewed. Bacterial, host and pharmaceutical-derived H2S are all considered and presented according to the physiological or pathophysiological effects of the gaseous signal molecule. These subjects include the toxicology of intestinal H2S with emphasis on bacterial-derived H2S, especially from sulfate-reducing bacteria, the role of endogenous and exogenous H2S in intestinal inflammation, and the roles of H2S in gastrointestinal motility, secretion and nociception. Recent Advances: While its pro- and anti-inflammatory, smooth muscle relaxant, prosecretory, and pro- and antinociceptive actions continue to remain the major effects of H2S in this system; recent findings have expanded the potential molecular targets for H2S in the gastrointestinal tract. Critical Issues: Numerous discrepancies remain in the literature, and definitive molecular targets in this system have not been supported by the use of competitive antagonism. Future Directions: Future work will hopefully resolve discrepancies in the literature and identify molecular targets and mechanisms of action for H2S. It is clear from the current literature that the long-appreciated relationship between H2S and the gastrointestinal tract continues to be strong as we endeavor to unravel its mysteries. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 818–830. PMID:23582008

  6. Prion diseases and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Davies, G A; Bryant, Adam R; Reynolds, John D; Jirik, Frank R; Sharkey, Keith A

    2006-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a central role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. These are human and animal diseases that include bovine spongiform encephalopathy, scrapie and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. They are uniformly fatal neurological diseases, which are characterized by ataxia and vacuolation in the central nervous system. Although they are known to be caused by the conversion of normal cellular prion protein to its infectious conformational isoform (PrPsc) the process by which this isoform is propagated and transported to the brain remains poorly understood. M cells, dendritic cells and possibly enteroendocrine cells are important in the movement of infectious prions across the GI epithelium. From there, PrPsc propagation requires B lymphocytes, dendritic cells and follicular dendritic cells of Peyer's patches. The early accumulation of the disease-causing agent in the plexuses of the enteric nervous system supports the contention that the autonomic nervous system is important in disease transmission. This is further supported by the presence of PrPsc in the ganglia of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves that innervate the GI tract. Additionally, the lymphoreticular system has been implicated as the route of transmission from the gut to the brain. Although normal cellular prion protein is found in the enteric nervous system, its role has not been characterized. Further research is required to understand how the cellular components of the gut wall interact to propagate and transmit infectious prions to develop potential therapies that may prevent the progression of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. PMID:16432555

  7. Abdominal ultrasonography of the pediatric gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Gale, Heather I; Gee, Michael S; Westra, Sjirk J; Nimkin, Katherine

    2016-07-28

    Ultrasound is an invaluable imaging modality in the evaluation of pediatric gastrointestinal pathology; it can provide real-time evaluation of the bowel without the need for sedation or intravenous contrast. Recent improvements in ultrasound technique can be utilized to improve detection of bowel pathology in children: Higher resolution probes, color Doppler, harmonic and panoramic imaging are excellent tools in this setting. Graded compression and cine clips provide dynamic information and oral and intravenous contrast agents aid in detection of bowel wall pathology. Ultrasound of the bowel in children is typically a targeted exam; common indications include evaluation for appendicitis, pyloric stenosis and intussusception. Bowel abnormalities that are detected prenatally can be evaluated after birth with ultrasound. Likewise, acquired conditions such as bowel hematoma, bowel infections and hernias can be detected with ultrasound. Rare bowel neoplasms, vascular disorders and foreign bodies may first be detected with sonography, as well. At some centers, comprehensive exams of the gastrointestinal tract are performed on children with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease to evaluate for disease activity or to confirm the diagnosis. The goal of this article is to review up-to-date imaging techniques, normal sonographic anatomy, and characteristic sonographic features of common and uncommon disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract in children. PMID:27551336

  8. Estrogens and Male Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wynder, Jalissa L.; Nicholson, Tristan M.; DeFranco, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology and affect the majority of men at some time during their lives. The development of BPH/LUTS is associated with an increased ratio of estrogen to androgen levels, and this ratio, when mimicked in a variety of animals, induces BPH and lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, estrogens have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Numerous endogenous and exogenous estrogens exist in humans. These estrogens act via multiple estrogen receptors to promote or inhibit prostatic hyperplasia and other BPH-associated processes. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue, and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of estrogen action directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area and remains to be elucidated. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation illustrating their potential roles in the development of BPH as therapy. More work will be required to identify estrogen signaling pathways associated with LUTD in order to develop more efficacious drugs for BPH treatment and prevention. PMID:26156791

  9. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Liedl, B

    2001-01-01

    In the past few years it has been clearly demonstrated that the concept of bacterial biofilm production permits an understanding and provides some explanation of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of catheter-associated urinary tract infections. This concept describes the colonization of catheter surfaces and the movement of bacteria against the urinary flow. It explains the antibacterial resistance of these matrix-enclosed sessile populations of bacteria. The catheter encrustation can be observed as mineralizing bacterial biofilm. The differentiation in swarming cells exposing a much higher activity of the enzyme urease is responsible for the predominant role of Proteus mirabilis in obstructing encrustations. The guidelines for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were developed over the past decades by clinicians and are still valid. They can now be better understood taking into consideration these new theories. As overuse of urethral catheters and non-compliance of their recommended use are still apparent, educational and surveillance programmes are needed to help maintain good standards of care. PMID:11148750

  10. TRP channel functions in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyun; Yu, Mingran; Liu, Yingzhe; Yu, Shaoyong

    2016-05-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are predominantly distributed in both somatic and visceral sensory nervous systems and play a crucial role in sensory transduction. As the largest visceral organ system, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract frequently accommodates external inputs, which stimulate sensory nerves to initiate and coordinate sensory and motor functions in order to digest and absorb nutrients. Meanwhile, the sensory nerves in the GI tract are also able to detect potential tissue damage by responding to noxious irritants. This nocifensive function is mediated through specific ion channels and receptors expressed in a subpopulation of spinal and vagal afferent nerve called nociceptor. In the last 18 years, our understanding of TRP channel expression and function in GI sensory nervous system has been continuously improved. In this review, we focus on the expressions and functions of TRPV1, TRPA1, and TRPM8 in primary extrinsic afferent nerves innervated in the esophagus, stomach, intestine, and colon and briefly discuss their potential roles in relevant GI disorders. PMID:26459157

  11. Lower urinary tract symptoms in men.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, John M; Wilt, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a highly prevalent and costly condition that affects older men worldwide. Many affected men develop lower urinary tract symptoms, which can have a negative impact on their quality of life. In the past, transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was the mainstay of treatment. However, several efficacious drug treatments have been developed, which have transformed BPH from an acute surgical entity to a chronic medical condition. Specifically, multiple clinical trials have shown that α adrenoceptor antagonists can significantly ameliorate lower urinary tract symptoms. Moreover, 5α reductase inhibitors, alone or combined with an α adrenoceptor antagonist, can reverse the natural course of BPH, reducing the risk of urinary retention and the need for surgical intervention. Newer medical regimens including the use of antimuscarinic agents or phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, have shown promise in men with predominantly storage symptoms and concomitant erectile dysfunction, respectively. For men who do not adequately respond to conservative measures or pharmacotherapy, minimally invasive surgical techniques (such as transurethral needle ablation, microwave thermotherapy, and prostatic urethral lift) may be of benefit, although they lack the durability of TURP. A variety of laser procedures have also been introduced, whose improved hemostatic properties abrogate many of the complications associated with traditional surgery. PMID:25125424

  12. Origin of the Cheney-Palouse Scabland tract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patton, P. C.; Baker, V. R.

    1978-01-01

    The Cheney-Palouse tract of the channeled scabland is the largest continuous tract of scabland in eastern Washington. The tract is composed of a varied assortment of bedrock erosional forms, loess islands, and gravel bars. Prominent bedrock longitudinal grooves and inner channels formed by macroturbulent plucking erosion of the jointed rock. Loess island forms vary as a function of their position within the flow. The three major types (submerged, partially submerged, and subaerially exposed) created sedimentologic conditions and resulting bar forms distinct from one another. Other bar forms, notably expansion bars, account for most of the sedimentation in the tract.

  13. Tract Specific Reproducibility of Tractography Based Morphology and Diffusion Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Besseling, René M. H.; Jansen, Jacobus F. A.; Overvliet, Geke M.; Vaessen, Maarten J.; Braakman, Hilde M. H.; Hofman, Paul A. M.; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Backes, Walter H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The reproducibility of tractography is important to determine its sensitivity to pathological abnormalities. The reproducibility of tract morphology has not yet been systematically studied and the recently developed tractography contrast Tract Density Imaging (TDI) has not yet been assessed at the tract specific level. Materials and Methods Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and probabilistic constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) tractography are performed twice in 9 healthy subjects. Tractography is based on common space seed and target regions and performed for several major white matter tracts. Tractograms are converted to tract segmentations and inter-session reproducibility of tract morphology is assessed using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The coefficient of variation (COV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) are calculated of the following tract metrics: fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), volume, and TDI. Analyses are performed both for proximal (deep white matter) and extended (including subcortical white matter) tract segmentations. Results Proximal DSC values were 0.70–0.92. DSC values were 5–10% lower in extended compared to proximal segmentations. COV/ICC values of FA, ADC, volume and TDI were 1–4%/0.65–0.94, 2–4%/0.62–0.94, 3–22%/0.53–0.96 and 8–31%/0.48–0.70, respectively, with the lower COV and higher ICC values found in the proximal segmentations. Conclusion For all investigated metrics, reproducibility depended on the segmented tract. FA and ADC had relatively low COV and relatively high ICC, indicating clinical potential. Volume had higher COV but its moderate to high ICC values in most tracts still suggest subject-differentiating power. Tract TDI had high COV and relatively low ICC, which reflects unfavorable reproducibility. PMID:22485157

  14. Sex hormones and the female urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Miodrag, A; Castleden, C M; Vallance, T R

    1988-10-01

    Symptomatic clinical changes and urodynamic changes are apparent in the female urinary tract system during pregnancy, the menstrual cycle and following the menopause. The sex hormones exert physiological effects on the female urinary tract, from the ureters to the urethra, with oestrogens having an additional influence on the structures of the pelvic floor. High affinity oestrogen receptors have been identified in bladder, trigone, urethra and pubococcygeus muscle of women. Oestrogen pretreatment enhances the contractile response of animal detrusor muscle to alpha-adrenoceptor agonists, cholinomimetics and prostaglandins, as well as enhancing the contractile response to alpha-agonists in ureter and urethra. Progesterone on the other hand decreases tone in the ureter, bladder and urethra by enhancing beta-adrenergic responses. The dependence on oestrogens of the tissues of the lower urinary tract contributes to increased urinary problems in postmenopausal women. Urinary symptoms due to atrophic mucosal changes respond well to oestrogen replacement therapy. However, because they recur when treatment is stopped, continuous therapy with low dose natural oestrogens is recommended. Oestrogens may be of benefit in postmenopausal women with stress incontinence, but the doses necessary for clinical effect are higher than for the treatment of atrophic urethritis. The practice of adding a progestagen to long term oestrogen therapy to reduce the risk of endometrial carcinoma may, however, exacerbate stress incontinence by decreasing urethral pressure. Cyclical therapy with oestrogens may therefore be more appropriate particularly in women who are not suitable for surgery or have a mild degree of stress incontinence, along with other conservative measures such as pelvic floor exercises and alpha-adrenoceptor agonists. The place of oestrogen therapy in motor urge incontinence has not been determined. The risk of developing endometrial carcinoma as a result of long term high dose

  15. Kinetics of DNA duplex formation: A-tracts versus AT-tracts.

    PubMed

    Wyer, Jean Ann; Kristensen, Mads Bejder; Jones, Nykola C; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2014-09-21

    The hybridisation and melting of DNA strands are critical steps in many biological processes, but still a deeper understanding of the kinetics is lacking. This is evident from the absence of a clear correlation between rate constants for duplex formation and the number of bases in the strand or the sequence. Here we have probed differences between formation times of A-tracts and AT-tracts by studying complementary model strands mainly comprised of adenine (A) and thymine (T) in stopped-flow (SF) experiments. These strands are relevant as DNA replication begins in regions with a large number of AT base pairs. Interpretation of our results is aided by secondary-structure modelling where both the fractions of the different types of structures and the number of paired bases in the lowest-energy ones are determined. The model is based on calculation of free energies using fixed values for enthalpies and entropies associated with base pairing and a stochastic sampling of the possible structures. We find that the strand length affects rates: the activation energy for the formation of short (16-base pairs) A-tracts is larger than that for longer ones (20-base pairs). Activation energies for the formation of AT-tracts are an order of magnitude larger, and larger for shorter strands than for long ones. These higher activation energies are in agreement with the fact that the fraction of unpaired bases in the constituent AT-tract strands is less than in those which comprise the A-tracts. That the pre-structures of the single strands significantly affect rates is also used to rationalise the results obtained for two pairs of complementary 12-mer strands that have the same bases but in a different sequence; we report here similar activation energies as reported earlier and that these are strongly sequence dependent. Finally, we demonstrate that SF can be coupled with the measurement of circular dichroism (CD) in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region, taking advantage of a

  16. Advances in biomarkers of biliary tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Yin, Baobing

    2016-07-01

    Tumor biomarkers can be applied for early diagnosis or precise treatment, thereby leading to personalized treatment and better outcomes. Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a group of cancers that occurs in different locations and have different clinical or genetic properties. Though the incidence of BTCs is rare, BTCs are among the most lethal cancers in the world and all have very low 5-year survivals. Lack of efficient early diagnostic approaches or adjuvant therapies for BTCs are main reasons. These urge us to broaden the researches into BTC biomarkers. Although few progresses of diagnostic biomarkers for BTCs have been achieved, there are still some advances in prognostic, predictive and therapeutic areas. In this review, we will focus on these achievements. PMID:27261586

  17. The Microbiome and the Respiratory Tract.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Robert P; Erb-Downward, John R; Martinez, Fernando J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2016-01-01

    Although the notion that "the normal lung is free from bacteria" remains common in textbooks, it is virtually always stated without citation or argument. The lungs are constantly exposed to diverse communities of microbes from the oropharynx and other sources, and over the past decade, novel culture-independent techniques of microbial identification have revealed that the lungs, previously considered sterile in health, harbor diverse communities of microbes. In this review, we describe the topography and population dynamics of the respiratory tract, both in health and as altered by acute and chronic lung disease. We provide a survey of current techniques of sampling, sequencing, and analysis of respiratory microbiota and review technical challenges and controversies in the field. We review and synthesize what is known about lung microbiota in various diseases and identify key lessons learned across disease states. PMID:26527186

  18. Physiologic Status Monitoring via the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, S.; Hughes, T.; Boettcher, T.; Barman, R.; Langer, R.; Swiston, A.

    2015-01-01

    Reliable, real-time heart and respiratory rates are key vital signs used in evaluating the physiological status in many clinical and non-clinical settings. Measuring these vital signs generally requires superficial attachment of physically or logistically obtrusive sensors to subjects that may result in skin irritation or adversely influence subject performance. Given the broad acceptance of ingestible electronics, we developed an approach that enables vital sign monitoring internally from the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report initial proof-of-concept large animal (porcine) experiments and a robust processing algorithm that demonstrates the feasibility of this approach. Implementing vital sign monitoring as a stand-alone technology or in conjunction with other ingestible devices has the capacity to significantly aid telemedicine, optimize performance monitoring of athletes, military service members, and first-responders, as well as provide a facile method for rapid clinical evaluation and triage. PMID:26580216

  19. [Synchronous tumors of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Pătraşcu, Tr; Doran, H; Catrina, E; Mihalache, O; Degeratu, D; Predescu, G

    2010-01-01

    The term "synchronous tumors" is reserved for simultaneous evolution of two or more tumors with distinct sites, in which the possibility that one tumor is a metastasis of the other has been excluded. In medical practice, the involvement of two different cavitary organs of the gastrointestinal tract is very rare. We present two clinical cases of synchronous tumors: one of a malignant degeneration of a colonic polyp, associated to a jejunal tumor; the other of a patient with a gastric adenocarcinoma, who also had a bulky rectal villous tumor. We tried to find out the etiology of the tumors and the frequency of these associations, mentioned in medical literature. Immunohistochemistry investigations, genetic analysis and familial screening must complete an individualized medical approach in which the surgical technique must be adequate for each case. PMID:20405687

  20. Gastrothorax following upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Alaeldin Hassan; Elsayed, Muaz Abdellatif

    2009-01-01

    A 27-year-old man presented with vomiting and breathlessness for 1 day, 5 days after upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy. On admission, the patient was breathless but not cyanosed; he had sinus tachycardia (heart rate 110 beats/min) and was normotensive (blood pressure 120/75 mm Hg). There were signs of mediastinal shift to the right. There were no breath sounds over the left side of the chest but normal breath sounds were heard to the right of the sternum. His chest x ray, CT scan of the chest and a barium meal study revealed gastrothorax. He was operated on and at surgery the stomach and ascending colon were found herniating into the chest through a posterolateral defect of the left hemidiaphragm. These were moved back to the abdomen and the diaphragmatic defect was closed. The patient made an uneventful recovery and remained well when seen in the clinic 2 months following surgery. PMID:22140411

  1. Urinary tract infection in febrile convulsions.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, P; Verrier Jones, K

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective review of the casenotes of 403 children admitted to hospital with febrile convulsions was performed to estimate the frequency of symptomatic urinary tract infection and examine medical practice in making this diagnosis. A total of 228 (56%) children had urine cultured: 150 bag specimens, 76 clean voided samples, and two suprapubic aspirates. There were 13 'probable' and six 'possible' infected urine samples together representing 5% of the whole study population (n = 403), 8% of those having urine cultured (n = 228), and 12% of those providing uncontaminated urine samples (n = 155). Those with first febrile convulsions and those aged under 18 months were more likely to have urine examined. Practices varied significantly between different hospitals. These results suggest that there has indeed been a need for practice guidelines, and that further audit of practice is required to assess their impact. PMID:1755639

  2. Targeted therapy for biliary tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Faris, Jason E; Zhu, Andrew X

    2012-07-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a heterogeneous group of malignancies, with a historically poor prognosis as a whole. Until recently, the development of effective therapeutics was hampered by the relatively low incidence, heterogeneity in patients and tumors, and correspondingly poor clinical trial enrollments. With the publication of the landmark phase III ABC-02 trial demonstrating the superiority of gemcitabine and cisplatin combination chemotherapy, the landscape changed for the development of new agents. Despite this progress, there are currently no approved targeted agents for BTC. This review will focus on recent developments in targeted therapeutics, directed against several key signaling pathways in BTC, including epidermal growth factor receptor, angiogenesis, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Data from recent phase I and II trials will be discussed, along with a preview of upcoming trials involving targeted therapies. PMID:22318523

  3. Urinary tract infections in HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Schönwald, S; Begovac, J; Skerk, V

    1999-05-01

    HIV-positive patients are liable to acquire opportunistic infections. Their liability to acquire other common infectious conditions is less frequently reported. In order to determine the frequency of urinary tract infections (UTI) in HIV-positive patients, we performed a retrospective analysis. The control group was formed from patients with community acquired pneumonia. We reviewed charts of 96 HIV-positive patients and of 314 patients in the control study group. The analysis has shown that patients with HIV had a UTI more frequently than the controls. Besides the difference in the frequency, we observed the difference in the etiology. Enterococci were the most frequent isolates in patients with HIV disease, whereas Escherichia coli was most frequently isolated in the controls. These facts should be taken into consideration when treatment of a UTI with suspected bacteremia in AIDS patients is initiated. PMID:10394989

  4. Urinary tract infection in women - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Most urinary tract infections (UTIs) are caused by bacteria that enter the urethra and travel to the bladder. This can lead ... BATHING AND HYGIENE To prevent future urinary tract infections, you ... make infections more likely. Change your pad each time you ...

  5. 43 CFR 3420.3-3 - Preliminary tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Preliminary tract delineation. 3420.3-3 Section 3420.3-3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) COMPETITIVE LEASING Competitive Leasing § 3420.3-3 Preliminary tract...

  6. Bovine coronaviruses from the respiratory tract: Antigenic and genetic diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine corona viruses (BoCV) isolated from respiratory tract, nasal swab and broncho alveolar washing fluid samples were evaluated for genetic and antigenic differences. These BoCV from the respiratory tract of healthy and clinically ill cattle with BRD signs were compared to reference and vaccine ...

  7. Prophylactic antibiotics for children with recurrent urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Joan L; Finlay, Jane C; Lang, Mia Eileen; Bortolussi, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Prophylactic antibiotics for urinary tract infections are no longer routinely recommended. A large number of children must be given prophylaxis to prevent one infection and antibiotic resistance is a major concern when treating community-acquired urinary tract infections. The results of three recent significant studies are examined, with focus on the efficacy of prophylaxis, and recommendations are made. PMID:25722643

  8. Census Tracts More Precisely Define Rural Populations and Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromartie, John B.; Swanson, Linda L.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of census tracts in place of counties to identify metro and nonmetro components of a five-level "rural-urban continuum." Application of the system to Arizona, South Carolina, and Minnesota demonstrates the superiority of census tracts in providing a more precise territorial delineation of areas and classification of population in…

  9. 43 CFR 3131.2 - Tentative tract selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... State Director, after completion of the required environmental analysis (see 40 CFR 1500-1508), shall... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tentative tract selection. 3131.2 Section... RESERVE, ALASKA Leasing Program § 3131.2 Tentative tract selection. (a) The State Director Alaska,...

  10. The effect of spaceflight on retino-hypothalamic tract development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, D. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Tang, I. H.; Fuller, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers examined the effect of late prenatal exposure to microgravity on the development of the retina, retinohypothalamic tract, geniculo-hypothalamic tract, and suprachiasmatic nucleus. Results indicate an effect on c-fos activity in the intergeniculate leaflet between gestational day 20 and postnatal day 8, suggesting a delay in development of the circadian timing system.

  11. Pkd1 is Required for Male Reproductive tract Development

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xuguang; Arend, Lois J.

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive tract abnormalities and male infertility have higher incidence in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients than in general population. In this work, we revealed that Pkd1, whose mutations account for 85% of ADPKD cases, is essential for male reproductive tract development. Disruption of Pkd1 caused a spectrum of defects in the murine male reproductive tract. The earliest visible defect in Pkd1-/- reproductive tract was cystic dilation of the efferent ducts, which are derivatives of the mesonephric tubules. Epididymis development was delayed or arrested in the Pkd1-/- mice. No sign of epididymal coiling was seen in the Pkd1 null mice. Disruption of Pkd1 in epithelia alone using the Pax2-cre mice was sufficient to cause efferent duct dilation and coiling defect in the epididymis, suggesting that Pkd1 is critical for epithelial development and maintenance in male reproductive tract. In-depth analysis showed that Pkd1 is required to maintain tubulin cytoskeleton and important for Tgf-β/Bmp signal transduction in the epithelia of male reproductive tract. Altogether, our results provide the first direct evidence for developmental roles of Pkd1 in male reproductive tract and provide new insights in reproductive tract abnormalities and infertility in ADPKD patients. PMID:23933588

  12. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Humberto R; Hickling, Duane R

    2016-02-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥10(3) CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5-14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  13. Myocardialization of the cardiac outflow tract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van den Hoff, M. J.; Moorman, A. F.; Ruijter, J. M.; Lamers, W. H.; Bennington, R. W.; Markwald, R. R.; Wessels, A.

    1999-01-01

    During development, the single-circuited cardiac tube transforms into a double-circuited four-chambered heart by a complex process of remodeling, differential growth, and septation. In this process the endocardial cushion tissues of the atrioventricular junction and outflow tract (OFT) play a crucial role as they contribute to the mesenchymal components of the developing septa and valves in the developing heart. After fusion, the endocardial ridges in the proximal portion of the OFT initially form a mesenchymal outlet septum. In the adult heart, however, this outlet septum is basically a muscular structure. Hence, the mesenchyme of the proximal outlet septum has to be replaced by cardiomyocytes. We have dubbed this process "myocardialization." Our immunohistochemical analysis of staged chicken hearts demonstrates that myocardialization takes place by ingrowth of existing myocardium into the mesenchymal outlet septum. Compared to other events in cardiac septation, it is a relatively late process, being initialized around stage H/H28 and being basically completed around stage H/H38. To unravel the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the induction and regulation of myocardialization, an in vitro culture system in which myocardialization could be mimicked and manipulated was developed. Using this in vitro myocardialization assay it was observed that under the standard culture conditions (i) whole OFT explants from stage H/H20 and younger did not spontaneously myocardialize the collagen matrix, (ii) explants from stage H/H21 and older spontaneously formed extensive myocardial networks, (iii) the myocardium of the OFT could be induced to myocardialize and was therefore "myocardialization-competent" at all stages tested (H/H16-30), (iv) myocardialization was induced by factors produced by, most likely, the nonmyocardial component of the outflow tract, (v) at none of the embryonic stages analyzed was ventricular myocardium myocardialization-competent, and finally

  14. The gastrointestinal tract microbiome, probiotics, and mood.

    PubMed

    Vitetta, Luis; Bambling, Matthew; Alford, Hollie

    2014-12-01

    Mental health is closely linked to physical health. Depression (e.g., major depression) is highly prevalent worldwide and a major cause of disability. In a subgroup with treatment-resistant depression, standard pharmacotherapy interventions provide small if any incremental improvement in patient outcomes and may also require the application of an alternate approach. Therefore, in addition to the standard pharmacotherapies prescribed, patients will also be advised on the benefits of psychological counseling, electroconvulsive therapy, and transcranial magnetic stimulation or increasing physical activity and reducing harmful substance consumption. Numerous nutraceuticals have a beneficial role in treatment-resistant depression and include, herbal medicines of which Hypericum perforatum is the best studied, omega-3 fatty acid preparations, S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAMe), various mineral formulations (e.g., magnesium) and folate (singly or in combination with B group vitamins) are prescribed to a lesser extent. Furthermore, a largely neglected area of research activity has been the role of live probiotic cultures that contribute to repairing dysbiosis (a leaky gut barrier abnormality) in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). In this commentary, we build a hypothesis that in addition suggests that GIT metabolites that are elaborated by the microbiome cohort may provide novel and significant avenues for efficacious therapeutic interventions for mood disorders. We posit that the microbiome in the gastrointestinal tract is implicit as an important participant for the amelioration of adverse mood conditions via the diverse metabolic activities provided by live beneficial bacteria (probiotics) as an active adjuvant treatment. This activity is in part triggered by a controlled release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hence further questions the antioxidant/oxidative stress postulate. PMID:25266952

  15. Congenital diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lentze, M

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid increase in knowledge on the genetic origin of diseases within the gastrointestinal tract the number of congenital diseases, which already manifest during childhood have drastically increased. Due to the large application of molecular genetics the number is steadily increasing. To make the access to these rare diseases fast and efficient the data base of the National Library of Medicine (Online Mendelian Inheritance of Man - OMIN) is a very helpful online tool, with which all these disease entities can be found easily (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim). Detailed tables are given to find most of the congenitally inherited disease, which affect the gastrointestinal tract. A variety of congenital diarrheas with disturbances of digestion, hydrolysis, absorption and secretion is described in detail: lactose intolerance, sucrose intolerance, glucose-galactose malabsorption, fructose malabsorption, trehalase and enterokinase deficiency, congenital chloride and sodium diarrhea, congenital hypomagnesaemia, primary bile acid malabsorption, acrodermatitis enteropathica and Menke's syndrome. Also described in detail are diseases with structural anomalies of the intestine like microvillous inclusion disease, congenital tufting enteropathy and IPEX syndrome. The diagnosis in the disturbances of carbohydrate hydrolysis or absorption can be established by H2-breath tests after appropriate sugar challenge. Treatment consists of elimination of the responsible sugar from the diet. The diagnosis of the congenital secretory diarrheas is established by investigation of electrolytes in blood and stool. Substitution of high doses of the responsible mineral can improve the clinical outcome. In acrodermatitis enteropathica low serum zinc level together with the typical skin lesions guide to the diagnosis. High doses of oral zinc aspartate can cure the symptoms of the disease. The diagnosis of structural congenital lesions of the intestine can be established by histology and

  16. [Splenic metastases from female genital tract malignancies].

    PubMed

    Piura, Ettie; Piura, Benjamin

    2010-05-01

    Splenic metastases are rare. Usually, they are part of a disseminated disease and located on the splenic capsule. Common sources are breast cancer, lung cancer and malignant melanoma. SoLitary splenic metastases are rare, usuaLLy located in the splenic parenchyma and metastasizing via the hematogenous route. Splenic metastases from ovarian carcinoma are usuaLly part of a disseminated disease, located on the splenic capsule and metastasize via the peritoneum. Splenic metastases from endometriaL carcinoma are usuaLLy solitary, Located in the splenic parenchyma and metastasize via the hematogenous route. Splenic metastases from cervical carcinoma are divided equally between metastases as part of a disseminated disease and soLitary metastases. Less than 100 cases of solitary splenic metastases have been reported with half of them being metastases from female genital tract malignancies: 30--ovarian carcinoma; 11--endometriaL carcinoma; 8--cervical carcinoma; and 1--tubal carcinoma. Few cases have been reported of splenic rupture because of metastases from choriocarcinoma. Splenic metastases as part of a disseminated disease are associated with poor prognosis, and splenectomy--apart from cases in which it might assist in achieving optimaL debulking--is not effective. Solitary splenic metastases represent a more moderate disease and the treatment of choice is splenectomy. SoLitary splenic metastases may be detected after an interval from the diagnosis of the primary disease. Hence, patients who had been treated for female genital tract malignancy, even if they are asymptomatic, need a long-term follow-up, including serial imaging studies of the spleen. PMID:20929072

  17. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Humberto R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥103 CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5–14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  18. Managing lower urinary tract symptoms in men.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Kenneth R; Aning, Jonathan J

    2016-04-01

    Male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common and increase in prevalence with age. Up to 90% of men aged 50 to 80 may suffer from troublesome LUTS. Men may attend expressing direct concern about micturition, describing one or more LUTS and the related impact on their quality of life. Frequently men may present for other medical or urological reasons such as concern regarding their risk of having prostate cancer or erectile dysfunction but on taking a history bothersome LUTS are identified. Men may present late in the community with urinary retention: the inability to pass urine. A thorough urological history is essential to inform management. It is important to determine whether men have storage or voiding LUTS or both. All patients must have a systematic comprehensive examination including genitalia and a digital rectal examination. Investigations performed in primary care should be guided by the history and examination findings, taking into account the impact of the LUTS on the individual's quality of life. Current NICE guidelines recommend the following to be performed at initial assessment: frequency volume chart (FVC); urine dipstick to detect blood, glucose, protein, leucocytes and nitrites; and prostate specific antigen. Men should be referred for urological review if they have: bothersome LUTS which have not responded to conservative management or medical therapy; LUTS in association with recurrent or persistent UTIs; urinary retention; renal impairment suspected to be secondary to lower urinary tract dysfunction; or suspected urological malignancy. All patients not meeting criteria for immediate referral to urology can be managed initially in primary care. Based on history, examination and investigation findings an individualised management plan should be formulated. Basic lifestyle advice should be given regarding reduction or avoidance of caffeinated products and alcohol. The FVC should guide advice regarding fluid intake management and all

  19. Cutaneous sinus tracts (or emerging sinus tracts) of odontogenic origin: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ronald S; Jones, Robert; Feimster, Tawana; Sam, Frances E

    2010-01-01

    Three cases are presented in which patients presented with either cutaneous swelling or cutaneous sinus tracts of odontogenic origin. A cutaneous sinus tract of odontogenic origin is a pathway through the alveolar bone that typically begins at the apex of an infected tooth or of an infected portion of the dental alveolus and empties infected material (pus) through the skin. Where as the more common finding of an oral fistula is a pathway from the apical periodontal area of a tooth to the surface of the oral mucous membrane, permitting the discharge of suppurative material. Diagnosis, etiology and treatment are discussed with reference to patient history, clinical examinations, imaging, and treatment perspectives. PMID:23662083

  20. Value of Ultrasound in Detecting Urinary Tract Anomalies After First Febrile Urinary Tract Infection in Children.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, Emad E; Abdelaziz, Doaa M; Sheba, Maha F; Abdel-Azeem, Yasser S

    2016-05-01

    Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that affects part of the urinary tract. Ultrasound is a noninvasive test that can demonstrate the size and shape of kidneys, presence of dilatation of the ureters, and the existence of anatomic abnormalities. The aim of the study is to estimate the value of ultrasound in detecting urinary tract anomalies after first attack of UTI. Methods This study was conducted at the Nephrology Clinic, New Children's Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, from August 2012 to March 2013, and included 30 children who presented with first attack of acute febrile UTI. All patients were subjected to urine analysis, urine culture and sensitivity, serum creatinine, complete blood count, and imaging in the form of renal ultrasound, voiding cysto-urethrography, and renal scan. Results All the patients had fever with a mean of 38.96°C ± 0.44°C and the mean duration of illness was 6.23 ± 5.64 days. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had an ultrasound abnormality. The commonest abnormalities were kidney stones (15.8%). Only 2 patients who had abnormal ultrasound had also vesicoureteric reflux on cystourethrography. Sensitivity of ultrasound was 66.7%, specificity was 37.5%, positive predictive value was 21.1%, negative predictive value was 81.8%, and total accuracy was 43.33%. Conclusion We concluded that ultrasound alone was not of much value in diagnosing and putting a plan of first attack of febrile UTI. It is recommended that combined investigations are the best way to confirm diagnosis of urinary tract anomalies. PMID:26084536

  1. Development and Morphology of the Ventricular Outflow Tracts.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert H; Mori, Shumpei; Spicer, Diane E; Brown, Nigel A; Mohun, Timothy J

    2016-09-01

    It is customary, at the current time, to consider many, if not most, of the lesions involving the ventricular outflow tract in terms of conotruncal malformations. This reflects the introduction, in the early 1940s, of the terms conus and truncus to describe the components of the developing outflow tract. The definitive outflow tracts in the postnatal heart, however, possess three, rather than two, components. These are the intrapericardial arterial trunks, the arterial roots, and the subvalvar ventricular outflow tracts. Congenital lesions afflicting the arterial roots, however, are not currently considered to be conotruncal malformations. This suggests a lack of logic in the description of cardiac development and its use as a means of categorizing congenital malformations. It is our belief that the developing outflow tract, like the postnatal outflow tracts, can readily be described in tripartite fashion, with its distal, intermediate, and proximal components forming the primordiums of the postnatal parts. In this review, we present evidence obtained from developing mice and human hearts to substantiate this notion. We show that the outflow tract, initially with a common lumen, is divided into its aortic and pulmonary components by a combination of an aortopulmonary septum derived from the dorsal wall of the aortic sac and outflow tract cushions that spiral through its intermediate and proximal components. These embryonic septal structures, however, subsequently lose their septal functions as the outflow tracts develop their own discrete walls. We then compare the developmental findings with the anatomic arrangements seen postnatally in the normal human heart. We show how correlations with the embryologic findings permit logical analysis of the congenital lesions involving the outflow tracts. PMID:27587491

  2. Development and Morphology of the Ventricular Outflow Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shumpei; Spicer, Diane E.; Brown, Nigel A.; Mohun, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    It is customary, at the current time, to consider many, if not most, of the lesions involving the ventricular outflow tract in terms of conotruncal malformations. This reflects the introduction, in the early 1940s, of the terms conus and truncus to describe the components of the developing outflow tract. The definitive outflow tracts in the postnatal heart, however, possess three, rather than two, components. These are the intrapericardial arterial trunks, the arterial roots, and the subvalvar ventricular outflow tracts. Congenital lesions afflicting the arterial roots, however, are not currently considered to be conotruncal malformations. This suggests a lack of logic in the description of cardiac development and its use as a means of categorizing congenital malformations. It is our belief that the developing outflow tract, like the postnatal outflow tracts, can readily be described in tripartite fashion, with its distal, intermediate, and proximal components forming the primordiums of the postnatal parts. In this review, we present evidence obtained from developing mice and human hearts to substantiate this notion. We show that the outflow tract, initially with a common lumen, is divided into its aortic and pulmonary components by a combination of an aortopulmonary septum derived from the dorsal wall of the aortic sac and outflow tract cushions that spiral through its intermediate and proximal components. These embryonic septal structures, however, subsequently lose their septal functions as the outflow tracts develop their own discrete walls. We then compare the developmental findings with the anatomic arrangements seen postnatally in the normal human heart. We show how correlations with the embryologic findings permit logical analysis of the congenital lesions involving the outflow tracts. PMID:27587491

  3. Vocal tract resonances in speech, singing, and playing musical instruments

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Joe; Garnier, Maëva; Smith, John

    2009-01-01

    In both the voice and musical wind instruments, a valve (vocal folds, lips, or reed) lies between an upstream and downstream duct: trachea and vocal tract for the voice; vocal tract and bore for the instrument. Examining the structural similarities and functional differences gives insight into their operation and the duct-valve interactions. In speech and singing, vocal tract resonances usually determine the spectral envelope and usually have a smaller influence on the operating frequency. The resonances are important not only for the phonemic information they produce, but also because of their contribution to voice timbre, loudness, and efficiency. The role of the tract resonances is usually different in brass and some woodwind instruments, where they modify and to some extent compete or collaborate with resonances of the instrument to control the vibration of a reed or the player’s lips, and∕or the spectrum of air flow into the instrument. We give a brief overview of oscillator mechanisms and vocal tract acoustics. We discuss recent and current research on how the acoustical resonances of the vocal tract are involved in singing and the playing of musical wind instruments. Finally, we compare techniques used in determining tract resonances and suggest some future developments. PMID:19649157

  4. Antibacterial Activity of Barringtonia acutangula against Selected Urinary Tract Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, S; Panda, P K; Mishra, S R; Parida, R K; Ellaiah, P; Dash, S K

    2008-09-01

    Barringtonia acutangula (L.) Gaertn belonging to family Barringtoniaceae was investigated to evaluate In vitro antibacterial activity of aqueous, ethanolic, petroleum ether and chloroform extracts against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli the major urinary tract infection causing pathogens were tested by disc diffusion assay method and the minimum inhibitory concentration was evaluated. Ethanol (95%) extract exhibited broader spectrum of inhibition followed by chloroform, petroleum ether and aqueous extracts against the urinary tract pathogens under test. An attempt has been made to compare the activity of extracts with standard antibiotics against selected urinary tract infection causing pathogens. PMID:21394275

  5. Antibacterial Activity of Barringtonia acutangula against Selected Urinary Tract Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, S.; Panda, P. K.; Mishra, S. R.; Parida, R. K.; Ellaiah, P.; Dash, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    Barringtonia acutangula (L.) Gaertn belonging to family Barringtoniaceae was investigated to evaluate In vitro antibacterial activity of aqueous, ethanolic, petroleum ether and chloroform extracts against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli the major urinary tract infection causing pathogens were tested by disc diffusion assay method and the minimum inhibitory concentration was evaluated. Ethanol (95%) extract exhibited broader spectrum of inhibition followed by chloroform, petroleum ether and aqueous extracts against the urinary tract pathogens under test. An attempt has been made to compare the activity of extracts with standard antibiotics against selected urinary tract infection causing pathogens. PMID:21394275

  6. [Uncomplicated urinary tract infection and treatment].

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Vahlensieck, W; Watermann, D; Weidner, W; Naber, K G

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are frequent infections in the outpatient and hospital setting. With respect to treatment options, UTI can generally be stratified into uncomplicated and complicated / nosocomial infections. Uncomplicated UTI are represented by the acute uncomplicated cystitis and the uncomplicated pyelonephritis. They are mainly caused by E. coli. There are, however, also increasing resistance rates found in uncomplicated UTI, e. g., against aminopenicillins, cotrimoxazole and increasingly also fluoroquinolones. This development has called for a new evaluation of the treatment recommendations in uncomplicated UTI. As an empirical therapy for uncomplicated cystitis fosfomycin trometamol, nitrofurantoin or pivmecillinam are recommended as first-line agents. As the oral first line therapy for uncomplicated pyelonephritis fluroquinolones in high dosages are recommended. The frequent asymptomatic bacteriuria does not need to be treated, with only a few exceptions. Due to the increasing antibiotic resistance and the emergence of multiresistant uropathogens, empirical antibiotic treatment becomes more difficult. Therefore the results of susceptibility testing should be awaited whenever possible. PMID:21267803

  7. Use of antioxidants in urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Allameh, Zahra; Salamzadeh, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Pyelonephritis is an inflammatory process, and oxidative stress plays a major role in it. Anti-inflammatory or antioxidant therapy given concomitantly with antibiotics should lower the risk of postpyelonephritic scarring. As the lack of review studies in the use of antioxidants in urinary tract infections was detected, this study was designed. We conducted a review of available articles in PubMed and Google Scholar with a simple review, using keywords of "antioxidant" and "pyelonephritis" with all their possible synonyms and combinations. Only interventional studies were collected. There were neither limitations on time, nor the location of the study, type of subjects, administration rout of the antioxidant drug, and the antioxidant drug used. After studying the abstracts or in some cases the full text of articles, they were categorized based on the type of antioxidant, type and number of subjects, rout of administration, dosing, duration of treatment, year of publication of the paper, and the results. A total of 66 articles published from 1991 to 2015 were found by studying just the title of the papers. Studying the abstracts reduced this number to 51 studies. Antioxidants used for this condition were Vitamins A, E, and C, cytoflavin, caffeic acid phenethyl ester, ebselen, allopurinol, melatonin, N-acetylcysteine, oleuropein, montelukast, oxytocin, ozon, dapsone, pentoxifyllin, tadalafil, bilirubin, cranberry, meloxicam, L-carnitine, colchicine, perfluoran, methylprednisolone, and dexamethasone. Studies show that antioxidants are capable of reducing oxidative stress and can be used effectively along with antibiotics to reduce the scar formation. PMID:27162800

  8. Use of antioxidants in urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Allameh, Zahra; Salamzadeh, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Pyelonephritis is an inflammatory process, and oxidative stress plays a major role in it. Anti-inflammatory or antioxidant therapy given concomitantly with antibiotics should lower the risk of postpyelonephritic scarring. As the lack of review studies in the use of antioxidants in urinary tract infections was detected, this study was designed. We conducted a review of available articles in PubMed and Google Scholar with a simple review, using keywords of “antioxidant” and “pyelonephritis” with all their possible synonyms and combinations. Only interventional studies were collected. There were neither limitations on time, nor the location of the study, type of subjects, administration rout of the antioxidant drug, and the antioxidant drug used. After studying the abstracts or in some cases the full text of articles, they were categorized based on the type of antioxidant, type and number of subjects, rout of administration, dosing, duration of treatment, year of publication of the paper, and the results. A total of 66 articles published from 1991 to 2015 were found by studying just the title of the papers. Studying the abstracts reduced this number to 51 studies. Antioxidants used for this condition were Vitamins A, E, and C, cytoflavin, caffeic acid phenethyl ester, ebselen, allopurinol, melatonin, N-acetylcysteine, oleuropein, montelukast, oxytocin, ozon, dapsone, pentoxifyllin, tadalafil, bilirubin, cranberry, meloxicam, L-carnitine, colchicine, perfluoran, methylprednisolone, and dexamethasone. Studies show that antioxidants are capable of reducing oxidative stress and can be used effectively along with antibiotics to reduce the scar formation. PMID:27162800

  9. [Congenital gastrointestinal tract obstructions (pictorial essay)].

    PubMed

    Coşkun, Abdulhakim; Sevinç, Halil

    2004-03-01

    A wide spectrum of congenital anomalies may cause obstruction in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Neonates with complete upper intestinal obstruction do not usually require further radiological evaluation after radiography. Barium studies are sometimes needed. Barium studies and other comprehensive methods such as ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are usually complementary procedures which are not usually helpful and may even delay surgery, resulting in some complications and death. The decision to perform a given imaging examination should be considered carefully to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure to the patient. The diagnosis of low intestinal obstruction is usually apparent at abdominal radiography because of the presence of many dilated loops. The differentiation between ileal and colonic obstruction can be made with a contrast enema study. Dilute ionic, water-soluble contrast agents and non-balloon tip catheter of appropriate size is preferred for neonatal contrast enemas. Barium sulphate suspensions typically should not be used because of their potential to exacerbate the impaction of meconium plugs in meconium ileus, whereas water-soluble enemas can be therapeutic. PMID:15054709

  10. Drosophila sperm motility in the reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Lu, Xiangyi

    2011-05-01

    Motile cilia and flagella exhibit many waveforms as outputs of dynein activation sequences on the highly conserved axoneme. Motility change of sperm in the reproductive tract is difficult to study and remains an important area of investigation. Sperm typically execute a sinusoidal waveform. Increased viscosity in the medium induces somewhat unusual arc-line and helical waveforms in some sperm. However, whether the latter two waveforms occur in vivo is not known. Using green fluorescence protein imaging, we show that Drosophila sperm in the uterus move in circular foci via arc-line waves, predominantly in a tail-leading orientation. From the uterus, a small fraction of the sperm enters the seminal receptacle (SR) in parallel formations. After sperm storage and coincident with fertilization of the egg, the sperm exit the SR via head-leading helical waves. Consistent with the observed bidirectional movements, the sperm show the ability to propagate both base-to-tip and tip-to-base flagellar waves. Numerous studies have shown that sperm motility is regulated by intraflagellar calcium concentrations; in particular, the Pkd2 calcium channel has been shown to affect sperm storage. Our analyses here suggest that Pkd2 is required for the sperm to adopt the correct waveform and movement orientation during SR entry. A working model for the sperm's SR entry movement is proposed. PMID:21293028

  11. Fluorescence diagnosis of upper respiratory tract infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Kate C.; Inada, Natalia M.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    The pharyngitis and laryngitis are respiratory tract infections highly common. Pharyngitis can be accompanied by fever, especially if caused by a systemic infection. Laryngitis is an inflammation of your voice box (larynx) from irritation or infection. The conventional treatment is the antibiotics administration, which may be responsible by an increase of identification of bacterial strains resistant to drug. This fact associated to high incidence of these infections become important to develop new technologies for diagnosis. This study aims to evaluate the use of widefield fluorescence imaging for the characterization of oropharynx infections, in order to diagnose the bacteria colonization. The imaging system for wide field fluorescence visualization is Evince® (MMOptics, São Carlos, SP, Brazil) coupled to an Apple iPhone® cell phone device. The system consists of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) operating in the violet blue region centered at green-red spectrum 450 nm and optical filters that allow viewing of fluorescence. A tongue depressor was adapted to Evince® for mouth opening. The same images were captured with white light and fluorescence with an optical system. The red fluorescence may be a bacterial marker for physiological monitoring of oropharynx infection processes. The bacterial biofilm on tissue were assigned to the presence of protoporphyrin IX. This work indicates that the autofluorescence of the tissue may be used as a non-invasive technique to aid in the oropharynx infection diagnostic.

  12. Environmentally mediated disorders of the respiratory tract

    SciTech Connect

    Utell, M.J.; Samet, J.M. )

    1990-03-01

    Although much of the evidence in environmental lung disease remains equivocal, some environmental exposures are known to be clinically relevant. Ambient air pollution remains of concern as a source of morbidity, particularly for susceptible populations such as persons with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or cardiac disease and the elderly. The adverse effects of several components of indoor air pollution have been established. Environmental tobacco smoke contributes to lower-respiratory illness in infants; office workers exposed to thermophilic actinomycetes contaminating ventilation systems have developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis; and in the home, components of house dust and fungus spores may provoke asthma via immediate hypersensitivity. The evidence is less compelling for a link between other exposures and disorders of the respiratory tract. For example, formaldehyde may be responsible for provoking vague respiratory symptoms and even nasal cancers; however, the associations are unproved. Likewise, the relation between low-level exposure to asbestos and the development of lung cancer, although a concern, is not conclusively established. The clinician should be aware of practical measures for patients who inquire about air cleaning. Often, relatively simple solutions are effective. A knowledge of sources and exposures as well as an understanding of the principles of inhalation lung injury should prove useful in directing patient care. 33 references.

  13. Pythiosis of the digestive tract in sheep.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Clarice R M; Riet-Correa, Franklin; Pimentel, Luciano A; Garino, Felício; Dantas, Antônio F M; Kommers, Glaucia D; Tabosa, Ivon M; Reis-Júnior, Janildo L

    2012-11-01

    Cutaneous and rhinofacial infections by Pythium insidiosum have previously been reported in sheep in Brazil. In the current study, a new form of pythiosis involving the alimentary tract of 2 nursing lambs from 2 different farms in the semiarid region of Brazil is described. The first lamb showed food regurgitation, lethargy, and anorexia, and died 5 days after the presentation of clinical signs. The second lamb had no history of gastrointestinal disease before death. Necropsy findings were similar in both lambs. The mucosa of the esophagus, reticulum, rumen, omasum, and abomasum showed ulcerated areas covered by yellowish caseous granular exudate. The lesions were transmural and extended to the serosal surfaces, and adhesions were observed between the serosa of the forestomachs and abomasum to the liver and diaphragm. Histologic lesions consisted of pyogranulomatous necrotizing transmural esophagitis, rumenitis, reticulitis, omasitis, and abomasitis with vascular thrombosis and intralesional hyphae. Pythium insidiosum was confirmed as the etiology by immunohistochemistry and culture. The presence of sheep in the vicinity of water ponds during the hot, dry season when forage is not available in the pastures seems to be the main predisposing factor for the occurrence of pythiosis in sheep in the Brazilian semiarid region. PMID:23051827

  14. THE TREATMENT OF URINARY TRACT CALCULI

    PubMed Central

    Leadbetter, Wyland F.

    1958-01-01

    From review of recent information relative to calculus formation in the kidney, the conclusion reached that we do not yet understand, despite much effort, the basic physicochemical mechanisms involved. Since this is so, it has seemed best to the author for the present to rely, in treating patients with renal stones, on simple therapeutic concepts, which, if carefully and conscientiously applied, produce good results. The concepts are the elimination of known causes such as parathyroid adenomas and obstructive lesions, elimination or at least treatment of infections, diminution of urinary components which form the basis of calculi by limiting the oral intake or absorption from the gastrointestinal tract and maintenance of a dilute urine of desired pH. A plan for preoperative study is suggested to allow planned therapy. Indications for operative removal of calculi as well as some points of technique are discussed. It is emphasized that surgical removal of a calculus is but an incident in the care of patients with calculi and that treatment during the postoperative period and followup therapy is most important if success is to be achieved. Reports of cases to illustrate the application of these concepts are presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16 PMID:13523394

  15. Biomarkers in lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Francesco; Stolz, Daiana; Piffer, Federico

    2010-12-01

    This review aims to provide physicians with an overview of the potential of biomarkers to complement existing clinical severity scores and in conjunction with clinical parameters to improve the diagnosis, risk-stratification and management of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). The usefulness of biomarkers for diagnosing LRTIs is still unclear. However, the specificity of pneumonia diagnosis is high when high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) are used. PCT, CRP and particularly pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), pro-vasopressin (CT-proAVP) and proadrenomedullin (proADM) levels can reliably predict LRTIs mortality. These markers do not significantly improve the severity scores predictive values, confirming that biomarkers are meant to complement, rather than supersede, clinician's judgment and validated severity scores. Biomarkers, and particularly PCT, are useful tools as antibiotic treatment duration indicators both in pneumonia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Even if more data are required to fully appreciate the role of biomarkers in LRTIs management, there is emerging evidence that biomarkers have the potential to improve the daily clinical management of LRTIs. PMID:20434579

  16. Urinary tract infection in renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Giessing, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract infection (UTI), especially recurrent UTI, is a common problem, occurring in >75% of kidney transplant (KTX) recipients. UTI degrades the health-related quality of life and can impair graft function, potentially reducing graft and patient survival. As urologists are often involved in treating UTI after KTX, previous reports were searched to elucidate underlying causes, risk factors and treatment options, as well as recommendations for prophylaxis of UTI after KTX. Methods Pubmed/Medline was searched and international guidelines and recommendations for prevention and treatment of UTI after KTX were also assessed. Results Most studies on UTI after KTX have a small sample, and are descriptive and retrospective. Many transplant- and recipient-related risk factors have been identified. While asymptomatic bacteriuria is often treated, even though some studies advise against it, symptomatic UTI should be treated empirically after collecting urine for microbiological analysis, to avoid the development of transplant pyelonephritis with a high chance of urosepsis. The duration of treatment has not been determined in studies and recommendations refer to the treatment of complicated UTI in the non-transplant population. Prophylaxis has not been the focus of studies either. Conclusion UTI after KTX is still largely an under-represented field of study, despite many recipients developing UTI after KTX. Prospective studies on this topic are urgently needed. PMID:26558020

  17. The Corticospinal Tract in Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, O; Squitieri, F; Sanchez-Castaneda, C; Elifani, F; Griguoli, A; Maglione, V; Caltagirone, C; Sabatini, U; Di Paola, M

    2015-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is characterized by progressive motor impairment. Therefore, the connectivity of the corticospinal tract (CST), which is the main white matter (WM) pathway that conducts motor impulses from the primary motor cortex to the spinal cord, merits particular attention. WM abnormalities have already been shown in presymptomatic (Pre-HD) and symptomatic HD subjects using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the present study, we examined CST microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-based tractography in 30-direction DTI data collected from 100 subjects: Pre-HD subjects (n = 25), HD patients (n = 25) and control subjects (n = 50), and T2*-weighted (iron sensitive) imaging. Results show decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased axial (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) in the bilateral CST of HD patients. Pre-HD subjects had elevated iron in the left CST, regionally localized between the brainstem and thalamus. CAG repeat length in conjunction with age, as well as motor (UHDRS) assessment were correlated with CST FA, AD, and RD both in Pre-HD and HD. In the presymptomatic phase, increased iron in the inferior portion supports the "dying back" hypothesis that axonal damage advances in a retrograde fashion. Furthermore, early iron alteration may cause a high level of toxicity, which may contribute to further damage. PMID:24706734

  18. TRP channels in lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Franken, J; Uvin, P; De Ridder, D; Voets, T

    2014-01-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTd) represents a major healthcare problem. Although it is mostly not lethal, associated social disturbance, medical costs, loss of productivity and especially diminished quality of life should not be underestimated. Although more than 15% of people suffer from a form of LUTd to some extent, pathophysiology often remains obscure. In the past 20 years, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have become increasingly important in this field of research. These intriguing ion channels are believed to be the main molecular sensors that generate bladder sensation. Therefore, they are intensely pursued as new drug targets for both curative and symptomatic treatment of different forms of LUTd. TRPV1 was the first of its class to be investigated. Actually, even before this channel was cloned, it had already been targeted in the bladder, with clinical trials of intravesical capsaicin instillations. Several other polymodally gated TRP channels, particularly TRPM8, TRPA1 and TRPV4, also appear to play a prominent role in bladder (patho)physiology. With this review, we provide a brief overview of current knowledge on the role of these TRP channels in LUTd and their potential as molecular targets for treatment. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24895732

  19. "Duck stamp" dollars reserve native prairie tracts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Ducks and wetlands are inseparable in the prairies. Hunters know this, bird watchers know this, wildlife managers know this, and most importantly people who manage the croplands and rangelands know this. The 1,746 tracts of native prairie within these upland-wetland complexes known as Waterfowl Production Areas are not the only lands purchased with "duck stamp" dollars. Considerable acreages have also been purchased in central and southern parts of the United States to provide staging, resting, and wintering areas for waterfowl. Since 1934, when "duck stamps" were first sold, nearly 2.5 million acres of waterfowl habitats have been acquired or taken under easement within the United States with revenue from these sales. By purchasing "duck stamps", more than 2.2 million people provide over $16.5 million in annual revenue. It is certainly gratifying to know that some of the remaining native prairie remnants in the Northern Great Plains are being reserved for the future with "duck stamp" dollars.

  20. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Kimberly A.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI. PMID:27227294

  1. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Kline, Kimberly A; Lewis, Amanda L

    2016-04-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary-tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI. PMID:27227294

  2. Urinary tract infection in women - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    UTI - self-care; Cystitis - self-care; Bladder infection - self-care ... Most urinary tract infections (UTIs) are caused by bacteria that enter the urethra and travel to the bladder. This can lead ...

  3. Late-onset congenital lateral dermal sinus tract.

    PubMed

    Nishimon, Mari; Shimizu, Yusuke; Ueno, Mari; Iwanami, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Cases of laterally located, congenital dermal sinus tracts are extremely rare, with only six having been reported to date. We describe a case of a 14-year-old girl who developed symptoms of this type of sinus tract at an age that was considerably older than is usually reported. At the age of 12 years, the patient exhibited a purulent discharge from a pit on the right buttock. MRI indicated the presence of two tracts running from the right buttock skin to a cystic lesion that had formed on the right ala of the sacral spine. The lesion was surgically resected and successfully reconstructed using a partial iliocostalis lumborum muscle flap, without any functional morbidity. From our experience, such flaps appear to be appropriate treatment choices for lateral congenital dermal sinus tracts that develop late and result in large defects. PMID:25535223

  4. Xenobiotic Transporter Expression along the Male Genital Tract1

    PubMed Central

    Klein, David M.; Wright, Stephen H.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2015-01-01

    The male genital tract plays an important role in protecting sperm by forming a distinct compartment separate from the body which limits exposure to potentially toxic substrates. Transporters along this tract can influence the distribution of xenobiotics into the male genital tract through efflux back into the blood or facilitating the accumulation of toxicants. The aim of this study was to quantitatively determine the constitutive mRNA expression of 30 xenobiotic transporters in caput and cauda regions of the epididymis, vas deferens, prostate, and seminal vesicles from adult Sprague-Dawley rats. The epididymis was found to express at least moderate levels of 18 transporters, vas deferens 15, seminal vesicles 23, and prostate 18. Constitutive expression of these xenobiotic transporters in the male genital tract may provide insight into the xenobiotics that can potentially be transported into these tissues and may provide the molecular mechanism for site specific toxicity of select agents. PMID:24814985

  5. Particle size and pathogenicity in the respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Richard James

    2013-01-01

    Particle size dictates where aerosolized pathogens deposit in the respiratory tract, thereafter the pathogens potential to cause disease is influenced by tissue tropism, clearance kinetics and the host immunological response. This interplay brings pathogens into contact with a range of tissues spanning the respiratory tract and associated anatomical structures. In animal models, differential deposition within the respiratory tract influences infection kinetics for numerous select agents. Greater numbers of pathogens are required to infect the upper (URT) compared with the lower respiratory tract (LRT), and in comparison the URT infections are protracted with reduced mortality. Pathogenesis in the URT is characterized by infection of the URT lymphoid tissues, cervical lymphadenopathy and septicemia, closely resembling reported human infections of the URT. The olfactory, gastrointestinal, and ophthalmic systems are also infected in a pathogen-dependent manner. The relevant literature is reviewed with respect to particle size and infection of the URT in animal models and humans. PMID:24225380

  6. Degradation of blood in the human digestive tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mørup, Steen; Johansen, Claus

    1986-02-01

    Samples of human faeces from patients suffering from intestinal bleeding have been studied by use of Mössbauer spectroscopy. It is shown that it is possible to follow the degradation of blood in the digestive tract.

  7. Genetic and developmental basis for urinary tract obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract obstruction results in obstructive nephropathy and uropathy. It is the most frequent cause of renal failure in infants and children. In the past two decades, studies in transgenic models and humans have greatly enhanced our understanding of the genetic factors and developmental processes important in urinary tract obstruction. The emerging picture is that development of the urinary tract requires precise integration of a variety of progenitor cell populations of different embryonic origins. Such integration is controlled by an intricate signaling network that undergoes dynamic changes as the embryo develops. Most congenital forms of urinary tract obstruction result from the disruption of diverse factors and genetic pathways involved in these processes, especially in the morphogenesis of the urinary conduit or the functional aspects of the pyeloureteral peristaltic machinery. PMID:19085015

  8. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  9. An articulatory silicon vocal tract for speech and hearing prostheses.

    PubMed

    Keng Hoong Wee; Turicchia, L; Sarpeshkar, R

    2011-08-01

    We describe the concept of a bioinspired feedback loop that combines a cochlear processor with an integrated-circuit vocal tract to create what we call a speech-locked loop. We discuss how the speech-locked loop can be applied in hearing prostheses, such as cochlear implants, to help improve speech recognition in noise. We also investigate speech-coding strategies for brain-machine-interface-based speech prostheses and present an articulatory speech-synthesis system by using an integrated-circuit vocal tract that models the human vocal tract. Our articulatory silicon vocal tract makes the transmission of low bit-rate speech-coding parameters feasible over a bandwidth-constrained body sensor network. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first articulatory speech-prosthesis system reported to date. We also present a speech-prosthesis simulator as a means to generate realistic articulatory parameter sequences. PMID:23851948

  10. Nasal Sinus Tract of Odontogenic Origin: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Sagar; Pathak, Anjani Kumar; Purwar, Parth; Dixit, Jaya; Singhal, Divya; Sajjanhar, Isha; Goel, Kopal; Gupta, Vaibhav Sheel

    2015-01-01

    Extraoral sinus tract often poses a diagnostic challenge to the clinician owing to its rare occurrence and absence of symptoms. The accurate diagnosis and comprehensive management are inevitable as the aetiology of such lesions is often masked and requires holistic approach. The present case report encompasses the management of an extraoral discharging sinus tract at the base of the right nostril in a chronic smoker. The lesion which was earlier diagnosed to be of nonodontogenic origin persisted even after erratic treatment modalities. Our investigations showed the aetiology of sinus tract to be odontogenic. Initially, a five-step program as recommended by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality was used for smoking cessation followed by root canal therapy (RCT) and surgical management of the sinus tract. The patient has been under stringent follow-up and no reoccurrence has been noted. PMID:26649208

  11. MECHANISTIC DOSIMETRY MODELS OF NANOMATERIAL DEPOSITION IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate health risk assessments of inhalation exposure to nanomaterials will require dosimetry models that account for interspecies differences in dose delivered to the respiratory tract. Mechanistic models offer the advantage to interspecies extrapolation that physicochemica...

  12. Urinary Tract Infection in Children: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Wm. Lane M.

    1990-01-01

    The history and the physical examination are important and rewarding in the assessment of urinary tract infection in children. Urinary tract infection is usually an ascending infection; periurethral colonization is fundamental to its pathogenesis. It is important to treat predisposing factors, such as poor personal hygiene, diarrhea, and diaper rash. Parents should be specifically instructed on the proper procedures for introital and foreskin cleansing. To minimize the risk of urinary tract infection, children should be encouraged to void frequently and instructed not to hold their urine. Antibiotics should be chosen after taking into account the susceptibilities of the common bacterial pathogens and antibiotics received by the child. Consideration of the symptoms and signs of urinary tract infection is important to develop an appropriate treatment plan. PMID:21233931

  13. Iatrogenic Urinary Tract Injuries: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Esparaz, Anthony M.; Pearl, Jeffrey A.; Herts, Brian R.; LeBlanc, Justin; Kapoor, Baljendra

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic injury to the urinary tract, including the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra, is a potential complication of surgical procedures performed in or around the retroperitoneal abdominal space or pelvis. While both diagnostic and interventional radiologists often play a central and decisive role in the identification and initial management of a variety of iatrogenic injuries, discussions of these injuries are often directed toward specialists such as urologists, obstetricians, gynecologists, and general surgeons whose procedures are most often implicated in iatrogenic urinary tract injuries. Interventional radiologic procedures can also be a source of an iatrogenic urinary tract injury. This review describes the clinical presentation, risk factors, imaging findings, and management of iatrogenic renal vascular and urinary tract injuries, as well as the radiologist's role in the diagnosis, treatment, and cause of these injuries. PMID:26038626

  14. [Urodynamic parameters of fetal lower urinary tract in physiological pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Chekhonatskaia, M L; Glybochko, P V; Demidov, V N

    2005-01-01

    The study of urodynamic parameters in 76 fetuses in physiological course of pregnancy at gestation term from 20 to 40 weeks has shown that urodynamics of the lower urinary tract in the prenatal period directly correlate with embryon and fetus formation. Urodynamic indices of fetal lower urinary tract have 13 significant correlations out of possible 43, indicating distinct interactions of various organs and strictures of fetal urinary system. The analysis of the structure of correlations between different urodynamic indices of the lower urinary tract of the fetus demonstrates that they vary greatly in pregnancy trimester II and remain constant in trimester III. Thus, interrelations between basic urodynamic parameters of the lower urinary tract get established to the end of trimester II. PMID:16097713

  15. Comparative Screening of Digestion Tract Toxic Genes in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaolu; Lin, Yiman; Qiu, Yaqun; Li, Yinghui; Jiang, Min; Chen, Qiongcheng; Jiang, Yixiang; Yuan, Jianhui; Cao, Hong; Hu, Qinghua; Huang, Shenghe

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common urinary tract pathogen, and may induce various inflammation symptoms. Its notorious ability to resist multiple antibiotics and to form urinary tract stones makes its treatment a long and painful process, which is further challenged by the frequent horizontal gene transferring events in P. mirabilis genomes. Three strains of P. mirabilis C02011/C04010/C04013 were isolated from a local outbreak of a food poisoning event in Shenzhen, China. Our hypothesis is that new genes may have been acquired horizontally to exert the digestion tract infection and toxicity. The functional characterization of these three genomes shows that each of them independently acquired dozens of virulent genes horizontally from the other microbial genomes. The representative strain C02011 induces the symptoms of both vomit and diarrhea, and has recently acquired a complete type IV secretion system and digestion tract toxic genes from the other bacteria. PMID:27010388

  16. Mechanism, diagnosis, and treatment of outflow tract tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Bruce B

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmia is a generic term for a spectrum of arrhythmias that occur in the absence of structural heart disease or ion channelopathy. These arrhythmias include monomorphic premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), nonsustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT), and sustained VT. Most idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias originate from the right and left ventricular outflow tracts and include sites accessed from the aortic sinuses of Valsalva. Outflow tract arrhythmia is identified by an electrocardiographic pattern consistent with a left bundle branch block inferior axis morphology. Characteristically, outflow tract VT is caused by cAMP-mediated triggered activity, and is terminated by administration of adenosine. Outflow tract arrhythmias are focal and, therefore, are readily amenable to definitive treatment with catheter-based radiofrequency ablation. Although arrhythmia might be associated with reversible PVC-mediated cardiomyopathy, and infrequently with PVC-induced polymorphic VT or ventricular fibrillation, prognosis is generally favourable. PMID:26283265

  17. Structure-specific statistical mapping of white matter tracts.

    PubMed

    Yushkevich, Paul A; Zhang, Hui; Simon, Tony J; Gee, James C

    2008-06-01

    We present a new model-based framework for the statistical analysis of diffusion imaging data associated with specific white matter tracts. The framework takes advantage of the fact that several of the major white matter tracts are thin sheet-like structures that can be effectively modeled by medial representations. The approach involves segmenting major tracts and fitting them with deformable geometric medial models. The medial representation makes it possible to average and combine tensor-based features along directions locally perpendicular to the tracts, thus reducing data dimensionality and accounting for errors in normalization. The framework enables the analysis of individual white matter structures, and provides a range of possibilities for computing statistics and visualizing differences between cohorts. The framework is demonstrated in a study of white matter differences in pediatric chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:18407524

  18. PERIVASCULAR EPITHELIOID TUMOURS (PEComas) OF THE GYNAECOLOGICAL TRACT

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Niamh; Soslow, Robert A.; Murali, Rajmohan

    2016-01-01

    Perivascular epithelioid tumour (PEComas) of the gynaecological tract are rare tumours which were first recognised and diagnosed within the last twenty years. They represent a unique diagnostic challenge with regard to their accurate and reproducible distinction from more common entities such as smooth muscle tumours of the uterine corpus. In this review article we trace the development of the concept of the PEComa tumour family, highlight what is known about extra-gynaecological tract PEComa at an immunohistochemical, molecular and therapeutic level and then present a summary of all reported cases of gynaecological tract PEComa to date. In the summary, we highlight rare subtypes of gynaecological tract PEComa, and compare the performances of extant prognostic classification systems for malignancy in these tumours. PMID:25750268

  19. Structure-Specific Statistical Mapping of White Matter Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Yushkevich, Paul A.; Zhang, Hui; Simon, Tony; Gee, James C.

    2008-01-01

    We present a new model-based framework for the statistical analysis of diffusion imaging data associated with specific white matter tracts. The framework takes advantage of the fact that several of the major white matter tracts are thin sheet-like structures that can be effectively modeled by medial representations. The approach involves segmenting major tracts and fitting them with deformable geometric medial models. The medial representation makes it possible to average and combine tensor-based features along directions locally perpendicular to the tracts, thus reducing data dimensionality and accounting for errors in normalization. The framework enables the analysis of individual white matter structures, and provides a range of possibilities for computing statistics and visualizing differences between cohorts. The framework is demonstrated in a study of white matter differences in pediatric chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:18407524

  20. [Febrile urinary tract infection in infants: diagnostic strategy].

    PubMed

    Dubos, F; Raymond, J

    2012-11-01

    The diagnosis of febrile urinary tract infection in young children is difficult. Its prevalence is about 7.5 % but varies from 2 to 20 % according to the sex and age of the child. Except fever higher than 39°C for at least 48 h, no other anamnestic signs or from the clinical examination change significantly the probability of having a urinary tract infection or not. The most appropriate method of urine collection should be proposed to children clinically suspected of urinary tract infection, to avoid contamination and allow a proper diagnosis. Rapid tests (such as dipstick tests and microscopy) are useful to improve the likelihood of the diagnosis. This review focuses on the usefulness of anamnestic signs and clinical data, the way to collect urine and the performance of rapid diagnostic tests to increase or decrease the likelihood of acute urinary tract infection in children less than two years of age. PMID:23178130

  1. [Urinary tract carcinomas in gas industry employees (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Manz, A

    1976-01-16

    Arising from a retrospective investigation of the causes of death in active and pensioned employees from the author's sphere of observation, the increased occurence of urinary tract carcinoma in furnace battery and pipe system workers in the gas industry is pointed out. Statistical studies suggest a causal connection between exposure to tar in these jobs and the urinary tract carcinomas. The necessity for industrial medical precautions is commented on. PMID:814428

  2. Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Female Reproductive Tract: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Yi Kyeong

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the female reproductive tract are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that display various histologic findings and biologic behaviors. In this review, the classification and clinicopathologic characteristics of neuroendocrine tumors of the female reproductive tract are described. Differential diagnoses are discussed, especially for non-neuroendocrine tumors showing high-grade nuclei with neuroendocrine differentiation. This review also discusses recent advances in our pathogenetic understanding of these disorders. PMID:26459408

  3. Salmonella-related urinary tract infection in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Klosterman, Scott Anthony

    2014-01-01

    An elderly female patient with an uncomplicated urinary tract infection from Salmonella newport is presented. Radiological and laboratory studies were performed because of her systemic and exposure risk factors as well as prior urinary tract abnormalities. While this patient was successfully treated as an outpatient with oral antibiotics, complications and recurrence are common and deserve close follow-up with repeat urine cultures at a minimum. Further laboratory and radiological testing should be guided by patient gender, risk factors and recurrence. PMID:25193813

  4. The effect of tamoxifen on the genital tract

    PubMed Central

    Ascher, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Tamoxifen is a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) that is widely used in the treatment of patients with breast cancer and for chemoprophylaxis in high risk women. Tamoxifen results in a spectrum of abnormalities involving the genital tract, the most significant being an increased incidence of endometrial cancer and uterine sarcoma. This article reviews the effects of tamoxifen on the genital tract and the strengths and weaknesses of various imaging modalities for evaluating the endometrium. PMID:18603495

  5. Automated Tract Extraction via Atlas Based Adaptive Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Tunç, Birkan; Parker, William A.; Ingalhalikar, Madhura; Verma, Ragini

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in imaging protocols such as the high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (HARDI) and in tractography techniques are expected to cause an increase in the tract-based analyses. Statistical analyses over white matter tracts can contribute greatly towards understanding structural mechanisms of the brain since tracts are representative of the connectivity pathways. The main challenge with tract-based studies is the extraction of the tracts of interest in a consistent and comparable manner over a large group of individuals without drawing the inclusion and exclusion regions of interest. In this work, we design a framework for automated extraction of white matter tracts. The framework introduces three main components, namely a connectivity based fiber representation, a fiber clustering atlas, and a clustering approach called Adaptive Clustering. The fiber representation relies on the connectivity signatures of fibers to establish an easy correspondence between different subjects. A group-wise clustering of these fibers that are represented by the connectivity signatures is then used to generate a fiber bundle atlas. Finally, Adaptive Clustering incorporates the previously generated clustering atlas as a prior, to cluster the fibers of a new subject automatically. Experiments on the HARDI scans of healthy individuals acquired repeatedly, demonstrate the applicability, the reliability and the repeatability of our approach in extracting white matter tracts. By alleviating the seed region selection or the inclusion/exclusion ROI drawing requirements that are usually handled by trained radiologists, the proposed framework expands the range of possible clinical applications and establishes the ability to perform tract-based analyses with large samples. PMID:25134977

  6. Multidrug resistance in pediatric urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Dickson, Eric; Karlowsky, James; Doern, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent a common infection in the pediatric population. Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen in children, and antimicrobial resistance in this species complicates the treatment of pediatric UTIs. Despite the impact of resistance on empiric antibiotic choice, there is little data on multidrug resistance in pediatric patients. In this paper, we describe characteristics of multidrug-resistant E. coli in pediatric patients using a large national database of uropathogens antimicrobial sensitivities. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to commonly prescribed antibiotics were performed on uropathogens isolated from children presenting to participating hospitals between 1999 and 2001. Data were analyzed separately for four pediatric age groups. Single and multidrug resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) were performed on all specimens. There were a total of 11,341 E. coli urine cultures from 343 infants (0-4 weeks), 1,801 toddlers (5 weeks-24 months), 6,742 preteens (2-12 years), and 2,455 teens (13-17 years). E. coli resistance to ampicillin peaked in toddlers (52.8%) but was high in preteens (52.1%), infants (50.4%), and teens (40.6%). Resistance to two or more antibiotics varied across age groups, with toddlers (27%) leading preteens (23.1%), infants (21%), and teens (15.9%). Resistance to three or more antibiotics was low in all age groups (range 3.1-5.2%). The most common co-resistance in all age groups was ampicillin/TMP-SMZ. In conclusion, less than half of all pediatric UTIs are susceptible to all commonly used antibiotics. In some age groups, there is a significant percentage of co-resistance between the two most commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin and TMP-SMZ). PMID:16922629

  7. Role of scintigraphy in urinary tract infection

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J.J.

    1988-10-01

    There is controversy regarding the role of radiological imaging for urinary tract infection (UTI). The gold standard has been the intravenous pyelogram (IVP). Yet, the IVP has a very limited value with only about 25% of children with pyelonephritis demonstrating abnormalities. Ultrasound (US) has recently been advocated as a replacement for the poorly sensitive and poorly specific IVP. However, comparative studies between US and IVP indicate only an equivalent sensitivity and specificity. Cortical scintigraphy with Technetium-99m glucoheptonate (99mTc GH) or 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc DMSA) has also been advocated as a means of differentiating parenchymal (pyelonephritis) from nonparenchymal (lower UTI) involvement in UTI. The clinical presentation may be misleading especially in the infant and child in whom an elevated temperature, flank pain, shaking chills, or an elevated sedimentation rate are often lacking. The clinician attempts to localize the site of infection for it has a direct bearing upon the therapy. A collecting system infection can often be eradicated with a single oral dose of an appropriate antibiotic, whereas renal parenchymal involvement requires IV therapy for an extended interval. Cortical scintigraphy can localize the site of infection with a high degree of accuracy. Recent studies report a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 81% of pyelonephritis. This is in contrast to the IVP with a sensitivity of only 24% and US with a sensitivity of only 42%. The scintigraphic appearance of parenchymal infection of the kidney is a spectrum of minimal to gross defects reflecting the degree of histologic involvement that spans from a mild infection to frank abscess. Cortical scintigraphy can be used to monitor the evolution of scarring following infection. Cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc DMSA or 99mTc GH is the method of choice for the initial evaluation of UTI. 37 references.

  8. Interleukin 8 and the male genital tract.

    PubMed

    Lotti, Francesco; Maggi, Mario

    2013-11-01

    Interleukin 8 (IL-8) is a pro-inflammatory CXC chemokine involved in inflammatory reactions. IL-8 exerts its function in concert with other cytokines and chemokines causing chemoattraction of leukocytes to the inflammatory sites, recruitment and activation of neutrophils to phagocytosis and bacterial clearance. Furthermore, IL-8 is characterized by chemoattractant activity on basophils and T cells, and by a potent pro-angiogenic action. IL-8 is crucially involved in several inflammatory diseases. In particular, it has been suggested that IL8 might play a key role in male genital tract (MGT) infection/inflammation. In fact, IL-8 seems crucially involved in benign prostatic hyperplasia-related inflammation. In addition, among different cytokines and chemokines, seminal plasma IL-8 (sIL-8) appears to be the most reliable and predictive surrogate marker of prostatitis. Furthermore, evidence is emerging on sIL-8 involvement in inflammation not only of the prostate, but also of other organs of the MGT, in particular seminal vesicles and epididymis, but not the testis, and in male accessory gland infection (MAGI). Accordingly, an association between sIL-8 levels and color-Doppler ultrasound characteristics of the MGT suggestive of inflammation has been recently reported. sIL-8 is strongly related to leukocytospermia, and although the relationship between sIL-8 levels and sperm parameters has not been completely clarified, a tight inverse correlation with ejaculate volume has been demonstrated, suggesting an association with distal MGT sub-obstruction, corroborated by the correlation with ejaculatory duct and seminal vesicle abnormalities. Finally, recent studies have focused on the role of IL-8 in cancer biology, in particular in prostate cancer, thus increasing the interest in this pro-inflammatory chemokine. PMID:23611586

  9. Update on hidradenitis suppurativa: connecting the tracts

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Liza; Williams, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a debilitating skin disease characterized by recurrent abscesses, sinus tract formation, and scarring. Prevalence estimates range from 0.053% to 4.1%, although HS is likely an underdiagnosed disease. Although the first reports of HS date back to the mid-19th century, the disease continues to plague patients and physicians desperate for a definitive treatment. Advances in the understanding of the disease process include the possibility of a defective basement membrane at the sebofollicular junction of the folliculopilosebaceous unit (FPSU; that is, where the sebaceous gland empties into the hair follicle) as an initiating event followed by secondary bacterial colonization. New evidence suggests that bacteria living in a community, known as a biofilm, rather than single planktonic bacteria in HS lesions may explain why HS can be resistant to current antibiotic treatment regimens. Available treatment options have expanded to include triple-antibiotic therapy, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) inhibitors (biologics), laser therapy, and surgical excision, including the skin tissue-sparing excision with electrosurgical peeling procedure. Despite the array of treatments available, many patients continue to struggle with the embarrassment, pain, odor, and frustration that accompany this often isolating disease. Physicians should address comorbidities in HS, including the psychosocial issues patients with HS frequently encounter. Patients can be directed to HS support groups, where they can openly discuss their frustrations, share their experiences in dealing with HS, and band together to advocate for themselves. HS is misunderstood by both patients and physicians, often resulting in a delay in clinical presentation and diagnosis. Patients and physicians across multiple specialties must work together to expand awareness of and interest in HS, so that one day, individuals with HS can be freed from this crippling disease

  10. The human urine virome in association with urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Ly, Melissa; Bonilla, Natasha; Pride, David T.

    2014-01-01

    While once believed to represent a sterile environment, the human urinary tract harbors a unique cellular microbiota. We sought to determine whether the human urinary tract also is home to viral communities whose membership might reflect urinary tract health status. We recruited and sampled urine from 20 subjects, 10 subjects with urinary tract infections (UTIs) and 10 without UTIs, and found viral communities in the urine of each subject group. Most of the identifiable viruses were bacteriophage, but eukaryotic viruses also were identified in all subjects. We found reads from human papillomaviruses (HPVs) in 95% of the subjects studied, but none were found to be high-risk genotypes that are associated with cervical and rectal cancers. We verified the presence of some HPV genotypes by quantitative PCR. Some of the HPV genotypes identified were homologous to relatively novel and uncharacterized viruses that previously have been detected on skin in association with cancerous lesions, while others may be associated with anal and genital warts. On a community level, there was no association between the membership or diversity of viral communities based on urinary tract health status. While more data are still needed, detection of HPVs as members of the human urinary virome using viral metagenomics represents a non-invasive technique that could augment current screening techniques to detect low-risk HPVs in the genitourinary tracts of humans. PMID:25667584

  11. Imaging of malignancies of the biliary tract- an update

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Malignancies of the biliary tract include cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancers and carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. Biliary tract adenocarcinomas are the second most common primary hepatobiliary cancer. Due to their slow growing nature, non-specific and late symptomatology, these malignancies are often diagnosed in advanced stages with poor prognosis. Apart from incidental discovery of gall bladder carcinoma upon cholecystectomy, early stage biliary tract cancers are now detected with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Accurate characterization and staging of these indolent cancers will determine outcome as majority of the patients’ are inoperable at the time of presentation. Ultrasound is useful for initial evaluation of the biliary tract and gallbladder masses and in determining the next suitable modality for further evaluation. Multimodality imaging plays an integral role in the management of the biliary tract malignancies. The imaging techniques most useful are MRI with MRCP, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and positron emission tomography (PET). In this review we will discuss epidemiology and the role of imaging in detection, characterization and management of the biliary tract malignancies under the three broad categories of cholangiocarcinomas (intra- and extrahepatic), gallbladder cancers and ampullary carcinomas. PMID:25608662

  12. Group D Salmonella Urinary Tract Infection in an Immunocompetent Male

    PubMed Central

    Jehangir, Asad; Poudel, Dilli; Fareedy, Shoaib Bilal; Salman, Ahmed; Qureshi, Anam; Jehangir, Qasim

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old male with past medical history of benign prostatic hyperplasia presented to the emergency department with complaints of decreased urinary flow, inability to fully empty his bladder, and gross hematuria. Physical examination was unremarkable. Urinalysis revealed large amount of blood and more than 700 white blood cells suggesting a urinary tract infection. Urine culture grew group D Salmonella greater than 100,000 colony-forming units per mL. He was prescribed 6 weeks of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and had resolution of symptoms. Retrospectively, he reported a 3-day history of watery diarrhea about a week prior to onset of urinary symptoms that was presumed to be the hematogenous source in this case. Urinary tract infection from nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) is rare and is usually associated with immunosuppression, chronic diseases, such as diabetes or structural abnormalities of the genitourinary tract. Genitourinary tract abnormalities previously reported in the literature that predispose to nontyphoidal Salmonella urinary tract infection include nephrolithiasis, chronic pyelonephritis, retrovesicular fistula, urethrorectal fistula, hydrocele, and post-TURP. We present an exceedingly uncommon case of 62-year-old male with group D Salmonella urinary tract infection predisposed by his history of benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:25984372

  13. Manifestations of immune tolerance in the human female reproductive tract

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Gary F.; Schust, Danny J.

    2012-01-01

    Like other mucosal surfaces (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract, the respiratory tract), the human female reproductive tract acts as an initial barrier to foreign antigens. In this role, the epithelial surface and subepithelial immune cells must balance protection against pathogenic insults against harmful inflammatory reactions and acceptance of particular foreign antigens. Two common examples of these acceptable foreign antigens are the fetal allograft and human semen/sperm. Both are purposely deposited into the female genital tract and appropriate immunologic response to these non-self antigens is essential to the survival of the species. In light of the weight of this task, it is not surprising that multiple, redundant and overlapping mechanisms are involved. For instance, cells at the immunologic interface between self (female reproductive tract epithelium) and non-self (placental trophoblast cells or human sperm) express glycosylation patterns that mimic those on many metastatic cancer cells and successful pathogens. The cytokine/chemokine milieu at this interface is altered through endocrine and immunologic mechanisms to favor tolerance of non-self. The “foreign” cells themselves also play an integral role in their own immunologic acceptance, since sperm and placental trophoblast cells are unusual and unique in their antigen presenting molecule expression patterns. Here, we will discuss these and other mechanisms that allow the human female reproductive tract to perform this delicate and indispensible balancing act. PMID:23407606

  14. Evolution of the red nucleus and rubrospinal tract.

    PubMed

    ten Donkelaar, H J

    1988-01-01

    A red nucleus, defined by its relative position in the tegmentum mesencephali, its contralateral rubrospinal or rubrobulbar projections and by crossed cerebellar afferents, is found in terrestrial vertebrates and certain rays. A crossed rubrospinal tract occurs in anurans, limbed urodeles and reptiles, birds and mammals, but is apparently absent in boid snakes, caecilians and sharks. A distinct rubrospinal tract is found in certain rays which use their enlarged pectoral fins for locomotion. A crossed tegmentospinal tract, possibly a rubrospinal tract, is found in lungfishes. Although evidence was presented for a rubrospinal tract in more advanced snakes, the available experimental data in lower vertebrates suggest that the presence of a rubrospinal tract is related to the presence of limbs or limb-like structures. In the connectivity of the red nucleus in terrestrial vertebrates, 'levels' of complexity can be distinguished, paralleled by the development of the cerebellum. These 'grades of organization' are probably related to the type of motor performance the particular terrestrial vertebrates are capable of. PMID:3289562

  15. Regional respiratory tract absorption of inhaled reactive gases

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, F.J.; Overton, J.H.; Kimbell, J.S.; Russell, M.L.

    1992-06-29

    Highly reactive gases present unique problems due to the number of factors which must be taken into account to determine regional respiratory tract uptake. The authors reviewed some of the physical, chemical, and biological factors that affect dose and that must be understood to interpret toxicological data, to evaluate experimental dosimetry studies, and to develop dosimetry models. Selected dosimetry experiments involving laboratory animals and humans were discussed, showing the variability and uptake according to animal species and respiratory tract region for various reactive gases. New experimental dosimetry approaches, such as those involving isotope ratio mass spectroscopy and cyclotron generation reactive gases, were discussed that offer great promise for improving the ability to study regional respiratory tract absorption of reactive gases. Various dosimetry modeling applications were discussed which demonstrate: the importance of airflow patterns for site-specific dosimetry in the upper respiratory tract, the influence of the anatomical model used to make inter- and intraspecies dosimetric comparisons, the influence of tracheobronchial path length on predicted dose curves, and the implications of ventilatory unit structure and volume on dosimetry and response. Collectively, these examples illustrate important aspects of regional respiratory tract absorption of inhaled reactive gases. Given the complex nature of extent and pattern of injury in the respiratory tract from exposure to reactive gases, understanding interspecies differences in the absorption of reactive gases will continue to be an important area for study.

  16. Spectrum of Renal and Urinary Tract Diseases in Kashmiri Children

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Virender; Bano, Rifat Ara; Wani, Khursheed Ahmed; Ahmed, Javed; Ahmed, Kaisar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Definite paucity of data pertaining to spectrum of renal and urinary tract diseases in our state and in various parts of India forms the basis of this study. Available data has emphasized more on specific clinical syndromes and chronic renal diseases rather than over all spectrums of renal and urinary tract diseases, that too in adult population. Aim The present study a retrospective analysis, forms one of the basic data of paediatric nephrology and urology related disorders in our state. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of the case records of all the hospitalized patients with renal and urinary tract diseases between 2012 and 2013 were performed. Case records were analysed and categorized into various groups like; Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), Acute Kidney Injury (AKI), Acute Glomerulonephritis (AGN), Nephrotic Syndrome (NS), haematuria, Polycystic Kidney Disease (PCKD), Posterior Urethral Valve (PUV), Vesicoureteric Reflux (VUR), Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Iract (CAKUT) and others. These groups were divided into subgroups to get more insight about the pattern of these diseases. Results Out of 28114 patients hospitalized between 2012 and 2013 years, 447 (232 males and 215 females) patients were diagnosed of renal and urinary tract diseases which forms 1.58% the total admitted patients. Among these patients 32.9% (147/447) were diagnosed Acute Kidney Injury (AKI); 24.1% (108/447): Urinary Tract Infection (UTI); 9.6% (43/447): Acute Glomerulonephritis (AGN); 5.6% (25/447): bilateral hydronephrosis with UTI; 4.47% (20/447): nephrotic syndrome (NS); 3.5% (16/447): haematuria; and 4% (18/447) were having CAKUT (Congenital Anomalies Of Kidney And Urinary Tract). In addition to this there were 17 cases of Renal Tubular Acidosis (RTA), 3 cases of Barter syndrome and one case of Liddle syndrome. Conclusion A substantial number of children are hospitalized with renal and urinary tract diseases with

  17. Urinary Tract Infections in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Lona; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) in older women are commonly encountered in outpatient practice. OBJECTIVE To review management of asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic UTI and review prevention of recurrent UTIs in older community-dwelling women. EVIDENCE REVIEW A search of Ovid (Medline, PsycINFO, Embase) for English-language human studies conducted among adults aged 65 years and older and published in peer-reviewed journals from 1946 to November 20, 2013. RESULTS The clinical spectrum of UTIs ranges from asymptomatic bacteriuria, to symptomatic and recurrent UTIs, to sepsis associated with UTI requiring hospitalization. Recent evidence helps differentiate asymptomatic bacteriuria from symptomatic UTI. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is transient in older women, often resolves without any treatment, and is not associated with morbidity or mortality. The diagnosis of symptomatic UTI is made when a patient has both clinical features and laboratory evidence of a urinary infection. Absent other causes, patients presenting with any 2 of the following meet the clinical diagnostic criteria for symptomatic UTI: fever, worsened urinary urgency or frequency, acute dysuria, suprapubic tenderness, or costovertebral angle pain or tenderness. A positive urine culture (≥105 CFU/mL) with no more than 2 uropathogens and pyuria confirms the diagnosis of UTI. Risk factors for recurrent symptomatic UTI include diabetes, functional disability, recent sexual intercourse, prior history of urogynecologic surgery, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence. Testing for UTI is easily performed in the clinic using dipstick tests. When there is a low pretest probability of UTI, a negative dipstick result for leukocyte esterase and nitrites excludes infection. Antibiotics are selected by identifying the uropathogen, knowing local resistance rates, and considering adverse effect profiles. Chronic suppressive antibiotics for 6 to 12 months and

  18. [Endoscopic ultrasonography of the upper digestive tract].

    PubMed

    Mesihović, Rusmir; Vanis, Nenad; Tanović, Haris; Gornjaković, Srdan; Smajlović, Fahrudin; Borovac, Nada

    2003-01-01

    Endoscopic Ultrasonography, or EUS, has joined medical techniques of endoscopy with high frequency ultrasound technique, known as ultrasound. This removable achievement allows physician for microscopic tissue examination, not only in digestive system, but also in its surroundings by highly frequent technique. Endoscopic ultrasonography detects all kinds and nature of possible abnormalities, including and information, which are necessary for proper diagnosis and optimal treatment. In experience hands, EUS can detect abnormalities, which are undetectable during any other techniques of examination. EUS is applied from inside the body, near or even touching the examined surface, so the precise, highly frequent energy of showing the images can be used. The sonography, MRI, CT techniques must show the inner organs through outside surface of body, loosing the resolution during process. The superior resolution of EUS shows 5 layers of digestive tract, almost equally good as by microscope; none of other techniques allows showing of intestinal wall equally good as this one. By EUS liquid has been proved with 90% of precision in diagnosis of operative degrees of pancreas tumours. CT in this case has shows only 50% of precision. Highly skilled surgeons are aware of application of these diagnostics techniques in preoperative cases so the surgical removement of tumours is going to be more effective. The precision of EUS findings are of critical importance for the utilisation of maximum of new treatment having in mind that abnormalities could be diagnosed and characterised without operative intervention. To be able to focus on specific anatomic surfaces, there is need of great knowledge, skillfulness and praxis during the manipulation with EUS instrument. The years of experience are needed to be able to achieve high standard of expertise. The accuracy of results varies, depending on physicians diagnostic experience, sub-optimal results are not going to be a good guide during

  19. Specific pharmacokinetic aspects of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Korstanje, Cees; Krauwinkel, Walter

    2011-01-01

    This chapter reviews the evidence for "specific" pharmacokinetics playing a role in currently marketed drugs intended to treat lower urinary tract (LUT) symptoms. Principles of drug targeting include intrinsic properties of drugs or organs as well as drug formulations to modify drug release or to create confinement of drug presence. Prodrugs and specific formulations to deliver high drug concentrations at the site(s) of action as well as other ways to manipulate drug distribution to achieve enrichment in target tissues are considered. In overactive bladder (OAB), specific formulations for oxybutynin have been introduced to reduce the level of side effects of the active drug. Extended release tablet formulations and a topical gel formulation have been introduced, with efficacy similar to immediate release (IR) tablets, but with a reduction in anticholinergic adverse effects. However, these modifications have not led to outstanding performance parameters compared to other anticholinergic drugs marketed as IR formulations. Urinary excretion is discussed as potential mechanism for targeting LUT symptoms, but no strong indications appear to exist that this mechanism would contribute for currently available drugs. Intravesical administration of drugs is not a preferred option and only considered for drugs like botulinum toxin, where the inconvenient application compensates for a reasonable degree of long-term efficacy in severe refractory OAB. Alpha acid glycoprotein binding is discussed as a potential factor to influence drug tissue distribution, and it is concluded that there is reasonable evidence that for tamsulosin this mechanism is responsible for the difference in free fraction of the drug observed in plasma and prostate, which could contribute to its relative absence of blood pressure effects in patients with LUT symptoms related to benign prostate hyperplasia (LUTS-BPH). The principle of irreversible inhibition of type II 5α-reductase as a tool to develop drugs

  20. Studies of retinal representations within the cat's optic tract

    SciTech Connect

    Torrealba, F.; Guillery, R.W.; Eysel, U.; Polley, E.H.; Mason, C.A.

    1982-11-10

    The manner in which each retina can be mapped onto a single cross section of the optic tract of the cat has been defined by neuroanatomical methods. It has been found that the contralateral nasal hemi-retina and both temporal hemi-retinae are represented in each tract by multiple, rough maps which partially overlap one another. All maps show the same general orientation, with area centralis represented dorsomedially, lower retina represented dorsolaterally, and upper retina represented ventromedially. The peripheral part of the horizontal meridian is represented ventrolaterally. Labeling all of the fibers from one eye by axonal degeneration or autoradiographic methods shows that the crossed map is displaced dorsally and medially relative to the uncrossed map, leaving a dorsomedial crescent of pure crossed fibers. Localized retinal lesions or injections of /sup 3/H-amino acid show the general orientation of the maps. Lesions within the dorsomedial pure crossed crescent show that fibers in this crescent arise from retinal areas close to the optic disc, near the site of the early fetal fissure. Localized injections of horseradish peroxidase into the optic tract show the relationships of the several maps in terms of the retinal distribution of retrogradely labeled retinal ganglion cells. They show that axons of large and small cells map ventrolaterally in the tract while intermediate sizes map dorsomedially. They confirm that the crossed map is displaced relative to the uncrossed maps. It is suggested that the optic tract develops by fibers taking a position in the tract in accordance with their time of arrival at the chiasm. The several maps are displaced because they develop sequentially and the optic tract can be read as a developmental record, the most dorsomedial axons being the oldest.

  1. Solution structure of an A-tract DNA bend.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, D; Herbert, K; Zhang, X; Pologruto, T; Lu, P; Polgruto, T

    2001-03-01

    The solution structure of a DNA dodecamer d(GGCAAAAAACGG)/d(CCGTTTTTTGCC) containing an A-tract has been determined by NMR spectroscopy with residual dipolar couplings. The structure shows an overall helix axis bend of 19 degrees in a geometry consistent with solution and gel electrophoresis experiments. Fourteen degrees of the bending occurs in the GC regions flanking the A-tract. The remaining 5 degrees is spread evenly over its six AT base-pairs. The A-tract is characterized by decreasing minor groove width from the 5' to the 3' direction along the A strand. This is a result of propeller twist in the AT pairs and the increasing negative inclination of the adenine bases at the 3' side of the run of adenine bases. The four central thymine bases all have negative inclination throughout the A-tract with an average value of -6.1 degrees. Although this negative inclination makes the geometry of the A-tract different from all X-ray structures, the proton on N6 of adenine and the O4 of thymine one step down the helix are within distance to form bifurcated hydrogen bonds. The 5' bend of 4 degrees occurs at the junction between the GC flank and the A-tract through a combination of tilt and roll. The larger 3' bend, 10 degrees, occurs in two base steps: the first composed of tilt, -4.1 degrees, and the second a combination of tilt, -4.2 degrees, and roll, 6.0 degrees. This second step is a direct consequence of the change in inclination between an adjacent cytosine base, which has an inclination of -12 degrees, and the next base, a guanine, which has 3 degrees inclination. This bend is a combination of tilt and roll. The large change in inclination allows the formation of a hydrogen bond between the protons of N4 of the 3' cytosine and the O6 of the next 3' base, a guanine, stabilizing the roll component in the bend. These structural features differ from existing models for A-tract bends.For comparison, we also determined the structure of the control sequence, d

  2. Structural constraints regulating triple helix formation by A-tracts.

    PubMed

    Sen, A; Gräslund, A

    2000-12-15

    The study concerns the propensity of triple helix formation by different DNA oligonucleotides containing long A-tracts with and without flanking GxC base pairs in order to probe the role of length of the A-tract and the flanking sequences. From nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of imino proton spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of samples composed of potential triplex forming strand sequences in correct stoichiometries, we have concluded that 8-mer A-tracts flanked by GxC base pairs exert significant steric hindrance to triple helix formation. When as much as 50 mM Mg2+ was added, no triple helix formation was observed in these samples. In contrast, open-ended 8-mer A-tracts formed triplex with the corresponding two T8 strands under relatively mild ionic conditions (100 mM Na+). Moreover, the shorter the length of the A-tract, the less is the hindrance to form a triple helix. PMID:11152277

  3. Models of Inflammation of the Lower Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Bjorling, Dale E.; Wang, Zun-Yi; Bushman, Wade

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation of the lower urinary tract occurs frequently in people. The causes remain obscure, with the exception of urinary tract infection. Animal models have proven useful for investigating and assessing mechanisms underlying symptoms associated with lower urinary tract inflammation and options for suppressing these symptoms. This review will discuss various animal models of lower urinary tract inflammation, including feline spontaneous (interstitial) cystitis, neurogenic cystitis, autoimmune cystitis, cystitis induced by intravesical instillation of chemicals or bacterial products (particularly lipopolysaccharide or LPS), and prostatic inflammation initiated by transurethral instillation of bacteria. Animal models will continue to be of significant value in identifying mechanisms resulting in bladder inflammation, but the relevance of some of these models to the causes underlying clinical disease is unclear. This is primarily because of the lack of understanding of causes of these disorders in people. Comparative and translational studies are required if the full potential of findings obtained with animal models to improve prevention and treatment of lower urinary tract inflammation in people is to be realized. PMID:21661012

  4. Co-polymer tracts in eukaryotic, prokaryotic, and organellar DNA.

    PubMed

    Behe, M J; Beasty, A M

    1991-01-01

    Large variations in DNA base composition and noticeable strand asymmetries are known to occur between different organisms and within different regions of the genomes of single organisms. Apparently such composition and sequence biases occur to fulfill structural rather than informational requirements. Here we report the wide occurrence of a more subtle biasing of DNA sequence that can have structural consequences: an increase or a suppression of the number of long tracts of two-base co-polymers. Strong biases were observed when the DNA sequences of the longest eukaryotic, prokaryotic, and organellar entries in the GenBank data base (totaling 773 kilobases) were analyzed for the number of occurrences of tracts of the two-base co-polymers (A,T)n, (G,C)n, and (A,C)n as a function of tract length. (The expression (A,T)n is used here to denote an uninterrupted tract, n nucleotides in length, of A and T bases in any proportion or order, terminated at each end by a G or C residue.) Characteristic differences are also observed in tract biases of eukaryotic vs. prokaryotic organisms. PMID:1799681

  5. Variations in lowstand systems tracts: Constraints on exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.F. Jr.

    1991-03-01

    Results of worldwide exploration of lowstand systems tracts support continued application and evaluation of Exxon's cyclic sequence concepts but indicate the need for a better understanding of erosional and depositional variations possible along ancient lowstand coastlines. Exxon's idealized siliciclastic (type 1) model applies where a major highstand fluvial system was entrenched during falling relative sea level, eroding canyons and contributing sediments to lowstand depositional systems. Canyons and incised valleys were filled by late lowstand and retrogradational (transgressive) systems. Not explicit in Exxon's scenario are lowstand tracts at sites of minor entrenched coastal-plain streams or along interdeltaic or nondeltaic margins. A spectrum of systems tracts, identified along ancient basin margins, provides clues for predicting lowstand targets. In the absence of rivers, basin-floor sediments were supplied locally by headward-slumping submarine canyons and erosion of contributary valleys into subaerially exposed highstand shelf and/or strandline systems. Submarine erosion typically continued during subsequent rise and highstand of sea level, and sediments may have been introduced to basin floors through canyons from active retrogradational and highstand longshore systems. Headwardly eroded canyons and valleys were not always filled during subsequent transgression and highstand, leading to long-term multiple erosional/depositional cycles to produce some of the world's major ancient canyon complexes. The type and distribution of highstand systems tracts strongly influenced the quality and distribution of sandstone reservoir potential in subsequent lowstand tracts and, therefore, may help guide deep-water exploration along ancient basin margins.

  6. Clinical Guideline for Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoru; Takei, Mineo; Nishizawa, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Kato, Kumiko; Gotoh, Momokazu; Yoshimura, Yasukuni; Takeyama, Masami; Ozawa, Hideo; Shimada, Makoto; Yamanishi, Tomonori; Yoshida, Masaki; Tomoe, Hikaru; Yokoyama, Osamu; Koyama, Masayasu

    2016-01-01

    The "Japanese Clinical Guideline for Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms," published in Japan in November 2013, contains two algorithms (a primary and a specialized treatment algorithm) that are novel worldwide as they cover female lower urinary tract symptoms other than urinary incontinence. For primary treatment, necessary types of evaluation include querying the patient regarding symptoms and medical history, examining physical findings, and performing urinalysis. The types of evaluations that should be performed for select cases include evaluation with symptom/quality of life (QOL) questionnaires, urination records, residual urine measurement, urine cytology, urine culture, serum creatinine measurement, and ultrasonography. If the main symptoms are voiding/post-voiding, specialized treatment should be considered because multiple conditions may be involved. When storage difficulties are the main symptoms, the patient should be assessed using the primary algorithm. When conditions such as overactive bladder or stress incontinence are diagnosed and treatment is administered, but sufficient improvement is not achieved, the specialized algorithm should be considered. In case of specialized treatment, physiological re-evaluation, urinary tract/pelvic imaging evaluation, and urodynamic testing are conducted for conditions such as refractory overactive bladder and stress incontinence. There are two causes of voiding/post-voiding symptoms: lower urinary tract obstruction and detrusor underactivity. Lower urinary tract obstruction caused by pelvic organ prolapse may be improved by surgery. PMID:26789539

  7. The role of dendritic cells in male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Duan, Yong-Gang

    2016-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells. The central role of various DC subsets as bridges between innate and adaptive immunity has become more and more evident. However, the role of DC subsets in male reproductive tract remains largely unexplored, in particular distinct DC subsets (including myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs), their maturation stage, and tissue distribution, as well as state of health or disease. Furthermore, infection and inflammation of male genital tract are thought to be a primary etiological factor of male infertility. This review sheds some light on this complex and rapidly growing field. It summarized the recent findings and deals with the characterization and role of DCs in male reproductive tract, that is, testis, epididymis, prostate, seminal vesicle, semen, and foreskin, which might help to understand the immunopathological mechanisms of male infertility and design effective vaccines for male reproductive health. PMID:27353336

  8. Bovine coronaviruses from the respiratory tract: antigenic and genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Fulton, R W; Ridpath, J F; Burge, L J

    2013-01-30

    BoCV isolated from respiratory tract, nasal swab and broncho alveolar washing fluid samples were evaluated for genetic and antigenic differences. These BoCV from the respiratory tract of healthy and clinically ill cattle with BRD signs were compared to reference and vaccine strains based on Spike protein coding sequences and VNT using convalescent antisera. Based on this study, the BoCV isolates belong to one of two genomic clades (clade 1 and 2) which can be differentiated antigenically. The respiratory isolates from Oklahoma in this study were further divided by genetic differences into three subclades, 2a, 2b, and 2c. Reference enteric BoCV strains and a vaccine strain were in clade 1. Currently available vaccines designed to control enteric disease are based on viruses from one clade while viruses isolated from respiratory tracts, in this study, belong to the other clade. PMID:23246548

  9. Neurostimulation of the Gastrointestinal Tract: Review of Recent Developments

    PubMed Central

    Abell, Thomas L.; Chen, Jiande; Emmanuel, Anton; Jolley, Christopher; Sarela, Abeezar I.; Törnblom, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Neurostimulation is one manifestation of neuromodulation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This manuscript reviews the history of neurostimulation of the GI tract with emphasis on current methods of stimulation. Upper GI disorders can be modulated with both temporary (placed endoscopically or surgically) or permanent (placed surgically) gastric electrical stimulation (GES) devices. The current gastrointestinal (GI) neurostimulation of stomach (GES) devices have been used in both children and adults and some patients have been followed in excess of 15 years with good long-term results. Similar GES devices have also been used for a variety of lower GI disorders, including constipation and fecal incontinence, for a number of years. Based on these recent developments, the future uses of neurostimulation in the GI tract are discussed with an emphasis on new applications and innovations. PMID:25581846

  10. Dendritic cells and macrophages in the genitourinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, N; Thompson, JM; Iwasaki, A

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages are antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that are important in innate immune defense as well as in the generation and regulation of adaptive immunity against a wide array of pathogens. The genitourinary (GU) tract, which serves an important reproductive function, is constantly exposed to numerous agents of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). To combat these STIs, several subsets of DCs and macrophages are strategically localized within the GU tract. In the female genital mucosa, recruitment and function of these APCs are uniquely governed by sex hormones. This review summarizes the latest advances in our understanding of DCs and macrophages in the GU tract with respect to their subsets, lineage, and function. In addition, we discuss the divergent roles of these cells in immune defense against STIs as well as in maternal tolerance to the fetus. PMID:19079212

  11. [Gynaecological and obstetrical aspects of recurrent urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Hoyme, U B; Schneede, P

    2006-04-01

    The microbial colonization of vulva, vagina and cervix uteri represents the reservoir for recurrent urinary tract infection. All bacterial species of normal cutaneous or gastrointestinal flora can be found in the external genital tract even under physiological conditions. The higher concentration of microbes adds to the predisposition for urinary tract infection in cases of dysbiosis or inflammation, apart from specific infection by Trichomonas vaginalis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Chlamydia trachomatis. The specific immunological interaction between bacteria and host, i.e. between virulence factors and intrinsic defense, appears to be the major mechanism paving the way for recurrent infection. The elimination of predisposing factors is the clue for successful therapy as well as for prevention of recurrence. PMID:16586054

  12. Capecitabine-induced leukoencephalopathy involving the bilateral corticospinal tracts

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Mark Bang-Wei; McAdory, Louis Elliott

    2016-01-01

    An 80 year old lady with a history of metastatic sigmoid carcinoma presented with expressive dysphasia and unsteady gait 4 days after commencement of adjuvant capecitabine chemotherapy. MRI demonstrated restricted diffusion and T2/FLAIR hyperintensity involving the course of the bilateral corticospinal tracts, the corpus callosum and the middle cerebellar peduncles. Discontinuation of chemotherapy lead to symptom resolution in 2 days; repeat MRI at 2 months demonstrated reversal of the diffusion changes and improvement of the previous T2W/FLAIR hyperintensity. This report describes the first case of capecitabine induced leukoencephalopathy causing restricted diffusion along the corticospinal tracts, which should be differentiated from other entities that involve the corticospinal tracts (i.e. amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), hypoglycemic coma, etc.) PMID:27200161

  13. Spontaneous reproductive tract leiomyomas in aged guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Field, K J; Griffith, J W; Lang, C M

    1989-10-01

    Seven of 83 female guinea-pigs were found to have reproductive tract leiomyomas at necropsy. Sixty-three of these guinea-pigs also had cystic rete ovarii. Eleven separate leiomyomas were identified, the most common site of formation being the uterine body or horn. The tumours contained histological evidence of smooth muscle, abundant fibrous connective tissue and occasional foci of fibrocartilage and bone. Mitotic figures were identified in only one tumour. The mean age of guinea-pigs with leiomyomas was 47.6 months, and the mean age of the study population was 33.1 months. Two other reproductive tract tumours identified in the 83 guinea-pigs were an ovarian teratoma and a cavernous haemangioma. These data indicate that leiomyomas are the most common reproductive tract tumour in this colony of aged female guinea-pigs and that they are frequently seen in conjunction with cystic rete ovarii. PMID:2584448

  14. Mucosal Immunity in the Female Genital Tract, HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Reis Machado, Juliana; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; Antônia dos Reis, Marlene; Monteiro, Maria Luiza Gonçalves dos Reis; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes; Rosa Miranda Corrêa, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal immunity consists of innate and adaptive immune responses which can be influenced by systemic immunity. Despite having been the subject of intensive studies, it is not fully elucidated what exactly occurs after HIV contact with the female genital tract mucosa. The sexual route is the main route of HIV transmission, with an increased risk of infection in women compared to men. Several characteristics of the female genital tract make it suitable for inoculation, establishment of infection, and systemic spread of the virus, which causes local changes that may favor the development of infections by other pathogens, often called sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The relationship of these STDs with HIV infection has been widely studied. Here we review the characteristics of mucosal immunity of the female genital tract, its alterations due to HIV/AIDS, and the characteristics of coinfections between HIV/AIDS and the most prevalent STDs. PMID:25313360

  15. Management of upper respiratory tract infections by telephone.

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, S; Holbrook, J H; Hale, D; Lyon, J

    1994-01-01

    We surveyed Utah general internists (N = 134) regarding their attitudes toward and practices associated with telephone management of upper respiratory tract infections. The questionnaire contained 3 case vignettes--viral upper respiratory tract infection, streptococcal pharyngitis, and acute infectious epiglottitis--and a series of questions were asked about telephone diagnosis, management preferences (clinic versus telephone), and telephone management practices. The 53 respondents (40%) were able to make important diagnostic distinctions about upper respiratory tract infections from a written vignette. As the likelihood of a complicated or serious condition increased, patients would be appropriately triaged for clinical evaluation. Most internists would make a written record of the telephone conversation. Only 1 internist of the 53 would charge for telephone management. PMID:8053174

  16. Axon diameters and conduction velocities in the macaque pyramidal tract

    PubMed Central

    Firmin, L.; Field, P.; Maier, M. A.; Kraskov, A.; Kirkwood, P. A.; Nakajima, K.; Lemon, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Small axons far outnumber larger fibers in the corticospinal tract, but the function of these small axons remains poorly understood. This is because they are difficult to identify, and therefore their physiology remains obscure. To assess the extent of the mismatch between anatomic and physiological measures, we compared conduction time and velocity in a large number of macaque corticospinal neurons with the distribution of axon diameters at the level of the medullary pyramid, using both light and electron microscopy. At the electron microscopic level, a total of 4,172 axons were sampled from 2 adult male macaque monkeys. We confirmed that there were virtually no unmyelinated fibers in the pyramidal tract. About 14% of pyramidal tract axons had a diameter smaller than 0.50 μm (including myelin sheath), most of these remaining undetected using light microscopy, and 52% were smaller than 1 μm. In the electrophysiological study, we determined the distribution of antidromic latencies of pyramidal tract neurons, recorded in primary motor cortex, ventral premotor cortex, and supplementary motor area and identified by pyramidal tract stimulation (799 pyramidal tract neurons, 7 adult awake macaques) or orthodromically from corticospinal axons recorded at the mid-cervical spinal level (192 axons, 5 adult anesthetized macaques). The distribution of antidromic and orthodromic latencies of corticospinal neurons was strongly biased toward those with large, fast-conducting axons. Axons smaller than 3 μm and with a conduction velocity below 18 m/s were grossly underrepresented in our electrophysiological recordings, and those below 1 μm (6 m/s) were probably not represented at all. The identity, location, and function of the majority of corticospinal neurons with small, slowly conducting axons remains unknown. PMID:24872533

  17. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital renal and urinary tract malformations.

    PubMed

    Hindryckx, A; De Catte, L

    2011-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidneys and the urinary tract are the most common sonographically identified -malformations in the prenatal period. Obstructive uropathies account for the majority of cases. The aim of prenatal diagnosis and management is to detect those anomalies having impact on the prognosis of the affected child and -requiring early postnatal evaluation or treatment to minimize adverse outcomes. In this paper, we summarize the embryology of kidneys and urinary tract, the normal sonographic appearance through-out pregnancy and the prenatal diagnosis of their congenital malformations. PMID:24753862

  18. Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Pseudoaneurysm after Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Shariff, Masood A.; Martingano, Daniel; Khan, Usman; Goyal, Nikhil; Sharma, Raman; Rizvi, Syed B.; Motivala, Apurva; Asgarian, Kourosh T.; Nabagiez, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular outflow tract pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication following aortic valve replacement (AVR), occurring most frequently secondary to endocarditis. We present a case of a 47-year-old female with a history of intravenous drug abuse and a past surgical history of two AVRs (2001 and 2009 with aortic root replacement for endocarditis) who presented with symptoms of lower extremity weakness. Subsequent radiologic imaging revealed the presence of a left ventricular outflow tract pseudoaneurysm, which was surgically managed with a homologous conduit. PMID:27175367

  19. Abdomen: Retroperitoneum, peritoneum, gastrointestinal tract, kidney, and adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Suen, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    In this book the author explores aspiration biopsy as it can be applied to lesions of the retroperitoneum, gastrointestinal tract, kidney, peritoneum, and adrenal gland. With experience from two different institutions - one an acute general care hospital, the other a cancer referral center - Dr. Suen has achieved in creating a text that reflects a wide range of experience. Throughout the work, Dr. Suen stresses pattern recognition of cytologic material. And a chapter on unusual and interesting lesions is included. Contents: Introduction and General Considerations; Abdomen Imaging Techniques; Clinical Relevance; Indentification of Normal ABC; retroperitoneum; Gastrointestinal Tract; Kidney; Adrenal Gland; Unusual Lesions; Immunocytochemistry and Electron Microscopy; Index.

  20. [Urinary tract abnormalities with anorrectal malformations (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Nogués, A; Ceres, M L; Olagüe, R; Andrés, V; Lanuza, A

    1978-01-01

    Thirty five patients with anorrectal malformations are reviewed. These are divided in high and low anomalies according to some simple clinical data, better than the drawing of reference lines to determinate the height of puborrectalis muscle. Malformations were associated in 13 cases with urinary tract estructural anomalies and in four cases with isolated vesico-ureteral reflux. Diagnosis of urinary tract infection was made in 14 patients, 12 of them with recto-urinary fistula. A point is made about the complete and early exploration of all these patients to prevent irreparable renal damage that could be developed. PMID:655503

  1. Prevalence of urinary tract infection in severely malnourished preschool children.

    PubMed

    Banapurmath, C R; Jayamony, S

    1994-06-01

    Eighty eight severely malnourished preschool children (Grade III or Grade IV, IAP classification) were studied to find out the prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI). Fifty three well nourished preschool children served as controls. Urine samples were collected by suprapubic aspiration in children below 3 years and in older children a clean catch midstream sample of urine was collected. The urine samples were subjected to direct microscopic examination, Gram's stain and culture. UTI was detected in 7 (8%) of the 88 malnourished children. Besides UTI, the other associated infections included respiratory tract infection (31.8%), diarrhea (27.2%) and tuberculous meningitis (12.7%). PMID:7896393

  2. [FACTORS AFFECTING SPERMATOGENESIS PRESERVATION IN RATS WITH SEMINIFEROUS TRACT OBSTRUCTION].

    PubMed

    Gamidov, S I; Ovchinnikov, R L; Popova, A Ju; Krasova, O M; Polivoda, M D; Dubova, E A; Pavlov, K A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effect of the seminal tract obstruction of different degree and duration on the morphological and functional condition of testicular tissue. The study was conducted in 50 male Wistar rats. Three experimental models of seminiferous tract obstruction were set up: obstruction of the proximal part of the ductus deferens, obstruction of the distal part of the ductus deferens and obstruction of at the epididymis level. Morphological evaluation of testicular tissue was performed at 3 and 6 months after the obstruction. It was found that obstruction at the epididymis level caused the most severe impairment of spermatogenesis. PMID:26665771

  3. Extrahepatic biliary tract in chinchilla (Chinchilla laniger, Molina).

    PubMed

    Nowak, E; Kuchinka, J; Szczurkowski, A; Kuder, T

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was the macromorphological analysis of extrahepatic biliary tract in chinchilla (Chinchilla laniger Molina). Bile ducts, the gall bladder and portal vein were injected with coloured latex. Using the technique of dissection, bile ducts were isolated from the liver lobes. It was found that the cystic duct in this species is rarely single. Hepatic ducts form a system of multiple anastomosing structures running in the hepatoduodenal ligament. Many bile duct openings were observed in the duodenal papilla. The results confirm wide variations of the biliary tract in mammals and may be important for comparative analysis of the morphological differentiation of these structures in small mammals. PMID:25091180

  4. A Rare Cause of Testicular Metastasis: Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Manav, Alper Nesip; Kazan, Ercan; Ertek, Mehmet Şirin; Amasyalı, Akın Soner; Çulhacı, Nil; Erol, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic testicular cancers are rare. Primary tumor sources are prostate, lung, and gastrointestinal tract for metastatic testicular cancers. Metastasis of urothelial carcinoma (UC) to the testis is extremely rare. Two-thirds of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is of invasive stage at diagnosis and metastatic sites are the pelvic lymph nodes, liver, lung, and bone. We report a rare case of metastatic UTUC to the testis which has not been reported before, except one case in the literature. Testicular metastasis of UC should be considered in patients with hematuria and testicular swelling. PMID:25120937

  5. A rare cause of testicular metastasis: upper tract urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Manav, Alper Nesip; Kazan, Ercan; Ertek, Mehmet Şirin; Amasyalı, Akın Soner; Culhacı, Nil; Erol, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic testicular cancers are rare. Primary tumor sources are prostate, lung, and gastrointestinal tract for metastatic testicular cancers. Metastasis of urothelial carcinoma (UC) to the testis is extremely rare. Two-thirds of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is of invasive stage at diagnosis and metastatic sites are the pelvic lymph nodes, liver, lung, and bone. We report a rare case of metastatic UTUC to the testis which has not been reported before, except one case in the literature. Testicular metastasis of UC should be considered in patients with hematuria and testicular swelling. PMID:25120937

  6. The Chlamydia muridarum Organisms Fail to Auto-Inoculate the Mouse Genital Tract after Colonization in the Gastrointestinal Tract for 70 days

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luying; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Tianyuan; Zhang, Yuyang; Zhu, Cuiming; Sun, Xin; Zhang, Nu; Xue, Min; Zhong, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia muridarum is known to colonize in the gastrointestinal tract for long periods of time, which has been hypothesized to serve as a reservoir for spreading to the genital tract. To test this hypothesis, a luciferase-expressing C. muridarum was used to establish a long-lasting infection in the mouse gastrointestinal tract following either intragastric or intrarectal inoculations. In vivo imaging revealed significant bioluminescent signals mainly in the mouse abdominal area throughout the experiments. Ex vivo imaging localized the signals to the mouse gastrointestinal tract, which was confirmed by monitoring the C. muridarum organisms in the mouse organs/tissues. Despite the long-lasting colonization in the gastrointestinal tract and active shedding of infectious organisms in the rectal swabs, the organisms did not cause any significant infection or pathology in the genital tract throughout the experiments, which was reproduced in multiple strains of mice and with an increased inoculation dose to the gastrointestinal tract. The above observations have demonstrated that the long-lasting C. muridarum organisms from the gastrointestinal tract are inefficient in auto-inoculating the genital tract, suggesting that the gastrointestinal tract Chlamydia may utilize an indirect mechanism to affect its pathogenicity in the genital tract. PMID:27192556

  7. A tract-specific framework for white matter morphometry combining macroscopic and microscopic tract features

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Awatea, Suyash P; Das, Sandhitsu R; Woo, John H; Melhem, Elias R; Gee, James C; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging plays a key role in our understanding of white matter both in normal populations and in populations with brain disorders. Existing techniques focus primarily on using diffusivity-based quantities derived from diffusion tensor as surrogate measures of microstructural tissue properties of white matter. In this paper, we describe a novel tract-specific framework that enables the examination of white matter morphometry at both the macroscopic and microscopic scales. The framework leverages the skeleton-based modeling of sheet-like white matter fasciculi using the continuous medial representation, which gives a natural definition of thickness and supports its comparison across subjects. The thickness measure provides a macroscopic characterization of white matter fasciculi that complements existing analysis of microstructural features. The utility of the framework is demonstrated in quantifying white matter atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, a severe neurodegenerative disease of motor neurons. We show that, compared to using microscopic features alone, combining the macroscopic and microscopic features gives a more complete characterization of the disease. PMID:20547469

  8. Topography of the goldfish optic tracts: implications for the chronological clustering model.

    PubMed

    Springer, A D; Mednick, A S

    1985-09-01

    Both the dorsal and ventral optic tracts of goldfish have similar shapes when they are sectioned perpendicularly to their longitudinal axes. Each tract is pear-shaped, consisting of a narrow and a deep apex, a wide midspan, and a progressively curved and tapered superficial base. The tracts differ in that the apex of the dorsal optic tract points caudally, while the apex of the ventral optic tract points medially. In addition, upon segregating from the main optic tract, the dorsal optic tract courses dorsally while the ventral optic tract courses caudally. Thus, the two optic tracts have similar shapes and are orthongonal to one another. The topography of the retinal fibers within the optic tracts was determined either by ablating part of the retina and subsequently filling the axons from the intact hemiretina with cobaltous-lysine or by applying cobaltous-lysine to a slit in the retina. Both optic tracts contain a similar arrangement of optic fibers. Axons of central retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are in the apex of each tract and optic fibers of peripheral RGCs are located along the base of each tract. Axons of temporal RGCs are located dorsally in the ventral optic tract and laterally in the dorsal optic tract, while axons of nasal RGCs are located ventrally in the ventral optic tract and medially in the dorsal optic tract. These findings indicate that the optic axons are organized as laminae. Deeper laminae contain the axons of older annuli of RGCs and superficial laminae contain the axons of younger annuli of RGCs. This type of chronological organization appears to be consistent across vertebrates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4044928

  9. Asymptomatic urinary tract infection caused by Shigella sonnei.

    PubMed

    Ekwall, E; Ljungh, A; Selander, B

    1984-01-01

    The first case of asymptomatic urinary tract infection caused by Shigella sonnei in a patient, a 74-yr-old man, who was not a faecal carrier and had no history of dysentery is reported. Treatment with pivmecillinam 400 mg 3 times daily for 14 days was instituted and the bacteria were eradicated. The time and source of infection is unknown. PMID:6364325

  10. The tract of Lissauer and the dorsal root potential.

    PubMed Central

    Cervero, F; Iggo, A; Molony, V

    1978-01-01

    1. Intersegmental dorsal root potentials (d.r.p.s) have been recorded in the lumbar spinal cord of spinalized cats under Na pentobarbitone anaesthesia, to investigate the spinal cord structures involved in the intersegmental transmission of d.r.p.s. 2. A technique has been developed for restricted surgical isolation of Lissauer's tract between the segments with subsequent histological verification of the extent of the isolation. 3. Section of the ipsilateral dorsal column resulted in an increase in the latency of the intersegmental d.r.p. and a significant reduction in its amplitude. A further reduction in amplitude was achieved by section of the ipsilateral dorso-lateral funiculus. 4. Neither section of Lissauer's tract after the above lesions were performed nor restricted Lissauer's tractotomies abolished intersegmental d.r.p.s; only a small reduction in the amplitude of the d.r.p. was obtained. 5. It is proposed that intersegmental d.r.p.s are produced by the activaiton of a propriospinal system projecting through pathways other than Lissauer's tract and that primary afferent collaterals from the dorsal columns make a major contribtuion to their generation. The contribution made by Lissauer's tract is probably small. PMID:214544

  11. Diuretic radionuclide localization of upper urinary tract obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Koff, S.A.; Shore, R.M.; Hayden, L.J.; Smith, S.P.; Trepashko, D.W.

    1984-09-01

    In 59 children with proved upper urinary tract obstruction diuretic radionuclide ureteral scans provided an accurate assessment of ureteral dilatation sufficient to distinguish ureteropelvic from ureterovesical obstruction. As a result, this test may be used instead of more invasive studies, such as retrograde or antegrade pyelography, to determine the site of obstruction in many cases of hydronephrosis.

  12. 3-D PARTICLE TRANSPORT WITHIN THE HUMAN UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study trajectories of inhaled particulate matter (PM) were simulated within a three-dimensional (3-D) computer model of the human upper respiratory tract (URT). The airways were described by computer-reconstructed images of a silicone rubber cast of the human head, throat...

  13. FLOW SIMULATION IN THE HUMAN UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory


    ABSTRACT

    Computer simulations of airflow patterns within the human upper respiratory tract (URT) are presented. The URT model includes airways of the head (nasal and oral), throat (pharyngeal and laryngeal), and lungs (trachea and main bronchi). The head and throat mor...

  14. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-01

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:26819503

  15. Vocal Tract Representation in the Recognition of Cerebral Palsied Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudzicz, Frank; Hirst, Graeme; van Lieshout, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors explored articulatory information as a means of improving the recognition of dysarthric speech by machine. Method: Data were derived chiefly from the TORGO database of dysarthric articulation (Rudzicz, Namasivayam, & Wolff, 2011) in which motions of various points in the vocal tract are measured during speech.…

  16. Two Cases of Urinary Tract Infection Caused by Propionimicrobium lymphophilum.

    PubMed

    Williams, Glynne D

    2015-09-01

    The first case reports involving Propionimicrobium lymphophilum, a rarely encountered anaerobic Gram-positive non-spore-forming rod, are presented here as urinary tract infections. Initial detection of these bacteria required urine Gram stains. Comparison of the type strain to the two isolates by various methods is depicted and includes antimicrobial susceptibility data. PMID:26135862

  17. Two Cases of Urinary Tract Infection Caused by Propionimicrobium lymphophilum

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The first case reports involving Propionimicrobium lymphophilum, a rarely encountered anaerobic Gram-positive non-spore-forming rod, are presented here as urinary tract infections. Initial detection of these bacteria required urine Gram stains. Comparison of the type strain to the two isolates by various methods is depicted and includes antimicrobial susceptibility data. PMID:26135862

  18. MODELING OZONE ABSORPTION IN THE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A dosimetry simulation model has been developed for predicting the local absorption of ozone (03) in the lower respiratory tract (LRT) of animals and man. The model takes into account species LRT anatomy and ventilatory characteristics, transport in the lumen and air spaces, loss...

  19. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF OZONE ABSORPTION IN THE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical O3 dosimetry model has been developed for simulating the local absorption of O3 in the lower respiratory tract (LRT) of animals and man. The model takes into account LRT anatomy, transport in the lumen and air spaces, transport and chemical reactions in the liquid ...

  20. Dynamic 3D Visualization of Vocal Tract Shaping During Speech

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yinghua; Kim, Yoon-Chul; Proctor, Michael I.; Narayanan, Shrikanth S.; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is widely used in speech research as a means to investigate the shaping and dynamics of the vocal tract during speech production. 3D dynamic MRI would be a major advance, as it would provide 3D dynamic visualization of the entire vocal tract. We present a novel method for the creation of 3D dynamic movies of vocal tract shaping based on the acquisition of 2D dynamic data from parallel slices and temporal alignment of the image sequences using audio information. Multiple sagittal 2D real-time movies with synchronized audio recordings are acquired for English vowel-consonant-vowel stimuli /ala/, /aɹa/, /asa/ and /aʃa/. Audio data are aligned using mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC) extracted from windowed intervals of the speech signal. Sagittal image sequences acquired from all slices are then aligned using dynamic time warping (DTW). The aligned image sequences enable dynamic 3D visualization by creating synthesized movies of the moving airway in the coronal planes, visualizing desired tissue surfaces and tube-shaped vocal tract airway after manual segmentation of targeted articulators and smoothing. The resulting volumes allow for dynamic 3D visualization of salient aspects of lingual articulation, including the formation of tongue grooves and sublingual cavities, with a temporal resolution of 78 ms. PMID:23204279

  1. Antibiotic Resistance in Urinary Tract Infections in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Ronald P.; Haith, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine resistance to antibiotics of "Escherichia coli" in uncomplicated urinary tract infections (uUTIs) in female college students. Participants: Symptomatic patients presenting to a student health service from September 2008 to December 2009. Methods: Clean catch midstream urine samples were tested for urinalysis (UA) and…

  2. Urinary Tract Infection Caused by a Capnophilic Proteus mirabilis Strain.

    PubMed

    Trapman, Maryse; van Ingen, Jakko; Keijman, Jeroen; Swanink, Caroline M

    2015-06-01

    From a urine sample from a patient with a urinary tract infection, a carbon dioxide-dependent Proteus mirabilis strain was isolated. It is important to perform urine cultures in 5% carbon dioxide and an anaerobic atmosphere if bacteria prominent in Gram stains do not grow on routine media in ambient air. PMID:25878339

  3. REGIONAL RESPIRATORY TRACT ABSORPTION OF INHALED REACTIVE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Highly reactive gases present unique problems due to the number of actors which must be taken into account to determine regional respiratory tract uptake. We reviewed some of the physical, chemical, and biological factors that affect dose and that must be understood to interpret ...

  4. Condylomata acuminata within perianal fistulae tracts: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Panidis, Stavros; Paramythiotis, Daniel; Papadopoulos, Vasileios N; Michalopoulos, Antonios

    2015-04-01

    The commonest sights of appearance of condylomata acuminata are in the genital and anal regions. Herein we present two cases of condylomata within perianal fistulae tracts, resulting in recurrence in one case and a malignant-like tumour in the second. To our knowledge, these are the first cases reported in the literature. PMID:24872374

  5. [How Does Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Affekt Female Sexuality?].

    PubMed

    Anding, R; Kirschner-Hermanns, R; Rantell, A; Wiedemann, A

    2016-08-01

    With increasing age many women suffer from lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) and female sexual dysfunction. An increasing body of evidence supports an association between the 2 conditions. Especially women with urodynamically proved detrusor hyperactivity suffer from sexual dysfunction and there is some evidence that in patients with stress incontinence sexual health improves after successful surgery. PMID:27328304

  6. Behçet's disease and the alimentary tract

    PubMed Central

    Parkin, J. V.; Wight, D. G. D.

    1975-01-01

    Two patients with perforation of the alimentary tract in Behçet's disease are described. One of these is believed to be the first recorded case of oesophageal perforation in this condition, while the second is one of the few survivors of bowel perforation. The literature, aetiology and treatment are reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:1197160

  7. Swarming and pathogenicity of Proteus mirabilis in the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Mobley, H L; Belas, R

    1995-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis is best known for its pattern of swarming differentiation on agar plates, as well as for its association with the development of renal stones in patients with urinary tract infection. Urease and flagella appear to contribute most significantly to virulence, with fimbriae playing a more subtle role, whereas hemolysin does not appear to contribute significantly to pathogenesis. PMID:7551643

  8. Investigation of insoluble endogenous fractions of gastrointestinal tract by SRXRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunova, V. A.; Zvereva, V. V.

    2005-05-01

    For the determination of the elemental composition of insoluble endogenous fractions from gastrointestinal tract by SRXRF (XRF experimental beam line, VEPP-3, INP SU RAS, Novosibirsk), an analytical method was developed for producing epithelial tissue in vivo. The metrological characteristics were determined using a number of international biological standards.

  9. Antenatal diagnosis of upper urinary tract dilation by ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Langer, B; Simeoni, U; Montoya, Y; Casanova, R; Schlaeder, G

    1996-01-01

    The criteria for the detection of fetal pyelectasis are still controversial. Prenatal and postnatal data from 2,170 consecutive pregnant women who underwent at least one antenatal ultrasound scan were prospectively studied. Fetal pyelectasis was defined on the basis of a mean renal pelvis dimension > 5 or 10 mm before or after 28 weeks of gestation, respectively. Pyelectasis was detected in 95 (4.4%) fetuses. Eighty-nine among them were explored after birth. In 13 (13.7%) cases, an obstructive urinary tract abnormality, a severe vesicoureteral reflux, or a megaureter were diagnosed postnatally. In 29 (30.5%) cases, pyelectasis was confirmed postnatally, while complementary investigations ruled out an obstruction of the urinary tract. The incidence of urinary tract malformations was thus 0.60%, while the positive predictive value was 13.7%. We recommend to use a value not < 10 mm of the renal pelvis mean dimension beyond 28 weeks of gestation as a threshold for detection of fetal upper urinary tract obstruction, in the absence of ureteric and/or bladder dilation. Any value between 5 and 10 mm measured during the 2nd trimester of gestation should be confirmed by a second ultrasound examination performed during the 3rd trimester, before being considered pathological. PMID:8739586

  10. Reproductive tract infections: prevalence and risk factors in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Sarah; Morison, Linda; Chakraborty, Jyotsnamoy; Gausia, Kaniz; Ahmed, Farid; Islam, Shamim Sufia; Alam, Nazmul; Brown, David; Mabey, David

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for reproductive tract infections among men and women in a rural community in Bangladesh. METHODS: In the Matlab area a systematic sample of married non-pregnant women aged 15-50 years was drawn from a comprehensive household registration system for married women. A systematic sample of married and unmarried men in the same age group was drawn from a census-derived demographic surveillance list. Private interviews were conducted with 804 women in a clinic, and cervical, vaginal, urinary and serological samples were collected. Urine and blood specimens were obtained from 969 men who were interviewed at home. FINDINGS: The prevalence of bacterial and viral reproductive tract infections was low to moderate. For example, fewer than 1% of the women had a cervical infection. No cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were found. However, among men there was a high level of reported risk behaviour and a low level of protection against infection. CONCLUSION: A low prevalence of reproductive tract infections, coupled with a high level of reported risk behaviour, indicated a need for primary programmes that would prevent an increase in the incidence of reproductive tract infections, sexually transmitted infections and HIV infection. PMID:11984603

  11. Persistence and reactivation of human adenoviruses in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kosulin, K; Geiger, E; Vécsei, A; Huber, W-D; Rauch, M; Brenner, E; Wrba, F; Hammer, K; Innerhofer, A; Pötschger, U; Lawitschka, A; Matthes-Leodolter, S; Fritsch, G; Lion, T

    2016-04-01

    Reactivation of persistent human adenoviruses (HAdVs) is associated with high morbidity and mortality in paediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Although invasive HAdV infections mainly arise from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the specific sites of HAdV persistence are not well characterised. We prospectively screened biopsies from 143 non-HSCT paediatric patients undergoing GI endoscopy and monitored serial stool specimens from 148 paediatric HSCT recipients for the presence of HAdV by real-time PCR. Persistence of HAdV in the GI tract was identified in 31% of children, with the highest prevalence in the terminal ileum. In situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry identified HAdV persistence in lymphoid cells of the lamina propria, whereas biopsies from five transplant recipients revealed high numbers of replicating HAdV in intestinal epithelial cells. The prevalence of HAdV species, the frequencies of persistence in the GI tract and reactivations post transplant indicated a correlation of intestinal HAdV shedding pre-transplant with high risk of invasive infection. HAdV persistence in the GI tract is a likely origin of infectious complications in immunocompromised children. Intestinal lymphocytes represent a reservoir for HAdV persistence and reactivation, whereas the intestinal epithelium is the main site of viral proliferation preceding dissemination. The findings have important implications for assessing the risk of life-threatening invasive HAdV infections. PMID:26711435

  12. In Vivo and Ex Vivo Imaging Reveals a Long-Lasting Chlamydial Infection in the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract following Genital Tract Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Huang, Yumeng; Gong, Siqi; Yang, Zhangsheng; Sun, Xin; Schenken, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Intravaginal infection with Chlamydia muridarum in mice can ascend to the upper genital tract, resulting in hydrosalpinx, a pathological hallmark for tubal infertility in women infected with C. trachomatis. Here, we utilized in vivo imaging of C. muridarum infection in mice following an intravaginal inoculation and confirmed the rapid ascent of the chlamydial organisms from the lower to upper genital tracts. Unexpectedly, the C. muridarum-derived signal was still detectable in the abdominal area 100 days after inoculation. Ex vivo imaging of the mouse organs revealed that the long-lasting presence of the chlamydial signal was restricted to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which was validated by directly measuring the chlamydial live organisms and genomes in the same organs. The C. muridarum organisms spreading from the genital to the GI tracts were detected in different mouse strains and appeared to be independent of oral or rectal routes. Mice prevented from orally taking up excretions also developed the long-lasting GI tract infection. Inoculation of C. muridarum directly into the upper genital tract, which resulted in a delayed vaginal shedding of live organisms, accelerated the chlamydial spreading to the GI tract. Thus, we have demonstrated that the genital tract chlamydial organisms may use a systemic route to spread to and establish a long-lasting infection in the GI tract. The significance of the chlamydial spreading from the genital to GI tracts is discussed. PMID:26099591

  13. Prefrontal cortex white matter tracts in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Joy T; Vaidya, Jatin G; Wassermann, Demian; Kim, Regina Eunyoung; Magnotta, Vincent A; Johnson, Hans J; Paulsen, Jane S

    2015-10-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is most widely known for its selective degeneration of striatal neurons but there is also growing evidence for white matter (WM) deterioration. The primary objective of this research was to conduct a large-scale analysis using multisite diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tractography data to quantify diffusivity properties along major prefrontal cortex WM tracts in prodromal HD. Fifteen international sites participating in the PREDICT-HD study collected imaging and neuropsychological data on gene-positive HD participants without a clinical diagnosis (i.e., prodromal) and gene-negative control participants. The anatomical prefrontal WM tracts of the corpus callosum (PFCC), anterior thalamic radiations (ATRs), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi (IFO), and uncinate fasciculi (UNC) were identified using streamline tractography of DWI. Within each of these tracts, tensor scalars for fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity coefficients were calculated. We divided prodromal HD subjects into three CAG-age product (CAP) groups having Low, Medium, or High probabilities of onset indexed by genetic exposure. We observed significant differences in WM properties for each of the four anatomical tracts for the High CAP group in comparison to controls. Additionally, the Medium CAP group presented differences in the ATR and IFO in comparison to controls. Furthermore, WM alterations in the PFCC, ATR, and IFO showed robust associations with neuropsychological measures of executive functioning. These results suggest long-range tracts essential for cross-region information transfer show early vulnerability in HD and may explain cognitive problems often present in the prodromal stage. Hum Brain Mapp 36:3717-3732, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26179962

  14. Exposure to Cigarette Smoke Reduces Vitamin D3 in the Blood Stream and Respiratory Tract

    MedlinePlus

    ... respiratory tract Share | Exposure to cigarette smoke reduces vitamin D3 in the blood stream and respiratory tract ... be understood as to how smoke causes inflammation. Vitamin D3 has anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial effects. ...

  15. The Diagnosis, Evaluation and Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Becknell, Brian; Schober, Megan; Korbel, Lindsey; Spencer, John David

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the most common bacterial infections encountered by pediatricians. Currently, the diagnosis and management of acute urinary tract infection and recurrent urinary tract infection in children remains controversial. Recently published guidelines and large clinical trials have attempted to clarify UTI diagnostic and management strategies. In this manuscript, we review the diagnosis and management of acute and recurrent urinary tract infection in the pediatric population. PMID:25421102

  16. Role of fronto-striatal tract and frontal aslant tract in movement and speech: an axonal mapping study.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Masashi; de Champfleur, Nicolas Menjot; Deverdun, Jeremy; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Herbet, Guillaume; Duffau, Hugues

    2015-11-01

    Despite a better understanding of their anatomy, the functional role of frontal pathways, i.e., the fronto-striatal tract (FST) and frontal aslant tract (FAT), remains obscure. We studied 19 patients who underwent awake surgery for a frontal glioma (14 left, 5 right) by performing intraoperative electrical mapping of both fascicles during motor and language tasks. Furthermore, we evaluated the relationship between these tracts and the eventual onset of transient postoperative disorders. We also performed post-surgical tract-specific measurements on probabilistic tractography. All patients but one experienced intraoperative inhibition of movement and/or speech during subcortical electrostimulation. On postoperative tractography, the subcortical distribution of stimulated sites corresponded to the spatial course of the FST and/or FAT. Furthermore, we found a significant correlation between postoperative worsening and distances between these tracts and resection cavity. A resection close to the (right or left) FST was correlated with transitory motor initiation disorders (p = 0.026), while a resection close to the left FAT was associated with transient speech initiation disorders (p = 0.003). Moreover, the measurements of average distances between resection cavity and left FAT showed a positive correlation with verbal fluency in both semantic (p = 0.019) and phonemic scores (p = 0.017), while average distances between surgical cavity and left FST showed a positive correlation with verbal fluency scores in both semantic (p = 0.0003) and phonemic modalities (p = 0.037). We suggest that FST and FAT would cooperatively play a role in self-initiated movement and speech, as a part of "negative motor network" involving the pre-supplementary motor area, left inferior frontal gyrus and caudate nucleus. PMID:25086832

  17. Recent Advances in Urinary Tract Reconstruction for Neuropathic Bladder in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Roberto I.; Lorenzo, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic bladder usually causes several limitations to patients’ quality of life, including urinary incontinence, recurrent urinary tract infections, and upper urinary tract damage. Its management has significantly changed over the last few years. The aim of our paper is to address some salient features of recent literature dealing with reconstructive procedures in pediatric and adolescent patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26962441

  18. 43 CFR 2711.1-1 - Identification of tracts by land use planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Identification of tracts by land use... POLICY AND MANAGEMENT ACT Sales: Procedures § 2711.1-1 Identification of tracts by land use planning. (a) Tracts of public lands shall only be offered for sale in implementation of land use planning prepared...

  19. 43 CFR 2711.1-1 - Identification of tracts by land use planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Identification of tracts by land use... POLICY AND MANAGEMENT ACT Sales: Procedures § 2711.1-1 Identification of tracts by land use planning. (a) Tracts of public lands shall only be offered for sale in implementation of land use planning prepared...

  20. 43 CFR 2711.1-1 - Identification of tracts by land use planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Identification of tracts by land use... POLICY AND MANAGEMENT ACT Sales: Procedures § 2711.1-1 Identification of tracts by land use planning. (a) Tracts of public lands shall only be offered for sale in implementation of land use planning prepared...

  1. 43 CFR 2711.1-1 - Identification of tracts by land use planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Identification of tracts by land use... POLICY AND MANAGEMENT ACT Sales: Procedures § 2711.1-1 Identification of tracts by land use planning. (a) Tracts of public lands shall only be offered for sale in implementation of land use planning prepared...

  2. Differential susceptibilities to azithromycin treatment of chlamydial infection in the gastrointestinal tract and cervix

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence from animal studies suggests that chlamydiae may persist in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and be a reservoir for reinfection of the genital tract. We hypothesize that there may be a differential susceptibility of organisms in the GI and genital tracts. To determine the effect of azithromy...

  3. Use of Religious Tracts in the Teaching of an Introductory Course in Persuasive Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorgan, Howard

    The use of religious tracts in teaching a course in persuasive communication is described in this paper. Excerpts from a number of tracts are presented to show how religious tracts can be used in teaching about (1) persuasive messages that appeal to fear, (2) the question of ethics in persuasion, (3) appeals to concerns about physiological…

  4. Phonation Threshold Pressure Measurement with a Semi-Occluded Vocal Tract

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titze, Ingo R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to determine if a semi-occluded vocal tract could be used to measure phonation threshold pressure. This is in contrast to the shutter technique, where an alternation between a fully occluded tract and an unoccluded tract is used. Method: Five male and 5 female volunteers phonated through a thin straw held…

  5. Kidney α-Intercalated Cells, NGAL and Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lihe; Zhang, Wenzheng

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that kidney α-intercalated cells can acidify the urine and acidified urine can inhibit bacterial growth and other urinary organisms. However, regulation of acid-base balance rather than a dedicated function in preventing urinary tract infection has been assigned to α-intercalated cells. A series of studies, culminated by the publication of a paper (J Clin Invest. 2014 Jul 1;124(7):2963–76) from Dr. Barasch’s lab unearthed a novel mechanism by which α-intercalated cells function in the innate immune defense of urinary tract infection. This mechanism involves production and release of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin by α-intercalated cells to chelate the siderophore containing host iron to achieve bacteriostasis.

  6. Simulation of singing qualities governed by lower vocal tract adjustments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titze, Ingo R.

    2003-04-01

    In previous meetings, voice qualities such as pressed, ring, yawn, and twang were discussed in a speech context. It was shown that these qualities have unique spectral characteristics brought about by combinations of glottal and lower vocal tract adjustments (the epilarynx tube and the pharynx). Yawn has a wide glottis, a wide epilarynx tube, and a wide pharynx. On the contrary, twang has a general narrowing of all these airway sections. Ring has a wide pharynx and a relatively narrow epilarynx tube. A pressed voice is primary laryngeal, with a narrowed glottis. In this presentation, similar adjustments are made for singing with a voice simulator that controls vocal tract area functions and glottal flow pulses by rules. Results suggest that various singing styles, such as country-western, opera, or pop, may in part be characterized by these unique combinations of source and filter adjustments.

  7. Susceptibility of Urinary Tract Bacteria to Newer Antimicrobial Drugs.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Manjula; Sharma, Jyoti; Bhardwaj, Sonia

    2016-03-15

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the commonest types of bacterial infections. The antibiotic treatment for UTIs is associated with important medical and economic implications. Many different microorganisms can cause UTIs though the most common pathogens are E. coli and members of family Enterobacteriaceae. The knowledge of etiology and antibiotic resistance pattern of the organisms causing urinary tract infection is essential. The present study was undertaken to evaluate trends of antibiotic susceptibility of commonly isolated uropathogens using newer antimicrobial agents, prulifloxacin, fosfomycin (FOM) and doripenem. We conclude that maintaining a record of culture results and the antibiogram may help clinicians to determine the empirical and/or specific treatment based on the antibiogram of the isolate for better therapeutic outcome. PMID:27275323

  8. Ingestible wireless capsules for enhanced diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, Mahdi; Kencana, Andy Prima; Huynh, Van An; Ting, Eng Kiat; Lai, Joshua Chong Yue; Wong, Kai Juan; Tan, Su Lim; Phee, Soo Jay

    2011-03-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy has become a common procedure for diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract. This method offers a less-invasive alternative to traditional endoscopy by eliminating uncomfortable procedures of the traditional endoscopy. Moreover, it provides the opportunity for exploring inaccessible areas of the small intestine. Current capsule endoscopes, however, move by peristalsis and are not capable of detailed and on-demand inspection of desired locations. Here, we propose and develop two wireless endoscopes with maneuverable vision systems to enhance diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. The vision systems in these capsules are equipped with mechanical actuators to adjust the position of the camera. This may help to cover larger areas of the digestive tract and investigate desired locations. The preliminary experimental results showed that the developed platform could successfully communicate with the external control unit via human body and adjust the position of camera to limited degrees.

  9. Mechanisms of Bacterial Colonization of the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Steven J.; Weiser, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Chief among these are infections involving the lower airways. The opportunistic bacterial pathogens responsible for most cases of pneumonia can cause a range of local and invasive infections. However, bacterial colonization (or carriage) in the upper airway is the prerequisite of all these infections. Successful colonizers must attach to the epithelial lining, grow on the nutrient-limited mucosal surface, evade the host immune response, and transmit to a susceptible host. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms underlying these conserved stages of carriage. We also examine how the demands of colonization influence progression to disease. A range of bacteria can colonize the upper airway; nevertheless, we focus on strategies shared by many respiratory tract opportunistic pathogens. Understanding colonization opens a window to the evolutionary pressures these pathogens face within their animal hosts and that have selected for attributes that contribute to virulence and pathogenesis. PMID:26488280

  10. Comparison of vocal tract formants in singing and nonperiodic phonation.

    PubMed

    Miller, D G; Sulter, A M; Schutte, H K; Wolf, R F

    1997-03-01

    The skilled use of nonperiodic phonation techniques in combination with spectrum analysis has been proposed here as a practical method for locating formant frequencies in the singing voice. The study addresses the question of the degree of similarity between sung phonations and their nonperiodic imitations, with respect to both frequency of the first two formants as well as posture of the vocal tract. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), linear predictive coding (LPC), and spectrum analysis, two types of nonperiodic phonation (ingressive and vocal fry) are compared with singing phonations to determine the degree of similarity/difference in acoustic and spatial dimensions of the vocal tract when these phonation types are used to approximate the postures of singing. In comparing phonation types, the close similarity in acoustic data in combination with the relative dissimilarity in spatial data indicates that the accurate imitations are not primarily the result of imitating the singing postures, but have instead an aural basis. PMID:9075171

  11. [The characteristic of biocenosis of urogenital tract in women].

    PubMed

    Andosova, L D; Kontorshchikova, K N; Kachalina, O V; Belov, A V; Gonova, E S; Kudel'kina, S Iu

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with the study of characteristics of biocenosis of urogenital tract in women of reproductive age with using of "Femoflor" test. The scrapings of posterolateral wall of vagina were analyzed using the technique of real-time polymerase chain reaction using the reagents "Femoflor". The complex evaluation of urogenital biota identified three main types of biocenosis of vagina: type I--normocenosis (n = 50 or 11.5%): type II--mild dysbiosis (n = 88 or 21%); type III--marked dysbiosis (n = 133 or 30.6%). In the structure of alterations of biocenosis of urogenital tract the main role play the anaerobic bacteria with involvement of candida, ureoplasma and mcoplasma. PMID:23807998

  12. Prenatal Imaging of the Gastrointestinal Tract with Postnatal Imaging Correlation.

    PubMed

    Blask, Anna Nussbaum; Fagen, Kimberly

    2016-03-01

    Prenatal detection of a wide variety of anomalies and masses of the gastrointestinal tract is now possible. Prenatal imaging with ultrasonography and in selected cases magnetic resonance imaging provides invaluable information to the referring obstetrician, the maternal fetal medicine specialist, the neonatologist and pediatrician who will care for the child after birth, the surgeons and pediatric specialists who will repair or manage a prenatally detected anomaly, and of course to the parents, allowing them to prepare psychologically and financially for the specific interventions that may be needed for their child. Additional screening for associated anomalies can take place, route of delivery can be decided, and arrangements for delivery in an appropriate setting can be made. Prenatal detection also allows for consideration for pregnancy termination. This article will give a broad overview of anomalies of the gastrointestinal tract that can be detected prenatally and their imaging appearance postnatally. PMID:26086457

  13. Susceptibility of Urinary Tract Bacteria to Newer Antimicrobial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Manjula; Sharma, Jyoti; Bhardwaj, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the commonest types of bacterial infections. The antibiotic treatment for UTIs is associated with important medical and economic implications. Many different microorganisms can cause UTIs though the most common pathogens are E. coli and members of family Enterobacteriaceae. The knowledge of etiology and antibiotic resistance pattern of the organisms causing urinary tract infection is essential. The present study was undertaken to evaluate trends of antibiotic susceptibility of commonly isolated uropathogens using newer antimicrobial agents, prulifloxacin, fosfomycin (FOM) and doripenem. We conclude that maintaining a record of culture results and the antibiogram may help clinicians to determine the empirical and/or specific treatment based on the antibiogram of the isolate for better therapeutic outcome. PMID:27275323

  14. Late injury of cancer therapy on the female reproductive tract

    SciTech Connect

    Grigsby, P.W.; Russell, A.; Bruner, D.

    1995-03-30

    The purpose of this article is to review the late effects of cancer therapy on the female reproductive tract. The anatomic sites detailed are the vulva, vagina, cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. The available pathophysiology is discussed. Clinical syndromes are presented. Tolerance doses of irradiation for late effects are rarely presented in the literature and are reviewed where available. Management strategies for surgical, radiotherapeutic, and chemotherapeutic late effects are discussed. Endpoints for evaluation of therapeutic late effects have been formulated utilizing the symptons, objective, management, and analytic (SOMA) format. Late effects on the female reproductive tract from cancer therapy should be recognized and managed appropriately. A grading system for these effects is presented. Endpoints for late effects and tolls for the evaluation need to be further developed. 61 refs., 9 figs., 13 tabs.

  15. Optimizing oncologic outcomes in upper tract urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Ryan C; Margulis, Vitaly

    2016-08-01

    Upper tract urothelial carcinoma is a disease with rapidly changing management. Though rare, recent multi-institutional collaborations have allowed for study of its biology and treatment outcomes in greater detail than ever before. In coming years physicians treating ureteral cancers will have an expanded armamentarium of treatment options and better data on which to base treatment decisions. Currently there is exciting work underway both in terms of developmental therapies, including neoadjuvant chemotherapy, as well as improved prognostics allowing for better utilization of nephron-sparing approaches where applicable. We present a review of current management techniques and the data on which to base management choices for surgeons treating upper tract urothelial carcinoma. The ultimate goal is improving outcomes for patients; with recent developments and current work in the field, there is reason to be optimistic for the future in this rare, challenging disease. PMID:26756501

  16. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors in the canine gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.P.; Gates, T.S.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Boehmer, C.G.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-11-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a putative neurotransmitter in both the brain and peripheral tissues. To define possible target tissues of VIP we have used quantitative receptor autoradiography to localize and quantify the distribution of /sup 125/I-VIP receptor binding sites in the canine gastrointestinal tract. While the distribution of VIP binding sites was different for each segment examined, specific VIP binding sites were localized to the mucosa, the muscularis mucosa, the smooth muscle of submucosal arterioles, lymph nodules, and the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle of the muscularis externa. These results identify putative target tissues of VIP action in the canine gastrointestinal tract. In correlation with physiological data, VIP sites appear to be involved in the regulation of a variety of gastrointestinal functions including epithelial ion transport, gastric secretion, hemodynamic regulation, immune response, esophageal, gastric and intestinal motility.

  17. Hemostatic Plug: Novel Technique for Closure of Percutaneous Nephrostomy Tract

    PubMed Central

    Cicic, Arman; Jump, Roger W.; Davalos, Julio G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is a standard treatment for patients with large or complex kidney stones. The procedure has traditionally included postoperative placement of a nephrostomy tube to allow for drainage and possible reentry. This practice was first implemented after complications incurred after tubeless PCNL in a small patient population. Recently, tubeless PCNL has reemerged as a viable option for selected patients, resulting in decreased pain and analgesic use, shorter hospitalization, quicker return to normal activity, and decreased urine extravasation. Gelatin matrix sealants are occasionally used in nephrostomy tract closure. Techniques for delivery of these agents have been ill described, and placement may be performed with varying results. We present a literature review comparing tubeless PCNL to its traditional variant with indications for use of each, as well as a comparison of agents used in closure. Finally, we outline a novel, reproducible technique for closure of the dilated percutaneous renal access tract. PMID:25157538

  18. Vaccines for Proteus mirabilis in urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Mobley, Harry L T

    2002-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a documented cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) in the complicated urinary tract. Urease-mediated urea hydrolysis is responsible for both virulence of the organism and the ability to cause urolithiasis. A urease-negative mutant of P. mirabilis is unable to initiate stone formation and colonizes the kidney at a significantly lower rate. The considerable pathology caused by P. mirabilis warrants the development of a vaccine. We have initiated the advancement of vaccine studies and have determined that the MR/P fimbria, a surface adhesin of P. mirabilis, is a promising vaccine candidate. Successful vaccination would be expected both to prevent colonization by P. mirabilis and urolithiasis. PMID:12135833

  19. [Selection of type of urinary tract drainage in laparoscopic ureterolithotomy].

    PubMed

    Kisliakov, D A; Sirota, E S; Shpot', E V; Enikeev, M É

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the results of 44 laparoscopic ureterolithotomies performed for large stones in upper and middle third of the ureter. Patients' age ranged from 35 to 82 years. The different types of drainage of the urinary tract depending on the characteristics of surgical treatment (retro- or transperitoneal ureterolithotomy) were used. The effectiveness was evaluated according to the results of plain urography, ultrasound, and multi-layer spiral CT. The results showed that the preferred method of urinary tract drainage is a preoperative deployment of ureteral catheter-stent. However, in the case of impossibility of such procedure, preoperative deployment of ureteral catheter with subsequent intraoperative replacing it on catheter-stent is permissible. With retroperitoneal approach, tubeless ureterolithotomy is feasible in the absence of the ipsilateral kidney stones, residual ureteral stones and pronounced changes in the area of finding the stones. PMID:25799734

  20. Management of a hypoplastic lower urinary tract: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alagaratnam, Swethan; Sengamalai, Manoharan; Mushtaq, Imran

    2011-06-01

    This case relates to a child with an antenatal diagnosis of severe bilateral hydronephrosis with congenital anomalies of the ureters, bladder, and urethra. We describe the presentation and surgical management, highlighting the complexity of this anomaly and the surgical technique used to reconstruct the lower urinary tract. To our knowledge, there has not been a similar case in the literature and the use of a segment of colon for ureteric substitution in children has not been previously reported in the literature. PMID:21683188

  1. Postnatal management of newborn with antenatal detected urinary tract abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Galiano, Rossella; Spasari, Ezio

    2011-10-01

    The goals of postnatal management of congenital anomalies of the kidneys and the urinary tracts are two: The first to distinguish between patients (the minority) who are at risk for renal parenchyma damage, from neonates (the majority) who have not consequences to renal functionality; the second to avoid for healthy infant strenuous follow-up, painful diagnostic procedures, and unnecessary anxiety for their parents. PMID:21942607

  2. Effects of inhaled acids on respiratory tract defense mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, R B

    1985-01-01

    The respiratory tract is endowed with an interlocking array of nonspecific and specific defense mechanisms which protect it from the effects of inhaled microbes and toxicants, and reduce the risk of absorption of materials into the bloodstream, with subsequent systemic translocation. Ambient acids may compromise these defenses, perhaps providing a link between exposure and development of chronic and acute pulmonary disease. This paper reviews the effects of inhaled acids upon the nonspecific clearance system of the lungs. PMID:3908089

  3. Lactobacillus crispatus as biomarker of the healthy vaginal tract.

    PubMed

    Lepargneur, Jean-Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Decades of research have shown that the lactobacilli inhabiting the human vagina are the first line of defense in the female urogenital and reproductive tracts. In healthy cervicovaginal microbiota, Lactobacillus crispatus is prevalent and beneficial with production of copious amounts of lactic acid potent broad spectrum bactericide virucide and immunomodulator. Future and preventic approaches may need to include probiotics, prebiotics also have the potential to optimize and restore the vaginal ecosystem. PMID:27492695

  4. Management of uveal tract melanoma: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Akhil; Beniwal, Vimla; Beniwal, Surender; Mathur, Harsh; Kumar, Harvindra Singh

    2016-06-01

    Uveal tract melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, accounting for about 5-10% of all the melanomas. Since there are no lymphatic vessels in the eye, uveal melanoma can only spread hematogenously leading to liver metastasis. A wide variety of treatment modalities are available for its management, leading to dilemma in selecting the appropriate therapy. This article reviews the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities available and thus, can help to individualize the treatment plan for each patient. PMID:26975730

  5. Female genital tract tumors in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, K T

    1986-08-01

    Multiple genital tract tumors, including bilateral ovarian sex cord tumors with annular tubules, adenoma malignum of the cervix, and bilateral ovarian mucinous tumors, developed in a female patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Although each of these tumor types has been reported to occur in this syndrome, the present case appears to be the first in which the syndrome was complicated by tumors of all three types. PMID:3733073

  6. Therapeutic upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy in Paediatric Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Imdadur; Patel, Praful; Boger, Philip; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Thomson, Mike; Afzal, Nadeem Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report of use of endoscopy in children in the 1970s, there has seen an exponential growth in published experience and innovation in the field. In this review article we focus on modern age therapeutic endoscopy practice, explaining use of traditional as well as new and innovative techniques, for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the paediatric upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25789087

  7. Adhesion Molecules Associated with Female Genital Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Xi; Carrascosa, José Manuel; Cabré, Eduard; Dern, Olga; Sumoy, Lauro; Requena, Gerard; McSorley, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines that can elicit mucosal immune responses in the female genital tract against sexually transmitted infections have been hampered by an inability to measure immune responses in these tissues. The differential expression of adhesion molecules is known to confer site-dependent homing of circulating effector T cells to mucosal tissues. Specific homing molecules have been defined that can be measured in blood as surrogate markers of local immunity (e.g. α4β7 for gut). Here we analyzed the expression pattern of adhesion molecules by circulating effector T cells following mucosal infection of the female genital tract in mice and during a symptomatic episode of vaginosis in women. While CCR2, CCR5, CXCR6 and CD11c were preferentially expressed in a mouse model of Chlamydia infection, only CCR5 and CD11c were clearly expressed by effector T cells during bacterial vaginosis in women. Other homing molecules previously suggested as required for homing to the genital mucosa such as α4β1 and α4β7 were also differentially expressed in these patients. However, CD11c expression, an integrin chain rarely analyzed in the context of T cell immunity, was the most consistently elevated in all activated effector CD8+ T cell subsets analyzed. This molecule was also induced after systemic infection in mice, suggesting that CD11c is not exclusive of genital tract infection. Still, its increase in response to genital tract disorders may represent a novel surrogate marker of mucosal immunity in women, and warrants further exploration for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:27272720

  8. Vocal tract articulation revisited: the case of the monk parakeet.

    PubMed

    Ohms, Verena R; Beckers, Gabriël J L; ten Cate, Carel; Suthers, Roderick A

    2012-01-01

    Birdsong and human speech share many features with respect to vocal learning and development. However, the vocal production mechanisms have long been considered to be distinct. The vocal organ of songbirds is more complex than the human larynx, leading to the hypothesis that vocal variation in birdsong originates mainly at the sound source, while in humans it is primarily due to vocal tract filtering. However, several recent studies have indicated the importance of vocal tract articulators such as the beak and oropharyngeal-esophageal cavity. In contrast to most other bird groups, parrots have a prominent tongue, raising the possibility that tongue movements may also be of significant importance in vocal production in parrots, but evidence is rare and observations often anecdotal. In the current study we used X-ray cinematographic imaging of naturally vocalizing monk parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) to assess which articulators are possibly involved in vocal tract filtering in this species. We observed prominent tongue height changes, beak opening movements and tracheal length changes, which suggests that all of these components play an important role in modulating vocal tract resonance. Moreover, the observation of tracheal shortening as a vocal articulator in live birds has to our knowledge not been described before. We also found strong positive correlations between beak opening and amplitude as well as changes in tongue height and amplitude in several types of vocalization. Our results suggest considerable differences between parrot and songbird vocal production while at the same time the parrot's vocal articulation might more closely resemble human speech production in the sense that both make extensive use of the tongue as a vocal articulator. PMID:22162856

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of postnatal ultrasound screening for urinary tract abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hálek, Jan; Flögelová, Hana; Michálková, Kamila; Smakal, Oldrich; Dubrava, Lubomír; Zapletalová, Jana; Janout, Vladimír

    2010-02-01

    The study was aimed at (1) the determination of the incidence of abnormalities of the urinary tract in newborn infants detected by postnatal ultrasound screening, and (2) the evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of postnatal ultrasound screening for detecting surgical urinary tract abnormalities. The prospective study was of full-term neonates born in the University Hospital of Olomouc in 2005-2008 who underwent renal ultrasound screening after 72 h of life. Significant findings were recorded. Subsequent diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were recorded and evaluated in a group of children with detected renal pelvic dilatation (RPD). (1) A total of 6,088 newborn infants was examined. The absolute and relative RPD incidence rates (anteroposterior diameter, APD) were as follows: 5-7 mm, 146 (2.4%); 7-10 mm, 70 (1.15%); 10-15 mm, 13 (0.21%), and 15 mm or more, 5 (0.08%). Of those, 16 children were operated on for abnormalities of the urinary tract, of which nine (56%) had been detected by prenatal screening. Other findings: six cases of unilateral renal agenesis, four cases of multicystic renal dysplasia, four of renal dystopia, one of polycystic kidney disease and one of renal hypoplasia. (2) A group of 224 children with postnatally detected RPD was examined, of whom 40 (17.9%) underwent voiding cystourethrography and/or scintigraphy and 16 (7.1%) were treated surgically. The receiver operating characteristic curves were analyzed, and the areas under the curves were calculated. Postnatal renal ultrasound screening is probably a suitable test for detecting significant urinary tract abnormalities. PMID:19856001

  10. Contemporary issues with pharmacotherapy for lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Osman, N; Chapple, C R

    2014-05-01

    Two articles appeared in the November 2012 edition of the journal evaluating aspects relating to the use of two important pharmacotherapeutic classes for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in real life clinical practice. LUTS is a non-specific term that encompasses urine storage, voiding and postmicturition symptoms. LUTS is a common bothersome problem affecting both men and women with a comparable prevalence in age-matched patients of both sexes that increases with ageing. PMID:24750526

  11. Vocal tract articulation revisited: the case of the monk parakeet

    PubMed Central

    Ohms, Verena R.; Beckers, Gabriël J. L.; ten Cate, Carel; Suthers, Roderick A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Birdsong and human speech share many features with respect to vocal learning and development. However, the vocal production mechanisms have long been considered to be distinct. The vocal organ of songbirds is more complex than the human larynx, leading to the hypothesis that vocal variation in birdsong originates mainly at the sound source, while in humans it is primarily due to vocal tract filtering. However, several recent studies have indicated the importance of vocal tract articulators such as the beak and oropharyngeal–esophageal cavity. In contrast to most other bird groups, parrots have a prominent tongue, raising the possibility that tongue movements may also be of significant importance in vocal production in parrots, but evidence is rare and observations often anecdotal. In the current study we used X-ray cinematographic imaging of naturally vocalizing monk parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) to assess which articulators are possibly involved in vocal tract filtering in this species. We observed prominent tongue height changes, beak opening movements and tracheal length changes, which suggests that all of these components play an important role in modulating vocal tract resonance. Moreover, the observation of tracheal shortening as a vocal articulator in live birds has to our knowledge not been described before. We also found strong positive correlations between beak opening and amplitude as well as changes in tongue height and amplitude in several types of vocalization. Our results suggest considerable differences between parrot and songbird vocal production while at the same time the parrot's vocal articulation might more closely resemble human speech production in the sense that both make extensive use of the tongue as a vocal articulator. PMID:22162856

  12. Mutations in DSTYK and Dominant Urinary Tract Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Nees, Shannon N.; Perry, Brittany J.; Choi, Murim; Bodria, Monica; Liu, Yan; Weng, Patricia L.; Lozanovski, Vladimir J.; Verbitsky, Miguel; Lugani, Francesca; Sterken, Roel; Paragas, Neal; Caridi, Gianluca; Carrea, Alba; Dagnino, Monica; Materna-Kiryluk, Anna; Santamaria, Giuseppe; Murtas, Corrado; Ristoska-Bojkovska, Nadica; Izzi, Claudia; Kacak, Nilgun; Bianco, Beatrice; Giberti, Stefania; Gigante, Maddalena; Piaggio, Giorgio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Vukic, Durdica Kosuljandic; Vukojevic, Katarina; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Saraga, Marijan; Gucev, Zoran; Allegri, Landino; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Casu, Domenica; State, Matthew; Scolari, Francesco; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Al-Awqati, Qais; D'Agati, Vivette D.; Drummond, Iain A.; Tasic, Velibor; Lifton, Richard P.; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and the urinary tract are the most common cause of pediatric kidney failure. These disorders are highly heterogeneous, and the etiologic factors are poorly understood. METHODS We performed genomewide linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing in a family with an autosomal dominant form of congenital abnormalities of the kidney or urinary tract (seven affected family members). We also performed a sequence analysis in 311 unrelated patients, as well as histologic and functional studies. RESULTS Linkage analysis identified five regions of the genome that were shared among all affected family members. Exome sequencing identified a single, rare, deleterious variant within these linkage intervals, a heterozygous splice-site mutation in the dual serine–threonine and tyrosine protein kinase gene (DSTYK). This variant, which resulted in aberrant splicing of messenger RNA, was present in all affected family members. Additional, independent DSTYK mutations, including nonsense and splice-site mutations, were detected in 7 of 311 unrelated patients. DSTYK is highly expressed in the maturing epithelia of all major organs, localizing to cell membranes. Knockdown in zebrafish resulted in developmental defects in multiple organs, which suggested loss of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. Consistent with this finding is the observation that DSTYK colocalizes with FGF receptors in the ureteric bud and metanephric mesenchyme. DSTYK knockdown in human embryonic kidney cells inhibited FGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the principal signal downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases. CONCLUSIONS We detected independent DSTYK mutations in 2.3% of patients with congenital abnormalities of the kidney or urinary tract, a finding that suggests that DSTYK is a major determinant of human urinary tract development, downstream of FGF signaling. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and

  13. A respiratory tract dosimetry model for air toxics

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, J.H. )

    1990-10-01

    The development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for the whole body in which inhalation, exhalation, and metabolism in respiratory tract tissues are taken into account is described. As an example of the model's use, the results of several experiments in which rats and humans were exposed to styrene were simulated; these results are discussed. The predicted results agree with the empirical data and with the modeling results of others.

  14. A respiratory tract dosimetry model for air toxics.

    PubMed

    Overton, J H

    1990-10-01

    The development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for the whole body in which inhalation, exhalation, and metabolism in respiratory tract tissues are taken into account is described. As an example of the model's use, the results of several experiments in which rats and humans were exposed to styrene were simulated; these results are discussed. The predicted results agree with the empirical data and with the modeling results of others. PMID:2274981

  15. Respiratory-tract dosimetry model for air toxics (October 1990)

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    The development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for the whole body in which inhalation, exhalation, and metabolism in respiratory tract tissues are taken into account is described. As an example of the model's use, the results of several experiments in which rats and humans were exposed to styrene were simulated; these results are discussed. The predicted results agree with the empirical data and with the modeling results of others.

  16. Upper Tract Urological Laparoendoscopic Single-Site Surgery (LESS)

    PubMed Central

    Tugcu, Volkan; Sahin, Selcuk; Seker, Gokhan; Kargi, Taner; Tasci, Ali Ihsan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Our objective is to report intermediate-term outcomes for patients who have undergone upper tract urologic laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) at a single institution. Methods: From January 1, 2008, through November 30, 2012, 107 cases treated with LESS were identified, including pyeloplasty (n = 30), ureterolithotomy (n = 32), nephrectomy (n = 35; simple = 31, partial = 4), and cyst decortication (n = 10). Perioperative data were reviewed, and conversion and complication rates were noted. Results: The median follow-up was 21.5 months for pyeloplasty, 20.5 for ureterolithotomy, 28.0 for simple nephrectomy, 14.0 for partial nephrectomy, and 19.0 for cyst decortication. Major complications were encountered in 8 patients, including 3 intraoperative complications (2 bowel injury with serosal tearing and 1 intraoperative bleeding), which were recognized and repaired with LESS or conversion to conventional laparoscopy (CL). During the intermediate postoperative period (30–90 days) major complications occurred in 5 patients: 4 ureteral strictures (Clavien-Dindo grade [CG] IIIb) and 1 urinoma formation (CG IIIa). During the early postoperative period (<30 days), the most common minor complications were flank pain (CG I) in 16 patients and urinary tract infection (CG II) in 11, followed by urinary leakage (CG I) in 8. Conclusions: Intermediate-term functional outcomes of this single-center study confirm that upper tract LESS is a challenging procedure that can be safe and effective when performed by an experienced team. Prospective studies with longer follow-up periods are needed to investigate the safety of LESS in the treatment of various upper urinary tract conditions. PMID:26648679

  17. Spontaneous Reproductive Tract Lesions in Aged Captive Chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Chaffee, B K; Beck, A P; Owston, M A; Kumar, S; Baze, W B; Magden, E R; Dick, E J; Lammey, M; Abee, C R

    2016-03-01

    Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) have served as an important model for studies of reproductive diseases and aging-related disorders in humans. However, limited information is available about spontaneously occurring reproductive tract lesions in aging chimpanzees. In this article, the authors present histopathologic descriptions of lesions identified in the reproductive tract, including the mammary gland, of 33 female and 34 male aged chimpanzees from 3 captive populations. The most common findings in female chimpanzees were ovarian atrophy, uterine leiomyoma, adenomyosis, and endometrial atrophy. The most common findings in male chimpanzees were seminiferous tubule degeneration and lymphocytic infiltrates in the prostate gland. Other less common lesions included an ovarian granulosa cell tumor, cystic endometrial hyperplasia, an endometrial polyp, uterine artery hypertrophy and mineralization, atrophic vaginitis, mammary gland inflammation, prostatic epithelial hyperplasia, dilated seminal vesicles, a sperm granuloma, and lymphocytic infiltrates in the epididymis. The findings in this study closely mimic changes described in the reproductive tract of aged humans, with the exception of a lack of malignant changes observed in the mammary gland and prostate gland. PMID:26823448

  18. Reproductive tract inflammatory disease in postpartum dairy cows.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, S J

    2014-05-01

    Up to half of dairy cows are affected by at least one of metritis, purulent vaginal discharge, endometritis or cervicitis in the postpartum period. These conditions result from inadequate immune response to bacterial infection (failure to clear pathogenic bacteria from the uterus) or persistent inflammation that impairs rather than enhances reproductive function. The degree of mobilization of fat and how effectively it is used as a metabolic fuel is well recognized as a risk factor for metabolic and infectious disease. Release of non-esterified fatty acids has direct effects on liver and immune function but also produces pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-6), which contribute to systemic inflammation and to insulin resistance. Therefore, reproductive tract inflammatory disease may be a function of both local and systemic inflammatory stimuli and regulation as well as regulation of fat metabolism. Better understanding of variables associated with insulin resistance and inflammatory regulation in the liver and adipose tissue may lead to improvement of reproductive tract health. This paper reviews factors that may contribute to postpartum reproductive tract inflammatory diseases in dairy cows and their inter-relationships, impacts and treatment. PMID:24679404

  19. Role of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Resected Extrahepatic Biliary Tract Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae Lee, Woo Jin; Woo, Sang Myung; Moon, Sung Ho; Yoo, Tae; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Seong Hoon; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) on locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) for patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer treated with curative resection. Methods and Materials: The study involved 168 patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer undergoing curative resection between August 2001 and April 2009. Of the 168 patients, 115 received adjuvant CRT (CRT group) and 53 did not (no-CRT group). Gender, age, tumor size, histologic differentiation, pre- and postoperative carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level, resection margin, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, T stage, N stage, overall stage, and the use of adjuvant CRT were analyzed to identify the prognostic factors associated with LRC, DFS, and OS. Results: For all patients, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rate was 54.8%, 30.6%, and 33.9%, respectively. On univariate analysis, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rates in the CRT group were significantly better than those in the no-CRT group (58.5% vs. 44.4%, p = .007; 32.1% vs. 26.1%, p = .041; 36.5% vs. 28.2%, p = .049, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that adjuvant CRT was a significant independent prognostic factor for LRC, DFS, and OS (p < .05). Conclusion: Our results have suggested that adjuvant CRT helps achieve LRC and, consequently, improves DFS and OS in patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer.

  20. FRATS: Functional Regression Analysis of DTI Tract Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongtu; Styner, Martin; Tang, Niansheng; Liu, Zhexing; Lin, Weili; Gilmore, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides important information on the structure of white matter fiber bundles as well as detailed tissue properties along these fiber bundles in vivo. This paper presents a functional regression framework, called FRATS, for the analysis of multiple diffusion properties along fiber bundle as functions in an infinite dimensional space and their association with a set of covariates of interest, such as age, diagnostic status and gender, in real applications. The functional regression framework consists of four integrated components: the local polynomial kernel method for smoothing multiple diffusion properties along individual fiber bundles, a functional linear model for characterizing the association between fiber bundle diffusion properties and a set of covariates, a global test statistic for testing hypotheses of interest, and a resampling method for approximating the p-value of the global test statistic. The proposed methodology is applied to characterizing the development of five diffusion properties including fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and the three eigenvalues of diffusion tensor along the splenium of the corpus callosum tract and the right internal capsule tract in a clinical study of neurodevelopment. Significant age and gestational age effects on the five diffusion properties were found in both tracts. The resulting analysis pipeline can be used for understanding normal brain development, the neural bases of neuropsychiatric disorders, and the joint effects of environmental and genetic factors on white matter fiber bundles. PMID:20335089

  1. Site and mechanism of morphine tolerance in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    AKBARALI, H. I.; INKISAR, A.; DEWEY, W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation is a major clinical problem. The effects of morphine, and other narcotics, on the gastrointestinal tract persist over long-term use thus limiting the clinical benefit of these excellent pain relievers. The effects of opioids in the gut, including morphine, are largely mediated by the μ-opioid receptors at the soma and nerve terminals of enteric neurons. Recent studies demonstrate that regional differences exist in both acute and chronic morphine along the gastrointestinal tract. While tolerance develops to the analgesic effects and upper gastrointestinal motility upon repeated morphine administration, tolerance does not develop in the colon with chronic opioids resulting in persistent constipation. Here, we review the mechanisms by which tolerance develops in the small but not the large intestine. The regional differences lie in the signaling and regulation of the μopioid receptor in the various segments of the gastrointestinal tract. The differential role of β-arrestin2 in tolerance development between central and enteric neurons defines the potential for therapeutic approaches in developing ligands with analgesic properties and minimal constipating effects. PMID:25257923

  2. Immunohistochemical analysis of clear cell carcinoma of the gynecologic tract.

    PubMed

    Vang, R; Whitaker, B P; Farhood, A I; Silva, E G; Ro, J Y; Deavers, M T

    2001-07-01

    Clear cell carcinoma of the gynecologic tract has been defined in terms of its clinical and histologic features; however, its immunophenotypic profile has not been fully characterized. Seventeen cases of primary clear cell carcinoma from various sites within the female genital tract (11 ovary, 5 uterus, 1 vagina) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. These tumors were assessed for the expression of cytokeratin 7 (CK7), cytokeratin 20 (CK20), low and high molecular weight cytokeratin, (CAM5.2 and 34 beta E12, respectively), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), Leu-M1, vimentin, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), bcl-2, p53, HER-2/neu, and CA-125. The characteristic immunoprofile for all sites was positivity for CK7, CAM5.2, 34 beta E12, CEA, Leu-M1, vimentin, bcl-2, p53, and CA-125; variably positivity for ER and HER-2/neu; and negativity for CK20 and PR. For comparison, two cases of urologic clear cell carcinoma (1 bladder, 1 urethra) were also studied, and their profile was found to be similar to the gynecologic cases. Aside from minor differences, clear cell carcinoma appears to have the same immunophenotype regardless of whether it originates in the endometrium, ovary, or genitourinary tract. Much of its profile is similar to other gynecologic adenocarcinomas, but some of the markers studied may be useful in the differential diagnosis of this tumor. PMID:11444201

  3. Glucosensing in the gastrointestinal tract: Impact on glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fournel, Audren; Marlin, Alysson; Abot, Anne; Pasquio, Charles; Cirillo, Carla; Cani, Patrice D; Knauf, Claude

    2016-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is an important interface of exchange between ingested food and the body. Glucose is one of the major dietary sources of energy. All along the gastrointestinal tube, e.g., the oral cavity, small intestine, pancreas, and portal vein, specialized cells referred to as glucosensors detect variations in glucose levels. In response to this glucose detection, these cells send hormonal and neuronal messages to tissues involved in glucose metabolism to regulate glycemia. The gastrointestinal tract continuously communicates with the brain, especially with the hypothalamus, via the gut-brain axis. It is now well established that the cross talk between the gut and the brain is of crucial importance in the control of glucose homeostasis. In addition to receiving glucosensing information from the gut, the hypothalamus may also directly sense glucose. Indeed, the hypothalamus contains glucose-sensitive cells that regulate glucose homeostasis by sending signals to peripheral tissues via the autonomous nervous system. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which glucosensors along the gastrointestinal tract detect glucose, as well as the results of such detection in the whole body, including the hypothalamus. We also highlight how disturbances in the glucosensing process may lead to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. A better understanding of the pathways regulating glucose homeostasis will further facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metabolic diseases. PMID:26939867

  4. Mouse Model of Respiratory Tract Infection Induced by Waddlia chondrophila

    PubMed Central

    Pilloux, Ludovic; LeRoy, Didier; Brunel, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Waddlia chondrophila, an obligate intracellular bacterium belonging to the Chlamydiales order, is considered as an emerging pathogen. Some clinical studies highlighted a possible role of W. chondrophila in bronchiolitis, pneumonia and miscarriage. This pathogenic potential is further supported by the ability of W. chondrophila to infect and replicate within human pneumocytes, macrophages and endometrial cells. Considering that W. chondrophila might be a causative agent of respiratory tract infection, we developed a mouse model of respiratory tract infection to get insight into the pathogenesis of W. chondrophila. Following intranasal inoculation of 2 x 108 W. chondrophila, mice lost up to 40% of their body weight, and succumbed rapidly from infection with a death rate reaching 50% at day 4 post-inoculation. Bacterial loads, estimated by qPCR, increased from day 0 to day 3 post-infection and decreased thereafter in surviving mice. Bacterial growth was confirmed by detecting dividing bacteria using electron microscopy, and living bacteria were isolated from lungs 14 days post-infection. Immunohistochemistry and histopathology of infected lungs revealed the presence of bacteria associated with pneumonia characterized by an important multifocal inflammation. The high inflammatory score in the lungs was associated with the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines in both serum and lungs at day 3 post-infection. This animal model supports the role of W. chondrophila as an agent of respiratory tract infection, and will help understanding the pathogenesis of this strict intracellular bacterium. PMID:26950066

  5. Tract-specific white matter microstructure and gait in humans.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, Vincentius J A; de Groot, Marius; Cremers, Lotte G M; van der Geest, Jos N; Hofman, Albert; Niessen, Wiro J; van der Lugt, Aad; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M Arfan

    2016-07-01

    Gait is a complex sequence of movements, requiring cooperation of many brain areas, such as the motor cortex, somatosensory cortex, and cerebellum. However, it is unclear which connecting white matter tracts are essential for communication across brain areas to facilitate proper gait. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we investigated associations of microstructural organization in 14 brain white matter tracts with gait, among 2330 dementia- and stroke-free community-dwelling individuals. Gait was assessed by electronic walkway and summarized into Global Gait, and 7 gait domains. Higher white matter microstructure associated with higher Global Gait, Phases, Variability, Pace, and Turning. Microstructure in thalamic radiations, followed by association tracts and the forceps major, associated most strongly with gait. Hence, in community-dwelling individuals, higher white matter microstructure associated with better gait, including larger strides, more single support, less stride-to-stride variability, and less turning steps. Our findings suggest that intact thalamocortical communication, cortex-to-cortex communication, and interhemispheric visuospatial integration are most essential in human gait. PMID:27255826

  6. Acoustic signatures of sound source-tract coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, Ezequiel M.; Perl, Yonatan Sanz; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2011-04-01

    Birdsong is a complex behavior, which results from the interaction between a nervous system and a biomechanical peripheral device. While much has been learned about how complex sounds are generated in the vocal organ, little has been learned about the signature on the vocalizations of the nonlinear effects introduced by the acoustic interactions between a sound source and the vocal tract. The variety of morphologies among bird species makes birdsong a most suitable model to study phenomena associated to the production of complex vocalizations. Inspired by the sound production mechanisms of songbirds, in this work we study a mathematical model of a vocal organ, in which a simple sound source interacts with a tract, leading to a delay differential equation. We explore the system numerically, and by taking it to the weakly nonlinear limit, we are able to examine its periodic solutions analytically. By these means we are able to explore the dynamics of oscillatory solutions of a sound source-tract coupled system, which are qualitatively different from those of a sound source-filter model of a vocal organ. Nonlinear features of the solutions are proposed as the underlying mechanisms of observed phenomena in birdsong, such as unilaterally produced “frequency jumps,” enhancement of resonances, and the shift of the fundamental frequency observed in heliox experiments.

  7. Healthcare practices among blacks and whites with urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Daniel L.; Edwards, Bennett G.; Whitehead, Kimberly; Amamoo, M. Ahinee; Godley, Paul A.

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: The reasons for African-American men to seek care for lower urinary care symptoms has not been determined due to sparse population-based data. OBJECTIVE: Our study examines the solicitation and receipt of medical care for urinary symptoms among racially oversampled elderly urban and rural cohort of African Americans and whites. DESIGN: Longitudinal analyses were conducted on five North Carolina counties through the Piedmont Health Survey of the Elderly Established Populations for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly. In 1994, the analytic cohort included 482 African Americans and 407 whites; by 1998, 249 and 222, respectively. RESULTS: In 1994, 49.4% of African Americans presented with lower urinary tract symptoms compared to 56.8% of whites. By 1998, these percentages increased to 60.6% and 70.3%, respectively. African Americans reported more interference with activities of daily living than whites. African Americans were less likely than whites to have regular digital rectal exams (DRE) and were more likely to have never received a DRE at all. Additionally, elders with less educational attainment, those who smoked, those who delayed care quite often and those who used less-experienced physicians were less likely to receive regular DREs. CONCLUSION: Poor health behavior has the greatest impact on healthcare seeking for lower urinary tract symptoms. These health behavior risk factors are systemic of a lack of health education. Increases in health education among African Americans regarding lower urinary tract symptoms may close the racial disparity in healthcare-seeking behaviors. PMID:17444430

  8. [Needle tract seeding of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Mrzljak, Anna; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Blasković, Darko; Skegro, Dinko; Jadrijević, Stipislav; Colić-Cvrlje, Vesna

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and core needle biopsy (CNB) are effective methods for the diagnosis of focal hepatic lesions. In case of neoplastic lesions, however, this may be followed by the seeding of malignant cells along the needle tract. We report a case of subcutaneous needle tract seeding of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) 25 months after liver transplantation. A 57-year-old man with compensated hepatitis-B-related liver cirrhosis was diagnosed with HCC by CNB, and the lesion was resected. Ten months after the procedure, FNAC of a small hepatic lesion confirmed tumor recurrence. The patient was successfully transplanted and 25 months later, a subcutaneous tumor appeared on the abdominal wall over the previous site of puncture without further dissemination of the disease. Total resection of the lesion confirmed HCC. It remains undetermined whether the seeding appeared after FNAC or CNB. After 18-month follow-up the patient was uneventful. The objectives of this report are to present clinical aspects and outcome of HCC needle tract seeding in a transplanted patient, discussing the problems and pitfalls of diagnostic workup and management of HCC. PMID:23126051

  9. Host-pathogen interactions in urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nielubowicz, Greta R; Mobley, Harry L T

    2010-08-01

    The urinary tract is a common site of bacterial infections; nearly half of all women experience at least one urinary tract infection (UTI) during their lifetime. These infections are classified based on the condition of the host. Uncomplicated infections affect otherwise healthy individuals and are most commonly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli, whereas complicated infections affect patients with underlying difficulties, such as a urinary tract abnormality or catheterization, and are commonly caused by species such as Proteus mirabilis. Virulence and fitness factors produced by both pathogens include fimbriae, toxins, flagella, iron acquisition systems, and proteins that function in immune evasion. Additional factors that contribute to infection include the formation of intracellular bacterial communities by E. coli and the production of urease by P. mirabilis, which can result in urinary stone formation. Innate immune responses are induced or mediated by pattern recognition receptors, antimicrobial peptides, and neutrophils. The adaptive immune response to UTI is less well understood. Host factors TLR4 and CXCR1 are implicated in disease outcome and susceptibility, respectively. Low levels of TLR4 are associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria while low levels of CXCR1 are associated with increased incidence of acute pyelonephritis. Current research is focused on the identification of additional virulence factors and therapeutic or prophylactic targets that might be used in the generation of vaccines against both uropathogens. PMID:20647992

  10. Colonization of the female genital tract with Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, M E; Soper, D E; Archer, G L

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of colonization by Staphylococcus saprophyticus of the urogenital tracts of 276 women from an outpatient gynecology practice was determined by using selective and enrichment culture techniques. Nineteen subjects (6.9%) were found to be colonized by S. saprophyticus. The rectum was the most frequent site of colonization and was responsible for 40% of the isolates; this was followed in decreasing order by the urethra, urine, and cervix. Women colonized by S. saprophyticus were more likely to have experienced a urinary tract infection in the previous 12 months (P = 0.058; odds ratio, 2.844; 95% confidence interval, 1.054 to 7.671). Patients colonized by S. saprophyticus tended to have had their menstrual periods more recently (P = 0.066), experienced sexual intercourse more recently (P = 0.168), and had a recent or concurrent diagnosis of vaginal candidiasis (P = 0.111; odds ratio, 2.393; 95% confidence interval, 0.877 to 6.528). A seasonal variation in colonization was observed, with colonization most likely occurring during the summer and fall. Follow-up for an average of 6.75 months failed to document any colonized woman progressing to symptomatic urinary tract infection. In addition, 21 women colonized by non-S. saprophyticus, novobiocin-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci were identified and characterized. PMID:1452668

  11. The Paramagnetic Pillared Bentonites as Digestive Tract MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojović, Miloš; Daković, Marko; Omerašević, Mia; Mojović, Zorica; Banković, Predrag; Milutinović-Nikolić, Aleksandra; Jovanović, Dušan

    The increased use of imaging techniques in diagnostic studies, such as MRI, has contributed to the development of the wide range of new materials which could be successfully used as image improving agents. However, there is a lack of such substances in the area of gastrointestinal tract MRI. Many of the traditionally popular relaxation altering agents show poor results and disadvantages provoking black bowel, side effects of diarrhea and the presence of artifacts arising from clumping. Paramagnetic species seem to be potentially suitable agents for these studies, but contrast opacification has been reported and less than 60% of the gastrointestinal tract magnetic resonance scans showed improved delineation of abdominal pathologies. The new solution has been proposed as zeolites or smectite clays (hectorite and montmorillonite) enclosing of paramagnetic metal ions obtained by ion-exchange methods. However, such materials have problems of leakage of paramagnetic ions causing the appearance of the various side-effects. In this study we show that Co+2 and Dy+3 paramagnetic-pillared bentonites could be successfully used as MRI digestive tract non-leaching contrast agents, altering the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of fluids in contact with the clay minerals.

  12. Management of primary melanoma of the female urogenital tract.

    PubMed

    Piura, Benjamin

    2008-10-01

    Primary melanoma of the urogenital tract in women is rare, but biologically aggressive. They usually affect elderly women and account for less than 10% of all cancer of the urogenital tract in women and less than 10% of all melanoma diagnosed in women. Tumours originate from melanocytes that are present in the urogenital mucosal epithelium of about 3% of women. Tumour staging can be challenging; however, the American Joint Committee on Cancer melanoma staging system has been recommended for use in vulvar and vaginal melanoma. Surgery is the treatment of choice; less-extensive surgery can be a sensible approach because satisfactory locoregional control might be obtained from wide local excision and radiotherapy, without the morbidity and disfigurement associated with radical surgery. Complete regional lymphadenectomy does not seem necessary if a sentinel lymph-node biopsy sample is negative; however, this decision should be made with caution. Various chemotherapy and biotherapy (ie, immunotherapy and biological-response modifiers) regimens have been used in advanced or metastatic melanoma. However, the role of chemotherapy for women with urogenital-tract melanoma has not been established, and biotherapy methods presented to date have been anecdotal. PMID:19071254

  13. Sperm Storage in the Female Reproductive Tract in Birds

    PubMed Central

    SASANAMI, Tomohiro; MATSUZAKI, Mei; MIZUSHIMA, Shusei; HIYAMA, Gen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The ability to store sperm in the female genital tract is frequently observed in vertebrates as well as in invertebrates. Because of the presence of a system that maintains the ejaculated sperm alive in the female reproductive tract in a variety of animals, this strategy appears to be advantageous for animal reproduction. Although the occurrence and physiological reasons for sperm storage have been reported extensively in many species, the mechanism of sperm storage in the female reproductive tract has been poorly understood until recently. In avian species, the specialized simple tubular invaginations referred to as sperm storage tubules (SSTs) are found in the oviduct as a sperm storage organ. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the mechanism of sperm uptake into the SSTs, maintenance within it, and controlled release of the sperm from the SSTs. Since sperm storage in avian species occurs at high body temperatures (i.e., 41 C), elucidation of the mechanism for sperm storage may lead to the development of new strategies for sperm preservation at ambient temperatures, and these could be used in a myriad of applications in the field of reproduction. PMID:23965601

  14. [Current Aspects on the Pathogenesis of Urinary Tract Infections].

    PubMed

    Magistro, G; Marcon, J; Beck, V; Herlemann, A; Stief, C G; Gratzke, C

    2016-05-01

    Urinary tract infections are among the most common bacterial infectious diseases worldwide. Every second woman will experience at least one urinary tract infection in her lifetime. The administration of antibiotics has been a safe and efficient treatment modality so far. However, due to the emergence of multi-resistant pathogens and the developmental void of new antimicrobial drugs, the therapy of infections mighty become more challenging in the near future. So, knowledge of the complex host-pathogen interaction is of great importance. Common phenotypes observed in clinical practice suggest basic principles, which are relevant for the development of novel antimicrobial strategies. With invading pathogens forming intracellular bacterial communities they evade host response and provide a nidus for recurrent infection. A plethora of virulence factors allow uropathogenic bacteria to colonize and to establish infections in the urinary tract. In response, host responses seem to address specific virulence mechanisms that are essential to pathogenicity. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying the complex host-pathogen interaction is critical to devise novel treatment options. PMID:27008434

  15. Structural abnormality of the corticospinal tract in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Scientists are beginning to document abnormalities in white matter connectivity in major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent developments in diffusion-weighted image analyses, including tractography clustering methods, may yield improved characterization of these white matter abnormalities in MDD. In this study, we acquired diffusion-weighted imaging data from MDD participants and matched healthy controls. We analyzed these data using two tractography clustering methods: automated fiber quantification (AFQ) and the maximum density path (MDP) procedure. We used AFQ to compare fractional anisotropy (FA; an index of water diffusion) in these two groups across major white matter tracts. Subsequently, we used the MDP procedure to compare FA differences in fiber paths related to the abnormalities in major fiber tracts that were identified using AFQ. Results FA was higher in the bilateral corticospinal tracts (CSTs) in MDD (p’s < 0.002). Secondary analyses using the MDP procedure detected primarily increases in FA in the CST-related fiber paths of the bilateral posterior limbs of the internal capsule, right superior corona radiata, and the left external capsule. Conclusions This is the first study to implicate the CST and several related fiber pathways in MDD. These findings suggest important new hypotheses regarding the role of CST abnormalities in MDD, including in relation to explicating CST-related abnormalities to depressive symptoms and RDoC domains and constructs. PMID:25295159

  16. Fiber deposition pattern in two human respiratory tract replicas.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei-Chung; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2006-09-01

    This study consisted of a series of experiments to investigate the factors that might affect the fiber deposition pattern in the human respiratory tract. Carbon fibers with uniform diameter and polydispersed length were chosen as the test material. Two geometry-defined human respiratory tract replicas encompassing the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, trachea, and first few bifurcations of the tracheobronchial airways were used in this research. Deposition studies were conducted by delivering aerosolized carbon fibers into the replicas at constant inspiratory flow rates of 15, 43.5, and 60 L/min. The results showed that impaction is the dominant deposition mechanism for both replicas. Most of the fibers with high momentum deposited in the oral airway (oral cavity to larynx), and fibers with low momentum were found to pass through the entire replica easily. When comparing the results between the two replicas, fiber length, inspiratory flow rate, and the geometry of the oral airway were found to be factors that might affect the fiber deposition pattern in the human respiratory tract. PMID:16774864

  17. Improving DTI tractography by including diagonal tract propagation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Paul A; Cho, Kuan-Hung; Lin, Ching-Po; Biswal, Bharat B

    2012-01-01

    Tractography algorithms have been developed to reconstruct likely WM pathways in the brain from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. In this study, an elegant and simple means for improving existing tractography algorithms is proposed by allowing tracts to propagate through diagonal trajectories between voxels, instead of only rectilinearly to their facewise neighbors. A series of tests (using both real and simulated data sets) are utilized to show several benefits of this new approach. First, the inclusion of diagonal tract propagation decreases the dependence of an algorithm on the arbitrary orientation of coordinate axes and therefore reduces numerical errors associated with that bias (which are also demonstrated here). Moreover, both quantitatively and qualitatively, including diagonals decreases overall noise sensitivity of results and leads to significantly greater efficiency in scanning protocols; that is, the obtained tracts converge much more quickly (i.e., in a smaller amount of scanning time) to those of data sets with high SNR and spatial resolution. Importantly, the inclusion of diagonal propagation adds essentially no appreciable time of calculation or computational costs to standard methods. This study focuses on the widely-used streamline tracking method, FACT (fiber assessment by continuous tracking), and the modified method is termed "FACTID" (FACT including diagonals). PMID:22970125

  18. Chateter-associated Urinary Tract Infections in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Piljic, Dilista; Porobic-Jahic, Humera; Piljic, Dragan; Ahmetagic, Sead; Jahic, Rahima

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hospital-acquired Urinary tract infections make 35% of all the hospital-acquired infections, and about 80% of them are related to the catheterization of the urinary bladder Purpose: To determine clinical characteristics and dominant etiologic factors of Urinary Tract Infections associated with urinary catheter (C-UTIs). Methods: Determined clinical characteristics of C-UTIs were prospectively analyzed on 38 hospitalized patients in the Clinic for Infectious Diseases at the University Clinical Centre Tuzla, from January 1st 2011 to December 31st 2011. The control group constituted of 200 patients with community-acquired Urinary Tract Infections (Co-UTIs) hospitalized in the same period. Results: It was registered on 22 (57.89%) of symptomatic infections, 14 (36.84%) asymptomatic bacteriuria and 2 (5.26%) other C-UTIs. Dominant etiologic factors were: E. coli, caused 14 (36.84%), Extended-Spectrum Beta-lactamase producing (ESBL) Klebsiella pneumoniae 7 (18.42%), Enterococcus faecium and Candida spp. 3 (7.89%) of C-UTIs. E. coli was significantly most common etiologic factor of C-UTIs in younger women (p=0.04). E. coli from C-UTIS showed significantly higher resistance to antimicrobial drugs. Inadequate antimicrobial therapy was significantly more common prescribed to patients from C-UTIs. Lethal outcome was significantly most common associated with certain clinical and laboratory findings. Conclusion: Initial antimicrobial therapy of those serious infections should be based on data from those research. PMID:24167432

  19. Photodynamic therapy for pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-02-01

    Patients with non-resectable pancreatic and biliary tract cancer (cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer) have a dismal outlook with conventional palliative therapies, with a median survival of 3-9 months and a 5 year survival of less than 3%. Surgery is the only curative treatment but is appropriate in less than 20% of cases, and even then is associated with a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Although most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastroenterology have been on lesions of the luminal gut, there is increasing experimental and clinical evidence for its efficacy in cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract. Our group has carried out the only clinical study of PDT in pancreatic carcinoma reported to date, and showed that PDT is feasible for local debulking of pancreatic cancer. PDT has also been used with palliative intent in patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, with patients treated with stenting plus PDT reporting improvements in cholestasis, quality of life and survival compared with historical or randomized controls treated with stenting alone. Further controlled studies are needed to establish the influence of PDT and chemotherapy on the survival and quality of life of patients with pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma.

  20. Differential adaptation of descending motor tracts in musicians.

    PubMed

    Rüber, Theodor; Lindenberg, Robert; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2015-06-01

    Between-group comparisons of musicians and nonmusicians have revealed structural brain differences and also functional differences in motor performance. In this study, we aimed to examine the relation between white matter microstructure and high-level motor skills by contrasting 2 groups of musicians with different instrument-specific motor requirements. We used diffusion tensor imaging to compare diffusivity measures of different corticospinal motor tracts of 10 keyboard players, 10 string players, and 10 nonmusicians. Additionally, the maximal tapping rates of their left and right index fingers were determined. When compared with nonmusicians, fractional anisotropy (FA) values of right-hemispheric motor tracts were significantly higher in both musician groups, whereas left-hemispheric motor tracts showed significantly higher FA values only in the keyboard players. Voxel-wise FA analysis found a group effect in white matter underlying the right motor cortex. Diffusivity measures of fibers originating in the primary motor cortex correlated with the maximal tapping rate of the contralateral index finger across all groups. The observed between-group diffusivity differences might represent an adaptation to the specific motor demands of the respective musical instrument. This is supported further by finding correlations between diffusivity measures and maximal tapping rates. PMID:24363265

  1. The acoustic effect of vocal tract adjustments in zebra finches

    PubMed Central

    Riede, Tobias; Schilling, Nadja; Goller, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Vocal production in songbirds requires the control of the respiratory system, the syrinx as sound source and the vocal tract as acoustic filter. Vocal tract movements consist of beak, tongue and hyoid movements which change the volume of the oropharyngeal-esophageal cavity (OEC), glottal movements and tracheal length changes. The respective contributions of each movement to filter properties are not completely understood, but the effects of this filtering are thought to be very important for acoustic communication in birds. One of the most striking movements of the upper vocal tract during vocal behavior in songbirds involves the OEC. This study measured the acoustic effect of OEC adjustments in zebra finches by comparing resonance acoustics between an utterance with OEC expansion (calls) and a similar utterance without OEC expansion (respiratory sounds induced by a bilateral syringeal denervation). X-ray cineradiography confirmed the presence of an OEC motor pattern during song and call production, and a custom-built Hall-effect collar system confirmed that OEC expansion movements were not present during respiratory sounds. The spectral emphasis during zebra finch call production ranging between 2.5 and 5 kHz was not present during respiratory sounds, indicating strongly that it can be attributed to the OEC expansion. PMID:23085986

  2. The acoustic effect of vocal tract adjustments in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Riede, Tobias; Schilling, Nadja; Goller, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Vocal production in songbirds requires the control of the respiratory system, the syrinx as sound source and the vocal tract as acoustic filter. Vocal tract movements consist of beak, tongue and hyoid movements, which change the volume of the oropharyngeal-esophageal cavity (OEC), glottal movements and tracheal length changes. The respective contributions of each movement to filter properties are not completely understood, but the effects of this filtering are thought to be very important for acoustic communication in birds. One of the most striking movements of the upper vocal tract during vocal behavior in songbirds involves the OEC. This study measured the acoustic effect of OEC adjustments in zebra finches by comparing resonance acoustics between an utterance with OEC expansion (calls) and a similar utterance without OEC expansion (respiratory sounds induced by a bilateral syringeal denervation). X-ray cineradiography confirmed the presence of an OEC motor pattern during song and call production, and a custom-built Hall-effect collar system confirmed that OEC expansion movements were not present during respiratory sounds. The spectral emphasis during zebra finch call production ranging between 2.5 and 5 kHz was not present during respiratory sounds, indicating strongly that it can be attributed to the OEC expansion. PMID:23085986

  3. Hedgehog signaling in development and homeostasis of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, Gijs R

    2007-10-01

    The Hedgehog family of secreted morphogenetic proteins acts through a complex evolutionary conserved signaling pathway to regulate patterning events during development and in the adult organism. In this review I discuss the role of Hedgehog signaling in the development, postnatal maintenance, and carcinogenesis of the gastrointestinal tract. Three mammalian hedgehog genes, sonic hedgehog (Shh), indian hedgehog (Ihh), and desert hedgehog (Dhh) have been identified. Shh and Ihh are important endodermal signals in the endodermal-mesodermal cross-talk that patterns the developing gut tube along different axes. Mutations in Shh, Ihh, and downstream signaling molecules lead to a variety of gross malformations of the murine gastrointestinal tract including esophageal atresia, tracheoesophageal fistula, annular pancreas, midgut malrotation, and duodenal and anal atresia. These congenital malformations are also found in varying constellations in humans, suggesting a possible role for defective Hedgehog signaling in these patients. In the adult, Hedgehog signaling regulates homeostasis in several endoderm-derived epithelia, for example, the stomach, intestine, and pancreas. Finally, growth of carcinomas of the proximal gastrointestinal tract such as esophageal, gastric, biliary duct, and pancreatic cancers may depend on Hedgehog signaling offering a potential avenue for novel therapy for these aggressive cancers. PMID:17928586

  4. Urinary Tract Stones and Osteoporosis: Findings From the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Laura D; Hovey, Kathleen M; Andrews, Christopher A; Thomas, Fridtjof; Sorensen, Mathew D; Crandall, Carolyn J; Watts, Nelson B; Bethel, Monique; Johnson, Karen C

    2015-11-01

    Kidney and bladder stones (urinary tract stones) and osteoporosis are prevalent, serious conditions for postmenopausal women. Men with kidney stones are at increased risk of osteoporosis; however, the relationship of urinary tract stones to osteoporosis in postmenopausal women has not been established. The purpose of this study was to determine whether urinary tract stones are an independent risk factor for changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and incident fractures in women in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). Data were obtained from 150,689 women in the Observational Study and Clinical Trials of the WHI with information on urinary tract stones status: 9856 of these women reported urinary tract stones at baseline and/or incident urinary tract stones during follow-up. Cox regression models were used to determine the association of urinary tract stones with incident fractures and linear mixed models were used to investigate the relationship of urinary tract stones with changes in BMD that occurred during WHI. Follow-up was over an average of 8 years. Models were adjusted for demographic and clinical factors, medication use, and dietary histories. In unadjusted models there was a significant association of urinary tract stones with incident total fractures (HR 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.17). However, in covariate adjusted analyses, urinary tract stones were not significantly related to changes in BMD at any skeletal site or to incident fractures. In conclusion, urinary tract stones in postmenopausal women are not an independent risk factor for osteoporosis. PMID:25990099

  5. Three-dimensional interactive and stereotactic human brain atlas of white matter tracts.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Chua, Beng Choon; Yang, Guo Liang; Qian, Guo Yu

    2012-01-01

    We present a human brain atlas of white matter (WM) tracts containing 40 major tracts, which is three-dimensional (3D), segmented, labeled, interactive, stereotactic and correlated to structure and vasculature. We consider: (1) WM accuracy by correlating WM tracts to underlying neuroanatomy and quantifying them; (2) balance between realism and completeness by processing a sequence of track volumes generated for various parameters with the increasing track number to enable a tract "shape convergence". MPRAGE and DTI in 64 directions of the same subject were acquired on 3 Tesla. The method has three steps: DTI-MPRAGE registration, 3D tract generation from DTI, to WM reconstruction from MPRAGE to parcellation into 17 components. 82 track volumes were generated for a wide spectrum of parameter values: Fractional Anisotropy threshold in [0.0125, 0.55] and trajectory angle lower than 45°, 60°, 65°, 70°, 75°, 80°, 85°, 90°. For each tract, a sequence of track volumes was processed to create/edit contours delineating this tract to achieve its shape convergence. The parcellated tracts were grouped into commissures, associations, projections and posterior fossa tracts, and labeled following Terminologia Anatomica. To facilitate that, a dedicated tract editor is developed which processes multiple track volumes, handles tracts in three representations (tracks, contours, envelopes); provides editing/visualization simultaneously on axial, coronal, sagittal planes; enables tract labeling and coloring; and provides numerous tools (track counting, smoothing and length thresholding; representation conversion and saving; structural atlas support). A stereotactic tract atlas along with parcellated WM was developed to explore in real-time any individual tract or their groups along with surrounding neuroanatomy. PMID:21505883

  6. Usefulness and problems of the urinary tract infection criteria for evaluating drug efficacy for complicated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Soichi; Tanaka, Kazushi; Miura, Tetsuya; Shigemura, Katsumi; Takenaka, Atsushi; Matsui, Takashi; Kamidono, Sadao; Nakano, Yuzo; Fujisawa, Masato

    2007-10-01

    We aimed to reveal the usefulness of and problematic points with the Criteria for evaluation of clinical efficacy of antimicrobial agents on urinary tract infection (draft fourth edition) proposed by the UTI Subcommittee of the Clinical Evaluation Guidelines Committee, Japan Society of Chemotherapy, for evaluating antimicrobial agents for complicated urinary tract infections. We conducted a multicenter trial involving 159 patients with complicated urinary tract infections without indwelling urinary catheters. The antimicrobial agents used were cefcapene pivoxil and levofloxacin. "Early evaluation" took place the day after completion of 7 days of therapy; "late evaluation" took place 5-9 days after the end of treatment, and "follow-up evaluation" was done 4-6 weeks after treatment. In the early evaluation, overall clinical efficacy was judged as excellent in 52.9% of the patients, moderate in 26.1%, and poor in 21.0%, and the bacteriological response was judged as "eradicated" for 86.4% of the 198 bacterial strains isolated. Of 96 patients included in the "late evaluation" category in accordance with the draft fourth edition, the clinical outcome was judged as "cured" in 68.4% and the microbiological outcome was judged as "eradicated" in 59.4%. These rates may be low, because 25 patients in whom clinical efficacy was evaluated as "poor" at the end of treatment were separately classified as "failed" at the late evaluation. Of the 49 patients with an excellent clinical response at the end of treatment, symptoms were exacerbated in 18 at the follow-up evaluation. Overall, the draft fourth edition, with some modifications of the third edition criteria, such as the addition of a follow-up evaluation 7 days after the cessation of drug administration, has the potential to play a role in the international standards for evaluating antimicrobial drug efficacy for complicated urinary tract infections. PMID:17982714

  7. Flanking A·T Basepairs Destabilize the B∗ Conformation of DNA A-Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Stellwagen, Earle; Dong, Qian; Stellwagen, Nancy C.

    2015-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis has been used to characterize the interaction of monovalent cations with 26-basepair DNA oligomers containing A-tracts embedded in flanking sequences with different basepair compositions. A 26-basepair random-sequence oligomer was used as the reference; lithium and tetrabutylammonium (TBA+) ions were used as the probe ions. The free solution mobilities of the A-tract and random-sequence oligomers were identical in solutions containing <∼100 mM cation. At higher cation concentrations, the A-tract oligomers migrated faster than the reference oligomer in TBA+ and slower than the reference in Li+. Hence, cations of different sizes can interact very differently with DNA A-tracts. The increased mobilities observed in TBA+ suggest that the large hydrophobic TBA+ ions are preferentially excluded from the vicinity of the A-tract minor groove, increasing the effective net charge of the A-tract oligomers and increasing the mobility. By contrast, Li+ ions decrease the mobility of A-tract oligomers because of the preferential localization of Li+ ions in the narrow A-tract minor groove. Embedding the A-tracts in AT-rich flanking sequences markedly alters preferential interactions of monovalent cations with the B∗ conformation. Hence, A-tracts embedded in genomic DNA may or may not interact preferentially with monovalent cations, depending on the relative number of A·T basepairs in the flanking sequences. PMID:25954886

  8. Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This group conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of lung and head and neck cancers, as well as new approac | Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of lung and head and neck cancers.

  10. Enterococcal urinary tract infections in a university hospital: clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Barros, Milton; Martinelli, Reinaldo; Rocha, Heonir

    2009-08-01

    Although urinary tract infections (UTI) represent the most common infection caused by enterococci, some aspects remain to be fully clarified. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics present in UTI caused by Enterococcus spp. in patients followed up at the Prof. Edgard Santos Teaching Hospital of the Federal University of Bahia. All patients consecutively examined between 1997 and 2005, who received a diagnosis of UTI caused by Enterococcus spp. were included in the study. UTI was defined as the presence of > or = 10(5) colony-forming units per mL of urine. Standard microbiological techniques were used. During the study period, 6.2% of the urine cultures were positive for Enterococcus spp. The mean age of the patients was 48.9 years and 57% were male. At initial evaluation, 13% of the patients had complaints suggestive of UTI. Nineteen patients had a history consistent with obstructive uropathy and 26 with neurogenic bladder. At final evaluation, UTI was the diagnosis in 48 patients. In 36 patients (29%), the primary diagnosis was related to urogenital diseases, consisting of obstructive uropathy in 23 of these cases, while in 32 patients (25.8%) primary diagnosis was related to neurologic diseases, frequently neurogenic bladder. UTI caused by Enterococcus spp. is not infrequent, is usually associated with few or no symptoms and occurs in sick patients who have anatomical or functional obstructive uropathy associated or not with urinary tract catheterization or instrumentation. The diagnosis of enterococcal UTI may indicate a urinary tract abnormality yet to be diagnosed. PMID:20231994

  11. Northern Florida reef tract benthic metabolism scaled by remote sensing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, J.C.; Yates, K.K.; Halley, R.B.; Kuffner, I.B.; Wright, C.W.; Hatcher, B.G.

    2006-01-01

    Holistic rates of excess organic carbon production (E) and calcification for a 0.5 km2 segment of the backreef platform of the northern Florida reef tract (NFRT) were estimated by combining biotope mapping using remote sensing with community metabolic rates determined with a benthic incubation system. The use of ASTER multispectral satellite imaging for the spatial scaling of benthic metabolic processes resulted in errors in E and net calcification (G) of 48 and 431% respectively, relative to estimates obtained using AISA hyperspectral airborne scanning. At 19 and 125%, the E and G errors relative to the AISA-based estimates were less pronounced for an analysis that used IKONOS multispectral satellite imagery to spatially extrapolate the chamber process measurements. Our scaling analysis indicates that the holistic calcification rate of the backreef platform of the northern Florida reef tract is negligible at 0.07 g CaCO3 m-2 d-1. All of the mapped biotopes in this reef zone are net heterotrophic, resulting in an estimated holistic excess production rate of -0.56 g C m-2 d-1, and an overall gross primary production to respiration ratio of 0.85. Based on our finding of ubiquitous heterotrophy, we infer that the backreef platform of the NFRT is a sink for external inputs of suspended particulate organic matter. Further, our results suggest that the inward advection of inorganic nutrients is not a dominant forcing mechanism for benthic biogeochemical function in the NFRT. We suggest that the degradation of the northern Florida reef tract may parallel the community phase shifts documented within other reef systems polluted by organic detritus.

  12. [Hypercalcemia in malignancies of the female genital tract].

    PubMed

    Piura, Benjamin

    2008-03-01

    Hypercalcemia is the most common paraneoplastic syndrome in adult malignancies (10%-30%) and rare in pediatric cancers (0.5%-1.3%). Hypercalcemia in malignancies is categorized into two groups: 1) Humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM)-caused by substances that are produced by the tumor cells and secreted into the blood circulation such as parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTH-rP), parathyroid hormone-intact (PTH-i), the enzyme 1-alpha-hydroxylase that catalyzes the synthesis of the active form of vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3), and other substances; 2) Hypercalcemia due to bone destruction by metastases. Hypercalcemia occurs in less than 5% of female genital tract malignancies and virtually in all cases (95%) it is HHM. Female genital tract malignancy-associated HHM is caused most often (80%) by PTH-rP. Ovarian cancer is the most common female genital tract malignancy that is associated with HHM. Although HHM occurs in only 5% of ovarian cancers, it occurs in a relatively high percentage in the following rare ovarian tumors: a). Small cell carcinoma of the ovary - a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all ovarian cancers and is associated with HHM in 66% of the cases; b). Clear cell carcinoma of the ovary - an uncommon tumor that accounts for 5% of all ovarian cancers and is associated with HHM in 5%-10% of the cases. Since dysgerminoma is the most common malignant ovarian tumor in children, in girls it is the second most common ovarian neoplasm, after ovarian small cell carcinoma, to be associated with HHM. PMID:18488865

  13. [Nitrofurantoin--clinical relevance in uncomplicated urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2014-07-01

    The nitrofuran derivative nitrofurantoin has been used for more than 60 years for the antibacterial therapy of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). Despite its long application, this antibiotic retained good activity against Escherichia coli and some other pathogens of uncomplicated urinary tract infections such as Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterococcus species. Nitrofurantoin therapy has been shown to be accompanied by numerous adverse drug effects. Among these, there are also serious side effects such as pulmonary reactions and polyneuropathy, which mainly occur in long-term use. Recent studies, however, have shown a good efficacy and tolerability of short-term nitrofurantoin therapy comparable to previous established standard therapeutic regimens applying cotrimoxazole or quinolones. Because of these data and the alarming resistance rates of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to cotrimoxazole and quinolones that have been increased markedly in several countries, the clinical significance ofnitrofurantoin has been raised again. In many current treatment guidelines, e. g., the international clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, nitrofurantoin has been recommended as one first-line antibiotic of empiric antibacterial treatment of uncomplicated cystitis in otherwise healthy women. In Germany, however, nitrofurantoin should only be applied if more effective and less risky antibiotics cannot be used. Nitrofurantoin is contraindicated in the last three months of pregnancy and in patients suffering from renal impairment of each degree. Despite compatibility concerns, nitrofurantoin has also been recommended for the re-infection prophylaxis of recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in Germany and several other countries. PMID:25065160

  14. [Update on current care guidelines: urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Wuorela, Maarit; Kouri, Timo; Laato, Matti; Lipponen, Pertti; Sammalkorpi, Kari; Uhari, Matti; Uusitalo, Leena; Vuento, Risto

    2011-01-01

    This guideline is focused on the diagnostics and treatment of acute, recurrent and relapsing urinary tract infections in adults and children. Sexually transmitted diseases are not addressed, but must be considered in differential diagnostics. The resistance prevalence of the causative microbes and the ecological adverse effects of antimicrobial agents were considered important factors in selecting optimal therapeutic choices for the guideline. Diagnosis and management of cystitis in otherwise healthy women aged 18-65 years can be based on structured telephone interviews. Primary antimicrobiotic drugs are nitrofurantoin, pivmesillinam and trimetoprim for three days. PMID:22204148

  15. Actinomyces in the female genital tract. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Grice, G C; Hafiz, S

    1983-10-01

    Actinomyces spp were isolated by culture of endocervical specimens from two groups of women attending the department of genitourinary medicine of the Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield. The first group consisted of 78 users of intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) of whom 20 (25.6%) were culture positive. The second group contained 63 women using various forms of contraception 12 (19%) of whom were culture positive. None of these 12 women had an IUCD or foreign body in situ. The results suggest that Actinomyces spp may be part of the commensal flora of the genital tract in some women. PMID:6616167

  16. Odontogenic sinus tract to the chin: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Magliocca, Kelly R; Minehart, Stephen J; Brown, David L; Ward, Brent B

    2010-07-01

    Sinus tracts of odontogenic origin most commonly open into the oral cavity but occasionally may drain extraorally. The diagnosis is more difficult when necrosis of the tooth occurs in the absence of dental caries. We report a 23-year-old man with a long-standing chronic wound on the inferior aspect of the chin that was refractory to treatment. This case demonstrates the use of a simple technique to identify a necrotic mandibular incisor tooth as the source of infection. PMID:21049765

  17. Deposition of sidestream cigarette smoke in the human respiratory tract

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, F.C.; McCusker, K.T.; Mazumder, M.K.; Wilson, J.D.; Bone, R.C.

    1982-04-01

    Measurement of deposition of sidestream cigarette smoke in the human respiratory tract is important for assessing the health effects of sidestream cigarette smoke. We measured the deposition fraction of sidestream cigarette smoke in 5 normal adult male volunteers using sidestream smoke at a concentration similar to that encountered indoors with smokers present. The mean deposition was 11%. These data indicate that the deposition fraction of sidestream smoke is similar to other previously studied aerosols in the same size range and is much less than mainstream smoke.

  18. The Dynamic Bioenergy of Animals with a Digestive Tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxnes, John F.; Hausken, Kjell

    This paper provides a mathematical dynamic description of the bioenergetic time history of bilataria (multicellular animals with a digestive tract) during feeding, growth and activity. We analyze the dynamics of bioenergy using ordinary differential equations on a compartment model, which we believe could constitute a mathematical foundation. Allometric scaling laws of the quarter type are assumed for all scaling relations in accordance with fractal theory. The paper demonstrates the dynamics by which bilataria respond to activity and feeding. The model is tested against some well-known experiments for fishes.

  19. [Therapy of lower urinary tract infections in children].

    PubMed

    Principi, N; Viganò, A; Dalla Villa, A; Tommasi, P

    1988-01-01

    Infection of the urinary tract has been described for nearly two centuries, yet the diagnosis, localization of infection, outcome, and management of UTI continue to generate significant problems. The two basic aims of treatment of UTI are the relief of symptoms and the prevention, or at least limitation, of damage to the renal parenchyma. The initial choice of an antimicrobial in the patient with a suspected UTI is based on knowledge of the expected organisms and their antimicrobial susceptibilities. The spectrum of urinary pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns in our geographical area are presented. Moreover therapeutic regimens in the treatment of upper and lower UTI are discussed. PMID:3241749

  20. Syndromes that Link the Endocrine System and Genitourinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Özlük, Yasemin; Kılıçaslan, Işın

    2015-01-01

    The endocrine system and genitourinary tract unite in various syndromes. Genitourinary malignancies may cause paraneoplastic endocrine syndromes by secreting hormonal substances. These entities include Cushing`s syndrome, hypercalcemia, hyperglycemia, polycythemia, hypertension, and inappropriate ADH or HCG production. The most important syndromic scenarios that links these two systems are hereditary renal cancer syndromes with specific genotype/phenotype correlation. There are also some very rare entities in which endocrine and genitourinary systems are involved such as Carney complex, congenital adrenal hyperplasia and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. We will review all the syndromes regarding manifestations present in endocrine and genitourinary organs. PMID:26177325

  1. [Eubiosis and dysbiosis of gastrointestinal tract: myths and reality].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S

    2013-01-01

    Current data on eubiosis and dysbiosis of gastrointestinal tract are discussed along with the role of its microflora in human body under normal and pathological conditions. Certain debatable problems are discussed. Classification of colonic dysbiosis is presented with reference to its stages, functions of normal flora, "myths" related to the science of eubiosis and dysbiosis, the authors views of the problem. Diagnostic methods and their informative value are described. The main diseases and syndromes associated with intestinal dysbiosis are discussed. In conjunction with approaches to its correction. PMID:23659063

  2. Bacteruria and Urinary Tract Infections in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Detweiler, Keri; Mayers, Daniel; Fletcher, Sophie G

    2015-11-01

    Both urinary tract infection (UTI) and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) are common problems among elderly adults and represent a significant health care burden. Despite their frequency, differentiating between ASB and true UTI remains controversial among health care providers. Several challenges exist in the evaluation of urinary symptoms in the elderly patient. Symptoms of UTI are variable; problems are encountered in the collection, testing, and interpretation of urine specimens; and results of urinalysis are often misinterpreted and mishandled. Multiple studies have shown no morbidity or mortality benefit to antibiotic therapy in either community or long-term care facility residents with ASB. PMID:26475952

  3. Local actions of trimebutine on canine gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Daniel, E E; Kostolanska, F; Fox, J E

    1987-01-01

    The local actions of trimebutine on the circular muscle of canine gastrointestinal tract were studied after close intraarterial injection. The effects resembled those of metenkephalin at all sites. In stomach, trimebutine had no excitatory effects, but inhibited responses mediated by cholinergic post-ganglionic nerves. In small intestine, trimebutine stimulated the quiet gut by probably both neural and direct smooth muscle mechanisms, and it inhibited the field-stimulated phasic contractions. In large intestine, trimebutine had no excitatory actions and only weak inhibitory actions on the field-stimulated gut. Excitatory actions most likely seem to use the mu or delta receptors while inhibitory actions may focus on kappa opiate receptors. PMID:3038657

  4. Census tract analysis of lead exposure in Rhode Island children.

    PubMed

    Sargent, J D; Bailey, A; Simon, P; Blake, M; Dalton, M A

    1997-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in a targeted approach to the screening and prevention of lead exposure in children. Targeted screening requires an understanding of variation in lead exposure in individual children or by region. In order to better understand variation by region, we studied Rhode Island lead poisoning screening data, examining average lead exposure to children living in 136 Providence County census tracts (CTs). The study population included 17,956 children aged 59 months and under, who were screened between May 1, 1992, and April 30, 1993. We evaluated the relationship between the percentage of children with blood lead > or = 10 micrograms/dL (pe10) and sociodemographic and housing characteristics, derived from United States 1990 Census data, of these CTs. CT descriptors included population density, percentage of households receiving public assistance income, median per capita income, percentage of households female headed, percentage of houses owner occupied, percentage of houses built before 1950, percentage of houses vacant, percentage of population Black, percentage of recent immigrants, and intraurban mobility. On average, 109 children were screened in each census tract; mean screening rate was 44%. There was wide variation in average lead exposure among census tracts, with pe10 ranging from 3 to 60% of screened children (mean 27%). Individual census variables explained between 24 and 67% of the variance in pe10 among CTs. A multiple regression model including percentage screened, percentage of households receiving public assistance, percentage of houses built before 1950, In (percentage of houses vacant), and percentage of recent immigrants explained 83% of variance in pe10. The percentage of houses built before 1950, a variable which models the presence of lead paint in old houses, displayed the largest adjusted effect on pe10 over the range observed for that variable in RI CTs. The percentage of houses vacant was also a highly

  5. Management of Male Reproductive Tract Injuries and Disease.

    PubMed

    Hopper, Richard M

    2016-07-01

    Medical and surgical management can be used to restore a bull that has suffered a reproductive tract malady. The economic cost of treatment weighed against the bull's replacement value as well as prognosis for recovery is of prime consideration. In turn, early recognition of a treatable condition and immediate initiation of action are factors that impact both treatment cost and prognosis in many cases. Common problems are penile hair rings, fibropapillomas, vesicular adenitis, penile hematoma, and traumatic injury to the prepuce. Less frequent problems are injuries that lead to denervation of the penis, penile shunts, and penile deviation. PMID:27039689

  6. Human papillomavirus-related carcinomas of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A; Guo, Theresa W; Smith, David F; Wang, Hao; Ogawa, Takenori; Pai, Sara I; Westra, William H

    2013-02-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is an established cause of head and neck carcinomas arising in the oropharynx. The presence of HPV has also been reported in some carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract, but little is known about their overall incidence or their clinicopathologic profile. The surgical pathology archives of The Johns Hopkins Hospital were searched for all carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract from 1995 to 2011, and tissue microarrays were constructed. p16 immunohistochemical analysis and DNA in situ hybridization for high-risk types of HPV were performed. Demographic and clinical outcome data were extracted from patient medical records. Of 161 sinonasal carcinomas, 34 (21%) were positive for high-risk HPV DNA, including type 16 (82%), type 31/33 (12%), and type 18 (6%). HPV-positive carcinomas consisted of 28 squamous cell carcinomas and variants (15 nonkeratinizing or partially keratinizing, 4 papillary, 5 adenosquamous, 4 basaloid), 1 small cell carcinoma, 1 sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma, and 4 carcinomas that were difficult to classify but exhibited adenoid cystic carcinoma-like features. Immunohistochemistry for p16 was positive in 59/161 (37%) cases, and p16 expression strongly correlated with the presence of HPV DNA: 33 of 34 (97%) HPV-positive tumors exhibited high p16 expression, whereas only 26 of 127 (20%) HPV-negative tumors were p16 positive (P<0.0001). The HPV-related carcinomas occurred in 19 men and 15 women ranging in age from 33 to 87 years (mean, 54 y). A trend toward improved survival was observed in the HPV-positive group (hazard ratio=0.58, 95% confidence interval [0.26, 1.28]). The presence of high-risk HPV in 21% of sinonasal carcinomas confirms HPV as an important oncologic agent of carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract. Although nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma is the most common histologic type, there is a wide morphologic spectrum of HPV-related disease that includes a variant that resembles

  7. Urinary tract infections: epidemiology, mechanisms of infection and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Mireles, Ana L.; Walker, Jennifer N.; Caparon, Michael; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a severe public health problem and are caused by a range of pathogens, but most commonly by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. High recurrence rates and increasing antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens threaten to greatly increase the economic burden of these infections. In this Review, we discuss how basic science studies are elucidating the molecular details of the crosstalk that occurs at the host–pathogen interface, as well as the consequences of these interactions for the pathophysiology of UTIs. We also describe current efforts to translate this knowledge into new clinical treatments for UTIs. PMID:25853778

  8. Management of Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections in Healthy Adult Women

    PubMed Central

    Hickling, Duane R; Nitti, Victor W

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence after urinary tract infection (rUTI) is common in adult women. The majority of recurrences are believed to be reinfection from extraurinary sources such as the rectum or vagina. However, uropathogenic Escherichia coli are now known to invade urothelial cells and form quiescent intracellular bacterial reservoirs. Management of women with frequent symptomatic rUTI can be particularly vexing for both patients and their treating physicians. This review addresses available and promising management strategies for rUTI in healthy adult women. PMID:24082842

  9. Management of upper respiratory tract infections in children

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, MF; Innes, S; Jaspan, H; Madide, A; Rabie, H

    2011-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) occurs commonly in both children and adults and is a major cause of mild morbidity. It has a high cost to society, being responsible for absenteeism from school and work and unnecessary medical care, and is occasionally associated with serious sequelae. URTIs are usually caused by several families of virus; these are the rhinovirus, coronavirus, parainfluenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus, human metapneumovirus, influenza, enterovirus and the recently discovered bocavirus. This review will mainly focus on the rhinovirus, where significant advances have been made in understanding the epidemiology, natural history and relationship with other pathogens. PMID:21603094

  10. Work-up of Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bogdana; Copp, Hillary L

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric urinary tract infection (UTI) costs the health care system more than $180 million annually, and accounts for more than 1.5 million clinician visits per year. Accurate and timely diagnosis of these infections is important for determining appropriate treatment and preventing long-term complications such as renal scarring, hypertension, and end-stage renal disease. After the first 12 months, girls are more likely to be diagnosed with a UTI. About half of boys with UTI are diagnosed within the first 12 months of life. Diagnosis of UTI is made based on history and examination findings and confirmed by urine testing. PMID:26475948

  11. [Molecular identification of Candida lusitaniae in lower respiratory tract infection].

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Israel Martínez; Ibarra, Misael González; Torres Guerrero, Haydee K

    2014-01-01

    Candida lusitaniae is a yeast that has emerged as a low frequency nosocomial pathogen in deep infections. Although it usually shows in vitro susceptibility to all antifungal agents, in vivo resistance to amphotericin B has been observed in several clinical cases. Therefore, its early identification in the course of therapy is important. We report the isolation of C. lusitaniae as an etiologic agent of a lower respiratory tract infection in a male patient. Urine and sputum cultures were negative for bacteria and positive for this yeast. Isolates were identified by routine phenotypic methods and confirmed by sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of PCR internal spacer of ribosomal DNA. PMID:25576413

  12. Dosimetry modeling of inhaled formaldehyde: the human respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Overton, J H; Kimbell, J S; Miller, F J

    2001-11-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO), which has been shown to be a nasal carcinogen in rats and mice, is used widely and extensively in various manufacturing processes. Studies in rhesus monkeys suggest that the lower respiratory tract may be at risk and some epidemiologic studies have reported an increase in lung cancer associated with HCHO; other studies have not. Thus, an assessment of possible human risk to HCHO exposure based on dosimetry information throughout the respiratory tract (RT) is desirable. To obtain dosimetry estimates for a risk assessment, two types of models were used. The first model (which is the subject of another investigation) used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to estimate local fluxes in a 3-dimensional model of the nasal region. The subject of the present investigation (the second model) applied a 1-dimensional equation of mass transport to each generation of an adult human symmetric, bifurcating Weibel-type RT anatomical model, augmented by an upper respiratory tract. The two types of modeling approaches were made consistent by requiring that the 1-dimensional version of the nasal passages have the same inspiratory air-flow rate and uptake during inspiration as the CFD simulations for 4 daily human activity levels. Results obtained include the following: (1) More than 95% of the inhaled HCHO is predicted to be retained by the RT. (2) The CFD predictions for inspiration, modified to account for the difference in inspiration and complete breath times, are a good approximation to uptake in the nasal airways during a single breath. (3) In the lower respiratory tract, flux is predicted to increase for several generations and then decrease rapidly. (4) Compared to first pulmonary region generation fluxes, the first few tracheobronchial generations fluxes are over 1000 times larger. Further, there is essentially no flux in the alveolar sacs. (5) Predicted fluxes based on the 1-dimensional model are presented that can be used in a biologically based dose

  13. Update on viral diseases of the equine respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Gilkerson, James R; Bailey, Kirsten E; Diaz-Méndez, Andrés; Hartley, Carol A

    2015-04-01

    Many viral agents have been associated with respiratory disease of the horse. The most important viral causes of respiratory disease in horses are equine influenza and the equine alphaherpesviruses. Agents such as equine viral arteritis virus, African horse sickness virus, and Hendra virus establish systemic infections. Clinical signs of disease resulting from infection with these agents can manifest as respiratory disease, but the respiratory tract is not the major body system affected by these viruses. Treatment of viral respiratory disease is generally limited to supportive therapies, whereas targeted antimicrobial therapy is effective in cases of bacterial infection. PMID:25648568

  14. Tissue engineering for neuromuscular disorders of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Kenneth L; Bitar, Khalil N; Fortunato, John E

    2012-01-01

    The digestive tract is designed for the optimal processing of food that nourishes all organ systems. The esophagus, stomach, small bowel, and colon are sophisticated neuromuscular tubes with specialized sphincters that transport ingested food-stuffs from one region to another. Peristaltic contractions move ingested solids and liquids from the esophagus into the stomach; the stomach mixes the ingested nutrients into chyme and empties chyme from the stomach into the duodenum. The to-and-fro movement of the small bowel maximizes absorption of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Peristaltic contractions are necessary for colon function and defecation. PMID:23322989

  15. Cranberry proanthocyanidins and the maintenance of urinary tract health.

    PubMed

    Howell, Amy B

    2002-01-01

    One of the major health benefits attributed to the ingestion of cranberry juice is the maintenance of urinary tract health. Traditionally, the juice was thought to cause acidification of the urine resulting in a bacteriostatic effect. However, recent research has demonstrated that a bacterial antiadhesion mechanism is responsible. Proanthocyanidins with unique molecular structures have been isolated from cranberry fruit that exhibit potent bacterial antiadhesion activity. Little is known about the bioavailability and structure-activity relationships of cranberry proanthocyanidins. Data on how certain structural features of the molecules can influence bioactivity and bioavailability are reviewed. PMID:12058985

  16. Prognosis and Survival in Patients With Gastrointestinal Tract Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shebani, Khaled O.; Souba, Wiley W.; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Stark, Paul C.; Elgadi, Khaled M.; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Ott, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of clinical presentation variables on the management and survival of patients with gastrointestinal (GI) tract carcinoid tumors. Methods A 20-year (1975–1995) retrospective analysis of 150 patients with GI tract carcinoid tumors at the Massachusetts General Hospital was conducted. Median follow-up was 66 months (range 1–378). Survival estimates for prognostic factors were calculated using Kaplan-Meier product limit estimators, with death from carcinoid as the outcome. Univariate analyses for each factor were obtained using a log-rank test, and multivariate survival analysis was performed. Results All but two patients underwent surgical intervention with the intent to cure (90%) or debulk the tumor (9%). Mean age at presentation was 55 ± 18 years (range 11–90). There was a slight female/male predominance (80:70). Symptoms were nonspecific; the most common were abdominal pain (40%), nausea and vomiting (29%), weight loss (19%), and GI blood loss (15%). Incidental carcinoids, discovered at the time of another procedure, occurred in 40% of patients and were noted at multiple sites throughout the GI tract. The distribution of tumors was ileojejunum (37%), appendix (31%), colon (13%), rectum (12%), stomach (4%), duodenum (1.3%), and Meckel’s diverticulum (1.3%). Of the 27 patients with documented liver metastases, carcinoid syndrome developed in only 13 patients (48%), manifested by watery diarrhea (100%), upper body flushing (70%), asthma (38%), and tricuspid regurgitation (23%). All 13 patients with carcinoid syndrome had elevated levels of 5-HIAA, but the absolute levels did not correlate with the severity of symptoms. An additional 11 patients, 3 without liver metastases, had elevated levels of 5-HIAA without any evidence of carcinoid syndrome. Multicentric carcinoid tumors occurred in 15 patients (10%), and all but one of these tumors were centered around the ileocecal valve. There was no difference in the incidence of

  17. Familial non-cystic fibrosis mucus inspissation of respiratory tract.

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, M; Williams, J; Hirsch, M; Bar-Ziv, J

    1975-01-01

    Perlman, M., Williams, J., Hirsch, M., and Bar-Ziv, J. (1975). Archives of Disease in Childhood, 50, 727. Familial non-cystic fibrosis mucus inspissation of respiratory tract. Two sibs, whose parents are first cousins, have had chronic obstructive airways disease from birth with recurrent otitis media, sinusitis, and mastoiditis. The disease, associated with clinically abnormal mucus, differs from other familial obstructive airways diseases and probably constitutes a new entity. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:1190822

  18. How to avoid infections in Ramadan, especially urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Salahuddin, Naseem

    2015-05-01

    Prolonged and poor control of diabetes has detrimental effects on the immune system by reducing both B and T cell function, causing neutrophilic dysfunction and less production of inflammatory cytokines. This makes people with diabetes vulnerable to various bacterial, viral and fungal infections in all body organs. The commonest cause of chronic renal disease is uncontrolled diabetes, placing patients, particularly women, at high risk for recurrent and complicated urinary tract infections. Diabetic patients who opt to fast during Ramadan must be clearly counseled about keeping themselves hydrated between non-fasting hours and maintaining good glycaemic control through diet and antidiabetic drugs. PMID:26013793

  19. The use of optical imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Beg, Sabina; Wilson, Ana; Ragunath, Krish

    2016-01-01

    With significant advances in the management of gastrointestinal disease there has been a move from diagnosing advanced pathology, to detecting early lesions that are potentially amenable to curative endoscopic treatment. This has required an improvement in diagnostics, with a focus on identifying and characterising subtle mucosal changes. There is great interest in the use of optical technologies to predict histology and enable the formulation of a real-time in vivo diagnosis, a so-called ‘optical biopsy’. The aim of this review is to explore the evidence for the use of the current commercially available imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27429735

  20. Active Fibers: Matching Deformable Tract Templates to Diffusion Tensor Images

    PubMed Central

    Eckstein, Ilya; Shattuck, David W.; Stein, Jason L.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2009-01-01

    Reliable quantitative analysis of white matter connectivity in the brain is an open problem in neuroimaging, with common solutions requiring tools for fiber tracking, tractography segmentation and estimation of intersubject correspondence. This paper proposes a novel, template matching approach to the problem. In the proposed method, a deformable fiber-bundle model is aligned directly with the subject tensor field, skipping the fiber tracking step. Furthermore, the use of a common template eliminates the need for tractography segmentation and defines intersubject shape correspondence. The method is validated using phantom DTI data and applications are presented, including automatic fiber-bundle reconstruction and tract-based morphometry. PMID:19457360

  1. Urinary tract infection in the setting of vesicoureteral reflux

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Roig, Michael L.; Kirsch, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common underlying etiology responsible for febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs) or pyelonephritis in children. Along with the morbidity of pyelonephritis, long-term sequelae of recurrent renal infections include renal scarring, proteinuria, and hypertension. Treatment is directed toward the prevention of recurrent infection through use of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis during a period of observation for spontaneous resolution or by surgical correction. In children, bowel and bladder dysfunction (BBD) plays a significant role in the occurrence of UTI and the rate of VUR resolution. Effective treatment of BBD leads to higher rates of spontaneous resolution and decreased risk of UTI. PMID:27408706

  2. Endoluminal pharmacologic stimulation of the upper urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Jørn Skibsted

    2013-05-01

    The experiments performed in this PhD thesis were conducted at the Institute of Experimental Surgery, Skejby Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark and at the Laboratory of Animal Science, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. The thesis is based on 3 peer review articles published in international journals and a review. Diagnostic or therapeutic endoscopic upper urinary tract procedures are usually characterised as minimal invasive procedures and associated with a low complication rate. Most often fever or pain are seen and sometimes septicaemia. However, mucosa lesion or even ureteric ruptures are known complications. Research has suggested that high renal pelvic pressures generated during these procedures, might contribute to per-/postoperative complications seen, and even possible renal parenchymal damage. Nevertheless, local administration (endoluminal) of a relaxant drug has not previously been tried in order to lower renal pelvic pressure. The purposes of this thesis were to examine the effect of local administration (endoluminal) of the nonspecific β-adrenergic agonist ISOproterenol (ISO) on: 1) The normal pressure flow relation in porcine ureter, 2) The effect of endoluminal ISO perfusion during flexible ureterorenoscopy, 3) The pressure flow relation during semirigid ureterorenoscopy and 4) The cardiovascular system. Among other receptor-types β-adrenergic receptor are located in the upper urinary tract and the activation thereof mediates smooth muscle relaxation. We have shown - in an animal experimental model - that ISO added to the irrigation fluid had significant impact on the renal pelvic pressures generated during upper urinary tract endoscopy. ISO significantly and dose dependently reduced the normal pressure flow relations by approximately 80% without concomitant cardiovascular side effects or measurable plasma levels of ISO. During flexible ureterorenoscopy 0.1 µg/ml ISO added to the irrigation fluid significantly reduced renal pelvic pressure during

  3. Role of the innate immunity in female reproductive tract

    PubMed Central

    Amjadi, Fatemehsadat; Salehi, Ensieh; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Aflatoonian, Reza

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system in the female reproductive tract (FRT) is well equipped to meet the sexually transmitted pathogens, allogeneic sperm, and the immunologically distinct fetus. Analysis of the FRT indicates that epithelial cells provide a physical barrier against pathogens and microbial infections as well as secretions containing anti-microbial peptides, cytokines, and chemokines which recruit and activate immune cells. Epithelial and immune cells confer protection in part through Toll-like receptors. The aim of this literature is to review the diverse components of the innate immune system, contributing to an exclusive protection system throughout the FRT. PMID:24592358

  4. Child abuse: multiple foreign bodies in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Wadhera, Raman; Kalra, Vijay; Gulati, Sat Paul; Ghai, Anju

    2013-02-01

    The incidents of foreign body ingestion in infants and children are usually viewed as accidents, but these events may be a form of child abuse. We are reporting a case of child abuse who presented with multiple foreign bodies in the gastrointestinal tract. Physicians are required to report abuse when they have reason to believe or to suspect that it occurred. The purpose of reporting is not punishment of the perpetrator - it is the protection of the child. It is certainly in the best interest of the child, because child abuse is a recurrent and usually escalating problem that exposes the child to substantial risk. PMID:23164499

  5. Urinary tract infections: epidemiology, mechanisms of infection and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Flores-Mireles, Ana L; Walker, Jennifer N; Caparon, Michael; Hultgren, Scott J

    2015-05-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a severe public health problem and are caused by a range of pathogens, but most commonly by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. High recurrence rates and increasing antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens threaten to greatly increase the economic burden of these infections. In this Review, we discuss how basic science studies are elucidating the molecular details of the crosstalk that occurs at the host-pathogen interface, as well as the consequences of these interactions for the pathophysiology of UTIs. We also describe current efforts to translate this knowledge into new clinical treatments for UTIs. PMID:25853778

  6. Cellular Organization of Neuroimmune Interactions in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Kara Gross; Gershon, Michael David; Bogunovic, Milena

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the largest immune organ; in vertebrates, it is the only organ whose function is controlled by its own intrinsic enteric nervous system (ENS), but it is additionally regulated by extrinsic (sympathetic and parasympathetic) innervation. The GI nervous and immune systems are highly integrated in their common goal, which is to unite digestive functions with protection from ingested environmental threats. This review discusses the physiological relevance of enteric neuroimmune integration by summarizing the current knowledge of evolutionary and developmental pathways, cellular organization, and molecular mechanisms of neuroimmune interactions in health and disease. PMID:27289177

  7. Changes in gastrointestinal tract function and structure in functional dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Vanheel, Hanne; Farré, Ricard

    2013-03-01

    Functional dyspepsia is an extremely common disorder of gastrointestinal function. The disorder is thought to be heterogeneous, with different pathophysiological mechanisms underlying varied symptom patterns. A diversity of changes in gastrointestinal tract function and structure has been described in functional dyspepsia. These involve alterations in the stomach, such as impaired accommodation, delayed gastric emptying and hypersensitivity, and alterations in the duodenum, such as increased sensitivity to duodenal acid and/or lipids and low-grade inflammation. In this Review, we summarize all these abnormalities in an attempt to provide an integrated overview of the pathophysiological mechanisms in functional dyspepsia. PMID:23318268

  8. Low to medium WU-virus titers in young children with lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Kleines, Michael; Scheithauer, Simone; Hengst, Meike; Honnef, Dagmar; Ritter, Klaus; Mühler, Eberhard; Häusler, Martin; Rostamzadeh, Ayda

    2008-01-01

    The WU-virus (WUV), a novel polyomavirus, has recently been recovered from respiratory tract samples. Within a study collective of children with severe lower respiratory tract disease, 3% of the patients tested WUV positive. Viral loads ranged from 5 x 10(2) copies/ml to 1 x 10(4) copies/ml. The WUV genome-positive patients did not display specific clinical or radiological characteristics to be distinguished from other respiratory tract infections. PMID:19321930

  9. Cultured High-Fidelity Three-Dimensional Human Urogenital Tract Carcinomas and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Artificial high-fidelity three-dimensional human urogenital tract carcinomas are propagated under in vitro-microgravity conditions from carcinoma cells. Artificial high-fidelity three-dimensional human urogenital tract carcinomas are also propagated from a coculture of normal urogenital tract cells inoculated with carcinoma cells. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  10. Transport of nattokinase across the rat intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Fujita, M; Hong, K; Ito, Y; Misawa, S; Takeuchi, N; Kariya, K; Nishimuro, S

    1995-09-01

    Intraduodenal administration of nattokinase (NK) at a dose of 80 mg/kg, resulted in the degradation of fibrinogen in plasma suggesting transport of NK across the intestinal tract in normal rats. The action of NK on the cleavage of fibrinogen in the plasma from blood samples drawn at intervals after intraduodenal administration of the enzyme was investigated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting analysis with an anti-fibrinogen gamma chain antibody. The 270 kDa fragment carrying antigenic sites for the binding of the anti-fibrinogen gamma chain antibody appeared within 0.5 h and was then degraded gradually to a 105 kDa fragment via a 200 kDa fragment. This suggests that fibrinogen was degraded to a 105 kDa fragment via several intermediates (270 and 200 kDa). In parallel with the degradation process, plasma recalcification times were remarkably prolonged NK was also detected in the plasma from blood samples drawn 3 and 5 h after administration of the enzyme by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis with an anti-NK antibody. The results indicate that NK is absorbed from the rat intestinal tract and that NK cleaves fibrinogen in plasma after intraduodenal administration of the enzyme. PMID:8845803

  11. Association between diaphragm use and urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Fihn, S D; Latham, R H; Roberts, P; Running, K; Stamm, W E

    1985-07-12

    We conducted independent case-control and retrospective cohort investigations to assess the relationship between diaphragm use and urinary tract infection (UTI). In the former, we compared diaphragm use and vaginal flora among 114 women with acute UTI and 85 women with acute urinary tract symptoms and no UTI. In the latter study, we ascertained the incidence of UTI in 192 diaphragm users and 182 women taking oral contraceptives during a mean follow-up of 9.4 months. Both studies demonstrated a significantly increased risk of UTI in diaphragm users: relative odds were 2.0 in the case-control study and the relative risk was 2.5 in the retrospective cohort study. Vaginal colonization with Escherichia coli was significantly greater in diaphragm users. The incidence of UTI in the cohort study was 26.6 per 1,000 patient-months for diaphragm users and 8.9 per 1,000 patient-months for women taking oral contraceptives. The increased risk of UTI in diaphragm users could not be attributed to differences in age, parity, sexual activity, or previous UTI. PMID:3999367

  12. Vocal-Tract Resonances as Indexical Cues in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfar, Asif A.; Turesson, Hjalmar K.; Maier, Joost X.; van Dinther, Ralph; Patterson, Roy D.; Logothetis, Nikos K.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Vocal-tract resonances (or formants) are acoustic signatures in the voice and are related to the shape and length of the vocal tract. Formants play an important role in human communication, helping us not only to distinguish several different speech sounds [1], but also to extract important information related to the physical characteristics of the speaker, so-called indexical cues. How did formants come to play such an important role in human vocal communication? One hypothesis suggests that the ancestral role of formant perception—a role that might be present in extant nonhuman primates—was to provide indexical cues [2–5]. Although formants are present in the acoustic structure of vowel-like calls of monkeys [3–8] and implicated in the discrimination of call types [8–10], it is not known whether they use this feature to extract indexical cues. Here, we investigate whether rhesus monkeys can use the formant structure in their “coo” calls to assess the age-related body size of conspecifics. Using a preferential-looking paradigm [11, 12] and synthetic coo calls in which formant structure simulated an adult/large- or juvenile/small-sounding individual, we demonstrate that untrained monkeys attend to formant cues and link large-sounding coos to large faces and small-sounding coos to small faces—in essence, they can, like humans [13], use formants as indicators of age-related body size. PMID:17320389

  13. Interrelationships Within the Bacterial Flora of the Female Genital Tract

    PubMed Central

    Lapoint, Paul G.; Monif, Gilles R. G.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of 240 consecutive vaginal swabs using the compatibility profile technique revealed that only 2 bacteria have the ability to be a sole isolate and as such a candidate to be a major aerobic regulator of the bacterial flora of the female genital tract (BFFGT). Compatibility profiles of Lactobacillus and Gardnerella vaginalis have shown that these organisms shared compatibility profiling for the majority of the normal bacterial constituents of the female genital tract. Dominance disruption appears to come from the addition of compatible co-isolates and presumed loss of numerical superiority. These phenomena appear to be the keys to reregulation of BFFGT. Lactobacillus appears to be the major regulator of both G. vaginalis and anaerobic bacteria. When additional organisms are added to the bacterial flora, they may add to or partially negate the inhibitory influence of Lactobacillus on the BFFGT. Inhibitor interrelationships appear to exist between coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus and the group B streptococci (GBS) and other beta hemolytic streptococci. Facilitating interrelationships appear to exist between S. aureus and the GBS and selected Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:18476156

  14. Improved Segmentation of White Matter Tracts with Adaptive Riemannian Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiang; Zygmunt, Kristen; Whitaker, Ross T.; Fletcher, P. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel geodesic approach to segmentation of white matter tracts from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Compared to deterministic and stochastic tractography, geodesic approaches treat the geometry of the brain white matter as a manifold, often using the inverse tensor field as a Riemannian metric. The white matter pathways are then inferred from the resulting geodesics, which have the desirable property that they tend to follow the main eigenvectors of the tensors, yet still have the flexibility to deviate from these directions when it results in lower costs. While this makes such methods more robust to noise, the choice of Riemannian metric in these methods is ad hoc. A serious drawback of current geodesic methods is that geodesics tend to deviate from the major eigenvectors in high-curvature areas in order to achieve the shortest path. In this paper we propose a method for learning an adaptive Riemannian metric from the DTI data, where the resulting geodesics more closely follow the principal eigenvector of the diffusion tensors even in high-curvature regions. We also develop a way to automatically segment the white matter tracts based on the computed geodesics. We show the robustness of our method on simulated data with different noise levels. We also compare our method with tractography methods and geodesic approaches using other Riemannian metrics and demonstrate that the proposed method results in improved geodesics and segmentations using both synthetic and real DTI data. PMID:24211814

  15. Upper tract urothelial carcinoma: epidemiology, high risk populations and detection.

    PubMed

    Redrow, Grant P; Matin, Surena F

    2016-08-01

    Upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is a rare but highly morbid genitourinary malignancy. In 2014 approximately 15,000 new cases were diagnosed in the United States. It accounts for approximately 5-10% of all urothelial cell carcinomas, and 10% of renal tumors. Recent research has increased understanding of the epidemiology of this disease, including several high-risk populations. Environmental exposure to tobacco as well as aristolochic acid, and other carcinogens significantly increase the development of UTUC. Additionally, the genetic condition of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC), also known as Lynch Syndrome (LS) is linked to development of UTUC. Advances in imaging, ureteroscopy, cytological techniques and pathological recognition have allowed for improved detection of primary tumors and recurrent disease. Non-invasive imaging with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now represent the gold standard in imaging detection and surveillance, while technological advances in ureteroscopy allow for minimally invasive approaches to obtain pathologic diagnosis anywhere within the upper tracts. This review will highlight these recent improvements to allow better understanding of who is affected by this rare and morbid disease, as well as the latest developments in detection and surveillance. PMID:27008468

  16. Autonomous locomotion of capsule endoscope in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungwook; Park, Kitae; Kim, Jinseok; Kim, Tae Song; Cho, Il-Joo; Yoon, Eui-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Autonomous locomotion in gastrointestinal (GI) tracts is achieved with a paddling-based capsule endoscope. For this, a miniaturized encoder module was developed utilizing a MEMS fabrication technology to monitor the position of paddles. The integrated encoder module yielded the high resolution of 0.0025 mm in the linear motion of the paddles. In addition, a PID control method was implemented on a DSP to control the stroke of the paddles accurately. As a result, the average accuracy and the standard deviation were measured to be 0.037 mm and 0.025 mm by a laser position sensor for the repetitive measurements. The locomotive performance was evaluated via ex-vivo tests according to various strokes in paddling. In an in-vivo experiment with a living pig, the locomotion speed was improved by 58% compared with the previous control method relying on a given timer value for reciprocation of the paddles. Finally, the integrated encoder module and the control system allow consistent paddling during locomotion even under loads in GI tract. It provides the autonomous locomotion without intervention in monitoring and controlling the capsule endoscope. PMID:22255866

  17. Quality of life after surgery of the alimentary tract

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, Marco

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, patient-reported outcomes have become important in clinical medicine. Nowadays, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is considered a primary outcome in many clinical trials, and it is often the major criterion for judging treatment success. At the beginning of the 21st century, morbidity and mortality rates after surgery of the alimentary tract have dropped dramatically and they can no longer be considered the only outcome measures to determine the success of a surgical procedure. QOL can yield a definitely more patient-orientated measure of outcome that provides us with a more formal measure of the patient’s judgment and desires, which can influence treatment decisions. Nevertheless, despite a very large number of published papers on HRQOL, there is some skepticism on the value of HRQOL and other patient-related outcomes. Therefore, this topic highlight aims to assess how QOL after surgery of the alimentary tract is covered in the medical literature. Different reviews have analyzed the topic according to different points of view: benign and malignant disease; curative and palliative treatment; open and minimally invasive surgical approach; traditional and newly introduced surgical procedures. This topic highlight does not aim to cover all the possible diseases or different surgical procedures, but it does describe the different approaches in order to give the reader a broad spectrum of analysis of QOL after surgery. This quick overview could stimulate the reader to form his/her own opinion about how to use this primary outcome measure. PMID:20976837

  18. Upper tract urothelial carcinoma: Paradigm shift towards nephron sparing management

    PubMed Central

    Fiuk, Julia V; Schwartz, Brad F

    2016-01-01

    Upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is relatively rare compared to urothelial carcinoma of the lower tract, comprising only 5%-10% of all urothelial cancers. Although both entities share histologic properties, UTUC tends to be more invasive at diagnosis and portend a worse prognosis, with a 5 year overall mortality of 23%. To date, the gold standard management of UTUC has been radical nephroureterectomy (RNU), with nephron sparing techniques reserved for solitary kidneys or cases where the patient could not tolerate radical surgery. Limited data from these series, as well as select series where nephron-sparing endoscopic management has been offered to a broader patient base, suggest that minimally invasive, nephron sparing techniques can offer comparable oncologic and survival outcomes to RNU in appropriately selected patients. We review the current literature on the topic and discuss long term outcomes and sequelae of the gold standard treatment, RNU. We also discuss the oncologic outcomes of minimally invasive, endoscopic management of UTUC. Our goal is to provide the reader a comprehensive overview of the current state of the field in order to inform and guide their treatment decisions. PMID:26981440

  19. A current perspective on geriatric lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ha Bum; Kim, Hyung Jee

    2015-01-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunction-such as urinary incontinence (UI), detrusor overactivity, and benign prostatic hyperplasia-is prevalent in elderly persons. These conditions can interfere with daily life and normal functioning and lead to negative effects on health-related quality of life. UI is one of the most common urologic conditions but is poorly understood elderly persons. The overall prevalence of UI increases with age in both men and women. Elderly persons often neglect UI or dismiss it as part of the normal aging process. However, UI can have significant negative effects on self-esteem and has been associated with increased rates of depression. UI also affects quality of life and activities of daily living. Although UI is more common in elderly than in younger persons, it should not be considered a normal part of aging. UI is abnormal at any age. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the cause, classification, evaluation, and management of geriatric lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:25874039

  20. Coinfections of the Respiratory Tract: Viral Competition for Resources

    PubMed Central

    Pinky, Lubna; Dobrovolny, Hana M.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that simultaneous infection of the respiratory tract with at least two viruses is common in hospitalized patients, although it is not clear whether these infections are more or less severe than single virus infections. We use a mathematical model to study the dynamics of viral coinfection of the respiratory tract in an effort to understand the kinetics of these infections. Specifically, we use our model to investigate coinfections of influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, and human metapneumovirus. Our study shows that during coinfections, one virus can block another simply by being the first to infect the available host cells; there is no need for viral interference through immune response interactions. We use the model to calculate the duration of detectable coinfection and examine how it varies as initial viral dose and time of infection are varied. We find that rhinovirus, the fastest-growing virus, reduces replication of the remaining viruses during a coinfection, while parainfluenza virus, the slowest-growing virus is suppressed in the presence of other viruses. PMID:27196110

  1. Urinary tract infections in adult general practice patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Kochen, Michael M

    2002-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are symptomatic infections of the urinary tract, mainly caused by the bacterium Escherichia coli. One in two women suffers from a UTI at least once in her life. The young and sexually active are particulaly affected, but it is also seen in elderly, postmenopausal women. The likelihood of recurrence is high. Diagnosis is made with regard to typical complaints and the presence of leucocytes and nitrites in the urine. A culture is unnecessary in most cases. Uncomplicated UTI should be distinguished from complicated UTI, which has a risk of severe illness. The treatment of choice--short-term therapy with trimethoprim or nitrofurantoin--is successful in over 80% of the cases. Co-trimoxazol fluoroquinolones or cephalsporins are not considered first-choice drugs. There are indications that general practitioners' (GPs') management of UTI is not always optimal, specifically concerning diagnostic tests, the application of second-choice antibiotics, and the length of prescribed treatment courses. Many points relevant to GPs requirefurther research, such as epidemiology and resistance of urinary pathogens in the community and natural history of UTI, as well as optimal management in elderly or complicated patients and men. PMID:12236281

  2. PET/MR Imaging in Cancers of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Gupta, Amit

    2016-10-01

    PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an established hybrid imaging technique for staging and follow-up of gastrointestinal (GI) tract malignancies, especially for colorectal carcinoma. Dedicated hybrid PET/MR imaging scanners are currently available for clinical use. Although they will not replace regular use of PET/CT, they may have utility in selected cases of GI tract malignancies. The superior soft tissue contrast resolution and depiction of anatomy and the functional information obtained from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provided by MR imaging in PET/MR imaging are advantages over CT of PET/CT for T staging and follow-up of rectal carcinoma and for better characterization of liver lesions. Functional information from DWI and use of liver-specific MR imaging contrast agents are an added advantage in follow-up of liver metastases after systemic and locoregional treatment. New radiotracers will improve the utility of PET/MR imaging in staging and follow-up of tumors, which may not be [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose avid, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. PET/MR imaging also has application in selected cases of cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, and pancreatic carcinoma for initial staging and follow-up assessment. PMID:27593246

  3. Clinical efficacy of ciprofloxacin in lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, S S

    1989-01-01

    The sputum pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of ciprofloxacin in lower respiratory tract infections is reviewed. Following intravenous administration, ciprofloxacin penetrates rapidly into bronchial tissue; the elimination half life is between 3 and 4 h and a dose dependency is seen. Following oral intake, the time to reach maximal concentrations is approximately two hours and after a dose of 750 mg the concentration may reach 1.7 mg/l in patients without cystic fibrosis and range from 0.5 to 3.4 mg/l in cystic fibrosis patients. Coadministration of ciprofloxacin increases serum levels and decreases total body clearance of theophylline. In controlled comparative clinical trials, ciprofloxacin has been found to have similar clinical efficacy as amoxycillin, ampicillin, cefalexin, doxycycline, co-trimoxazole, imipenem-cilastatin and ceftazidime for the treatment of a range of lower respiratory tract infections. Ciprofloxacin has been found to be superior in clinical efficacy to cefaclor. Experimental animal models suggest a role for ciprofloxacin in infections caused by Legionella pneumophila and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The clinical and bacteriological efficacy of ciprofloxacin is less pronounced in lung infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but is comparable to the combination of beta-lactams and aminoglycosides. Development of resistance is frequently observed during ciprofloxacin treatment of Ps. aeruginosa. Because of the availability of other oral and effective agents, ciprofloxacin is not recommended for empirical treatment of community acquired lower respiratory infections, but should be reserved for infections caused by multiply resistant organisms. PMID:2667111

  4. Measuring Escherichia coli Gene Expression during Human Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Escherichia coli (E. coli) evolved by acquisition of pathogenicity islands, phage, plasmids, and DNA segments by horizontal gene transfer. Strains are heterogeneous but virulent uropathogenic isolates more often have specific fimbriae, toxins, and iron receptors than commensal strains. One may ask whether it is the virulence factors alone that are required to establish infection. While these virulence factors clearly contribute strongly to pathogenesis, bacteria must survive by metabolizing nutrients available to them. By constructing mutants in all major metabolic pathways and co-challenging mice transurethrally with each mutant and the wild type strain, we identified which major metabolic pathways are required to infect the urinary tract. We must also ask what else is E. coli doing in vivo? To answer this question, we examined the transcriptome of E. coli CFT073 in the murine model of urinary tract infection (UTI) as well as for E. coli strains collected and analyzed directly from the urine of patients attending either a urology clinic or a university health clinic for symptoms of UTI. Using microarrays and RNA-seq, we measured in vivo gene expression for these uropathogenic E. coli strains, identifying genes upregulated during murine and human UTI. Our findings allow us to propose a new definition of bacterial virulence. PMID:26784237

  5. Getting Back on Tract: Developer Housing Re-energized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeatman, Andrea

    The problems of the suburban condition have been documented over the past few decades by urban planners and architects alike. However it is clear that demand for car-oriented developments remains high, and expansion of the suburbs with single family houses continues. Given this reality, this thesis focuses on the importance of developing a comprehensive design approach to tract housing that is more responsive to site, more energy efficient and less damaging to the environment. The work builds upon research that is being conducted through the Carleton Research & Innovation in Sustainable Energy Project (C-RISE). In collaboration with Urbandale Developers, C-RISE is studying the potential for making single family houses more energy efficient through passive solar design, building envelope, seasonal storage of solar thermal energy, hybrid passive-active storage of solar thermal energy, and passive and solar cooling. In light of this work, this thesis proposes a series of single family house designs that incorporate the C-RISE energy technologies and also address larger architectural issues around tract house and lot design.

  6. Lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vignozzi, Linda; Gacci, Mauro; Maggi, Mario

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that age is the principal unmodifiable risk factor of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Until the past decade, the process of lower urinary tract ageing was, therefore, considered unmodifiable - as ageing per se. However, the traditional dogma that BPH-related LUTS (BPH-LUTS) is an immutable consequence of old age is no longer acceptable. Results from multiple preclinical and clinical studies indicate that several modifiable, age-related metabolic aberrations (metabolic syndrome, obesity, dyslipidaemia, diabetes) are important determinants in both the development and the progression of BPH-LUTS. Metabolic syndrome and its related comorbidities, such as sex steroid alterations and low-grade inflammation, have been related to BPH-LUTS development and progression. With the correct treatment and recommended lifestyle changes, many individuals with metabolic syndrome might be able to prevent or delay the onset of metabolic-syndrome-related complications; however, whether promoting healthier lifestyles can really alter a man's propensity to develop BPH-LUTS remains to be clarified. PMID:26754190

  7. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers in Biliary Tract Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Letelier, Pablo; Riquelme, Ismael; Hernández, Alfonso H.; Guzmán, Neftalí; Farías, Jorge G.; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a group of highly aggressive malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. The current diagnosis is based mainly on imaging and intraoperative exploration due to brush cytology havinga low sensitivity and the standard markers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate 19-9 (CA19-9), not having enough sensitivity nor specificity to be used in a differential diagnosis and early stage detection. Thus, better non-invasive methods that can distinguish between normal and pathological tissue are needed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, single-stranded non-coding RNA molecules of ~20–22 nucleotides that regulate relevant physiological mechanisms and can also be involved in carcinogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are detectable in multiple body fluids, showing great stability, either free or trapped in circulating microvesicles, such as exosomes. miRNAs are ideal biomarkers that may be used in screening and prognosis in biliary tract cancers, aiding also in the clinical decisions at different stages of cancer treatment. This review highlights the progress in the analysis of circulating miRNAs in serum, plasma and bile as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers of BTCs. PMID:27223281

  8. Urinary tract infections in infants and children: Diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Joan L; Finlay, Jane C; Lang, Mia Eileen; Bortolussi, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have resulted in major changes in the management of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children. The present statement focuses on the diagnosis and management of infants and children >2 months of age with an acute UTI and no known underlying urinary tract pathology or risk factors for a neurogenic bladder. UTI should be ruled out in preverbal children with unexplained fever and in older children with symptoms suggestive of UTI (dysuria, urinary frequency, hematuria, abdominal pain, back pain or new daytime incontinence). A midstream urine sample should be collected for urinalysis and culture in toilet-trained children; others should have urine collected by catheter or by suprapubic aspirate. UTI is unlikely if the urinalysis is completely normal. A bagged urine sample may be used for urinalysis but should not be used for urine culture. Antibiotic treatment for seven to 10 days is recommended for febrile UTI. Oral antibiotics may be offered as initial treatment when the child is not seriously ill and is likely to receive and tolerate every dose. Children <2 years of age should be investigated after their first febrile UTI with a renal/bladder ultrasound to identify any significant renal abnormalities. A voiding cystourethrogram is not required for children with a first UTI unless the renal/bladder ultrasound reveals findings suggestive of vesicoureteral reflux, selected renal anomalies or obstructive uropathy. PMID:25332662

  9. Immunohistochemical study of the digestive tract of Oligosarcus hepsetus

    PubMed Central

    Vieira-Lopes, Danielle A; Pinheiro, Nadja L; Sales, Armando; Ventura, Adriana; Araújo, Francisco G; Gomes, Iracema D; Nascimento, Aparecida A

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To describe the histology of the digestive tract and to investigate the occurrence of endocrine cells in Oligosarcus hepsetus (O. hepsetus). METHODS: The digestive tract (DT) of O. hepsetus was divided into esophagus, two stomach regions (glandular and non-glandular) and two intestinal regions (anterior and posterior). These specimens were processed by routine histological techniques and stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Gomori’s trichrome, periodic acid Schiff (PAS) and Alcian blue (AB). An immunohistochemical method using avidin-biotin-peroxidase was employed. RESULTS: The esophagus is lined with a non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium that is reactive to PAS and AB. The stomach has a mucosa lined with a simple columnar epithelium with mucus-secreting cells that are reactive only to PAS. The intestine has a simple columnar epithelium with a brush border and goblet cells that are reactive to PAS and AB. Somatostatin, serotonin and cholecystokinin immunoreactive cells were identified throughout the DT. CONCLUSION: This study revealed adaptations for the species’ diet and showed that the distribution and relative frequency of immunoreactive cells are similar to those of other fish. PMID:23569337

  10. [Urinary tract infections--still a real problem].

    PubMed

    Cermák, P; Veselský, Z

    2000-07-19

    By analyzing the standard works in the scientific world literature, it was possible to construct a contemporary view on the etiology and antibiotic therapy of some urinary tract infections. It can be stated, that the most effective remedies are cotrimoxazol and fluoroquinolones. In contrary to beta-lactam antibiotics, cotrimoxazole and fluoroquinolones work with a rapid bactericidal effect, they have long elimination half-times and better sterilization capacity in the periurethral region, and it use brings minimal risk of recurrence of the infection. This facts are compared with results of bacteriological investigation of urine, which were done in the microbiological laboratories of University Hospital Hradec Králové, Czech Republic, in 1998. The most frequent origins of urinary tract infections are Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. Stains. The are keeping high susceptibility to contrimoxazole, furantoin and oxoline acid. The other Gram negative rods isolated from hospitalised patients are highly resistant to most of antimicrobial agents included fluorochinolons, which resistance culminates to 50%. The widest spectrum of pathogens and the highest resistance was found in the hospitalised patients of the university hospital. High percentages of resistant strains was also in patients from the district hospitals. The results are discussed. PMID:11048404

  11. Source-tract interaction with prescribed vocal fold motion

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Richard S.; Howe, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    An equation describing the time-evolution of glottal volume velocity with specified vocal fold motion is derived when the sub- and supra-glottal vocal tracts are present. The derivation of this Fant equation employs a property explicated in Howe and McGowan [(2011) J. Fluid Mech. 672, 428–450] that the Fant equation is the adjoint to the equation characterizing the matching conditions of sub- and supra-glottal Green’s functions segments with the glottal segment. The present aeroacoustic development shows that measurable quantities such as input impedances at the glottis, provide the coefficients for the Fant equation when source-tract interaction is included in the development. Explicit expressions for the Green’s function are not required. With the poles and zeros of the input impedance functions specified, the Fant equation can be solved. After the general derivation of the Fant equation, the specific cases where plane wave acoustic propagation is described either by a Sturm-Liouville problem or concatenated cylindrical tubes is considered. Simulations show the expected skewing of the glottal volume velocity pulses depending on whether the fundamental frequency is below or above a sub- or supra-glottal formant. More complex glottal wave forms result when both the first supra-glottal fundamental frequencies are high and close to the first sub-glottal formant. PMID:22501076

  12. Kidney and Urinary Tract Involvement in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis and can develop multiple organ injuries including kidney and urinary tract involvement. These disorders include pyuria, prerenal acute kidney injury (AKI), renal AKI caused by tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN), hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), and immune-complex mediated nephropathy, renal AKI associated with either Kawasaki disease shock syndrome or unknown causes, acute nephritic syndrome (ANS), nephrotic syndrome (NS), renal tubular abnormalities, renal abnormalities in imaging studies, and renal artery lesions (aneurysms and stenosis). Pyuria is common in KD and originates from the urethra and/or the kidney. TIN with AKI and renal tubular abnormalities probably result from renal parenchymal inflammation caused by T-cell activation. HUS and renal artery lesions are caused by vascular endothelial injuries resulting from vasculitis. Some patients with ANS have immunological abnormalities associated with immune-complex formation. Nephromegaly and renal parenchymal inflammatory foci are detected frequently in patients with KD by renal ultrasonography and renal scintigraphy, respectively. Although the precise pathogenesis of KD is not completely understood, renal vasculitis, immune-complex mediated kidney injuries, or T-cell immune-regulatory abnormalities have been proposed as possible mechanisms for the development of kidney and urinary tract injuries. PMID:24288547

  13. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers in Biliary Tract Cancers.

    PubMed

    Letelier, Pablo; Riquelme, Ismael; Hernández, Alfonso H; Guzmán, Neftalí; Farías, Jorge G; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a group of highly aggressive malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. The current diagnosis is based mainly on imaging and intraoperative exploration due to brush cytology havinga low sensitivity and the standard markers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate 19-9 (CA19-9), not having enough sensitivity nor specificity to be used in a differential diagnosis and early stage detection. Thus, better non-invasive methods that can distinguish between normal and pathological tissue are needed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, single-stranded non-coding RNA molecules of ~20-22 nucleotides that regulate relevant physiological mechanisms and can also be involved in carcinogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are detectable in multiple body fluids, showing great stability, either free or trapped in circulating microvesicles, such as exosomes. miRNAs are ideal biomarkers that may be used in screening and prognosis in biliary tract cancers, aiding also in the clinical decisions at different stages of cancer treatment. This review highlights the progress in the analysis of circulating miRNAs in serum, plasma and bile as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers of BTCs. PMID:27223281

  14. Approach to the male patient with lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wyndaele, Jean Jacques; Vodušek, David B

    2015-01-01

    History and physical examination are the cornerstones of evaluation of the male patient with lower urinary tract (LUT) symptoms and (suspected) neurologic disorder, both to diagnose the nervous system lesion, and to get insight into the type of LUT dysfunction (LUTD). Non-neurologic LUTD needs to be ruled out. Laboratory testing is necessary to diagnose urinary infection. In those in whom neurogenic LUTD is probable, postvoid residual urine and urinary flow measurement generally rule out significant outflow obstruction and allow for basic symptomatic management. If symptomatology is complex or severe, or the pathophysiology uncertain, or invasive treatment planned, urodynamic or videourodynamic measurements should be performed to inform on bladder sensation, detrusor contractility, pressures generated in the bladder, as well as the behavior of bladder neck, the striated urethral sphincter, and urinary flow. This information is paramount to the clinician to plan management and consider prognosis. Assessment needs to be repeated, as chronic neurogenic LUTD is not a stable condition; in progressive neurologic diseases the nature of LUTD itself may change. The upper urinary tract needs to be checked and followed up regularly, particularly in patient groups in which high intravesical pressures may be generated. PMID:26003243

  15. The Structural Properties of Major White Matter Tracts in Strabismic Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yiran; Norcia, Anthony M.; Yeatman, Jason D.; Mezer, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In order to better understand whether white matter structural deficits are present in strabismic amblyopia, we performed a survey of the tissue properties of 28 major white matter tracts using diffusion and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging approaches. Methods We used diffusion-based tensor modeling and a new quantitative T1 protocol to measure fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and myelin-sensitive T1 values. We surveyed tracts in the occipital lobe, including the vertical occipital fasciculus (VOF)—a newly rediscovered tract that bridges dorsal and ventral areas of the occipital lobe, as well as tracts across the rest of the brain. Results Adults with long-standing strabismic amblyopia show tract-specific elevations in MD. We rank-ordered the tracts on the basis of their MD effect-size. The four most affected tracts were the anterior frontal corpus callosum (ACC), the right VOF, the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) and the left optic radiation. Conclusions The results suggest that most white matter tissue properties are relatively robust to the early visual insult caused by strabismus. However, strabismic amblyopia does affect MD, not only in occipital tracts, such as the VOF and optic radiation, but also in long range association tracts connecting visual cortex to the frontal and temporal lobes (ILF) and connecting the two hemispheres (ACC). PMID:26241402

  16. A study of brain white matter plasticity in early blinds using tract-based spatial statistics and tract statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Lao, Yi; Kang, Yue; Collignon, Olivier; Brun, Caroline; Kheibai, Shadi B; Alary, Flamine; Gee, James; Nelson, Marvin D; Lepore, Franco; Lepore, Natasha

    2015-12-16

    Early blind individuals are known to exhibit structural brain reorganization. Particularly, early-onset blindness may trigger profound brain alterations that affect not only the visual system but also the remaining sensory systems. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows in-vivo visualization of brain white matter connectivity, and has been extensively used to study brain white matter structure. Among statistical approaches based on DTI, tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) is widely used because of its ability to automatically perform whole brain white matter studies. Tract specific analysis (TSA) is a more recent method that localizes changes in specific white matter bundles. In the present study, we compare TBSS and TSA results of DTI scans from 12 early blind individuals and 13 age-matched sighted controls, with two aims: (a) to investigate white matter alterations associated with early visual deprivation; (b) to examine the relative sensitivity of TSA when compared with TBSS, for both deficit and hypertrophy of white matter microstructures. Both methods give consistent results for broad white matter regions of deficits. However, TBSS does not detect hypertrophy of white matter, whereas TSA shows a higher sensitivity in detecting subtle differences in white matter colocalized to the posterior parietal lobe. PMID:26559727

  17. Morphological lesions of the rat urinary tract induced by inoculation of mycoplasmas and other urinary tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Larsson, P A; Cano, M; Grenabo, L; Brorson, J E; Hedelin, H; Pettersson, S; Johansson, S L

    1989-01-01

    The effects on the urinary tract after inoculation of Ureaplasma urealyticum into the rat bladder were evaluated and compared to that seen after Mycoplasma hominis, Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis inoculation. The inoculation of the urease-producing organisms P. mirabilis and U. urealyticum were associated with the formation of struvite bladder stones and predominantly hyperplastic lesions of the bladder. The P. mirabilis inoculated rats also displayed marked pyelonephritis. A similar but much less pronounced reaction also occurred in the kidneys of some of the U. urealyticum inoculated rats. P. mirabilis could frequently be recultured. In contrast, this was not possible with U. urealyticum, but the organism was detected by scanning electron microscopy 2 weeks after the inoculation. Inoculation of M. hominis was associated with a few mild lesions of the bladder, but inflammatory lesions were not present in the kidneys. The study confirms the potential of Ureaplasma to form struvite stones in rat urinary tract. It also demonstrates that it can induce inflammatory changes in both bladder and kidney of rats without concomitant stone formation. PMID:2678669

  18. Immunobiology of genital tract trauma: Endocrine Regulation of HIV Acquisition in Women Following Sexual Assault or Genital Tract Mutilation

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mimi; Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Wira, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    Studies on HIV acquisition and transmission in women exposed to sexual trauma throughout their life cycle are lacking but some findings suggest that rates of HIV acquisition through coercive sex are significantly higher than that seen in consensual sex. Sexual trauma can also occur as a result of female genital mutilation, which makes sex extremely painful and can cause increased abrasions, lacerations and inflammation, which enhances the risk of HIV acquisition. This review presents an overview of the immune system in the human female reproductive tract from adolescence, through puberty to pregnancy and menopause. What is clear is that the foundation of information on immune protection in the female reproductive tract throughout the life cycle of women is extremely limited and at some stages such as adolescence and menopause are grossly lacking. Against this back backdrop, forced or coercive sexual intercourse as well as genital mutilation further complicates our understanding of the biological risk factors that can result in transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. PMID:23034063

  19. Anatomy and Physiology of the Urinary Tract: Relation to Host Defense and Microbial Infection

    PubMed Central

    HICKLING, DUANE R.; SUN, TUNG-TIEN; WU, XUE-RU

    2015-01-01

    The urinary tract exits to a body surface area that is densely populated by a wide range of microbes. Yet, under most normal circumstances, it is typically considered sterile, i.e., devoid of microbes, a stark contrast to the gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tracts where many commensal and pathogenic microbes call home. Not surprisingly, infection of the urinary tract over a healthy person’s lifetime is relatively infrequent, occurring once or twice or not at all for most people. For those who do experience an initial infection, the great majority (70% to 80%) thankfully do not go on to suffer from multiple episodes. This is a far cry from the upper respiratory tract infections, which can afflict an otherwise healthy individual countless times. The fact that urinary tract infections are hard to elicit in experimental animals except with inoculum 3–5 orders of magnitude greater than the colony counts that define an acute urinary infection in humans (105 cfu/ml), also speaks to the robustness of the urinary tract defense. How can the urinary tract be so effective in fending off harmful microbes despite its orifice in a close vicinity to that of the microbe-laden gastrointestinal tract? While a complete picture is still evolving, the general consensus is that the anatomical and physiological integrity of the urinary tract is of paramount importance in maintaining a healthy urinary tract. When this integrity is breached, however, the urinary tract can be at a heightened risk or even recurrent episodes of microbial infections. In fact, recurrent urinary tract infections are a significant cause of morbidity and time lost from work and a major challenge to manage clinically. Additionally, infections of the upper urinary tract often require hospitalization and prolonged antibiotic therapy. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the basic anatomy and physiology of the urinary tract with an emphasis on their specific roles in host defense. We also highlight the

  20. Changes in the axonal conduction velocity of pyramidal tract neurons in the aged cat.

    PubMed

    Xi, M C; Liu, R H; Engelhardt, J K; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1999-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether age-dependent changes in axonal conduction velocity occur in pyramidal tract neurons. A total of 260 and 254 pyramidal tract neurons were recorded extracellularly in the motor cortex of adult control and aged cats, respectively. These cells were activated antidromically by electrical stimulation of the medullary pyramidal tract. Fast- and slow-conducting neurons were identified according to their axonal conduction velocity in both control and aged cats. While 51% of pyramidal tract neurons recorded in the control cats were fast conducting (conduction velocity greater than 20 m/s), only 26% of pyramidal tract neurons in the aged cats were fast conducting. There was a 43% decrease in the median conduction velocity for the entire population of pyramidal tract neurons in aged cats when compared with that of pyramidal tract neurons in the control cats (P < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U-test). A linear relationship between the spike duration of pyramidal tract neurons and their antidromic latency was present in both control and aged cats. However, the regression slope was significantly reduced in aged cats. This reduction was due to the appearance of a group of pyramidal tract neurons with relatively shorter spike durations but slower axonal conduction velocities in the aged cat. Sample intracellular data confirmed the above results. These observations form the basis for the following conclusions: (i) there is a decrease in median conduction velocity of pyramidal tract neurons in aged cats; (ii) the reduction in the axonal conduction velocity of pyramidal tract neurons in aged cats is due, in part, to fibers that previously belonged to the fast-conducting group and now conduct at slower velocity. PMID:10392844

  1. A systematic review: perivascular epithelioid cell tumor of gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zehong; Han, Siqi; Wu, Jialin; Xiong, Minmin; Huang, Yanqiao; Chen, Jianhui; Yuan, Yujie; Peng, Jianjun; Song, Wu

    2016-07-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) is a rare entity with distinctive morphology and of expressing myomelanocytic markers. Gastrointestinal tract (GI) is one of the most common anatomic sites of origin and counts for 20% to 25% of all reported cases of perivascular epithelioid cell tumors not otherwise specified (PEComas-NOS). However, the biologic behavior of perivascular epithelioid cell tumors of gastrointestinal tract (GI PEComas-NOS) is still unclear. The aim of conducting this systematic review is to sum up what is known so far of the epidemiology, natural history, management and prognosis of GI PEComas-NOS.A systematic research was performed on PubMed and EMBASE using the following terms: ("perivascular epithelioid cell tumor" or "PEComa") and ("gastrointestinal tract" or "GI" or "oral " or "mouth" or "esophagus" or "gullet" or "gastric" or "stomach" or "duodenum" or "jejunum" or "ileum" or "cecum" or "colon" or "colorectal" or "sigmoid" or "rectum" or "anus" or "mesentery") up to December 1, 2015. Retrieved GI PEComas-NOS publications, which included these terms, contains case reports, case series to case characteristic researches.A total of 168 articles were reviewed, 41 GI PEComa-NOS English studies among which were retrieved for analysis. We reviewed epidemiology, natural history, management and prognosis of GI PEComa-NOS. Generally GI PEComa-NOS is believed to have women predomination. The most frequently involved location is colon with non-specific clinical signs. Pathologically, GI PEComas-NOS shows epithelioid predominance (70%), meanwhile coexpresses melanocytic and muscle markers characteristically, while immunohistochemistry is a useful tool for identify, which indicates that HMB-45 is regarded as the most sensitive reagent. Complete resection served as mainstay of treatment, while chemotherapy should be unanimously considered to apply in malignant cases. Eventually, it is necessary for closed and long-term follow-up with endoscope and

  2. Potential Misclassification of Urinary Tract-Related Bacteremia Upon Applying the 2015 Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Surveillance Definition From the National Healthcare Safety Network.

    PubMed

    Greene, M Todd; Ratz, David; Meddings, Jennifer; Fakih, Mohamad G; Saint, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently updated the surveillance definition of catheter-associated urinary tract infection to include only urine culture bacteria of at least 1×105 colony-forming units/mL. Our findings suggest that the new surveillance definition may fail to capture clinically meaningful catheter-associated urinary tract infections. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(4):469-471. PMID:26778287

  3. Urinary Tract Infections: Current and Emerging Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Amelia E.; Norton, J. Paul; Spivak, Adam M.; Mulvey, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    Acute cystitis is one of the most commonly encountered bacterial infections and is responsible for substantial morbidity and high medical costs in the United States and across the globe. Though generally considered to be self-limiting and easily treated with antibiotics, urinary tract infections (UTIs) are often incompletely resolved by antibiotic therapy and frequently recur. This is in part due to the ability of uropathogenic bacteria to invade, replicate, and persist within host epithelial cells. The biological complexity of these infections combined with a dramatic rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens highlight the need for alternative therapies. In this review we examine current management strategies for UTIs, as well as emerging treatments, including novel compounds that block bacterial interactions with the urothelium and vaccines focused on preventing both acute and recurrent infections. PMID:23645845

  4. [Oral antibiotic treatment of urinary tract infections in children].

    PubMed

    Klingenberg, Claus; Småbrekke, Lars; Døllner, Henrik; Simonsen, Gunnar Skov

    2009-06-25

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections in childhood. Empiric antibiotic therapy is guided by the clinical presentation, the patient's ability to take oral agents and the local resistance pattern of Escherichia coli (E. coli), the most common pathogen. Most children (with both upper and lower UTI) can safely be treated with oral antibiotics. We recommend pivmecillinam or amoxicillin-clavulanic acid as first-line empiric therapy for upper UTI. Amoxicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are no longer first-line oral agents due to increasing E. coli resistance to both drugs. For lower UTI nitrofurantoin is an excellent first choice. In Norway, lack of paediatric antibiotic syrups is a great challenge and we recommend that such formulations are introduced to the Norwegian market. PMID:19561661

  5. Urinary tract infections in women: etiology and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Minardi, Daniele; d’Anzeo, Gianluca; Cantoro, Daniele; Conti, Alessandro; Muzzonigro, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common among the female population. It has been calculated that about one-third of adult women have experienced an episode of symptomatic cystitis at least once. It is also common for these episodes to recur. If predisposing factors are not identified and removed, UTI can lead to more serious consequences, in particular kidney damage and renal failure. The aim of this review was to analyze the factors more commonly correlated with UTI in women, and to see what possible solutions are currently used in general practice and specialized areas, as well as those still under investigation. A good understanding of the possible pathogenic factors contributing to the development of UTI and its recurrence will help the general practitioner to interview the patient, search for causes that would otherwise remain undiscovered, and to identify the correct therapeutic strategy. PMID:21674026

  6. Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and the Urinary Tract (CAKUT).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Maria M

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the majority of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) with emphasis in Pediatric Pathology describing and illustrating lesions as varied as ureteral duplications, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, horseshoe kidney, posterior urethral valve and prune belly syndrome, obstructive renal dysplasia, nonmotile ciliopathies and several syndromes associated with renal malformations (Meckel-Joubert, short rib, Bardet-Biedl, asplenia/polysplenia, hereditary renal adysplasia, Zellweger, trisomies, VACTER-L, Potter, caudal dysplasia, and sirenomelia), as well as ADPK, and ARPK. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the congenital renal anomalies, but also to analyze the more recent therapeutic interventions that may modify the natural history of some of these severe conditions. PMID:25313840

  7. Diagnosing and treating urinary tract infections in older people.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Kirsty

    2015-05-01

    Even though diagnosing and treating urinary tract infections (UTIs) in older people can be difficult, it is essential to prevent reduction in the patients' wellbeing. Near-patient testing can be useful, but guidelines on this discuss the use of urine dipstick testing and laboratory culture in some detail. In addition, there are significant differences in the management of males and females, those with recurrent infections, and those with catheters. Community nurses are well placed to assess and manage this common condition, implementing correct treatment and resolution, owing to the close relationships they cultivate with service users. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of UTIs in older people, highlighting the differentials and red flags that need to be addressed urgently. PMID:25993370

  8. Prognostic Genetic Signatures in Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Bagrodia, Aditya; Cha, Eugene K; Coleman, Jonathan A

    2016-02-01

    Urothelial carcinoma is a highly heterogeneous disease that can arise throughout the entire urothelial lining from the renal pelvis to the proximal urethra. Upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is rare, and while it shares many similarities with urothelial carcinoma of bladder (UCB), there are also significant differences between UTUC and UCB regarding clinical management and outcomes. No major advances have been made recently in the development of new systemic therapies for urothelial carcinoma, partly due to the lack of understanding of underlying molecular pathogenetic mechanisms. In the past decade, the emergence of next-generation sequencing has greatly enabled genomic characterization of tumor samples. Researchers are currently exploring a personalized approach to augment traditional clinical decision-making based on genetic alterations. In the present review, we summarize current genomic advances in UTUC and discuss the potential implications of these developments for developing prognostic and predictive biomarkers. PMID:26757906

  9. Foreign material in the gastrointestinal tract: cocaine packets.

    PubMed

    Kucukmetin, Nurten Turkel; Gucyetmez, Bulent; Poyraz, Tuncer; Yildirim, Sadik; Boztas, Gungor; Tozun, Nurdan

    2014-01-01

    Smuggling drugs by swallowing or inserting into a body cavity is not only a serious and growing international crime, but can also lead to lethal medical complications. The most common cause of death in 'body packers', people transporting drugs by ingesting a packet into the gastrointestinal tract, is acute drug toxicity from a ruptured packet. However, more than 30 years after the initial report of body packing, there is still no definitive treatment protocol for the management of this patient group. The treatment strategy is determined according to the particular condition of the patient and the clinical experience of the treatment center. Surgical intervention is also less common now, due to both the use of improved packaging materials among smugglers and a shift towards a more conservative medical approach. Herein, we report a case of toxicity from ingested packets of cocaine that leaked and, despite surgery, resulted in exitus of the patient. PMID:24574951

  10. New genomic landscapes and therapeutic targets for biliary tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Simbolo, Michele; Fassan, Matteo; Mafficini, Andrea; Lawlor, Rita T; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms characterized by a dismal prognosis. At variance with most solid tumors, no effective molecular targeted agent has been currently approved for BTCs treatment and their molecular landscape has only been recently investigated. Comprehensive mutational profiling studies identified IDH1/2 and BAP1 as characteristic of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, while extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas and gallbladder carcinomas were characterized by frequent KRAS and TP53 alterations. Moreover, targeted next-generation sequencing has uncovered alterations in several key cellular pathways. BTC-specific alterations include disorders of major regulators of cell cycle and chromatin remodeling processes, as well as deregulation of the mTOR-, TGF-beta/Smad- and receptor tyrosine kinases signaling. The next step will be the correlation of these findings with clinical trials to identify predictive biomarkers for the development of personalized therapies. This will permit early access for BTC patients to innovative drugs. PMID:26709801

  11. Clonal Evolution of Stem Cells in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Fink, Juergen; Koo, Bon-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    The field of gastrointestinal epithelial stem cells is a rapidly developing area of adult stem cell research. The discovery of Lgr5(+) intestinal stem cells has enabled us to study many hidden aspects of the biology of gastrointestinal adult stem cells. Marked by Lgr5 and Troy, several novel endodermal stem cells have been identified in the gastrointestinal tract. A precise working model of stem cell propagation, dynamics, and plasticity has been revealed by a genetic labeling method, termed lineage tracing. This chapter introduces the reidentification of crypt base columnar cells as Lgr5(+) stem cells in the intestine. Subsequently, it will discuss dynamic clonal evolution and cellular plasticity in the intestinal stem cell zone, as well as in stem cell zones of stomach glands. PMID:27573765

  12. Adhesion-GPCRs in the male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Davies, Ben; Kirchhoff, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    The male reproductive tract expresses a diverse array of adhesion-GPCRs, many in a highly specific and regulated manner. Despite this specificity of expression, little is known about the function of this receptor family in male reproductive physiology. Insights into function are beginning to emerge with the increasing availability of genetically modified mice harbouring mutations in these genes. Gpr64 is the best characterised of the adhesion-GPCRs in the male reproductive system and the phenotype of Gpr64 knock-out mice implicates this receptor in the regulation of fluid absorption in the efferent ducts and proximal epididymis. This chapter summarizes recent data concerning this receptor and other family members in the male reproductive system. PMID:21618837

  13. Urinary tract infections: bacteriology and antibiotic resistance patterns.

    PubMed

    Mashouf, Rasoul Yousefi; Babalhavaeji, Hooshang; Yousef, Javad

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the bacteria causing community acquired urinary tract infections (UTI) and detection of antibiotics resistance of isolates in 912 children below 18 years in the west of Iran. Data were analyzed for 4 age groups: infants, toddlers, preteens and teens. Fourteen antibiotics were tested by gel-diffusion method. Of 912 patients, 34.2% had positive bacterial cultures. The most common isolates were E. coli (57.4 %), K. pneumoniae (9.7 %), S. aureus (5.8%) and A. baumannii (2.2%). Most isolates showed high resistance against ampicillin, cotrimoxazole, nalidixic acid, tobramycin and nitrofurantoin. Klebsiella isolates showed more resistance against tested antibiotics than E. coli isolates. PMID:19430071

  14. Stenting of the Lower Gastrointestinal Tract: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Sabharwal, Tarun Adam, Andreas

    2011-06-15

    Colon obstruction due to colorectal cancer is a major surgical emergency. Patients with acute bowel obstruction are usually poor surgical candidates with 10-20% operative mortality and 40-50% operative morbidity rates. Colorectal stenting is an image-guided, minimally invasive procedure, and typical indications include either palliation of inoperable malignant disease or temporary bowel decompression as a bridge to surgery. Colorectal stenting allows the patient to recover before definite elective surgical resection, reducing perioperative morbidity and mortality, overall hospital stay, and associated health care costs. Palliative stenting improves quality of life compared to surgery. A concise review is provided of contemporary stenting practice of the lower gastrointestinal tract, the colon in particular, and both palliative and preoperative adjuvant procedures are evaluated in terms of relevant patient oncology, insertion technique, available stent designs, technical and clinical outcomes, associated complications, and cost-benefit analysis.

  15. Acoustic coupling between oral tract and diatonic harmonica: Recent observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antaki, James; Bahnson, Henry; Burgreen, Greg

    2002-05-01

    The diatonic harmonica is arguably one of the most ``vocal'' of all reed instruments. Due to the relatively short distance, thus tight coupling, between the player's oral cavity and the instrument, relatively subtle changes in the oral tract may effect dramatic modulations of both frequency and spectral content of the sound produced. Over the past several years we have endeavored to improve the understanding of this interaction, as well as the coupling between reeds of a given cell. This presentation will discuss our most recent observations. Benchtop experiments were conducted by laser vibrometer to measure the simultaneous motion of the reeds. Studies on human subjects were based on x-ray, ultrasonographic, and laryngoscopic imaging of players while sounding notes on the harmonica. Evidence of torsional instability has been observed, and analyzed by subsequent computational fluid dynamics simulation.

  16. Biochemical basis of physical properties of respiratory tract secretions.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vidriero, M T

    1987-01-01

    The physical properties of respiratory tract secretion (RTS) play a prominent rôle in the non-specific defence mechanisms of the lung. Viscosity and elasticity, that is flow and deformation, are only two of the physical properties of RTS. Spinability, pourability, adhesiveness and tackiness are starting to be recognised as physical properties of RTS and its is likely that they may be relevant in the pathogenesis of airways obstruction. RTS is a gel, which consists of a cross-linked polymer network dispersed in a liquid solvent. The polymeric structure of the epithelial glycoprotein can be explained in terms of covalent (disulphide) linkages and/or physical entanglement between glycoproteins subunits. Other constituents of RTS such as proteins, lipids, ions and water can influence the physical properties of RTS. PMID:3322857

  17. Effect of postoperative extradural morphine on lower urinary tract function.

    PubMed

    Husted, S; Djurhuus, J C; Husegaard, H C; Jepsen, J; Mortensen, J

    1985-02-01

    The effect of postoperative extradurally administered morphine on lower urinary tract function was studied in female patients undergoing uterine surgery. Urodynamic measurements were made on the day before and on the day after the operation, using a DISA 2-channel carbon dioxide (CO2) cystomictrograph. In ten patients without postoperative urinary retention no changes in cystometry were found during morphine administration, while two patients who developed acute urinary retention had a marked increase in bladder capacity and of detrusor pressure. In contrast, the urethral pressure profile was unchanged in both groups of patients. Intravenously administered naloxone tended to normalize the bladder capacity in the patients with urinary retention. These findings seem to indicate a marked effect in some patients of extradurally administered morphine and the acute urinary retention, following morphine administration, may be treated with naloxone. PMID:3976331

  18. Trichodinosis associated with pathology of the reproductive tract in waterfowl.

    PubMed

    Carnaccini, S; Lowenstine, L J; Sentíes-Cué, C G; Nyaoke, A; Bland, M; Bickford, A A; Shivaprasad, H L; Stoute, S T

    2016-08-01

    Trichodinid ciliophorans are opportunistic parasites of many species of fish, amphibians, and molluscs, but yet never reported in association with lesions in birds. Postmortem and histopathological evaluation of a commercial adult Toulouse gander and female goose, and a wild Mallard drake revealed the presence of severe pathological parasitic colonization of their reproductive tracts. Histopathological findings included moderate to severe granulocytic inflammation, acanthosis, accentuation of the rete pegs, and proliferative hyperplastic squamous metaplasia of the mucosa of the ejaculatory ducts and groove, sulcus spermaticus, glandular part of the phallus (cavum penis), and oviduct in association with large numbers of ciliated protozoa anchored to the tissues or free in the lumen. These protozoa had characteristic morphological features analogous to the family of Trichodinidae. The source of this parasitism could not be determined. To our knowledge, this is the first report of trichodinosis associated with pathology in birds. PMID:26926786

  19. [Microbiocenosis of parietal mucin in the gastrointestinal tract of rats].

    PubMed

    Vorob'ev, A A; Nesvizhskiĭ, Iu V; Bogdanova, E A; Korneev, L M

    2005-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative composition of the microbial community in parietal mucin at different areas of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of rats was revealed. The pronounced variability in the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of microbiocenosis in parietal mucin of rats at different sections was revealed. The differences were most pronounced in the passage from upper to lower GIT sections, the large intestine found to be the richest biocenosis. The microbial composition of rat feces was faintly associated with the GIT parietal microbiocenosis. The individual areas of GIT mucosa were unique of their microbial characteristics and organization. This makes it possible to regard them as relatively independent biotopes and indicates that it is impossible to evaluate the microbial community by one of the colonic mucosal sifes. PMID:16438365

  20. Targeting the gastrointestinal tract to treat type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Paige V; Duca, Frank A

    2016-09-01

    The rising global rates of type 2 diabetes and obesity present a significant economic and social burden, underscoring the importance for effective and safe therapeutic options. The success of glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, along with the potent glucose-lowering effects of bariatric surgery, highlight the gastrointestinal tract as a potential target for diabetes treatment. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that the gut plays a prominent role in the ability of metformin to lower glucose levels. As such, the current review highlights some of the current and potential pathways in the gut that could be targeted to improve glucose homeostasis, such as changes in nutrient sensing, gut peptides, gut microbiota and bile acids. A better understanding of these pathways will lay the groundwork for novel gut-targeted antidiabetic therapies, some of which have already shown initial promise. PMID:27496374