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Sample records for aerodynamic design problems

  1. Computational aerodynamics and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The role of computational aerodynamics in design is reviewed with attention given to the design process; the proper role of computations; the importance of calibration, interpretation, and verification; the usefulness of a given computational capability; and the marketing of new codes. Examples of computational aerodynamics in design are given with particular emphasis on the Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology. Finally, future prospects are noted, with consideration given to the role of advanced computers, advances in numerical solution techniques, turbulence models, complex geometries, and computational design procedures. Previously announced in STAR as N82-33348

  2. Nonlinear aerodynamic wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, Ellwood

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of new nonlinear theoretical techniques is demonstrated for supersonic wing design. The new technology was utilized to define outboard panels for an existing advanced tactical fighter model. Mach 1.6 maneuver point design and multi-operating point compromise surfaces were developed and tested. High aerodynamic efficiency was achieved at the design conditions. A corollary result was that only modest supersonic penalties were incurred to meet multiple aerodynamic requirements. The nonlinear potential analysis of a practical configuration arrangement correlated well with experimental data.

  3. Systems design study of the Pioneer Venus spacecraft. Volume 1. Technical analyses and tradeoffs, section 7 (part 3 of 4). [aerodynamic design problems for small probe reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The aerodynamic design problems for the Pioneer Venus mission are discussed for a small probe shape that enters the atmosphere, and exhibits good stability for the subsonic portion of the flight. The problems discussed include: heat shield, structures and mechanisms, thermal control, decelerator, probe communication, data handling and command, and electric power.

  4. Aerodynamic Design Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan; Madavan, Nateri K.

    2003-01-01

    The design of aerodynamic components of aircraft, such as wings or engines, involves a process of obtaining the most optimal component shape that can deliver the desired level of component performance, subject to various constraints, e.g., total weight or cost, that the component must satisfy. Aerodynamic design can thus be formulated as an optimization problem that involves the minimization of an objective function subject to constraints. A new aerodynamic design optimization procedure based on neural networks and response surface methodology (RSM) incorporates the advantages of both traditional RSM and neural networks. The procedure uses a strategy, denoted parameter-based partitioning of the design space, to construct a sequence of response surfaces based on both neural networks and polynomial fits to traverse the design space in search of the optimal solution. Some desirable characteristics of the new design optimization procedure include the ability to handle a variety of design objectives, easily impose constraints, and incorporate design guidelines and rules of thumb. It provides an infrastructure for variable fidelity analysis and reduces the cost of computation by using less-expensive, lower fidelity simulations in the early stages of the design evolution. The initial or starting design can be far from optimal. The procedure is easy and economical to use in large-dimensional design space and can be used to perform design tradeoff studies rapidly. Designs involving multiple disciplines can also be optimized. Some practical applications of the design procedure that have demonstrated some of its capabilities include the inverse design of an optimal turbine airfoil starting from a generic shape and the redesign of transonic turbines to improve their unsteady aerodynamic characteristics.

  5. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-04-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  6. Aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, E. M.; Chapman, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    The procedure of using numerical optimization methods coupled with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes for the development of an aerodynamic design is examined. Several approaches that replace wind tunnel tests, develop pressure distributions and derive designs, or fulfill preset design criteria are presented. The method of Aerodynamic Design by Numerical Optimization (ADNO) is described and illustrated with examples.

  7. Turbine Aerodynamics Design Tool Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Frank W.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the Marshal Space Flight Center Fluids Workshop on Turbine Aerodynamic design tool development. The topics include: (1) Meanline Design/Off-design Analysis; and (2) Airfoil Contour Generation and Analysis. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  8. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1988-01-01

    The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

  9. Integrated structural-aerodynamic design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Kao, P. J.; Grossman, B.; Polen, D.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper focuses on the processes of simultaneous aerodynamic and structural wing design as a prototype for design integration, with emphasis on the major difficulty associated with multidisciplinary design optimization processes, their enormous computational costs. Methods are presented for reducing this computational burden through the development of efficient methods for cross-sensitivity calculations and the implementation of approximate optimization procedures. Utilizing a modular sensitivity analysis approach, it is shown that the sensitivities can be computed without the expensive calculation of the derivatives of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix, and the derivatives of the structural flexibility matrix. The same process is used to efficiently evaluate the sensitivities of the wing divergence constraint, which should be particularly useful, not only in problems of complete integrated aircraft design, but also in aeroelastic tailoring applications.

  10. Aerodynamics Research Revolutionizes Truck Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center conducted numerous tests to refine the shape of trucks to reduce aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the 1980s and 1990s, a team based at Langley Research Center explored controlling drag and the flow of air around a moving body. Aeroserve Technologies Ltd., of Ottawa, Canada, with its subsidiary, Airtab LLC, in Loveland, Colorado, applied the research from Dryden and Langley to the development of the Airtab vortex generator. Airtabs create two counter-rotating vortices to reduce wind resistance and aerodynamic drag of trucks, trailers, recreational vehicles, and many other vehicles.

  11. Extended mapping and characteristics techniques for inverse aerodynamic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieczky, H.; Qian, Y. J.

    1991-01-01

    Some ideas for using hodograph theory, mapping techniques and methods of characteristics to formulate typical aerodynamic design boundary value problems are developed. The inverse method of characteristics is shown to be a fast tool for design of transonic flow elements as well as supersonic flows with given shock waves.

  12. Formulation for Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, G. W.; Taylor, A. C., III; Mani, S. V.; Newman, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient approach for simultaneous aerodynamic analysis and design optimization is presented. This approach does not require the performance of many flow analyses at each design optimization step, which can be an expensive procedure. Thus, this approach brings us one step closer to meeting the challenge of incorporating computational fluid dynamic codes into gradient-based optimization techniques for aerodynamic design. An adjoint-variable method is introduced to nullify the effect of the increased number of design variables in the problem formulation. The method has been successfully tested on one-dimensional nozzle flow problems, including a sample problem with a normal shock. Implementations of the above algorithm are also presented that incorporate Newton iterations to secure a high-quality flow solution at the end of the design process. Implementations with iterative flow solvers are possible and will be required for large, multidimensional flow problems.

  13. Aerodynamic Design of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, R. O. (Editor); Johnsen, I. A.

    1965-01-01

    An overview of 'Aerodynamic systems design of axial flow compressors' is presented. Numerous chapters cover topics such as compressor design, ptotential and viscous flow in two dimensional cascades, compressor stall and blade vibration, and compressor flow theory. Theoretical aspects of flow are also covered.

  14. Efficient optimization of integrated aerodynamic-structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.; Eppard, W. M.; Kao, P. J.; Polen, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques for reducing the computational complexity of multidisciplinary design optimization (DO) of aerodynamic structures are described and demonstrated. The basic principles of aerodynamic and structural DO are reviewed; the formulation of the combined DO problem is outlined; and particular attention is given to (1) the application of perturbation methods to cross-sensitivity computations and (2) numerical approximation procedures. Trial DOs of a simple sailplane design are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. The IBM 3090 CPU time for the entire integrated DO was reduced from an estimated 10 h to about 6 min.

  15. Aerodynamic design lowers truck fuel consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steers, L.

    1978-01-01

    Energy-saving concepts in truck design are emerging from developing new shapes with improved aerodynamic flow properties that can reduce air-drag coefficient of conventional tractor-trailers without requiring severe design changes or compromising load-carrying capability. Improvements are expected to decrease somewhat with increased wind velocities and would be affected by factors such as terrain, driving techniques, and mechanical condition.

  16. Turbine Aerodynamic Design System Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Frank W.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Simpson, Steven P.

    2003-01-01

    Presentation outline includes the following: 1. Volute manifold design and analysis methodology. 2. Meanline modification for compatibility with engine analysis code. Objective is to develop a manifold design methodology for turbines and pumps, and to enable rapid screening of candidate flow paths.

  17. Innovation in Aerodynamic Design Features of Soviet Missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    2006-01-01

    Wind tunnel investigations of some tactical and strategic missile systems developed by the former Soviet Union have been included in the basic missile research programs of the NACA/NASA. Studies of the Soviet missiles sometimes revealed innovative design features that resulted in unusual or unexpected aerodynamic characteristics. In some cases these characteristics have been such that the measured performance of the missile exceeds what might have been predicted. In other cases some unusual design features have been found that would alleviate what might otherwise have been a serious aerodynamic problem. In some designs, what has appeared to be a lack of refinement has proven to be a matter of expediency. It is a purpose of this paper to describe some examples of unusual design features of some Soviet missiles and to illustrate the effectiveness of the design features on the aerodynamic behavior of the missile. The paper draws on the experience of the author who for over 60 years was involved in the aerodynamic wind tunnel testing of aircraft and missiles with the NACA/NASA.

  18. Aerodynamic design optimization by using a continuous adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, JiaQi; Xiong, JunTao; Liu, Feng

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents the fundamentals of a continuous adjoint method and the applications of this method to the aerodynamic design optimization of both external and internal flows. General formulation of the continuous adjoint equations and the corresponding boundary conditions are derived. With the adjoint method, the complete gradient information needed in the design optimization can be obtained by solving the governing flow equations and the corresponding adjoint equations only once for each cost function, regardless of the number of design parameters. An inverse design of airfoil is firstly performed to study the accuracy of the adjoint gradient and the effectiveness of the adjoint method as an inverse design method. Then the method is used to perform a series of single and multiple point design optimization problems involving the drag reduction of airfoil, wing, and wing-body configuration, and the aerodynamic performance improvement of turbine and compressor blade rows. The results demonstrate that the continuous adjoint method can efficiently and significantly improve the aerodynamic performance of the design in a shape optimization problem.

  19. AERODYNAMIC AND BLADING DESIGN OF MULTISTAGE AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSORS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The axial-flow compressor is used for aircraft engines because it has distinct configuration and performance advantages over other compressor types. However, good potential performance is not easily obtained. The designer must be able to model the actual flows well enough to adequately predict aerodynamic performance. This computer program has been developed for computing the aerodynamic design of a multistage axial-flow compressor and, if desired, the associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis. The aerodynamic solution gives velocity diagrams on selected streamlines of revolution at the blade row edges. The program yields aerodynamic and blading design results that can be directly used by flow and mechanical analysis codes. Two such codes are TSONIC, a blade-to-blade channel flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-10977), and MERIDL, a more detailed hub-to-shroud flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-12966). The aerodynamic and blading design program can reduce the time and effort required to obtain acceptable multistage axial-flow compressor configurations by generating good initial solutions and by being compatible with available analysis codes. The aerodynamic solution assumes steady, axisymmetric flow so that the problem is reduced to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. The streamline curvature method is used for the iterative aerodynamic solution at stations outside of the blade rows. If a blade design is desired, the blade elements are defined and stacked within the aerodynamic solution iteration. The blade element inlet and outlet angles are established by empirical incidence and deviation angles to the relative flow angles of the velocity diagrams. The blade element centerline is composed of two segments tangentially joined at a transition point. The local blade angle variation of each element can be specified as a fourth-degree polynomial function of path distance. Blade element thickness can also be specified

  20. Aerodynamic Design Opportunities for Future Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.

    2002-01-01

    A discussion of a diverse set of aerodynamic opportunities to improve the aerodynamic performance of future supersonic aircraft has been presented and discussed. These ideas are offered to the community in a hope that future supersonic vehicle development activities will not be hindered by past efforts. A number of nonlinear flow based drag reduction technologies are presented and discussed. The subject technologies are related to the areas of interference flows, vehicle concepts, vortex flows, wing design, advanced control effectors, and planform design. The authors also discussed the importance of improving the aerodynamic design environment to allow creativity and knowledge greater influence. A review of all of the data presented show that pressure drag reductions on the order of 50 to 60 counts are achievable, compared to a conventional supersonic cruise vehicle, with the application of several of the discussed technologies. These drag reductions would correlate to a 30 to 40% increase in cruise L/D (lift-to-drag ratio) for a commercial supersonic transport.

  1. Multigrid Methods for Aerodynamic Problems in Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caughey, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Work has been directed at the development of efficient multigrid methods for the solution of aerodynamic problems involving complex geometries, including the development of computational methods for the solution of both inviscid and viscous transonic flow problems. The emphasis is on problems of complex, three-dimensional geometry. The methods developed are based upon finite-volume approximations to both the Euler and the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The methods are developed for use on multi-block grids using diagonalized implicit multigrid methods to achieve computational efficiency. The work is focused upon aerodynamic problems involving complex geometries, including advanced engine inlets.

  2. Biological and aerodynamic problems with the flight of animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, E. V.; Kuchemann, D.

    1980-01-01

    Biological and aerodynamic considerations related to birds and insects are discussed. A wide field is open for comparative biological, physiological, and aerodynamic investigations. Considerable mathematics related to the flight of animals is presented, including 20 equations. The 15 figures included depict the design of bird and insect wings, diagrams of propulsion efficiency, thrust, lift, and angles of attack and photographs of flapping wing free flying wing only models which were built and flown.

  3. Integrated aerodynamic/structural design of a sailplane wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, B.; Gurdal, Z.; Haftka, R. T.; Strauch, G. J.; Eppard, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Using lifting-line theory and beam analysis, the geometry (planiform and twist) and composite material structural sizes (skin thickness, spar cap, and web thickness) were designed for a sailplane wing, subject to both structural and aerodynamic constraints. For all elements, the integrated design (simultaneously designing the aerodynamics and the structure) was superior in terms of performance and weight to the sequential design (where the aerodynamic geometry is designed to maximize the performance, following which a structural/aeroelastic design minimizes the weight). Integrated designs produced less rigid, higher aspect ratio wings with favorable aerodynamic/structural interactions.

  4. A faster optimization method based on support vector regression for aerodynamic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xixiang; Zhang, Weihua

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a new strategy for optimal design of complex aerodynamic configuration with a reasonable low computational effort is proposed. In order to solve the formulated aerodynamic optimization problem with heavy computation complexity, two steps are taken: (1) a sequential approximation method based on support vector regression (SVR) and hybrid cross validation strategy, is proposed to predict aerodynamic coefficients, and thus approximates the objective function and constraint conditions of the originally formulated optimization problem with given limited sample points; (2) a sequential optimization algorithm is proposed to ensure the obtained optimal solution by solving the approximation optimization problem in step (1) is very close to the optimal solution of the originally formulated optimization problem. In the end, we adopt a complex aerodynamic design problem, that is optimal aerodynamic design of a flight vehicle with grid fins, to demonstrate our proposed optimization methods, and numerical results show that better results can be obtained with a significantly lower computational effort than using classical optimization techniques.

  5. Aerodynamic design trends for commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbig, R.; Koerner, H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent research on advanced-configuration commercial aircraft at DFVLR is surveyed, with a focus on aerodynamic approaches to improved performance. Topics examined include transonic wings with variable camber or shock/boundary-layer control, wings with reduced friction drag or laminarized flow, prop-fan propulsion, and unusual configurations or wing profiles. Drawings, diagrams, and graphs of predicted performance are provided, and the need for extensive development efforts using powerful computer facilities, high-speed and low-speed wind tunnels, and flight tests of models (mounted on specially designed carrier aircraft) is indicated.

  6. Aerodynamics of a promising vortex furnace design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufriev, I. S.; Strizhak, P. A.; Chernetskii, M. Yu.; Shadrin, E. Yu.; Sharypov, O. V.

    2015-08-01

    The aerodynamics of a promising vortex furnace design with secondary top blasting has been studied. Flow velocity fields have been measured in an isothermal laboratory model of the furnace using a digital tracer imaging (particle image velocimetry) technique. Three-dimensional diagnostics of flow structure in the combustion chamber has been carried out by the method of laser Doppler anemometry. Processing of the obtained data using the criterion of "minimum total pressure" has been used to visualize the spatial structure of the vortex core.

  7. A New Aerodynamic Data Dispersion Method for Launch Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for implementing aerodynamic data dispersion analysis is herein introduced. A general mathematical approach combined with physical modeling tailored to the aerodynamic quantity of interest enables the generation of more realistically relevant dispersed data and, in turn, more reasonable flight simulation results. The method simultaneously allows for the aerodynamic quantities and their derivatives to be dispersed given a set of non-arbitrary constraints, which stresses the controls model in more ways than with the traditional bias up or down of the nominal data within the uncertainty bounds. The adoption and implementation of this new method within the NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Project has resulted in significant increases in predicted roll control authority, and lowered the induced risks for flight test operations. One direct impact on launch vehicles is a reduced size for auxiliary control systems, and the possibility of an increased payload. This technique has the potential of being applied to problems in multiple areas where nominal data together with uncertainties are used to produce simulations using Monte Carlo type random sampling methods. It is recommended that a tailored physics-based dispersion model be delivered with any aerodynamic product that includes nominal data and uncertainties, in order to make flight simulations more realistic and allow for leaner spacecraft designs.

  8. Integrated aerodynamic-structural design of a transport wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, B.; Haftka, R. T.; Kao, P.-J.; Polen, D. M.; Rais-Rohani, M.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1989-01-01

    The integrated aerodynamic-structural design of a subsonic transport wing for minimum weight subject to required range is formulated and solved. The problem requires large computational resources, and two methods are used to alleviate the computational burden. First, a modular sensitivity method that permits the usage of black-box disciplinary software packages, is used to reduce the cost of sensitivity derivatives. In particular, it is shown that derivatives of the aeroelastic response and divergence speed can be calculated without the costly computation of derivatives of aerodynamic influence coefficient and structural stiffness matrices. A sequential approximate optimization is used to further reduce computational cost. The optimization procedure is shown to require a relatively small number of analysis and sensitivity calculations.

  9. The aerodynamic design of an advanced rotor airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, J. A., Jr.; Hinson, B. L.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced rotor airfoil, designed utilizing supercritical airfoil technology and advanced design and analysis methodology is described. The airfoil was designed subject to stringent aerodynamic design criteria for improving the performance over the entire rotor operating regime. The design criteria are discussed. The design was accomplished using a physical plane, viscous, transonic inverse design procedure, and a constrained function minimization technique for optimizing the airfoil leading edge shape. The aerodynamic performance objectives of the airfoil are discussed.

  10. User's manual for an aerodynamic optimization scheeme that updates flow variables and design parameters simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    This user's manual is presented for an aerodynamic optimization program that updates flow variables and design parameters simultaneously. The program was developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The program was tested by applying it to the problem of optimizing propeller designs. Some reference to this particular application is therefore made in the manual. However, the optimization scheme is suitable for application to general aerodynamic design problems. A description of the approach used in the optimization scheme is first presented, followed by a description of the use of the program.

  11. Hypersonic Arbitrary-Body Aerodynamics (HABA) for conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Salguero, D.E.

    1990-03-15

    The Hypersonic Arbitrary-Body Aerodynamics (HABA) computer program predicts static and dynamic aerodynamic derivatives at hypersonic speeds for any vehicle geometry. It is intended to be used during conceptual design studies where fast computational speed is required. It uses the same geometry and hypersonic aerodynamic methods as the Mark IV Supersonic/Hypersonic Arbitrary-Body Program (SHABP) developed under sponsorship of the Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory; however, the input and output formats have been improved to make it easier to use. This program is available as part of the Department 9140 CAE software.

  12. Aerodynamic Design Study of Advanced Multistage Axial Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, Louis M.; Wood, Jerry R.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Medd, Adam J.; Dang, Thong Q.

    2002-01-01

    As a direct response to the need for further performance gains from current multistage axial compressors, an investigation of advanced aerodynamic design concepts that will lead to compact, high-efficiency, and wide-operability configurations is being pursued. Part I of this report describes the projected level of technical advancement relative to the state of the art and quantifies it in terms of basic aerodynamic technology elements of current design systems. A rational enhancement of these elements is shown to lead to a substantial expansion of the design and operability space. Aerodynamic design considerations for a four-stage core compressor intended to serve as a vehicle to develop, integrate, and demonstrate aerotechnology advancements are discussed. This design is biased toward high efficiency at high loading. Three-dimensional blading and spanwise tailoring of vector diagrams guided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are used to manage the aerodynamics of the high-loaded endwall regions. Certain deleterious flow features, such as leakage-vortex-dominated endwall flow and strong shock-boundary-layer interactions, were identified and targeted for improvement. However, the preliminary results were encouraging and the front two stages were extracted for further aerodynamic trimming using a three-dimensional inverse design method described in part II of this report. The benefits of the inverse design method are illustrated by developing an appropriate pressure-loading strategy for transonic blading and applying it to reblade the rotors in the front two stages of the four-stage configuration. Multistage CFD simulations based on the average passage formulation indicated an overall efficiency potential far exceeding current practice for the front two stages. Results of the CFD simulation at the aerodynamic design point are interrogated to identify areas requiring additional development. In spite of the significantly higher aerodynamic loadings, advanced CFD

  13. A PDE Sensitivity Equation Method for Optimal Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borggaard, Jeff; Burns, John

    1996-01-01

    The use of gradient based optimization algorithms in inverse design is well established as a practical approach to aerodynamic design. A typical procedure uses a simulation scheme to evaluate the objective function (from the approximate states) and its gradient, then passes this information to an optimization algorithm. Once the simulation scheme (CFD flow solver) has been selected and used to provide approximate function evaluations, there are several possible approaches to the problem of computing gradients. One popular method is to differentiate the simulation scheme and compute design sensitivities that are then used to obtain gradients. Although this black-box approach has many advantages in shape optimization problems, one must compute mesh sensitivities in order to compute the design sensitivity. In this paper, we present an alternative approach using the PDE sensitivity equation to develop algorithms for computing gradients. This approach has the advantage that mesh sensitivities need not be computed. Moreover, when it is possible to use the CFD scheme for both the forward problem and the sensitivity equation, then there are computational advantages. An apparent disadvantage of this approach is that it does not always produce consistent derivatives. However, for a proper combination of discretization schemes, one can show asymptotic consistency under mesh refinement, which is often sufficient to guarantee convergence of the optimal design algorithm. In particular, we show that when asymptotically consistent schemes are combined with a trust-region optimization algorithm, the resulting optimal design method converges. We denote this approach as the sensitivity equation method. The sensitivity equation method is presented, convergence results are given and the approach is illustrated on two optimal design problems involving shocks.

  14. Nonlinear problems in flight dynamics involving aerodynamic bifurcations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, M.; Chapman, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    Aerodynamic bifurcation is defined as the replacement of an unstable equilibrium flow by a new stable equilibrium flow at a critical value of a parameter. A mathematical model of the aerodynamic contribution to the aircraft's equations of motion is amended to accommodate aerodynamic bifurcations. Important bifurcations such as, the onset of large-scale vortex-shedding are defined. The amended mathematical model is capable of incorporating various forms of aerodynamic responses, including those associated with dynamic stall of airfoils.

  15. Wind turbine design codes: A preliminary comparison of the aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, M.L. Jr.; Wright, A.D.; Tangler, J.L.

    1997-12-01

    The National Wind Technology Center of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is comparing several computer codes used to design and analyze wind turbines. The first part of this comparison is to determine how well the programs predict the aerodynamic behavior of turbines with no structural degrees of freedom. Without general agreement on the aerodynamics, it is futile to try to compare the structural response due to the aerodynamic input. In this paper, the authors compare the aerodynamic loads for three programs: Garrad Hassan`s BLADED, their own WT-PERF, and the University of Utah`s YawDyn. This report documents a work in progress and compares only two-bladed, downwind turbines.

  16. Improved Aerodynamic Analysis for Hybrid Wing Body Conceptual Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gern, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of ongoing efforts to develop, evaluate, and validate different tools for improved aerodynamic modeling and systems analysis of Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft configurations. Results are being presented for the evaluation of different aerodynamic tools including panel methods, enhanced panel methods with viscous drag prediction, and computational fluid dynamics. Emphasis is placed on proper prediction of aerodynamic loads for structural sizing as well as viscous drag prediction to develop drag polars for HWB conceptual design optimization. Data from transonic wind tunnel tests at the Arnold Engineering Development Center s 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel was used as a reference data set in order to evaluate the accuracy of the aerodynamic tools. Triangularized surface data and Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) models of an X-48B 2% scale wind tunnel model were used to generate input and model files for the different analysis tools. In support of ongoing HWB scaling studies within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program, an improved finite element based structural analysis and weight estimation tool for HWB center bodies is currently under development. Aerodynamic results from these analyses are used to provide additional aerodynamic validation data.

  17. Aerodynamic design of electric and hybrid vehicles: A guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    A typical present-day subcompact electric hybrid vehicle (EHV), operating on an SAE J227a D driving cycle, consumes up to 35% of its road energy requirement overcoming aerodynamic resistance. The application of an integrated system design approach, where drag reduction is an important design parameter, can increase the cycle range by more than 15%. This guidebook highlights a logic strategy for including aerodynamic drag reduction in the design of electric and hybrid vehicles to the degree appropriate to the mission requirements. Backup information and procedures are included in order to implement the strategy. Elements of the procedure are based on extensive wind tunnel tests involving generic subscale models and full-scale prototype EHVs. The user need not have any previous aerodynamic background. By necessity, the procedure utilizes many generic approximations and assumptions resulting in various levels of uncertainty. Dealing with these uncertainties, however, is a key feature of the strategy.

  18. Parametric Deformation of Discrete Geometry for Aerodynamic Shape Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, George R.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian

    2012-01-01

    We present a versatile discrete geometry manipulation platform for aerospace vehicle shape optimization. The platform is based on the geometry kernel of an open-source modeling tool called Blender and offers access to four parametric deformation techniques: lattice, cage-based, skeletal, and direct manipulation. Custom deformation methods are implemented as plugins, and the kernel is controlled through a scripting interface. Surface sensitivities are provided to support gradient-based optimization. The platform architecture allows the use of geometry pipelines, where multiple modelers are used in sequence, enabling manipulation difficult or impossible to achieve with a constructive modeler or deformer alone. We implement an intuitive custom deformation method in which a set of surface points serve as the design variables and user-specified constraints are intrinsically satisfied. We test our geometry platform on several design examples using an aerodynamic design framework based on Cartesian grids. We examine inverse airfoil design and shape matching and perform lift-constrained drag minimization on an airfoil with thickness constraints. A transport wing-fuselage integration problem demonstrates the approach in 3D. In a final example, our platform is pipelined with a constructive modeler to parabolically sweep a wingtip while applying a 1-G loading deformation across the wingspan. This work is an important first step towards the larger goal of leveraging the investment of the graphics industry to improve the state-of-the-art in aerospace geometry tools.

  19. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of a Spacecraft Cabin Ventilation Fan Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    Quieter working environments for astronauts are needed if future long-duration space exploration missions are to be safe and productive. Ventilation and payload cooling fans are known to be dominant sources of noise, with the International Space Station being a good case in point. To address this issue cost effectively, early attention to fan design, selection, and installation has been recommended, leading to an effort by NASA to examine the potential for small-fan noise reduction by improving fan aerodynamic design. As a preliminary part of that effort, the aerodynamics of a cabin ventilation fan designed by Hamilton Sundstrand has been simulated using computational fluid dynamics codes, and the computed solutions analyzed to quantify various aspects of the fan aerodynamics and performance. Four simulations were performed at the design rotational speed: two at the design flow rate and two at off-design flow rates. Following a brief discussion of the computational codes, various aerodynamic- and performance-related quantities derived from the computed flow fields are presented along with relevant flow field details. The results show that the computed fan performance is in generally good agreement with stated design goals.

  20. Integrated aerodynamic-structural design of a forward-swept transport wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Grossman, Bernard; Kao, Pi-Jen; Polen, David M.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1989-01-01

    The introduction of composite materials is having a profound effect on aircraft design. Since these materials permit the designer to tailor material properties to improve structural, aerodynamic and acoustic performance, they require an integrated multidisciplinary design process. Futhermore, because of the complexity of the design process, numerical optimization methods are required. The utilization of integrated multidisciplinary design procedures for improving aircraft design is not currently feasible because of software coordination problems and the enormous computational burden. Even with the expected rapid growth of supercomputers and parallel architectures, these tasks will not be practical without the development of efficient methods for cross-disciplinary sensitivities and efficient optimization procedures. The present research is part of an on-going effort which is focused on the processes of simultaneous aerodynamic and structural wing design as a prototype for design integration. A sequence of integrated wing design procedures has been developed in order to investigate various aspects of the design process.

  1. Adjoint methods for aerodynamic wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    A model inverse design problem is used to investigate the effect of flow discontinuities on the optimization process. The optimization involves finding the cross-sectional area distribution of a duct that produces velocities that closely match a targeted velocity distribution. Quasi-one-dimensional flow theory is used, and the target is chosen to have a shock wave in its distribution. The objective function which quantifies the difference between the targeted and calculated velocity distributions may become non-smooth due to the interaction between the shock and the discretization of the flowfield. This paper offers two techniques to resolve the resulting problems for the optimization algorithms. The first, shock-fitting, involves careful integration of the objective function through the shock wave. The second, coordinate straining with shock penalty, uses a coordinate transformation to align the calculated shock with the target and then adds a penalty proportional to the square of the distance between the shocks. The techniques are tested using several popular sensitivity and optimization methods, including finite-differences, and direct and adjoint discrete sensitivity methods. Two optimization strategies, Gauss-Newton and sequential quadratic programming (SQP), are used to drive the objective function to a minimum.

  2. Preliminary aerodynamic design considerations for advanced laminar flow aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph L., Jr.; Yip, Long P.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Modern composite manufacturing methods have provided the opportunity for smooth surfaces that can sustain large regions of natural laminar flow (NLF) boundary layer behavior and have stimulated interest in developing advanced NLF airfoils and improved aircraft designs. Some of the preliminary results obtained in exploratory research investigations on advanced aircraft configurations at the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed. Results of the initial studies have shown that the aerodynamic effects of configuration variables such as canard/wing arrangements, airfoils, and pusher-type and tractor-type propeller installations can be particularly significant at high angles of attack. Flow field interactions between aircraft components were shown to produce undesirable aerodynamic effects on a wing behind a heavily loaded canard, and the use of properly designed wing leading-edge modifications, such as a leading-edge droop, offset the undesirable aerodynamic effects by delaying wing stall and providing increased stall/spin resistance with minimum degradation of laminar flow behavior.

  3. Advanced Aerodynamic Design of Passive Porosity Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Viken, Sally A.; Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes aerodynamic design work aimed at developing a passive porosity control effector system for a generic tailless fighter aircraft. As part of this work, a computational design tool was developed and used to layout passive porosity effector systems for longitudinal and lateral-directional control at a low-speed, high angle of attack condition. Aerodynamic analysis was conducted using the NASA Langley computational fluid dynamics code USM3D, in conjunction with a newly formulated surface boundary condition for passive porosity. Results indicate that passive porosity effectors can provide maneuver control increments that equal and exceed those of conventional aerodynamic effectors for low-speed, high-alpha flight, with control levels that are a linear function of porous area. This work demonstrates the tremendous potential of passive porosity to yield simple control effector systems that have no external moving parts and will preserve an aircraft's fixed outer mold line.

  4. Research on inverse, hybrid and optimization problems in engineering sciences with emphasis on turbomachine aerodynamics: Review of Chinese advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Gao-Lian

    1991-01-01

    Advances in inverse design and optimization theory in engineering fields in China are presented. Two original approaches, the image-space approach and the variational approach, are discussed in terms of turbomachine aerodynamic inverse design. Other areas of research in turbomachine aerodynamic inverse design include the improved mean-streamline (stream surface) method and optimization theory based on optimal control. Among the additional engineering fields discussed are the following: the inverse problem of heat conduction, free-surface flow, variational cogeneration of optimal grid and flow field, and optimal meshing theory of gears.

  5. Computational methods for aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeters, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Five methods to increase the computational efficiency of aerodynamic design using numerical optimization, by reducing the computer time required to perform gradient calculations, are examined. The most promising method consists of drastically reducing the size of the computational domain on which aerodynamic calculations are made during gradient calculations. Since a gradient calculation requires the solution of the flow about an airfoil whose geometry was slightly perturbed from a base airfoil, the flow about the base airfoil is used to determine boundary conditions on the reduced computational domain. This method worked well in subcritical flow.

  6. Aerodynamic design optimization with sensitivity analysis and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1995-01-01

    An investigation was conducted from October 1, 1990 to May 31, 1994 on the development of methodologies to improve the designs (more specifically, the shape) of aerodynamic surfaces of coupling optimization algorithms (OA) with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) algorithms via sensitivity analyses (SA). The study produced several promising methodologies and their proof-of-concept cases, which have been reported in the open literature.

  7. Nonlinear aerodynamics and the design of wing tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, Ilan; Wakayama, Sean

    1993-01-01

    This contract began in April 1990 with studies on the effect of wingtip shape on induced drag. That work considered problems of determining induced drag from computational aerodynamic methods and examined effects of wake roll up on the induced drag of elliptical and crescent wings. The research contract was continued in April 1991 and again in April 1992 with scope augmented to include considerations other than induced drag. The idea was to develop methods for comparing wing tip shapes on the basis of their effects on total drag, structural weight, and high lift performance. To accomplish this, work was done to improve methods for multidisciplinary analysis and optimization of wings. This report describes results of research conducted from April 1992 through March 1993. The general objective was to improve an existing wing optimization method and apply the method to specific problems of interest. The method, while a valuable tool for wing tip design studies, can be applied to more general problems, and has been applied to some of these other problems during its development. Specific goals that were accomplished are listed below and are explained in more detail in attached reports: analysis methods were improved in the area of structural modeling; small improvements to the high lift model were made, and ideas were collected on how clean wing c(sub l(sub max)) should vary with sweep - these ideas should provide a guide for future examination of high lift with experiment or CFD; and a calculation for drag due to the loss of leading edge suction was added to the wing analysis.

  8. Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) for a 3-D Rigid Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumbert, Clyde R.; Hou, Gene J.-W.; Newman, Perry A.

    1999-01-01

    The formulation and implementation of an optimization method called Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) is presented and applied to a simple 3D wing problem. The method aims to reduce the computational expense incurred in performing shape optimization using state-of-the-art CFD flow analysis and sensitivity analysis tools. Results for this small problem show that the method reaches the same local optimum as conventional optimization methods and does so in about half the computational time.

  9. Aerodynamic Design Study of an Advanced Active Twist Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekula, Martin K.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Yeager, William T., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    An Advanced Active Twist Rotor (AATR) is currently being developed by the U.S. Army Vehicle Technology Directorate at NASA Langley Research Center. As a part of this effort, an analytical study was conducted to determine the impact of blade geometry on active-twist performance and, based on those findings, propose a candidate aerodynamic design for the AATR. The process began by creating a baseline design which combined the dynamic design of the original Active Twist Rotor and the aerodynamic design of a high lift rotor concept. The baseline model was used to conduct a series of parametric studies to examine the effect of linear blade twist and blade tip sweep, droop, and taper on active-twist performance. Rotor power requirements and hub vibration were also examined at flight conditions ranging from hover to advance ratio = 0.40. A total of 108 candidate designs were analyzed using the second-generation version of the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD II) code. The study concluded that the vibration reduction capabilities of a rotor utilizing controlled, strain-induced twisting are enhanced through the incorporation of blade tip sweep, droop, and taper into the blade design, while they are degraded by increasing the nose-down linear blade twist. Based on the analysis of rotor power, hub vibration, and active-twist response, a candidate aerodynamic design for the AATR consisting of a blade with approximately 10 degrees of linear blade twist and a blade tip design with 30 degree sweep, 10 degree droop, and 2.5:1 taper ratio over the outer five percent of the blade is proposed.

  10. Energy expenditure, aerodynamics and medical problems in cycling. An update.

    PubMed

    Faria, I E

    1992-07-01

    The cyclist's ability to maintain an extremely high rate of energy expenditure for long durations at a high economy of effort is dependent upon such factors as the individual's anaerobic threshold, muscle fibre type, muscle myoglobin concentration, muscle capillary density and certain anthropometric dimensions. Although laboratory tests have had some success predicting cycling potential, their validity has yet to be established for trained cyclists. Even in analysing the forces producing propulsive torque, cycling effectiveness cannot be based solely on the orientation of applied forces. Innovations of shoe and pedal design continue to have a positive influence on the biomechanics of pedalling. Although muscle involvement during a complete pedal revolution may be similar, economical pedalling rate appears to differ significantly between the novice and racing cyclist. This difference emanates, perhaps, from long term adaptation. Air resistance is by far the greatest retarding force affecting cycling. The aerodynamics of the rider and the bicycle and its components are major contributors to cycling economy. Correct body posture and spacing between riders can significantly enhance speed and efficiency. Acute and chronic responses to cycling and training are complex. To protect the safety and health of the cyclist there must be close monitoring and cooperation between the cyclist, coach, exercise scientist and physician.

  11. Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) for a 3-D Flexible Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumbert, Clyde R.; Hou, Gene J.-W.; Newman, Perry A.

    2001-01-01

    The formulation and implementation of an optimization method called Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) are extended from single discipline analysis (aerodynamics only) to multidisciplinary analysis - in this case, static aero-structural analysis and applied to a simple 3-D wing problem. The method aims to reduce the computational expense incurred in performing shape optimization using state-of-the-art Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow analysis, Finite Element Method (FEM) structural analysis and sensitivity analysis tools. Results for this small problem show that the method reaches the same local optimum as conventional optimization. However, unlike its application to the rigid wing (single discipline analysis), the method, as implemented here, may not show significant reduction in the computational cost. Similar reductions were seen in the two-design-variable (DV) problem results but not in the 8-DV results given here.

  12. Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) for a 3-D Flexible Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumbert, Clyde R.; Hou, Gene J.-W.

    2001-01-01

    The formulation and implementation of an optimization method called Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) are extended from single discipline analysis (aerodynamics only) to multidisciplinary analysis - in this case, static aero-structural analysis - and applied to a simple 3-D wing problem. The method aims to reduce the computational expense incurred in performing shape optimization using state-of-the-art Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow analysis, Finite Element Method (FEM) structural analysis and sensitivity analysis tools. Results for this small problem show that the method reaches the same local optimum as conventional optimization. However, unlike its application to the win,, (single discipline analysis), the method. as I implemented here, may not show significant reduction in the computational cost. Similar reductions were seen in the two-design-variable (DV) problem results but not in the 8-DV results given here.

  13. Newton-Krylov-Schwarz methods for aerodynamics problems : compressible and incompressible flows on unstructured grids.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaushik, D. K.; Keyes, D. E.; Smith, B. F.

    1999-02-24

    We review and extend to the compressible regime an earlier parallelization of an implicit incompressible unstructured Euler code [9], and solve for flow over an M6 wing in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic regimes. While the parallelization philosophy of the compressible case is identical to the incompressible, we focus here on the nonlinear and linear convergence rates, which vary in different physical regimes, and on comparing the performance of currently important computational platforms. Multiple-scale problems should be marched out at desired accuracy limits, and not held hostage to often more stringent explicit stability limits. In the context of inviscid aerodynamics, this means evolving transient computations on the scale of the convective transit time, rather than the acoustic transit time, or solving steady-state problems with local CFL numbers approaching infinity. Whether time-accurate or steady, we employ Newton's method on each (pseudo-) timestep. The coupling of analysis with design in aerodynamic practice is another motivation for implicitness. Design processes that make use of sensitivity derivatives and the Hessian matrix require operations with the Jacobian matrix of the state constraints (i.e., of the governing PDE system); if the Jacobian is available for design, it may be employed with advantage in a nonlinearly implicit analysis, as well.

  14. Aerodynamic design and analysis of a highly loaded turbine exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, F. W.; Montesdeoca, X. A.; Rowey, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and analysis of a turbine exhaust volute manifold is described. This turbine exhaust system will be used with an advanced gas generator oxidizer turbine designed for very high specific work. The elevated turbine stage loading results in increased discharge Mach number and swirl velocity which, along with the need for minimal circumferential variation of fluid properties at the turbine exit, represent challenging volute design requirements. The design approach, candidate geometries analyzed, and steady state/unsteady CFD analysis results are presented.

  15. Comprehensive missile aerodynamics programs for preliminary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillenius, M. F. E.; Hemsch, M. J.; Sawyer, W. C.; Allen, J. M.; Blair, A. B., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Two different classes of missile aeroprediction programs have been recently developed. The first class of programs provides rapid engineering predictions and includes MISSILE1 and MISSILE2 applicable to missile configurations with axisymmetric bodies. The second class of programs consists of the DEMON series, including a simplified version NSWCDM, designed to calculate detailed loadings acting on supersonic missiles which may have non-circular body cross sections. Both classes account for high angles of attack and track vortices from canard or wing section to the tail section. Extensive comparisons with experimental data are presented including nonlinear effects of canard control.

  16. Reduced truck fuel consumption through aerodynamic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steers, L. L.; Saltzman, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    Full-scale fuel consumption and drag tests were performed on a conventional cab-over-engine tractor-trailer combination and a version of the same vehicle with significant forebody modifications. The modified configuration had greatly increased radii on all front corners and edges of the tractor and a smooth fairing of the modified tractor top and sides extending to the trailer. Concurrent highway testing of the two configurations showed that the modified design used 20% to 24% less fuel than the baseline configuration at 88.5 km/hr (55 mph) with near-calm wind conditions. Coastdown test results showed that the modified configuration reduced the drag coefficient by 0.43 from the baseline value of 1.17 at 88.5 km/hr (55 mph) in calm wind conditions.

  17. Optimum aerodynamic design via boundary control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1994-01-01

    These lectures describe the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil and wing design. In previous studies it was shown that control theory could be used to devise an effective optimization procedure for two-dimensional profiles in which the shape is determined by a conformal transformation from a unit circle, and the control is the mapping function. Recently the method has been implemented in an alternative formulation which does not depend on conformal mapping, so that it can more easily be extended to treat general configurations. The method has also been extended to treat the Euler equations, and results are presented for both two and three dimensional cases, including the optimization of a swept wing.

  18. A Rapid Aerodynamic Design Procedure Based on Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2001-01-01

    An aerodynamic design procedure that uses neural networks to model the functional behavior of the objective function in design space has been developed. This method incorporates several improvements to an earlier method that employed a strategy called parameter-based partitioning of the design space in order to reduce the computational costs associated with design optimization. As with the earlier method, the current method uses a sequence of response surfaces to traverse the design space in search of the optimal solution. The new method yields significant reductions in computational costs by using composite response surfaces with better generalization capabilities and by exploiting synergies between the optimization method and the simulation codes used to generate the training data. These reductions in design optimization costs are demonstrated for a turbine airfoil design study where a generic shape is evolved into an optimal airfoil.

  19. Aerodynamic Analysis of Multistage Turbomachinery Flows in Support of Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the state of 3D CFD based models of the time average flow field within axial flow multistage turbomachines. Emphasis is placed on models which are compatible with the industrial design environment and those models which offer the potential of providing credible results at both design and off-design operating conditions. The need to develop models which are free of aerodynamic input from semi-empirical design systems is stressed. The accuracy of such models is shown to be dependent upon their ability to account for the unsteady flow environment in multistage turbomachinery. The relevant flow physics associated with some of the unsteady flow processes present in axial flow multistage machinery are presented along with procedures which can be used to account for them in 3D CFD simulations. Sample results are presented for both axial flow compressors and axial flow turbines which help to illustrate the enhanced predictive capabilities afforded by including these procedures in 3D CFD simulations. Finally, suggestions are given for future work on the development of time average flow models.

  20. Nonlinear potential analysis techniques for supersonic-hypersonic aerodynamic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, V.; Clever, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    Approximate nonlinear inviscid theoretical techniques for predicting aerodynamic characteristics and surface pressures for relatively slender vehicles at supersonic and moderate hypersonic speeds were developed. Emphasis was placed on approaches that would be responsive to conceptual configuration design level of effort. Second order small disturbance and full potential theory was utilized to meet this objective. Numerical codes were developed for relatively general three dimensional geometries to evaluate the capability of the approximate equations of motion considered. Results from the computations indicate good agreement with experimental results for a variety of wing, body, and wing-body shapes.

  1. Global Design Optimization for Aerodynamics and Rocket Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyy, Wei; Papila, Nilay; Vaidyanathan, Rajkumar; Tucker, Kevin; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Modern computational and experimental tools for aerodynamics and propulsion applications have matured to a stage where they can provide substantial insight into engineering processes involving fluid flows, and can be fruitfully utilized to help improve the design of practical devices. In particular, rapid and continuous development in aerospace engineering demands that new design concepts be regularly proposed to meet goals for increased performance, robustness and safety while concurrently decreasing cost. To date, the majority of the effort in design optimization of fluid dynamics has relied on gradient-based search algorithms. Global optimization methods can utilize the information collected from various sources and by different tools. These methods offer multi-criterion optimization, handle the existence of multiple design points and trade-offs via insight into the entire design space, can easily perform tasks in parallel, and are often effective in filtering the noise intrinsic to numerical and experimental data. However, a successful application of the global optimization method needs to address issues related to data requirements with an increase in the number of design variables, and methods for predicting the model performance. In this article, we review recent progress made in establishing suitable global optimization techniques employing neural network and polynomial-based response surface methodologies. Issues addressed include techniques for construction of the response surface, design of experiment techniques for supplying information in an economical manner, optimization procedures and multi-level techniques, and assessment of relative performance between polynomials and neural networks. Examples drawn from wing aerodynamics, turbulent diffuser flows, gas-gas injectors, and supersonic turbines are employed to help demonstrate the issues involved in an engineering design context. Both the usefulness of the existing knowledge to aid current design

  2. Design Exploration of Aerodynamic Wing Shape for RLV Flyback Booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Kazuhisa; Obayashi, Shigeru; Nakahashi, Kazuhiro

    The wing shape of flyback booster for a Two-Stage-To-Orbit reusable launch vehicle has been optimized considering four objectives. The objectives are to minimize the shift of aerodynamic center between supersonic and transonic conditions, transonic pitching moment and transonic drag coefficient, as well as to maximize subsonic lift coefficient. The three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computation using the modified Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model is used in aerodynamic evaluation accounting for possible flow separations. Adaptive range multi-objective genetic algorithm is used for the present study because tradeoff can be obtained using a smaller number of individuals than conventional multi-objective genetic algorithms. Consequently, four-objective optimization has produced 102 non-dominated solutions, which represent tradeoff information among four objective functions. Moreover, Self-Organizing Maps have been used to analyze the present non-dominated solutions and to visualize tradeoffs and influence of design variables to the four objectives. Self-Organizing Maps contoured by the four objective functions and design variables are found to visualize tradeoffs and effects of each design variable.

  3. Wind turbine trailing-edge aerodynamic brake design

    SciTech Connect

    Quandt, G.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the design of a centrifugally actuated aerodynamic-overspeed device for a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The device will meet the following criteria; (1) It will be effective for airfoil angles of attack 0{degrees} to 45{degrees}. (2) It will be stowed inside the blade profile prior to deployment. (3) It will be capable of offsetting the positive torque produced by the overall blade. (4) Hinge moments will be minimized to lower actuator loads and cost. (5) It will be evaluated as a potential power modulating active rotor-control system. A literature review of aerodynamic braking devices was conducted. Information from the literature review was used to conceptualize the most effective devices for subsequent testing and design. Wind-tunnel test data for several braking devices are presented in this report. Using the data for the most promising configuration, a preliminary design was developed for a MICON 65/13 wind turbine with Phoenix 7.9-m rotor blades.

  4. Problem Solving by Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capobianco, Brenda M.; Tyrie, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    In a unique school-university partnership, methods students collaborated with fifth graders to use the engineering design process to build their problem-solving skills. By placing the problem in the context of a client having particular needs, the problem took on a real-world appeal that students found intriguing and inviting. In this article, the…

  5. Recent Improvements in Aerodynamic Design Optimization on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Anderson, W. Kyle

    2000-01-01

    Recent improvements in an unstructured-grid method for large-scale aerodynamic design are presented. Previous work had shown such computations to be prohibitively long in a sequential processing environment. Also, robust adjoint solutions and mesh movement procedures were difficult to realize, particularly for viscous flows. To overcome these limiting factors, a set of design codes based on a discrete adjoint method is extended to a multiprocessor environment using a shared memory approach. A nearly linear speedup is demonstrated, and the consistency of the linearizations is shown to remain valid. The full linearization of the residual is used to precondition the adjoint system, and a significantly improved convergence rate is obtained. A new mesh movement algorithm is implemented and several advantages over an existing technique are presented. Several design cases are shown for turbulent flows in two and three dimensions.

  6. An Efficient Multiblock Method for Aerodynamic Analysis and Design on Distributed Memory Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Alonso, Juan Jose; Vassberg, John C.; Jameson, Antony; Martinelli, Luigi

    1997-01-01

    The work presented in this paper describes the application of a multiblock gridding strategy to the solution of aerodynamic design optimization problems involving complex configurations. The design process is parallelized using the MPI (Message Passing Interface) Standard such that it can be efficiently run on a variety of distributed memory systems ranging from traditional parallel computers to networks of workstations. Substantial improvements to the parallel performance of the baseline method are presented, with particular attention to their impact on the scalability of the program as a function of the mesh size. Drag minimization calculations at a fixed coefficient of lift are presented for a business jet configuration that includes the wing, body, pylon, aft-mounted nacelle, and vertical and horizontal tails. An aerodynamic design optimization is performed with both the Euler and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations governing the flow solution and the results are compared. These sample calculations establish the feasibility of efficient aerodynamic optimization of complete aircraft configurations using the RANS equations as the flow model. There still exists, however, the need for detailed studies of the importance of a true viscous adjoint method which holds the promise of tackling the minimization of not only the wave and induced components of drag, but also the viscous drag.

  7. Numerical solution techniques for unsteady transonic aerodynamics problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F.; Bridgeman, J. O.

    1980-01-01

    Basic concepts of finite difference solution techniques for unsteady transonic flows are presented. The hierarchy of mathematical forumulations that approximate the Navier-Stokes equations are reviewed. The basic concepts involved in constructing numerical algorthms to solve these formulations are given. Semi-implicit and implicit schemes are constructed and analyzed. The discussion focuses primarily on techniques for solving the low frequency transonic small disturbance equation. This is the simplest formulation that contains the essence of inviscid unsteady transonic flow physics. The low frequency formulation is emphasized here because codes based on this theory can be run in minutes of processor time on currently available computers. Furthermore, numerical techniques involved in solving this simple formulation also apply to the more complicated formulations. Extensions to these formulations are briefly described. An indication of the present capability for solving unsteady transonic flows is provided. Important areas of future research for the advancement of computational unsteady transonic aerodynamics are described.

  8. Universal Design Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Mary C.

    2004-01-01

    Universal design is made up of four elements: accessibility, adaptability, aesthetics, and affordability. This article addresses the concept of universal design problem solving through experiential learning for an interior design studio course in postsecondary education. Students' experiences with clients over age 55 promoted an understanding of…

  9. Team Software Development for Aerothermodynamic and Aerodynamic Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, N.; Atkins, H. L.; Bibb, K. L.; Biedron, R. T.; Carpenter, M. H.; Gnoffo, P. A.; Hammond, D. P.; Jones, W. T.; Kleb, W. L.; Lee-Rausch, E. M.

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative approach to software development is described. The approach employs the agile development techniques: project retrospectives, Scrum status meetings, and elements of Extreme Programming to efficiently develop a cohesive and extensible software suite. The software product under development is a fluid dynamics simulator for performing aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic analysis and design. The functionality of the software product is achieved both through the merging, with substantial rewrite, of separate legacy codes and the authorship of new routines. Examples of rapid implementation of new functionality demonstrate the benefits obtained with this agile software development process. The appendix contains a discussion of coding issues encountered while porting legacy Fortran 77 code to Fortran 95, software design principles, and a Fortran 95 coding standard.

  10. Design, aerodynamics and autonomy of the DelFly.

    PubMed

    de Croon, G C H E; Groen, M A; De Wagter, C; Remes, B; Ruijsink, R; van Oudheusden, B W

    2012-06-01

    One of the major challenges in robotics is to develop a fly-like robot that can autonomously fly around in unknown environments. In this paper, we discuss the current state of the DelFly project, in which we follow a top-down approach to ever smaller and more autonomous ornithopters. The presented findings concerning the design, aerodynamics and autonomy of the DelFly illustrate some of the properties of the top-down approach, which allows the identification and resolution of issues that also play a role at smaller scales. A parametric variation of the wing stiffener layout produced a 5% more power-efficient wing. An experimental aerodynamic investigation revealed that this could be associated with an improved stiffness of the wing, while further providing evidence of the vortex development during the flap cycle. The presented experiments resulted in an improvement in the generated lift, allowing the inclusion of a yaw rate gyro, pressure sensor and microcontroller onboard the DelFly. The autonomy of the DelFly is expanded by achieving (1) an improved turning logic to obtain better vision-based obstacle avoidance performance in environments with varying texture and (2) successful onboard height control based on the pressure sensor. PMID:22617112

  11. Design, aerodynamics and autonomy of the DelFly.

    PubMed

    de Croon, G C H E; Groen, M A; De Wagter, C; Remes, B; Ruijsink, R; van Oudheusden, B W

    2012-06-01

    One of the major challenges in robotics is to develop a fly-like robot that can autonomously fly around in unknown environments. In this paper, we discuss the current state of the DelFly project, in which we follow a top-down approach to ever smaller and more autonomous ornithopters. The presented findings concerning the design, aerodynamics and autonomy of the DelFly illustrate some of the properties of the top-down approach, which allows the identification and resolution of issues that also play a role at smaller scales. A parametric variation of the wing stiffener layout produced a 5% more power-efficient wing. An experimental aerodynamic investigation revealed that this could be associated with an improved stiffness of the wing, while further providing evidence of the vortex development during the flap cycle. The presented experiments resulted in an improvement in the generated lift, allowing the inclusion of a yaw rate gyro, pressure sensor and microcontroller onboard the DelFly. The autonomy of the DelFly is expanded by achieving (1) an improved turning logic to obtain better vision-based obstacle avoidance performance in environments with varying texture and (2) successful onboard height control based on the pressure sensor.

  12. Application of Reduced Order Transonic Aerodynamic Influence Coefficient Matrix for Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Li, Wesley W.

    2009-01-01

    Supporting the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate guidelines, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA] Dryden Flight Research Center is developing a multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization [MDAO] tool. This tool will leverage existing tools and practices, and allow the easy integration and adoption of new state-of-the-art software. Today s modern aircraft designs in transonic speed are a challenging task due to the computation time required for the unsteady aeroelastic analysis using a Computational Fluid Dynamics [CFD] code. Design approaches in this speed regime are mainly based on the manual trial and error. Because of the time required for unsteady CFD computations in time-domain, this will considerably slow down the whole design process. These analyses are usually performed repeatedly to optimize the final design. As a result, there is considerable motivation to be able to perform aeroelastic calculations more quickly and inexpensively. This paper will describe the development of unsteady transonic aeroelastic design methodology for design optimization using reduced modeling method and unsteady aerodynamic approximation. The method requires the unsteady transonic aerodynamics be represented in the frequency or Laplace domain. Dynamically linear assumption is used for creating Aerodynamic Influence Coefficient [AIC] matrices in transonic speed regime. Unsteady CFD computations are needed for the important columns of an AIC matrix which corresponded to the primary modes for the flutter. Order reduction techniques, such as Guyan reduction and improved reduction system, are used to reduce the size of problem transonic flutter can be found by the classic methods, such as Rational function approximation, p-k, p, root-locus etc. Such a methodology could be incorporated into MDAO tool for design optimization at a reasonable computational cost. The proposed technique is verified using the Aerostructures Test Wing 2 actually designed

  13. AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF TWO ROTARY WING UAV DESIGNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry E.; Wong, Oliver D.; Noonan, Kevin W.; Reis, Deane G.; Malovrh, Brendon D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of two rotary-wing UAV designs. The primary goal of the investigation was to provide a set of interactional aerodynamic data for an emerging class of rotorcraft. The present paper provides an overview of the test and an introduction to the test articles, and instrumentation. Sample data in the form of a parametric study of fixed system lift and drag coefficient response to changes in configuration and flight condition for both rotor off and on conditions are presented. The presence of the rotor is seen to greatly affect both the character and magnitude of the response. The affect of scaled stores on body drag is observed to be dependent on body shape.

  14. Aerodynamic Characteristics of Two Rotary Wing UAV Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry E.; Wong, Oliver D.; Noonan, Kevin W.; Reis, Deane G.; Malovrh, Brendon D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of two rotary-wing UAV designs. The primary goal of the investigation was to provide a set of interactional aerodynamic data for an emerging class of rotorcraft. The present paper provides an overview of the test and an introduction to the test articles, and instrumentation. Sample data in the form of a parametric study of fixed system lift and drag coefficient response to changes in configuration and flight condition for both rotor off and on conditions are presented. The presence of the rotor is seen to greatly affect both the character and magnitude of the response. The affect of scaled stores on body drag is observed to be dependent on body shape.

  15. Aerodynamic design of gas and aerosol samplers for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Hazen, Nathan L.; Brune, William H.

    1991-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of airborne probes for the capture of air and aerosols is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the key parameters that affect proper sampling, such as inlet-lip design, internal duct components for low pressure drop, and exhaust geometry. Inlet designs that avoid sonic flow conditions on the lip and flow separation in the duct are shown. Cross-stream velocities of aerosols are expressed in terms of droplet density and diameter. Flow curvature, which can cause aerosols to cross streamlines and impact on probe walls, can be minimized by means of a proper inlet shape and proper probe orientation, and by avoiding bends upstream of the test section. A NASA panel code called PMARC was used successfully to compute streamlines around aircraft and probes, as well as to compute to local velocity and pressure distributions in inlets. A NACA 1-series inlet with modified lip radius was used for the airborne capture of stratospheric chlorine monoxide at high altitude and high flight speed. The device has a two-stage inlet that decelerates the inflow with little disturbance to the flow through the test section. Diffuser design, exhaust hood design, valve loss, and corner vane geometry are discussed.

  16. On the Use of Parmetric-CAD Systems and Cartesian Methods for Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    Automated, high-fidelity tools for aerodynamic design face critical issues in attempting to optimize real-life geometry arid in permitting radical design changes. Success in these areas promises not only significantly shorter design- cycle times, but also superior and unconventional designs. To address these issues, we investigate the use of a parmetric-CAD system in conjunction with an embedded-boundary Cartesian method. Our goal is to combine the modeling capabilities of feature-based CAD with the robustness and flexibility of component-based Cartesian volume-mesh generation for complex geometry problems. We present the development of an automated optimization frame-work with a focus on the deployment of such a CAD-based design approach in a heterogeneous parallel computing environment.

  17. The aerodynamic design of the oblique flying wing supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandervelden, Alexander J. M.; Kroo, Ilan

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of a supersonic oblique flying wing is strongly influenced by the requirement that passengers must be accommodated inside the wing. It was revealed that thick oblique wings of very high sweep angle can be efficient at supersonic speeds when transonic normal Mach numbers are allowed on the upper surface of the wing. The goals were motivated by the ability to design a maximum thickness, minimum size oblique flying wing. A 2-D Navier-Stokes solver was used to design airfoils up to 16 percent thickness with specified lift, drag and pitching moment. A new method was developed to calculate the required pressure distribution on the wing based on the airfoil loading, normal Mach number distribution and theoretical knowledge of the minimum drag of oblique configurations at supersonic speeds. The wing mean surface for this pressure distribution was calculated using an inverse potential flow solver. The lift to drag ratio of this wing was significantly higher than that of a comparable delta wing for cruise speeds up to Mach 2.

  18. The DELTA MONSTER: An RPV designed to investigate the aerodynamics of a delta wing platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Kristen; Flynn, Mike; Gallagher, Randy; Greek, Chris; Kozlowski, Marc; Mcdonald, Brian; Mckenna, Matt; Sellar, Rich; Shearon, Andy

    1989-01-01

    The mission requirements for the performance of aerodynamic tests on a delta wind planform posed some problems, these include aerodynamic interference; structural support; data acquisition and transmission instrumentation; aircraft stability and control; and propulsion implementation. To eliminate the problems of wall interference, free stream turbulence, and the difficulty of achieving dynamic similarity between the test and actual flight aircraft that are associated with aerodynamic testing in wind tunnels, the concept of the remotely piloted vehicle which can perform a basic aerodynamic study on a delta wing was the main objective for the Green Mission - the Delta Monster. The basic aerodynamic studies were performed on a delta wing with a sweep angle greater than 45 degrees. These tests were performed at various angles of attack and Reynolds numbers. The delta wing was instrumented to determine the primary leading edge vortex formation and location, using pressure measurements and/or flow visualization. A data acquisition system was provided to collect all necessary data.

  19. Aerodynamic design of axisymmetric hypersonic wind-tunnel nozzles using least-squares/parabolized Navier-Stokes procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, John J.

    1992-01-01

    A new procedure unifying the best of present classical design practices, CFD and optimization procedures, is demonstrated for designing the aerodynamic lines of hypersonic wind tunnel nozzles. This procedure can be employed to design hypersonic wind tunnel nozzles with thick boundary layers where the classical design procedure has been demonstrated to break down. Advantages of this procedure allow full utilization of powerful CFD codes in the design process, solves an optimization problem to determine the new contour, may be used to design new nozzles or improve sections of existing nozzles, and automatically compensates the nozzle contour for viscous effects as part of the unified design procedure.

  20. The space shuttle ascent vehicle aerodynamic challenges configuration design and data base development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, C. C.; Young, J. C.; Roberts, B. B.; Craig, M. K.; Hamilton, J. T.; Boyle, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    The phase B Space Shuttle systems definition studies resulted in a generic configuration consisting of a delta wing orbiter, and two solid rocket boosters (SRB) attached to an external fuel tank (ET). The initial challenge facing the aerodynamic community was aerodynamically optimizing, within limits, this configuration. As the Shuttle program developed and the sensitivities of the vehicle to aerodynamics were better understood the requirements of the aerodynamic data base grew. Adequately characterizing the vehicle to support the various design studies exploded the size of the data base to proportions that created a data modeling/management challenge for the aerodynamicist. The ascent aerodynamic data base originated primarily from wind tunnel test results. The complexity of the configuration rendered conventional analytic methods of little use. Initial wind tunnel tests provided results which included undesirable effects from model support tructure, inadequate element proximity, and inadequate plume simulation. The challenge to improve the quality of test results by determining the extent of these undesirable effects and subsequently develop testing techniques to eliminate them was imposed on the aerodynamic community. The challenges to the ascent aerodynamics community documented are unique due to the aerodynamic complexity of the Shuttle launch. Never before was such a complex vehicle aerodynamically characterized. The challenges were met with innovative engineering analyses/methodology development and wind tunnel testing techniques.

  1. Bicriteria network design problems

    SciTech Connect

    Marathe, M.V.; Ravi, R.; Sundaram, R.; Ravi, S.S.; Rosenkrantz, D.J.; Hunt, H.B. III

    1997-11-20

    The authors study a general class of bicriteria network design problems. A generic problem in this class is as follows: Given an undirected graph and two minimization objectives (under different cost functions), with a budget specified on the first, find a subgraph from a given subgraph class that minimizes the second objective subject to the budget on the first. They consider three different criteria -- the total edge cost, the diameter and the maximum degree of the network. Here, they present the first polynomial-time approximation algorithms for a large class of bicriteria network design problems for the above mentioned criteria. The following general types of results are presented. First, they develop a framework for bicriteria problems and their approximations. Second, when the two criteria are the same they present a black box parametric search technique. This black box takes in as input an (approximation) algorithm for the criterion situation and generates an approximation algorithm for the bicriteria case with only a constant factor loss in the performance guarantee. Third, when the two criteria are the diameter and the total edge costs they use a cluster based approach to devise approximation algorithms. The solutions violate both the criteria by a logarithmic factor. Finally, for the class of treewidth-bounded graphs, they provide pseudopolynomial-time algorithms for a number of bicriteria problems using dynamic programming. The authors show how these pseudopolynomial-time algorithms can be converted to fully polynomial-time approximation schemes using a scaling technique.

  2. Spectral methods and their implementation to solution of aerodynamic and fluid mechanic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streett, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    Fundamental concepts underlying spectral collocation methods, especially pertaining to their use in the solution of partial differential equations, are outlined. Theoretical accuracy results are reviewed and compared with results from test problems. A number of practical aspects of the construction and use of spectral methods are detailed, along with several solution schemes which have found utility in applications of spectral methods to practical problems. Results from a few of the successful applications of spectral methods to problems of aerodynamic and fluid mechanic interest are then outlined, followed by a discussion of the problem areas in spectral methods and the current research under way to overcome these difficulties.

  3. Wind Turbine Blade Design System - Aerodynamic and Structural Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Soumitr

    2011-12-01

    The ever increasing need for energy and the depletion of non-renewable energy resources has led to more advancement in the "Green Energy" field, including wind energy. An improvement in performance of a Wind Turbine will enhance its economic viability, which can be achieved by better aerodynamic designs. In the present study, a design system that has been under development for gas turbine turbomachinery has been modified for designing wind turbine blades. This is a very different approach for wind turbine blade design, but will allow it to benefit from the features inherent in the geometry flexibility and broad design space of the presented system. It starts with key overall design parameters and a low-fidelity model that is used to create the initial geometry parameters. The low-fidelity system includes the axisymmetric solver with loss models, T-Axi (Turbomachinery-AXIsymmetric), MISES blade-to-blade solver and 2D wing analysis code XFLR5. The geometry parameters are used to define sections along the span of the blade and connected to the CAD model of the wind turbine blade through CAPRI (Computational Analysis PRogramming Interface), a CAD neutral API that facilitates the use of parametric geometry definition with CAD. Either the sections or the CAD geometry is then available for CFD and Finite Element Analysis. The GE 1.5sle MW wind turbine and NERL NASA Phase VI wind turbine have been used as test cases. Details of the design system application are described, and the resulting wind turbine geometry and conditions are compared to the published results of the GE and NREL wind turbines. A 2D wing analysis code XFLR5, is used for to compare results from 2D analysis to blade-to-blade analysis and the 3D CFD analysis. This kind of comparison concludes that, from hub to 25% of the span blade to blade effects or the cascade effect has to be considered, from 25% to 75%, the blade acts as a 2d wing and from 75% to the tip 3D and tip effects have to be taken into account

  4. NASP aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the critical aerodynamic technologies needed to support the development of a class of aircraft represented by the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The air-breathing, single-stage-to-orbit mission presents a severe challenge to all of the aeronautical disciplines and demands an extension of the state-of-the-art in each technology area. While the largest risk areas are probably advanced materials and the development of the scramjet engine, there remains a host of design issues and technology problems in aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and propulsion integration. The paper presents an overview of the most significant propulsion integration problems, and defines the most critical fluid flow phenomena that must be evaluated, defined, and predicted for the class of aircraft represented by the Aero-Space Plane.

  5. Creation of a Rapid High-Fidelity Aerodynamics Module for a Multidisciplinary Design Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Muktha; Whittecar, William; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    surrogate model, which captures the relationships between input variables and responses into regression equations. Depending on the dimensionality of the problem and the fidelity of the code for which a surrogate model is being created, the initial DOE can itself be computationally prohibitive to run. Cokriging, a modeling approach from the field of geostatistics, provides a desirable compromise between computational expense and fidelity. To do this, cokriging leverages a large body of data generated by a low fidelity analysis, combines it with a smaller set of data from a higher fidelity analysis, and creates a kriging surrogate model with prediction fidelity approaching that of the higher fidelity analysis. When integrated into a multidisciplinary environment, a disciplinary analysis module employing cokriging can raise the analysis fidelity without drastically impacting the expense of design iterations. This is demonstrated through the creation of an aerodynamics analysis module in NASA s OpenMDAO framework. Aerodynamic analyses including Missile DATCOM, APAS, and USM3D are leveraged to create high fidelity aerodynamics decks for parametric vehicle geometries, which are created in NASA s Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP). Several trade studies are performed to examine the achieved level of model fidelity, and the overall impact to vehicle design is quantified.

  6. The use of linearized-aerodynamics and vortex-flow methods in aircraft design /invited paper/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with selected linearized-aerodynamic and vortex-flow methods as applied to aircraft design problems at high subsonic speeds. In particular, the NASA Vortex Lattice and Modified Multhopp methods are the linearized techniques employed, and the suction analogy is used to provide estimates associated with vortex-flow aerodynamics. Many examples are given as to how researchers at Langley have used these methods to design the high subsonic, wing-mean-camber shapes for various configurations such as a supersonic transport, high-aspect-ratio transport, trapezoidal fighter wing, strake wing, tandem wing, joined wing, delta wing, and slender cranked wing. Many of these have been built, tested, and have had their data compared with theory. In addition, a technique for defining efficiently performing strake planforms for use in strake-wing combinations is discussed, and further improvements in wing design are outlined. The latter may be obtained by using higher-ordered linear panel methods as well as nonlinear-transonic methods.

  7. Application of numerical optimization to rotor aerodynamic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pleasants, W. A., III; Wiggins, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Based on initial results obtained from the performance optimization code, a number of observations can be made regarding the utility of optimization codes in supporting design of rotors for improved performance. (1) The primary objective of improving the productivity and responsiveness of current design methods can be met. (2) The use of optimization allows the designer to consider a wider range of design variables in a greatly compressed time period. (3) Optimization requires the user to carefully define his problem to avoid unproductive use of computer resources. (4) Optimization will increase the burden on the analyst to validate designs and to improve the accuracy of analysis methods. (5) Direct calculation of finite difference derivatives by the optimizer was not prohibitive for this application but was expensive. Approximate analysis in some form would be considered to improve program response time. (6) Program developement is not complete and will continue to evolve to integrate new analysis methods, design problems, and alternate optimizer options.

  8. Two-Stage Axial Compressor Rig Designed To Develop and Validate Advanced Aerodynamic Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, Louis M.

    2003-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine engines must be affordable in addition to being energy efficient and environmentally benign. Progress in aerodynamic design capability is required not only to maximize the specific thrust of next-generation engines without sacrificing fuel consumption, but also to reduce parts count by increasing the aerodynamic loading of the compression system. To meet future compressor requirements, the NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating advanced aerodynamic design concepts that will lead to more compact, higher efficiency, and wider operability configurations than are currently in operation.

  9. A comparison of two closely-related approaches to aerodynamic design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shubin, G. R.; Frank, P. D.

    1991-01-01

    Two related methods for aerodynamic design optimization are compared. The methods, called the implicit gradient approach and the variational (or optimal control) approach, both attempt to obtain gradients necessary for numerical optimization at a cost significantly less than that of the usual black-box approach that employs finite difference gradients. While the two methods are seemingly quite different, they are shown to differ (essentially) in that the order of discretizing the continuous problem, and of applying calculus, is interchanged. Under certain circumstances, the two methods turn out to be identical. We explore the relationship between these methods by applying them to a model problem for duct flow that has many features in common with transonic flow over an airfoil. We find that the gradients computed by the variational method can sometimes be sufficiently inaccurate to cause the optimization to fail.

  10. Bicriteria network design problems

    SciTech Connect

    Marathe, M.V.; Ravi, R.; Sundaram, R.; Ravi, S.S.; Rosenkrantz, D.J.; Hunt, H.B. III

    1995-05-01

    We study several bicriteria network design problems phrased as follows: given an indirected graph and two minimization objectives with a budget specified on one objective, find a subgraph satisfying certain connectivity requirements that minimizes the second objective subject to the budget on the first. First, we develop a formalism for bicriteria problems and their approximations. Secondly, we use a simple parametric search technique to provide bicriteria approximation algorithms for problems with two similar criteria, where both criteria are the same measure (such as the diameter or the total cost of a tree) but differ only in the cost function under which the measure is computed. Thirdly, we present an (O(log n), O(log n))-approximation algorithm for finding a diameter-constrained minimum cost spanning tree of an undirected graph on n nodes. Finally, for the class of treewidth-bounded graphs, we provide pseudopolynomial-time algorithms for a number of bicriteria problems using dynamic programming. These pseudopolynomial-time algorithms can be converted to fully polynomial-time approximation schemes using a scaling technique.

  11. Aerodynamic and aerothermal challenges for the design of the Hermes spaceplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Pierre

    1993-04-01

    The Hermes spaceplane will represent a major step in the European space activities. It will be placed into orbit by the heavy-lift launcher Ariane 5. After completion of the mission, it will glide back from low earth orbit to its landing site. In order to take the different problems linked to the ascent and the reentry phases, an aerodynamic strategy was set up. A global review of this strategy will be made. It will contain elements on the available and necessary tools (experimental and theoretical) for the Hermes definition and qualification phases. Some aspects such as the design of the Hermes spaceplane will also be highlighted. It will review the different constraints that will be faced during the ascent and reentry phases. Constraints may come from mission requirements such as crossrange capability or from technology limits such as thermal limits on the thermal protection system or from guidance and control requirements. A new methodology was selected in order to take constraints and uncertainties into account in the design oriented towards qualification of the Hermes spaceplane. The main line of this methodology is the projection on a typical reentry trajectory of the uncertainties in the aerodynamic characteristics checked on control points.

  12. Aerodynamic Design of Complex Configurations Using Cartesian Methods and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The objective for this paper is to present the development of an optimization capability for the Cartesian inviscid-flow analysis package of Aftosmis et al. We evaluate and characterize the following modules within the new optimization framework: (1) A component-based geometry parameterization approach using a CAD solid representation and the CAPRI interface. (2) The use of Cartesian methods in the development Optimization techniques using a genetic algorithm. The discussion and investigations focus on several real world problems of the optimization process. We examine the architectural issues associated with the deployment of a CAD-based design approach in a heterogeneous parallel computing environment that contains both CAD workstations and dedicated compute nodes. In addition, we study the influence of noise on the performance of optimization techniques, and the overall efficiency of the optimization process for aerodynamic design of complex three-dimensional configurations. of automated optimization tools. rithm and a gradient-based algorithm.

  13. Application of Jetstream to a Suite of Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telidetzki, Karla

    The impact of dimensionality on three aerodynamic optimization cases is studied to determine the effect of the number of geometric design variables. The cases investigated are: (1) drag minimization of an airfoil in transonic inviscid flow, (2) drag minimization through optimizing the twist distribution of a rectangular wing in subsonic inviscid flow, and (3) drag minimization through optimizing the twist distribution and section shapes of a wing in transonic turbulent flow. The optimization algorithm achieves significant drag reductions in all three cases. Valuable insight into the impact of dimensionality is gained, showing that increasing the number of design variables can provide greater flexibility. This flexibility can come at a cost to the convergence of the optimization algorithm, whether that be due to an inability to reduce the optimality significantly, the increased geometric flexibility challenging the mesh movement algorithm, or the unique aerodynamic shapes being unable to achieve converged flow solutions.

  14. The development and application of aerodynamic uncertainties in the design of the entry trajectory and flight control system of the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, J. D.; Young, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with the decision to conduct with the Shuttle an orbital, manned mission on its first launch, certain problems arose related to mission safety, which had to be provided without the benefit of either a graduated flight test program or an initial unmanned flight concept. In an attempt to overcome these problems, the philosophy was adopted to provide a reasonable estimate of maximum possible errors in the preflight predicted aerodynamics. The flight control system (FCS) was to be certified on the basis of the estimated errors prior to STS-1. A set of 'worst case' aerodynamic uncertainties, defined as variations, was developed. As part of the first flight certification, variations, combined with other system uncertainties, were used to 'stress' the FCS through a multitude of simulations. Attention is given to an Orbiter description, the entry mission, the correlation of aerodynamic uncertainties, the application of aerodynamic variation in FCS and trajectory design, and the flight test results.

  15. Nonlinear aerodynamics and the design of wing tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, Ilan; Wakayama, Sean

    1992-01-01

    This report describes results of research conducted from April 1991 through March 1992. The general objective was to improve an existing wing optimization method, and apply the method to specific problems of interest. The method, while a valuable tool for wing tip design studies, can be applied to more general problems, and has been applied to some of these other problems during its development. Specific goals that were accomplished are listed and explained in more detail in the report. First, improvements were made to the portability and control flow of the existing code. The major iteration loop dealing with structural design was sped up and an alternate approach, using the optimizer to do structural sizing, was studied. Second, analysis methods were improved in the areas of structural and high lift modeling. The structural method was revised to give total wing weight and verified against data for particular commercial aircraft. The high lift analysis was improved to provide reasonable estimates of C(sub L max) in the flaps down condition. These improvements enabled making wing area a design variable, where it had been a fixed variable in the original method. Third, the method was applied to the design of wings for a Learjet. Rough studies were done to determine the effects of laminar flow design on wing shape. Finally, studies on wingtip shape were begun.

  16. Design Problems for Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Are there different kinds of design problems? Jonassen (2011) argued that problems vary in terms of structuredness, complexity, and context. On the structuredness and complexity continua, design problems tend to be the most ill-structured and complex. Brown and Chandrasekaran suggest that design problems may vary along a continuum from…

  17. Group Design Problems in Engineering Design Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, David

    2001-01-01

    Describes group design techniques used within the engineering design graphics sequence at Western Washington University. Engineering and design philosophies such as concurrent engineering place an emphasis on group collaboration for the solving of design problems. (Author/DDR)

  18. The critical role of aerodynamic heating effects in the design of hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, Allan R.

    1989-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles operate in a hostile aerothermal environment, which has a significant impact on their aerothermostructural performance. Significant coupling occurs between the aerodynamic flow field, structural heat transfer, and structural response, creating a multidisciplinary interaction. The critical role of aerodynamic heating effects in the design of hypersonic vehicles is identified with an example of high localized heating on an engine-cowl leading edge. Recent advances is integrated fluid-thermal-structural finite-element analyses are presented.

  19. X based interactive computer graphics applications for aerodynamic design and education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Higgs, C. Fred, III

    1995-01-01

    Six computer applications packages have been developed to solve a variety of aerodynamic problems in an interactive environment on a single workstation. The packages perform classical one dimensional analysis under the control of a graphical user interface and can be used for preliminary design or educational purposes. The programs were originally developed on a Silicon Graphics workstation and used the GL version of the FORMS library as the graphical user interface. These programs have recently been converted to the XFORMS library of X based graphics widgets and have been tested on SGI, IBM, Sun, HP and PC-Lunix computers. The paper will show results from the new VU-DUCT program as a prime example. VU-DUCT has been developed as an educational package for the study of subsonic open and closed loop wind tunnels.

  20. Computational methods of robust controller design for aerodynamic flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The development of Riccati iteration, a tool for the design and analysis of linear control systems is examined. First, Riccati iteration is applied to the problem of pole placement and order reduction in two-time scale control systems. Order reduction, yielding a good approximation to the original system, is demonstrated using a 16th order linear model of a turbofan engine. Next, a numerical method for solving the Riccati equation is presented and demonstrated for a set of eighth order random examples. A literature review of robust controller design methods follows which includes a number of methods for reducing the trajectory and performance index sensitivity in linear regulators. Lastly, robust controller design for large parameter variations is discussed.

  1. Aerodynamic Design and Computational Analysis of a Spacecraft Cabin Ventilation Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    Quieter working environments for astronauts are needed if future long-duration space exploration missions are to be safe and productive. Ventilation and payload cooling fans are known to be dominant sources of noise, with the International Space Station being a good case in point. To address this issue in a cost-effective way, early attention to fan design, selection, and installation has been recommended. Toward that end, NASA has begun to investigate the potential for small-fan noise reduction through improvements in fan aerodynamic design. Using tools and methodologies similar to those employed by the aircraft engine industry, most notably computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, the aerodynamic design of a new cabin ventilation fan has been developed, and its aerodynamic performance has been predicted and analyzed. The design, intended to serve as a baseline for future work, is discussed along with selected CFD results

  2. Aerodynamic Design of Axial-flow Compressors. Volume III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Irving A; Bullock, Robert O; Graham, Robert W; Costilow, Eleanor L; Huppert, Merle C; Benser, William A; Herzig, Howard Z; Hansen, Arthur G; Jackson, Robert J; Yohner, Peggy L; Dugan, Ames F , Jr

    1956-01-01

    Chapters XI to XIII concern the unsteady compressor operation arising when compressor blade elements stall. The fields of compressor stall and surge are reviewed in Chapters XI and XII, respectively. The part-speed operating problem in high-pressure-ratio multistage axial-flow compressors is analyzed in Chapter XIII. Chapter XIV summarizes design methods and theories that extend beyond the simplified two-dimensional approach used previously in the report. Chapter XV extends this three-dimensional treatment by summarizing the literature on secondary flows and boundary layer effects. Charts for determining the effects of errors in design parameters and experimental measurements on compressor performance are given in Chapters XVI. Chapter XVII reviews existing literature on compressor and turbine matching techniques.

  3. The aerodynamic challenges of the design and development of the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. C.; Underwood, J. M.; Hillje, E. R.; Whitnah, A. M.; Romere, P. O.; Gamble, J. D.; Roberts, B. B.; Ware, G. M.; Scallion, W. I.; Spencer, B., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The major aerodynamic design challenge at the beginning of the United States Space Transportation System (STS) research and development phase was to design a vehicle that would fly as a spacecraft during early entry and as an aircraft during the final phase of entry. The design was further complicated because the envisioned vehicle was statically unstable during a portion of the aircraft mode of operation. The second challenge was the development of preflight aerodynamic predictions with an accuracy consistent with conducting a manned flight on the initial orbital flight. A brief history of the early contractual studies is presented highlighting the technical results and management decisions influencing the aerodynamic challenges. The configuration evolution and the development of preflight aerodynamic predictions will be reviewed. The results from the first four test flights shows excellent agreement with the preflight aerodynamic predictions over the majority of the flight regimes. The only regimes showing significant disagreement is confined primarily to early entry, where prediction of the basic vehicle trim and the influence of the reaction control system jets on the flow field were found to be deficient. Postflight results are analyzed to explain these prediction deficiencies.

  4. Application of multidisciplinary design optimization formulation theory to a wind design problems

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, P.; Benton, J.R.; Borland, C.; Kao, T.J.; Barthelemy, J.

    1994-12-31

    Multidisciplinary Design Optimization, MDO, is optimal design with simultaneous consideration of several disciplines. MDO in conjunction with coupled high-fidelity analysis codes is in a formative stage of development. This talk describes application of MDO formulation theory to the problem of aeroelastic wing design. That is, wing design with simultaneous consideration of the disciplines of structures and aerodynamics. In addition to MDO formulation theory, particular attention is paid to practical problems. These problems include validation of the individual discipline analysis codes, the need for distributed computing and the need for inexpensive models to serve as optimization surrogates for compute intensive aerodynamics codes. An MDO solution method and associated test results will be presented.

  5. Combined aerodynamic and structural dynamic problem emulating routines (CASPER): Theory and implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William H.

    1985-01-01

    The Combined Aerodynamic and Structural Dynamic Problem Emulating Routines (CASPER) is a collection of data-base modification computer routines that can be used to simulate Navier-Stokes flow through realistic, time-varying internal flow fields. The Navier-Stokes equation used involves calculations in all three dimensions and retains all viscous terms. The only term neglected in the current implementation is gravitation. The solution approach is of an interative, time-marching nature. Calculations are based on Lagrangian aerodynamic elements (aeroelements). It is assumed that the relationships between a particular aeroelement and its five nearest neighbor aeroelements are sufficient to make a valid simulation of Navier-Stokes flow on a small scale and that the collection of all small-scale simulations makes a valid simulation of a large-scale flow. In keeping with these assumptions, it must be noted that CASPER produces an imitation or simulation of Navier-Stokes flow rather than a strict numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation. CASPER is written to operate under the Parallel, Asynchronous Executive (PAX), which is described in a separate report.

  6. Integrated design and manufacturing for the high speed civil transport (a combined aerodynamics/propulsion optimization study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baecher, Juergen; Bandte, Oliver; DeLaurentis, Dan; Lewis, Kemper; Sicilia, Jose; Soboleski, Craig

    1995-01-01

    This report documents the efforts of a Georgia Tech High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aerospace student design team in completing a design methodology demonstration under NASA's Advanced Design Program (ADP). Aerodynamic and propulsion analyses are integrated into the synthesis code FLOPS in order to improve its prediction accuracy. Executing the integrated product and process development (IPPD) methodology proposed at the Aerospace Systems Design Laboratory (ASDL), an improved sizing process is described followed by a combined aero-propulsion optimization, where the objective function, average yield per revenue passenger mile ($/RPM), is constrained by flight stability, noise, approach speed, and field length restrictions. Primary goals include successful demonstration of the application of the response surface methodolgy (RSM) to parameter design, introduction to higher fidelity disciplinary analysis than normally feasible at the conceptual and early preliminary level, and investigations of relationships between aerodynamic and propulsion design parameters and their effect on the objective function, $/RPM. A unique approach to aircraft synthesis is developed in which statistical methods, specifically design of experiments and the RSM, are used to more efficiently search the design space for optimum configurations. In particular, two uses of these techniques are demonstrated. First, response model equations are formed which represent complex analysis in the form of a regression polynomial. Next, a second regression equation is constructed, not for modeling purposes, but instead for the purpose of optimization at the system level. Such an optimization problem with the given tools normally would be difficult due to the need for hard connections between the various complex codes involved. The statistical methodology presents an alternative and is demonstrated via an example of aerodynamic modeling and planform optimization for a HSCT.

  7. An unstructured-grid software system for solving complex aerodynamic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Parikh, Paresh

    1995-01-01

    A coordinated effort has been underway over the past four years to elevate unstructured-grid methodology to a mature level. The goal of this endeavor is to provide a validated capability to non-expert users for performing rapid aerodynamic analysis and design of complex configurations. The Euler component of the system is well developed, and is impacting a broad spectrum of engineering needs with capabilities such as rapid grid generation and inviscid flow analysis, inverse design, interactive boundary layers, and propulsion effects. Progress is also being made in the more tenuous Navier-Stokes component of the system. A robust grid generator is under development for constructing quality thin-layer tetrahedral grids, along with a companion Navier-Stokes flow solver. This paper presents an overview of this effort, along with a perspective on the present and future status of the methodology.

  8. Gradient-Based Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using ADI Method for Large-Scale Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Baysal, Oktay

    1997-01-01

    A gradient-based shape optimization methodology, that is intended for practical three-dimensional aerodynamic applications, has been developed. It is based on the quasi-analytical sensitivities. The flow analysis is rendered by a fully implicit, finite volume formulation of the Euler equations.The aerodynamic sensitivity equation is solved using the alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) algorithm for memory efficiency. A flexible wing geometry model, that is based on surface parameterization and platform schedules, is utilized. The present methodology and its components have been tested via several comparisons. Initially, the flow analysis for for a wing is compared with those obtained using an unfactored, preconditioned conjugate gradient approach (PCG), and an extensively validated CFD code. Then, the sensitivities computed with the present method have been compared with those obtained using the finite-difference and the PCG approaches. Effects of grid refinement and convergence tolerance on the analysis and shape optimization have been explored. Finally the new procedure has been demonstrated in the design of a cranked arrow wing at Mach 2.4. Despite the expected increase in the computational time, the results indicate that shape optimization, which require large numbers of grid points can be resolved with a gradient-based approach.

  9. A system for aerodynamic design and analysis of supersonic aircraft. Part 4: Test cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, W. D.; Lundry, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    An integrated system of computer programs was developed for the design and analysis of supersonic configurations. The system uses linearized theory methods for the calculation of surface pressures and supersonic area rule concepts in combination with linearized theory for calculation of aerodynamic force coefficients. Interactive graphics are optional at the user's request. Representative test cases and associated program output are presented.

  10. Computer program for aerodynamic and blading design of multistage axial-flow compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.; Gorrell, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    A code for computing the aerodynamic design of a multistage axial-flow compressor and, if desired, the associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis codes is presented. Compressible flow, which is assumed to be steady and axisymmetric, is the basis for a two-dimensional solution in the meridional plane with viscous effects modeled by pressure loss coefficients and boundary layer blockage. The radial equation of motion and the continuity equation are solved with the streamline curvature method on calculation stations outside the blade rows. The annulus profile, mass flow, pressure ratio, and rotative speed are input. A number of other input parameters specify and control the blade row aerodynamics and geometry. In particular, blade element centerlines and thicknesses can be specified with fourth degree polynomials for two segments. The output includes a detailed aerodynamic solution and, if desired, blading coordinates that can be used for internal flow analysis codes.

  11. Post-Stall Aerodynamic Modeling and Gain-Scheduled Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Fen; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Kim, Sungwan

    2005-01-01

    A multidisciplinary research e.ort that combines aerodynamic modeling and gain-scheduled control design for aircraft flight at post-stall conditions is described. The aerodynamic modeling uses a decambering approach for rapid prediction of post-stall aerodynamic characteristics of multiple-wing con.gurations using known section data. The approach is successful in bringing to light multiple solutions at post-stall angles of attack right during the iteration process. The predictions agree fairly well with experimental results from wind tunnel tests. The control research was focused on actuator saturation and .ight transition between low and high angles of attack regions for near- and post-stall aircraft using advanced LPV control techniques. The new control approaches maintain adequate control capability to handle high angle of attack aircraft control with stability and performance guarantee.

  12. Integrating aerodynamics and structures in the minimum weight design of a supersonic transport wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.; Wrenn, Gregory A.; Dovi, Augustine R.; Coen, Peter G.; Hall, Laura E.

    1992-01-01

    An approach is presented for determining the minimum weight design of aircraft wing models which takes into consideration aerodynamics-structure coupling when calculating both zeroth order information needed for analysis and first order information needed for optimization. When performing sensitivity analysis, coupling is accounted for by using a generalized sensitivity formulation. The results presented show that the aeroelastic effects are calculated properly and noticeably reduce constraint approximation errors. However, for the particular example selected, the error introduced by ignoring aeroelastic effects are not sufficient to significantly affect the convergence of the optimization process. Trade studies are reported that consider different structural materials, internal spar layouts, and panel buckling lengths. For the formulation, model and materials used in this study, an advanced aluminum material produced the lightest design while satisfying the problem constraints. Also, shorter panel buckling lengths resulted in lower weights by permitting smaller panel thicknesses and generally, by unloading the wing skins and loading the spar caps. Finally, straight spars required slightly lower wing weights than angled spars.

  13. Scramjet exhaust simulation technique for hypersonic aircraft nozzle design and aerodynamic tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Talcott, N. A., Jr.; Cubbage, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Current design philosophy for scramjet-powered hypersonic aircraft results in configurations with the entire lower fuselage surface utilized as part of the propulsion system. The lower aft-end of the vehicle acts as a high expansion ratio nozzle. Not only must the external nozzle be designed to extract the maximum possible thrust force from the high energy flow at the combustor exit, but the forces produced by the nozzle must be aligned such that they do not unduly affect aerodynamic balance. The strong coupling between the propulsion system and aerodynamics of the aircraft makes imperative at least a partial simulation of the inlet, exhaust, and external flows of the hydrogen-burning scramjet in conventional facilities for both nozzle formulation and aerodynamic-force data acquisition. Aerodynamic testing methods offer no contemporary approach for such vehicle design requirements. NASA-Langley has pursued an extensive scramjet/airframe integration R&D program for several years and has recently developed a promising technique for simulation of the scramjet exhaust flow for hypersonic aircraft. Current results of the research program to develop a scramjet flow simulation technique through the use of substitute gas blends are described in this paper.

  14. An Efficient Inverse Aerodynamic Design Method For Subsonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milholen, William E., II

    2000-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics based design methods are maturing to the point that they are beginning to be used in the aircraft design process. Many design methods however have demonstrated deficiencies in the leading edge region of airfoil sections. The objective of the present research is to develop an efficient inverse design method which is valid in the leading edge region. The new design method is a streamline curvature method, and a new technique is presented for modeling the variation of the streamline curvature normal to the surface. The new design method allows the surface coordinates to move normal to the surface, and has been incorporated into the Constrained Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (CDISC) design method. The accuracy and efficiency of the design method is demonstrated using both two-dimensional and three-dimensional design cases.

  15. Longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a wing-winglet model designed at M = 0.8, C sub L = 0.4 using linear aerodynamic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Wind tunnel test results have been presented herein for a subsonic transport type wing fitted with winglets. Wind planform was chosen to be representative of wings used on current jet transport aircraft, while wing and winglet camber surfaces were designed using two different linear aerodynamic design methods. The purpose of the wind tunnel investigation was to determine the effectiveness of these linear aerodynamic design computer codes in designing a non-planar transport configuration which would cruise efficiently. The design lift coefficient was chosen to be 0.4, at a design Mach number of 0.8. Force and limited pressure data were obtained for the basic wing, and for the wing fitted with the two different winglet designs, at Mach numbers of 0.60, 0.70, 0.75 and 0.80 over an angle of attack range of -2 to +6 degrees, at zero sideslip. The data have been presented without analysis to expedite publication.

  16. Using High Resolution Design Spaces for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Under Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Padula, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    This paper explains why high resolution design spaces encourage traditional airfoil optimization algorithms to generate noisy shape modifications, which lead to inaccurate linear predictions of aerodynamic coefficients and potential failure of descent methods. By using auxiliary drag constraints for a simultaneous drag reduction at all design points and the least shape distortion to achieve the targeted drag reduction, an improved algorithm generates relatively smooth optimal airfoils with no severe off-design performance degradation over a range of flight conditions, in high resolution design spaces parameterized by cubic B-spline functions. Simulation results using FUN2D in Euler flows are included to show the capability of the robust aerodynamic shape optimization method over a range of flight conditions.

  17. Variable-complexity aerodynamic-structural design of a high-speed civil transport wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchison, M. G.; Huang, X.; Mason, W. H.; Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.

    1992-01-01

    A variable-complexity strategy of combining simple and detailed analysis methods is presented for the design optimization of a high-speed civil transport (HSCT) wing. Two sets of results are shown: the aerodynamic design of the wing using algebraic weight equations for structural considerations, and optimization results of the internal wing structure for a fixed wing configuration. We show example results indicating that using simple analysis methods alone for the calculation of a critical constraint can allow an optimizer to exploit weaknesses in the analysis. The structural optimization results provide a valuable check for the weight equations used in the aerodynamic design. In addition, these results confirm the need for using simple, algebraic models in conjunction with more detailed analysis methods. A strategy of interlaced aerodynanic-structural design is proposed.

  18. Aerodynamic performance of a 1.20-pressure ratio fan stage designed for low noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, G. W., Jr.; Moore, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and the overall blade element performance of a 51 centimeter diameter fan stage is presented. The stage was designed to minimize the noise generated by rotor stator interactions. The design pressure ratio was 1.20 at a flow of 30.6 kilograms per second and a rotor blade tip speed of 228.6 meters per second. At design speed the rotor peak efficiency was 0.935. The peak efficiency of the stage, however, was 0.824. The radial distribution of rotor performance parameters at peak efficiency and design speed indicated excellent agreement with design values.

  19. Aerodynamic characteristics and design guidelines of push-pull ventilation systems.

    PubMed

    Huang, R F; Lin, S Y; Jan, S-Y; Hsieh, R H; Chen, Y-K; Chen, C-W; Yeh, W-Y; Chang, C-P; Shih, T-S; Chen, C-C

    2005-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics such as the flow patterns, velocity field, streamline evolutions, characteristic flow modes and characteristic flow regimes of the push-pull ventilation system are cross-examined by using the laser-light sheet smoked-flow visualization method and laser Doppler velocimetry. Four characteristic flow modes, which are denoted as dispersion, transition, encapsulation and strong suction, are identified in the domain of the push-jet and pull-flow velocities at various open-surface tank widths and rising gas velocities. It is argued phenomenologically, from the aerodynamic point of view, that operating the system in the strong suction regime would be a better strategy than operating it in other characteristic regimes for the consideration of capture efficiency. Design guidelines are developed and summarized based on the results obtained from this study. The regression formulas for calculating the critical values of the push-jet and the pull-flow velocities are provided for easy access. The sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas validation technique is performed to measure the capture efficiency. The results of tracer gas validations are consistent with those obtained from the aerodynamic visualization and measurements. The operation points obtained by employing the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists design criteria are compared with the results obtained in this study for both the aerodynamics and the capture efficiency. Methods for improving the capture efficiency and energy consumptions are suggested.

  20. Aerodynamic Design Criteria for Class 8 Heavy Vehicles Trailer Base Devices to Attain Optimum Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Salari, K; Ortega, J

    2010-12-13

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of its Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), and Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) effort has investigated class 8 tractor-trailer aerodynamics for many years. This effort has identified many drag producing flow structures around the heavy vehicles and also has designed and tested many new active and passive drag reduction techniques and concepts for significant on the road fuel economy improvements. As part of this effort a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design for aerodynamic drag reduction devices has been established. The objective of this report is to provide design guidance for trailer base devices to improve their aerodynamic performance. These devices are commonly referred to as boattails, base flaps, tail devices, and etc. The information provided here is based on past research and our most recent full-scale experimental investigations in collaboration with Navistar Inc. Additional supporting data from LLNL/Navistar wind tunnel, track test, and on the road test will be published soon. The trailer base devices can be identified by 4 flat panels that are attached to the rear edges of the trailer base to form a closed cavity. These devices have been engineered in many different forms such as, inflatable and non-inflatable, 3 and 4-sided, closed and open cavity, and etc. The following is an in-depth discussion with some recommendations, based on existing data and current research activities, of changes that could be made to these devices to improve their aerodynamic performance. There are 6 primary factors that could influence the aerodynamic performance of trailer base devices: (1) Deflection angle; (2) Boattail length; (3) Sealing of edges and corners; (4) 3 versus 4-sided, Position of the 4th plate; (5) Boattail vertical extension, Skirt - boattail transition; and (6) Closed versus open cavity.

  1. Towards Exploratory Aerodynamic Design using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, David Tai Shun

    The aerodynamic optimization framework Jetstream is applied to problems involving lift-constrained drag minimization using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A parallel Newton-Krylov algorithm is used to solve the governing equations on multiblock structured meshes; gradients are computed using the discrete-adjoint method. Geometry parameterization and mesh movement are integrated using B-spline control volumes. Drag minimization studies from past works are revisited and strategies are devised to improve optimization convergence. These strategies include linear constraints for geometric feasibility, robust flow solver parameters, and meshing with an O-O topology. The single-point and multi-point optimization of the NASA Common Research Model (CRM) wing geometry is presented. A rectangular NACA0012 wing is optimized with planform design variables, enabling significant changes in span, sweep, taper, and airfoil section. To demonstrate Jetstream's flexibility, a wing based on the B737-900 is optimized with nonplanar winglets, split-tip, and wingtip fence configurations. Finally, the box-wing optimization in subsonic flow is revisited.

  2. Simultaneous Aerodynamic and Structural Design Optimization (SASDO) for a 3-D Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumbert, Clyde R.; Hou, Gene J.-W.; Newman, Perry A.

    2001-01-01

    The formulation and implementation of an optimization method called Simultaneous Aerodynamic and Structural Design Optimization (SASDO) is shown as an extension of the Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) method. It is extended by the inclusion of structure element sizing parameters as design variables and Finite Element Method (FEM) analysis responses as constraints. The method aims to reduce the computational expense. incurred in performing shape and sizing optimization using state-of-the-art Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow analysis, FEM structural analysis and sensitivity analysis tools. SASDO is applied to a simple. isolated, 3-D wing in inviscid flow. Results show that the method finds the saine local optimum as a conventional optimization method with some reduction in the computational cost and without significant modifications; to the analysis tools.

  3. Performance and Design Investigation of Heavy Lift Tiltrotor with Aerodynamic Interference Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeo, Yyeonsoo; Johnson, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    The aerodynamic interference effects on tiltrotor performance in cruise are investigated using comprehensive calculations, to better understand the physics and to quantify the effects on the aircraft design. Performance calculations were conducted for 146,600-lb conventional and quad tiltrotors, which are to cruise at 300 knots at 4000 ft/95 deg F condition. A parametric study was conducted to understand the effects of design parameters on the performance of the aircraft. Aerodynamic interference improves the aircraft lift-to-drag ratio of the baseline conventional tiltrotor. However, interference degrades the aircraft performance of the baseline quad tiltrotor, due mostly to the unfavorable effects from the front wing to the rear wing. A reduction of rotor tip speed increased the aircraft lift-to-drag ratio the most among the design parameters investigated.

  4. SRB ascent aerodynamic heating design criteria reduction study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, W. K.; Frost, C. L.; Engel, C. D.

    1989-01-01

    Data are presented for the wind tunnel interference heating factor data base, the timewise tabulated ascent design environments, and the timewise plotted environments comparing the REMTECH results to the Rockwell RI-IVBC-3 results.

  5. Aerodynamic design considerations for efficient high-lift supersonic wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. S.; Wood, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    A previously developed technique for selecting a design space for efficient supersonic wings is reviewed; this design-space concept is expanded to include thickness and camber effects and is evaluated for cambered wings at high-lift conditions. The original design-space formulation was based on experimental upper-surface and lower-surface normal-force characteristics for flat, uncambered delta wings; it is shown that these general characteristics hold for various thickness distributions and for various amounts of leading-edge camber. The original design-space formulation was also based on the assumption that the combination of Mach number and leading-edge sweep which would produce an equal division of flat-wing lift between the upper and lower surface would also be the proper combination to give the best cambered-wing performance. Using drag-due-to-lift factor as a measure of performance, for high-lift conditions cambered-wing performance is shown to significantly increase as conditions approach the design space; this correlation is demonstrated for both subcritical and supercritical flows.

  6. Nonlinear Aerodynamics and the Design of Wing Tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, Ilan

    1991-01-01

    The analysis and design of wing tips for fixed wing and rotary wing aircraft still remains part art, part science. Although the design of airfoil sections and basic planform geometry is well developed, the tip regions require more detailed consideration. This is important because of the strong impact of wing tip flow on wing drag; although the tip region constitutes a small portion of the wing, its effect on the drag can be significant. The induced drag of a wing is, for a given lift and speed, inversely proportional to the square of the wing span. Concepts are proposed as a means of reducing drag. Modern computational methods provide a tool for studying these issues in greater detail. The purpose of the current research program is to improve the understanding of the fundamental issues involved in the design of wing tips and to develop the range of computational and experimental tools needed for further study of these ideas.

  7. An approach to constrained aerodynamic design with application to airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    An approach was developed for incorporating flow and geometric constraints into the Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (DISC) design method. In this approach, an initial target pressure distribution is developed using a set of control points. The chordwise locations and pressure levels of these points are initially estimated either from empirical relationships and observed characteristics of pressure distributions for a given class of airfoils or by fitting the points to an existing pressure distribution. These values are then automatically adjusted during the design process to satisfy the flow and geometric constraints. The flow constraints currently available are lift, wave drag, pitching moment, pressure gradient, and local pressure levels. The geometric constraint options include maximum thickness, local thickness, leading-edge radius, and a 'glove' constraint involving inner and outer bounding surfaces. This design method was also extended to include the successive constraint release (SCR) approach to constrained minimization.

  8. Intermediate experimental vehicle, ESA program aerodynamics-aerothermodynamics key technologies for spacecraft design and successful flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutheil, Sylvain; Pibarot, Julien; Tran, Dac; Vallee, Jean-Jacques; Tribot, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    With the aim of placing Europe among the world's space players in the strategic area of atmospheric re-entry, several studies on experimental vehicle concepts and improvements of critical re-entry technologies have paved the way for the flight of an experimental space craft. The successful flight of the Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV), under ESA's Future Launchers Preparatory Programme (FLPP), is definitively a significant step forward from the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator flight (1998), establishing Europe as a key player in this field. The IXV project objectives were the design, development, manufacture and ground and flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled reentry system, which is highly flexible and maneuverable. The paper presents, the role of aerodynamics aerothermodynamics as part of the key technologies for designing an atmospheric re-entry spacecraft and securing a successful flight.

  9. DOE's effort to reduce truck aerodynamic drag : joint experiments and computations lead to smart design.

    SciTech Connect

    Yaste, David M; Salari, Kambiz; Hammache, Mustapha; Browand, Fred; Pointer, W. David; Ortega, Jason M.; McCallen, Rose; Walker, Stephen M; Heineck, James T; Hassan, Basil; Roy, Christopher John; Storms, B.; Satran, D.; Ross, James; Englar, Robert; Chatalain, Philippe; Rubel, Mike; Leonard, Anthony; Hsu, Tsu-Ya; DeChant, Lawrence Justin.

    2004-06-01

    At 70 miles per hour, overcoming aerodynamic drag represents about 65% of the total energy expenditure for a typical heavy truck vehicle. The goal of this US Department of Energy supported consortium is to establish a clear understanding of the drag producing flow phenomena. This is being accomplished through joint experiments and computations, leading to the smart design of drag reducing devices. This paper will describe our objective and approach, provide an overview of our efforts and accomplishments, and discuss our future direction.

  10. DOE's Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag-Joint Experiments and Computations Lead to Smart Design

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; DeChant, L; Hassan, B; Roy, C; Pointer, W; Browand, F; Hammache, M; Hsu, T; Leonard, A; Rubel, M; Chatalain, P; Englar, R; Ross, J; Satran, D; Heineck, J; Walker, S; Yaste, D; Storms, B

    2004-06-17

    At 70 miles per hour, overcoming aerodynamic drag represents about 65% of the total energy expenditure for a typical heavy truck vehicle. The goal of this US Department of Energy supported consortium is to establish a clear understanding of the drag producing flow phenomena. This is being accomplished through joint experiments and computations, leading to the 'smart' design of drag reducing devices. This paper will describe our objective and approach, provide an overview of our efforts and accomplishments, and discuss our future direction.

  11. A computational system for aerodynamic design and analysis of supersonic aircraft. Part 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, W. D.; Lundry, J. L.; Coleman, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    An integrated system of computer programs was developed for the design and analysis of supersonic configurations. The system uses linearized theory methods for the calculation of surface pressures and supersonic area rule concepts in combination with linearized theory for calculation of aerodynamic force coefficients. Interactive graphics are optional at the user's request. This user's manual contains a description of the system, an explanation of its usage, the input definition, and example output.

  12. Integrating aerodynamic surface modeling for computational fluid dynamics with computer aided structural analysis, design, and manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorp, Scott A.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation will discuss the development of a NASA Geometry Exchange Specification for transferring aerodynamic surface geometry between LeRC systems and grid generation software used for computational fluid dynamics research. The proposed specification is based on a subset of the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES). The presentation will include discussion of how the NASA-IGES standard will accommodate improved computer aided design inspection methods and reverse engineering techniques currently being developed. The presentation is in viewgraph format.

  13. Core compressor exit stage study. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdsall, E. A.; Canal, E., Jr.; Lyons, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of aspect ratio on the performance of core compressor exit stages was demonstrated using two three stage, highly loaded, core compressors. Aspect ratio was identified as having a strong influence on compressors endwall loss. Both compressors simulated the last three stages of an advanced eight stage core compressor and were designed with the same 0.915 hub/tip ratio, 4.30 kg/sec (9.47 1bm/sec) inlet corrected flow, and 167 m/sec (547 ft/sec) corrected mean wheel speed. The first compressor had an aspect ratio of 0.81 and an overall pressure ratio of 1.357 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.3% with an average diffusion factor or 0.529. The aspect ratio of the second compressor was 1.22 with an overall pressure ratio of 1.324 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.7% with an average diffusion factor of 0.491.

  14. Aerodynamic optimization by simultaneously updating flow variables and design parameters with application to advanced propeller designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    A scheme is developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The scheme updates the design parameter iterative solutions and the flow variable iterative solutions simultaneously. It is applied to an advanced propeller design problem with the Euler equations used as the flow governing equations. The scheme's accuracy, efficiency and sensitivity to the computational parameters are tested.

  15. Aerodynamic Design Exploration for Reusable Launch Vehicle Using Genetic Algorithm with Navier Stokes Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsukawa, Tomoaki; Nonomura, Taku; Oyama, Akira; Fujii, Kozo

    In this study, aerodynamic design exploration for reusable launch vehicle (RLV) is conducted using genetic algorithm with Navier-Stokes solver to understand the aerodynamic characteristics for various body configurations and find design information such as tradeoff information among objectives. The multi-objective aerodynamic design optimization for minimizing zero-lift drag at supersonic condition, maximizing maximum lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) at subsonic condition, maximizing maximum L/D at supersonic condition, and maximizing volume of shape is conducted for bi-conical shape RLV based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The total number of evaluation in multi-objective optimization is 400, and it is necessary for evaluating one body configuration to conduct 8 CFD runs. In total, 3200 CFD runs are conducted. The analysis of Pareto-optimal solutions shows that there are various trade-off relations among objectives clearly, and the analysis of flow fields shows that the shape for the minimum drag configuration is almost the same as that of the shape for the maximum L/D configuration at supersonic condition. The shape for the maximum L/D at subsonic condition obtains additional lift at the kink compared with the minimum drag configuration. It leads to enhancement of L/D.

  16. Nonlinear potential analysis techniques for supersonic aerodynamic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, V.; Szema, K. Y.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical method based on the conservation form of the full potential equation has been applied to the problem of three-dimensional supersonic flows with embedded subsonic regions. The governing equation is cast in a nonorthogonal coordinate system, and the theory of characteristics is used to accurately monitor the type-dependent flow field. A conservative switching scheme is employed to transition from the supersonic marching procedure to a subsonic relaxation algorithm and vice versa. The newly developed computer program can handle arbitrary geometries with fuselage, canard, wing, flow through nacelle, vertical tail and wake components at combined angles of attack and sideslip. Results are obtained for a variety of configurations that include a Langley advanced fighter concept with fuselage centerline nacelle, Rockwell's Advanced Tactical Fighter (ATF) with wing mounted nacelles, and the Shuttle Orbiter configuration. Comparisons with available experiments were good.

  17. Developments in steady and unsteady aerodynamics for use in aeroelastic analysis and design. [for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. C., Jr.; Bland, S. R.

    1976-01-01

    A review is given of seven research projects which are aimed at improving the generality, accuracy, and computational efficiency of steady and unsteady aerodynamic theory for use in aeroelastic analysis and design. These projects indicate three major thrusts of current research efforts: (1) more realistic representation of steady and unsteady subsonic and supersonic loads on aircraft configurations of general shape with emphasis on structural-design applications, (2) unsteady aerodynamics for application in active-controls analyses, and (3) unsteady aerodynamics for the frequently critical transonic speed range. The review of each project includes theoretical background, description of capabilities, results of application, current status, and plans for further development and use.

  18. Visualization in the Design of Modern Aircraft Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Modem aircraft design involves study of airflow through both windtunnel testing and computer simulation. These computer simulations result in often very large and complex sets of numbers, which contain information critical to the aircrafts performance. This talk will describe how visualization is used to understand these simulations, using a variety of techniques including low-level analysis such as simulated particles, high-level feature detection, and virtual-reality-based techniques for exploration. We will focus on the challenges of extremely large data sets, interactive performance, and information extraction. The talk will close with a vision of the future including the integration of simulation and visualization.

  19. Challenges and Progress in Aerodynamic Design of Hybrid Wingbody Aircraft with Embedded Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Kim, Hyoungjin; Liou, May-Fun

    2016-01-01

    We summarize the contributions to high-fidelity capabilities for analysis and design of hybrid wingbody (HWB) configurations considered by NASA. Specifically, we focus on the embedded propulsion concepts of the N2-B and N3-X configurations, some of the future concepts seriously investigated by the NASA Fixed Wing Project. The objective is to develop the capability to compute the integrated propulsion and airframe system realistically in geometry and accurately in flow physics. In particular, the propulsion system (including the entire engine core-compressor, combustor, and turbine stages) is vastly more difficult and costly to simulate with the same level of fidelity as the external aerodynamics. Hence, we develop an accurate modeling approach that retains important physical parameters relevant to aerodynamic and propulsion analyses for evaluating the HWB concepts. Having the analytical capabilities at our disposal, concerns and issues that were considered to be critical for the HWB concepts can now be assessed reliably and systematically; assumptions invoked by previous studies were found to have serious consequences in our study. During this task, we establish firmly that aerodynamic analysis of a HWB concept without including installation of the propulsion system is far from realistic and can be misleading. Challenges in delivering the often-cited advantages that belong to the HWB are the focus of our study and are emphasized in this report. We have attempted to address these challenges and have had successes, which are summarized here. Some can have broad implications, such as the concept of flow conditioning for reducing flow distortion and the modeling of fan stages. The design optimization capability developed for improving the aerodynamic characteristics of the baseline HWB configurations is general and can be employed for other applications. Further improvement of the N3-X configuration can be expected by expanding the design space. Finally, the support of

  20. The research progress on Hodograph Method of aerodynamic design at Tsinghua University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zuoyi; Guo, Jingrong

    1991-01-01

    Progress in the use of the Hodograph method of aerodynamic design is discussed. It was found that there are some restricted conditions in the application of Hodograph design to transonic turbine and compressor cascades. The Hodograph method is suitable not only to the transonic turbine cascade but also to the transonic compressor cascade. The three dimensional Hodograph method will be developed after obtaining the basic equation for the three dimensional Hodograph method. As an example of the Hodograph method, the use of the method to design a transonic turbine and compressor cascade is discussed.

  1. Parallel computing of overset grids for aerodynamic problems with moving objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prewitt, Nathan Coleman

    When a store is dropped from a military aircraft at high subsonic, transonic, or supersonic speeds, the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the store can be sufficient to send the store back into contact with the aircraft. Therefore, store separation analysis is used to certify the safety of any proposed drop. Time accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) offers the option of calculating store separation trajectories from first principles. In the Chimera grid scheme, a set of independent, overlapping, structured grids are used to decompose the domain of interest. This allows the use of efficient structured grid flow solvers and associated boundary conditions, and allows for grid motion without stretching or regridding. However, these advantages are gained in exchange for the requirement to establish communication links between the overlapping grids via a process referred to as "grid assembly." Relatively little work has been done to use parallel computing for time accurate, moving body problems. Thus, new techniques are presented for the parallel implementation of the assembly of overset, Chimera grids. This work is based on the grid assembly function defined in the Beggar code, currently under development at Eglin Air Force Base, FL. The parallel performance of each implementation is analyzed and equations are presented for estimating the parallel speedup. Each successive implementation attacks the weaknesses of the previous implementation in an effort to improve the parallel performance. The first implementation achieves the solution of moving body problems on multiple processors with minimum code changes. The second implementation improves the parallel performance by hiding the execution time of the grid assembly function behind the execution time of the flow solver. The third implementation uses coarse grain data decomposition to reduce the execution time of the grid assembly function. The final implementation demonstrates the fine grain decomposition

  2. The Modern Design of Experiments for Configuration Aerodynamics: A Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLoach, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The effects of slowly varying and persisting covariate effects on the accuracy and precision of experimental result is reviewed, as is the rationale for run-order randomization as a quality assurance tactic employed in the Modern Design of Experiments (MDOE) to defend against such effects. Considerable analytical complexity is introduced by restrictions on randomization in configuration aerodynamics tests because they involve hard-to-change configuration variables that cannot be randomized conveniently. Tradeoffs are examined between quality and productivity associated with varying degrees of rigor in accounting for such randomization restrictions. Certain characteristics of a configuration aerodynamics test are considered that may justify a relaxed accounting for randomization restrictions to achieve a significant reduction in analytical complexity with a comparably negligible adverse impact on the validity of the experimental results.

  3. Reductions in vehicle fuel consumption due to refinements in aerodynamic design. [for trailer trucks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Over-the-highway fuel consumption and coastdown drag tests were performed on cab-over-engine, van type trailer trucks and modifications of these vehicles incorporating refinements in aerodynamic design. In addition, 1/25-scale models of these configurations, and derivatives of these configurations were tested in a wind tunnel to determine the effects of wind on the magnitude of the benefits that aerodynamic refinements can provide. The results of these tests are presented for a vehicle incorporating major redesign features and for a relatively simple add-on modification. These results include projected fuel savings on the basis of annual savings per vehicle year as well as probable nationwide fuel savings.

  4. Design and aerodynamic performance evaluation of a high-work mixed flow turbine stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neri, Remo N.; Elliott, Thomas J.; Marsh, David N.; Civinskas, Kestutis C.

    1994-01-01

    As axial and radial turbine designs have been pushed to their aerothermodynamic and mechanical limits, the mixed-flow turbine (MFT) concept has been projected to offer performance and durability improvements, especially when ceramic materials are considered. The objective of this NASA/U.S. Army sponsored mixed-flow turbine (AMFT) program was to determine the level of performance attainable with MFT technology within the mechanical constraints of 1997 projected ceramic material properties. The MFT geometry is similar to a radial turbine, exhibiting a large radius change from inlet to exit, but differing in that the inlet flowpath is not purely radial, nor axial, but mixed; it is the inlet geometry that gives rise to the name 'mixed-flow'. The 'mixed' orientation of the turbine inlet offers several advantages over radial designs by allowing a nonzero inlet blade angle yet maintaining radial-element blades. The oblique inlet not only improves the particle-impact survivability of the design, but improves the aerodynamic performance by reducing the incidence at the blade inlet. The difficulty, however, of using mixed-flow geometry lies in the scarcity of detailed data and documented design experience. This paper reports the design of a MFT stage designed with the intent to maximize aerodynamic performance by optimizing design parameters such as stage reaction, rotor incidence, flowpath shape, blade shape, vane geometry, and airfoil counts using 2-D, 3-D inviscid, and 3-D viscous computational fluid dynamics code. The aerodynamic optimization was accomplished while maintaining mechanical integrity with respect to vibration and stress levels in the rotor. A full-scale cold-flow rig test was performed with metallic hardware fabricated to the specifications of the hot ceramic geometry to evaluate the stage performance.

  5. A Multi-Year Program Plan for the Aerodynamic Design of Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    The project tasks and deliverables are as follows: Computations and Experiments--(1) Simulation and analysis of a range of generic shapes, simplified to more complex, representative of tractor and integrated tractor-trailer flow characteristics using computational tools, (2) The establishment of an experimental data base for tractor-trailer models for code/computational method development and validation. The first shapes to be considered will be directed towards the investigation of tractor-trailer gaps and mismatch of tractor-trailer heights. (3) The evaluation and documentation of effective computational approaches for application to heavy vehicle aerodynamics based on the benchmark results with existing and advanced computational tools compared to experimental data, and (4) Computational tools and experimental methods for use by industry, National Laboratories, and universities for the aerodynamic modeling of heavy truck vehicles. Evaluation of current and new technologies--(1) The evaluation and documentation of current and new technologies for drag reduction based on published literature and continued communication with the heavy vehicle industry (e.g., identification and prioritization of tractor-trailer drag-sources, blowing and/or suction devices, body shaping, new experimental methods or facilities), and the identification and analysis of tractor and integrated tractor-trailer aerodynamic problem areas and possible solution strategies. (2) Continued industrial site visits. It should be noted that ''CFD tools'' are not only the actual computer codes, but descriptions of appropriate numerical solution methods. Part of the project effort will be to determine the restrictions or avenues for technology transfer.

  6. Aerodynamic design applying automatic differentiation and using robust variable fidelity optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemiya, Tetsushi

    , and that (2) the AMF terminates optimization erroneously when the optimization problems have constraints. The first problem is due to inaccuracy in computing derivatives in the AMF, and the second problem is due to erroneous treatment of the trust region ratio, which sets the size of the domain for an optimization in the AMF. In order to solve the first problem of the AMF, automatic differentiation (AD) technique, which reads the codes of analysis models and automatically generates new derivative codes based on some mathematical rules, is applied. If derivatives are computed with the generated derivative code, they are analytical, and the required computational time is independent of the number of design variables, which is very advantageous for realistic aerospace engineering problems. However, if analysis models implement iterative computations such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD), which solves system partial differential equations iteratively, computing derivatives through the AD requires a massive memory size. The author solved this deficiency by modifying the AD approach and developing a more efficient implementation with CFD, and successfully applied the AD to general CFD software. In order to solve the second problem of the AMF, the governing equation of the trust region ratio, which is very strict against the violation of constraints, is modified so that it can accept the violation of constraints within some tolerance. By accepting violations of constraints during the optimization process, the AMF can continue optimization without terminating immaturely and eventually find the true optimum design point. With these modifications, the AMF is referred to as "Robust AMF," and it is applied to airfoil and wing aerodynamic design problems using Euler CFD software. The former problem has 21 design variables, and the latter 64. In both problems, derivatives computed with the proposed AD method are first compared with those computed with the finite

  7. A performance index approach to aerodynamic design with the use of analysis codes only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, Raymond L.; Moitra, Anutosh

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for designing an aerodynamic configuration for a specified performance vector, based on results from several similar, but not identical, trial configurations, each defined by a geometry parameter vector. The theory shows the method effective provided that: (1) the results for the trial configuration provide sufficient variation so that a linear combination of them approximates the specified performance; and (2) the difference between the performance vectors (including the specifed performance) are sufficiently small that the linearity assumption of sensitivity analysis applies to the differences. A computed example describes the design of a high supersonic Mach number missile wing body configuration based on results from a set of four trial configurations.

  8. Aerodynamic Design of a Propeller for High-Altitude Balloon Trajectory Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Richard; Somers, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of a propeller for the trajectory control of a high-altitude, scientific balloon has been performed using theoretical methods developed especially for such applications. The methods are described. Optimum, nonlinear chord and twist distributions have been developed in conjunction with the design of a family of airfoils, the SE403, SE404, and SE405, for the propeller. The very low Reynolds numbers along the propeller blade fall in a range that has yet to be rigorously investigated, either experimentally or theoretically.

  9. Physical Insights, Steady Aerodynamic Effects, and a Design Tool for Low-Pressure Turbine Flutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, Joshua Joseph

    The successful, efficient, and safe turbine design requires a thorough understanding of the underlying physical phenomena. This research investigates the physical understanding and parameters highly correlated to flutter, an aeroelastic instability prevalent among low pressure turbine (LPT) blades in both aircraft engines and power turbines. The modern way of determining whether a certain cascade of LPT blades is susceptible to flutter is through time-expensive computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. These codes converge to solution satisfying the Eulerian conservation equations subject to the boundary conditions of a nodal domain consisting fluid and solid wall particles. Most detailed CFD codes are accompanied by cryptic turbulence models, meticulous grid constructions, and elegant boundary condition enforcements all with one goal in mind: determine the sign (and therefore stability) of the aerodynamic damping. The main question being asked by the aeroelastician, "is it positive or negative?'' This type of thought-process eventually gives rise to a black-box effect, leaving physical understanding behind. Therefore, the first part of this research aims to understand and reveal the physics behind LPT flutter in addition to several related topics including acoustic resonance effects. A percentage of this initial numerical investigation is completed using an influence coefficient approach to study the variation the work-per-cycle contributions of neighboring cascade blades to a reference airfoil. The second part of this research introduces new discoveries regarding the relationship between steady aerodynamic loading and negative aerodynamic damping. Using validated CFD codes as computational wind tunnels, a multitude of low-pressure turbine flutter parameters, such as reduced frequency, mode shape, and interblade phase angle, will be scrutinized across various airfoil geometries and steady operating conditions to reach new design guidelines regarding the influence

  10. Computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack

    DOEpatents

    Gard, Eric; Riot, Vincent; Coffee, Keith; Woods, Bruce; Tobias, Herbert; Birch, Jim; Weisgraber, Todd

    2011-11-22

    A computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack, using input from a designer related to, for example, particle size range to be considered, characteristics of the gas to be flowed through the system, the upstream temperature and pressure at the top of a first focusing lens, the flow rate through the aerodynamic focusing lens stack equivalent at atmosphere pressure; and a Stokes number range. Based on the design parameters, the method and system determines the total number of focusing lenses and their respective orifice diameters required to focus the particle size range to be considered, by first calculating for the orifice diameter of the first focusing lens in the Stokes formula, and then using that value to determine, in iterative fashion, intermediate flow values which are themselves used to determine the orifice diameters of each succeeding focusing lens in the stack design, with the results being output to a designer. In addition, the Reynolds numbers associated with each focusing lens as well as exit nozzle size may also be determined to enhance the stack design.

  11. New technology in turbine aerodynamics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Cursory review of some recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flowfields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

  12. Aerodynamic Performance of Scale-Model Turbofan Outlet Guide Vanes Designed for Low Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.

    2001-01-01

    The design of effective new technologies to reduce aircraft propulsion noise is dependent on an understanding of the noise sources and noise generation mechanisms in the modern turbofan engine. In order to more fully understand the physics of noise in a turbofan engine, a comprehensive aeroacoustic wind tunnel test programs was conducted called the 'Source Diagnostic Test.' The text was cooperative effort between NASA and General Electric Aircraft Engines, as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program. A 1/5-scale model simulator representing the bypass stage of a current technology high bypass ratio turbofan engine was used in the test. The test article consisted of the bypass fan and outlet guide vanes in a flight-type nacelle. The fan used was a medium pressure ratio design with 22 individual, wide chord blades. Three outlet guide vane design configurations were investigated, representing a 54-vane radial Baseline configuration, a 26-vane radial, wide chord Low Count configuration and a 26-vane, wide chord Low Noise configuration with 30 deg of aft sweep. The test was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9 by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at velocities simulating the takeoff and approach phases of the aircraft flight envelope. The Source Diagnostic Test had several acoustic and aerodynamic technical objectives: (1) establish the performance of a scale model fan selected to represent the current technology turbofan product; (2) assess the performance of the fan stage with each of the three distinct outlet guide vane designs; (3) determine the effect of the outlet guide vane configuration on the fan baseline performance; and (4) conduct detailed flowfield diagnostic surveys, both acoustic and aerodynamic, to characterize and understand the noise generation mechanisms in a turbofan engine. This paper addresses the fan and stage aerodynamic performance results from the Source Diagnostic Test.

  13. Aerodynamic aircraft design methods and their notable applications: Survey of the activity in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujii, Kozo; Takanashi, Susumu

    1991-01-01

    An overview of aerodynamic aircraft design methods and their recent applications in Japan is presented. A design code which was developed at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) and is in use now is discussed, hence, most of the examples are the result of the collaborative work between heavy industry and the National Aerospace Laboratory. A wide variety of applications in transonic to supersonic flow regimes are presented. Although design of aircraft elements for external flows are the main focus, some of the internal flow applications are also presented. Recent applications of the design code, using the Navier Stokes and Euler equations in the analysis mode, include the design of HOPE (a space vehicle) and Upper Surface Blowing (USB) aircraft configurations.

  14. Aerodynamic and mechanical design of an 8:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, C.; Runstadler, P. W., Jr.; Stacy, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    A high-pressure-ratio, low-mass-flow centrifugal compressor stage was designed, fabricated, and tested. The design followed specifications that the stage be representative of state-of-the-art performance and that the stage is to be used as a workhorse compressor for planned experiments using laser Doppler velocimeter equipment. The final design is a 75,000-RPM, 19-blade impeller with an axial inducer and 30 degrees of backward leaning at the impeller tip. The compressor design was tested for two- and/or quasi-three-dimensional aerodynamic and stress characteristics. Critical speed analyses were performed for the high speed rotating impeller assembly. An optimally matched, 17-channel vane island diffuser was also designed and built.

  15. The strengths and weaknesses of Computational Fluid Mechanics (CFM) in aerodynamic design and analysis. Part 1: Background and philosophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, B.; Marchbank, W. R.; Hewitt, B. L.

    The capabilities of modern theoretical methods for predicting some of the more important types of aerodynamic flow are summarized and the likelihood of their development and acceptance as routine, mainstream tools of the aircraft aerodynamicist are discussed. The impact of the new generation of computers and the associated numerical algorithms on the ability to solve large systems of differential equations, significantly reducing the need for expensive, time-consuming wind-tunnel tests and transforming aircraft design from a black art to an exact science is examined. The concept of validation of computational fluid mechanics methods is developed, involving the assessment of the accuracy with which the numerical method solves the boundary value problem posed. The methods discussed include linearized potential flow methods, nonlinear potential flow methods, the transonic small perturbation theory and exact inviscid flow methods.

  16. Optimized aerodynamic design process for subsonic transport wing fitted with winglets. [wind tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of a wind-tunnel model of a wing representative of that of a subsonic jet transport aircraft, fitted with winglets, was performed using two recently developed optimal wing-design computer programs. Both potential flow codes use a vortex lattice representation of the near-field of the aerodynamic surfaces for determination of the required mean camber surfaces for minimum induced drag, and both codes use far-field induced drag minimization procedures to obtain the required spanloads. One code uses a discrete vortex wake model for this far-field drag computation, while the second uses a 2-D advanced panel wake model. Wing camber shapes for the two codes are very similar, but the resulting winglet camber shapes differ widely. Design techniques and considerations for these two wind-tunnel models are detailed, including a description of the necessary modifications of the design geometry to format it for use by a numerically controlled machine for the actual model construction.

  17. Integrated Design Engineering Analysis (IDEA) Environment - Aerodynamics, Aerothermodynamics, and Thermal Protection System Integration Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hilmi N.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the work performed during from March 2010 October 2011. The Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis (IDEA) environment is a collaborative environment based on an object-oriented, multidisciplinary, distributed environment using the Adaptive Modeling Language (AML) as the underlying framework. This report will focus on describing the work done in the area of extending the aerodynamics, and aerothermodynamics module using S/HABP, CBAERO, PREMIN and LANMIN. It will also detail the work done integrating EXITS as the TPS sizing tool.

  18. CAD-Based Aerodynamic Design of Complex Configurations using a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    A modular framework for aerodynamic optimization of complex geometries is developed. By working directly with a parametric CAD system, complex-geometry models are modified nnd tessellated in an automatic fashion. The use of a component-based Cartesian method significantly reduces the demands on the CAD system, and also provides for robust and efficient flowfield analysis. The optimization is controlled using either a genetic or quasi-Newton algorithm. Parallel efficiency of the framework is maintained even when subject to limited CAD resources by dynamically re-allocating the processors of the flow solver. Overall, the resulting framework can explore designs incorporating large shape modifications and changes in topology.

  19. Low-subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of a shuttle-orbiter configuration designed for reduced length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, G. M.; Spencer, B., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation has been made in a low-turbulence pressure tunnel to determine the low-subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.01875-scale model of a potential shuttle orbiter. The design has the rocket engines mounted in fairings on either side of the body on top of the wing. The wing had a leading-edge sweep of 50 and a trailing-edge sweep of minus 4. configurations investigated included engine-mounted twin dorsal tails at various rollout angles, a body-mounted center-line vertical tail, cylindrical and boattailed afterbody, and elevon and rudder at several deflections.

  20. Aerodynamic Design Optimization on Unstructured Meshes Using the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Anderson, W. Kyle

    1998-01-01

    A discrete adjoint method is developed and demonstrated for aerodynamic design optimization on unstructured grids. The governing equations are the three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with a one-equation turbulence model. A discussion of the numerical implementation of the flow and adjoint equations is presented. Both compressible and incompressible solvers are differentiated and the accuracy of the sensitivity derivatives is verified by comparing with gradients obtained using finite differences. Several simplifying approximations to the complete linearization of the residual are also presented, and the resulting accuracy of the derivatives is examined. Demonstration optimizations for both compressible and incompressible flows are given.

  1. Rotor redesign for a highly loaded 1800 ft/sec tip speed fan. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, J. M.; Tari, U.; Weber, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    A quasi three dimensional design system and multiple-circular-arc airfoil sections were used to design a fan rotor. An axisymmetric intrablade flow field calculation modeled the shroud of an isolated splitter and radial distribution. The structural analysis indicates that the design is satisfactory for evaluation of aerodynamic performance of the fan stage in a test facility.

  2. The aerodynamic design and performance of the NASA/GE E3 low pressure turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, D. G.; Dengler, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and scaled rig test results of the low pressure turbine (LPT) component for the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine (E3) are presented. The low pressure turbine is a highly loaded five-stage design featuring high outer wall slope, controlled vortex aerodynamics, low stage flow coefficient, and reduced clearances. An assessment of its performance has been made based on a series of scaled air turbine tests which were divided into two phases: Block I (March through August, 1979) and Block II (June through September, 1981). Results from the Block II five-stage test, summarized in the paper, indicate that the E3 LPT will attain an efficiency level of 91.5 percent at the Mach 0.8/35,000 ft. max. climb altitude design point. This is relative to program goals of 91.1 percent for the E3 demonstrator engine and 91.7 percent for a fully developed flight propulsion system LPT.

  3. Aerodynamic Shape Sensitivity Analysis and Design Optimization of Complex Configurations Using Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Newman, James C., III; Barnwell, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional unstructured grid approach to aerodynamic shape sensitivity analysis and design optimization has been developed and is extended to model geometrically complex configurations. The advantage of unstructured grids (when compared with a structured-grid approach) is their inherent ability to discretize irregularly shaped domains with greater efficiency and less effort. Hence, this approach is ideally suited for geometrically complex configurations of practical interest. In this work the nonlinear Euler equations are solved using an upwind, cell-centered, finite-volume scheme. The discrete, linearized systems which result from this scheme are solved iteratively by a preconditioned conjugate-gradient-like algorithm known as GMRES for the two-dimensional geometry and a Gauss-Seidel algorithm for the three-dimensional; similar procedures are used to solve the accompanying linear aerodynamic sensitivity equations in incremental iterative form. As shown, this particular form of the sensitivity equation makes large-scale gradient-based aerodynamic optimization possible by taking advantage of memory efficient methods to construct exact Jacobian matrix-vector products. Simple parameterization techniques are utilized for demonstrative purposes. Once the surface has been deformed, the unstructured grid is adapted by considering the mesh as a system of interconnected springs. Grid sensitivities are obtained by differentiating the surface parameterization and the grid adaptation algorithms with ADIFOR (which is an advanced automatic-differentiation software tool). To demonstrate the ability of this procedure to analyze and design complex configurations of practical interest, the sensitivity analysis and shape optimization has been performed for a two-dimensional high-lift multielement airfoil and for a three-dimensional Boeing 747-200 aircraft.

  4. High Reynolds Number Hybrid Laminar Flow Control (HLFC) Flight Experiment. Report 2; Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the aerodynamic design of an experimental hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) wing panel intended for use on a Boeing 757 airplane to provide a facility for flight research on high Reynolds number HLFC and to demonstrate practical HLFC operation on a full-scale commercial transport airplane. The design consists of revised wing leading edge contour designed to produce a pressure distribution favorable to laminar flow, definition of suction flow requirements to laminarize the boundary layer, provisions at the inboard end of the test panel to prevent attachment-line boundary layer transition, and a Krueger leading edge flap that serves both as a high lift device and as a shield to prevent insect accretion on the leading edge when the airplane is taking off or landing.

  5. An interactive version of PropID for the aerodynamic design of horizontal axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Ninham, C.P.; Selig, M.S.

    1997-12-31

    The original PROP code developed by AeroVironment, Inc. and its various versions have been in use for wind turbine performance predictions for over ten years. Due to its simplicity, rapid execution times and relatively accurate predictions, it has become an industry standard in the US. The Europeans have similar blade-element/momentum methods in use for design. Over the years, PROP has continued to be improved (in its accuracy and capability), e.g., PROPSH, PROPPC, PROP93, and PropID. The latter version incorporates a unique inverse design capability that allows the user to specify the desired aerodynamic characteristics from which the corresponding blade geometry is determined. Through this approach, tedious efforts related to manually adjusting the chord, twist, pitch and rpm to achieve desired aerodynamic/performance characteristics can be avoided, thereby making it possible to perform more extensive trade studies in an effort to optimize performance. Past versions of PropID did not have supporting graphics software. The more current version to be discussed includes a Matlab-based graphical user interface (GUI) and additional features that will be discussed in this paper.

  6. Aerodynamic Modeling of Transonic Aircraft Using Vortex Lattice Coupled with Transonic Small Disturbance for Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaparro, Daniel; Fujiwara, Gustavo E. C.; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan

    2016-01-01

    The need to rapidly scan large design spaces during conceptual design calls for computationally inexpensive tools such as the vortex lattice method (VLM). Although some VLM tools, such as Vorview have been extended to model fully-supersonic flow, VLM solutions are typically limited to inviscid, subcritical flow regimes. Many transport aircraft operate at transonic speeds, which limits the applicability of VLM for such applications. This paper presents a novel approach to correct three-dimensional VLM through coupling of two-dimensional transonic small disturbance (TSD) solutions along the span of an aircraft wing in order to accurately predict transonic aerodynamic loading and wave drag for transport aircraft. The approach is extended to predict flow separation and capture the attenuation of aerodynamic forces due to boundary layer viscosity by coupling the TSD solver with an integral boundary layer (IBL) model. The modeling framework is applied to the NASA General Transport Model (GTM) integrated with a novel control surface known as the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF).

  7. Axial compressor blade design for desensitization of aerodynamic performance and stability to tip clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erler, Engin

    Tip clearance flow is the flow through the clearance between the rotor blade tip and the shroud of a turbomachine, such as compressors and turbines. This flow is driven by the pressure difference across the blade (aerodynamic loading) in the tip region and is a major source of loss in performance and aerodynamic stability in axial compressors of modern aircraft engines. An increase in tip clearance, either temporary due to differential radial expansion between the blade and the shroud during transient operation or permanent due to engine wear or manufacturing tolerances on small blades, increases tip clearance flow and results in higher fuel consumption and higher risk of engine surge. A compressor design that can reduce the sensitivity of its performance and aerodynamic stability to tip clearance increase would have a major impact on short and long-term engine performance and operating envelope. While much research has been carried out on improving nominal compressor performance, little had been done on desensitization to tip clearance increase beyond isolated observations that certain blade designs such as forward chordwise sweep, seem to be less sensitive to tip clearance size increase. The current project aims to identify through a computational study the flow features and associated mechanisms that reduces sensitivity of axial compressor rotors to tip clearance size and propose blade design strategies that can exploit these results. The methodology starts with the design of a reference conventional axial compressor rotor followed by a parametric study with variations of this reference design through modification of the camber line and of the stacking line of blade profiles along the span. It is noted that a simple desensitization method would be to reduce the aerodynamic loading of the blade tip which would reduce the tip clearance flow and its proportional contribution to performance loss. However, with the larger part of the work on the flow done in this

  8. Sensitivity of Key Parameters in Aerodynamic Wind Turbine Rotor Design on Power and Energy Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Christian

    2007-07-01

    In this paper the influence of different key parameters in aerodynamic wind turbine rotor design on the power efficiency, Cp, and energy production has been investigated. The work was divided into an analysis of 2D airfoils/blade sections and of entire rotors. In the analysis of the 2D airfoils it was seen that there was a maximum of the local Cp for airfoils with finite maximum Cl/Cd values. The local speed ratio should be between 2.4 and 3.8 for airfoils with maximum cl/cd between 50 and 200, respectively, to obtain maximum local Cp. Also, the investigation showed that Re had a significant impact on CP and especially for Re<2mio corresponding to rotors below approximately 400kW this impact was pronounced. The investigation of Cp for rotors was made with three blades and showed that with the assumption of constant maximum cl/cd along the entire blade, the design tip speed ratio changed from X=6 to X=12 for cl/cd=50 and cl/cd=200, respectively, with corresponding values of maximum cp of 0.46 and 0.525. An analysis of existing rotors re-designed with new airfoils but maintaining the absolute thickness distribution to maintain the stiffness showed that big rotors are more aerodynamic efficient than small rotors caused by higher Re. It also showed that the design tip speed ratio was very dependent on the rotor size and on the assumptions of the airfoil flow being fully turbulent (contaminated airfoil) or free transitional (clean airfoil). The investigations showed that rotors with diameter D=1.75m, should be designed for X around 5.5, whereas rotors with diameter D=126m, should be designed for Xbetween 6.5 and 8.5, depending on the airfoil performance.

  9. Comparison of Various Supersonic Turbine Tip Designs to Minimize Aerodynamic Loss and Tip Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The rotor tips of axial turbines experience high heat flux and are the cause of aerodynamic losses due to tip clearance flows, and in the case of supersonic tips, shocks. As stage loadings increase, the flow in the tip gap approaches and exceeds sonic conditions. This introduces effects such as shock-boundary layer interactions and choked flow that are not observed for subsonic tip flows that have been studied extensively in literature. This work simulates the tip clearance flow for a flat tip, a diverging tip gap and several contoured tips to assess the possibility of minimizing tip heat flux while maintaining a constant massflow from the pressure side to the suction side of the rotor, through the tip clearance. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code GlennHT was used for the simulations. Due to the strong favorable pressure gradients the simulations assumed laminar conditions in the tip gap. The nominal tip gap width to height ratio for this study is 6.0. The Reynolds number of the flow is 2.4 x 10(exp 5) based on nominal tip width and exit velocity. A wavy wall design was found to reduce heat flux by 5 percent but suffered from an additional 6 percent in aerodynamic loss coefficient. Conventional tip recesses are found to perform far worse than a flat tip due to severe shock heating. Overall, the baseline flat tip was the second best performer. A diverging converging tip gap with a hole was found to be the best choice. Average tip heat flux was reduced by 37 percent and aerodynamic losses were cut by over 6 percent.

  10. Aerodynamic design and analysis of small horizontal axis wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xinzi

    This work investigates the aerodynamic design and analysis of small horizontal axis wind turbine blades via the blade element momentum (BEM) based approach and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based approach. From this research, it is possible to draw a series of detailed guidelines on small wind turbine blade design and analysis. The research also provides a platform for further comprehensive study using these two approaches. The wake induction corrections and stall corrections of the BEM method were examined through a case study of the NREL/NASA Phase VI wind turbine. A hybrid stall correction model was proposed to analyse wind turbine power performance. The proposed model shows improvement in power prediction for the validation case, compared with the existing stall correction models. The effects of the key rotor parameters of a small wind turbine as well as the blade chord and twist angle distributions on power performance were investigated through two typical wind turbines, i.e. a fixed-pitch variable-speed (FPVS) wind turbine and a fixed-pitch fixed-speed (FPFS) wind turbine. An engineering blade design and analysis code was developed in MATLAB to accommodate aerodynamic design and analysis of the blades.. The linearisation for radial profiles of blade chord and twist angle for the FPFS wind turbine blade design was discussed. Results show that, the proposed linearisation approach leads to reduced manufacturing cost and higher annual energy production (AEP), with minimal effects on the low wind speed performance. Comparative studies of mesh and turbulence models in 2D and 3D CFD modelling were conducted. The CFD predicted lift and drag coefficients of the airfoil S809 were compared with wind tunnel test data and the 3D CFD modelling method of the NREL/NASA Phase VI wind turbine were validated against measurements. Airfoil aerodynamic characterisation and wind turbine power performance as well as 3D flow details were studied. The detailed flow

  11. An aerodynamic design and numerical investigation of transonic centrifugal compressor stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Weilin; Ji, Lucheng; Tian, Yong; Shao, Weiwei; Li, Weiwei; Xiao, Yunhan

    2011-09-01

    In the present paper, the design of a transonic centrifugal compressor stage with the inlet relative Mach number about 1.3 and detailed flow field investigation by three-dimensional CFD are described. Firstly the CFD program was validated by an experimental case. Then the preliminary aerodynamic design of stage completed through in-house one-dimensional code. Three types of impellers and two sets of stages were computed and analyzed. It can be found that the swept shape of leading edge has prominent influence on the performance and can enlarge the flow range. Similarly, the performance of the stage with swept impeller is better than others. The total pressure ratio and adiabatic efficiency of final geometry achieve 7:1 and 80% respectively. The vane diffuser with same airfoils along span increases attack angle at higher span, and the local flow structure and performance is deteriorated.

  12. The Aerodynamic Optimization of Wings at Subsonic Speeds and the Influence of Wingtip Design. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmer, H.

    1987-01-01

    Some of the objectives of modern aircraft development are related to the achievement of reduced fuel consumption and aircraft noise. This investigation is mainly concerned with the aerodynamic aspects of aircraft development, i.e., reduction of induced drag. New studies of wing design, and in particular wing tips, are considered. Induced drag is important since, in cruising flight, it accounts for approximately one-third of the entire drag for the aircraft, and one-half while climbing. A survey is presented for the wing geometries and wing tip designs studied, and theoretical investigations of different planar wings with systematically varied wing tip forms are conducted. Attention is also paid to a theoretical study of some planar and nonplanar wings and their comparison with experimental data.

  13. Aerodynamic control, recovery, and sensor design for a first stage flyback booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The mission of the flyback group is to control and recover the first stage of a commercially developed winged booster launched from a B-52 at 40,000 ft and Mach 0.8. First-stage separation occurs at 210,000 ft and Mach 8.7; the second and third stages will continue deployment of their 600 lb payload into low Earth orbit. The job of the flyback group begins at this point, employing a modified control system developed to stabilize and maneuver the separated first-stage vehicle to a suitable landing site approximately 130 miles from the launch point over the Pacific Ocean. This multidisciplinary design was accomplished by four subgroups: aerodynamic design/vehicle configuration (ADVC), trajectory optimization, controls, and thermal management.

  14. A methodology for using nonlinear aerodynamics in aeroservoelastic analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is presented for using the Volterra-Wiener theory of nonlinear systems in aeroservoelastic (ASE) analyses and design. The theory is applied to the development of nonlinear aerodynamic response models that can be defined in state-space form and are, therefore, appropriate for use in modern control theory. The theory relies on the identification of nonlinear kernels that can be used to predict the response of a nonlinear system due to an arbitrary input. A numerical kernel identification technique, based on unit impulse responses, is presented and applied to a simple bilinear, single-input single-output (SISO) system. The linear kernel (unit impulse response) and the nonlinear second-order kernel of the system are numerically-identified and compared with the exact, analytically-defined and linear and second-order kernels. This kernel identification technique is then applied to the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program-Transonic Small Disturbance) code for identification of the linear and second-order kernels of a NACA64A010 rectangular wing undergoing pitch at M = 0.5, M = 8.5 (transonic), and M = 0.93 (transonic). Results presented demonstrate the feasibility of this approach for use with nonlinear, unsteady aerodynamic responses.

  15. Effect of design changes on aerodynamic and acoustic performance of translating-centerbody sonic inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of design changes on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of translating centerbody sonic inlets. Scale model inlets were tested in the Lewis Research Center's V/STOL wind tunnel. The effects of centerbody position, entry lip contraction ratio, diffuser length, and diffuser area ratio on inlet total pressure recovery, distortion, and noise suppression were investigated at static conditions and at forward velocity and angle of attack. With the centerbody in the takeoff position (retracted), good aerodynamic and acoustic performance was attained at static conditions and at forward velocity. At 0 deg incidence angle with a sound pressure level reduction of 20 dB, the total pressure recovery was 0.986. Pressure recovery at 50 deg was 0.981. With the centerbody in the approach position (extended), diffuser flow separation occurred at an incidence angle of approximately 20 deg. However, good performance was attained at lower angles. With the centerbody in the takeoff position the ability of the inlet to tolerate high incidence angles was improved by increasing the lip contraction ratio. However, at static conditions with the centerbody in the approach position, an optimum lip contraction ratio appears to exist, with both thinner and thicker lips yielding reduced performance.

  16. Unsteady transonic aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, D.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on unsteady transonic aerodynamics are presented. The topics addressed include: physical phenomena associated with unsteady transonic flows, basic equations for unsteady transonic flow, practical problems concerning aircraft, basic numerical methods, computational methods for unsteady transonic flows, application of transonic flow analysis to helicopter rotor problems, unsteady aerodynamics for turbomachinery aeroelastic applications, alternative methods for modeling unsteady transonic flows.

  17. Single stage, low noise, advanced technology fan. Volume 1: Aerodynamic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Younghans, J. L.; Little, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic design for a half-scale fan vehicle, which would have application on an advanced transport aircraft, is described. The single stage advanced technology fan was designed to a pressure ratio of 1.8 at a tip speed of 503 m/sec 11,650 ft/sec). The fan and booster components are designed in a scale model flow size convenient for testing with existing facility and vehicle hardware. The design corrected flow per unit annulus area at the fan face is 215 kg/sec sq m (44.0 lb m/sec sq ft) with a hub-tip ratio of 0.38 at the leading edge of the fan rotor. This results in an inlet corrected airflow of 117.9 kg/sec (259.9 lb m/sec) for the selected rotor tip diameter if 90.37 cm (35.58 in.). The variable geometry inlet is designed utilizing a combination of high throat Mach number and acoustic treatment in the inlet diffuser for noise suppression (hybrid inlet). A variable fan exhaust nozzle was assumed in conjunction with the variable inlet throat area to limit the required area change of the inlet throat at approach and hence limit the overall diffusion and inlet length. The fan exit duct design was primarily influenced by acoustic requirements, including length of suppressor wall treatment; length, thickness and position on a duct splitter for additional suppressor treatment; and duct surface Mach numbers.

  18. Modification and Validation of Conceptual Design Aerodynamic Prediction Method HASC95 With VTXCHN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, Alan E.; Dixon, Charles J.; Hegedus, Martin C.

    1996-01-01

    A conceptual/preliminary design level subsonic aerodynamic prediction code HASC (High Angle of Attack Stability and Control) has been improved in several areas, validated, and documented. The improved code includes improved methodologies for increased accuracy and robustness, and simplified input/output files. An engineering method called VTXCHN (Vortex Chine) for prediciting nose vortex shedding from circular and non-circular forebodies with sharp chine edges has been improved and integrated into the HASC code. This report contains a summary of modifications, description of the code, user's guide, and validation of HASC. Appendices include discussion of a new HASC utility code, listings of sample input and output files, and a discussion of the application of HASC to buffet analysis.

  19. Aerodynamic heating and surface temperatures on vehicles for computer-aided design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.; Kania, L. A.; Chitty, A.

    1983-01-01

    A computer subprogram has been developed to calculate aerodynamic and radiative heating rates and to determine surface temperatures by integrating the heating rates along the trajectory of a vehicle. Convective heating rates are calculated by applying the axisymmetric analogue to inviscid surface streamlines and using relatively simple techniques to calculate laminar, transitional, or turbulent heating rates. Options are provided for the selection of gas model, transition criterion, turbulent heating method, Reynolds Analogy factor, and entropy-layer swallowing effects. Heating rates are compared to experimental data, and the time history of surface temperatures are given for a high-speed trajectory. The computer subprogram is developed for preliminary design and mission analysis where parametric studies are needed at all speeds.

  20. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE). The aerodynamic and mechanical design of the QCSEE over-the-wing fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic and mechanical design of a fixed-pitch 1.36 pressure ratio fan for the over-the-wing (OTW) engine is presented. The fan has 28 blades. Aerodynamically, the fan blades were designed for a composite blade, but titanium blades were used in the experimental fan as a cost savings measure.

  1. Aerodynamic Design of Heavy Vehicles Reporting Period January 15, 2004 through April 15, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, A; Chatelain, P; Heineck, J; Browand, F; Mehta, R; Ortega, J; Salari, K; Storms, B; Brown, J; DeChant, L; Rubel, M; Ross, J; Hammache, M; Pointer, D; Roy, C; Hassan, B; Arcas, D; Hsu, T; Payne, J; Walker, S; Castellucci, P; McCallen, R

    2004-04-13

    Listed are summaries of the activities and accomplishments during this second-quarter reporting period for each of the consortium participants. The following are some highlights for this reporting period: (1) Experiments and computations guide conceptual designs for reduction of drag due to tractor-trailer gap flow (splitter plate), trailer underbody (wedges), and base drag (base-flap add-ons). (2) Steady and unsteady RANS simulations for the GTS geometry are being finalized for development of clear modeling guidelines with RANS. (3) Full geometry and tunnel simulations on the GCM geometry are underway. (4) CRADA with PACCAR is supporting computational parametric study to determine predictive need to include wind tunnel geometry as limits of computational domain. (5) Road and track test options are being investigated. All is ready for field testing of base-flaps at Crows Landing in California in collaboration with Partners in Advanced Transportation Highways (PATH). In addition, MAKA of Canada is providing the device and Wabash is providing a new trailer. (6) Apparatus to investigate tire splash and spray has been designed and is under construction. Michelin has offered tires with customized threads for this study. (7) Vortex methods have improved techniques for the treatment of vorticity near surfaces and spinning geometries like rotating tires. (8) Wind tunnel experiments on model rail cars demonstrate that empty coal cars exhibit substantial aerodynamic drag compared to full coal cars, indicating that significant fuel savings could be obtained by reducing the drag of empty coal cars. (9) Papers are being prepared for an exclusive conference session on the Heavy Vehicle DOE Aerodynamic Drag Project at the 34th AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference in Portland, Oregon, June 28-July 1, 2004.

  2. The light airplane : modern theoretical aerodynamics as applied to light airplane design with a series of charts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driggs, Ivan H

    1925-01-01

    T.M. 311 gave a short outline of modern theoretical aerodynamics as applied to light airplane design. This discussion may have been somewhat obscure to the nontechnical reader. A series of charts or curves should serve to clear up such obscurity as well as to more definitely emphasize those quantities most important for each flight characteristic.

  3. Supersonic Aerodynamic Design Improvements of an Arrow-Wing HSCT Configuration Using Nonlinear Point Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unger, Eric R.; Hager, James O.; Agrawal, Shreekant

    1999-01-01

    This paper is a discussion of the supersonic nonlinear point design optimization efforts at McDonnell Douglas Aerospace under the High-Speed Research (HSR) program. The baseline for these optimization efforts has been the M2.4-7A configuration which represents an arrow-wing technology for the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Optimization work on this configuration began in early 1994 and continued into 1996. Initial work focused on optimization of the wing camber and twist on a wing/body configuration and reductions of 3.5 drag counts (Euler) were realized. The next phase of the optimization effort included fuselage camber along with the wing and a drag reduction of 5.0 counts was achieved. Including the effects of the nacelles and diverters into the optimization problem became the next focus where a reduction of 6.6 counts (Euler W/B/N/D) was eventually realized. The final two phases of the effort included a large set of constraints designed to make the final optimized configuration more realistic and they were successful albeit with a loss of performance.

  4. New technology in turbine aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    A cursory review is presented of some of the recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research at NASA-Lewis Research Center. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. An extensive bibliography is included. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Turbines currently being investigated make use of advanced blading concepts designed to maintain high efficiency under conditions of high aerodynamic loading. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flow fields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

  5. Development of a three-dimensional multistage inverse design method for aerodynamic matching of axial compressor blading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rooij, Michael P. C.

    Current turbomachinery design systems increasingly rely on multistage Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) as a means to assess performance of designs. However, design weaknesses attributed to improper stage matching are addressed using often ineffective strategies involving a costly iterative loop between blading modification, revision of design intent, and evaluation of aerodynamic performance. A design methodology is presented which greatly improves the process of achieving design-point aerodynamic matching. It is based on a three-dimensional viscous inverse design method which generates the blade camber surface based on prescribed pressure loading, thickness distribution and stacking line. This inverse design method has been extended to allow blading analysis and design in a multi-blade row environment. Blade row coupling was achieved through a mixing plane approximation. Parallel computing capability in the form of MPI has been implemented to reduce the computational time for multistage calculations. Improvements have been made to the flow solver to reach the level of accuracy required for multistage calculations. These include inclusion of heat flux, temperature-dependent treatment of viscosity, and improved calculation of stress components and artificial dissipation near solid walls. A validation study confirmed that the obtained accuracy is satisfactory at design point conditions. Improvements have also been made to the inverse method to increase robustness and design fidelity. These include the possibility to exclude spanwise sections of the blade near the endwalls from the design process, and a scheme that adjusts the specified loading area for changes resulting from the leading and trailing edge treatment. Furthermore, a pressure loading manager has been developed. Its function is to automatically adjust the pressure loading area distribution during the design calculation in order to achieve a specified design objective. Possible objectives are overall

  6. Aerodynamic Design and Numerical Analysis of Supersonic Turbine for Turbo Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chao; Zou, Zhengping; Kong, Qingguo; Cheng, Honggui; Zhang, Weihao

    2016-09-01

    Supersonic turbine is widely used in the turbo pump of modern rocket. A preliminary design method for supersonic turbine has been developed considering the coupling effects of turbine and nozzle. Numerical simulation has been proceeded to validate the feasibility of the design method. As the strong shockwave reflected on the mixing plane, additional numerical simulated error would be produced by the mixing plane model in the steady CFD. So unsteady CFD is employed to investigate the aerodynamic performance of the turbine and flow field in passage. Results showed that the preliminary design method developed in this paper is suitable for designing supersonic turbine. This periodical variation of complex shockwave system influences the development of secondary flow, wake and shock-boundary layer interaction, which obviously affect the secondary loss in vane passage. The periodical variation also influences the strength of reflecting shockwave, which affects the profile loss in vane passage. Besides, high circumferential velocity at vane outlet and short blade lead to high radial pressure gradient, which makes the low kinetic energy fluid moves towards hub region and produces additional loss.

  7. Fundamental Aspects of the Aerodynamics of Turbojet Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrere, M.

    1978-01-01

    Aerodynamic considerations in the design of high performance combustors for turbojet engines are discussed. Aerodynamic problems concerning the preparation of the fuel-air mixture, the recirculation zone where primary combustion occurs, the secondary combustion zone, and the dilution zone were examined. An aerodynamic analysis of the entire primary chamber ensemble was carried out to determine the pressure drop between entry and exit. The aerodynamics of afterburn chambers are discussed. A model which can be used to investigate the evolution of temperature, pressure, and rate and efficiency of combustion the length of the chamber was developed.

  8. DESIGNING PROCESSES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Designing for the environment requires consideration of environmental impacts. The Generalized WAR Algorithm is the methodology that allows the user to evaluate the potential environmental impact of the design of a chemical process. In this methodology, chemicals are assigned val...

  9. Influence of Reynolds Number on Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Design of a Wind Turbine Blade

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Mingwei; Fang, Le; Tian, De

    2015-01-01

    At present, the radius of wind turbine rotors ranges from several meters to one hundred meters, or even more, which extends Reynolds number of the airfoil profile from the order of 105 to 107. Taking the blade for 3MW wind turbines as an example, the influence of Reynolds number on the aerodynamic design of a wind turbine blade is studied. To make the study more general, two kinds of multi-objective optimization are involved: one is based on the maximum power coefficient (CPopt) and the ultimate load, and the other is based on the ultimate load and the annual energy production (AEP). It is found that under the same configuration, the optimal design has a larger CPopt or AEP (CPopt//AEP) for the same ultimate load, or a smaller load for the same CPopt//AEP at higher Reynolds number. At a certain tip-speed ratio or ultimate load, the blade operating at higher Reynolds number should have a larger chord length and twist angle for the maximum Cpopt//AEP. If a wind turbine blade is designed by using an airfoil database with a mismatched Reynolds number from the actual one, both the load and Cpopt//AEP will be incorrectly estimated to some extent. In some cases, the assessment error attributed to Reynolds number is quite significant, which may bring unexpected risks to the earnings and safety of a wind power project. PMID:26528815

  10. Influence of Reynolds Number on Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Design of a Wind Turbine Blade.

    PubMed

    Ge, Mingwei; Fang, Le; Tian, De

    2015-01-01

    At present, the radius of wind turbine rotors ranges from several meters to one hundred meters, or even more, which extends Reynolds number of the airfoil profile from the order of 105 to 107. Taking the blade for 3MW wind turbines as an example, the influence of Reynolds number on the aerodynamic design of a wind turbine blade is studied. To make the study more general, two kinds of multi-objective optimization are involved: one is based on the maximum power coefficient (CPopt) and the ultimate load, and the other is based on the ultimate load and the annual energy production (AEP). It is found that under the same configuration, the optimal design has a larger CPopt or AEP (CPopt//AEP) for the same ultimate load, or a smaller load for the same CPopt//AEP at higher Reynolds number. At a certain tip-speed ratio or ultimate load, the blade operating at higher Reynolds number should have a larger chord length and twist angle for the maximum Cpopt//AEP. If a wind turbine blade is designed by using an airfoil database with a mismatched Reynolds number from the actual one, both the load and Cpopt//AEP will be incorrectly estimated to some extent. In some cases, the assessment error attributed to Reynolds number is quite significant, which may bring unexpected risks to the earnings and safety of a wind power project.

  11. Influence of Reynolds Number on Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Design of a Wind Turbine Blade.

    PubMed

    Ge, Mingwei; Fang, Le; Tian, De

    2015-01-01

    At present, the radius of wind turbine rotors ranges from several meters to one hundred meters, or even more, which extends Reynolds number of the airfoil profile from the order of 105 to 107. Taking the blade for 3MW wind turbines as an example, the influence of Reynolds number on the aerodynamic design of a wind turbine blade is studied. To make the study more general, two kinds of multi-objective optimization are involved: one is based on the maximum power coefficient (CPopt) and the ultimate load, and the other is based on the ultimate load and the annual energy production (AEP). It is found that under the same configuration, the optimal design has a larger CPopt or AEP (CPopt//AEP) for the same ultimate load, or a smaller load for the same CPopt//AEP at higher Reynolds number. At a certain tip-speed ratio or ultimate load, the blade operating at higher Reynolds number should have a larger chord length and twist angle for the maximum Cpopt//AEP. If a wind turbine blade is designed by using an airfoil database with a mismatched Reynolds number from the actual one, both the load and Cpopt//AEP will be incorrectly estimated to some extent. In some cases, the assessment error attributed to Reynolds number is quite significant, which may bring unexpected risks to the earnings and safety of a wind power project. PMID:26528815

  12. Reinventing the Wheel: Design and Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasetti, Sean M.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a design problem that not only takes students through the technological design process, but it also provides them with real-world problem-solving experience as it relates to the manufacturing and engineering fields. It begins with a scenario placing the student as a custom wheel designer for an automotive manufacturing…

  13. Wicked problems in designing healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2009-10-01

    The design process for new healthcare facilities presents many wicked problems for nurse leaders with a number of stakeholders, a myriad of opinions, and numerous options to consider. This bimonthly department expands nurse leaders' knowledge and competencies in health facility design and enables them to lead in design efforts. In this article, the concept of wicked problems is explored with application to the healthcare design situation using examples of design decisions frequently challenging nurse leaders.

  14. Redesigned rotor for a highly loaded, 1800 ft/sec tip speed compressor fan stage 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halle, J. E.; Ruschak, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    A highly loaded, high tip-speed fan rotor was designed with multiple-circular-arc airfoil sections as a replacement for a marginally successful rotor which had precompression airfoil sections. The substitution of airfoil sections was the only aerodynamic change. Structural design of the redesigned rotor blade was guided by successful experience with the original blade. Calculated stress levels and stability parameters for the redesigned rotor are within limits demonstrated in tests of the original rotor.

  15. The engine design engine. A clustered computer platform for the aerodynamic inverse design and analysis of a full engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanz, J.; Pischel, K.; Hubler, D.

    1992-01-01

    An application for parallel computation on a combined cluster of powerful workstations and supercomputers was developed. A Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) is used as message passage language on a macro-tasking parallelization of the Aerodynamic Inverse Design and Analysis for a Full Engine computer code. The heterogeneous nature of the cluster is perfectly handled by the controlling host machine. Communication is established via Ethernet with the TCP/IP protocol over an open network. A reasonable overhead is imposed for internode communication, rendering an efficient utilization of the engaged processors. Perhaps one of the most interesting features of the system is its versatile nature, that permits the usage of the computational resources available that are experiencing less use at a given point in time.

  16. Aerodynamic Characteristics at High Speeds of Full-Scale Propellers having Different Shank Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Julian D.

    1947-01-01

    Tests of two 10-foot-diameter two-blade propellers which differed only in shank design have been made in the Langley 16-foot high-speed tunnel. The propellers are designated by their blade design numbers, NACA 10-(5)(08)-03, which had aerodynamically efficient airfoil shank sections, and NACA l0-(5)(08)-03R which had thick cylindrical shank sections typical of conventiona1 blades, The propellers mere tested on a 2000-horsepower dynamometer through a range of blade-angles from 20deg to 55deg at various rotational speeds and at airspeeds up to 496 miles per hour. The resultant tip speeds obtained simulate actual flight conditions, and the variation of air-stream Mach number with advance ratio is within the range of full-scale constant-speed propeller operation. Both propellers were very efficient, the maximum envelope efficiency being approximately 0,95 for the NACA 10-(5)(08)-03 propeller and about 5 percent less for the NACA 10-(5)(08)-03R propeller. Based on constant power and rotational speed, the efficiency of the NACA 10-(05)(08)-03 propeller was from 2.8 to 12 percent higher than that of the NACA 10-(5)(08)-03R propeller over a range of airspeeds from 225 to 450 miles per hour. The loss in maximum efficiency at the design blade angle for the NACA 10-(5)(08)-03 and 10-(5)(08)-03R propellers vas about 22 and 25 percent, respectively, for an increase in helical tip Mach number from 0.70 to 1.14.

  17. Design and Execution of the Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Large-Article Wind Tunnel Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    The testing of 3- and 6-meter diameter Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) test articles was completed in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40 ft x 80 ft Wind Tunnel test section. Both models were stacked tori, constructed as 60 degree half-angle sphere cones. The 3-meter HIAD was tested in two configurations. The first 3-meter configuration utilized an instrumented flexible aerodynamic skin covering the inflatable aeroshell surface, while the second configuration employed a flight-like flexible thermal protection system. The 6-meter HIAD was tested in two structural configurations (with and without an aft-mounted stiffening torus near the shoulder), both utilizing an instrumented aerodynamic skin.

  18. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied transonic aerodynamic wing design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1989-01-01

    Progress in the direct-inverse wing design method in curvilinear coordinates has been made. This includes the remedying of a spanwise oscillation problem and the assessment of grid skewness, viscous interaction, and the initial airfoil section on the final design. It was found that, in response to the spanwise oscillation problem that designing at every other spanwise station produced the best results for the cases presented, a smoothly varying grid is especially needed for the accurate design at the wing tip, the boundary layer displacement thicknesses must be included in a successful wing design, the design of high and medium aspect ratio wings is possible with this code, and the final airfoil section designed is fairly independent of the initial section.

  19. An aerodynamic analysis computer program and design notes for low speed wing flap systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.; Walkley, K. B.

    1983-01-01

    The expanded capabilities for analysis and design of low speed flap systems afforded by recent modifications of an existing computer program is described. The program provides for the simultaneous analysis of up to 25 pairs of leading-edge and trailing-edge flap deflection schedules. Among other new features of the program are a revised attainable thrust estimation method to provide more accurate predictions for low Mach numbers, and a choice of three options for estimation of leading-edge separation vortex flow effects. Comparison of program results with low speed experimental data for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration with leading-edge and trailing-edge flaps showed good agreement over most of the range of flap deflections. Other force data comparisons and an independent study of airfoil and wing pressure distributions indicated that wind-tunnel measurements of the aerodynamic performance of twisted and cambered wings and wings with leading-edge flaps can be very sensitive to Reynolds number effects.

  20. Geoengineering as a design problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, Ben; MacMartin, Douglas G.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the climate impacts of solar geoengineering is essential for evaluating its benefits and risks. Most previous simulations have prescribed a particular strategy and evaluated its modeled effects. Here we turn this approach around by first choosing example climate objectives and then designing a strategy to meet those objectives in climate models. There are four essential criteria for designing a strategy: (i) an explicit specification of the objectives, (ii) defining what climate forcing agents to modify so the objectives are met, (iii) a method for managing uncertainties, and (iv) independent verification of the strategy in an evaluation model. We demonstrate this design perspective through two multi-objective examples. First, changes in Arctic temperature and the position of tropical precipitation due to CO2 increases are offset by adjusting high-latitude insolation in each hemisphere independently. Second, three different latitude-dependent patterns of insolation are modified to offset CO2-induced changes in global mean temperature, interhemispheric temperature asymmetry, and the Equator-to-pole temperature gradient. In both examples, the "design" and "evaluation" models are state-of-the-art fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models.

  1. Geoengineering as a design problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, B.; MacMartin, D. G.; Wang, H.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the climate impacts of solar geoengineering is essential for evaluating its benefits and risks. Most previous simulations have prescribed a particular strategy and evaluated its modeled effects. Here we turn this approach around by first choosing example climate objectives and then designing a strategy to meet those objectives in climate models. There are four essential criteria for designing a strategy: (i) an explicit specification of the objectives, (ii) defining what climate forcing agents to modify so the objectives are met, (iii) a method for managing uncertainties, and (iv) independent verification of the strategy in an evaluation model. We demonstrate this design perspective through two multi-objective examples. First, changes in Arctic temperature and the position of tropical precipitation due to CO2 increases are offset by adjusting high latitude insolation in each hemisphere independently. Second, three different latitude-dependent patterns of insolation are modified to offset CO2-induced changes in global mean temperature, interhemispheric temperature asymmetry, and the equator-to-pole temperature gradient. In both examples, the "design" and "evaluation" models are state-of-the-art fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models.

  2. Venus In Situ Explorer Mission design using a mechanically deployed aerodynamic decelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B.; Venkatapathy, E.; Wercinski, P.; Yount, B.; Prabhu, D.; Gage, P.; Glaze, L.; Baker, C.

    The Venus In Situ Explorer (VISE) Mission addresses the highest priority science questions within the Venus community outlined in the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. The heritage Venus atmospheric entry system architecture, a 45° sphere-cone rigid aeroshell with a carbon phenolic thermal protection system, may no longer be the preferred entry system architecture compared to other viable alternatives being explored at NASA. A mechanically-deployed aerodynamic decelerator, known as the Adaptive Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT), is an entry system alternative that can provide key operational benefits and risk reduction compared to a rigid aeroshell. This paper describes a mission feasibility study performed with the objectives of identifying potential adverse interactions with other mission elements and establishing requirements on decelerator performance. Feasibility is assessed through a launch-to-landing mission design study where the Venus Intrepid Tessera Lander (VITaL), a VISE science payload designed to inform the Decadal Survey results, is repackaged from a rigid aeroshell into the ADEPT decelerator. It is shown that ADEPT reduces the deceleration load on VITaL by an order of magnitude relative to a rigid aeroshell. The more benign entry environment opens up the VISE mission design environment for increased science return, reduced risk, and reduced cost. The ADEPT-VITAL mission concept of operations is presented and details of the entry vehicle structures and mechanisms are given. Finally, entry aerothermal analysis is presented that defines the operational requirements for a revolutionary structural-TPS material employed by ADEPT: three-dimensionally woven carbon cloth. Ongoing work to mitigate key risks identified in this feasibility study is presented.

  3. Aerodynamics of Small Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas J.

    In this review we describe the aerodynamic problems that must be addressed in order to design a successful small aerial vehicle. The effects of Reynolds number and aspect ratio (AR) on the design and performance of fixed-wing vehicles are described. The boundary-layer behavior on airfoils is especially important in the design of vehicles in this flight regime. The results of a number of experimental boundary-layer studies, including the influence of laminar separation bubbles, are discussed. Several examples of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in this regime are described. Also, a brief survey of analytical models for oscillating and flapping-wing propulsion is presented. These range from the earliest examples where quasi-steady, attached flow is assumed, to those that account for the unsteady shed vortex wake as well as flow separation and aeroelastic behavior of a flapping wing. Experiments that complemented the analysis and led to the design of a successful ornithopter are also described.

  4. Common problems and pitfalls in gear design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.

    1986-01-01

    There are several pitfalls and problems associated with the successful design of a new gear transmission. A new design will require the knowledge and experience of several technical areas of engineering. Most of the pitfalls and problems associated with a new design are related to an inadequate evaluation of several areas, such as, the lubrication and cooling requirements, complete static and dynamic load analysis, evaluation of materials and heat treatment and the latest manufacturing technology. Some of the common problems of the gear design process are discussed with recommendations made for avoiding these conditions.

  5. Aerodynamic characteristics of a rotorcraft airfoil designed for the tip region of a main rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noonan, Kevin W.

    1991-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the 2-D aerodynamic characteristics of a new rotorcraft airfoil designed for application to the tip region (stations outboard of 85 pct. radius) of a helicopter main rotor blade. The new airfoil, the RC(6)-08, and a baseline airfoil, the RC(3)-08, were investigated in the Langley 6- by 28-inch transonic tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.37 to 0.90. The Reynolds number varied from 5.2 x 10(exp 6) at the lowest Mach number to 9.6 x 10(exp 6) at the highest Mach number. Some comparisons were made of the experimental data for the new airfoil and the predictions of a transonic, viscous analysis code. The results of the investigation indicate that the RC(6)-08 airfoil met the design goals of attaining higher maximum lift coefficients than the baseline airfoil while maintaining drag divergence characteristics at low lift and pitching moment characteristics nearly the same as those of the baseline airfoil. The maximum lift coefficients of the RC(6)-08 varied from 1.07 at M=0.37 to 0.94 at M=0.52 while those of the RC(3)-08 varied from 0.91 to 0.85 over the same Mach number range. At lift coefficients of -0.1 and 0, the drag divergence Mach number of both the RC(6)-08 and the RC(3)-08 was 0.86. The pitching moment coefficients of the RC(6)-08 were less negative than those of the RC(3)-08 for Mach numbers and lift coefficients typical of those that would occur on a main rotor blade tip at high forward speeds on the advancing side of the rotor disk.

  6. Vortex generator design for aircraft inlet distortion as a numerical optimization problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Levy, Ralph

    1991-01-01

    Aerodynamic compatibility of aircraft/inlet/engine systems is a difficult design problem for aircraft that must operate in many different flight regimes. Takeoff, subsonic cruise, supersonic cruise, transonic maneuvering, and high altitude loiter each place different constraints on inlet design. Vortex generators, small wing like sections mounted on the inside surfaces of the inlet duct, are used to control flow separation and engine face distortion. The design of vortex generator installations in an inlet is defined as a problem addressable by numerical optimization techniques. A performance parameter is suggested to account for both inlet distortion and total pressure loss at a series of design flight conditions. The resulting optimization problem is difficult since some of the design parameters take on integer values. If numerical procedures could be used to reduce multimillion dollar development test programs to a small set of verification tests, numerical optimization could have a significant impact on both cost and elapsed time to design new aircraft.

  7. The transonic Reynolds number problem. [limitations of transonic aerodynamic test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Problems in modeling the complex interacting flow fields in the transonic speed regime are reviewed. The limitations of wind tunnel test capabilities are identified, and options for resolving the deficiency are examined. The evolution of the National Transonic Facility, and the various needs for research investigations to be done there are discussed. The relative priorities that should be given within and across subdisciplines for guidance in planning for the most effective use of the facility are considered.

  8. Computational Design and Analysis of a Micro-Tab Based Aerodynamic Loads Control System for Lifting Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dam, C P; Nakafuji, D Y; Bauer, C; Chao, D; Standish, K

    2002-11-01

    A computational design and analysis of a microtab based aerodynamic loads control system is presented. The microtab consists of a small tab that emerges from a wing approximately perpendicular to its surface in the vicinity of its trailing edge. Tab deployment on the upper side of the wing causes a decrease in the lift generation whereas deployment on the pressure side causes an increase. The computational methods applied in the development of this concept solve the governing Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on structured, overset grids. The application of these methods to simulate the flows over lifting surface including the tabs has been paramount in the development of these devices. The numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the microtab and that it is possible to carry out a sensitivity analysis on the positioning and sizing of the tabs before they are implemented in successfully controlling the aerodynamic loads.

  9. Program Helps Decompose Complicated Design Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Time saved by intelligent decomposition into smaller, interrelated problems. DeMAID is knowledge-based software system for ordering sequence of modules and identifying possible multilevel structure for design problem. Displays modules in N x N matrix format. Requires investment of time to generate and refine list of modules for input, it saves considerable amount of money and time in total design process, particularly new design problems in which ordering of modules has not been defined. Program also implemented to examine assembly-line process or ordering of tasks and milestones.

  10. The Instructional Design Environment: Technology to Support Design Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirolli, Peter; Russell, Daniel M.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the Instructional Design Environment (IDE), a hypermedia system for designing and developing instructional material, including texts, interactive video disks, and intelligent tutoring systems. Highlights include the problem-solving nature of instructional design; other computer-based systems for instructional design; and the use of IDE…

  11. Design of control laws for flutter suppression based on the aerodynamic energy concept and comparisons with other design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, Eli

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic energy method is used to synthesize control laws for NASA's drone for aerodynamic and structural testing-aerodynamic research wing 1 (DAST-ARW1) mathematical model. The performance of these control laws in terms of closed-loop flutter dynamic pressure, control surface activity, and robustness is compared with other control laws that relate to the same model. A control law synthesis technique that makes use of the return difference singular values is developed. It is based on the aerodynamic energy approach and is shown to yield results that are superior to those results given in the literature and are based on optimal control theory. Nyquist plots are presented, together with a short discussion regarding the relative merits of the minimum singular value as a measure of robustness as compared with the more traditional measure involving phase and gain margins.

  12. External Boundary Conditions for Three-Dimensional Problems of Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, Semyon V.

    1997-01-01

    We consider an unbounded steady-state flow of viscous fluid over a three-dimensional finite body or configuration of bodies. For the purpose of solving this flow problem numerically, we discretize the governing equations (Navier-Stokes) on a finite-difference grid. The grid obviously cannot stretch from the body up to infinity, because the number of the discrete variables in that case would not be finite. Therefore, prior to the discretization we truncate the original unbounded flow domain by introducing some artificial computational boundary at a finite distance of the body. Typically, the artificial boundary is introduced in a natural way as the external boundary of the domain covered by the grid. The flow problem formulated only on the finite computational domain rather than on the original infinite domain is clearly subdefinite unless some artificial boundary conditions (ABC's) are specified at the external computational boundary. Similarly, the discretized flow problem is subdefinite (i.e., lacks equations with respect to unknowns) unless a special closing procedure is implemented at this artificial boundary. The closing procedure in the discrete case is called the ABC's as well. In this paper, we present an innovative approach to constructing highly accurate ABC's for three-dimensional flow computations. The approach extends our previous technique developed for the two-dimensional case; it employs the finite-difference counterparts to Calderon's pseudodifferential boundary projections calculated in the framework of the difference potentials method (DPM) by Ryaben'kii. The resulting ABC's appear spatially nonlocal but particularly easy to implement along with the existing solvers. The new boundary conditions have been successfully combined with the NASA-developed production code TLNS3D and used for the analysis of wing-shaped configurations in subsonic (including incompressible limit) and transonic flow regimes. As demonstrated by the computational experiments

  13. Ultra high tip speed (670.6 m/sec) fan stage with composite rotor: Aerodynamic and mechanical design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halle, J. E.; Burger, G. D.; Dundas, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    A highly loaded, single-stage compressor having a tip speed of 670.6 m/sec was designed for the purpose of investigating very high tip speeds and high aerodynamic loadings to obtain high stage pressure ratios at acceptable levels of efficiency. The design pressure ratio is 2.8 at an adiabatic efficiency of 84.4%. Corrected design flow is 83.4 kg/sec; corrected design speed is 15,200 rpm; and rotor inlet tip diameter is 0.853 m. The rotor uses multiple-circular-arc airfoils from 0 to 15% span, precompression airfoils assuming single, strong oblique shocks from 21 to 43% span, and precompression airfoils assuming multiple oblique shocks from 52% span to the tip. Because of the high tip speeds, the rotor blades are designed to be fabricated of composite materials. Two composite materials were investigated: Courtaulds HTS graphite fiber in a Kerimid 601 polyimide matrix and the same fibers in a PMR polyimide matrix. In addition to providing a description of the aerodynamic and mechanical design of the 670.0 m/sec fan, discussion is presented of the results of structural tests of blades fabricated with both types of matrices.

  14. Computation of radar cross section with the coupling of aerodynamic performance in a multidisciplinary design optimization of aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seng Muy

    The computation or prediction of plane wave scattering widths is one of the major design considerations of future aircraft and weapon systems. The control of scattering and penetration of electromagnetic waves is the primary objective of emerging low observable technology. The task in computing the electromagnetic backscattered field of an airframe structure is by no means a new endeavor. Whereas predicting a minimal backscattered field return under the manipulation of airframe geometry in the context of multidisciplinary design is considered the most prudent approach to obtain the optimal solution. The objective of this paper is to develop a mathematical method to couple the backscattered field with the defined aerodynamic performance constraints in the design process of future airframes. This paper will address the basic concept of integrating the radio frequency (RF) backscattered field or electromagnetic (EM) discipline with the Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) methodology. The development of the MDO system is complex and the result appears to be intractable and time consuming despite the availability of high-speed super computers. Due to the fact that many disciplines and analyses were implemented with various optimization methods and techniques, such as the Finite Element Method (FEM), Method of Moment (MoM), the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, the integration of multiple individual disciplines with various software coding formats would be the most difficult task. In spite of this expected challenge, this paper will address: (a) The effects and benefits of employing the EM discipline in MDO systems in preliminary configuration design of aircraft structure. (b) The criteria to minimize backscattered field return while maximizing aerodynamic performance and the methods of optimization, trade-off, and implementation. (c) The integration issue of electromagnetic discipline into the grand scheme of MDO. Furthermore, this paper explores the

  15. How Instructional Designers Solve Workplace Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Kathleen S.; Yamagata-Lynch, Lisa C.

    2013-01-01

    This naturalistic inquiry investigated how instructional designers engage in complex and ambiguous problem solving across organizational boundaries in two corporations. Participants represented a range of instructional design experience, from novices to experts. Research methods included a participant background survey, observations of…

  16. Off-design computer code for calculating the aerodynamic performance of axial-flow fans and compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, James F.

    1995-01-01

    An off-design axial-flow compressor code is presented and is available from COSMIC for predicting the aerodynamic performance maps of fans and compressors. Steady axisymmetric flow is assumed and the aerodynamic solution reduces to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. A streamline curvature method is used for calculating this flow-field outside the blade rows. This code allows for bleed flows and the first five stators can be reset for each rotational speed, capabilities which are necessary for large multistage compressors. The accuracy of the off-design performance predictions depend upon the validity of the flow loss and deviation correlation models. These empirical correlations for the flow loss and deviation are used to model the real flow effects and the off-design code will compute through small reverse flow regions. The input to this off-design code is fully described and a user's example case for a two-stage fan is included with complete input and output data sets. Also, a comparison of the off-design code predictions with experimental data is included which generally shows good agreement.

  17. Aerodynamic optimization studies on advanced architecture computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chawla, Kalpana

    1995-01-01

    The approach to carrying out multi-discipline aerospace design studies in the future, especially in massively parallel computing environments, comprises of choosing (1) suitable solvers to compute solutions to equations characterizing a discipline, and (2) efficient optimization methods. In addition, for aerodynamic optimization problems, (3) smart methodologies must be selected to modify the surface shape. In this research effort, a 'direct' optimization method is implemented on the Cray C-90 to improve aerodynamic design. It is coupled with an existing implicit Navier-Stokes solver, OVERFLOW, to compute flow solutions. The optimization method is chosen such that it can accomodate multi-discipline optimization in future computations. In the work , however, only single discipline aerodynamic optimization will be included.

  18. Aerodynamic performances of three fan stator designs operating with rotor having tip speed of 337 meters per second and pressure ratio of 1.54. 1: Experimental performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelder, T. F.

    1980-01-01

    The aerodynamic performances of four stator-blade rows are presented and evaluated. The aerodynamic designs of two of these stators were compromised to reduce noise, a third design was not. On a calculated operating line passing through the design point pressure ratio, the best stator had overall pressure-ratio and efficiency decrements of 0.031 and 0.044, respectively, providing a stage pressure ratio of 1.483 and efficiency of 0.865. The other stators showed some correctable deficiencies due partly to the design compromises for noise. In the end-wall regions blade-element losses were significantly less for the shortest chord studied.

  19. Aerodynamic coefficients and transformation tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Joseph S

    1918-01-01

    The problem of the transformation of numerical values expressed in one system of units into another set or system of units frequently arises in connection with aerodynamic problems. Report contains aerodynamic coefficients and conversion tables needed to facilitate such transformation. (author)

  20. Aerodynamic potpourri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic developments for vertical axis and horizontal axis wind turbines are given that relate to the performance and aerodynamic loading of these machines. Included are: (1) a fixed wake aerodynamic model of the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine; (2) experimental results that suggest the existence of a laminar flow Darrieus vertical axis turbine; (3) a simple aerodynamic model for the turbulent windmill/vortex ring state of horizontal axis rotors; and (4) a yawing moment of a rigid hub horizontal axis wind turbine that is related to blade coning.

  1. Aerodynamic potpourri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1981-05-01

    Aerodynamic developments for vertical axis and horizontal axis wind turbines are given that relate to the performance and aerodynamic loading of these machines. Included are: (1) a fixed wake aerodynamic model of the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine; (2) experimental results that suggest the existence of a laminar flow Darrieus vertical axis turbine; (3) a simple aerodynamic model for the turbulent windmill/vortex ring state of horizontal axis rotors; and (4) a yawing moment of a rigid hub horizontal axis wind turbine that is related to blade coning.

  2. Numerical investigation of the aerodynamic performance for the newly designed cavity vane type vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suffer, K. H.; Usubamatov, R.; Quadir, G. A.; Ismail, K. A.

    2015-05-01

    Research and development activities in the field of renewable energy, especially wind and solar, have been considerably increased, due to the worldwide energy crisis and high global emission. However, the available technical designs are not yet adequate to develop a reliable distributed wind energy converter for low wind speed conditions. The last few years have proved that Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs) are more suitable for urban areas than Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs). To date, very little has been published in this area to assess good performance and lifetime of VAWTs either in open or urban areas. The power generated by vertical axis wind turbines is strongly dependent on the aerodynamic performance of the turbines. The main goal of this current research is to investigate numerically the aerodynamic performance of a newly designed cavity type vertical axis wind turbine. In the current new design the power generated depends on the drag force generated by the individual blades and interactions between them in a rotating configuration. For numerical investigation, commercially available computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software GAMBIT and FLUENT were used. In this numerical analysis the Shear Stress Transport (SST) k-ω turbulence model is used which is better than the other turbulence models available as suggested by some researchers. The computed results show good agreement with published experimental results.

  3. Hydrodynamic and Aerodynamic Tests of Models of Flying-boat Hulls Designed Flow Aerodynamic Drag - NACA Models 74, 74-A, and 75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truscott, Starr; Parkinson, J B; Ebert, John W , Jr; Valentine, E Floyd

    1938-01-01

    The present tests illustrate how the aerodynamic drag of a flying boat hull may be reduced by following closely the form of a low drag aerodynamic body and the manner in which the extent of the aerodynamic refinement is limited by poorer hydrodynamic performance. This limit is not sharply defined but is first evidenced by an abnormal flow of water over certain parts of the form accompanied by a sharp increase in resistance. In the case of models 74-A and 75, the resistance (sticking) occurs only at certain combinations of speed, load, and trim and can be avoided by proper control of the trim at high water speeds. Model 75 has higher water resistance at very high speeds than does model 74-A. With constant speed propellers and high takeoff speeds, it appears that the form of model 75 would give slightly better takeoff performance. Model 74-A, however, has lower aerodynamic drag than does model 75 for the same volume of hull.

  4. Integrated network design and scheduling problems :

    SciTech Connect

    Nurre, Sarah G.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the class of integrated network design and scheduling problems. These problems focus on selecting and scheduling operations that will change the characteristics of a network, while being speci cally concerned with the performance of the network over time. Motivating applications of INDS problems include infrastructure restoration after extreme events and building humanitarian distribution supply chains. While similar models have been proposed, no one has performed an extensive review of INDS problems from their complexity, network and scheduling characteristics, information, and solution methods. We examine INDS problems under a parallel identical machine scheduling environment where the performance of the network is evaluated by solving classic network optimization problems. We classify that all considered INDS problems as NP-Hard and propose a novel heuristic dispatching rule algorithm that selects and schedules sets of arcs based on their interactions in the network. We present computational analysis based on realistic data sets representing the infrastructures of coastal New Hanover County, North Carolina, lower Manhattan, New York, and a realistic arti cial community CLARC County. These tests demonstrate the importance of a dispatching rule to arrive at near-optimal solutions during real-time decision making activities. We extend INDS problems to incorporate release dates which represent the earliest an operation can be performed and exible release dates through the introduction of specialized machine(s) that can perform work to move the release date earlier in time. An online optimization setting is explored where the release date of a component is not known.

  5. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  6. Design and Problem Solving in Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer, Rodney L.

    1999-01-01

    Collectively, technological literacy embraces everything from intelligent consumerism to concerns about environmental degradation, ethics, and elitism. Technological problem solving can have social, ecological, or technological goals and may be categorized by four types: invention, design, trouble shooting, and procedures. Every citizen should be…

  7. Aerodynamic design of a Coanda induced force and thruster anti-torque system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velkoff, Henry R.; Tung, Chee

    1991-01-01

    A general method of analysis of the external and internal aerodynamics of a generic Coanda induced circulation anti-torque system is presented. The technique gives moment about the yaw axis and download induced on the boom as well as the force developed by an aft jet. The external flows including downwash, wake swirl and the boom circulation are considered. The internal flow and losses through the duct, fan, blown slots, cascades and nozzle are considered on a step-by-step basis. Limited comparison is made with open data where available.

  8. Mathematical Optimization for Engineering Design Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandurand, Brian C.

    Applications in engineering design and the material sciences motivate the development of optimization theory in a manner that additionally draws from other branches of mathematics including the functional, complex, and numerical analyses. The first contribution, motivated by an automotive design application, extends multiobjective optimization theory under the assumption that the problem information is not available in its entirety to a single decision maker as traditionally assumed in the multiobjective optimization literature. Rather, the problem information and the design control are distributed among different decision makers. This requirement appears in the design of an automotive system whose subsystem components themselves correspond to highly involved design subproblems each of whose performance is measured by multiple criteria. This leads to a system/subsystem interaction requiring a coordination whose algorithmic foundation is developed and rigorously examined mathematically. The second contribution develops and analyzes a parameter estimation approach motivated from a time domain modeling problem in the material sciences. In addition to drawing from the theory of least-squares optimization and numerical analysis, the development of a mathematical foundation for comparing a baseline parameter estimation approach with an alternative parameter estimation approach relies on theory from both the functional and complex analyses. The application of the developed theory and algorithms associated with both contributions is also discussed.

  9. Wireless device connection problems and design solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ji-Won; Norman, Donald; Nam, Tek-Jin; Qin, Shengfeng

    2016-09-01

    Users, especially the non-expert users, commonly experience problems when connecting multiple devices with interoperability. While studies on multiple device connections are mostly concentrated on spontaneous device association techniques with a focus on security aspects, the research on user interaction for device connection is still limited. More research into understanding people is needed for designers to devise usable techniques. This research applies the Research-through-Design method and studies the non-expert users' interactions in establishing wireless connections between devices. The "Learning from Examples" concept is adopted to develop a study focus line by learning from the expert users' interaction with devices. This focus line is then used for guiding researchers to explore the non-expert users' difficulties at each stage of the focus line. Finally, the Research-through-Design approach is used to understand the users' difficulties, gain insights to design problems and suggest usable solutions. When connecting a device, the user is required to manage not only the device's functionality but also the interaction between devices. Based on learning from failures, an important insight is found that the existing design approach to improve single-device interaction issues, such as improvements to graphical user interfaces or computer guidance, cannot help users to handle problems between multiple devices. This study finally proposes a desirable user-device interaction in which images of two devices function together with a system image to provide the user with feedback on the status of the connection, which allows them to infer any required actions.

  10. Assessment of two fast codes used for preliminary aerodynamic design of guided projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhail, Ameer G.

    1986-07-01

    Two missile aerodynamic prediction fast codes, namely NSWCAP and Missile-DATCOM, have been applied to the geometry of the guided, gun-launched Copperhead projectile. Assessment of the two codes was made in comparison with wind tunnel and free-flight range test data. Two configurations were considered for computation: the launch configuration (body-tail) in the Mach range of 0.5 to 1.8 and the maneuvering configuration (body-wing-tail) in the Mach range of 0.3 to 0.95. Results show reasonable agreement for the drag coefficient, C sub D, and show very large disagreements for both C sub N sub alpha and C sub M sub alpha. The incapability of both codes to include body slots and fin gap effects seems to have contributed largely to these differences. The dynamic derivatives C sub l sub p and (C sub M sub q + C sub M sub alpha) are not adequately estimated by the NSWCAP code, and are not calculated in the DATCOM code. For the coefficients actually computed, the DATCOM code results were slightly more accurate than those of the NSWCAP code. Both codes lack the determination of the explicit effects of control surface deflection angles on the aerodynamic coefficients. Development is needed for the determination if both codes are to be used for predictions for guided projectiles. Several areas of improvements in both codes are identified.

  11. Lobed Mixer Design for Noise Suppression: Plume, Aerodynamic and Acoustic Data. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Baker, V. David; Dalton, William N.; Bridges, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive database for the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several model-scale lobe mixers of bypass ratio 5 to 6 has been created for mixed jet speeds up to 1080 ft per s at typical take-off (TO) conditions of small-to-medium turbofan engines. The flight effect was simulated for Mach numbers up to 0.3. The static thrust performance and plume data were also obtained at typical TO and cruise conditions. The tests were done at NASA Lewis anechoic dome and ASE's FluiDyne Laboratories. The effect of several lobe mixer and nozzle parameters, such as, lobe scalloping, lobe count, lobe penetration and nozzle length was examined in terms of flyover noise at constant altitude and also noise in the reference frame of the nozzle. This volume is divided into three parts: in the first two parts, we collate the plume survey data in graphical form (line, contour and surface plots) and analyze it; in part 3, we tabulate the aerodynamic data for the acoustics tests and the acoustic data in one-third octave band levels.

  12. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 13 percent thick medium speed airfoil designed for general aviation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghee, R. J.; Beasley, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to determine the low speed, two dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of a 13percent thick medium speed airfoil designed for general aviation applications. The results were compared with data for the 13 percent thick low speed airfoil. The tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.10 to 0.32, a chord Reynolds number range from 2.0 x 10 to the 6th power to 12.0 x 10 to the 6th power, and an angle of attack frange from about -8 deg to 10 deg. The objective of retaining good high-lift low speed characteristics for an airfoil designed to have good medium speed cruise performance was achieved.

  13. Efficient algorithms for future aircraft design: Contributions to aerodynamic shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicken, Jason Edward

    Advances in numerical optimization have raised the possibility that efficient and novel aircraft configurations may be "discovered" by an algorithm. To begin exploring this possibility, a fast and robust set of tools for aerodynamic shape optimization is developed. Parameterization and mesh-movement are integrated to accommodate large changes in the geometry. This integrated approach uses a coarse B-spline control grid to represent the geometry and move the computational mesh; consequently, the mesh-movement algorithm is two to three orders faster than a node-based linear elasticity approach, without compromising mesh quality. Aerodynamic analysis is performed using a flow solver for the Euler equations. The governing equations are discretized using summation-by-parts finite-difference operators and simultaneous approximation terms, which permit C0 mesh continuity at block interfaces. The discretization results in a set of nonlinear algebraic equations, which are solved using an efficient parallel Newton-Krylov-Schur strategy. A gradient-based optimization algorithm is adopted. The gradient is evaluated using adjoint variables for the flow and mesh equations in a sequential approach. The flow adjoint equations are solved using a novel variant of the Krylov solver GCROT. This variant of GCROT is flexible to take advantage of non-stationary preconditioners and is shown to outperform restarted flexible GMRES. The aerodynamic optimizer is applied to several studies of induced-drag minimization. An elliptical lift distribution is recovered by varying spanwise twist, thereby validating the algorithm. Planform optimization based on the Euler equations produces a nonelliptical lift distribution, in contrast with the predictions of lifting-line theory. A study of spanwise vertical shape optimization confirms that a winglet-up configuration is more efficient than a winglet-down configuration. A split-tip geometry is used to explore nonlinear wake-wing interactions: the

  14. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using Hybridized Differential Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2003-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses an evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution (DE) in conjunction with various hybridization strategies is described. DE is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Various hybridization strategies for DE are explored, including the use of neural networks as well as traditional local search methods. A Navier-Stokes solver is used to evaluate the various intermediate designs and provide inputs to the hybrid DE optimizer. The method is implemented on distributed parallel computers so that new designs can be obtained within reasonable turnaround times. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine. (The final paper will include at least one other aerodynamic design application). The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated.

  15. Aerodynamic characteristics of the ventilated design for flapping wing micro air vehicle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G Q; Yu, S C M

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by superior flight performance of natural flight masters like birds and insects and based on the ventilating flaps that can be opened and closed by the changing air pressure around the wing, a new flapping wing type has been proposed. It is known that the net lift force generated by a solid wing in a flapping cycle is nearly zero. However, for the case of the ventilated wing, results for the net lift force are positive which is due to the effect created by the "ventilation" in reducing negative lift force during the upstroke. The presence of moving flaps can serve as the variable in which, through careful control of the areas, a correlation with the decrease in negative lift can be generated. The corresponding aerodynamic characteristics have been investigated numerically by using different flapping frequencies and forward flight speeds. PMID:24683339

  16. Aerodynamic Characteristics of the Ventilated Design for Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, G. Q.; Yu, S. C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by superior flight performance of natural flight masters like birds and insects and based on the ventilating flaps that can be opened and closed by the changing air pressure around the wing, a new flapping wing type has been proposed. It is known that the net lift force generated by a solid wing in a flapping cycle is nearly zero. However, for the case of the ventilated wing, results for the net lift force are positive which is due to the effect created by the “ventilation” in reducing negative lift force during the upstroke. The presence of moving flaps can serve as the variable in which, through careful control of the areas, a correlation with the decrease in negative lift can be generated. The corresponding aerodynamic characteristics have been investigated numerically by using different flapping frequencies and forward flight speeds. PMID:24683339

  17. The design of fibre-reinforced composite blades for passive and active wind turbine rotor aerodynamic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaolis, Nicos M.

    An alternative method of varying the pitch of wind turbine rotor blades is examined, which relies on the use of fiber reinforced composite materials to design the blades so as to develop elastic coupling between an applied load of a generally twisting and non-twisting nature. With such an approach, twist can be obtained either by using one of the forces experienced by the blade during operation to alter passively the blade pitch, or by internal pressurization to control actively the blade pitch by varying the pressure. The passive control option is considered in detail. First the relevant composite construction geometries that produce the desired coupling effect are identified and then a theoretical model is developed. This is also used to explore the variation in coupling and stiffness properties with the fiber orientation. Various materials are considered including glass, aramid, and carbon fiber epoxy composites. Subsequently, the structural model is confirmed experimentally by a series of tests on composite, foam-cored beams specially designed and manufactured for this purpose. It is then combined with existing aerodynamic theories in order to model the performance of horizontal and vertical axis rotors employing such blades. The effect of passively induced twist on the aerodynamic performance is examined both theoretically and experimentally. Additionally, a simplified dynamic model is developed to obtain a general idea on how built-in elastic coupling may affect the dynamic stability of a horizontal axis rotor system. The active control option is considered in general as an alternative mechanism of inducing twist. The relevant theory is derived and illustrated with examples, and the realistic practicability of this concept is discussed. To validate the theory, a composite cylindrical shell has been designed, manufactured and tested under pressure.

  18. Applied computational aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The present volume discusses the original development of the panel method, the mapping solutions and singularity distributions of linear potential schemes, the capabilities of full-potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes schemes, the use of the grid-generation methodology in applied aerodynamics, subsonic airfoil design, inverse airfoil design for transonic applications, the divergent trailing-edge airfoil innovation in CFD, Euler and potential computational results for selected aerodynamic configurations, and the application of CFD to wing high-lift systems. Also discussed are high-lift wing modifications for an advanced-capability EA-6B aircraft, Navier-Stokes methods for internal and integrated propulsion system flow predictions, the use of zonal techniques for analysis of rotor-stator interaction, CFD applications to complex configurations, CFD applications in component aerodynamic design of the V-22, Navier-Stokes computations of a complete F-16, CFD at supersonic/hypersonic speeds, and future CFD developments.

  19. The metric-restricted inverse design problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Amit; Lewicka, Marta; Pakzad, Mohammad Reza

    2016-06-01

    We study a class of design problems in solid mechanics, leading to a variation on the classical question of equi-dimensional embeddability of Riemannian manifolds. In this general new context, we derive a necessary and sufficient existence condition, given through a system of total differential equations, and discuss its integrability. In the classical context, the same approach yields conditions of immersibility of a given metric in terms of the Riemann curvature tensor. In the present situation, the equations do not close in a straightforward manner, and successive differentiation of the compatibility conditions leads to a new algebraic description of integrability. We also recast the problem in a variational setting and analyze the infimum of the appropriate incompatibility energy, resembling the non-Euclidean elasticity. We then derive a Γ -convergence result for dimension reduction from 3d to 2d in the Kirchhoff energy scaling regime.

  20. Modeling of pulverized coal combustion processes in a vortex furnace of improved design. Part 1: Flow aerodynamics in a vortex furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasinsky, D. V.; Salomatov, V. V.; Anufriev, I. S.; Sharypov, O. V.; Shadrin, E. Yu.; Anikin, Yu. A.

    2015-02-01

    Some results of the complex experimental and numerical study of aerodynamics and transfer processes in a vortex furnace, whose design was improved via the distributed tangential injection of fuel-air flows through the upper and lower burners, were presented. The experimental study of the aerodynamic characteristics of a spatial turbulent flow was performed on the isothermal laboratory model (at a scale of 1 : 20) of an improved vortex furnace using a laser Doppler measurement system. The comparison of experimental data with the results of the numerical modeling of an isothermal flow for the same laboratory furnace model demonstrated their agreement to be acceptable for engineering practice.

  1. Application of CAD/CAE class systems to aerodynamic analysis of electric race cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, L.; Baier, A.; Buchacz, A.; Majzner, M.; Sobek, M.

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamics is one of the most important factors which influence on every aspect of a design of a car and car driving parameters. The biggest influence aerodynamics has on design of a shape of a race car body, especially when the main objective of the race is the longest distance driven in period of time, which can not be achieved without low energy consumption and low drag of a car. Designing shape of the vehicle body that must generate the lowest possible drag force, without compromising the other parameters of the drive. In the article entitled „Application of CAD/CAE class systems to aerodynamic analysis of electric race cars” are being presented problems solved by computer analysis of cars aerodynamics and free form modelling. Analysis have been subjected to existing race car of a Silesian Greenpower Race Team. On a basis of results of analysis of existence of Kammback aerodynamic effect innovative car body were modeled. Afterwards aerodynamic analysis were performed to verify existence of aerodynamic effect for innovative shape and to recognize aerodynamics parameters of the shape. Analysis results in the values of coefficients and aerodynamic drag forces. The resulting drag forces Fx, drag coefficients Cx(Cd) and aerodynamic factors Cx*A allowed to compare all of the shapes to each other. Pressure distribution, air velocities and streams courses were useful in determining aerodynamic features of analyzed shape. For aerodynamic tests was used Ansys Fluent CFD software. In a paper the ways of surface modeling with usage of Realize Shape module and classic surface modeling were presented. For shapes modeling Siemens NX 9.0 software was used. Obtained results were used to estimation of existing shapes and to make appropriate conclusions.

  2. Distributed memory compiler design for sparse problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Janet; Saltz, Joel; Berryman, Harry; Hiranandani, Seema

    1991-01-01

    A compiler and runtime support mechanism is described and demonstrated. The methods presented are capable of solving a wide range of sparse and unstructured problems in scientific computing. The compiler takes as input a FORTRAN 77 program enhanced with specifications for distributing data, and the compiler outputs a message passing program that runs on a distributed memory computer. The runtime support for this compiler is a library of primitives designed to efficiently support irregular patterns of distributed array accesses and irregular distributed array partitions. A variety of Intel iPSC/860 performance results obtained through the use of this compiler are presented.

  3. Airframe noise: A design and operating problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A critical assessment of the state of the art in airframe noise is presented. Full-scale data on the intensity, spectra, and directivity of this noise source are evaluated in light of the comprehensive theory developed by Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings. Vibration of panels on the aircraft is identified as a possible additional source of airframe noise. The present understanding and methods for prediction of other component sources - airfoils, struts, and cavities - are discussed. Operating problems associated with airframe noise as well as potential design methods for airframe noise reduction are identified.

  4. The application of aerodynamic uncertainties in the design of the entry trajectory and flight control system of the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The process used in the application of aerodynamic uncertainties for the design and verification of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Entry Flight Control System is presented. The uncertainties were used to help set center of gravity, angle of attack and dynamic pressure lateral control divergence parameter as well as C sub n sub beta dynamic were instrumental in setting these placards.

  5. Design problems of large space mirror radiotelescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvamichava, A. S.; Buiakas, V. I.; Kardashev, N. S.; Melnikov, N. P.; Sokolov, A. S.; Tsarevskii, G. S.; Usiukin, V. I.

    1981-04-01

    It is noted that large space antennas can solve problems of theoretical and practical importance. Large-diameter (tens or hundreds of meters) mirror antennas have been designed to use an automatically deployed truss frame as a base onto which the radio-reflecting surface is pulled (long-wave version) or on which controllable panels are mounted (short-wave version). The reasons why antennas of mm range can be promptly developed are discussed. Consideration is given to the factors that influence the precision of the reflecting surface of the space antenna, that is technological errors during the process of frame manufacture, technological errors during the manufacture of the reflecting surface, and deformation arising from thermal or force effects. The need to design antennas with automatic control of the reflecting surface in order to operate in the mm wavelength range is stressed.

  6. Lobed Mixer Design for Noise Suppression Acoustic and Aerodynamic Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Dalton, William N.; Boyd, Kathleen (Technical Monitor); Bridges, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive database for the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several model-scale lobe mixers of bypass ratio 5 to 6 has been created for mixed jet speeds up to 1080 ft/s at typical take-off (TO) conditions of small-to-medium turbofan engines. The flight effect was simulated for Mach numbers up to 0.3. The static thrust performance and plume data were also obtained at typical TO and cruise conditions. The tests were done at NASA Lewis anechoic dome and ASK's FluiDyne Laboratories. The effect of several lobe mixer and nozzle parameters, such as, lobe scalloping, lobe count, lobe penetration and nozzle length was examined in terms of flyover noise at constant altitude. Sound in the nozzle reference frame was analyzed to understand the source characteristics. Several new concepts, mechanisms and methods are reported for such lobed mixers, such as, "boomerang" scallops, "tongue" mixer, detection of "excess" internal noise sources, and extrapolation of flyover noise data from one flight speed to different flight speeds. Noise reduction of as much as 3 EPNdB was found with a deeply scalloped mixer compared to annular nozzle at net thrust levels of 9500 lb for a 29 in. diameter nozzle after optimizing the nozzle length.

  7. Geometry Control System for Exploratory Shape Optimization Applied to High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Design of Unconventional Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Hugo

    This thesis represents a step forward to bring geometry parameterization and control on par with the disciplinary analyses involved in shape optimization, particularly high-fidelity aerodynamic shape optimization. Central to the proposed methodology is the non-uniform rational B-spline, used here to develop a new geometry generator and geometry control system applicable to the aerodynamic design of both conventional and unconventional aircraft. The geometry generator adopts a component-based approach, where any number of predefined but modifiable (parametric) wing, fuselage, junction, etc., components can be arbitrarily assembled to generate the outer mold line of aircraft geometry. A unique Python-based user interface incorporating an interactive OpenGL windowing system is proposed. Together, these tools allow for the generation of high-quality, C2 continuous (or higher), and customized aircraft geometry with fast turnaround. The geometry control system tightly integrates shape parameterization with volume mesh movement using a two-level free-form deformation approach. The framework is augmented with axial curves, which are shown to be flexible and efficient at parameterizing wing systems of arbitrary topology. A key aspect of this methodology is that very large shape deformations can be achieved with only a few, intuitive control parameters. Shape deformation consumes a few tenths of a second on a single processor and surface sensitivities are machine accurate. The geometry control system is implemented within an existing aerodynamic optimizer comprising a flow solver for the Euler equations and a sequential quadratic programming optimizer. Gradients are evaluated exactly with discrete-adjoint variables. The algorithm is first validated by recovering an elliptical lift distribution on a rectangular wing, and then demonstrated through the exploratory shape optimization of a three-pronged feathered winglet leading to a span efficiency of 1.22 under a height

  8. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE): The aerodynamic and mechanical design of the QCSEE under-the-wing fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of two experimental high bypass geared turbofan engines and propulsion systems for short haul passenger aircraft are described. The aerodynamic and mechanical design of a variable pitch 1.34 pressure ratio fan for the under the wing (UTW) engine are included. The UTW fan was designed to permit rotation of the 18 composite fan blades into the reverse thrust mode of operation through both flat pitch and stall pitch directions.

  9. Aerodynamic performance of conventional and advanced design labyrinth seals with solid-smooth abradable, and honeycomb lands. [gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, H. L.; Cox, D. M.; Holle, G. F.

    1977-01-01

    Labyrinth air seal static and dynamic performance was evaluated using solid, abradable, and honeycomb lands with standard and advanced seal designs. The effects on leakage of land surface roughness, abradable land porosity, rub grooves in abradable lands, and honeycomb land cell size and depth were studied using a standard labyrinth seal. The effects of rotation on the optimum seal knife pitch were also investigated. Selected geometric and aerodynamic parameters for an advanced seal design were evaluated to derive an optimized performance configuration. The rotational energy requirements were also measured to determine the inherent friction and pumping energy absorbed by the various seal knife and land configurations tested in order to properly assess the net seal system performance level. Results indicate that: (1) seal leakage can be significantly affected with honeycomb or abradable lands; (2) rotational energy absorption does not vary significantly with the use of a solid-smooth, an abradable, or a honeycomb land; and (3) optimization of an advanced lab seal design produced a configuration that had leakage 25% below a conventional stepped seal.

  10. Numerical methods and a computer program for subsonic and supersonic aerodynamic design and analysis of wings with attainable thrust considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.; Walkley, K. B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes methodology and an associated computer program for the design of wing lifting surfaces with attainable thrust taken into consideration. The approach is based on the determination of an optimum combination of a series of candidate surfaces rather than the more commonly used candidate loadings. Special leading-edge surfaces are selected to provide distributed leading-edge thrust forces which compensate for any failure to achieve the full theoretical leading-edge thrust, and a second series of general candidate surfaces is selected to minimize drag subject to constraints on the lift coefficient and, if desired, on the pitching moment coefficient. A primary purpose of the design approach is the introduction of attainable leading-edge thrust considerations so that relatively mild camber surfaces may be employed in the achievement of aerodynamic efficiencies comparable to those attainable if full theoretical leading-edge thrust could be achieved. The program provides an analysis as well as a design capability and is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic flow.

  11. Preliminary Low-Speed Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Some Aspects of the Aerodynamic Problems Associated with Missiles Carried Externally in Positions Near Airplane Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, William J., Jr.; Silvers, H. Norman; King, Thomas J., Jr.

    1954-01-01

    A low-speed wind-tunnel investigation has been made of some aspects of the aerodynamic problems associated with the use of air-to-air missiles when carried externally on aircraft. Measurements of the forces and moments on a missile model for a range of positions under the mid-semispan location of a 45deg sweptback wing indicated longitudinal and lateral forces with regard to both carriage and release of the missiles. Surveys of the characteristics of the flow field in the region likely to be traversed by the missiles showed abrupt gradients in both flow angularity and in local dynamic pressure. Through the use of aerodynamic data on the isolated missile and the measured flow-field characteristics, the longitudinal forces and moments acting on the missile while in the presence of the wing-fuselage combination could be estimated with fair accuracy. Although the lateral forces and moments predicted were qualitatively correct, there existed some large discrepancies in absolute magnitude.

  12. Strain measurement of objects subjected to aerodynamic heating using digital image correlation: experimental design and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Jiang, Tianyun; Wu, Dafang

    2014-11-01

    In thermomechanical testing of hypersonic materials and structures, direct observation and quantitative strain measurement of the front surface of a test specimen directly exposed to severe aerodynamic heating has been considered as a very challenging task. In this work, a novel quartz infrared heating device with an observation window is designed to reproduce the transient thermal environment experienced by hypersonic vehicles. The specially designed experimental system allows the capture of test article's surface images at various temperatures using an optical system outfitted with a bandpass filter. The captured images are post-processed by digital image correlation to extract full-field thermal deformation. To verify the viability and accuracy of the established system, thermal strains of a chromiumnickel austenite stainless steel sample heated from room temperature up to 600 °C were determined. The preliminary results indicate that the air disturbance between the camera and the specimen due to heat haze induces apparent distortions in the recorded images and large errors in the measured strains, but the average values of the measured strains are accurate enough. Limitations and further improvements of the proposed technique are discussed.

  13. Strain measurement of objects subjected to aerodynamic heating using digital image correlation: experimental design and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Jiang, Tianyun; Wu, Dafang

    2014-11-01

    In thermomechanical testing of hypersonic materials and structures, direct observation and quantitative strain measurement of the front surface of a test specimen directly exposed to severe aerodynamic heating has been considered as a very challenging task. In this work, a novel quartz infrared heating device with an observation window is designed to reproduce the transient thermal environment experienced by hypersonic vehicles. The specially designed experimental system allows the capture of test article's surface images at various temperatures using an optical system outfitted with a bandpass filter. The captured images are post-processed by digital image correlation to extract full-field thermal deformation. To verify the viability and accuracy of the established system, thermal strains of a chromiumnickel austenite stainless steel sample heated from room temperature up to 600 °C were determined. The preliminary results indicate that the air disturbance between the camera and the specimen due to heat haze induces apparent distortions in the recorded images and large errors in the measured strains, but the average values of the measured strains are accurate enough. Limitations and further improvements of the proposed technique are discussed. PMID:25430144

  14. An analytical framework for the design and comparative analysis of galloping energy harvesters under quasi-steady aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibo, Amin; Daqaq, Mohammed F.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a generalized formulation, analysis, and optimization of energy harvesters subjected to galloping and base excitations. The harvester consists of a cantilever beam with a bluff body attached at the free end. A nondimensional lumped-parameter model which accounts for the combined loading and different electro-mechanical transduction mechanisms is presented. The aerodynamic loading is modeled using the quasi-steady assumption with polynomial approximation. A nonlinear analysis is carried out and an approximate analytical solution is obtained. A dimensional analysis is performed to identify the important parameters that affect the system's response. The analysis of the response is divided into two parts. The first treats a harvester subjected to only galloping excitations. It is shown that, for a given shape of the bluff body and under quasi-steady flow conditions, the harvester's dimensionless response can be described by a single universal curve irrespective to the geometric, mechanical, and electrical design parameters of the harvester. In the second part, a harvester under concurrent galloping and base excitations is analyzed. It is shown that, the total output power depends on three dimensionless loading parameters; wind speed, base excitation amplitude, and excitation frequency. The response curves of the harvester are generated in terms of the loading parameters. These curves can serve as a complete design guide for scaling and optimizing the performance of galloping-based harvesters.

  15. Designing Tools for Reflection on Problem-Based Instruction and Problem-Based Instructional Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefer, Matthew W.; Hui, Diane; RuffusDoerr, Amy Marie

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research project into teacher education was to document the collaborative development and refection on teachers' tools in a problem-based learning (PBL) program. These results were then used to design materials and formats for the transmission of this teaching knowledge to less-experienced PBL teachers. The tools were…

  16. Problems of radome design for modern airborne radar. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulf, B.

    1985-05-01

    Solution techniques devised for designing aircraft radomes, particularly AWACS and nose mounts, are presented. Consideration is given to the range of the angles of incidence and the ratio between polarization over the radome area. Methods are defined for selecting optimal ratios for the radome emitting/receiving segments, thus simultaneously controlling reflection and transmission effects. Nose radomes are primarily aerodynamic structures and thereby possess incidence angles of up to 80 deg. Reflected power is calculated with geometric optics. Both types of radome are constructed of carbon composite sandwich structures, which minimize reflection sufficiently to justify doubled costs.

  17. Toward a Design Theory of Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H.

    2000-01-01

    Proposes a metatheory of problem solving. Describes differences among problems in terms of their structured ness, domain specificity (abstractness), and complexity; describes individual differences that affect problem solving; and presents a typology of problems, each of which engages different cognitive, affective, and conative process and…

  18. A review of 50 years of aerodynamic research with NACA/NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    1994-01-01

    Continuous improvements in flight systems have occurred over the past 50 years due, in part, to continuous improvements in aerodynamic research techniques and capabilities. This paper traces that research from the first-hand perspective of the author who, beginning in 1944, has taken part in the NACA/NASA aerodynamic research effort through studies in low-speed wind tunnels, high-speed subsonic tunnels, transonic tunnels, supersonic tunnels, and hypersonic tunnels. New problems were found as systems advanced from low-speed propeller-driven designs to more sophisticated high-speed jet- and rocket-propelled designs. The paper reviews some of these problems and reflects on some of the solutions that have been developed in the course of various aerodynamic research programs in the past. Some of the factors, both technical and nontechnical, that have influenced the aerodynamic design, research, and development of various flight systems will be mentioned.

  19. Aerodynamic design of turbomachinery blading in three-dimensional flow - An application to radial inflow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Y. L.; Tan, C. S.; Hawthorne, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    A computational method, based on a theory for turbomachinery blading design in three-dimensional inviscid flow, is applied to a parametric design study of a radial inflow turbine wheel. As the method requires the specification of swirl distribution, a technique for its smooth generation within the blade region is proposed. Excellent agreements have been obtained between the computed results from this design method and those from direct Euler computations, demonstrating the correspondence and consistency between the two. The computed results indicate the sensitivity of the pressure distribution to a lean in the stacking axis and a minor alteration in the hub/shroud profiles. Analysis based on Navier-Stokes solver shows no breakdown of flow within the designed blade passage and agreement with that from design calculation; thus the flow in the designed turbine rotor closely approximates that of an inviscid one. These calculations illustrate the use of a design method coupled to an analysis tool for establishing guidelines and criteria for designing turbomachinery blading.

  20. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied transonic aerodynamic wing design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1989-01-01

    An inverse wing design method was developed around an existing transonic wing analysis code. The original analysis code, TAWFIVE, has as its core the numerical potential flow solver, FLO30, developed by Jameson and Caughey. Features of the analysis code include a finite-volume formulation; wing and fuselage fitted, curvilinear grid mesh; and a viscous boundary layer correction that also accounts for viscous wake thickness and curvature. The development of the inverse methods as an extension of previous methods existing for design in Cartesian coordinates is presented. Results are shown for inviscid wing design cases in super-critical flow regimes. The test cases selected also demonstrate the versatility of the design method in designing an entire wing or discontinuous sections of a wing.

  1. High-Tip-Speed, Low-Loading Transonic Fan Stage. Part 1: Aerodynamic and Mechanical Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, L. C.; Vitale, N. G.; Ware, T. C.; Erwin, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A high-tip-speed, low-loading transonic fan stage was designed to deliver an overall pressure ratio of 1.5 with an adiabatic efficiency of 86 percent. The design flow per unit annulus area is 42.0 pounds per square foot. The fan features a hub/tip ratio of 0.46, a tip diameter of 28.74 in. and operates at a design tip speed of 1600 fps. For these design conditions, the rotor blade tip region operates with supersonic inlet and supersonic discharge relative velocities. A sophisticated quasi-three-dimensional characteristic section design procedure was used for the all-supersonic sections and the inlet of the midspan transonic sections. For regions where the relative outlet velocities are supersonic, the blade operates with weak oblique shocks only.

  2. Study of blade aspect ratio on a compressor front stage aerodynamic and mechanical design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, G. D.; Lee, D.; Snow, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    A single stage compressor was designed with the intent of demonstrating that, for a tip speed and hub-tip ratio typical of an advanced core compressor front stage, the use of low aspect ratio can permit high levels of blade loading to be achieved at an acceptable level of efficiency. The design pressure ratio is 1.8 at an adiabatic efficiency of 88.5 percent. Both rotor and stator have multiple-circular-arc airfoil sections. Variable IGV and stator vanes permit low speed matching adjustments. The design incorporates an inlet duct representative of an engine transition duct between fan and high pressure compressor.

  3. A system for aerodynamic design and analysis of supersonic aircraft. Part 3: Computer program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, W. D.; Lundry, J. L.; Coleman, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    The computer program documentation for the design and analysis of supersonic configurations is presented. Schematics and block diagrams of the major program structure, together with subroutine descriptions for each module are included.

  4. Study of controlled diffusion stator blading. 1. Aerodynamic and mechanical design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canal, E.; Chisholm, B. C.; Lee, D.; Spear, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Pratt & Whitney Aircraft is conducting a test program for NASA in order to demonstrate that a controlled-diffusion stator provides low losses at high loadings and Mach numbers. The technology has shown great promise in wind tunnel tests. Details of the design of the controlled diffusion stator vanes and the multiple-circular-arc rotor blades are presented. The stage, including stator and rotor, was designed to be suitable for the first-stage of an advanced multistage, high-pressure compressor.

  5. Functional design specification for the problem data system. [space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boatman, T. W.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the Functional Design Specification is to outline the design for the Problem Data System. The Problem Data System is a computer-based data management system designed to track the status of problems and corrective actions pertinent to space shuttle hardware.

  6. Supersonic aerodynamic trade data for a low-profile monoplanar missile concept. [air launched maneuvering missile design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, E. B.; Robins, A. W.

    1979-01-01

    A monoplanar missile concept has been studied which shows promise of improving the aerodynamic performance of air-launched missiles. This missile concept has a constant eccentricity elliptical cross-section body. Since current guidance and propulsion technologies influence missile nose and base shapes, an experimental investigation has been conducted at Mach number 2.50 to determine the effects of variations in these shapes on the missile aerodynamics. Results of these tests are presented.

  7. An aerodynamic investigation of two 1.83-meter-diameter fan systems designed to drive a subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, V. R.; Eckert, W. T.; Mort, K. W.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental, aerodynamic investigation was made of two 1.83 m diameter fan systems which are being considered for the repowered drive section of the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. One system was low speed, the other was high speed. The low speed fan was tested at various stagger angles from 32.9 deg to 62.9 deg. At a fan blade stagger angle of 40.8 deg and operating at a tip speed of 1155 m/sec, the low speed fan developed 207.3 m of head. The high speed fan had a design blade stagger angle of 56.2 deg and was tested at this stagger angle only. The high speed fan operating at 191.5 m/sec developed 207.3 m of head. Radial distributions of static pressure coefficients, total pressure coefficients, and angles of swirl are presented. Radial surveys were conducted at four azimuth locations in front of the fan, and repeated downstream of the fan. Data were taken for various flow control devices and for two inlet contraction lengths.

  8. Two stage low noise advanced technology fan. 1: Aerodynamic, structural, and acoustic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, H. E.; Ruschak, J. T.; Sofrin, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    A two-stage fan was designed to reduce noise 20 db below current requirements. The first-stage rotor has a design tip speed of 365.8 m/sec and a hub/tip ratio of 0.4. The fan was designed to deliver a pressure ratio of 1.9 with an adiabatic efficiency of 85.3 percent at a specific inlet corrected flow of 209.2kg/sec/sq m. Noise reduction devices include acoustically treated casing walls, a flowpath exit acoustic splitter, a translating centerbody sonic inlet device, widely spaced blade rows, and the proper ratio of blades and vanes. Multiple-circular-arc rotor airfoils, resettable stators, split outer casings, and capability to go to close blade-row spacing are also included.

  9. Aerodynamics of Race Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, suspension, road, aerodynamics, and of course the driver. In recent years, however, vehicle aerodynamics gained increased attention, mainly due to the utilization of the negative lift (downforce) principle, yielding several important performance improvements. This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic downforce and how it improves race car performance. After this short introduction various methods to generate downforce such as inverted wings, diffusers, and vortex generators are discussed. Due to the complex geometry of these vehicles, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flows and lifting surface shapes unlike traditional airplane wings. Typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development, are discussed as well. In spite of the tremendous progress of these design tools (due to better instrumentation, communication, and computational power), the fluid dynamic phenomenon is still highly nonlinear, and predicting the effect of a particular modification is not always trouble free. Several examples covering a wide range of vehicle shapes (e.g., from stock cars to open-wheel race cars) are presented to demonstrate this nonlinear nature of the flow field.

  10. Examining Young Students' Problem Scoping in Engineering Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Jessica; Spencer, Kathleen; Hammer, David

    2014-01-01

    Problem scoping--determining the nature and boundaries of a problem--is an essential aspect of the engineering design process. Some studies from engineering education suggest that beginning students tend to skip problem scoping or oversimplify a problem. However, the ways these studies often characterize students' problem scoping often do not…

  11. Aerodynamic design and performance testing of an advanced 30 deg swept, eight bladed propeller at Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. M.; Menthe, R. W.; Wainauski, H. S.

    1978-01-01

    The increased emphasis on fuel conservation in the world has stimulated a series of studies of both conventional and unconventional propulsion systems for commercial aircraft. Preliminary results from these studies indicate that a fuel saving of from 15 to 28 percent may be realized by the use of an advanced high speed turboprop. The turboprop must be capable of high efficiency at Mach 0.8 above 10.68 km (35,000 ft) altitude if it is to compete with turbofan powered commercial aircraft. An advanced turboprop concept was wind tunnel tested. The model included such concepts as an aerodynamically integrated propeller/nacelle, blade sweep and power (disk) loadings approximately three times higher than conventional propeller designs. The aerodynamic design for the model is discussed. Test results are presented which indicate propeller net efficiencies near 80 percent were obtained at high disk loadings at Mach 0.8.

  12. Aerodynamic design and analysis system for supersonic aircraft. Part 3: Computer program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, W. D.; Lundry, J. L.; Coleman, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    The computer program for the design and analysis of supersonic aircraft configurations is presented. The schematics of the program structure are provided. The individual overlays and subroutines are described. The system is useful in determining surface pressures and supersonic area rule concepts.

  13. Aerodynamic optimization, comparison, and trim design of canard and conventional high performance general aviation configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, M. W.; Selberg, B. P.

    1983-01-01

    A design study has been conducted to optimize trim cruise flight of high performance general aviation canard aircraft which achieve minimum drag. In order to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of canard configured aircraft, corresponding conventional tail-aft 'baseline' aircraft were designed and used for comparison. Two-dimensional predictions were obtained by coupling inviscid results from a vortex panel multi-element program to a momentum integral boundary layer analysis. Using the results of the two-dimensional vortex panel analysis, a vortex lattice method was employed to predict the finite wing results. The analysis utilized a turbulent airfoil and a natural laminar airfoil which are two NASA state-of-the-art airfoil sections. The canard aircraft designs give quantitative results of wing and canard loadings, wing-to-canard moment arm ratios, and aspect ratio effects for trim cruise flight for a wide range of wing-to-canard area ratios. Both canard and baseline aircraft achieved a 25 to 30 percent improvement in performance over typical current technology aircraft, but high canard loading necessary for trim resulted in slightly poorer performance of the canard aircraft as compared to the baseline designs.

  14. POEMS in Newton's Aerodynamic Frustum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampedro, Jaime Cruz; Tetlalmatzi-Montiel, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The golden mean is often naively seen as a sign of optimal beauty but rarely does it arise as the solution of a true optimization problem. In this article we present such a problem, demonstrating a close relationship between the golden mean and a special case of Newton's aerodynamical problem for the frustum of a cone. Then, we exhibit a parallel…

  15. Aerodynamic design optimization of a fuel efficient high-performance, single-engine, business airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    A design study has been conducted to optimize a single-engine airplane for a high-performance cruise mission. The mission analyzed included a cruise speed of about 300 knots, a cruise range of about 1300 nautical miles, and a six-passenger payload (5340 N (1200 lb)). The purpose of the study is to investigate the combinations of wing design, engine, and operating altitude required for the mission. The results show that these mission performance characteristics can be achieved with fuel efficiencies competitive with present-day high-performance, single- and twin-engine, business airplanes. It is noted that relaxation of the present Federal Aviation Regulation, Part 23, stall-speed requirement for single-engine airplanes facilitates the optimization of the airplane for fuel efficiency.

  16. Aerodynamic Design Optimization on Unstructured Grids with a Continuous Adjoint Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1997-01-01

    A continuous adjoint approach for obtaining sensitivity derivatives on unstructured grids is developed and analyzed. The derivation of the costate equations is presented, and a second-order accurate discretization method is described. The relationship between the continuous formulation and a discrete formulation is explored for inviscid, as well as for viscous flow. Several limitations in a strict adherence to the continuous approach are uncovered, and an approach that circumvents these difficulties is presented. The issue of grid sensitivities, which do not arise naturally in the continuous formulation, is investigated and is observed to be of importance when dealing with geometric singularities. A method is described for modifying inviscid and viscous meshes during the design cycle to accommodate changes in the surface shape. The accuracy of the sensitivity derivatives is established by comparing with finite-difference gradients and several design examples are presented.

  17. Problem Based Learning in Constructed Textile Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayer, Kate; Wilson, Jacquie; Challis, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Staff observing undergraduate students enrolled on the BSc Hons Textile Design and Design Management programme in The School of Materials, The University of Manchester, identified difficulties with knowledge retention in the area of constructed textile design. Consequently an experimental pilot was carried out in seamless knitwear design using a…

  18. Aerodynamic Design of Axial-Flow Compressors. VII - Blade-Element Flow in Annular Cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, William H.; Jackson, Robert J.; Lieblein, Seymour

    1955-01-01

    Annular blade-element data obtained primarily from single-stage compressor installations are correlated over a range of inlet Mach numbers and cascade geometry. The correlation curves are presented in such a manner that they are related directly to the low-speed two-dimensional-cascade data of part VI of this series. Thus, the data serve as both an extension and a verification of the two-dimensional-cascade data. In addition, the correlation results are applied to compressor design.

  19. Development of a Computer-Aided-Design-Based Geometry and Mesh Movement Algorithm for Three-Dimensional Aerodynamic Shape Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Anh Hoang

    This thesis focuses on the development of a Computer-Aided-Design (CAD)-based geometry parameterization method and a corresponding surface mesh movement algorithm suitable for three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization. The geometry parameterization method includes a geometry control tool to aid in the construction and manipulation of a CAD geometry through a vendor-neutral application interface, CAPRI. It automates the tedious part of the construction phase involving data entry and provides intuitive and effective design variables that allow for both the flexibility and the precision required to control the movement of the geometry. The surface mesh movement algorithm, on the other hand, transforms an initial structured surface mesh to fit the new geometry using a discrete representation of the new CAD surface provided by CAPRI. Using a unique mapping procedure, the algorithm not only preserves the characteristics of the original surface mesh, but also guarantees that the new mesh points are on the CAD geometry. The new surface mesh is then smoothed in the parametric space before it is transformed back into three-dimensional space. The procedure is efficient in that all the processing is done in the parametric space, incurring minimal computational cost. The geometry parameterization and mesh movement tools are integrated into a three-dimensional shape optimization framework, with a linear-elasticity volume-mesh movement algorithm, a Newton-Krylov flow solver for the Euler equations, and a gradient-based optimizer. The validity and accuracy of the CAD-based optimization algorithm are demonstrated through a number of verification and optimization cases.

  20. Aerodynamic noise sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munin, A. G.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Leontev, E. A.

    A general theory is developed for aerodynamic sound generation and its propagation in an inhomogeneous medium. Results of theoretical and experimental studies of the acoustic characteristics of jets are discussed, and a solution is presented to the problem concerning the noise from a section, free rotor, and a rotor located inside a channel. Sound propagation in a channel with flow and selection of soundproofing liners for the channel walls are also discussed.

  1. Aerodynamic Design of Axial-flow Compressors. VI - Experimental Flow in Two-Dimensional Cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieblein, Seymour

    1955-01-01

    Available experimental two-dimensional cascade data for conventional compressor blade sections are correlated at a reference incidence angle in the region of minimum loss. Variations of reference incidence angle, total-pressure loss, and deviation angle with cascade geometry, inlet Mach number, and Reynolds number are investigated. From the analysis and the correlations of the available data, rules and relations are evolved for the prediction of blade-profile performance. These relations are developed in simplified forms readily applicable to compressor design procedures.

  2. Integration of Rotor Aerodynamic Optimization with the Conceptual Design of a Large Civil Tiltrotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Coupling of aeromechanics analysis with vehicle sizing is demonstrated with the CAMRAD II aeromechanics code and NDARC sizing code. The example is optimization of cruise tip speed with rotor/wing interference for the Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR2) concept design. Free-wake models were used for both rotors and the wing. This report is part of a NASA effort to develop an integrated analytical capability combining rotorcraft aeromechanics, structures, propulsion, mission analysis, and vehicle sizing. The present paper extends previous efforts by including rotor/wing interference explicitly in the rotor performance optimization and implicitly in the sizing.

  3. Aerodynamic design guidelines and computer program for estimation of subsonic wind tunnel performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, W. T.; Mort, K. W.; Jope, J.

    1976-01-01

    General guidelines are given for the design of diffusers, contractions, corners, and the inlets and exits of non-return tunnels. A system of equations, reflecting the current technology, has been compiled and assembled into a computer program (a user's manual for this program is included) for determining the total pressure losses. The formulation presented is applicable to compressible flow through most closed- or open-throat, single-, double-, or non-return wind tunnels. A comparison of estimated performance with that actually achieved by several existing facilities produced generally good agreement.

  4. Design and Predictions for a High-Altitude (Low-Reynolds-Number) Aerodynamic Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Donald; Hamory, Phil; Krake, Keith; Drela, Mark

    1999-01-01

    A sailplane being developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center will support a high-altitude flight experiment. The experiment will measure the performance parameters of an airfoil at high altitudes (70,000 to 100,000 ft), low Reynolds numbers (200,000 to 700,000), and high subsonic Mach numbers (0.5 and 0.65). The airfoil section lift and drag are determined from pitot and static pressure measurements. The locations of the separation bubble, Tollmien-Schlichting boundary layer instability frequencies, and vortex shedding are measured from a hot-film strip. The details of the planned flight experiment are presented. Several predictions of the airfoil performance are also presented. Mark Drela from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology designed the APEX-16 airfoil, using the MSES code. Two-dimensional Navier-Stokes analyses were performed by Mahidhar Tatineni and Xiaolin Zhong from the University of California, Los Angeles, and by the authors at NASA Dryden.

  5. Narrative Problems of Graphic Design History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolin, Victor

    1994-01-01

    Discusses three major accounts (by Philip Meggs, Enric Satue and Richard Hollis) of graphic design history. Notes that these texts address the history of graphic design, but each raises questions about what material to include, as well as how graphic design is both related to and distinct from other visual practices such as typography, art…

  6. Vortical sources of aerodynamic force and moment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. Z.; Wu, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the aerodynamic force and moment can be expressed in terms of vorticity distribution (and entropy variation for compressible flow) on near wake plane, or in terms of boundary vorticity flux on the body surface. Thus the vortical sources of lift and drag are clearly identified, which is the real physical basis of optimal aerodynamic design. Moreover, these sources are highly compact, hence allowing one to concentrate on key local regions of the configuration, which have dominating effect to the lift and drag. A detail knowledge of the vortical low requires measuring or calculating the vorticity and dilatation field, which is however still a challenging task. Nevertheless, this type of formulation has some unique advantages; and how to set up a well-posed problem, in particular how to establish vorticity-dilatation boundary conditions, is addressed.

  7. The Design of Cruciform Test Specimens for Planar Biaxial Testing of Fabrics for Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, Cole K.

    2012-01-01

    A preliminary analytical study was conducted to investigate the effects of cruciform test specimen geometries on strain distribution uniformity in the central gage section under biaxial loads. Three distinct specimen geometries were considered while varying the applied displacements in the two orthogonal directions. Two sets of woven fabric material properties found in literature were used to quantify the influence of specimen geometries on the resulting strain distributions. The uniformity of the strain distribution is quantified by taking the ratio between the two orthogonal strain components and characterizing its gradient across the central area of the gage section. The analysis results show that increasing the specimen s length relative to its width promotes a more uniform strain distribution in the central section of the cruciform test specimen under equibiaxial enforced tensile displacements. However, for the two sets of material properties used in this study, this trend did not necessary hold, when the enforced tensile displacements in the two orthogonal directions were not equal. Therefore, based on the current study, a tail length that is 1.5 times that of the tail width is recommended to be the baseline/initial specimen design.

  8. Effects of wing deformation on aerodynamic performance of a revolving insect wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Ryusuke; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Flexible wings of insects and bio-inspired micro air vehicles generally deform remarkably during flapping flight owing to aerodynamic and inertial forces, which is of highly nonlinear fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems. To elucidate the novel mechanisms associated with flexible wing aerodynamics in the low Reynolds number regime, we have built up a FSI model of a hawkmoth wing undergoing revolving and made an investigation on the effects of flexible wing deformation on aerodynamic performance of the revolving wing model. To take into account the characteristics of flapping wing kinematics we designed a kinematic model for the revolving wing in two-fold: acceleration and steady rotation, which are based on hovering wing kinematics of hawkmoth, Manduca sexta. Our results show that both aerodynamic and inertial forces demonstrate a pronounced increase during acceleration phase, which results in a significant wing deformation. While the aerodynamic force turns to reduce after the wing acceleration terminates due to the burst and detachment of leading-edge vortices (LEVs), the dynamic wing deformation seem to delay the burst of LEVs and hence to augment the aerodynamic force during and even after the acceleration. During the phase of steady rotation, the flexible wing model generates more vertical force at higher angles of attack (40°-60°) but less horizontal force than those of a rigid wing model. This is because the wing twist in spanwise owing to aerodynamic forces results in a reduction in the effective angle of attack at wing tip, which leads to enhancing the aerodynamics performance by increasing the vertical force while reducing the horizontal force. Moreover, our results point out the importance of the fluid-structure interaction in evaluating flexible wing aerodynamics: the wing deformation does play a significant role in enhancing the aerodynamic performances but works differently during acceleration and steady rotation, which is mainly induced by

  9. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  10. An experimental investigation of the aerodynamics and cooling of a horizontally-opposed air-cooled aircraft engine installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, S. J.; Cross, E. J., Jr.; Owens, J. K.; Lawrence, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    A flight-test based research program was performed to investigate the aerodynamics and cooling of a horizontally-opposed engine installation. Specific areas investigated were the internal aerodynamics and cooling mechanics of the installation, inlet aerodynamics, and exit aerodynamics. The applicable theory and current state of the art are discussed for each area. Flight-test and ground-test techniques for the development of the cooling installation and the solution of cooling problems are presented. The results show that much of the internal aerodynamics and cooling technology developed for radial engines are applicable to horizontally opposed engines. Correlation is established between engine manufacturer's cooling design data and flight measurements of the particular installation. Also, a flight-test method for the development of cooling requirements in terms of easily measurable parameters is presented. The impact of inlet and exit design on cooling and cooling drag is shown to be of major significance.

  11. HYSHOT-2 Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, T.; Owen, R.; Walton, C.

    2005-02-01

    The scramjet flight test Hyshot-2, flew on the 30 July 2002. The programme, led by the University of Queensland, had the primary objective of obtaining supersonic combustion data in flight for comparison with measurements made in shock tunnels. QinetiQ was one of the sponsors, and also provided aerodynamic data and trajectory predictions for the ballistic re-entry of the spinning sounding rocket. The unconventional missile geometry created by the nose-mounted asymmetric-scramjet in conjunction with the high angle of attack during re-entry makes the problem interesting. This paper presents the wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamic calculations used as input for the trajectory prediction. Indirect comparison is made with data obtained in the Hyshot-2 flight using a 6 degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation.

  12. Computational aerodynamics and supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the progress in computational aerodynamics over the last decade is reviewed. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program objectives, computational goals, and implementation plans are described.

  13. Advanced missile technology. A review of technology improvement areas for cruise missiles. [including missile design, missile configurations, and aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronvich, L. L.; Liepman, H. P.

    1979-01-01

    Technology assessments in the areas of aerodynamics, propulsion, and structures and materials for cruise missile systems are discussed. The cruise missiles considered cover the full speed, altitude, and target range. The penetrativity, range, and maneuverability of the cruise missiles are examined and evaluated for performance improvements.

  14. Statistical problems in design technique validation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.S.

    1980-04-01

    This work is concerned with the statistical validation process for measuring the accuracy of design techniques for solar energy systems. This includes a discussion of the statistical variability inherent in the design and measurement processes and the way in which this variability can dictate the choice of experimental design, choice of data, accuracy of the results, and choice of questions that can be reliably answered in such a study. The approach here is primarily concerned with design procedure validation in the context of the realistic process of system desig, where the discrepancy between measured and predicted results is due to limitations in the mathematical models employed by the procedures and the inaccuracies of input data. A set of guidelines for successful validation methodologies is discussed, and a simplified validation methodology for domestic hot water heaters is presented.

  15. [Designer drugs--diagnostic, psychological and low aspects of problem].

    PubMed

    Morawska-Siudak, Jowanka; Szkolnicka, Beata; Gomółka, Ewa; Krawczyk-Pasławska, Elzbieta

    2010-01-01

    Designer drugs used often by teenagers have simulative, relaxing, hallucinogenic and psychedelic properties. The biological action, addictive potential, diagnostic problems and low regulations related to designer drugs are presented in the study.

  16. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, P.; Mehta, U. B.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of artificial intelligence are considered and questions are speculated on, including how knowledge-based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use 'expert' systems and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. The anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements are examined for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics. Considering two of the essentials of computational aerodynamics - reasoniing and calculating - it is believed that a substantial part of the reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence, with computers being used as reasoning machines to set the stage for calculating. Expert systems will probably be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  17. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The general principles of artificial intelligence are reviewed and speculations are made concerning how knowledge based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use expert systems, and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. In addition, the anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics are examined. Three main conclusions are presented. First, there are two related aspects of computational aerodynamics: reasoning and calculating. Second, a substantial portion of reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence. It offers the opportunity of using computers as reasoning machines to set the stage for efficient calculating. Third, expert systems are likely to be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  18. Problem Solving Techniques for the Design of Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kant, Elaine; Newell, Allen

    1984-01-01

    Presents model of algorithm design (activity in software development) based on analysis of protocols of two subjects designing three convex hull algorithms. Automation methods, methods for studying algorithm design, role of discovery in problem solving, and comparison of different designs of case study according to model are highlighted.…

  19. Rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith

    1992-01-01

    Means for relatively simple and quick procedures are examined for estimating aerodynamic coefficients of lifting reentry vehicles. The methods developed allow aerospace designers not only to evaluate the aerodynamics of specific shapes but also to optimize shapes under given constraints. The analysis was also studied of the effect of thermomolecular flow on pressures measured by an orifice near the nose of a Space Shuttle Orbiter at altitudes above 75 km. It was shown that pressures corrected for thermomolecular flow effect are in good agreement with values predicted by independent theoretical methods. An incidental product was the insight gained about the free molecular thermal accommodation coefficient applicable under 'real' conditions of high speed flow in the Earth's atmosphere. The results are presented as abstracts of referenced papers. One reference paper is presented in its entirety.

  20. Designing Problem-Driven Instruction with Online Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyeong-Ju Seo, Kay, Ed.; Pellegrino, Debra A., Ed.; Engelhard, Chalee, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Designing Problem-Driven Instruction with Online Social Media has the capacity to transform an educator's teaching style by presenting innovative ways to empower problem-based instruction with online social media. Knowing that not all instructors are comfortable in this area, this book provides clear, systematic design approaches for instructors…

  1. Problem Solving in the School Curriculum from a Design Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toh, Tin Lam; Leong, Yew Hoong; Dindyal, Jaguthsing; Quek, Khiok Seng

    2010-01-01

    In this symposium, the participants discuss some preliminary data collected from their problem solving project which uses a design experiment approach. Their approach to problem solving in the school curriculum is in tandem with what Schoenfeld (2007) claimed: "Crafting instruction that would make a wide range of problem-solving strategies…

  2. Recent advances in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh K.; Desse, Jerry E.

    1991-04-01

    The current state of the art in computational aerodynamics is described. Recent advances in the discretization of surface geometry, grid generation, and flow simulation algorithms have led to flowfield predictions for increasingly complex and realistic configurations. As a result, computational aerodynamics is emerging as a crucial enabling technology for the development and design of flight vehicles. Examples illustrating the current capability for the prediction of aircraft, launch vehicle and helicopter flowfields are presented. Unfortunately, accurate modeling of turbulence remains a major difficulty in the analysis of viscosity-dominated flows. In the future inverse design methods, multidisciplinary design optimization methods, artificial intelligence technology and massively parallel computer technology will be incorporated into computational aerodynamics, opening up greater opportunities for improved product design at substantially reduced costs.

  3. Aerodynamic characteristics of wings designed with a combined-theory method to cruise at a Mach number of 4.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    A wind-tunnel study was conducted to determine the capability of a method combining linear theory and shock-expansion theory to design optimum camber surfaces for wings that will fly at high-supersonic/low-hypersonic speeds. Three force models (a flat-plate reference wing and two cambered and twisted wings) were used to obtain aerodynamic lift, drag, and pitching-moment data. A fourth pressure-orifice model was used to obtain surface-pressure data. All four wing models had the same planform, airfoil section, and centerbody area distribution. The design Mach number was 4.5, but data were also obtained at Mach numbers of 3.5 and 4.0. Results of these tests indicated that the use of airfoil thickness as a theoretical optimum, camber-surface design constraint did not improve the aerodynamic efficiency or performance of a wing as compared with a wing that was designed with a zero-thickness airfoil (linear-theory) constraint.

  4. Aerodynamic performance and particle image velocimetery of piezo actuated biomimetic manduca sexta engineered wings towards the design and application of a flapping wing flight vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, Anthony M.

    Considerable research and investigation has been conducted on the aerodynamic performance, and the predominate flow physics of the Manduca Sexta size of biomimetically designed and fabricated wings as part of the AFIT FWMAV design project. Despite a burgeoning interest and research into the diverse field of flapping wing flight and biomimicry, the aerodynamics of flapping wing flight remains a nebulous field of science with considerable variance into the theoretical abstractions surrounding aerodynamic mechanisms responsible for aerial performance. Traditional FWMAV flight models assume a form of a quasi-steady approximation of wing aerodynamics based on an infinite wing blade element model (BEM). An accurate estimation of the lift, drag, and side force coefficients is a critical component of autonomous stability and control models. This research focused on two separate experimental avenues into the aerodynamics of AFIT's engineered hawkmoth wings|forces and flow visualization. 1. Six degree of freedom force balance testing, and high speed video analysis was conducted on 30°, 45°, and 60° angle stop wings. A novel, non-intrusive optical tracking algorithm was developed utilizing a combination of a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) and ComputerVision (OpenCV) tools to track the wing in motion from multiple cameras. A complete mapping of the wing's kinematic angles as a function of driving amplitude was performed. The stroke angle, elevation angle, and angle of attack were tabulated for all three wings at driving amplitudes ranging from A=0.3 to A=0.6. The wing kinematics together with the force balance data was used to develop several aerodynamic force coefficient models. A combined translational and rotational aerodynamic model predicted lift forces within 10%, and vertical forces within 6%. The total power consumption was calculated for each of the three wings, and a Figure of Merit was calculated for each wing as a general expression of the overall efficiency of

  5. Some effects of wing and body geometry on the aerodynamic characteristics of configurations designed for high supersonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.; Tice, David C.; Braswell, Dorothy O.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented for a family of aerodynamic configurations for flight Mach numbers as high as Mach 8. All of these generic configurations involved 70-deg sweep delta planform wings of three different areas and three fuselage shapes with circular-to-elliptical cross sections. It is noted that fuselage ellipticity enhances lift-curve slope and maximum L/D, while decreasing static longitudinal stability (especially with smaller wing areas).

  6. A Problem-Solving Conceptual Framework and Its Implications in Designing Problem-Posing Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Florence Mihaela; Voica, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    The links between the mathematical and cognitive models that interact during problem solving are explored with the purpose of developing a reference framework for designing problem-posing tasks. When the process of solving is a successful one, a solver successively changes his/her cognitive stances related to the problem via transformations that…

  7. Index for aerodynamic data from the Bumblebee program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronvich, L. L.; Barnes, G. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Bumblebee program, was designed to provide a supersonic guided missile. The aerodynamics program included a fundamental research effort in supersonic aerodynamics as well as a design task in developing both test vehicles and prototypes of tactical missiles. An index of aerodynamic missile data developed in this program is presented.

  8. Survey of lift-fan aerodynamic technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, David H.; Kirk, Jerry V.

    1993-01-01

    Representatives of NASA Ames Research Center asked that a summary of technology appropriate for lift-fan powered short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft be prepared so that new programs could more easily benefit from past research efforts. This paper represents one of six prepared for that purpose. The authors have conducted or supervised the conduct of research on lift-fan powered STOVL designs and some of their important components for decades. This paper will first address aerodynamic modeling requirements for experimental programs to assure realistic, trustworthy results. It will next summarize the results or efforts to develop satisfactory specialized STOVL components such as inlets and flow deflectors. It will also discuss problems with operation near the ground, aerodynamics while under lift-fan power, and aerodynamic prediction techniques. Finally, results of studies to reduce lift-fan noise will be presented. The paper will emphasize results from large scale experiments, where available, for reasons that will be brought out in the discussion. Some work with lift-engine powered STOVL aircraft is also applicable to lift-fan technology and will be presented herein. Small-scale data will be used where necessary to fill gaps.

  9. Execution of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Approaches on Common Test Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balling, R. J.; Wilkinson, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    A class of synthetic problems for testing multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) approaches is presented. These test problems are easy to reproduce because all functions are given as closed-form mathematical expressions. They are constructed in such a way that the optimal value of all variables and the objective is unity. The test problems involve three disciplines and allow the user to specify the number of design variables, state variables, coupling functions, design constraints, controlling design constraints, and the strength of coupling. Several MDO approaches were executed on two sample synthetic test problems. These approaches included single-level optimization approaches, collaborative optimization approaches, and concurrent subspace optimization approaches. Execution results are presented, and the robustness and efficiency of these approaches an evaluated for these sample problems.

  10. Minimization In Digital Design As A Meta-Planning Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, William P. C.; Wu, Jung-Gen

    1987-05-01

    In our model-based expert system for automatic digital system design, we formalize the design process into three sub-processes - compiling high-level behavioral specifications into primitive behavioral operations, grouping primitive operations into behavioral functions, and grouping functions into modules. Consideration of design minimization explicitly controls decision-making in the last two subprocesses. Design minimization, a key task in the automatic design of digital systems, is complicated by the high degree of interaction among the time sequence and content of design decisions. In this paper, we present an AI approach which directly addresses these interactions and their consequences by modeling the minimization prob-lem as a planning problem, and the management of design decision-making as a meta-planning problem.

  11. Recent Problems of Transformer Core Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkovic, Z.

    1988-01-01

    The paper describes the result of the investigations of the efficiency of power loss reduction in transformer cores made with high-permeability (HGO) and laser scribed (LS) grain-oriented electrical steels, and also the phenomena in three-limb three-phase cores with the so-called staggered T-joint design. The efficiency of the HGO material depends on core form and core induction. The efficiency is better for single-phase than for three-phase cores and also for higher induction. The localised efficiency of HGO material is not uniform and it is significantly lower in the yoke than in other parts. The efficiency of LS material (grade ZDKH) is better than that of the HGO material and also somewhat higher for single-phase than for three-phase cores. The localised flux distribution in the central limb of the core with staggered T-joint is more uniform and the content of higher harmonics is smaller than in the core with conventional V-45° T-joint. This results in a 13% loss reduction in the central limb and in a 4-5% reduction of total core loss.

  12. Embracing Wicked Problems: The Turn to Design in Composition Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marback, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Recent appeal to the concept of design in composition studies benefits teaching writing in digital media. Yet the concept of design has not been developed enough to fully benefit composition instruction. This article develops an understanding of design as a matter of resolving wicked problems and makes a case for the advantages of this…

  13. Designing Online Problem Representation Engine for Conceptual Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chwee Beng; Ling, Keck Voon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the web-based scaffold dynamic simulation system (PRES-on) designed for pre-service teachers. Design/methodology/approach: The paper describes the initial design of a web-based scaffold dynamic simulation system (PRES-on) as a cognitive tool for learners to represent problems. For the widespread use of the…

  14. Artificial intelligence and design: Opportunities, research problems and directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amarel, Saul

    1990-01-01

    The issues of industrial productivity and economic competitiveness are of major significance in the U.S. at present. By advancing the science of design, and by creating a broad computer-based methodology for automating the design of artifacts and of industrial processes, we can attain dramatic improvements in productivity. It is our thesis that developments in computer science, especially in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and in related areas of advanced computing, provide us with a unique opportunity to push beyond the present level of computer aided automation technology and to attain substantial advances in the understanding and mechanization of design processes. To attain these goals, we need to build on top of the present state of AI, and to accelerate research and development in areas that are especially relevant to design problems of realistic complexity. We propose an approach to the special challenges in this area, which combines 'core work' in AI with the development of systems for handling significant design tasks. We discuss the general nature of design problems, the scientific issues involved in studying them with the help of AI approaches, and the methodological/technical issues that one must face in developing AI systems for handling advanced design tasks. Looking at basic work in AI from the perspective of design automation, we identify a number of research problems that need special attention. These include finding solution methods for handling multiple interacting goals, formation problems, problem decompositions, and redesign problems; choosing representations for design problems with emphasis on the concept of a design record; and developing approaches for the acquisition and structuring of domain knowledge with emphasis on finding useful approximations to domain theories. Progress in handling these research problems will have major impact both on our understanding of design processes and their automation, and also on several fundamental questions

  15. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using A Real-Number-Encoded Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2001-01-01

    A new method for aerodynamic shape optimization using a genetic algorithm with real number encoding is presented. The algorithm is used to optimize three different problems, a simple hill climbing problem, a quasi-one-dimensional nozzle problem using an Euler equation solver and a three-dimensional transonic wing problem using a nonlinear potential solver. Results indicate that the genetic algorithm is easy to implement and extremely reliable, being relatively insensitive to design space noise.

  16. Expert vs. novice: Problem decomposition/recomposition in engineering design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ting

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the differences of using problem decomposition and problem recomposition among dyads of engineering experts, dyads of engineering seniors, and dyads of engineering freshmen. Fifty participants took part in this study. Ten were engineering design experts, 20 were engineering seniors, and 20 were engineering freshmen. Participants worked in dyads to complete an engineering design challenge within an hour. The entire design process was video and audio recorded. After the design session, members participated in a group interview. This study used protocol analysis as the methodology. Video and audio data were transcribed, segmented, and coded. Two coding systems including the FBS ontology and "levels of the problem" were used in this study. A series of statistical techniques were used to analyze data. Interview data and participants' design sketches also worked as supplemental data to help answer the research questions. By analyzing the quantitative and qualitative data, it was found that students used less problem decomposition and problem recomposition than engineer experts in engineering design. This result implies that engineering education should place more importance on teaching problem decomposition and problem recomposition. Students were found to spend less cognitive effort when considering the problem as a whole and interactions between subsystems than engineer experts. In addition, students were also found to spend more cognitive effort when considering details of subsystems. These results showed that students tended to use dept-first decomposition and experts tended to use breadth-first decomposition in engineering design. The use of Function (F), Behavior (B), and Structure (S) among engineering experts, engineering seniors, and engineering freshmen was compared on three levels. Level 1 represents designers consider the problem as an integral whole, Level 2 represents designers consider interactions between

  17. The design of aircraft using the decision support problem technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mistree, Farrokh; Marinopoulos, Stergios; Jackson, David M.; Shupe, Jon A.

    1988-01-01

    The Decision Support Problem Technique for unified design, manufacturing and maintenance is being developed at the Systems Design Laboratory at the University of Houston. This involves the development of a domain-independent method (and the associated software) that can be used to process domain-dependent information and thereby provide support for human judgment. In a computer assisted environment, this support is provided in the form of optimal solutions to Decision Support Problems.

  18. Some Current Problems in Simulator Design, Testing and Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caro, Paul W.

    Concerned with the general problem of the effectiveness of simulator training, this report reflects information developed during the conduct of aircraft simulator training research projects sponsored by the Air Force, Army, Navy, and Coast Guard. Problems are identified related to simulator design, testing, and use, all of which impact upon…

  19. Creativity and Instruction: The Problem of Task Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehlbach, Roger D.

    1987-01-01

    Creativity is seen as a problem-solving process including problem recognition and definition, generation and teaching of alternative possible solutions, and selection of the best solution. Using this process as a task analysis for designing instruction in creativity, types of tasks are analyzed. The use of functional completion criteria is…

  20. Aeroassist flight experiment aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Edwin B.

    1989-01-01

    The problem is to determine the transitional flow aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics, including the base flow characteristics, of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE). The justification for the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) Application stems from MSFC's system integration responsibility for the AFE. To insure that the AFE objectives are met, MSFC must understand the limitations and uncertainties of the design data. Perhaps the only method capable of handling the complex physics of the rarefied high energy AFE trajectory is Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. The 3-D code used in this analysis is applicable only to the AFE geometry. It uses the Variable Hard Sphere (VHS) collision model and five specie chemistry model available from Langley Research Center. The code is benchmarked against the AFE flight data and used as an Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV) design tool. The code is being used to understand the AFE flow field and verify or modify existing design data. Continued application to lower altitudes is testing the capability of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) to handle 3-D DSMC and its practicality as an ASTV/AFE design tool.

  1. Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented which deal with results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include: viscous flows, boundary layer equations, turbulence modeling and Navier-Stokes equations, and internal flows.

  2. Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers given at the conference present the results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include two-dimensional configurations, three-dimensional configurations, transonic aircraft, and the space shuttle.

  3. Mathematical theory of a relaxed design problem in structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, Noboru; Suzuki, Katsuyuki

    1990-01-01

    Various attempts have been made to construct a rigorous mathematical theory of optimization for size, shape, and topology (i.e. layout) of an elastic structure. If these are represented by a finite number of parametric functions, as Armand described, it is possible to construct an existence theory of the optimum design using compactness argument in a finite dimensional design space or a closed admissible set of a finite dimensional design space. However, if the admissible design set is a subset of non-reflexive Banach space such as L(sup infinity)(Omega), construction of the existence theory of the optimum design becomes suddenly difficult and requires to extend (i.e. generalize) the design problem to much more wider class of design that is compatible to mechanics of structures in the sense of variational principle. Starting from the study by Cheng and Olhoff, Lurie, Cherkaev, and Fedorov introduced a new concept of convergence of design variables in a generalized sense and construct the 'G-Closure' theory of an extended (relaxed) optimum design problem. A similar attempt, but independent in large extent, can also be found in Kohn and Strang in which the shape and topology optimization problem is relaxed to allow to use of perforated composites rather than restricting it to usual solid structures. An identical idea is also stated in Murat and Tartar using the notion of the homogenization theory. That is, introducing possibility of micro-scale perforation together with the theory of homogenization, the optimum design problem is relaxed to construct its mathematical theory. It is also noted that this type of relaxed design problem is perfectly matched to the variational principle in structural mechanics.

  4. Aerodynamic design and analysis of the AST-204, AST-205, and AST-206 blended wing-fuse large supersonic transport configuration concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, G. L.; Walkley, K. B.

    1980-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and analysis of three blended wing-fuselage supersonic cruise configurations providing four, five, and six abreast seating was conducted using a previously designed supersonic cruise configuration as the baseline. The five abreast configuration was optimized for wave drag at a Mach number of 2.7. The four and six abreast configurations were also optimized at Mach 2.7, but with the added constraint that the majority of their structure be common with the five abreast configuration. Analysis of the three configurations indicated an improvement of 6.0, 7.5, and 7.7 percent in cruise lift-to-drag ratio over the baseline configuration for the four, five, and six abreast configurations, respectively.

  5. Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 2.16 of a supersonic cruise fighter configuration with a design Mach number of 1.8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrout, B. L.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was made in the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel and the Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel, over a Mach number range of 0.6 to 2.16, to determine the static longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics of a model of a supersonic-cruise fighter. The configuration, which is designed for efficient cruise at Mach number 1.8, is a twin-engine tailless arrow-wing concept with a single rectangular inlet beneath the fuselage and outboard vertical tails and ventral fins. It had untrimmed values of lift-drage ratio ranging from 10 at subsonic speeds to 6.4 at the design Mach number. The configuration was statically stable both longitudinally and laterally.

  6. Instructional Design for Heuristic-Based Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Albert L.

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of instructional design models focuses on a study concerned with developing effective instruction in heuristic-based problem solving for computer programing. Highlights include distinctions between algorithms and heuristics; pretests and posttests; revised instructional design procedures; student attitudes; task analysis; and…

  7. A Multilevel Analysis of Problem-Based Learning Design Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Kimberly S.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of experience-centered approaches like problem-based learning (PBL) by learning and development practitioners and management educators has raised interest in how to design, implement and evaluate PBL in that field. Of particular interest is how to evaluate the relative impact of design characteristics that exist at the…

  8. Exploring the Learning Problems and Resource Usage of Undergraduate Industrial Design Students in Design Studio Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    Design is a powerful weapon for modern companies so it is important to have excellent designers in the industry. The purpose of this study is to explore the learning problems and the resources that students use to overcome problems in undergraduate industrial design studio courses. A survey with open-type questions was conducted to collect data.…

  9. Analysis of Feeder Bus Network Design and Scheduling Problems

    PubMed Central

    Almasi, Mohammad Hadi; Karim, Mohamed Rehan

    2014-01-01

    A growing concern for public transit is its inability to shift passenger's mode from private to public transport. In order to overcome this problem, a more developed feeder bus network and matched schedules will play important roles. The present paper aims to review some of the studies performed on Feeder Bus Network Design and Scheduling Problem (FNDSP) based on three distinctive parts of the FNDSP setup, namely, problem description, problem characteristics, and solution approaches. The problems consist of different subproblems including data preparation, feeder bus network design, route generation, and feeder bus scheduling. Subsequently, descriptive analysis and classification of previous works are presented to highlight the main characteristics and solution methods. Finally, some of the issues and trends for future research are identified. This paper is targeted at dealing with the FNDSP to exhibit strategic and tactical goals and also contributes to the unification of the field which might be a useful complement to the few existing reviews. PMID:24526890

  10. Automating the design process - Progress, problems, prospects, potential.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldenfels, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    The design process for large aerospace vehicles is discussed, with particular emphasis on structural design. Problems with current procedures are identified. Then, the contributions possible from automating the design process (defined as the best combination of men and computers) are considered. Progress toward automated design in the aerospace and other communities is reviewed, including NASA studies of the potential development of Integrated Programs for Aerospace-Vehicle Design (IPAD). The need for and suggested directions of future research on the design process, both technical and social, are discussed. Although much progress has been made to exploit the computer in design, it is concluded that technology is available to begin using the computer to speed communications and management as well as calculations in the design process and thus build man-computer teams that can design better, faster and cheaper.

  11. Classical Aerodynamic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A collection of papers on modern theoretical aerodynamics is presented. Included are theories of incompressible potential flow and research on the aerodynamic forces on wing and wing sections of aircraft and on airship hulls.

  12. Aerodynamic instability: A case history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenmann, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The identification, diagnosis, and final correction of complex machinery malfunctions typically require the correlation of many parameters such as mechanical construction, process influence, maintenance history, and vibration response characteristics. The progression is reviewed of field testing, diagnosis, and final correction of a specific machinery instability problem. The case history presented addresses a unique low frequency instability problem on a high pressure barrel compressor. The malfunction was eventually diagnosed as a fluidic mechanism that manifested as an aerodynamic disturbance to the rotor assembly.

  13. Configuration Aerodynamics: Past - Present - Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Bencze, Daniel P.; Kulfan, Robert M.; Wilson, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    The Configuration Aerodynamics (CA) element of the High Speed Research (HSR) program is managed by a joint NASA and Industry team, referred to as the Technology Integration Development (ITD) team. This team is responsible for the development of a broad range of technologies for improved aerodynamic performance and stability and control characteristics at subsonic to supersonic flight conditions. These objectives are pursued through the aggressive use of advanced experimental test techniques and state of the art computational methods. As the HSR program matures and transitions into the next phase the objectives of the Configuration Aerodynamics ITD are being refined to address the drag reduction needs and stability and control requirements of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. In addition, the experimental and computational tools are being refined and improved to meet these challenges. The presentation will review the work performed within the Configuration Aerodynamics element in 1994 and 1995 and then discuss the plans for the 1996-1998 time period. The final portion of the presentation will review several observations of the HSR program and the design activity within Configuration Aerodynamics.

  14. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J.; Hessenius, Kristin A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Hicks, Gary; Richardson, Pamela F.; Unger, George; Neumann, Benjamin; Moss, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The annual accomplishments is reviewed for the Aerodynamics Division during FY 1991. The program includes both fundamental and applied research directed at the full spectrum of aerospace vehicles, from rotorcraft to planetary entry probes. A comprehensive review is presented of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications; CFD validation; transition and turbulence physics; numerical aerodynamic simulation; test techniques and instrumentation; configuration aerodynamics; aeroacoustics; aerothermodynamics; hypersonics; subsonics; fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  15. Airframe-propulsion system aerodynamic interference predictions at high transonic Mach numbers including off-design engine airflow effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulfan, R. M.; Sigalla, A.

    1981-01-01

    The transonic speed regime for airplanes at conditions where inlet spillage takes place is discussed. A wind tunnel test program to evaluate aerodynamic performance penalties associated with propulsion system installation and operation at subsonic through low supersonic speeds was conducted. The accuracy of analytic methods for predicting transonic engine airframe interference effects was assessed. Study variables included Mach number, angle of attack, relative nacelle location, and nacelle mass flow ratio. Results include test theory comparisons of forces as well as induced pressure fields. Prediction capability of induced shock wave strength and locations is assessed. It was found that large interference forces due to engine location and flow spillage occur at transonic speeds, that theory explains these effects; and that theory can predict quantitatively these effects.

  16. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Schairer, Edward; Hicks, Gary; Wander, Stephen; Blankson, Isiaiah; Rose, Raymond; Olson, Lawrence; Unger, George

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a comprehensive review of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation, transition and turbulence physics, numerical aerodynamic simulation, drag reduction, test techniques and instrumentation, configuration aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, aerothermodynamics, hypersonics, subsonic transport/commuter aviation, fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  17. An Algorithm for the Mixed Transportation Network Design Problem.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Qun

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an optimization algorithm, the dimension-down iterative algorithm (DDIA), for solving a mixed transportation network design problem (MNDP), which is generally expressed as a mathematical programming with equilibrium constraint (MPEC). The upper level of the MNDP aims to optimize the network performance via both the expansion of the existing links and the addition of new candidate links, whereas the lower level is a traditional Wardrop user equilibrium (UE) problem. The idea of the proposed solution algorithm (DDIA) is to reduce the dimensions of the problem. A group of variables (discrete/continuous) is fixed to optimize another group of variables (continuous/discrete) alternately; then, the problem is transformed into solving a series of CNDPs (continuous network design problems) and DNDPs (discrete network design problems) repeatedly until the problem converges to the optimal solution. The advantage of the proposed algorithm is that its solution process is very simple and easy to apply. Numerical examples show that for the MNDP without budget constraint, the optimal solution can be found within a few iterations with DDIA. For the MNDP with budget constraint, however, the result depends on the selection of initial values, which leads to different optimal solutions (i.e., different local optimal solutions). Some thoughts are given on how to derive meaningful initial values, such as by considering the budgets of new and reconstruction projects separately.

  18. An Algorithm for the Mixed Transportation Network Design Problem

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Qun

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an optimization algorithm, the dimension-down iterative algorithm (DDIA), for solving a mixed transportation network design problem (MNDP), which is generally expressed as a mathematical programming with equilibrium constraint (MPEC). The upper level of the MNDP aims to optimize the network performance via both the expansion of the existing links and the addition of new candidate links, whereas the lower level is a traditional Wardrop user equilibrium (UE) problem. The idea of the proposed solution algorithm (DDIA) is to reduce the dimensions of the problem. A group of variables (discrete/continuous) is fixed to optimize another group of variables (continuous/discrete) alternately; then, the problem is transformed into solving a series of CNDPs (continuous network design problems) and DNDPs (discrete network design problems) repeatedly until the problem converges to the optimal solution. The advantage of the proposed algorithm is that its solution process is very simple and easy to apply. Numerical examples show that for the MNDP without budget constraint, the optimal solution can be found within a few iterations with DDIA. For the MNDP with budget constraint, however, the result depends on the selection of initial values, which leads to different optimal solutions (i.e., different local optimal solutions). Some thoughts are given on how to derive meaningful initial values, such as by considering the budgets of new and reconstruction projects separately. PMID:27626803

  19. An Algorithm for the Mixed Transportation Network Design Problem.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Qun

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an optimization algorithm, the dimension-down iterative algorithm (DDIA), for solving a mixed transportation network design problem (MNDP), which is generally expressed as a mathematical programming with equilibrium constraint (MPEC). The upper level of the MNDP aims to optimize the network performance via both the expansion of the existing links and the addition of new candidate links, whereas the lower level is a traditional Wardrop user equilibrium (UE) problem. The idea of the proposed solution algorithm (DDIA) is to reduce the dimensions of the problem. A group of variables (discrete/continuous) is fixed to optimize another group of variables (continuous/discrete) alternately; then, the problem is transformed into solving a series of CNDPs (continuous network design problems) and DNDPs (discrete network design problems) repeatedly until the problem converges to the optimal solution. The advantage of the proposed algorithm is that its solution process is very simple and easy to apply. Numerical examples show that for the MNDP without budget constraint, the optimal solution can be found within a few iterations with DDIA. For the MNDP with budget constraint, however, the result depends on the selection of initial values, which leads to different optimal solutions (i.e., different local optimal solutions). Some thoughts are given on how to derive meaningful initial values, such as by considering the budgets of new and reconstruction projects separately. PMID:27626803

  20. Three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization using discrete sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization procedure based on discrete sensitivity analysis is extended to treat three-dimensional geometries. The function of sensitivity analysis is to directly couple computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with numerical optimization techniques, which facilitates the construction of efficient direct-design methods. The development of a practical three-dimensional design procedures entails many challenges, such as: (1) the demand for significant efficiency improvements over current design methods; (2) a general and flexible three-dimensional surface representation; and (3) the efficient solution of very large systems of linear algebraic equations. It is demonstrated that each of these challenges is overcome by: (1) employing fully implicit (Newton) methods for the CFD analyses; (2) adopting a Bezier-Bernstein polynomial parameterization of two- and three-dimensional surfaces; and (3) using preconditioned conjugate gradient-like linear system solvers. Whereas each of these extensions independently yields an improvement in computational efficiency, the combined effect of implementing all the extensions simultaneously results in a significant factor of 50 decrease in computational time and a factor of eight reduction in memory over the most efficient design strategies in current use. The new aerodynamic shape optimization procedure is demonstrated in the design of both two- and three-dimensional inviscid aerodynamic problems including a two-dimensional supersonic internal/external nozzle, two-dimensional transonic airfoils (resulting in supercritical shapes), three-dimensional transport wings, and three-dimensional supersonic delta wings. Each design application results in realistic and useful optimized shapes.

  1. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Sean; Bigatel, Patrick

    2004-10-17

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

  2. TAD- THEORETICAL AERODYNAMICS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, J.

    1994-01-01

    This theoretical aerodynamics program, TAD, was developed to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles with sounding rocket configurations. These slender, axisymmetric finned vehicle configurations have a wide range of aeronautical applications from rockets to high speed armament. Over a given range of Mach numbers, TAD will compute the normal force coefficient derivative, the center-of-pressure, the roll forcing moment coefficient derivative, the roll damping moment coefficient derivative, and the pitch damping moment coefficient derivative of a sounding rocket configured vehicle. The vehicle may consist of a sharp pointed nose of cone or tangent ogive shape, up to nine other body divisions of conical shoulder, conical boattail, or circular cylinder shape, and fins of trapezoid planform shape with constant cross section and either three or four fins per fin set. The characteristics computed by TAD have been shown to be accurate to within ten percent of experimental data in the supersonic region. The TAD program calculates the characteristics of separate portions of the vehicle, calculates the interference between separate portions of the vehicle, and then combines the results to form a total vehicle solution. Also, TAD can be used to calculate the characteristics of the body or fins separately as an aid in the design process. Input to the TAD program consists of simple descriptions of the body and fin geometries and the Mach range of interest. Output includes the aerodynamic characteristics of the total vehicle, or user-selected portions, at specified points over the mach range. The TAD program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 360 computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 123K of 8 bit bytes. The TAD program was originally developed in 1967 and last updated in 1972.

  3. A comprehensive analytical model of rotorcraft aerodynamics and dynamics. Part 3: Program manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1980-01-01

    The computer program for a comprehensive analytical model of rotorcraft aerodynamics and dynamics is described. This analysis is designed to calculate rotor performance, loads, and noise; the helicopter vibration and gust response; the flight dynamics and handling qualities; and the system aeroelastic stability. The analysis is a combination of structural, inertial, and aerodynamic models that is applicable to a wide range of problems and a wide class of vehicles. The analysis is intended for use in the design, testing, and evaluation of rotors and rotorcraft and to be a basis for further development of rotary wing theories.

  4. Missile aerodynamics; Proceedings of the Conference, Monterey, CA, Oct. 31-Nov. 2, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, M.R.; Nixon, D.; Dillenius, M.F.E.

    1989-01-01

    The present conference discusses the development status of predictive capabilities for missile aerodynamic characteristics, the application of experimental techniques to missile-release problems, prospective high-performance missile designs, the use of lateral jet controls for missile guidance, and the integration of stores on modern tactical aircraft. Also discussed are semiempirical aerodynamic methods for preliminary design, high angle-of-attack behavior for an advanced missile, and the dynamic derivatives of missiles and fighter-type configurations at high angles-of-attack.

  5. Comparison of optimal design methods in inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, H. T.; Holm, K.; Kappel, F.

    2011-07-01

    Typical optimal design methods for inverse or parameter estimation problems are designed to choose optimal sampling distributions through minimization of a specific cost function related to the resulting error in parameter estimates. It is hoped that the inverse problem will produce parameter estimates with increased accuracy using data collected according to the optimal sampling distribution. Here we formulate the classical optimal design problem in the context of general optimization problems over distributions of sampling times. We present a new Prohorov metric-based theoretical framework that permits one to treat succinctly and rigorously any optimal design criteria based on the Fisher information matrix. A fundamental approximation theory is also included in this framework. A new optimal design, SE-optimal design (standard error optimal design), is then introduced in the context of this framework. We compare this new design criterion with the more traditional D-optimal and E-optimal designs. The optimal sampling distributions from each design are used to compute and compare standard errors; the standard errors for parameters are computed using asymptotic theory or bootstrapping and the optimal mesh. We use three examples to illustrate ideas: the Verhulst-Pearl logistic population model (Banks H T and Tran H T 2009 Mathematical and Experimental Modeling of Physical and Biological Processes (Boca Raton, FL: Chapman and Hall/CRC)), the standard harmonic oscillator model (Banks H T and Tran H T 2009) and a popular glucose regulation model (Bergman R N, Ider Y Z, Bowden C R and Cobelli C 1979 Am. J. Physiol. 236 E667-77 De Gaetano A and Arino O 2000 J. Math. Biol. 40 136-68 Toffolo G, Bergman R N, Finegood D T, Bowden C R and Cobelli C 1980 Diabetes 29 979-90).

  6. The Sky's the Limit! With Math and Science. Aerodynamics. Book 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiebe, Arthur, Ed.; And Others

    Developed for use primarily with students of grades five through nine, the activities presented in this book provide teachers and students with opportunities of exploring the science of aerodynamics. The activities are designed so that students can practice and apply the 22 skills and concepts related to flight in problem-solving situations. Each…

  7. IODC 2014 Illumination design problem: the Cinderella Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassarly, William J.

    2014-12-01

    For the 3rd time, the International Optical Design Conference (IODC) included an Illumination Design contest. This year, the contest involved designing the illuminator to project the 1950 Walt Disney "Cinderella" movie using a box of optical knick-knacks. The goal of the problem was to provide the highest screen lumens with greater than 30% uniformity. There were 12 entries from 3 different countries. Three different commercial optical/illumination design packages were used. The winning solution, provided by Alois Herkommer, provided 371 screen lumens.

  8. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  9. Bifurcations in unsteady aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, M.; Unal, A.

    1986-01-01

    Nonlinear algebraic functional expansions are used to create a form for the unsteady aerodynamic response that is consistent with solutions of the time dependent Navier-Stokes equations. An enumeration of means of invalidating Frechet differentiability of the aerodynamic response, one of which is aerodynamic bifurcation, is proposed as a way of classifying steady and unsteady aerodynamic phenomena that are important in flight dynamics applications. Accomodating bifurcation phenomena involving time dependent equilibrium states within a mathematical model of the aerodynamic response raises an issue of memory effects that becomes more important with each successive bifurcation.

  10. Lessons Learned During Solutions of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Suna N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    Optimization research at NASA Glenn Research Center has addressed the design of structures, aircraft and airbreathing propulsion engines. During solution of the multidisciplinary problems several issues were encountered. This paper lists four issues and discusses the strategies adapted for their resolution: (1) The optimization process can lead to an inefficient local solution. This deficiency was encountered during design of an engine component. The limitation was overcome through an augmentation of animation into optimization. (2) Optimum solutions obtained were infeasible for aircraft and air-breathing propulsion engine problems. Alleviation of this deficiency required a cascading of multiple algorithms. (3) Profile optimization of a beam produced an irregular shape. Engineering intuition restored the regular shape for the beam. (4) The solution obtained for a cylindrical shell by a subproblem strategy converged to a design that can be difficult to manufacture. Resolution of this issue remains a challenge. The issues and resolutions are illustrated through six problems: (1) design of an engine component, (2) synthesis of a subsonic aircraft, (3) operation optimization of a supersonic engine, (4) design of a wave-rotor-topping device, (5) profile optimization of a cantilever beam, and (6) design of a cvlindrical shell. The combined effort of designers and researchers can bring the optimization method from academia to industry.

  11. The Aerodynamic Plane Table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    This report gives the description and the use of a specially designed aerodynamic plane table. For the accurate and expeditious geometrical measurement of models in an aerodynamic laboratory, and for miscellaneous truing operations, there is frequent need for a specially equipped plan table. For example, one may have to measure truly to 0.001 inch the offsets of an airfoil at many parts of its surface. Or the offsets of a strut, airship hull, or other carefully formed figure may require exact calipering. Again, a complete airplane model may have to be adjusted for correct incidence at all parts of its surfaces or verified in those parts for conformance to specifications. Such work, if but occasional, may be done on a planing or milling machine; but if frequent, justifies the provision of a special table. For this reason it was found desirable in 1918 to make the table described in this report and to equip it with such gauges and measures as the work should require.

  12. Distributed Aerodynamic Sensing and Processing Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin; Jutte, Christine; Mangalam, Arun

    2011-01-01

    A Distributed Aerodynamic Sensing and Processing (DASP) toolbox was designed and fabricated for flight test applications with an Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) mounted under the fuselage of an F-15B on the Flight Test Fixture (FTF). DASP monitors and processes the aerodynamics with the structural dynamics using nonintrusive, surface-mounted, hot-film sensing. This aerodynamic measurement tool benefits programs devoted to static/dynamic load alleviation, body freedom flutter suppression, buffet control, improvement of aerodynamic efficiency through cruise control, supersonic wave drag reduction through shock control, etc. This DASP toolbox measures local and global unsteady aerodynamic load distribution with distributed sensing. It determines correlation between aerodynamic observables (aero forces) and structural dynamics, and allows control authority increase through aeroelastic shaping and active flow control. It offers improvements in flutter suppression and, in particular, body freedom flutter suppression, as well as aerodynamic performance of wings for increased range/endurance of manned/ unmanned flight vehicles. Other improvements include inlet performance with closed-loop active flow control, and development and validation of advanced analytical and computational tools for unsteady aerodynamics.

  13. Improved Aerodynamic Influence Coefficients for Dynamic Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Patrice

    2011-12-01

    Currently at Bombardier Aerospace, aeroelastic analyses are performed using the Doublet Lattice Method (DLM) incorporated in the NASTRAN solver. This method proves to be very reliable and fast in preliminary design stages where wind tunnel experimental results are often not available. Unfortunately, the geometric simplifications and limitations of the DLM, based on the lifting surfaces theory, reduce the ability of this method to give reliable results for all flow conditions, particularly in transonic flow. Therefore, a new method has been developed involving aerodynamic data from high-fidelity CFD codes which solve the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations. These new aerodynamic loads are transmitted to the NASTRAN aeroelastic module through improved aerodynamic influence coefficients (AIC). A cantilevered wing model is created from the Global Express structural model and a set of natural modes is calculated for a baseline configuration of the structure. The baseline mode shapes are then combined with an interpolation scheme to deform the 3-D CFD mesh necessary for Euler and Navier-Stokes analyses. An uncoupled approach is preferred to allow aerodynamic information from different CFD codes. Following the steady state CFD analyses, pressure differences ( DeltaCp), calculated between the deformed models and the original geometry, lead to aerodynamic loads which are transferred to the DLM model. A modal-based AIC method is applied to the aerodynamic matrices of NASTRAN based on a least-square approximation to evaluate aerodynamic loads of a different wing configuration which displays similar types of mode shapes. The methodology developed in this research creates weighting factors based on steady CFD analyses which have an equivalent reduced frequency of zero. These factors are applied to both the real and imaginary part of the aerodynamic matrices as well as all reduced frequencies used in the PK-Method which solves flutter problems. The modal-based AIC method

  14. Low Reynolds Number Aerodynamic Characteristics of Several Airplane Configurations Designed to Fly in the Mars Atmosphere at Subsonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, Richard J.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2006-01-01

    A 1/4-scale wind tunnel model of an airplane configuration developed for short duration flight at subsonic speeds in the Martian atmosphere has been tested in the Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The tunnel was pumped down to extremely low pressures to represent Martian Mach/Reynolds number conditions. Aerodynamic data were obtained and upper and lower surface wind pressures were measured at one spanwise station on some configurations. Three unswept wings of the same planform but different airfoil sections were tested. Horizontal tail incidence was varied as was the deflection of plain and split trailing-edge flaps. One unswept wing configuration was tested with the lower part of the fuselage removed and the vertical/horizontal tail assembly inverted and mounted from beneath the fuselage. A sweptback wing was also tested. Tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.50 to 0.90. Wing chord Reynolds number was varied from 40,000 to 100,000 and angles of attack and sideslip were varied from -10deg to 20deg and -10deg to 10deg, respectively.

  15. A Problem-Based Learning Design for Teaching Biochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dods, Richard F.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the design of a biochemistry course that uses problem-based learning. Provides opportunities for students to question, dispute, confirm, and disconfirm their understanding of basic concepts. Emphasizes self-correction through dialogue. Topics covered include amino acids, metabolic pathways and inherited disease, proteins, enzymes and…

  16. Problems That Face Research in the Design of English Spelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yule, Valerie

    1994-01-01

    Argues that English spelling is a legitimate subject for research and development to improve it. Discusses research problems, including the definition of an "optimum" spelling, issues of models, and methodology and experimental design. Suggests that empirical exploration has been prevented by the historic unquestioned assumptions of spelling…

  17. Designing Digital Problem Based Learning Tasks that Motivate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Loon, Anne-Marieke; Ros, Anje; Martens, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether teachers are able to apply the principles of autonomy support and structure support in designing digital problem based learning (PBL) tasks. We examine whether these tasks are more autonomy- and structure-supportive and whether primary and secondary school students experience greater autonomy, competence, and motivation…

  18. Variational Bayesian strategies for high-dimensional, stochastic design problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsourelakis, P. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a lesser-studied problem in the context of model-based, uncertainty quantification (UQ), that of optimization/design/control under uncertainty. The solution of such problems is hindered not only by the usual difficulties encountered in UQ tasks (e.g. the high computational cost of each forward simulation, the large number of random variables) but also by the need to solve a nonlinear optimization problem involving large numbers of design variables and potentially constraints. We propose a framework that is suitable for a class of such problems and is based on the idea of recasting them as probabilistic inference tasks. To that end, we propose a Variational Bayesian (VB) formulation and an iterative VB-Expectation-Maximization scheme that is capable of identifying a local maximum as well as a low-dimensional set of directions in the design space, along which, the objective exhibits the largest sensitivity. We demonstrate the validity of the proposed approach in the context of two numerical examples involving thousands of random and design variables. In all cases considered the cost of the computations in terms of calls to the forward model was of the order of 100 or less. The accuracy of the approximations provided is assessed by information-theoretic metrics.

  19. Restoration as a science-based design problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternack, G.; Wheaton, J.

    2003-04-01

    Existing approaches for performing environmental restoration either involve problem diagnosis and assessment with little implementation or ad hoc construction with little forethought. Environmental assessment is an important aspect of stewardship that leads to the diagnosis and prioritization of problems requiring restoration. It should come before and inform restoration. Projects that are built ad hoc have been widely reported to fail due to a lack of recognition of key natural processes. By contrast, other creative human endeavors make extensive use of the science of design. Among other concepts, it is inherent in the design process to generate many alternatives, as open-ended problems always have multiple correct solutions. For environmental restoration, such alternatives can be created by integrating widely accepted concepts from hydrology, civil engineering, aquatic biology, riparian ecology, and geomorphology. Then the specifics of each alternative should be analyzed for their relative performance using predictive computer models and other analytical tools. A river restoration approach that makes use of a comprehensive science-based design process has been developed to address the specific problem of fish spawning habitat enhancement. The approach was used in summer 2001 and 2002. In the latter case, science-based design was used at multiple spatial scales. At the reach scale, designs aimed to elevate the bed and increase slopes over constructed riffles. At the sub-reach scale, designs incorporated a complex assemblage of geomorphic units including broad riffles (to encourage divergent flow and gravel deposition at high discharge), small pools (whose widths were constricted by bars to encourage convergent flow and scour at high discharge) and boulder complexes. After thorough analysis and evaluation, the best performing project was selected by a multidisciplinary design team according to habitat and geomorphic goals and then built. A long-term monitoring

  20. Distributed genetic algorithms for the floorplan design problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohoon, James P.; Hegde, Shailesh U.; Martin, Worthy N.; Richards, Dana S.

    1991-01-01

    Designing a VLSI floorplan calls for arranging a given set of modules in the plane to minimize the weighted sum of area and wire-length measures. A method of solving the floorplan design problem using distributed genetic algorithms is presented. Distributed genetic algorithms, based on the paleontological theory of punctuated equilibria, offer a conceptual modification to the traditional genetic algorithms. Experimental results on several problem instances demonstrate the efficacy of this method and indicate the advantages of this method over other methods, such as simulated annealing. The method has performed better than the simulated annealing approach, both in terms of the average cost of the solutions found and the best-found solution, in almost all the problem instances tried.

  1. Golf Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A former Martin Marietta Manned Space Systems engineer, Robert T. Thurman went from analyzing airloads on the Space Shuttle External Tank to analyzing airloads on golf balls for Wilson Sporting Goods Company. Using his NASA know-how, Thurman designed the Ultra 500 golf ball, which has three different-sized dimples in 60 triangular faces (instead of the usual 20) formed by a series of intersecting "parting" lines. This balances the asymmetry caused by the molding line in all golf balls. According to Wilson, the ball sustains initial velocity longer and produces the most stable ball flight for "unmatched" accuracy and distance.

  2. Aerodynamic Simulation of the MARINTEK Braceless Semisubmersible Wave Tank Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Gordon; Muskulus, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Model scale experiments of floating offshore wind turbines are important for both platform design for the industry as well as numerical model validation for the research community. An important consideration in the wave tank testing of offshore wind turbines are scaling effects, especially the tension between accurate scaling of both hydrodynamic and aerodynamic forces. The recent MARINTEK braceless semisubmersible wave tank experiment utilizes a novel aerodynamic force actuator to decouple the scaling of the aerodynamic forces. This actuator consists of an array of motors that pull on cables to provide aerodynamic forces that are calculated by a blade-element momentum code in real time as the experiment is conducted. This type of system has the advantage of supplying realistically scaled aerodynamic forces that include dynamic forces from platform motion, but does not provide the insights into the accuracy of the aerodynamic models that an actual model-scale rotor could provide. The modeling of this system presents an interesting challenge, as there are two ways to simulate the aerodynamics; either by using the turbulent wind fields as inputs to the aerodynamic model of the design code, or by surpassing the aerodynamic model and using the forces applied to the experimental turbine as direct inputs to the simulation. This paper investigates the best practices of modeling this type of novel aerodynamic actuator using a modified wind turbine simulation tool, and demonstrates that bypassing the dynamic aerodynamics solver of design codes can lead to erroneous results.

  3. Problems of radome design for modern airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulf, B.

    1985-01-01

    The operation of airborne radar involves a discrimination between targets and ground clutter. A solution of the resulting problems requires the design of antennas with special characteristics. Efforts of the antenna designer, however, will be defeated if the antenna is protected by a radome which fails to provide the same high performance as the antenna. The present investigation is concerned with problems arising in the design of high-performance radomes, taking into account two important airborne radar systems. The first example involves the E-3A (AWACS), the most modern airborne surveillance radar system now in operation. The second example is related to a typical fire-control radar in a modern tactical aircraft.

  4. IODC 1998 Lens Design Problem Revisited: A Strategy for Simplifying Glass Choices in an Apochromatic Design

    SciTech Connect

    Seppala, L G

    2000-09-15

    A glass-choice strategy, based on separately designing an achromatic lens before progressing to an apochromatic lens, simplified my approach to solving the International Optical Design Conference (IODC) 1998 lens design problem. The glasses that are needed to make the lens apochromatic are combined into triplet correctors with two ''buried'' surfaces. By applying this strategy, I reached successful solutions that used only six glasses--three glasses for the achromatic design and three additional glasses for the apochromatic design.

  5. Aerodynamic Characterization of a Modern Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.; Holland, Scott D.; Blevins, John A.

    2011-01-01

    A modern launch vehicle is by necessity an extremely integrated design. The accurate characterization of its aerodynamic characteristics is essential to determine design loads, to design flight control laws, and to establish performance. The NASA Ares Aerodynamics Panel has been responsible for technical planning, execution, and vetting of the aerodynamic characterization of the Ares I vehicle. An aerodynamics team supporting the Panel consists of wind tunnel engineers, computational engineers, database engineers, and other analysts that address topics such as uncertainty quantification. The team resides at three NASA centers: Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Ames Research Center. The Panel has developed strategies to synergistically combine both the wind tunnel efforts and the computational efforts with the goal of validating the computations. Selected examples highlight key flow physics and, where possible, the fidelity of the comparisons between wind tunnel results and the computations. Lessons learned summarize what has been gleaned during the project and can be useful for other vehicle development projects.

  6. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to: (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 1/Part 1 publication covers configuration aerodynamics.

  7. The oscillating wing with aerodynamically balanced elevator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussner, H G; Schwartz, I

    1941-01-01

    The two-dimensional problem of the oscillating wing with aerodynamically balanced elevator is treated in the manner that the wing is replaced by a plate with bends and stages and the airfoil section by a mean line consisting of one or more straights. The computed formulas and tables permit, on these premises, the prediction of the pressure distribution and of the aerodynamic reactions of oscillating elevators and tabs with any position of elevator hinge in respect to elevator leading edge.

  8. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2010-03-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re approximately 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small

  9. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re ≈ 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small robotic

  10. Interaction prediction optimization in multidisciplinary design optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Meng, Debiao; Zhang, Xiaoling; Huang, Hong-Zhong; Wang, Zhonglai; Xu, Huanwei

    2014-01-01

    The distributed strategy of Collaborative Optimization (CO) is suitable for large-scale engineering systems. However, it is hard for CO to converge when there is a high level coupled dimension. Furthermore, the discipline objectives cannot be considered in each discipline optimization problem. In this paper, one large-scale systems control strategy, the interaction prediction method (IPM), is introduced to enhance CO. IPM is utilized for controlling subsystems and coordinating the produce process in large-scale systems originally. We combine the strategy of IPM with CO and propose the Interaction Prediction Optimization (IPO) method to solve MDO problems. As a hierarchical strategy, there are a system level and a subsystem level in IPO. The interaction design variables (including shared design variables and linking design variables) are operated at the system level and assigned to the subsystem level as design parameters. Each discipline objective is considered and optimized at the subsystem level simultaneously. The values of design variables are transported between system level and subsystem level. The compatibility constraints are replaced with the enhanced compatibility constraints to reduce the dimension of design variables in compatibility constraints. Two examples are presented to show the potential application of IPO for MDO.

  11. Vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H. B.; Campbell, J. F.; Young, A. D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The principal emphasis of the meeting was to be on the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads. This report shows that a substantial amount of the papers covering this area were received from a wide range of countries, together with an attendance that was even more diverse. In itself, this testifies to the current interest in the subject and to the appropriateness of the Panel's choice of topic and approach. An attempt is made to summarize each paper delivered, and to relate the contributions made in the papers and in the discussions to some of the important aspects of vortex flow aerodynamics. This reveals significant progress and important clarifications, but also brings out remaining weaknesses in predictive capability and gaps in understanding. Where possible, conclusions are drawn and areas of continuing concern are identified.

  12. A general aerodynamic approach to the problem of decaying or growing vibrations of thin, flexible wings with supersonic leading and trailing edges and no side edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Indicial aerodynamic influence coefficients were evaluated from potential theory for a thin, flexible wing with supersonic leading and trailing edges only. The analysis is based on the use of small surface areas in which the downwash is assumed uniform. Within this limitation, the results are exact except for the restriction of linearized theory. The areas are not restricted either to square boxes or Mach boxes. A given area may be any rectangle or square which may or may not be cut by the Mach forecone, and any area can be used anywhere in the forecone without loss of accuracy.

  13. A comprehensive analytical model of rotorcraft aerodynamics and dynamics. Part 1: Analysis development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1980-01-01

    Structural, inertia, and aerodynamic models were combined to form a comprehensive model of rotor aerodynamics and dynamics that is applicable to a wide range of problems and a wide class of vehicles. A digital computer program is used to calculate rotor performance, loads, and noise; helicopter vibration and gust response; flight dynamics and handling qualities; and system aeroelastic stability. The analysis is intended for use in the design, testing, and evaluation of rotors and rotorcraft, and to be a basis for further development of rotary wing theories.

  14. Supporting operator problem solving through ecological interface design

    SciTech Connect

    Vicente, K.J.; Christoffersen, K.; Pereklita, A.

    1995-04-01

    Two experiments are described evaluating ecological interface design (EID), a novel theoretical framework for the design of interfaces for complex human-machine systems. The findings of experiment one are consistent with the claim that an interface based on an abstraction hierarchy representation can provide more support for problem solving than an interface based on physical variable alone, thereby providing some initial support for the EID framework. The findings of experiment two indicate that subjects that exhibited effective diagnosis performance using the P + F interface tended to start their search at a high level of abstraction and gradually work their way down to more detailed levels, as predicted. 28 refs.

  15. Application of clustering global optimization to thin film design problems.

    PubMed

    Lemarchand, Fabien

    2014-03-10

    Refinement techniques usually calculate an optimized local solution, which is strongly dependent on the initial formula used for the thin film design. In the present study, a clustering global optimization method is used which can iteratively change this initial formula, thereby progressing further than in the case of local optimization techniques. A wide panel of local solutions is found using this procedure, resulting in a large range of optical thicknesses. The efficiency of this technique is illustrated by two thin film design problems, in particular an infrared antireflection coating, and a solar-selective absorber coating. PMID:24663856

  16. Application of clustering global optimization to thin film design problems.

    PubMed

    Lemarchand, Fabien

    2014-03-10

    Refinement techniques usually calculate an optimized local solution, which is strongly dependent on the initial formula used for the thin film design. In the present study, a clustering global optimization method is used which can iteratively change this initial formula, thereby progressing further than in the case of local optimization techniques. A wide panel of local solutions is found using this procedure, resulting in a large range of optical thicknesses. The efficiency of this technique is illustrated by two thin film design problems, in particular an infrared antireflection coating, and a solar-selective absorber coating.

  17. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 1/Part 2 publication covers the design optimization and testing sessions.

  18. Switchable and Tunable Aerodynamic Drag on Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttag, Mark; Lopéz Jiménez, Francisco; Upadhyaya, Priyank; Kumar, Shanmugam; Reis, Pedro

    We report results on the performance of Smart Morphable Surfaces (Smporhs) that can be mounted onto cylindrical structures to actively reduce their aerodynamic drag. Our system comprises of an elastomeric thin shell with a series of carefully designed subsurface cavities that, once depressurized, lead to a dramatic deformation of the surface topography, on demand. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the giant cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) which possesses an array of axial grooves, thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. We perform systematic wind tunnel tests on cylinders covered with our Smorphs and characterize their aerodynamic performance. The switchable and tunable nature of our system offers substantial advantages for aerodynamic performance when compared to static topographies, due to their operation over a wider range of flow conditions.

  19. Switchable and Tunable Aerodynamic Drag on Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttag, Mark; Lopez Jimenez, Francisco; Reis, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    We report results on the performance of Smart Morphable Surfaces (Smporhs) that can be mounted onto cylindrical structures to actively reduce their aerodynamic drag. Our system comprises of an elastomeric thin shell with a series of carefully designed subsurface cavities that, once depressurized, lead to a dramatic deformation of the surface topography, on demand. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the giant cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) which possesses an array of axial grooves, which are thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. We perform systematic wind tunnel tests on cylinders covered with our Smorphs and characterize their aerodynamic performance. The switchable and tunable nature of our system offers substantial advantages for aerodynamic performance when compared to static topographies, due to their operation over a wider range of flow conditions.

  20. X-34 Vehicle Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.

    1998-01-01

    The X-34, being designed and built by the Orbital Sciences Corporation, is an unmanned sub-orbital vehicle designed to be used as a flying test bed to demonstrate key vehicle and operational technologies applicable to future reusable launch vehicles. The X-34 will be air-launched from an L-1011 carrier aircraft at approximately Mach 0.7 and 38,000 feet altitude, where an onboard engine will accelerate the vehicle to speeds above Mach 7 and altitudes to 250,000 feet. An unpowered entry will follow, including an autonomous landing. The X-34 will demonstrate the ability to fly through inclement weather, land horizontally at a designated site, and have a rapid turn-around capability. A series of wind tunnel tests on scaled models was conducted in four facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the X-34. Analysis of these test results revealed that longitudinal trim could be achieved throughout the design trajectory. The maximum elevon deflection required to trim was only half of that available, leaving a margin for gust alleviation and aerodynamic coefficient uncertainty. Directional control can be achieved aerodynamically except at combined high Mach numbers and high angles of attack, where reaction control jets must be used. The X-34 landing speed, between 184 and 206 knots, is within the capabilities of the gear and tires, and the vehicle has sufficient rudder authority to control the required 30-knot crosswind.

  1. Modeling Powered Aerodynamics for the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Aerodynamic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Robinson, Philip E.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling the aerodynamics of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) has presented many technical challenges to the developers of the Orion aerodynamic database. During a launch abort event, the aerodynamic environment around the LAV is very complex as multiple solid rocket plumes interact with each other and the vehicle. It is further complicated by vehicle separation events such as between the LAV and the launch vehicle stack or between the launch abort tower and the crew module. The aerodynamic database for the LAV was developed mainly from wind tunnel tests involving powered jet simulations of the rocket exhaust plumes, supported by computational fluid dynamic simulations. However, limitations in both methods have made it difficult to properly capture the aerodynamics of the LAV in experimental and numerical simulations. These limitations have also influenced decisions regarding the modeling and structure of the aerodynamic database for the LAV and led to compromises and creative solutions. Two database modeling approaches are presented in this paper (incremental aerodynamics and total aerodynamics), with examples showing strengths and weaknesses of each approach. In addition, the unique problems presented to the database developers by the large data space required for modeling a launch abort event illustrate the complexities of working with multi-dimensional data.

  2. Control of helicopter rotorblade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabunmi, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study of a method for controlling the aerodynamics of helicopter rotorblades using stacks of piezoelectric ceramic plates are presented. A resonant mechanism is proposed for the amplification of the displacements produced by the stack. This motion is then converted into linear displacement for the actuation of the servoflap of the blades. A design which emulates the actuation of the servoflap on the Kaman SH-2F is used to demonstrate the fact that such a system can be designed to produce the necessary forces and velocities needed to control the aerodynamics of the rotorblades of such a helicopter. Estimates of the electrical power requirements are also presented. A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 Program is suggested, whereby a bench-top prototype of the device can be built and tested. A collaborative effort between AEDAR Corporation and Kaman Aerospace Corporation is anticipated for future effort on this project.

  3. Mechanical design problems associated with turbopump fluid film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evces, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    Most high speed cryogenic turbopumps for liquid propulsion rocket engines currently use ball or roller contact bearings for rotor support. The operating speeds, loads, clearances, and environments of these pumps combine to make bearing wear a limiting factor on turbopump life. An example is the high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) used in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Although the HPOTP design life is 27,000 seconds at 30,000 rpms, or approximately 50 missions, bearings must currently be replaced after 2 missions. One solution to the bearing wear problem in the HPOTP, as well as in future turbopump designs, is the utilization of fluid film bearings in lieu of continuous contact bearings. Hydrostatic, hydrodynamic, and damping seal bearings are all replacement candidates for contact bearings in rocket engine high speed turbomachinery. These three types of fluid film bearings have different operating characteristics, but they share a common set of mechanical design opportunities and difficulties. Results of research to define some of the mechanical design issues are given. Problems considered include transient strat/stop rub, non-operational rotor support, bearing wear inspection and measurement, and bearing fluid supply route. Emphasis is given to the HPOTP preburner pump (PBP) bearing, but the results are pertinent to high-speed cryogenic turbomachinery in general.

  4. Computer Simulation of Aircraft Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inouye, Mamoru

    1989-01-01

    The role of Ames Research Center in conducting basic aerodynamics research through computer simulations is described. The computer facilities, including supercomputers and peripheral equipment that represent the state of the art, are described. The methodology of computational fluid dynamics is explained briefly. Fundamental studies of turbulence and transition are being pursued to understand these phenomena and to develop models that can be used in the solution of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Four applications of computer simulations for aerodynamics problems are described: subsonic flow around a fuselage at high angle of attack, subsonic flow through a turbine stator-rotor stage, transonic flow around a flexible swept wing, and transonic flow around a wing-body configuration that includes an inlet and a tail.

  5. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  6. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling and active aeroelastic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Unsteady aerodynamic modeling techniques are developed and applied to the study of active control of elastic vehicles. The problem of active control of a supercritical flutter mode poses a definite design goal stability, and is treated in detail. The transfer functions relating the arbitrary airfoil motions to the airloads are derived from the Laplace transforms of the linearized airload expressions for incompressible two dimensional flow. The transfer function relating the motions to the circulatory part of these loads is recognized as the Theodorsen function extended to complex values of reduced frequency, and is termed the generalized Theodorsen function. Inversion of the Laplace transforms yields exact transient airloads and airfoil motions. Exact root loci of aeroelastic modes are calculated, providing quantitative information regarding subcritical and supercritical flutter conditions.

  7. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in area of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodyamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  8. Uncertainty in Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Hemsch, M. J.; Morrison, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    An approach is presented to treat computational aerodynamics as a process, subject to the fundamental quality assurance principles of process control and process improvement. We consider several aspects affecting uncertainty for the computational aerodynamic process and present a set of stages to determine the level of management required to meet risk assumptions desired by the customer of the predictions.

  9. Aerodynamics of high-speed railway train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Raghu S.; Kim, H.-D.; Setoguchi, T.

    2002-10-01

    Railway train aerodynamic problems are closely associated with the flows occurring around train. Much effort to speed up the train system has to date been paid on the improvement of electric motor power rather than understanding the flow around the train. This has led to larger energy losses and performance deterioration of the train system, since the flows around train are more disturbed due to turbulence of the increased speed of the train, and consequently the flow energies are converted to aerodynamic drag, noise and vibrations. With the speed-up of train, many engineering problems which have been neglected at low train speeds, are being raised with regard to aerodynamic noise and vibrations, impulse forces occurring as two trains intersect each other, impulse wave at the exit of tunnel, ear discomfort of passengers inside train, etc. These are of major limitation factors to the speed-up of train system. The present review addresses the state of the art on the aerodynamic and aeroacoustic problems of high-speed railway train and highlights proper control strategies to alleviate undesirable aerodynamic problems of high-speed railway train system.

  10. 1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry HighSpeed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of. Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to: (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

  11. 1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

  12. Introduction. Computational aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Paul G

    2007-10-15

    The wide range of uses of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aircraft design is discussed along with its role in dealing with the environmental impact of flight. Enabling technologies, such as grid generation and turbulence models, are also considered along with flow/turbulence control. The large eddy simulation, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and hybrid turbulence modelling approaches are contrasted. The CFD prediction of numerous jet configurations occurring in aerospace are discussed along with aeroelasticity for aeroengine and external aerodynamics, design optimization, unsteady flow modelling and aeroengine internal and external flows. It is concluded that there is a lack of detailed measurements (for both canonical and complex geometry flows) to provide validation and even, in some cases, basic understanding of flow physics. Not surprisingly, turbulence modelling is still the weak link along with, as ever, a pressing need for improved (in terms of robustness, speed and accuracy) solver technology, grid generation and geometry handling. Hence, CFD, as a truly predictive and creative design tool, seems a long way off. Meanwhile, extreme practitioner expertise is still required and the triad of computation, measurement and analytic solution must be judiciously used.

  13. The 2014 IODC lens design problem: the Cinderella lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juergens, Richard C.

    2014-12-01

    The lens design problem for the 2014 IODC is to design a 100 mm focal length lens in which all the components of the lens can be manufactured from ten Schott N-BK7 lens blanks 100 mm in diameter x 30 mm thick. The lens is used monochromatically at 587.56 nm. The goal of the problem is to maximize the product of the entrance pupil diameter and the semi-field of view while holding the RMS wavefront error to <= 0.070 wave within the field of view. There were 45 entries from 13 different countries. Four different commercial lens design programs were used, along with six custom, in-house programs. The number of lens elements in the entries ranged from 10 to 52. The winning entry from Jon Ehrmann had 25 lens elements, and had an entrance pupil diameter of 33.9 mm and a semi-field of view of 62.5° for a merit function product of 2,119.

  14. Security Problems of Scan Design and Accompanying Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasizzo, Anton; Novak, Franc

    2016-05-01

    The paper deals with the security problems of scan design and investigates currently proposed solutions. A solution based on data encryption to protect the data in scan chains is discussed and problems related to the block-based encoding are outlined. Next, security extension for IEEE Std. 1149.1 providing a locking mechanism is analysed. The mechanism prevents unauthorised users to interfere via test bus with the system normal operation. Possible attack scenario is considered and the probabilities of successful attack within a given time interval are calculated for different lengths of the Lock register. The paper concludes with the description of current work focused on improvements the security of the locking mechanism, in particular by using simplified public key infrastructure.

  15. "Pierce and inhale" design in capsule based dry powder inhalers: Effect of capsule piercing and motion on aerodynamic performance of drugs.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Francesco; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Rossi, Alessandra; Sonvico, Fabio; Colombo, Paolo; Buttini, Francesca

    2015-06-20

    In this work three capsule-based dry powder inhalers, available for generics product development, were compared. Two technologically different dry powder formulations were used in order to relate the capsule piercing position and motion in the device to their aerodynamic performance. A "pierce and inhale" design, in which the capsules pierced with RS01, HandiHaler or Turbospin devices were aerosolized in the same device or transferred and aerosolized with another device, was constructed and carried out. The results obtained showed that two dry powder formulations, i.e., a drug/lactose blend or a carrier-free powder, aerosolized using capsule based inhalers, performed differently. The aerosolization of drug carrier mixture in terms of drug dispersion and emitted dose, was more sensible to the piercing and device combination than the carrier free powder. The motion of the capsule during the aerosolization boosted the powder emission, whereas the powder disaggregation was more influenced by the airflow pattern around the capsule and inside the inhaler turbulence chamber.

  16. Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers from 0.33 to 1.20 of a wing-body design concept for a hypersonic research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, J. L.; Pittman, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the static aerodynamic characteristics of a model of one design concept for the proposed National Hypersonic Flight Research Facility was conducted in the Langley 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel. The experiment consisted of configuration buildup from the basic body by adding a wing, center vertical tail, and a three module or six module scramjet engine. The freestream test Mach numbers were 0.33, 0.80, 0.90, 0.95, 0.98, 1.10, and 1.20 at Reynolds numbers per meter ranging from 4.8 x 1 million to 10.4 x 1 million. The test angle of attack range was approximately -4 deg to 22 deg at constant angles of sideslip of 0 deg and 4 deg; the angle of sideslip ranged from about -6 deg to 6 deg at constant angles of attack of 0 deg and 17 deg. The elevons were deflected 0 deg, -10 deg, and -20 deg with rudder deflections of 0 deg and 15.6 deg.

  17. Advancement of proprotor technology. Task 1: Design study summary. [aerodynamic concept of minimum size tilt proprotor research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    A tilt-proprotor proof-of-concept aircraft design study has been conducted. The results are presented. The ojective of the contract is to advance the state of proprotor technology through design studies and full-scale wind-tunnel tests. The specific objective is to conduct preliminary design studies to define a minimum-size tilt-proprotor research aircraft that can perform proof-of-concept flight research. The aircraft that results from these studies is a twin-engine, high-wing aircraft with 25-foot, three-bladed tilt proprotors mounted on pylons at the wingtips. Each pylon houses a Pratt and Whitney PT6C-40 engine with a takeoff rating of 1150 horsepower. Empty weight is estimated at 6876 pounds. The normal gross weight is 9500 pounds, and the maximum gross weight is 12,400 pounds.

  18. High-loading, 1800 ft/sec tip speed transonic compressor fan stage. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. L.; Halle, J. E.; Kennedy, E. E.

    1972-01-01

    A single stage fan with a tip speed of 1800 ft/sec (548.6m/sec) and hub/tip ratio of 0.5 was designed to produce a pressure ratio of 2.285:1 with an adiabatic efficiency of 84.0%. The design flow per inlet annulus area is 38.7 lbm/sq ft-sec (188.9KG/sqm-sec). Rotor blades have modified multiple-circular-arc and precompression airfoil sections. The stator vanes have multiple-circular-arc airfoil sections.

  19. Computational aerodynamics requirements: The future role of the computer and the needs of the aerospace industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubbert, P. E.

    1978-01-01

    The commercial airplane builder's viewpoint on the important issues involved in the development of improved computational aerodynamics tools such as powerful computers optimized for fluid flow problems is presented. The primary user of computational aerodynamics in a commercial aircraft company is the design engineer who is concerned with solving practical engineering problems. From his viewpoint, the development of program interfaces and pre-and post-processing capability for new computational methods is just as important as the algorithms and machine architecture. As more and more details of the entire flow field are computed, the visibility of the output data becomes a major problem which is then doubled when a design capability is added. The user must be able to see, understand, and interpret the results calculated. Enormous costs are expanded because of the need to work with programs having only primitive user interfaces.

  20. Viking entry aerodynamics and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polutchko, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the Mars entry including the mission sequence of events and associated spacecraft weights are described along with the Viking spacecraft. Test data are presented for the aerodynamic characteristics of the entry vehicle showing trimmed alpha, drag coefficient, and trimmed lift to drag ratio versus Mach number; the damping characteristics of the entry configuration; the angle of attack time history of Viking entries; stagnation heating and pressure time histories; and the aeroshell heating distribution as obtained in tests run in a shock tunnel for various gases. Flight tests which demonstrate the aerodynamic separation of the full-scale aeroshell and the flying qualities of the entry configuration in an uncontrolled mode are documented. Design values selected for the heat protection system based on the test data and analysis performed are presented.

  1. Structural dynamics and aerodynamics measurements of biologically inspired flexible flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Wu, P; Stanford, B K; Sällström, E; Ukeiley, L; Ifju, P G

    2011-03-01

    Flapping wing flight as seen in hummingbirds and insects poses an interesting unsteady aerodynamic problem: coupling of wing kinematics, structural dynamics and aerodynamics. There have been numerous studies on the kinematics and aerodynamics in both experimental and computational cases with both natural and artificial wings. These studies tend to ignore wing flexibility; however, observation in nature affirms that passive wing deformation is predominant and may be crucial to the aerodynamic performance. This paper presents a multidisciplinary experimental endeavor in correlating a flapping micro air vehicle wing's aeroelasticity and thrust production, by quantifying and comparing overall thrust, structural deformation and airflow of six pairs of hummingbird-shaped membrane wings of different properties. The results show that for a specific spatial distribution of flexibility, there is an effective frequency range in thrust production. The wing deformation at the thrust-productive frequencies indicates the importance of flexibility: both bending and twisting motion can interact with aerodynamic loads to enhance wing performance under certain conditions, such as the deformation phase and amplitude. By measuring structural deformations under the same aerodynamic conditions, beneficial effects of passive wing deformation can be observed from the visualized airflow and averaged thrust. The measurements and their presentation enable observation and understanding of the required structural properties for a thrust effective flapping wing. The intended passive responses of the different wings follow a particular pattern in correlation to their aerodynamic performance. Consequently, both the experimental technique and data analysis method can lead to further studies to determine the design principles for micro air vehicle flapping wings. PMID:21339627

  2. Structural dynamics and aerodynamics measurements of biologically inspired flexible flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Wu, P; Stanford, B K; Sällström, E; Ukeiley, L; Ifju, P G

    2011-03-01

    Flapping wing flight as seen in hummingbirds and insects poses an interesting unsteady aerodynamic problem: coupling of wing kinematics, structural dynamics and aerodynamics. There have been numerous studies on the kinematics and aerodynamics in both experimental and computational cases with both natural and artificial wings. These studies tend to ignore wing flexibility; however, observation in nature affirms that passive wing deformation is predominant and may be crucial to the aerodynamic performance. This paper presents a multidisciplinary experimental endeavor in correlating a flapping micro air vehicle wing's aeroelasticity and thrust production, by quantifying and comparing overall thrust, structural deformation and airflow of six pairs of hummingbird-shaped membrane wings of different properties. The results show that for a specific spatial distribution of flexibility, there is an effective frequency range in thrust production. The wing deformation at the thrust-productive frequencies indicates the importance of flexibility: both bending and twisting motion can interact with aerodynamic loads to enhance wing performance under certain conditions, such as the deformation phase and amplitude. By measuring structural deformations under the same aerodynamic conditions, beneficial effects of passive wing deformation can be observed from the visualized airflow and averaged thrust. The measurements and their presentation enable observation and understanding of the required structural properties for a thrust effective flapping wing. The intended passive responses of the different wings follow a particular pattern in correlation to their aerodynamic performance. Consequently, both the experimental technique and data analysis method can lead to further studies to determine the design principles for micro air vehicle flapping wings.

  3. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 13-percent-thick airfoil section designed for general aviation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghee, R. J.; Beasley, W. D.; Somers, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests were conducted to determine the low-speed section characteristics of a 13 percent-thick airfoil designed for general aviation applications. The results were compared with NACA 12 percent-thick sections and with the 17 percent-thick NASA airfoil. The tests were conducted ovar a Mach number range from 0.10 to 0.35. Chord Reynolds numbers varied from about 2,000,000 to 9,000,000.

  4. Aerodynamics of magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schetz, Joseph A.; Marchman, James F., III

    1996-01-01

    High-speed (500 kph) trains using magnetic forces for levitation, propulsion and control offer many advantages for the nation and a good opportunity for the aerospace community to apply 'high tech' methods to the domestic sector. One area of many that will need advanced research is the aerodynamics of such MAGLEV (Magnetic Levitation) vehicles. There are important issues with regard to wind tunnel testing and the application of CFD to these devices. This talk will deal with the aerodynamic design of MAGLEV vehicles with emphasis on wind tunnel testing. The moving track facility designed and constructed in the 6 ft. Stability Wind Tunnel at Virginia Tech will be described. Test results for a variety of MAGLEV vehicle configurations will be presented. The last topic to be discussed is a Multi-disciplinary Design approach that is being applied to MAGLEV vehicle configuration design including aerodynamics, structures, manufacturability and life-cycle cost.

  5. Aerodynamics of Laminar Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Chung K.

    2000-11-01

    The presentation will review recent advances in the understanding of the structure, dynamics, and geometry of stretched, nonequidiffusive, laminar premixed flames, as exemplified by the unsteady propagation of wrinkled flames in nonuniform flow fields. It is first shown that by considering the effects of aerodynamic stretch on the flame structure, and by allowing for mixture nonequidiffusion, the flame responses, especially the flame propagation speed, can be quantitatively as well as qualitatively modified from the idealized planar limit. Subsequently, by treating the flame as a level surface propagating with the stretch-affected flame speed, problems of increasing complexity are presented to illustrate various features of flame propagation. The illustration first treats the flame as a structureless surface propagating into a constant-density combustible with a constant velocity * the laminar flame speed, and demonstrates the phenomena of cusp formation and volumetric burning rate augmentation through flame wrinkling. By using the stretch-affected flame speed, we then describe the phenomena of cusp broadening as well as tip opening of the Bunsen flame. Finally, by allowing for the density jump across the flame surface, a unified dispersion relation is derived for the intrinsic hydrodynamic, body-force, and nonequidiffusive modes of flame

  6. Dynamical decoupling sequence construction as a filter-design problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biercuk, M. J.; Doherty, A. C.; Uys, H.

    2011-08-01

    Over the past decade we have seen an explosion of demonstrations of quantum coherence in atomic, optical and condensed matter systems. These developments have placed a new emphasis on the production of robust and optimal quantum control techniques in the presence of environmental noise. We discuss the use of dynamical decoupling as a form of open-loop quantum control capable of suppressing the effects of dephasing in quantum coherent systems. We introduce the concept of dynamical decoupling pulse-sequence construction as a filter-design problem, making connections with filter design from control theory and electrical engineering in the analysis of pulse-sequence performance for the preservation of the phase degree of freedom in a quantum superposition. A detailed mathematical description of how dephasing and its suppression can be reduced to a linear control problem is provided, and used as motivation and context for studies of the filtration properties of various dynamical decoupling sequences. Our work then takes this practical perspective in addressing both 'standard' sequences derived from nuclear magnetic resonance and novel optimized sequences developed in the context of quantum information. Additionally, we review new techniques for the numerical construction of optimized pulse sequences in this light. We show how the filter-design perspective permits concise comparisons of the relative capabilities of these sequences and reveals the physics underlying their functionality. The use of this new analytical framework allows us to derive new insights into the performance of these sequences and reveals important limiting issues, such as the effect of digital clocking on optimized sequence performance.

  7. Direct use of linear time-domain aerodynamics in aeroservoelastic analysis: Aerodynamic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, J. A.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    The work presented here is the first part of a continuing effort to expand existing capabilities in aeroelasticity by developing the methodology which is necessary to utilize unsteady time-domain aerodynamics directly in aeroservoelastic design and analysis. The ultimate objective is to define a fully integrated state-space model of an aeroelastic vehicle's aerodynamics, structure and controls which may be used to efficiently determine the vehicle's aeroservoelastic stability. Here, the current status of developing a state-space model for linear or near-linear time-domain indicial aerodynamic forces is presented.

  8. Aerodynamic performance of 0.5 meter-diameter, 337 meter-per-second tip speed, 1.5 pressure-ratio, single-stage fan designed for low noise aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelder, T. F.; Lewis, G. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Overall and blade-element aerodynamic performance of a 0.271-scale model of QF-1 are presented, examined, and then compared and evaluated with that from similar low noise fan stage designs. The tests cover a wide range of speeds and weight flows along with variations in stator setting angle and stator axial spacing from the rotor. At design speed with stator at design setting angle and a fixed distance between stage measuring stations, there were no significant effects of increasing the axial spacing between rotor stator from 1.0 to 3.5 rotor chords on stage overall pressure ratio, efficiency or stall margin.

  9. Managing the Complexity of Design Problems through Studio-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cennamo, Katherine; Brandt, Carol; Scott, Brigitte; Douglas, Sarah; McGrath, Margarita; Reimer, Yolanda; Vernon, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    The ill-structured nature of design problems makes them particularly challenging for problem-based learning. Studio-based learning (SBL), however, has much in common with problem-based learning and indeed has a long history of use in teaching students to solve design problems. The purpose of this ethnographic study of an industrial design class,…

  10. Crucial problems in the design of a terahertz tripler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Meng; Dehai, Zhang; Changhong, Jiang; Xin, Zhao; Jian, Huang; Dashuai, Yan

    2015-08-01

    A frequency-multiplied source at the terahertz band using discrete planar Schottky diodes, which is a critical element in heterodyne instruments, has been studied by some domestic research institutions in recent years. Besides the design method, there are still many crucial problems that must be taken into consideration in the design. This article mainly discuss three aspects based on the measured data of a 225 GHz tripler that we designed. Firstly, the accuracy of the diode model concerns the reliability of the simulation results. According to the Spice parameters and the measured results, the physical size and the DC parameter of the Schottky diode can be corrected until there is a good consistency between the simulated and measured results. Secondly, the heat accumulation happens to the Schottky junction when the high input power is added. A steady-state thermal simulation is done and the results show that the hottest temperature is about 140 °C with 250 mW input power, which is safe to the diode. Lastly, some non-ideal factors are brought during the assembly process such as the uncertainty in the conductive adhesive shape and location deviation of the circuit. Furthermore, the effect on the performance of the frequency multiplier is calculated in this work.

  11. Advanced turboprop installation aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The expected aerodynamic effects of a propfan installed on a thick supercritical wing are summarized qualitatively. Nacelle/wing and jet interactions, slipstream incremental velocity, nonuniform inflow, and swirl loss recovery are discussed.

  12. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  13. Analysis of the Hessian for Aerodynamic Optimization: Inviscid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal; Ta'asan, Shlomo

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we analyze inviscid aerodynamic shape optimization problems governed by the full potential and the Euler equations in two and three dimensions. The analysis indicates that minimization of pressure dependent cost functions results in Hessians whose eigenvalue distributions are identical for the full potential and the Euler equations. However the optimization problems in two and three dimensions are inherently different. While the two dimensional optimization problems are well-posed the three dimensional ones are ill-posed. Oscillations in the shape up to the smallest scale allowed by the design space can develop in the direction perpendicular to the flow, implying that a regularization is required. A natural choice of such a regularization is derived. The analysis also gives an estimate of the Hessian's condition number which implies that the problems at hand are ill-conditioned. Infinite dimensional approximations for the Hessians are constructed and preconditioners for gradient based methods are derived from these approximate Hessians.

  14. Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Jungil; Park, Hyungmin

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the aerodynamics of heavy vehicles, such as tractor-trailers, high-speed trains, and buses. We introduce three-dimensional flow structures around simplified model vehicles and heavy vehicles and discuss the flow-control devices used for drag reduction. Finally, we suggest important unsteady flow structures to investigate for the enhancement of aerodynamic performance and future directions for experimental and numerical approaches.

  15. High speed propeller acoustics and aerodynamics - A boundary element approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.; Dunn, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is applied in this paper to the problems of acoustics and aerodynamics of high speed propellers. The underlying theory is described based on the linearized Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation. The surface pressure on the blade is assumed unknown in the aerodynamic problem. It is obtained by solving a singular integral equation. The acoustic problem is then solved by moving the field point inside the fluid medium and evaluating some surface and line integrals. Thus the BEM provides a powerful technique in calculation of high speed propeller aerodynamics and acoustics.

  16. A mathematical solution to a network designing problem.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y

    1996-01-01

    One of the major open issues in neural network research includes a Network Designing Problem (NDP): find a polynomial-time procedure that produces minimal structures (the minimum intermediate size, thresholds and synapse weights) of multilayer threshold feed-forward networks so that they can yield outputs consistent with given sample sets of input-output data. The NDP includes as a subproblem a Network Training Problem (NTP) where the intermediate size is given. The NTP has been studied mainly by use of iterative algorithms of network training. This paper, making use of both rate distortion theory in information theory and linear algebra, solves the NDP mathematically rigorously. On the basis of this mathematical solution, it furthermore develops a mathematical solution procedure to the NDP that computes the minimal structure straightforwardly from the sample set. The procedure precisely attains the minimum intermediate size, although its computational time complexity can be of nonpolynomial order at worst cases. The paper also refers to a polynomial-time shortcut of the procedure for practical use that can reach an approximate minimum intermediate size with its error measurable. The shortcut, when the intermediate size is prespecified, reduces to a promising alternative as well to current network training algorithms to the NTP.

  17. Comparison of aerodynamic characteristics of pentagonal and hexagonal shaped bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Md. Naimul; Katsuchi, Hiroshi; Yamada, Hitoshi; Nishio, Mayuko

    2016-07-01

    Aerodynamics of the long-span bridge deck should be well understood for an efficient design of the bridge system. For practical bridges various deck shapes are being recommended and adopted, yet not all of their aerodynamic behaviors are well interpreted. In the present study, a numerical investigation was carried out to explore the aerodynamic characteristics of pentagonal and hexagonal shaped bridge decks. A relative comparison of steady state aerodynamic responses was made and the flow field was critically analyzed for better understanding the aerodynamic responses. It was found that the hexagonal shaped bridge deck has better aerodynamic characteristics as compared to the pentagonal shaped bridge deck.

  18. Nash equilibrium and multi criterion aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhili; Zhang, Lianhe

    2016-06-01

    Game theory and its particular Nash Equilibrium (NE) are gaining importance in solving Multi Criterion Optimization (MCO) in engineering problems over the past decade. The solution of a MCO problem can be viewed as a NE under the concept of competitive games. This paper surveyed/proposed four efficient algorithms for calculating a NE of a MCO problem. Existence and equivalence of the solution are analyzed and proved in the paper based on fixed point theorem. Specific virtual symmetric Nash game is also presented to set up an optimization strategy for single objective optimization problems. Two numerical examples are presented to verify proposed algorithms. One is mathematical functions' optimization to illustrate detailed numerical procedures of algorithms, the other is aerodynamic drag reduction of civil transport wing fuselage configuration by using virtual game. The successful application validates efficiency of algorithms in solving complex aerodynamic optimization problem.

  19. Aerodynamic tailoring of the Learjet Model 60 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekharan, Reuben M.; Hawke, Veronica M.; Hinson, Michael L.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Madson, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    The wing of the Learjet Model 60 was tailored for improved aerodynamic characteristics using the TRANAIR transonic full-potential computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. A root leading edge glove and wing tip fairing were shaped to reduce shock strength, improve cruise drag and extend the buffet limit. The aerodynamic design was validated by wind tunnel test and flight test data.

  20. High-lift aerodynamics: Prospects and plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Lawrence E.

    1992-01-01

    The emergence of high-lift aerodynamics is reviewed as one of the key technologies to the development of future subsonic transport aircraft. Airport congestion, community noise, economic competitiveness, and safety - the drivers that make high-lift an important technology - are discussed. Attention is given to the potentially synergistic integration of high-lift aerodynamics with two other advanced technologies: ultra-high bypass ratio turbofan engines and hybrid laminar flow control. A brief review of the ongoing high-lift research program at Ames Research Center is presented. Suggestions for future research directions are made with particular emphasis on the development and validation of computational codes and design methods. It is concluded that the technology of high-lift aerodynamics analysis and design should move boldly into the realm of high Reynolds number, three-dimensional flows.

  1. Wind turbine aerodynamics research needs assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, F. S.; Porter, B. K.

    1986-01-01

    A prioritized list is developed for wind turbine aerodynamic research needs and opportunities which could be used by the Department of Energy program management team in detailing the DOE Five-Year Wind Turbine Research Plan. The focus of the Assessment was the basic science of aerodynamics as applied to wind turbines, including all relevant phenomena, such as turbulence, dynamic stall, three-dimensional effects, viscosity, wake geometry, and others which influence aerodynamic understanding and design. The study was restricted to wind turbines that provide electrical energy compatible with the utility grid, and included both horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) and vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT). Also, no economic constraints were imposed on the design concepts or recommendations since the focus of the investigation was purely scientific.

  2. Aerodynamic shape optimization using control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James

    1996-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape design has long persisted as a difficult scientific challenge due its highly nonlinear flow physics and daunting geometric complexity. However, with the emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it has become possible to make accurate predictions of flows which are not dominated by viscous effects. It is thus worthwhile to explore the extension of CFD methods for flow analysis to the treatment of aerodynamic shape design. Two new aerodynamic shape design methods are developed which combine existing CFD technology, optimal control theory, and numerical optimization techniques. Flow analysis methods for the potential flow equation and the Euler equations form the basis of the two respective design methods. In each case, optimal control theory is used to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which provides the necessary gradient information to a numerical optimization method much more efficiently then by conventional finite differencing. Each technique uses a quasi-Newton numerical optimization algorithm to drive an aerodynamic objective function toward a minimum. An analytic grid perturbation method is developed to modify body fitted meshes to accommodate shape changes during the design process. Both Hicks-Henne perturbation functions and B-spline control points are explored as suitable design variables. The new methods prove to be computationally efficient and robust, and can be used for practical airfoil design including geometric and aerodynamic constraints. Objective functions are chosen to allow both inverse design to a target pressure distribution and wave drag minimization. Several design cases are presented for each method illustrating its practicality and efficiency. These include non-lifting and lifting airfoils operating at both subsonic and transonic conditions.

  3. Unsteady Aerodynamic Force Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2016-01-01

    , velocity, and acceleration sensors. This research demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining induced drag and lift forces through the use of distributed sensor technology with measured strain data. An active induced drag control system thus can be designed using the two computed aerodynamic forces, induced drag and lift, to improve the fuel efficiency of an aircraft. Interpolation elements between structural finite element grids and the CFD grids and centroids are successfully incorporated with the unsteady aeroelastic computation scheme. The most critical technology for the success of the proposed approach is the robust on-line parameter estimator, since the least-squares curve fitting method depends heavily on aeroelastic system frequencies and damping factors.

  4. Phase Transitions in Planning Problems: Design and Analysis of Parameterized Families of Hard Planning Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hen, Itay; Rieffel, Eleanor G.; Do, Minh; Venturelli, Davide

    2014-01-01

    There are two common ways to evaluate algorithms: performance on benchmark problems derived from real applications and analysis of performance on parametrized families of problems. The two approaches complement each other, each having its advantages and disadvantages. The planning community has concentrated on the first approach, with few ways of generating parametrized families of hard problems known prior to this work. Our group's main interest is in comparing approaches to solving planning problems using a novel type of computational device - a quantum annealer - to existing state-of-the-art planning algorithms. Because only small-scale quantum annealers are available, we must compare on small problem sizes. Small problems are primarily useful for comparison only if they are instances of parametrized families of problems for which scaling analysis can be done. In this technical report, we discuss our approach to the generation of hard planning problems from classes of well-studied NP-complete problems that map naturally to planning problems or to aspects of planning problems that many practical planning problems share. These problem classes exhibit a phase transition between easy-to-solve and easy-to-show-unsolvable planning problems. The parametrized families of hard planning problems lie at the phase transition. The exponential scaling of hardness with problem size is apparent in these families even at very small problem sizes, thus enabling us to characterize even very small problems as hard. The families we developed will prove generally useful to the planning community in analyzing the performance of planning algorithms, providing a complementary approach to existing evaluation methods. We illustrate the hardness of these problems and their scaling with results on four state-of-the-art planners, observing significant differences between these planners on these problem families. Finally, we describe two general, and quite different, mappings of planning

  5. Lessons Learned in the High-Speed Aerodynamic Research Programs of the NACA/NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    2004-01-01

    The achievement of flight with manned, powered, heavier-than-air aircraft in 1903 marked the beginning of a new era in the means of transportation. A special advantage for aircraft was in speed. However, when an aircraft penetrates the air at very high speeds, the disturbed air is compressed and there are changes in the density, pressure and temperature of the air. These compressibility effects change the aerodynamic characteristics of an aircraft and introduce problems in drag, stability and control. Many aircraft designed in the post-World War II era were plagued with the effects of compressibility. Accordingly, the study of the aerodynamic behavior of aircraft, spacecraft and missiles at high-speed became a major part of the research activity of the NACA/NASA. The intent of the research was to determine the causes and provide some solutions for the aerodynamic problems resulting from the effects of compressibility. The purpose of this paper is to review some of the high-speed aerodynamic research work conducted at the Langley Research Center from the viewpoint of the author who has been active in much of the effort.

  6. Summary analysis of the Gemini entry aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitnah, A. M.; Howes, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic data that were derived in 1967 from the analysis of flight-generated data for the Gemini entry module are presented. These data represent the aerodynamic characteristics exhibited by the vehicle during the entry portion of Gemini 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12 missions. For the Gemini, 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12 missions, the flight-generated lift-to-drag ratios and corresponding angles of attack are compared with the wind tunnel data. These comparisons show that the flight generated lift-to-drag ratios are consistently lower than were anticipated from the tunnel data. Numerous data uncertainties are cited that provide an insight into the problems that are related to an analysis of flight data developed from instrumentation systems, the primary functions of which are other than the evaluation of flight aerodynamic performance.

  7. Genetic Algorithms Applied to Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    2005-01-01

    A genetic algorithm approach suitable for solving multi-objective problems is described and evaluated using a series of aerodynamic shape optimization problems. Several new features including two variations of a binning selection algorithm and a gene-space transformation procedure are included. The genetic algorithm is suitable for finding Pareto optimal solutions in search spaces that are defined by any number of genes and that contain any number of local extrema. A new masking array capability is included allowing any gene or gene subset to be eliminated as decision variables from the design space. This allows determination of the effect of a single gene or gene subset on the Pareto optimal solution. Results indicate that the genetic algorithm optimization approach is flexible in application and reliable. The binning selection algorithms generally provide Pareto front quality enhancements and moderate convergence efficiency improvements for most of the problems solved.

  8. Genetic Algorithms Applied to Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    2004-01-01

    A genetic algorithm approach suitable for solving multi-objective optimization problems is described and evaluated using a series of aerodynamic shape optimization problems. Several new features including two variations of a binning selection algorithm and a gene-space transformation procedure are included. The genetic algorithm is suitable for finding pareto optimal solutions in search spaces that are defined by any number of genes and that contain any number of local extrema. A new masking array capability is included allowing any gene or gene subset to be eliminated as decision variables from the design space. This allows determination of the effect of a single gene or gene subset on the pareto optimal solution. Results indicate that the genetic algorithm optimization approach is flexible in application and reliable. The binning selection algorithms generally provide pareto front quality enhancements and moderate convergence efficiency improvements for most of the problems solved.

  9. Instructional Designers' Media Selection Practices for Distributed Problem-Based Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fells, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    The design of online or distributed problem-based learning (dPBL) is a nascent, complex design problem. Instructional designers are challenged to effectively unite the constructivist principles of problem-based learning (PBL) with appropriate media in order to create quality dPBL environments. While computer-mediated communication (CMC) tools and…

  10. Bilevel formulation of a policy design problem considering multiple objectives and incomplete preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawthorne, Bryant; Panchal, Jitesh H.

    2014-07-01

    A bilevel optimization formulation of policy design problems considering multiple objectives and incomplete preferences of the stakeholders is presented. The formulation is presented for Feed-in-Tariff (FIT) policy design for decentralized energy infrastructure. The upper-level problem is the policy designer's problem and the lower-level problem is a Nash equilibrium problem resulting from market interactions. The policy designer has two objectives: maximizing the quantity of energy generated and minimizing policy cost. The stakeholders decide on quantities while maximizing net present value and minimizing capital investment. The Nash equilibrium problem in the presence of incomplete preferences is formulated as a stochastic linear complementarity problem and solved using expected value formulation, expected residual minimization formulation, and the Monte Carlo technique. The primary contributions in this article are the mathematical formulation of the FIT policy, the extension of computational policy design problems to multiple objectives, and the consideration of incomplete preferences of stakeholders for policy design problems.

  11. Design sensitivity analysis for nonlinear magnetostatic problems by continuum approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Il-Han; Coulomb, J. L.; Hahn, Song-Yop

    1992-11-01

    Using the material derivative concept of continuum mechanics and an adjoint variable method, in a 2-dimensional nonlinear magnetostatic system the sensitivity formula is derived in a line integral form along the shape modification interface. The sensitivity coefficients are numerically evaluated from the solutions of state and adjoint variables calculated by the existing standard finite element code. To verify this method, the pole shape design problem of a quadrupole is provided. En utilisant la notion de dérivée matérielle de la mécanique des milieux continus et une méthode de variable adjointe, pour des problèmes magnétiques non linéaires bidimensionnels, la formule de sensibilité est dérivée sous forme d'une intégrale de contour sur la surface de modification. Les coefficients de sensibilité sont numériquement évalués avec les variables d'état et adjointes calculées à partir du logiciel existant d'éléments finis. Pour vérifier cette méthode, le problème d'optimisation de forme d'un quadripôle est décrit.

  12. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  13. A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics of a blunt lifting body is being developed by NASA. This experiment, called the Rarefied-Flow Aerodynamic Measurement Experiment (RAME), is part of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) mission, which is a Pathfinder design tool for aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles. The RAME will use flight measurements from accelerometers, rate gyros, and pressure transducers, combined with knowledge of AFE in-flight mass properties and trajectory, to infer aerodynamic forces and moments in the rarefied-flow environment, including transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Preflight estimates of the aerodynamic measurements are based upon environment models, existing computer simulations, and ground test results. Planned maneuvers at several altitudes will provide a first-time opportunity to examine gas-surface accommondation effects on aerodynamic coefficients in an environment of changing atmospheric composition. A description is given of the RAME equipment design.

  14. Three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization of supersonic delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Greg W.; Baysal, Oktay

    1994-01-01

    A recently developed three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization procedure AeSOP(sub 3D) is described. This procedure incorporates some of the most promising concepts from the area of computational aerodynamic analysis and design, specifically, discrete sensitivity analysis, a fully implicit 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methodology, and 3D Bezier-Bernstein surface parameterizations. The new procedure is demonstrated in the preliminary design of supersonic delta wings. Starting from a symmetric clipped delta wing geometry, a Mach 1.62 asymmetric delta wing and two Mach 1. 5 cranked delta wings were designed subject to various aerodynamic and geometric constraints.

  15. Structural effects of unsteady aerodynamic forces on horizontal-axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.S.; Shipley, D.E.

    1994-08-01

    Due to its renewable nature and abundant resources, wind energy has the potential to fulfill a large portion of this nation`s energy needs. The simplest means of utilizing wind energy is through the use of downwind, horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) with fixed-pitch rotors. This configuration regulates the peak power by allowing the rotor blade to aerodynamically stall. The stall point, the point of maximum coefficient of lift, is currently predicted using data obtained from wind tunnel tests. Unfortunately, these tests do not accurately simulate conditions encountered in the field. Flow around the tower and nacelle coupled with inflow turbulence and rotation of the turbine blades create unpredicted aerodynamic forces. Dynamic stall is hypothesized to occur. Such aerodynamic loads are transmitted into the rotor and tower causing structural resonance that drastically reduces the design lifetime of the wind turbine. The current method of alleviating this problem is to structurally reinforce the tower and blades. However, this adds unneeded mass and, therefore, cost to the turbines. A better understanding of the aerodynamic forces and the manner in which they affect the structure would allow for the design of more cost effective and durable wind turbines. Data compiled by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for a downwind HAWT with constant chord, untwisted, fixed-pitch rotors is analyzed. From these data, the actual aerodynamic characteristics of the rotor are being portrayed and the potential effects upon the structure can for the first time be fully analyzed. Based upon their understanding, solutions to the problem of structural resonance are emerging.

  16. Structural effects of unsteady aerodynamic forces on horizontal-axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. S.; Shipley, D. E.

    1994-08-01

    Due to its renewable nature and abundant resources, wind energy has the potential to fulfill a large portion of this nation's energy needs. The simplest means of utilizing wind energy is through the use of downwind, horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) with fixed-pitch rotors. This configuration regulates the peak power by allowing the rotor blade to aerodynamically stall. The stall point, the point of maximum coefficient of lift, is currently predicted using data obtained from wind tunnel tests. Unfortunately, these tests do not accurately simulate conditions encountered in the field. Flow around the tower and nacelle coupled with inflow turbulence and rotation of the turbine blades create unpredicted aerodynamic forces. Dynamic stall is hypothesized to occur. Such aerodynamic loads are transmitted into the rotor and tower causing structural resonance that drastically reduces the design lifetime of the wind turbine. The current method of alleviating this problem is to structurally reinforce the tower and blades. However, this adds unneeded mass and, therefore, cost to the turbines. A better understanding of the aerodynamic forces and the manner in which they affect the structure would allow for the design of more cost effective and durable wind turbines. Data compiled by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for a downwind HAWT with constant chord, untwisted, fixed-pitch rotors is analyzed. From these data, the actual aerodynamic characteristics of the rotor are being portrayed and the potential effects upon the structure can for the first time be fully analyzed. Based upon their understanding, solutions to the problem of structural resonance are emerging.

  17. Integrated aerodynamic and dynamic optimization of tiltrotor wing and rotor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Stanley

    Rotorcraft analysis and design must account for interdisciplinary interactions, especially between aerodynamics, structural, and dynamics responses. In this design domain, the work of disciplinary experts is segregated to a large extent. Furthermore, the design of subsystems is also segregated. In this environment it is difficult to account for interdisciplinary interactions and exploit the coupling between sub systems. This work examined the multidisciplinary nature of a tiltrotor aircraft focusing on the aerodynamic design of the rotor, and the structural and dynamic design of the rotor and wing systems. The design was considered to be in the preliminary design phase, after the basic configuration is set and before fine details of the design are defined. Attention was focused on developing an optimization problem formulation that was sufficiently complete so that optimization technologies and heuristic strategies could be developed and evaluated for tiltrotor design. Furthermore the level of detail in the analysis was consistent with the phase of design. Coupling between the aerodynamic, dynamic, and structural design was shown to be significant. Additionally, the coupling between the design of the wing and rotor systems was also significant, so that an integrated design was required. This work developed integrated design strategies for solving this design problem efficiently, while exploiting the couplings. Sum of system weights was the main objective along with vibratory rotor hub loads while hover performance, strength, frequency placement, and stability were constraints. Design variables included blade aerodynamic planform and twist as well as the details of composite D-spar blade sections, and details of composite torque-box wing sections. Cruise mode rotor speed and wing thickness were also included as design variables. A genetic algorithm based collaborative optimization was used as the solution framework for the global optimal search. The problem was

  18. Air flow testing on aerodynamic truck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    After leasing a cab-over tractor-trailer from a Southern California firm, Dryden researchers added sheet metal modifications like those shown here. They rounded the front corners and edges, and placed a smooth fairing on the cab's roofs and sides extending back to the trailer. During the investigation of truck aerodynamics, the techniques honed in flight research proved highly applicable. By closing the gap between the cab and the trailer, for example, researchers discovered a significant reduction in aerodynamic drag, one resulting in 20 to 25 percent less fuel consumption than the standard design. Many truck manufacturers subsequently incorporated similar modifications on their products.

  19. Assessing Reflective Thinking in Solving Design Problems: The Development of a Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Yi-Chun; Choi, Ikseon

    2015-01-01

    Reflection is a critical factor in solving design problems. Using good methods to observe designers' reflection is essential to inform the design of the learning environments that support the development of design problem-solving skills. In this study, we have developed and validated a novel self-reporting questionnaire as an efficient instrument…

  20. An aerodynamic load criterion for airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A simple aerodynamic bending moment envelope is derived for conventionally shaped airships. This criterion is intended to be used, much like the Naval Architect's standard wave, for preliminary estimates of longitudinal strength requirements. It should be useful in tradeoff studies between speed, fineness ratio, block coefficient, structure weight, and other such general parameters of airship design.

  1. The influence of wing, fuselage and tail design on rotational flow aerodynamics data obtained beyond maximum lift with general aviation configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihrle, W., Jr.; Bowman, J. S., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has initiated a broad general aviation stall/spin research program. A rotary balance system was developed to support this effort. Located in the Langley spin tunnel, this system makes it possible to identify an airplane's aerodynamic characteristics in a rotational flow environment, and thereby permits prediction of spins. This paper presents a brief description of the experimental set-up, testing technique, five model programs conducted to date, and an overview of the rotary balance results and their correlation with spin tunnel free-spinning model results. It is shown, for example, that there is a large, nonlinear dependency of the aerodynamic moments on rotational rate and that these moments are pronouncedly configuration-dependent. Fuselage shape, horizontal tail and, in some instances, wing location are shown to appreciably influence the yawing moment characteristics above an angle of attack of 45 deg.

  2. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 14-percent-thick NASA phase 2 supercritical airfoil designed for a lift coefficient of 0.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. D.; Mcghee, R. J.; Allison, D. O.

    1980-01-01

    The low speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 14 percent thick supercritical airfoil are documented. The wind tunnel test was conducted in the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. The effects of varying chord Reynolds number from 2,000,000 to 18,000,000 at a Mach number of 0.15 and the effects of varying Mach number from 0.10 to 0.32 at a Reynolds number of 6,000,000 are included.

  3. On Improving Efficiency of Differential Evolution for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2004-01-01

    Differential Evolution (DE) is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been provEn effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Although DE offers several advantages over traditional optimization approaches, its use in applications such as aerodynamic shape optimization where the objective function evaluations are computationally expensive is limited by the large number of function evaluations often required. In this paper various approaches for improving the efficiency of DE are reviewed and discussed. Several approaches that have proven effective for other evolutionary algorithms are modified and implemented in a DE-based aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses a Navier-Stokes solver for the objective function evaluations. Parallelization techniques on distributed computers are used to reduce turnaround times. Results are presented for standard test optimization problems and for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil. The efficiency improvements achieved by the different approaches are evaluated and compared.

  4. Constrained Multipoint Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using an Adjoint Formulation and Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony; Alonso, Juan Jose; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Saunders, David

    1997-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization method that treats the design of complex aircraft configurations subject to high fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD), geometric constraints and multiple design points is described. The design process will be greatly accelerated through the use of both control theory and distributed memory computer architectures. Control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations whose solution allows for the evaluation of design gradient information at a fraction of the computational cost required by previous design methods. The resulting problem is implemented on parallel distributed memory architectures using a domain decomposition approach, an optimized communication schedule, and the MPI (Message Passing Interface) standard for portability and efficiency. The final result achieves very rapid aerodynamic design based on a higher order CFD method. In order to facilitate the integration of these high fidelity CFD approaches into future multi-disciplinary optimization (NW) applications, new methods must be developed which are capable of simultaneously addressing complex geometries, multiple objective functions, and geometric design constraints. In our earlier studies, we coupled the adjoint based design formulations with unconstrained optimization algorithms and showed that the approach was effective for the aerodynamic design of airfoils, wings, wing-bodies, and complex aircraft configurations. In many of the results presented in these earlier works, geometric constraints were satisfied either by a projection into feasible space or by posing the design space parameterization such that it automatically satisfied constraints. Furthermore, with the exception of reference 9 where the second author initially explored the use of multipoint design in conjunction with adjoint formulations, our earlier works have focused on single point design efforts. Here we demonstrate that the same methodology may be extended to treat

  5. Considering the Nature of Scientific Problems When Designing Science Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, James; Rudolph, John L.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the nature and existence of both model-data fit and conceptual problems in science, then examines two curricular projects--one in genetics and one in evolutionary biology--that attempt to integrate these problems into classroom instruction. (Author/SAH)

  6. Applications of Genetic Methods to NASA Design and Operations Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, Philip D.

    1996-01-01

    We review four recent NASA-funded applications in which evolutionary/genetic methods are important. In the process we survey: the kinds of problems being solved today with these methods; techniques and tools used; problems encountered; and areas where research is needed. The presentation slides are annotated briefly at the top of each page.

  7. Conceptual design on H-2 Orbiting Plane (HOPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-03-01

    An overview of the results of the studies on technical problems concerning the following subjects related to the HOPE (H-2 Orbiting Plane) is presented: (1) technical problems on system design, aerodynamic design, thermal structure design, thermal control system design, and guidance and control system design; (2) studies on designs for the system, aerodynamic characteristics, thermal structure, actuator system, thermal control system, payload support system, and guidance and control system; (3) studies on operational concepts and overall operation system; and (4) study of development program.

  8. The discrete adjoint approach to aerodynamic shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadarajah, Siva Kumaran

    A viscous discrete adjoint approach to automatic aerodynamic shape optimization is developed, and the merits of the viscous discrete and continuous adjoint approaches are discussed. The viscous discrete and continuous adjoint gradients for inverse design and drag minimization cost functions are compared with finite-difference and complex-step gradients. The optimization of airfoils in two-dimensional flow for inverse design and drag minimization is illustrated. Both the discrete and continuous adjoint methods are used to formulate two new design problems. First, the time-dependent optimal design problem is established, and both the time accurate discrete and continuous adjoint equations are derived. An application to the reduction of the time-averaged drag coefficient while maintaining time-averaged lift and thickness distribution of a pitching airfoil in transonic flow is demonstrated. Second, the remote inverse design problem is formulated. The optimization of a three-dimensional biconvex wing in supersonic flow verifies the feasibility to reduce the near field pressure peak. Coupled drag minimization and remote inverse design cases produce wings with a lower drag and a reduced near field peak pressure signature.

  9. Problem-Based Learning in Management Education: A Framework for Designing Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Arthur Lloyd

    2004-01-01

    Problem-based learning has great potential for management education. Placing students in a problem-centered environment may help bridge the gap between theory and practice. One important but underdeveloped issue for problem-based learning is the context design of the problem-solving situation. This article's purpose is to develop a framework for…

  10. Orion Crew Module Aerodynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Bibb, Karen L.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Owens, Bruce; Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Bell, James H.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    The Apollo-derived Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), part of NASA s now-cancelled Constellation Program, has become the reference design for the new Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). The MPCV will serve as the exploration vehicle for all near-term human space missions. A strategic wind-tunnel test program has been executed at numerous facilities throughout the country to support several phases of aerodynamic database development for the Orion spacecraft. This paper presents a summary of the experimental static aerodynamic data collected to-date for the Orion Crew Module (CM) capsule. The test program described herein involved personnel and resources from NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Johnson Space Flight Center, Arnold Engineering and Development Center, Lockheed Martin Space Sciences, and Orbital Sciences. Data has been compiled from eight different wind tunnel tests in the CEV Aerosciences Program. Comparisons are made as appropriate to highlight effects of angle of attack, Mach number, Reynolds number, and model support system effects.

  11. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will design, build, and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604BOO02G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate the aerodynamic flight database for the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. Al these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  12. FLPP IXV Re-Entry Vehicle, Aerodynamic Characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmont, J.-P.; Cantinaud, O.; Tribot, J.-P.; Walloschek, T.

    2009-01-01

    The European Space Agency ESA, has engaged in 2004, the IXV project (Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle) which is part of the FLPP (Future Launcher Preparatory Programme) aiming at answering to critical technological issues, while supporting the future generation launchers and improving in general European capabilities in the strategic field of atmospheric re-entry for space transportation, exploration, and scientific applications. The IXV key mission and system objectives are the design, development, manufacturing, assembling and on- ground to in-flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled re- entry system, integrating the critical re-entry technologies at the system level. The current IXV vehicle is a slender body type exhibiting rounded shape and thick body. Since the beginning of the IXV project, an aerodynamic data base (AEDB) has been built up and continuously updated integrating the additional information mainly provided by means of CFD. The AEDB includes nominal aerodynamic data, a new set of free molecular aerodynamic coefficients as well as aerodynamic uncertainties. Through the phase B2/C1, complementary computations were performed (CFSE, EPFL, ASTRIUM, TAS, DAA) as well as wind tunnel tests such as ONERA S4ma, DLR H2K, DNW/NLR SST, FOI T1500. All data were analyzed and compared enabling the consolidation of the nominal aerodynamic and aerodynamic uncertainties as well. The paper presents the logic of work based on the system engineering plan with emphasis on the different prediction tools used aiming the final aerodynamic characterization of the IXV configuration.

  13. External aerodynamics of heavy ground vehicles: Computations and wind tunnel testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayraktar, Ilhan

    distribution around tractor-trailer assembly are computed for each case and the results compared with each other. Finally, this study demonstrates that it is possible to apply computational fluid dynamics for ground vehicle aerodynamics with substantial detail and fidelity. With the latest developments on computing power, computational fluid dynamics can be applied on real-life transportation problems with reasonable turn-around times, reliability, ease of accessibility and affordability. The next step is deemed to be considering such a computational methodology for analysis within an automated optimization process in improving aerodynamic designs of heavy ground vehicles.

  14. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficient using Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network for Sparse Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    coefficients to an accuracy of 110% . In our problem, we would like to get an optimized neural network architecture and minimum data set. This has been accomplished within 500 training cycles of a neural network. After removing training pairs (outliers), the GA has produced much better results. The neural network constructed is a feed forward neural network with a back propagation learning mechanism. The main goal has been to free the network design process from constraints of human biases, and to discover better forms of neural network architectures. The automation of the network architecture search by genetic algorithms seems to have been the best way to achieve this goal.

  15. How Instructional Design Experts Use Knowledge and Experience to Solve Ill-Structured Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertmer, Peggy A.; Stepich, Donald A.; York, Cindy S.; Stickman, Ann; Wu, Xuemei (Lily); Zurek, Stacey; Goktas, Yuksel

    2008-01-01

    This study examined how instructional design (ID) experts used their prior knowledge and previous experiences to solve an ill-structured instructional design problem. Seven experienced designers used a think-aloud procedure to articulate their problem-solving processes while reading a case narrative. Results, presented in the form of four…

  16. Technologists Talk: Making the Links between Design, Problem-Solving and Experiences with Hard Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Design and problem-solving is a key learning focus in technology education and remains a distinguishing factor that separates it from other subject areas. This research investigated how two expert designers considered experiences with hard materials contributed to their learning design and problem-solving with these materials. The research project…

  17. CFD research, parallel computation and aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1995-01-01

    Over five years of research in Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications are covered in this report. Using CFD as an established tool, aerodynamic optimization on parallel architectures is explored. The objective of this work is to provide better tools to vehicle designers. Submarine design requires accurate force and moment calculations in flow with thick boundary layers and large separated vortices. Low noise production is critical, so flow into the propulsor region must be predicted accurately. The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) has been the subject of recent work. This vehicle is to be a passenger vehicle with the capability of cutting overseas flight times by more than half. A successful design must surpass the performance of comparable planes. Fuel economy, other operational costs, environmental impact, and range must all be improved substantially. For all these reasons, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer and other disciplines.

  18. NASA Perspective on Requirements for Development of Advanced Methods Predicting Unsteady Aerodynamics and Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past three years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has initiated design, development, and testing of a new human-rated space exploration system under the Constellation Program. Initial designs within the Constellation Program are scheduled to replace the present Space Shuttle, which is slated for retirement within the next three years. The development of vehicles for the Constellation system has encountered several unsteady aerodynamics challenges that have bearing on more traditional unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis. This paper focuses on the synergy between the present NASA challenges and the ongoing challenges that have historically been the subject of research and method development. There are specific similarities in the flows required to be analyzed for the space exploration problems and those required for some of the more nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic problems encountered on aircraft. The aggressive schedule, significant technical challenge, and high-priority status of the exploration system development is forcing engineers to implement existing tools and techniques in a design and application environment that is significantly stretching the capability of their methods. While these methods afford the users with the ability to rapidly turn around designs and analyses, their aggressive implementation comes at a price. The relative immaturity of the techniques for specific flow problems and the inexperience with their broad application to them, particularly on manned spacecraft flight system, has resulted in the implementation of an extensive wind tunnel and flight test program to reduce uncertainty and improve the experience base in the application of these methods. This provides a unique opportunity for unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelastic method developers to test and evaluate new analysis techniques on problems with high potential for acquisition of test and even flight data against which they

  19. Problem Decomposition and Recomposition in Engineering Design: A Comparison of Design Behavior between Professional Engineers, Engineering Seniors, and Engineering Freshmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Ting; Becker, Kurt; Gero, John; DeBerard, Scott; DeBerard, Oenardi; Reeve, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigated the differences in using problem decomposition and problem recomposition between dyads of engineering experts, engineering seniors, and engineering freshmen. Participants worked in dyads to complete an engineering design challenge within 1 hour. The entire design process was video and audio recorded. After the design…

  20. Prediction of Hyper-X Stage Separation Aerodynamics Using CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Wong, Tin-Chee; Dilley, Arthur D.; Pao, Jenn L.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA X-43 "Hyper-X" hypersonic research vehicle will be boosted to a Mach 7 flight test condition mounted on the nose of an Orbital Sciences Pegasus launch vehicle. The separation of the research vehicle from the Pegasus presents some unique aerodynamic problems, for which computational fluid dynamics has played a role in the analysis. This paper describes the use of several CFD methods for investigating the aerodynamics of the research and launch vehicles in close proximity. Specifically addressed are unsteady effects, aerodynamic database extrapolation, and differences between wind tunnel and flight environments.

  1. Rarefield-Flow Shuttle Aerodynamics Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moats, Christina D.

    1994-01-01

    A model of the Shuttle Orbiter rarefied-flow aerodynamic force coefficients has been derived from the ratio of flight acceleration measurements. The in-situ, low-frequency (less than 1Hz), low-level (approximately 1 x 10(exp -6) g) acceleration measurements are made during atmospheric re-entry. The experiment equipment designed and used for this task is the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), one of the sensor packages in the Orbiter Experiments Program. To date, 12 HiRAP re-entry mission data sets spanning a period of about 10 years have been processed. The HiRAP-derived aerodynamics model is described in detail. The model includes normal and axial hypersonic continuum coefficient equations as function of angle of attack, body-flap deflection, and elevon deflection. Normal and axial free molecule flow coefficient equations as a function of angle of attack are also presented, along with flight-derived rarefied-flow transition bridging formulae. Comparisons are made between the aerodynamics model, data from the latest Orbiter Operational Aerodynamic Design Data Book, applicable computer simulations, and wind-tunnel data.

  2. Design and Performance Frameworks for Constructing Problem-Solving Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Rons; Palacio-Cayetano, Joycelin

    2003-01-01

    Rapid advancements in hardware, software, and connectivity are helping to shorten the times needed to develop computer simulations for science education. These advancements, however, have not been accompanied by corresponding theories of how best to design and use these technologies for teaching, learning, and testing. Such design frameworks…

  3. Stimulating Critical Thinking through Faculty Development: Design, Evaluation, and Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Leonard E.; And Others

    A faculty development program designed to encourage critical thinking skills across the curriculum at the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire is described in this report. The program's goal was to stimulate faculty to add critical thinking to their pedagogical objectives. Faculty participants attended six 4-hour meetings designed to heighten their…

  4. Designing cases in problem-based learning to foster problem-solving skill.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Margaret C; Finkelstein, Michael

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of case segmentation schemes in problem-based learning (PBL) on the development of problem-solving skill, self-directedness and technical knowledge. Seventy-four dental education students were randomly assigned to 12 PBL groups. Six groups experienced PBL cases that were formatted in short segments and six groups experienced PBL cases that were formatted in long segments. Pretest measures of problem-solving skill, self-directedness and technical knowledge were administered at the beginning of the Fall 1998 semester. Students studied three PBL cases in their assigned groups in the ensuing semester. Posttest measures were administered at the conclusion of the semester. Analysis of the data found that students who experienced PBL with a short case segmentation scheme were better able to solve problems highly similar to the problems in the teaching cases than students who experienced PBL with a long case segmentation scheme. No significant differences were found for self-directedness, technical knowledge, or ability to solve problems distinctly different from the teaching cases. Explanations of these findings and their implications for research and practice in PBL are discussed.

  5. Inverse problems in the design, modeling and testing of engineering systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alifanov, Oleg M.

    1991-01-01

    Formulations, classification, areas of application, and approaches to solving different inverse problems are considered for the design of structures, modeling, and experimental data processing. Problems in the practical implementation of theoretical-experimental methods based on solving inverse problems are analyzed in order to identify mathematical models of physical processes, aid in input data preparation for design parameter optimization, help in design parameter optimization itself, and to model experiments, large-scale tests, and real tests of engineering systems.

  6. Designing WebQuests to Support Creative Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Jim

    2013-01-01

    WebQuests have been a popular alternative for collaborative group work that utilizes internet resources, but studies have questioned how effective they are in challenging students to use higher order thinking processes that involve creative problem solving. This article explains how different levels of inquiry relate to categories of learning…

  7. Design concepts for the development of cooperative problem-solving systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Philip J.; Mccoy, Elaine; Layton, Chuck; Bihari, Tom

    1992-01-01

    There are many problem-solving tasks that are too complex to fully automate given the current state of technology. Nevertheless, significant improvements in overall system performance could result from the introduction of well-designed computer aids. We have been studying the development of cognitive tools for one such problem-solving task, enroute flight path planning for commercial airlines. Our goal was two-fold. First, we were developing specific systems designs to help with this important practical problem. Second, we are using this context to explore general design concepts to guide in the development of cooperative problem-solving systems. These designs concepts are described.

  8. Design Problems Yield Striking Solutions. 1974 Award Winning Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Performing Arts fan-shaped hall at the University of Akron has been structurally and acoustically designed to accommodate audiences of varying sizes and performances ranging from symphonies to intimate theater. (Author/MF)

  9. High-angle-of-attack aerodynamics - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the military and civil technical communities have undertaken numerous studies of the high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of advanced airplane and missile configurations. The method of approach and the design methodology employed have necessarily been experimental and exploratory in nature, due to the complex nature of separated flows. However, despite the relatively poor definition of many of the key aerodynamic phenomena involved for high-alpha conditions, some generic guidelines for design consideration have been identified. The present paper summarizes some of the more important lessons learned in the area of high angle-of-attack aerodynamics with examples of a number of key concepts and with particular emphasis on high-alpha stability and control characteristics of high performance aircraft. Topics covered in the discussion include the impact of design evolution, forebody flows, control of separated flows, configuration effects, aerodynamic controls, wind-tunnel flight correlation, and recent NASA research activities.

  10. Accomplishments at NASA Langley Research Center in rotorcraft aerodynamics technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the development of aerodynamic technology for rotorcraft has continued successfully at NASA LaRC. Though the NASA Langley Research Center is not the lead NASA center in this area, the activity was continued due to facilities and individual capabilities which are recognized as contributing to helicopter research needs of industry and government. Noteworthy accomplishments which contribute to advancing the state of rotorcraft technology in the areas of rotor design, airfoil research, rotor aerodynamics, and rotor/fuselage interaction aerodynamics are described. Rotor designs were defined for current helicopters and evaluated in wind tunnel testing. These designs have incorporated advanced airfoils defined analytically and also proven in wind tunnel tests. A laser velocimetry system has become a productive tool for experimental definition of rotor inflow/wake and is providing data for rotorcraft aerodynamic code validation.

  11. Rudolf Hermann, wind tunnels and aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Charles A.; Coleman, Anne M.

    2008-04-01

    Rudolf Hermann was born on December 15, 1904 in Leipzig, Germany. He studied at the University of Leipzig and at the Aachen Institute of Technology. His involvement with wind tunnels began in 1934 when Professor Carl Wieselsberger engaged him to work at Aachen on the development of a supersonic wind tunnel. On January 6, 1936, Dr. Wernher von Braun visited Dr. Hermann to arrange for use of the Aachen supersonic wind tunnel for Army problems. On April 1, 1937, Dr. Hermann became Director of the Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the Army installation at Peenemunde. Results from the Aachen and Peenemunde wind tunnels were crucial in achieving aerodynamic stability for the A-4 rocket, later designated as the V-2. Plans to build a Mach 10 'hypersonic' wind tunnel facility at Kochel were accelerated after the Allied air raid on Peenemunde on August 17, 1943. Dr. Hermann was director of the new facility. Ignoring destruction orders from Hitler as WWII approached an end in Europe, Dr. Hermann and his associates hid documents and preserved wind tunnel components that were acquired by the advancing American forces. Dr. Hermann became a consultant to the Air Force at its Wright Field in November 1945. In 1951, he was named professor of Aeronautical Engineering at the University of Minnesota. In 1962, Dr. Hermann became the first Director of the Research Institute at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a position he held until he retired in 1970.

  12. Aerodynamic interference effects on tilting proprotor aircraft. [using the Green function method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soohoo, P.; Morino, L.; Noll, R. B.; Ham, N. D.

    1977-01-01

    The Green's function method was used to study tilting proprotor aircraft aerodynamics with particular application to the problem of the mutual interference of the wing-fuselage-tail-rotor wake configuration. While the formulation is valid for fully unsteady rotor aerodynamics, attention was directed to steady state aerodynamics, which was achieved by replacing the rotor with the actuator disk approximation. The use of an actuator disk analysis introduced a mathematical singularity into the formulation; this problem was studied and resolved. The pressure distribution, lift, and pitching moment were obtained for an XV-15 wing-fuselage-tail rotor configuration at various flight conditions. For the flight configurations explored, the effects of the rotor wake interference on the XV-15 tilt rotor aircraft yielded a reduction in the total lift and an increase in the nose-down pitching moment. This method provides an analytical capability that is simple to apply and can be used to investigate fuselage-tail rotor wake interference as well as to explore other rotor design problem areas.

  13. Ares I Aerodynamic Testing at the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Niskey, Charles J.; Hanke, Jeremy L.; Tomek, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout three full design analysis cycles, the Ares I project within the Constellation program has consistently relied on the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel (PSWT) for aerodynamic testing of the subsonic, transonic and supersonic portions of the atmospheric flight envelope (Mach=0.5 to 4.5). Each design cycle required the development of aerodynamic databases for the 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) forces and moments, as well as distributed line-loads databases covering the full range of Mach number, total angle-of-attack, and aerodynamic roll angle. The high fidelity data collected in this facility has been consistent with the data collected in NASA Langley s Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at the overlapping condition ofMach=1.6. Much insight into the aerodynamic behavior of the launch vehicle during all phases of flight was gained through wind tunnel testing. Important knowledge pertaining to slender launch vehicle aerodynamics in particular was accumulated. In conducting these wind tunnel tests and developing experimental aerodynamic databases, some challenges were encountered and are reported as lessons learned in this paper for the benefit of future crew launch vehicle aerodynamic developments.

  14. Design of Biomedical Robots for Phenotype Prediction Problems.

    PubMed

    deAndrés-Galiana, Enrique J; Fernández-Martínez, Juan Luis; Sonis, Stephen T

    2016-08-01

    Genomics has been used with varying degrees of success in the context of drug discovery and in defining mechanisms of action for diseases like cancer and neurodegenerative and rare diseases in the quest for orphan drugs. To improve its utility, accuracy, and cost-effectiveness optimization of analytical methods, especially those that translate to clinically relevant outcomes, is critical. Here we define a novel tool for genomic analysis termed a biomedical robot in order to improve phenotype prediction, identifying disease pathogenesis and significantly defining therapeutic targets. Biomedical robot analytics differ from historical methods in that they are based on melding feature selection methods and ensemble learning techniques. The biomedical robot mathematically exploits the structure of the uncertainty space of any classification problem conceived as an ill-posed optimization problem. Given a classifier, there exist different equivalent small-scale genetic signatures that provide similar predictive accuracies. We perform the sensitivity analysis to noise of the biomedical robot concept using synthetic microarrays perturbed by different kinds of noises in expression and class assignment. Finally, we show the application of this concept to the analysis of different diseases, inferring the pathways and the correlation networks. The final aim of a biomedical robot is to improve knowledge discovery and provide decision systems to optimize diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. This analysis shows that the biomedical robots are robust against different kinds of noises and particularly to a wrong class assignment of the samples. Assessing the uncertainty that is inherent to any phenotype prediction problem is the right way to address this kind of problem. PMID:27347715

  15. Design of Biomedical Robots for Phenotype Prediction Problems.

    PubMed

    deAndrés-Galiana, Enrique J; Fernández-Martínez, Juan Luis; Sonis, Stephen T

    2016-08-01

    Genomics has been used with varying degrees of success in the context of drug discovery and in defining mechanisms of action for diseases like cancer and neurodegenerative and rare diseases in the quest for orphan drugs. To improve its utility, accuracy, and cost-effectiveness optimization of analytical methods, especially those that translate to clinically relevant outcomes, is critical. Here we define a novel tool for genomic analysis termed a biomedical robot in order to improve phenotype prediction, identifying disease pathogenesis and significantly defining therapeutic targets. Biomedical robot analytics differ from historical methods in that they are based on melding feature selection methods and ensemble learning techniques. The biomedical robot mathematically exploits the structure of the uncertainty space of any classification problem conceived as an ill-posed optimization problem. Given a classifier, there exist different equivalent small-scale genetic signatures that provide similar predictive accuracies. We perform the sensitivity analysis to noise of the biomedical robot concept using synthetic microarrays perturbed by different kinds of noises in expression and class assignment. Finally, we show the application of this concept to the analysis of different diseases, inferring the pathways and the correlation networks. The final aim of a biomedical robot is to improve knowledge discovery and provide decision systems to optimize diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. This analysis shows that the biomedical robots are robust against different kinds of noises and particularly to a wrong class assignment of the samples. Assessing the uncertainty that is inherent to any phenotype prediction problem is the right way to address this kind of problem.

  16. Aerodynamic characteristics of aerofoils I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1921-01-01

    The object of this report is to bring together the investigations of the various aerodynamic laboratories in this country and Europe upon the subject of aerofoils suitable for use as lifting or control surfaces on aircraft. The data have been so arranged as to be of most use to designing engineers and for the purposes of general reference. The absolute system of coefficients has been used, since it is thought by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics that this system is the one most suited for international use, and yet is one for which a desired transformation can be easily made. For this purpose a set of transformation constants is included in this report.

  17. Efficient Global Aerodynamic Modeling from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for identifying global aerodynamic models from flight data in an efficient manner is explained and demonstrated. A novel experiment design technique was used to obtain dynamic flight data over a range of flight conditions with a single flight maneuver. Multivariate polynomials and polynomial splines were used with orthogonalization techniques and statistical modeling metrics to synthesize global nonlinear aerodynamic models directly and completely from flight data alone. Simulation data and flight data from a subscale twin-engine jet transport aircraft were used to demonstrate the techniques. Results showed that global multivariate nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies could be accurately identified using flight data from a single maneuver. Flight-derived global aerodynamic model structures, model parameter estimates, and associated uncertainties were provided for all six nondimensional force and moment coefficients for the test aircraft. These models were combined with a propulsion model identified from engine ground test data to produce a high-fidelity nonlinear flight simulation very efficiently. Prediction testing using a multi-axis maneuver showed that the identified global model accurately predicted aircraft responses.

  18. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Suei; Lan, C. Edward

    1990-01-01

    Due to the requirement of increased performance and maneuverability, the flight envelope of a modern fighter is frequently extended to the high angle-of-attack regime. Vehicles maneuvering in this regime are subjected to nonlinear aerodynamic loads. The nonlinearities are due mainly to three-dimensional separated flow and concentrated vortex flow that occur at large angles of attack. Accurate prediction of these nonlinear airloads is of great importance in the analysis of a vehicle's flight motion and in the design of its flight control system. A satisfactory evaluation of the performance envelope of the aircraft may require a large number of coupled computations, one for each change in initial conditions. To avoid the disadvantage of solving the coupled flow-field equations and aircraft's motion equations, an alternate approach is to use a mathematical modeling to describe the steady and unsteady aerodynamics for the aircraft equations of motion. Aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a rapidly maneuvering aircraft are, in general, nonlinear functions of motion variables, their time rate of change, and the history of maneuvering. A numerical method was developed to analyze the nonlinear and time-dependent aerodynamic response to establish the generalized indicial function in terms of motion variables and their time rates of change.

  19. Nozzle Aerodynamic Stability During a Throat Shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawecki, Edwin J.; Ribeiro, Gregg L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on the internal aerodynamic stability of a family of two-dimensional (2-D) High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) nozzle concepts. These nozzles function during takeoff as mixer-ejectors to meet acoustic requirements, and then convert to conventional high-performance convergent-divergent (CD) nozzles at cruise. The transition between takeoff mode and cruise mode results in the aerodynamic throat and the minimum cross-sectional area that controls the engine backpressure shifting location within the nozzle. The stability and steadiness of the nozzle aerodynamics during this so called throat shift process can directly affect the engine aerodynamic stability, and the mechanical design of the nozzle. The objective of the study was to determine if pressure spikes or other perturbations occurred during the throat shift process and, if so, identify the caused mechanisms for the perturbations. The two nozzle concepts modeled in the test program were the fixed chute (FC) and downstream mixer (DSM). These 2-D nozzles differ principally in that the FC has a large over-area between the forward throat and aft throat locations, while the DSM has an over-area of only about 10 percent. The conclusions were that engine mass flow and backpressure can be held constant simultaneously during nozzle throat shifts on this class of nozzles, and mode shifts can be accomplished at a constant mass flow and engine backpressure without upstream pressure perturbations.

  20. Applications of numerical optimization methods to helicopter design problems: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, H.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of applications of mathematical programming methods is used to improve the design of helicopters and their components. Applications of multivariable search techniques in the finite dimensional space are considered. Five categories of helicopter design problems are considered: (1) conceptual and preliminary design, (2) rotor-system design, (3) airframe structures design, (4) control system design, and (5) flight trajectory planning. Key technical progress in numerical optimization methods relevant to rotorcraft applications are summarized.

  1. Rotary balance data for a typical single-engine general aviation design for an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg. 1: Low-wing model A. [fluid flow and vortices data for general aviation aircraft to determine aerodynamic characteristics for various designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultberg, R. S.; Mulcay, W.

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics obtained in a rotational flow environment utilizing a rotary balance are presented in plotted form for a 1/5 scale, single engine, low-wing, general aviation airplane model. The configuration tested included the basic airplane, various control deflections, tail designs, fuselage shapes, and wing leading edges. Data are presented without analysis for an angle of attack range of 8 to 90 deg and clockwise and counterclockwise rotations covering a range from 0 to 0.85.

  2. Superconducting magnets in high radiation environments: Design problems and solutions

    SciTech Connect

    St. Lorant, S.J.; Tillmann, E.

    1989-11-01

    As part of the Stanford Linear Collider Project, three high-field superconducting solenoid magnets are used to rotate the spin direction of a polarized electron beam. The magnets are installed in a high-radiation environment, where they will receive a dose of approximately 10{sup 3} rad per hour, or 10{sup 8} rad over their lifetimes. This level of radiation and the location in which the magnets are installed, some 10 meters below ground in contiguous tunnels, required careful selection of materials for the construction of the solenoids and their ancillary cryogenic equipment, as well as the development of compatible component designs. This paper describes the materials used and the design of the equipment appropriate for the application. Included are summaries of the physical and mechanical properties of the materials and how they behave when irradiated. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Confronting Design Problems in Developing On-Line Courses in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Thelma; Klotz, Jack

    This paper outlines design problems and other instructional delivery issues that need to be addressed by potential on-line program designers, and it suggests some possible solutions to these problems. The first issue was transforming a traditional, three-credit course in a developing student-centered curriculum into a course delivered through…

  4. Learning Problem-Solving through Making Games at the Game Design and Learning Summer Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akcaoglu, Mete

    2014-01-01

    Today's complex and fast-evolving world necessitates young students to possess design and problem-solving skills more than ever. One alternative method of teaching children problem-solving or thinking skills has been using computer programming, and more recently, game-design tasks. In this pre-experimental study, a group of middle school…

  5. Some lessons from NACA/NASA aerodynamic studies following World War II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    An historical account is presented of the new departures in aerodynamic research conducted by NACA, and subsequently NASA, as a result of novel aircraft technologies and operational regimes encountered in the course of the Second World War. The invention and initial development of the turbojet engine furnished the basis for a new speed/altitude regime in which numerous aerodynamic design problems arose. These included compressibility effects near the speed of sound, with attendant lift/drag efficiency reductions and longitudinal stability enhancements that were accompanied by a directional stability reduction. Major research initiatives were mounted in the investigation of swept, delta, trapezoidal and variable sweep wing configurations, sometimes conducted through flight testing of the 'X-series' aircraft. Attention is also given to the development of the first generation of supersonic fighter aircraft.

  6. On Improving Efficiency of Differential Evolution for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2004-01-01

    Differential Evolution (DE) is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Although DE offers several advantages over traditional optimization approaches, its use in applications such as aerodynamic shape optimization where the objective function evaluations are computationally expensive is limited by the large number of function evaluations often required. In this paper various approaches for improving the efficiency of DE are reviewed and discussed. These approaches are implemented in a DE-based aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses a Navier-Stokes solver for the objective function evaluations. Parallelization techniques on distributed computers are used to reduce turnaround times. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil. The efficiency improvements achieved by the different approaches are evaluated and compared.

  7. Assessing Complex Problem-Solving Skills and Knowledge Assembly Using Web-Based Hypermedia Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbagh, Nada

    This research project studied the effects of hierarchical versus heterarchical hypermedia structures of Web-based case representations on complex problem-solving skills and knowledge assembly in problem-centered learning environments in order to develop a system or model that informs the design of Web-based cases for ill-structured problems across…

  8. Validation and comparison of aerodynamic modelling approaches for wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondel, F.; Boisard, R.; Milekovic, M.; Ferrer, G.; Lienard, C.; Teixeira, D.

    2016-09-01

    The development of large capacity Floating Offshore Wind Turbines (FOWT) is an interdisciplinary challenge for the design solvers, requiring accurate modelling of both hydrodynamics, elasticity, servodynamics and aerodynamics all together. Floating platforms will induce low-frequency unsteadiness, and for large capacity turbines, the blade induced vibrations will lead to high-frequency unsteadiness. While yawed inflow conditions are still a challenge for commonly used aerodynamic methods such as the Blade Element Momentum method (BEM), the new sources of unsteadiness involved by large turbine scales and floater motions have to be tackled accurately, keeping the computational cost small enough to be compatible with design and certification purposes. In the light of this, this paper will focus on the comparison of three aerodynamic solvers based on BEM and vortex methods, on standard, yawed and unsteady inflow conditions. We will focus here on up-to-date wind tunnel experiments, such as the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) database and the MexNext international project.

  9. Future Challenges and Opportunities in Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Hefner, Jerry N.

    2000-01-01

    Investments in aeronautics research and technology have declined substantially over the last decade, in part due to the perception that technologies required in aircraft design are fairly mature and readily available. This perception is being driven by the fact that aircraft configurations, particularly the transport aircraft, have evolved only incrementally, over last several decades. If however, one considers that the growth in air travel is expected to triple in the next 20 years, it becomes quickly obvious that the evolutionary development of technologies is not going to meet the increased demands for safety, environmental compatibility, capacity, and economic viability. Instead, breakthrough technologies will he required both in traditional disciplines of aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, materials, controls, and avionics as well as in the multidisciplinary integration of these technologies into the design of future aerospace vehicles concepts. The paper discusses challenges and opportunities in the field of aerodynamics over the next decade. Future technology advancements in aerodynamics will hinge on our ability, to understand, model, and control complex, three-dimensional, unsteady viscous flow across the speed range. This understanding is critical for developing innovative flow and noise control technologies and advanced design tools that will revolutionize future aerospace vehicle systems and concepts. Specifically, the paper focuses on advanced vehicle concepts, flow and noise control technologies, and advanced design and analysis tools.

  10. Human factors research problems in electronic voice warning system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, C. A.; Williams, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The speech messages issued by voice warning systems must be carefully designed in accordance with general principles of human decision making processes, human speech comprehension, and the conditions in which the warnings can occur. The operator's effectiveness must not be degraded by messages that are either inappropriate or difficult to comprehend. Important experimental variables include message content, linguistic redundancy, signal/noise ratio, interference with concurrent tasks, and listener expectations generated by the pragmatic or real world context in which the messages are presented.

  11. Euler Technology Assessment for Preliminary Aircraft Design-Unstructured/Structured Grid NASTD Application for Aerodynamic Analysis of an Advanced Fighter/Tailless Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michal, Todd R.

    1998-01-01

    This study supports the NASA Langley sponsored project aimed at determining the viability of using Euler technology for preliminary design use. The primary objective of this study was to assess the accuracy and efficiency of the Boeing, St. Louis unstructured grid flow field analysis system, consisting of the MACGS grid generation and NASTD flow solver codes. Euler solutions about the Aero Configuration/Weapons Fighter Technology (ACWFT) 1204 aircraft configuration were generated. Several variations of the geometry were investigated including a standard wing, cambered wing, deflected elevon, and deflected body flap. A wide range of flow conditions, most of which were in the non-linear regimes of the flight envelope, including variations in speed (subsonic, transonic, supersonic), angles of attack, and sideslip were investigated. Several flowfield non-linearities were present in these solutions including shock waves, vortical flows and the resulting interactions. The accuracy of this method was evaluated by comparing solutions with test data and Navier-Stokes solutions. The ability to accurately predict lateral-directional characteristics and control effectiveness was investigated by computing solutions with sideslip, and with deflected control surfaces. Problem set up times and computational resource requirements were documented and used to evaluate the efficiency of this approach for use in the fast paced preliminary design environment.

  12. High speed civil transport aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report of work in support of the Computational Aerosciences (CAS) element of the Federal HPCC program. Specifically, CFD and aerodynamic optimization are being performed on parallel computers. The long-range goal of this work is to facilitate teraflops-rate multidisciplinary optimization of aerospace vehicles. This year's work is targeted for application to the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), one of four CAS grand challenges identified in the HPCC FY 1995 Blue Book. This vehicle is to be a passenger aircraft, with the promise of cutting overseas flight time by more than half. To meet fuel economy, operational costs, environmental impact, noise production, and range requirements, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer, controls, and perhaps other disciplines. The fundamental goal of this project is to contribute to improved design tools for U.S. industry, and thus to the nation's economic competitiveness.

  13. Aerodynamic database development of the ESA intermediate experimental vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzella, Giuseppe; Marino, Giuliano; Rufolo, Giuseppe C.

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the aerodynamic database development of the Intermediate Experiment Vehicle. The aerodynamic analysis, carried out for the whole flight scenario, relies on computational fluid dynamics, wind tunnel test, and engineering-based design data generated during the project phases, from rarefied flow conditions, to hypersonic continuum flow up to reach subsonic speeds regime. Therefore, the vehicle aerodynamic database covers the range of Mach number, angle of attack, sideslip and control surface deflections foreseen for the vehicle nominal re-entry. In particular, the databasing activities are developed in the light of build-up approach. This means that all aerodynamic force and moment coefficients are provided by means of a linear summation over certain number of incremental contributions such as, for example, effect of sideslip angle, aerodynamic control surface effectiveness, etc. Each force and moment coefficient is treated separately and appropriate equation is provided, in which all the pertinent contributions for obtaining the total coefficient for any selected flight conditions appear. To this aim, all the available numerical and experimental aerodynamic data are gathered in order to explicit the functional dependencies from each aerodynamic model addend through polynomial expressions obtained with the least squares method. These polynomials are function of the primary variable that drives the phenomenon whereas secondary dependencies are introduced directly into its unknown coefficients which are determined by means of best-fitting algorithms.

  14. Aerodynamic considerations in open shelters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, R.G.

    1984-11-01

    Aerodynamic factors are addressed bearing on the suitability of open structures as blast shelters. Blast closures and attenuator designs are discussed. The research on shelter filling is reviewed; this includes both experimental and theoretical work on scale models and full-scale structures of large dimensions. Shock-dominated and pressure-gradient-dominated shelter-filling mechanisms are described and their potential effects on people are discussed.

  15. Hypersonic vehicle design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The design task for the Advanced Aeronautics Design Project at UCLA is to provide a design for a hypersonic trans-atmospheric vehicle capable of horizontal take-off and landing from conventional runways. To accomplish this task, students are developing unclassified, unrestricted generic hypersonic vehicle models. These models include aerodynamic, propulsive, and thermal effects. The models will be used in the 1987-1988 academic year for vehicle design emphasizing the use of trajectory studies to optimize the vehicle design. The design problem is being considered both in terms of conventional issues such as aerodynamics, propulsion, and thermal systems and also in terms of flight systems, flight controls, and flight testing. The goal of this program is to consider testing as an integral part of design.

  16. High altitude aerodynamic platform concept evaluation and prototype engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    A design concept has been developed for maintaining a 150-pound payload at 60,000 feet altitude for about 50 hours. A 600-pound liftoff weight aerodynamic vehicle is used which operates at sufficient speeds to withstand prevailing winds. It is powered by a turbocharged four-stoke cycle gasoline fueled engine. Endurance time of 100 hours or more appears to be feasible with hydrogen fuel and a lighter payload. A prototype engine has been tested to 40,000 feet simulated altitude. Mismatch of the engine and the turbocharger system flow and problems with fuel/air mixture ratio control characteristics prohibited operation beyond 40,000 feet. But there seems to be no reason why the concept cannot be developed to function as analytically predicted.

  17. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  18. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  19. Aerodynamic challenges of ALT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, I.; Homan, D.; Romere, P. O.

    1985-01-01

    The approach and landing test (ALT) of the Space Shuttle Orbiter presented a number of unique challenges in the area of aerodynamics. The purpose of the ALT program was both to confirm the use of the Boeing 747 as a transport vehicle for ferrying the Orbiter across the country and to demonstrate the flight characteristics of the Orbiter in its approach and landing phase. Concerns for structural fatigue and performance dictated a tailcone be attached to the Orbiter for ferry and for the initial landing tests. The Orbiter with a tailcone attached presented additional challenges to the normal aft sting concept of wind tunnel testing. The landing tests required that the Orbiter be separated from the 747 at approximately 20,000 feet using aerodynamic forces to fly the vehicles apart. The concept required a complex test program to determine the relative effects of the two vehicles on each other. Also of concern, and tested, was the vortex wake created by the 747 and the means for the Orbiter to avoid it following separation.

  20. Aerodynamics of a Party Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that a party balloon can be made to fly erratically across a room, but it can also be used for quantitative measurements of other aspects of aerodynamics. Since a balloon is light and has a large surface area, even relatively weak aerodynamic forces can be readily demonstrated or measured in the classroom. Accurate measurements…