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Sample records for aerodynamic diameter pm10

  1. 78 FR 20001 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Idaho: Sandpoint PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 10 micrometers (PM 10 ) (52 FR 24634). The EPA established a 24... PM 10 standard (71 FR 61144, effective December 18, 2006). On August 7, 1987, the EPA designated the Sandpoint area as a PM 10 nonattainment area due to measured violations of the 24-hour PM 10 standard (52...

  2. Sampling and composition of airborne particulate matter (PM10) from two locations of Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Chirino, Yolanda I.; Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; Osornio-Vargas, Álvaro Román; Rosas, Irma; García-Cuellar, Claudia María

    2015-01-01

    The PM10 airborne particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 µm is considered as a risk factor of various adverse health outcomes, including lung cancer. Here we described the sampling and composition of PM10 collected from an industrial zone (IZ), and a commercial zone (CZ) of Mexico City. The PM10 was collected with a high-volume sampler in the above mentioned locations and both types of PM10 sampled were characterized by the content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals, and endotoxin. The endotoxin PM10 content from IZ and CZ displayed 138.4 UE/mg and 170.4 UE/mg of PM10, respectively. PMID:26217815

  3. Sampling and composition of airborne particulate matter (PM10) from two locations of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Chirino, Yolanda I; Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; Osornio-Vargas, Álvaro Román; Rosas, Irma; García-Cuellar, Claudia María

    2015-09-01

    The PM10 airborne particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 µm is considered as a risk factor of various adverse health outcomes, including lung cancer. Here we described the sampling and composition of PM10 collected from an industrial zone (IZ), and a commercial zone (CZ) of Mexico City. The PM10 was collected with a high-volume sampler in the above mentioned locations and both types of PM10 sampled were characterized by the content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals, and endotoxin. The endotoxin PM10 content from IZ and CZ displayed 138.4 UE/mg and 170.4 UE/mg of PM10, respectively.

  4. PM10 modeling of Beijing in the winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu; Zhang, Minsi; Cai, Xuhui

    The megacity of Beijing, China, has had an air pollution problem since the 1990s. The concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10) in Beijing in the winter of 2000 were high; the average value of 188 μg m -3 was nearly four times the first grade national standard of 50 μg m -3. The CALPUFF modeling system was used to simulate PM10 dispersion from 1 January 2000 to 29 February 2000. We used near real-time landcover data from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS). Statistical evaluation indicated that the model agreed well with the observations. The fluctuations of 24-h PM10 concentrations followed the winter synoptic winds. Cold air from the northwest or north intruded over Beijing for average periods of 4 days in winter, accompanied by high wind speeds. PM10 was swept out of Beijing after the cold fronts and accumulated again once the winds stopped, until the next cold air intrusion. Capital Steel Corporation Limited contributed 46% of the PM10 mass concentrations observed in the Shijingshan industrial area, and had little effect on the eastern part or the center of Beijing. The other industrial regions distributed in southeastern Beijing accounted for an average of 18% of the PM10 in Beijing. Boilers associated with coal consumption mostly for winter heating contributed 31%. Motor vehicles and road dust contributed 5% and 13%, respectively. The total of residential heating in old houses and restaurants contributed approximately 7%. The primary PM10 emissions from electrical generating units were relatively low. Some suggestions are proposed for reducing PM10 pollution in Beijing.

  5. Monetary Valuation of PM10-Related Health Risks in Beijing China: The Necessity for PM10 Pollution Indemnity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hao; Xu, Linyu; Cai, Yanpeng

    2015-08-01

    Severe health risks caused by PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm) pollution have induced inevitable economic losses and have rendered pressure on the sustainable development of society as a whole. In China, with the "Polluters Pay Principle", polluters should pay for the pollution they have caused, but how much they should pay remains an intractable problem for policy makers. This paper integrated an epidemiological exposure-response model with economics methods, including the Amended Human Capital (AHC) approach and the Cost of Illness (COI) method, to value the economic loss of PM10-related health risks in 16 districts and also 4 functional zones in Beijing from 2008 to 2012. The results show that from 2008 to 2012 the estimated annual deaths caused by PM10 in Beijing are around 56,000, 58,000, 63,000, 61,000 and 59,000, respectively, while the economic losses related to health damage increased from around 23 to 31 billion dollars that PM10 polluters should pay for pollution victims between 2008 and 2012. It is illustrated that not only PM10 concentration but also many other social economic factors influence PM10-related health economic losses, which makes health economic losses show a time lag discrepancy compared with the decline of PM10 concentration. In conclusion, health economic loss evaluation is imperative in the pollution indemnity system establishment and should be considered for the urban planning and policy making to control the burgeoning PM10 health economic loss. PMID:26308020

  6. Monetary Valuation of PM10-Related Health Risks in Beijing China: The Necessity for PM10 Pollution Indemnity

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hao; Xu, Linyu; Cai, Yanpeng

    2015-01-01

    Severe health risks caused by PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm) pollution have induced inevitable economic losses and have rendered pressure on the sustainable development of society as a whole. In China, with the “Polluters Pay Principle”, polluters should pay for the pollution they have caused, but how much they should pay remains an intractable problem for policy makers. This paper integrated an epidemiological exposure-response model with economics methods, including the Amended Human Capital (AHC) approach and the Cost of Illness (COI) method, to value the economic loss of PM10-related health risks in 16 districts and also 4 functional zones in Beijing from 2008 to 2012. The results show that from 2008 to 2012 the estimated annual deaths caused by PM10 in Beijing are around 56,000, 58,000, 63,000, 61,000 and 59,000, respectively, while the economic losses related to health damage increased from around 23 to 31 billion dollars that PM10 polluters should pay for pollution victims between 2008 and 2012. It is illustrated that not only PM10 concentration but also many other social economic factors influence PM10-related health economic losses, which makes health economic losses show a time lag discrepancy compared with the decline of PM10 concentration. In conclusion, health economic loss evaluation is imperative in the pollution indemnity system establishment and should be considered for the urban planning and policy making to control the burgeoning PM10 health economic loss. PMID:26308020

  7. Monetary Valuation of PM10-Related Health Risks in Beijing China: The Necessity for PM10 Pollution Indemnity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hao; Xu, Linyu; Cai, Yanpeng

    2015-08-21

    Severe health risks caused by PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm) pollution have induced inevitable economic losses and have rendered pressure on the sustainable development of society as a whole. In China, with the "Polluters Pay Principle", polluters should pay for the pollution they have caused, but how much they should pay remains an intractable problem for policy makers. This paper integrated an epidemiological exposure-response model with economics methods, including the Amended Human Capital (AHC) approach and the Cost of Illness (COI) method, to value the economic loss of PM10-related health risks in 16 districts and also 4 functional zones in Beijing from 2008 to 2012. The results show that from 2008 to 2012 the estimated annual deaths caused by PM10 in Beijing are around 56,000, 58,000, 63,000, 61,000 and 59,000, respectively, while the economic losses related to health damage increased from around 23 to 31 billion dollars that PM10 polluters should pay for pollution victims between 2008 and 2012. It is illustrated that not only PM10 concentration but also many other social economic factors influence PM10-related health economic losses, which makes health economic losses show a time lag discrepancy compared with the decline of PM10 concentration. In conclusion, health economic loss evaluation is imperative in the pollution indemnity system establishment and should be considered for the urban planning and policy making to control the burgeoning PM10 health economic loss.

  8. Improvement of PM10 prediction in East Asia using inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Youn-Seo; Choi, Dae-Ryun; Kwon, Hi-Yong; Jang, Young-Kee; Han, Jin-Seok

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols from anthropogenic emissions in industrialized region in China as well as dust emissions from southern Mongolia and northern China that transport along prevailing northwestern wind have a large influence on the air quality in Korea. The emission inventory in the East Asia region is an important factor in chemical transport modeling (CTM) for PM10 (particulate matters less than 10 ㎛ in aerodynamic diameter) forecasts and air quality management in Korea. Most previous studies showed that predictions of PM10 mass concentration by the CTM were underestimated when comparing with observational data. In order to fill the gap in discrepancies between observations and CTM predictions, the inverse Bayesian approach with Comprehensive Air-quality Model with extension (CAMx) forward model was applied to obtain optimized a posteriori PM10 emissions in East Asia. The predicted PM10 concentrations with a priori emission were first compared with observations at monitoring sites in China and Korea for January and August 2008. The comparison showed that PM10 concentrations with a priori PM10 emissions for anthropogenic and dust sources were generally under-predicted. The result from the inverse modeling indicated that anthropogenic PM10 emissions in the industrialized and urbanized areas in China were underestimated while dust emissions from desert and barren soil in southern Mongolia and northern China were overestimated. A priori PM10 emissions from northeastern China regions including Shenyang, Changchun, and Harbin were underestimated by about 300% (i.e., the ratio of a posteriori to a priori PM10 emission was a factor of about 3). The predictions of PM10 concentrations with a posteriori emission showed better agreement with the observations, implying that the inverse modeling minimized the discrepancies in the model predictions by improving PM10 emissions in East Asia.

  9. Assessment of human exposure level to PM10 in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Xingqin; Hou, Qing; Li, Nan; Zhai, Shixian

    2013-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have found that atmospheric particulate matter, especially PM10 (inhalable particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 10 μm) is one of the pollutants that are harmful to human health. In recent years, particulate matter pollution in China is becoming increasingly serious and PM10 has become the primary pollutant in Beijing and other cities. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out studies and a health damage assessment of PM10. In human health damage assessment, measuring human exposure level to PM10 is required and crucial to provide accurate exposure data for the exposure-response relationship, and also for the accurate quantitative assessment of human exposure. The spatial distribution of particle concentration in China is variable because of spatial differences in the local economic level and the geographical environment. Along with the accelerating urbanisation in China, city population density is high, and the population distribution is variable between and within cities, thus resulting in different population numbers exposed to different concentration ranges. Therefore, an accurate assessment of China's level of exposure to particulate matter is a priority and the basis for assessing the damage to public health caused by particle pollution. Using high accuracy population and PM10 monitoring data, this study analysed the human exposure to PM10 in different regions and typical cities of China. The results show that for most areas of China, the population-weighted PM10 exposure concentration is slightly higher than the annual mean concentration, meaning that more of the population is exposed to high concentrations, and most of the population is exposed to levels that meet the second national standard (between 40 and 100 μg m-3), occupying about 83.7% of population and 76.3% of area in China. The population exposure to PM10 is higher in two types of typical regions and cities: areas with dense human populations

  10. Chemical speciation of PM2.5 and PM10 in south Phoenix, AZ, USA.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Nabin; Clements, Andrea; Fraser, Matthew; Herckes, Pierre

    2011-03-01

    Phoenix, AZ, experiences high particulate matter (PM) episodes, especially in the wintertime. The spatial variation of the PM concentrations and resulting differences in exposure is of particular concern. In this study, PM2.s (PM with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 microm) and PM10 (PM with aerodynamic diameter <10 microm) samples were collected simultaneously from the east and west sides of South Phoenix and at a control site in Tempe and analyzed for trace elements and bulk elemental and organic carbon. Measurements showed that although PM2.5 concentrations had similar trends in temporal scale across all sites, concentrations of PM10 did not. The difference in PM10 concentrations and fluctuation across the three sites suggest effects of a local soil source as evidenced by high concentrations of Al, Ca, and Fe in PM10. K and anthropogenic elements (e.g., Cu, Pb, and Zn) in PM2.5 samples on January 1 were strikingly high, suggesting the influence of New Year's fireworks. Concentrations of toxic elements (e.g., Pb) in the study presented here are not different from similar studies in other U.S. cities. Application of principal component analysis indicated two broad categories of emission sources--soil and combustion--together accounting for 80 and 90% of variance, respectively, in PM2.5 and PM10. The soil and combustion components explained approximately 60 and 30% of the variance in PM10, respectively, whereas combustion sources dominated PM2.5 (>50% variance). Many elements associated with anthropogenic sources were highly enriched, with enrichment factors in PM2.5 an order of magnitude higher than in PM10 relative to surface soil composition in the study area.

  11. The Impact of African Dust on PM10 Air Quality in the Caribbean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prospero, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Decades of aerosol measurements on Barbados and Miami have yielded a broad picture of African mineral dust transport to the Caribbean Basin. These measurements show that in summer the aerosol mass is often dominated by dust. At such times over 90% of the dust mass is comprised of particles less than 10 μm aerodynamic diameter and thus fits the EPA criteria for PM10. A number of sites in the Caribbean monitor PM10 using the same instrumentation commonly deployed in European and United States networks. By comparing data from individual islands that have multiple monitoring sites (e.g., Puerto Rico, Martinique, Guadeloupe), it is shown that during dust events PM10 concentrations track very closely and that local sources have a minor impact on PM10 above about 15 to 20 μg m-3. Moreover the PM10 measurements are coherent with the movement of dust clouds over the islands as observed by satellites. In this way dust movement can be tracked at PM10 sites along the Gulf and southeast coasts of the United States. To assess the specific impact of African dust on PM10 in the region, I compare the daily records of dust measurements at Miami and Barbados with concurrent measurements made at proximate PM10 sites. I then use these relationships and the long term dust measurements at Barbados and Miami to assess the long-term variability of PM10 across the region. At Barbados the record goes back 50 years and provides a basis of assessing the effects of climate variability on PM10 transport. This study shows that there is great variability on scales ranging from daily to decadal. The impact of the droughts in the 1970s and 1980s was particularly significant. Across the Caribbean, the rates of exceedances of the WHO PM10 guideline is comparable to those observed in many major urban areas in Europe and the US. The dominance of dust in large PM10 events and the absence of major pollution sources on many islands offers the opportunity to study the health impacts of desert dust in

  12. Spatial analysis of PM10 and cardiovascular mortality in the Seoul metropolitan area

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yu-Ra; Bae, Hyun-Joo; Lim, Youn-Hee; Yu, Seungdo; Kim, Geun-Bae; Cho, Yong-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous studies have revealed the adverse health effects of acute and chronic exposure to particulate matter less than 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10). The aim of the present study was to examine the spatial distribution of PM10 concentrations and cardiovascular mortality and to investigate the spatial correlation between PM10 and cardiovascular mortality using spatial scan statistic (SaTScan) and a regression model. Methods From 2008 to 2010, the spatial distribution of PM10 in the Seoul metropolitan area was examined via kriging. In addition, a group of cardiovascular mortality cases was analyzed using SaTScan-based cluster exploration. Geographically weighted regression (GWR) was applied to investigate the correlation between PM10 concentrations and cardiovascular mortality. Results An examination of the regional distribution of the cardiovascular mortality was higher in provincial districts (gu) belonging to Incheon and the northern part of Gyeonggido than in other regions. In a comparison of PM10 concentrations and mortality cluster (MC) regions, all those belonging to MC 1 and MC 2 were found to belong to particulate matter (PM) 1 and PM 2 with high concentrations of air pollutants. In addition, the GWR showed that PM10 has a statistically significant relation to cardiovascular mortality. Conclusions To investigate the relation between air pollution and health impact, spatial analyses can be utilized based on kriging, cluster exploration, and GWR for a more systematic and quantitative analysis. It has been proven that cardiovascular mortality is spatially related to the concentration of PM10. PMID:25116367

  13. Evaluation of the Impact of Low Emission Zone and Heavy Traffic Ban in Munich (Germany) on the Reduction of PM10 in Ambient Air

    PubMed Central

    Fensterer, Veronika; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Maier, Verena; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Breitner, Susanne; Peters, Annette; Gu, Jianwei; Cyrys, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Concentrations of ambient fine particles (PM10: particles with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 µm) are still exceeding current air quality standards in many European cities. In Munich (Germany), low emission zone and transit bans for heavy-duty vehicles were introduced in 2008 aiming at reduction of traffic emissions contribution to PM10. The effects of those measures on PM10 mass concentrations in Munich were investigated with a semiparametric regression model for modeling PM10 levels adjusted for time, background pollution, public holidays and wind direction. The reduction of PM10 concentration after the introduction of the measures was larger at a traffic monitoring site (13.0 %, 19.6 % in summer, and 6.8 % in winter) and smaller in urban background (4.5 %, 5.7 % in summer, and 3.2 % in winter). The effect was most pronounced on Fridays and on the weekends in summer. PMID:24828081

  14. Temporal analysis of PM10 in Metropolitan Monterrey, México.

    PubMed

    González-Santiago, Omar; Badillo-Castañeda, Christian T; Kahl, Jonathan D W; Ramírez-Lara, Evangelina; Balderas-Renteria, Isaías

    2011-05-01

    The Monterrey Metropolitan Area (MMA) is the third largest city in Mexico. Few studies have been carried out regarding its air pollution. The aim of this study was to analyze the temporal behavior of PM10 (particulate matter < or =10 microm in aerodynamic diameter). Data reported by the "Sistema Integral de Monitoreo Ambiental" (Integrated Environmental Monitoring System) network from 2006 to 2008 were used. PM10 levels were compared among the stations by year, season, and day of week. A bootstrap technique was used to obtain subsamples to which Student's t test and ANOVA were applied. PM10 levels were high and exceeded the annual limit of 50 microg/m3 set up by the Mexican standard Norma Oficial Mexicana NOM-025-SSA1-1993. These levels could have serious health effects. The southwest zone of MMA had the highest levels of PM10 during the period studied. Winter was the most polluted season, and summer was the least polluted season. Thursday and Friday were the most polluted days, and Sunday was the least polluted day. The hours with the highest levels of PM10 were 8:00 to 10:00 a.m., whereas nighttime hours were the cleanest. PMID:21608497

  15. Temporal analysis of PM10 in Metropolitan Monterrey, México.

    PubMed

    González-Santiago, Omar; Badillo-Castañeda, Christian T; Kahl, Jonathan D W; Ramírez-Lara, Evangelina; Balderas-Renteria, Isaías

    2011-05-01

    The Monterrey Metropolitan Area (MMA) is the third largest city in Mexico. Few studies have been carried out regarding its air pollution. The aim of this study was to analyze the temporal behavior of PM10 (particulate matter < or =10 microm in aerodynamic diameter). Data reported by the "Sistema Integral de Monitoreo Ambiental" (Integrated Environmental Monitoring System) network from 2006 to 2008 were used. PM10 levels were compared among the stations by year, season, and day of week. A bootstrap technique was used to obtain subsamples to which Student's t test and ANOVA were applied. PM10 levels were high and exceeded the annual limit of 50 microg/m3 set up by the Mexican standard Norma Oficial Mexicana NOM-025-SSA1-1993. These levels could have serious health effects. The southwest zone of MMA had the highest levels of PM10 during the period studied. Winter was the most polluted season, and summer was the least polluted season. Thursday and Friday were the most polluted days, and Sunday was the least polluted day. The hours with the highest levels of PM10 were 8:00 to 10:00 a.m., whereas nighttime hours were the cleanest.

  16. Development of a continuous monitoring system for PM10 and components of PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, M; Xiong, J Q; Li, W

    2000-01-01

    While particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters below 10 and 2.5 microns (PM10 and PM2.5) correlate with excess mortality and morbidity, there is evidence for still closer epidemiological associations with sulfate ion, and experimental exposure-response studies suggest that the hydrogen ion and ultrafine (PM0.15) concentrations may be important risk factors. Also, there are measurement artifacts in current methods used to measure ambient PM10 and PM2.5, including negative artifacts because of losses of sampled semivolatile components (ammonium nitrate and some organics) and positive artifacts due to particle-bound water. To study such issues, we are developing a semi-continuous monitoring system for PM10, PM2.5, semivolatiles (organic compounds and NH4NO3), particle-bound water, and other PM2.5 constituents that may be causal factors. PM10 is aerodynamically sorted into three size-fractions: (1) coarse (PM10-PM2.5); (2) accumulation mode (PM2.5-PM0.15); and (3) ultrafine (PM0.15). The mass concentration of each fraction is measured in terms of the linear relation between accumulated mass and pressure drop on polycarbonate pore filters. The PM0.15 mass, being highly correlated with the ultrafine number concentration, provides a good index of the total number concentration in ambient air. For the accumulation mode (PM2.5-PM0.15), which contains nearly all of the semivolatiles and particle-bound water by mass, aliquots of the aerosol stream flow into system components that continuously monitor sulfur (by flame photometry), ammonium and nitrate (by chemiluminescence following catalytic transformations to NO), organics (by thermal-optical analysis) and particle-bound water (by electrolytic hygrometer after vacuum evaporation of sampled particles). The concentration of H+ can be calculated (by ion balance using the monitoring data on NO3-, NH4+, and SO4=).

  17. A wood-strand material for wind erosion control: effects on total sediment loss, PM10 vertical flux, and PM10 loss.

    PubMed

    Copeland, N S; Sharratt, B S; Wu, J Q; Foltz, R B; Dooley, J H

    2009-01-01

    Fugitive dust from eroding land poses risks to environmental quality and human health, and thus, is regulated nationally based on ambient air quality standards for particulate matter with mean aerodynamic diameter < or = 10 microm (PM10) established in the Clean Air Act. Agricultural straw has been widely used for rainfall-induced erosion control; however, its performance for wind erosion mitigation has been less studied, in part because straw is mobile at moderate wind velocities. A wood-based long-strand material has been developed for rainfall-induced erosion control and has shown operational promise for control of wind-induced erosion and dust emissions from disturbed sites. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of both agricultural straw and wood-strand materials in controlling wind erosion and fugitive dust emissions under laboratory conditions. Wind tunnel tests were conducted to compare wood strands of several geometries to agricultural wheat straw and bare soil in terms of total sediment loss, PM10 vertical flux, and PM10 loss. Results indicate that the types of wood strands tested are stable at wind speeds of up to 18 m s(-1), while wheat straw is only stable at speeds of up to 6.5 m s(-1). Wood strands reduced total sediment loss and PM10 emissions by 90% as compared to bare soil across the range of wind speeds tested. Wheat straw did not reduce total sediment loss for the range of speeds tested, but did reduce PM10 emissions by 75% compared to a bare soil at wind speeds of up to 11 m s(-1).

  18. Analysis of roadside inhalable particulate matter (PM10) in major Korean cities.

    PubMed

    Jo, Wan-Kuen; Park, Jin-Ho

    2005-12-01

    A data analysis of three major Korean cities was conducted to assess roadside inhalable particulate matter 10 microm or smaller in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), including temporal and meteorological variations, over a recent period of 4 to 6 years. The yearly roadside PM10 concentrations presented a well-defined increasing trend or no trend depending on the roadside monitoring station. Most mean values exceeded or approximated the Korean standard of 70 microg/m3 per year for PM10. A representative roadside diurnal trend was characterized by a distinct morning maximum. In most cases, the Sunday roadside concentrations were similar to or somewhat lower than the weekday concentrations, and the PM10 concentrations presented a well-defined seasonal variation, with the maximum concentration in March. The monthly maximum concentrations observed in March were most likely attributable to Asian dust storms. In two metropolitan cities (Seoul and Busan), the frequency of days with roadside PM10 concentrations exceeding the standard of 150 microg/m3 per 24 h was much lower for the roadside monitoring stations than for the residential monitoring station, whereas in the third city (Daegu), this result was reversed. Interestingly, the average maximum concentrations observed for the roadside sites in Seoul and Busan during March were higher than those for the residential sites, suggesting that the roadside concentrations responded more to the dust storms than the residential areas. The relationship between the pollutant concentrations and five important meteorological parameters (solar radiation, wind speed, air temperature, relative humidity, and precipitation) showed that the number and type of meteorological variables included in the equations varied according to the monitoring station or season. Finally, the current results confirmed that attention should be given to the PM10 exposure of residents living near roadways. PMID:16328679

  19. [Assessing PM10 and SO2 networks using positive matrix factorization in Beijing city].

    PubMed

    Gao, Tao; Xie, Shao-dong; Bo, Yu; Zhao, Yue

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify city areas with similar air pollution characteristics and determine which sites may be providing redundant information. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied in this study to assess the mass concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microm (PM010), collected in the air quality monitoring network in the year of 2000. The analysis indicated that there were obviously seasonal variations for PM10 and SO2 in Beijing. The PM10 concentrations were higher in spring and lower in summer, but the SO2 concentrations were higher in winter and lower in summer. The results of the PMF showed that the sites of PM10 network in Beijing could be identified as three regions, which represented city areas characterized by the same specific air pollution. These three regions represented Gucheng site/Chegongzhuang site, Qianmen site/National Olympic Sports Center site/Tiantan site/Nongzhanguan site, and Ming Tombs site, respectively. Some sites in region 2 which included four sites may be redundant and can be removed. SO2 network can be divided into six regions including Chegongzhuang site/Qianmen site, Tiantan site/Nongzhanguan stie, Ming Tombs site, National Olympic Sports Center site, Dongsi site, and Gucheng site. It indicated that some sites in Beijing PM10 and SO2 monitoring networks might be redundant and could be removed or relocated to other areas.

  20. [Assessing PM10 and SO2 networks using positive matrix factorization in Beijing city].

    PubMed

    Gao, Tao; Xie, Shao-dong; Bo, Yu; Zhao, Yue

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify city areas with similar air pollution characteristics and determine which sites may be providing redundant information. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied in this study to assess the mass concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microm (PM010), collected in the air quality monitoring network in the year of 2000. The analysis indicated that there were obviously seasonal variations for PM10 and SO2 in Beijing. The PM10 concentrations were higher in spring and lower in summer, but the SO2 concentrations were higher in winter and lower in summer. The results of the PMF showed that the sites of PM10 network in Beijing could be identified as three regions, which represented city areas characterized by the same specific air pollution. These three regions represented Gucheng site/Chegongzhuang site, Qianmen site/National Olympic Sports Center site/Tiantan site/Nongzhanguan site, and Ming Tombs site, respectively. Some sites in region 2 which included four sites may be redundant and can be removed. SO2 network can be divided into six regions including Chegongzhuang site/Qianmen site, Tiantan site/Nongzhanguan stie, Ming Tombs site, National Olympic Sports Center site, Dongsi site, and Gucheng site. It indicated that some sites in Beijing PM10 and SO2 monitoring networks might be redundant and could be removed or relocated to other areas. PMID:20358808

  1. Effect of chimneys on indoor air concentrations of PM 10 and benzo[a]pyrene in Xuan Wei, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Linwei; Lan, Qing; Yang, Dong; He, Xingzhou; Yu, Ignatius T. S.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    This paper reports the effect of chimneys in reducing indoor air pollution in a lung cancer epidemic area of rural China. Household indoor air pollution concentrations were measured during unvented burning (chimneys blocked) and vented burning (chimneys open) of bituminous coal in Xuan Wei, China. Concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM 10) and of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) were measured in 43 homes during normal activities. The use of chimneys led to significant decreases in indoor air concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM 10) by 66% and of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) by 84%. The average BaP content of PM 10 also decreased by 55% with the installation of a chimney. The reduction of indoor pollution levels by the installation of a chimney supports the epidemiology findings on the health benefits of stove improvement. However, even in the presence of a chimney, the indoor air concentrations for both PM 10 and BaP still exceeded the indoor air quality standards of China. Movement up the energy ladder to cleaner liquid or gaseous fuels is probably the only sustainable indoor air pollution control measure.

  2. TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 emissions from a beef cattle feedlot using the flux-gradient technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, Henry F.; Maghirang, Ronaldo G.; Trabue, Steven L.; McConnell, Laura L.; Prueger, John H.; Bonifacio, Edna R.

    2015-01-01

    Emissions data on air pollutants from large open-lot beef cattle feedlots are limited. This research was conducted to determine emissions of total suspended particulates (TSP) and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) from a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Kansas (USA). Vertical particulate concentration profiles at the feedlot were measured using gravimetric samplers, and micrometeorological parameters were monitored with eddy covariance instrumentation during the nine 4- to 5-day intensive sampling campaigns from May 2010 through September 2011. Emission fluxes were determined from the measured concentration gradients and meteorological parameters using the flux-gradient technique. PM ratios based on calculated emission fluxes were 0.28 for PM2.5/PM10, 0.12 for PM2.5/TSP, and 0.24 for PM10/TSP, indicating that a large fraction of the PM emitted at the studied feedlot was in the coarse range of aerodynamic diameter, >10 μm. Median daily emission factors were 57, 21, and 11 kg 1000-head (hd)-1 d-1 for TSP (n = 20 days), PM10 (n = 19 days), and PM2.5 (n = 11 days), respectively. Cattle pen surface moisture contents of at least 20-30% significantly reduced both TSP and PM10 emissions, but moisture's effect on PM2.5 emissions was not established due to difficulty in measuring PM2.5 concentrations under low-PM conditions.

  3. Forecasting PM10 in Algiers: efficacy of multilayer perceptron networks.

    PubMed

    Abderrahim, Hamza; Chellali, Mohammed Reda; Hamou, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Air quality forecasting system has acquired high importance in atmospheric pollution due to its negative impacts on the environment and human health. The artificial neural network is one of the most common soft computing methods that can be pragmatic for carving such complex problem. In this paper, we used a multilayer perceptron neural network to forecast the daily averaged concentration of the respirable suspended particulates with aerodynamic diameter of not more than 10 μm (PM10) in Algiers, Algeria. The data for training and testing the network are based on the data sampled from 2002 to 2006 collected by SAMASAFIA network center at El Hamma station. The meteorological data, air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed, are used as inputs network parameters in the formation of model. The training patterns used correspond to 41 days data. The performance of the developed models was evaluated on the basis index of agreement and other statistical parameters. It was seen that the overall performance of model with 15 neurons is better than the ones with 5 and 10 neurons. The results of multilayer network with as few as one hidden layer and 15 neurons were quite reasonable than the ones with 5 and 10 neurons. Finally, an error around 9% has been reached.

  4. Speciation of PM10 sources of airborne nonferrous metals within the 3-km zone of lead/zinc smelters.

    PubMed

    Batonneau, Yann; Bremard, Claude; Gengembre, Leon; Laureyns, Jacky; Le Maguer, Agnes; Le Maguer, Didier; Perdrix, Esperanza; Sobanska, Sophie

    2004-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the speciation of PM10 sources of airborne Pb, Zn, and Cd metals (PM10 is an aerosol standard of aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microm.) in the atmosphere of a 3 km zone surrounding lead/zinc facilities in operation for a century. Many powdered samples were collected in stacks of working units (grilling, furnace, and refinery), outdoor storages (ores, recycled materials), surrounding waste slag (4 Mt), and polluted topsoils (3 km). PM10 samples were generated from the raw powders by using artificial resuspension and collection devices. The bulk PM10 multielemental analyses were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The proportions in mass of Pb (50%), Zn (40%), and Cd (1%) contents and associated metals (traces) reach the proportions of corresponding raw powdered samples of ores, recycled materials, and fumesize emissions of plants without specific enrichment. In contrast, Pb (8%) and Zn (15%) contents of PM10 of slag deposit were found to be markedly higher than those of raw dust, Pb (4%), and Zn (9%), respectively. In the same way, Pb (0.18%), Zn (0.20%), and Cd (0.004%) were enriched by 1.7, 2.1, and 2.3 times, respectively, in PM10 as compared with raw top-soil corresponding values. X-ray wavelength dispersive electron-microprobe (EM-WDS) microanalysis did not indicate well-defined phases or simple stoichiometries of all the PM10 samples atthe level of the spatial resolution (1 microm3). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that minor elements such as Cd, Hg, and C are more concentrated on the particle surface than in the bulk of PM10 generated by the smelting processes. (XPS) provided also the average speciation of the surface of PM10; Pb is mainly represented as PbSO4, Zn as ZnS, and Cd as CdS or CdSO4, and small amounts of coke were also detected. The speciation of bulk PM10 crystallized compounds was deduced from XRD diffractograms with a raw estimation of

  5. PM(10) exposure, gaseous pollutants, and daily mortality in Inchon, South Korea.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Y C; Leem, J H; Ha, E H; Christiani, D C

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the relative importance of various measures of particulate and gaseous air pollution as predictors of daily mortality in Inchon, South Korea, the association between total daily mortality and air pollution was investigated for a 20-month period (January 1995 through August 1996). Poisson regression was used to regress daily death counts on each air pollutant, controlling for time trends, season, and meteorologic influences such as temperature and relative humidity. Regression coefficients of a 5-day moving average of particulate matter less than or = to 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM(10)) on total mortality were positively significant when considered separately and simultaneously with other pollutants in the model. PM(10) remained significant when the models were confined to cardiovascular or respiratory mortality. Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) and carbon monoxide (CO) were significantly related to respiratory mortality in the single-pollutant model. Ozone exposure was not statistically significant with regard to mortality in the above models, and graphic analysis showed that the relationship was nonlinear. A combined index of PM(10), nitrogen dioxide, SO(2), and CO seemed to better explain the exposure-response relationship with total mortality than an individual air pollutant. Pollutants should be considered together in the risk assessment of air pollution, as opposed to measuring the risk of individual pollutants. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10544154

  6. Cytoplasmic p21(CIP1/WAF1), ERK1/2 activation, and cytoskeletal remodeling are associated with the senescence-like phenotype after airborne particulate matter (PM(10)) exposure in lung cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; Chirino, Yolanda I; Osornio-Vargas, Álvaro Román; Herrera, Luis A; Morales-Bárcenas, Rocío; López-Saavedra, Alejandro; González-Ramírez, Imelda; Miranda, Javier; García-Cuellar, Claudia María

    2014-02-10

    The exposure to particulate matter with a mean aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm (PM10) from urban zones is considered to be a risk factor in the development of cancer. The aim of this work was to determine if PM10 exposure induces factors related to the acquisition of a neoplastic phenotype, such as cytoskeletal remodeling, changes in the subcellular localization of p21(CIP1/WAF1), an increase in β-galactosidase activity and changes in cell cycle. To test our hypothesis, PM10 from an industrial zone (IZ) and a commercial zone (CZ) were collected, and human adenocarcinoma lung cell cultures (A549) were exposed to a sublethal PM10 concentration (10 μg/cm(2)) for 24 h and 48 h. The results showed that PM10 exposure induced an increase in F-actin stress fibers and caused the cytoplasmic stabilization of p21(CIP1/WAF1) via phosphorylation at Thr(145) and Ser(146) and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 on Thr(202). Changes in the cell cycle or apoptosis were not observed, but an increase in β-galactosidase activity was detected. The PM10 from CZ caused more dramatic effects in lung cells. We conclude that PM10 exposure induced cytoplasmic p21(CIP1/WAF1) retention, ERK1/2 activation, cytoskeleton remodeling and the acquisition of a senescence-like phenotype in lung cells. These alterations could have mechanistic implications regarding the carcinogenic potential of PM10.

  7. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) in PM2.5, PM10, TSP and Gas Phase in Office Environment in Shanghai, China: Occurrence and Human Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Chen, Ling; Ngoc, Duong Minh; Duan, Yan-Ping; Lu, Zhi-Bo; Wen, Zhi-Hao; Meng, Xiang-Zhou

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate risk via inhalation exposure of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in office environment, thirty-six pairs air samples including PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm), PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm), total suspended particles (TSP) with matching gas phase were collected in office environment in Shanghai, China. The average concentrations of PM2.5, PM10 and TSP were 20.4, 27.2 and 50.3 μg/m3, respectively. Σ15PBDEs mean concentrations in PM2.5, PM10, TSP and gas phase were 51.8, 110.7, 148 and 59.6 pg/m3, respectively. Much more PBDEs distributed in fine fractions than coarse ones. PBDEs congener profiles found in PM2.5, PM10 and TSP (dominated by BDE-209) were different from that in gas phase (dominated by the tri- to penta-BDEs). Approximately 3.20 pg/kg/d PM2.5 bound PBDEs can be inhaled into the lung; 3.62 pg/kg/d PM10-PM2.5(particles with aerodynamic diameter of 2.5-10 μm) bound PBDEs tended to be deposited in the upper part of respiratory system, and the intake of PBDEs via gas-phase was 2.74 pg/kg/d. The exposure of PBDEs was far below the minimal risk levels (MRLs), indicating lower risk from PBDEs via inhalation in the studied office in Shanghai. PMID:25793925

  8. PM10 Emission, Sandblasting Efficiency and Vertical Entrainment During Successive Wind-Erosion Events: A Wind-Tunnel Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panebianco, J. E.; Mendez, M. J.; Buschiazzo, D. E.

    2016-11-01

    A wind-tunnel experiment was carried out to measure saltation and PM10 (particulate matter with a mean aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm) emission during three successive wind-erosion events on three different surfaces: an unpaved road and two different textured agricultural soils: a sandy loam and a loamy sand. The total horizontal mass transport ( Q) and the PM10 emissions ( E), were measured at two friction velocities: 0.2 and 0.3 m s^{-1}. Results indicated that Q decreased rapidly in time over all surfaces, as the Q values were only 13-17 % of the amount registered during the first event. Similar trends were detected at both wind speeds. However, E values showed a lower relative decrease in the second wind-erosion event at the lower wind speed (25-51 % of the initial amounts) than at the higher wind speed (19-28 % of the initial amounts) over all surfaces. After the second wind-erosion event, both Q and E values remained constant except for the unpaved road, where both values decreased by 50 % in relation to the second event. Emission from the agricultural soils was sustained over successive wind-erosion events even when saltation was low. The sandblasting efficiency for PM10 emission was found to be higher for agricultural soils than for the unpaved road, and increased over wind-erosion events particularly in agricultural soils, and this was also reflected in the PM10 vertical entrainment. Results suggest that sandblasting efficiency and PM10 vertical distribution can change among wind-erosion events even for the same surface. The saltation fraction to PM10 content ratio can be a simple indicator of the general behaviour of an emitting surface during successive wind-erosion events.

  9. PM10 Emission, Sandblasting Efficiency and Vertical Entrainment During Successive Wind-Erosion Events: A Wind-Tunnel Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panebianco, J. E.; Mendez, M. J.; Buschiazzo, D. E.

    2016-06-01

    A wind-tunnel experiment was carried out to measure saltation and PM10 (particulate matter with a mean aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μ m) emission during three successive wind-erosion events on three different surfaces: an unpaved road and two different textured agricultural soils: a sandy loam and a loamy sand. The total horizontal mass transport (Q) and the PM10 emissions (E), were measured at two friction velocities: 0.2 and 0.3 m {s}^{-1} . Results indicated that Q decreased rapidly in time over all surfaces, as the Q values were only 13-17 % of the amount registered during the first event. Similar trends were detected at both wind speeds. However, E values showed a lower relative decrease in the second wind-erosion event at the lower wind speed (25-51 % of the initial amounts) than at the higher wind speed (19-28 % of the initial amounts) over all surfaces. After the second wind-erosion event, both Q and E values remained constant except for the unpaved road, where both values decreased by 50 % in relation to the second event. Emission from the agricultural soils was sustained over successive wind-erosion events even when saltation was low. The sandblasting efficiency for PM10 emission was found to be higher for agricultural soils than for the unpaved road, and increased over wind-erosion events particularly in agricultural soils, and this was also reflected in the PM10 vertical entrainment. Results suggest that sandblasting efficiency and PM10 vertical distribution can change among wind-erosion events even for the same surface. The saltation fraction to PM10 content ratio can be a simple indicator of the general behaviour of an emitting surface during successive wind-erosion events.

  10. Objective Circulation type classifications for the estimation of local PM10 concentrations in Bavarian cities (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitnauer, Claudia; Beck, Christoph; Jacobeit, Jucundus

    2013-04-01

    Concentrations of particulate matter with a particle distribution of a median aerodynamic diameter < 10 μm (PM10), are known to be relevant for public health, notably concerning cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. High pollution events of PM10 are defined by a threshold of a daily mean concentration of 50μg/m³ by directive 1999/30/EC and following directive 2008/50/EC of the European Union, which are relevant for regional air-quality mitigation strategies. Local concentrations of these fine particles are influenced by meteorological parameters on different scales, e.g. local meteorological conditions and large scale circulation dynamics. In order to detect critical periods of high PM10 concentrations, one focus in recent studies is the improvement of accurate short-term deterministic and statistical prediction models as well as reliable approaches for long-term air-quality prediction. The general relationship between local PM10 and large-scale circulation dynamics - as for example reflected by weather- or circulation types - has been proven in several studies, but so far only a few systematic attempts have been made to optimize weather- and circulation type classifications concerning their relationship to local PM10 concentrations. Against this background the aim of this study is to evaluate various approaches for the optimization of circulation type classifications with respect to their relevance for local PM10 concentrations in Bavarian cities (Germany) in order to detect those approaches that are best suited for the use in planned subsequent studies (e.g. estimation of potential PM10 variations due to future climate change). The used data set of daily mean PM10 has been provided by the Bavarian Environment Agency. For the analysed period 1980-2011 measurements of 16 urban traffic related stations, spread over the whole of Bavaria, are available. We provide initial characteristics of this data set concerning data availability, basic quality aspects, long

  11. Effect of relative humidity on the aerodynamic diameter and respiratory deposition of fungal spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reponen, Tiina; Willeke, Klaus; Ulevicius, Vidmantas; Reponen, Auvo; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    Exposure to airborne fungal spores may cause respiratory symptoms. The hygroscopicity of airborne spores may significantly affect their aerodynamic diameter, and thus change their deposition pattern in the human respiratory tract. We have investigated the change in aerodynamic diameter of five different fungal species as a function of relative humidity. Liquid and dry dispersion methods were explored for the aerosolization of the fungal spores. A new system that produces non-aggregated spore aerosol directly from a moldy surface was designed and found suitable for this study. The spores were aerosolized from a mold growth on agar by ducting dry air over the surface, and spore chains in the flow were broken up by passing the entire flow through a critical orifice. Size-spectrometric measurements with an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer showed that the aerodynamic diameter of the tested fungal spores does not change significantly when the relative humidity increases from 30% to 90%. A more distinct spore size increase was found at a relative humidity of ˜ 100%. The highest change of the aerodynamic diameter was found with Cladosporium cladosporioides: it increased from 1.8 μm to 2.3 μm when the relative humidity increased from 30% to ˜ 100%. The size increase corresponds to an approximate doubling of the particle volume. In order to estimate the effect of hygroscopic growth on the respiratory deposition of spores, the mean depositions in the human respiratory tract were calculated for fungal spores with various size changes due to hygroscopic growth. A recently developed model of the International Commission of Radiological Protection was used for the respiratory deposition calculations. We found that the 27% increase in Cladosporium size results in a 20-30% increase in the respiratory deposition of these spores. We conclude that most fungal spores are only slightly hygroscopic and the hygroscopic increase does not significantly affect their respiratory deposition. Our

  12. Indoor/outdoor of PM10 relationships and its water-soluble ions composition in selected primary schools in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, Noorlin; Latif, Mohd Talib

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of PM10 and water-soluble ions were carried out on indoor and outdoor PM10 (particles > 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter) aerosols sampled at selected primary schools of Kuala Lumpur (S1) and Putrajaya (S2), respectively. Samples were collected using a low volume sampler on Teflon filters. The water-soluble ions chloride (Cl-), nitrate (NO3-), sulfate (SO42-), calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), sodium (Na+), potassium (K+) and ammonium (NH4+) was analyzed using ion chromatography. The results showed that the indoor PM10 mass concentrations in S1 and S2 were 96.6 and 69.5 μg/m3, while the outdoor PM10 mass concentrations were 80.1 and 85.2 μg/m3, respectively. This indicated that NO3- were the most dominant ions, followed by SO42-, Ca2+, K+ and Na+, while Cl-, Mg2+ and Na+ were present at low concentrations. Pearson's correlation test applied to all the data showed high correlation between SO42- and NO3-, indicating a common anthropogenic origin. In addition, the correlations between Na+ and Ca2+ indicated crustal origins that significantly contributed to human exposure.

  13. Daily concentrations trend and change point of particulate matter (PM10) in Pahang, Malaysia - A case study at Balok Baru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Sharifah Norhuda Syed; Ujang, Suriyati

    2015-02-01

    Daily concentration of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10) could be very harmful to human health such as respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this paper is to describe on the experiences of air pollutants in the state of Pahang, Malaysia during the first quarter of year 2014. Data were gathered from available automatic air quality monitoring stations at Balok Baru, Pahang through the assistance from the Department of Environment. Cumulative sum technique shows that a change occurred at March, 8th with 88 μg/ m3, moderate air quality level. This change point indicated that the PM10 level started to have a potential in moderate or worse level. In addition, time series regression analysis shows that the trend of daily concentrations of Balok Baru station was an upward trend and for additional day, the PM10 level was increased by 0.1117 μg/ m3. It is hoped that this study will give a significant contribution for future researcher in the area of the study on the risk of PM10 or other types of air pollutant to air quality and also human health.

  14. Effects of Meteorological Parameters and PM10 on the Incidence of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease in Children in China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruixue; Bian, Guolin; He, Tianfeng; Chen, Lv; Xu, Guozhang

    2016-01-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a globally-prevalent infectious disease. However, few data are available on prevention measures for HFMD. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the impacts of temperature, humidity, and air pollution, particularly levels of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter 10 micrometers (PM10), on the incidence of HFMD in a city in Eastern China. Daily morbidity, meteorological, and air pollution data for Ningbo City were collected for the period from January 2012 to December 2014. A total of 86,695 HFMD cases were enrolled in this study. We used a distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) with Poisson distribution to analyze the nonlinear lag effects of daily mean temperature, daily humidity, and found significant relationships with the incidence of HFMD; in contrast, PM10 level showed no relationship to the incidence of HFMD. Our findings will facilitate the development of effective preventive measures and early forecasting of HFMD outbreaks. PMID:27171104

  15. Characterization of water-soluble species of PM10 and PM2.5 aerosols in urban area in Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gehui; Huang, Liming; Gao, Shixiang; Gao, Songting; Wang, Liansheng

    The characterization for water-soluble species of PM10 (particle matter with aerodynamical diameter <10 μm) and PM2.5 (particle matter with aerodynamical diameter <2.5 μm) in five sites of Nanjing, China was carried out during February-May 2001.The pH and conductivity K of water-soluble matters of PM10 and PM2.5 were determined, and the water-soluble fraction of the sample was followed to identify the total carbon (TC), total organic carbon (TOC), inorganic carbon (IC), elements, NO 3-, SO 42- and NH 3-N.The experimental results show that water-soluble matters of PM10 and PM2.5 in Nanjing are acidic, and the pH of PM2.5 is lower than PM10. Conductivity of water-soluble species of PM10 and PM2.5 aerosols varied over a wide range from 1087 to 225 μs/cm. Conductivity between PM10 and PM2.5 has a linear correlationship, and the equation is Y=0.8459 X+44.74, r2=0.9376 ( Y: conductivity of PM2.5, X: conductivity of PM10). TOC make up the majority of TC and accounts for 3.17-14.13% of PM10 and/or PM2.5 loadings, while IC only accounts for 0.12-0.47% of PM10 and/or PM2.5 mass. Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Ti, V and Zn, 17 elements were detected in water-soluble matters of PM10 and/or PM2.5. Ca, K and Na are the most abundant chemical components, which account for more than 95% of total water-soluble elements (TWSE). Of all the five sites, TWSE accounts for 1.80-6.13% of the particle mass and 61.28-72.73% of TWSE of PM10 is enriched in fine particles (<2.5 μm in diameter). Nitrate (NO 3-), sulfate (SO 42-), ammonia and ammonium (NH 3-N) were determined. The highest level of nitrate was 15.49 μg/m 3 for PM10 and 12.66 μg/m 3 for PM2.5 at site FZ. As was the case for nitrate, the highest level of sulfate was also presented at the same site, which was 28.22 μg/m 3 for PM10 and 21.48 μg/m 3 for PM2.5. However, a higher level of ammonia and ammonium was presented at site ZS, which was 36.05 μg/m 3 for PM10 and 22.06 μg/m 3 for PM2.5.

  16. Optimized circulation and weather type classifications relating large-scale atmospheric conditions to local PM10 concentrations in Bavaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitnauer, C.; Beck, C.; Jacobeit, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the last decades the critical increase of the emission of air pollutants like nitrogen dioxide, sulfur oxides and particulate matter especially in urban areas has become a problem for the environment as well as human health. Several studies confirm a risk of high concentration episodes of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < 10 μm (PM10) for the respiratory tract or cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore it is known that local meteorological and large scale atmospheric conditions are important influencing factors on local PM10 concentrations. With climate changing rapidly, these connections need to be better understood in order to provide estimates of climate change related consequences for air quality management purposes. For quantifying the link between large-scale atmospheric conditions and local PM10 concentrations circulation- and weather type classifications are used in a number of studies by using different statistical approaches. Thus far only few systematic attempts have been made to modify consisting or to develop new weather- and circulation type classifications in order to improve their ability to resolve local PM10 concentrations. In this contribution existing weather- and circulation type classifications, performed on daily 2.5 x 2.5 gridded parameters of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set, are optimized with regard to their discriminative power for local PM10 concentrations at 49 Bavarian measurement sites for the period 1980 to 2011. Most of the PM10 stations are situated in urban areas covering urban background, traffic and industry related pollution regimes. The range of regimes is extended by a few rural background stations. To characterize the correspondence between the PM10 measurements of the different stations by spatial patterns, a regionalization by an s-mode principal component analysis is realized on the high-pass filtered data. The optimization of the circulation- and weather types is implemented using two representative

  17. Apparatus for alternatives to PM-10 sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Wente, M.; Wente, W.E.; Moore, M.E.

    1995-12-31

    Because of questions of whether PM-10 adequately characterizes the size fraction that is a challenge to human health, we have developed devices and samplers that will provide PM-2.5 and PM-1 size fractions. Each of these systems utilizes a cyclone for the fractionation process. Models have been developed to predict both the cutpoint and the fractional efficiency curves for single inlet cyclones are geometrically similar to a form that was utilized by Lapple. Modeling has been done with two geometrical forms of multiple inlet cyclones. Each form has six inlets, and one form has the body shape of a Lapple cyclone, while the other has a shortened body. The models for cutpoints are based on log-linear correlations between D{sub 0.5}/d{sub o} and a flow Reynolds number; where D{sub 0.5} = cutpoint size, d{sub o} = cyclone body diameter, and the flow Reynolds number is based on the inlet velocity and the outlet tube diameter. PM-1 and PM-2.5 fractionators with flow rates of 16.7 L/min have been tested in both laboratory and field environments. One version of the fractionator is a stand-alone cylone that has been commercialized by URG, Inc., and a second version is made as an adaptor to the Graseby Andersen Inc. Model 246 inlet for the dichotomous sampler. A third version of the PM-2.5 inlet is one that includes its own wind speed decelerator, bug screen and cyclonic pre-fractionator, where the latter device is used for reducing the aerosol mass that will be deposited in the PM-2.5 cyclone. A prototype field sampler has been developed that incorporates flow control, and a easily changeable filter cartridge.

  18. Determination and analysis of PM 10 source apportionment during episodes of air pollution in Central Eastern European urban areas: The case of wintertime 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juda-Rezler, Katarzyna; Reizer, Magdalena; Oudinet, Jean-Paul

    2011-11-01

    Source apportionment of air pollution due to particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10 μm (PM 10) was investigated in Central Eastern European urban areas. A combination of four methods was developed to distinguish long-range transport (LRT) and regional transport (RT) from local pollution (LP) sources as well as to discern the involvement of traffic or residential sources in LP. Sources of PM 10 events of pollution were determined in January 2006 in representative Polish cities using monitored air quality and meteorological data, backward air mass trajectories, correlation and principal component analysis (PCA). Daily patterns of PM 10 levels show that several peak episodes were registered in Poland; January 21-30th being the most polluted days. Air mass back-trajectory analysis shows that all cities were under the influence of LRT from North-eastern origins (Russia-Belarus-Ukraine), most were also under LRT from Southern origin (Slovakia, Czech Republic), and northern cities were under national RT influence. PCA analysis shows that ion-sums of secondary inorganic aerosols account for LRT pollution while arsenic and chromium represents markers of RT (industrial) and LP (residential) sources of PM 10, respectively. Determination of several ratios (REG/UB, REG/TRAF, TRAF/UB) calculated between PM 10 levels measured at regional background (REG); urban background (UB) and traffic (TRAF) monitoring sites shows that, with ratios REG/UB ≥ 0.57, PM 10 episodes in both Szczecin and Warsaw bore a marked RT origin. The lower REG/UB ≤ 0.35 in the Southern cities of Cracow and Zabrze indicates that LP was the main contributor to the observed episodes. Only PM 10 episodes in Southern-western Poland (Jelenia Góra) were clearly of LP origin as characterized, by the lowest REG/UB ratio (<0.2). The high TRAF/UB ratios obtained for all cities (close to 1) indicate that there was a great uniformity of PM levels on an urban scale owing to the meteorologically stagnant

  19. Vertical PM10 Characteristics and their Relation with Tropospheric Meteorology over Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei Tong, Cheuk

    2016-04-01

    Small particulates or PM10, those with aerodynamic diameters less than 10 mm, can cause long term impairment to human health as they can penetrate deep and deposit on the wall of the respiratory system. Hong Kong receives significant concentration of cross-boundary particulates but at the same time produce domestic pollutants which altogether contribute to the total pollution problem. Recent research interest is paying more attention on the vertical characteristic of PM in the lower atmosphere as possible correlations exist along different altitude. Besides, there exists potential relationship between PM concentration aloft and the high-level weather condition. Yet, most studies focus only up to around 200 meters above sea level due to the proposed significance and the lack of technology. Undoubtedly, this is not enough in investigating the relation between vertical atmospheric profile and PM vertical characteristics. New technology development has allowed measuring PM concentration along the vertical atmospheric profile up to tropopause. This measurement relies on the Atmospheric Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) which operates using the radar principle to detect Rayleigh and Mie scattering from atmospheric gas and aerosols. The research involves (1) study of the seasonal vertical PM10 characteristics in five studying site of Hong Kong covering urban, suburban and rural area; (2) the relationship of the PM10 characteristics with meteorological parameters; (3) the vertical PM10 characteristics under the approach of tropical cyclones. A portable Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) is adopted to collect PM data aloft while surface PM data is collected from ground stations. High-level meteorology data is received from Hong Kong Observatory. Statistical analyses are operated to investigate the correlation between weather conditions and PM concentration along the vertical profile. The research study is divided in phrases. The ultimate goal of the study is to develop models

  20. Modelling street level PM10 concentrations across Europe: source apportionment and possible futures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesewetter, G.; Borken-Kleefeld, J.; Schöpp, W.; Heyes, C.; Thunis, P.; Bessagnet, B.; Terrenoire, E.; Amann, M.

    2014-07-01

    Despite increasing emission controls, particulate matter (PM) has remained a critical issue for European air quality in recent years. The various sources of PM, both from primary particulate emissions as well as secondary formation from precursor gases, make this a complex problem to tackle. In order to allow for credible predictions of future concentrations under policy assumptions, a modelling approach is needed that considers all chemical processes and spatial dimensions involved, from long-range transport of pollution to local emissions in street canyons. Here we describe a modelling scheme which has been implemented in the GAINS integrated assessment model to assess compliance with PM10 (PM with aerodynamic diameter < 10 μm) limit values at individual air quality monitoring stations reporting to the AirBase database. The modelling approach relies on a combination of bottom up modelling of emissions, simplified atmospheric chemistry and dispersion calculations, and a traffic increment calculation wherever applicable. At each monitoring station fulfilling a few data coverage criteria, measured concentrations in the base year 2009 are explained to the extent possible and then modelled for the past and future. More than 1850 monitoring stations are covered, including more than 300 traffic stations and 80% of the stations which exceeded the EU air quality limit values in 2009. As a validation, we compare modelled trends in the period 2000-2008 to observations, which are well reproduced. The modelling scheme is applied here to quantify explicitly source contributions to ambient concentrations at several critical monitoring stations, displaying the differences in spatial origin and chemical composition of urban roadside PM10 across Europe. Furthermore, we analyse the predicted evolution of PM10 concentrations in the European Union until 2030 under different policy scenarios. Significant improvements in ambient PM10 concentrations are expected assuming successful

  1. Modelling street level PM10 concentrations across Europe: source apportionment and possible futures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesewetter, G.; Borken-Kleefeld, J.; Schöpp, W.; Heyes, C.; Thunis, P.; Bessagnet, B.; Terrenoire, E.; Fagerli, H.; Nyiri, A.; Amann, M.

    2015-02-01

    Despite increasing emission controls, particulate matter (PM) has remained a critical issue for European air quality in recent years. The various sources of PM, both from primary particulate emissions as well as secondary formation from precursor gases, make this a complex problem to tackle. In order to allow for credible predictions of future concentrations under policy assumptions, a modelling approach is needed that considers all chemical processes and spatial dimensions involved, from long-range transport of pollution to local emissions in street canyons. Here we describe a modelling scheme which has been implemented in the GAINS integrated assessment model to assess compliance with PM10 (PM with aerodynamic diameter <10 μm) limit values at individual air quality monitoring stations reporting to the AirBase database. The modelling approach relies on a combination of bottom up modelling of emissions, simplified atmospheric chemistry and dispersion calculations, and a traffic increment calculation wherever applicable. At each monitoring station fulfilling a few data coverage criteria, measured concentrations in the base year 2009 are explained to the extent possible and then modelled for the past and future. More than 1850 monitoring stations are covered, including more than 300 traffic stations and 80% of the stations which exceeded the EU air quality limit values in 2009. As a validation, we compare modelled trends in the period 2000-2008 to observations, which are well reproduced. The modelling scheme is applied here to quantify explicitly source contributions to ambient concentrations at several critical monitoring stations, displaying the differences in spatial origin and chemical composition of urban roadside PM10 across Europe. Furthermore, we analyse the predicted evolution of PM10 concentrations in the European Union until 2030 under different policy scenarios. Significant improvements in ambient PM10 concentrations are expected assuming successful

  2. Tillage and straw management affect PM10 emission potential in subarctic Alaska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emission of PM10 (particulates =10 um in diameter regulated by many nations as an air pollutant) from agricultural soils can impact regional air quality. Little information exists that describes the potential for PM10 and airborne dust emissions from subarctic soils or agricultural soils subject to ...

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF PM-10 EMISSIONS FROM ANTISKID MATERIALS APPLIED TO ICE- AND SNOW-COVERED ROADWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a field program to establish a predictive model for PM-10 (particulate matter with diameters or < 10 micrometers) emission. NOTE: Several areas of the U.S. in violation of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM-10 have conducted studies that ...

  4. Carbon species in PM10 particle fraction at different monitoring sites.

    PubMed

    Godec, Ranka; Jakovljević, Ivana; Šega, Krešimir; Čačković, Mirjana; Bešlić, Ivan; Davila, Silvije; Pehnec, Gordana

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine and compare the levels of elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mass concentrations in PM10 particles (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm) between seasons (winter and summer) and at different monitoring sites (urban background and rural industrial). Daily samples of airborne particles were collected on pre-fired quartz fibre filters. PM10 mass concentrations were determined gravimetrically. Samples were analysed for OC and EC with the thermal/optical transmittance method (TOT) and for PAHs by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a fluorescence detector. Measurements showed seasonal and spatial variations of mass concentrations for carbon species and for all of the measured PAHs (Flu, Pyr, Chry, BaA, BbF, BaP, BkF, BghiP and IP) in PM10 at the urban site and rural monitoring site described here. Diagnostic PAH ratios (Flu/(Flu + Pyr), BaA/(BaA + Cry), IP/(IP + BghiP), BaP/BghiP, IP/BghiP and BaP/(BaP + Chry)) make it possible to assess the sources of pollution, and these showed that diesel vehicles accounted for most pollution at the rural-industrial (RI) site in the summer, whereas coal and wood combustion were the causes of winter pollution. This difference between winter and summer PAH ratios were more expressed at the RI site than at the UB site because at the UB site the predominant heating fuel was gas. The OC/EC ratio yielded the same conclusion. Factor analysis showed that EC and OC originated from traffic at both sites, PAHs with 5 or more benzene rings originated from wood pellets industry or biomass burning, while Pyr and Flu originated from diesel combustion or as a consequence of different atmospheric behaviour - evaporation and participation in oxidation and photo oxidation processes. PMID:27364465

  5. Carbon species in PM10 particle fraction at different monitoring sites.

    PubMed

    Godec, Ranka; Jakovljević, Ivana; Šega, Krešimir; Čačković, Mirjana; Bešlić, Ivan; Davila, Silvije; Pehnec, Gordana

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine and compare the levels of elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mass concentrations in PM10 particles (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm) between seasons (winter and summer) and at different monitoring sites (urban background and rural industrial). Daily samples of airborne particles were collected on pre-fired quartz fibre filters. PM10 mass concentrations were determined gravimetrically. Samples were analysed for OC and EC with the thermal/optical transmittance method (TOT) and for PAHs by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a fluorescence detector. Measurements showed seasonal and spatial variations of mass concentrations for carbon species and for all of the measured PAHs (Flu, Pyr, Chry, BaA, BbF, BaP, BkF, BghiP and IP) in PM10 at the urban site and rural monitoring site described here. Diagnostic PAH ratios (Flu/(Flu + Pyr), BaA/(BaA + Cry), IP/(IP + BghiP), BaP/BghiP, IP/BghiP and BaP/(BaP + Chry)) make it possible to assess the sources of pollution, and these showed that diesel vehicles accounted for most pollution at the rural-industrial (RI) site in the summer, whereas coal and wood combustion were the causes of winter pollution. This difference between winter and summer PAH ratios were more expressed at the RI site than at the UB site because at the UB site the predominant heating fuel was gas. The OC/EC ratio yielded the same conclusion. Factor analysis showed that EC and OC originated from traffic at both sites, PAHs with 5 or more benzene rings originated from wood pellets industry or biomass burning, while Pyr and Flu originated from diesel combustion or as a consequence of different atmospheric behaviour - evaporation and participation in oxidation and photo oxidation processes.

  6. INTERPOLATING VANCOUVER'S DAILY AMBIENT PM 10 FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this article we develop a spatial predictive distribution for the ambient space- time response field of daily ambient PM10 in Vancouver, Canada. Observed responses have a consistent temporal pattern from one monitoring site to the next. We exploit this feature of the field b...

  7. A correlation equation for the mass median aerodynamic diameter of the aerosol emitted by solution metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Ivey, James W; Lewis, David; Church, Tanya; Finlay, Warren H; Vehring, Reinhard

    2014-04-25

    A correlation equation for the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of the aerosol emitted by solution metered dose inhalers (MDIs) is presented. A content equivalent diameter is defined and used to describe aerosols generated by evaporating metered dose inhaler sprays. A large set of cascade impaction data is analyzed, and the MMAD and geometric standard deviation is calculated for each datum. Using dimensional analysis, the mass median content equivalent diameter is correlated with formulation variables. Based on this correlation in combination with mass balance considerations and the definition of the aerodynamic diameter, an equation for prediction of the MMAD of an inhaler given the pressure of the propellant in the metering chamber of the MDI valve and the surface tension of the propellant is derived. The accuracy of the correlation equation is verified by comparison with literature results. The equation is applicable to both HFA (hydrofluoroalkane) propellants 134a and 227ea, with varying levels of co-solvent ethanol.

  8. Meteorological factors for PM10 concentration levels in Northern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santurtún, Ana; Mínguez, Roberto; Villar-Fernández, Alejandro; González Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Zarrabeitia, María Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is made up of a mixture of solid and aqueous species which enter the atmosphere by anthropogenic and natural pathways. The levels and composition of ambient air PM depend on the climatology and on the geography (topography, soil cover, proximity to arid zones or to the coast) of a given region. Spain has particular difficulties in achieving compliance with the limit values established by the European Union (based on recommendations from the World Health Organization) for particulate matter on the order of 10 micrometers of diameter or less (PM10), but not only antropogenical emissions are responsible for this: some studies show that PM10 concentrations originating from these kinds of sources are similar to what is found in other European countries, while some of the geographical features of the Iberian Peninsula (such as African mineral dust intrusion, soil aridity or rainfall) are proven to be a factor for higher PM concentrations. This work aims to describe PM10 concentration levels in Cantabria (Northern Spain) and their relationship with the following meteorological variables: rainfall, solar radiation, temperature, barometric pressure and wind speed. Data consists of daily series obtained from hourly data records for the 2000-2010 period, of PM10 concentrations from 4 different urban-background stations, and daily series of the meteorological variables provided by Spanish National Meteorology Agency. The method used for establishing the relationships between these variables consists of several steps: i) fitting a non-stationary probability density function for each variable accounting for long-term trends, seasonality during the year and possible seasonality during the week to distinguish between work and weekend days, ii) using the marginal distribution function obtained, transform the time series of historical values of each variable into a normalized Gaussian time series. This step allows using consistently time series

  9. Influence of burning of fireworks on particle size distribution of PM10 and associated barium at Nagpur.

    PubMed

    Khaparde, Vaishali V; Pipalatkar, Pradeep P; Pustode, Tushar; Rao, C V Chalapati; Gajghate, Daulat G

    2012-01-01

    Influence of burning of fireworks on particle size distribution of PM(10) and associated barium (Ba) were studied at a congested residential cum commercial area of Nagpur city, India. Sampling was carried out by cascade impactor having 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameters of <10, 9, 5.8, 4.7, 3.3, 2.1, 1.1, 0.7, and <0.4 μm, 2 days before diwali, during diwali, celebrations of marriage functions, and New Year's Eve. Noticeably, increased levels of PM(10) and Ba were observed during diwali as compared to days before diwali and other activities. PM(10) levels were increased by four to nine times whereas Ba levels were increased by eight to 20 times higher in alveolar region, when compared with the levels observed before diwali. Probability of deposition of Ba mass in alveolar region varied between 14 and 27 ng/h with higher deposition when the burning of fireworks activity was lower near the site. Trimodal distribution of Ba was observed on the first 2 days of diwali at 0.4-2.1, 2.1-4.7, and 4.7 to less than PM(10) micrometer range. While on the third day, it appeared bimodal with 70% contribution in coarse fraction whereas on the fourth day, distribution appeared unimodal with 66% contribution in alveolar region (<0.4-1.1 μm). Distribution of Ba varied with respect to particle size, in accordance with the intensity of the fireworks used on different days and distance between the burning of firecrackers from the monitoring site.

  10. Seasonal variations of PM10 and TSP in residential and industrial sites in an urban area of Kolkata, India.

    PubMed

    Karar, Kakoli; Gupta, A K; Kumar, Animesh; Biswas, Arun Kanti

    2006-07-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate seasonal and spatial variations of PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 10 microm) and TSP (total suspended particulate matter) of an Indian Metropolis with high pollution and population density from November 2003 to November 2004. Ambient concentration measurements of PM10 and TSP were carried out at two monitoring sites of an urban region of Kolkata. Monitoring sites have been selected based on the dominant activities of the area. Meteorological parameters such as wind speed, wind direction, rainfall, temperature and relative humidity were also collected simultaneously during the sampling period from Indian Meteorological Department, Kolkata. The 24 h average concentrations of PM10 and TSP were found in the range 68.2-280.6 microg/m3 and 139.3-580.3 microg/m3 for residential (Kasba) area, while 62.4-401.2 microg/m3 and 125.7-732.1 microg/m3 for industrial (Cossipore) area, respectively. Winter concentrations of particulate pollutants were higher than other seasons, irrespective of the monitoring sites. It indicates a longer residence time of particulates in the atmosphere during winter due to low winds and low mixing height. Spread of air pollution sources and non-uniform mixing conditions in an urban area often result in spatial variation of pollutant concentrations. The higher particulate pollution at industrial area may be attributed due to resuspension of road dust, soil dust, automobile traffic and nearby industrial emissions. Particle size analysis result shows that PM10 is about 52% of TSP at residential area and 54% at industrial area.

  11. Influence of burning of fireworks on particle size distribution of PM10 and associated barium at Nagpur.

    PubMed

    Khaparde, Vaishali V; Pipalatkar, Pradeep P; Pustode, Tushar; Rao, C V Chalapati; Gajghate, Daulat G

    2012-01-01

    Influence of burning of fireworks on particle size distribution of PM(10) and associated barium (Ba) were studied at a congested residential cum commercial area of Nagpur city, India. Sampling was carried out by cascade impactor having 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameters of <10, 9, 5.8, 4.7, 3.3, 2.1, 1.1, 0.7, and <0.4 μm, 2 days before diwali, during diwali, celebrations of marriage functions, and New Year's Eve. Noticeably, increased levels of PM(10) and Ba were observed during diwali as compared to days before diwali and other activities. PM(10) levels were increased by four to nine times whereas Ba levels were increased by eight to 20 times higher in alveolar region, when compared with the levels observed before diwali. Probability of deposition of Ba mass in alveolar region varied between 14 and 27 ng/h with higher deposition when the burning of fireworks activity was lower near the site. Trimodal distribution of Ba was observed on the first 2 days of diwali at 0.4-2.1, 2.1-4.7, and 4.7 to less than PM(10) micrometer range. While on the third day, it appeared bimodal with 70% contribution in coarse fraction whereas on the fourth day, distribution appeared unimodal with 66% contribution in alveolar region (<0.4-1.1 μm). Distribution of Ba varied with respect to particle size, in accordance with the intensity of the fireworks used on different days and distance between the burning of firecrackers from the monitoring site. PMID:21479560

  12. 75 FR 45485 - Determination of Attainment for PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... standards. On July 1, 1987 (52 FR 24634), EPA promulgated two primary standards for PM 10 : A 24-hour..., 2006, EPA revoked the annual PM 10 standard but retained the 24-hour PM 10 standard. 71 FR 61144...). These areas included all former Group I PM 10 planning areas identified in 52 FR 29383 (August 7,...

  13. Short-Term Health Impact Assessment of Urban PM10 in Bejaia City (Algeria)

    PubMed Central

    Maesano, Cara Nichole; Alkama, Rezak; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    We used Health Impact Assessment (HIA) to analyze the impact on a given population's health outcomes in terms of all-causes mortality and respiratory and cardiovascular hospitalizations attributable to short-term exposure to particulate matter less than 10 μm diameter (PM10) in Bejaia city, for which health effects of air pollution have never been investigated. Two scenarios of PM10 reduction were considered: first, a scenario where the PM10 annual mean is decreased by 5 µg/m3, and then a scenario where this PM10 mean is decreased to 20 µg/m3 (World Health Organization annual air quality guideline (WHO-AQG)). Annual mean level of PM10 (81.7 µg/m3) was calculated from objective measurements assessed in situ. Each year, about 4 and 55 deaths could be postponed with the first and the second scenarios successfully. Furthermore, decreasing PM10 annual mean by 5 µg/m3 would avoid 5 and 3 respiratory and cardiac hospitalizations, respectively, and not exceeding the PM10 WHO-AQG (20 µg/m3) would result in a potential gain of 36 and 23 per 100000 respiratory and cardiac hospitalizations, respectively. Lowering in current levels of PM10 has a nonnegligible impact in terms of public health that it is expected to be higher in the case of long-term effects.

  14. Short-Term Health Impact Assessment of Urban PM10 in Bejaia City (Algeria).

    PubMed

    Benaissa, Fatima; Maesano, Cara Nichole; Alkama, Rezak; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    We used Health Impact Assessment (HIA) to analyze the impact on a given population's health outcomes in terms of all-causes mortality and respiratory and cardiovascular hospitalizations attributable to short-term exposure to particulate matter less than 10 μm diameter (PM10) in Bejaia city, for which health effects of air pollution have never been investigated. Two scenarios of PM10 reduction were considered: first, a scenario where the PM10 annual mean is decreased by 5 µg/m(3), and then a scenario where this PM10 mean is decreased to 20 µg/m(3) (World Health Organization annual air quality guideline (WHO-AQG)). Annual mean level of PM10 (81.7 µg/m(3)) was calculated from objective measurements assessed in situ. Each year, about 4 and 55 deaths could be postponed with the first and the second scenarios successfully. Furthermore, decreasing PM10 annual mean by 5 µg/m(3) would avoid 5 and 3 respiratory and cardiac hospitalizations, respectively, and not exceeding the PM10 WHO-AQG (20 µg/m(3)) would result in a potential gain of 36 and 23 per 100000 respiratory and cardiac hospitalizations, respectively. Lowering in current levels of PM10 has a nonnegligible impact in terms of public health that it is expected to be higher in the case of long-term effects. PMID:27594794

  15. Short-Term Health Impact Assessment of Urban PM10 in Bejaia City (Algeria)

    PubMed Central

    Maesano, Cara Nichole; Alkama, Rezak; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    We used Health Impact Assessment (HIA) to analyze the impact on a given population's health outcomes in terms of all-causes mortality and respiratory and cardiovascular hospitalizations attributable to short-term exposure to particulate matter less than 10 μm diameter (PM10) in Bejaia city, for which health effects of air pollution have never been investigated. Two scenarios of PM10 reduction were considered: first, a scenario where the PM10 annual mean is decreased by 5 µg/m3, and then a scenario where this PM10 mean is decreased to 20 µg/m3 (World Health Organization annual air quality guideline (WHO-AQG)). Annual mean level of PM10 (81.7 µg/m3) was calculated from objective measurements assessed in situ. Each year, about 4 and 55 deaths could be postponed with the first and the second scenarios successfully. Furthermore, decreasing PM10 annual mean by 5 µg/m3 would avoid 5 and 3 respiratory and cardiac hospitalizations, respectively, and not exceeding the PM10 WHO-AQG (20 µg/m3) would result in a potential gain of 36 and 23 per 100000 respiratory and cardiac hospitalizations, respectively. Lowering in current levels of PM10 has a nonnegligible impact in terms of public health that it is expected to be higher in the case of long-term effects. PMID:27594794

  16. Identification of the sources of PM10 in a subway tunnel using positive matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Park, Duckshin; Lee, Taejeong; Hwang, Doyeon; Jung, Wonseok; Lee, Yongil; Cho, KiChul; Kim, Dongsool; Lees, Kiyoung

    2014-12-01

    The level of particulate matter of less than 10 μm diameter (PM10) at subway platforms can be significantly reduced by installing a platform screen-door system. However, both workers and passengers might be exposed to higher PM10 levels while the cars are within the tunnel because it is a more confined environment. This study determined the PM10 levels in a subway tunnel, and identified the sources of PM10 using elemental analysis and receptor modeling. Forty-four PM10 samples were collected in the tunnel between the Gireum and Mia stations on Line 4 in metropolitan Seoul and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and ion chromatography. The major PM10 sources were identified using positive matrix factorization (PMF). The average PM10 concentration in the tunnels was 200.8 ± 22.0 μg/m3. Elemental analysis indicated that the PM10 consisted of 40.4% inorganic species, 9.1% anions, 4.9% cations, and 45.6% other materials. Iron was the most abundant element, with an average concentration of 72.5 ± 10.4 μg/m3. The PM10 sources characterized by PMF included rail, wheel, and brake wear (59.6%), soil combustion (17.0%), secondary aerosols (10.0%), electric cable wear (8.1%), and soil and road dust (5.4%). Internal sources comprising rail, wheel, brake, and electric cable wear made the greatest contribution to the PM10 (67.7%) in tunnel air. Implications: With installation of a platform screen door, PM10 levels in subway tunnels were higher than those on platforms. Tunnel PM10 levels exceeded 150 µg/m3 of the Korean standard for subway platform. Elemental analysis of PM10 in a tunnel showed that Fe was the most abundant element. Five PM10 sources in tunnel were identified by positive matrix factorization. Railroad-related sources contributed 68% of PM10 in the subway tunnel. PMID:25562932

  17. 40 CFR 52.378 - Control strategy: PM10

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... maintenance plan (2006-2015). The State of Connecticut has committed to: maintain a PM10 monitoring network in... in the event the PM10 design value in the maintenance area exceeds 98 µgm/m3 for the 24-hour PM10... on maintaining levels of ambient PM10 below a PM10 design value criteria of 98 µgm/m3 for the...

  18. Seasonal variation of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons associated with PM10 in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ji-Hua; Bi, Xin-Hui; Duan, Jing-Cun; Rahn, Kenneth A.; Sheng, Guo-Ying; Fu, Jia-Mo

    2006-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous pollutants in the urban atmosphere. An investigation on seasonal variation of PAHs in the urban atmosphere of Guangzhou, China was conducted in this study. 112 PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 10 μm) samples were collected at two sites between June 2002 and June 2003. PAHs were analyzed with GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). The result showed that PAHs exhibit distinct seasonal variation. The seasonal concentration for the ∑PAHs ranged from 8.11 to 106.26 ng m - 3 . The average ∑PAHs measured were highest in winter and lowest in summer. The PAHs distribution patterns were similar within each season at two sites. 5-6 ring PAHs were the abundant compounds, which accounted for 65-90% of ∑PAHs and benzo [b + k] fluoranthene dominated in four seasons. The PAHs concentration and distribution pattern fluctuated greatly in winter for the cold air current. Based on the different temperature in winter, the samples were split into two groups. PM10 and the abundance of the PAHs in winter-1 (temperature, 12-22 °C) were much greater than in winter-2 (temperature, 8-12 °C). In winter-1 benzo [b + k] fluoranthene and Indeno [1, 2, 3] pyrene dominated while chrysene and benzo [b + k] fluoranthene dominated in winter-2. Meteorological conditions such as wind speed and temperature had a strong influence on the seasonal variation. Potential sources of PAHs were identified using the molecular diagnostic ratios between PAHs. Results showed fossil fuel combustion may be the major source of PAHs at the two sites.

  19. Dynamical Behaviors between the PM10 and the meteorological factor using the detrended cross-correlation analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyungsik; Lee, Dong-In

    2013-04-01

    There is considerable interest in cross-correlations in collective modes of real data from atmospheric geophysics, seismology, finance, physiology, genomics, and nanodevices. If two systems interact mutually, that interaction gives rise to collective modes. This phenomenon is able to be analyzed using the cross-correlation of traditional methods, random matrix theory, and the detrended cross-correlation analysis method. The detrended cross-correlation analysis method was used in the past to analyze several models such as autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average processes, stock prices and their trading volumes, and taxi accidents. Particulate matter is composed of the organic and inorganic mixtures such as the natural sea salt, soil particle, vehicles exhaust, construction dust, and soot. The PM10 is known as the particle with the aerodynamic diameter (less than 10 microns) that is able to enter the human respiratory system. The PM10 concentration has an effect on the climate change by causing an unbalance of the global radiative equilibrium through the direct effect that blocks the stoma of plants and cuts off the solar radiation, different from the indirect effect that changes the optical property of clouds, cloudiness, and lifetime of clouds. Various factors contribute to the degree of the PM10 concentration. Notable among these are the land-use types, surface vegetation coverage, as well as meteorological factors. In this study, we analyze and simulate cross-correlations in time scales between the PM10 concentration and the meteorological factor (among temperature, wind speed and humidity) using the detrended cross-correlation analysis method through the removal of specific trends at eight cities in the Korean peninsula. We divide time series data into Asian dust events and non-Asian dust events to analyze the change of meteorological factors on the fluctuation of PM10 the concentration during Asian dust events. In particular, our result is

  20. Validation of Satellite AOD Data with the Ground PM10 Data over Islamabad Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulbul, Gufran; Shahid, Imran

    2016-07-01

    Introduction The issue of air pollution affects the entire globe, but the countries having huge urban growth and industries are specially confronted with high amounts of suspended particles in atmosphere. According to WHO, for the areas where air pollution is monitored in Pakistan, the air pollution is deteriorating the air quality as time is passing. Pakistan, during the last decade, has seen an extensive rise in population growth, urbanization, and industrialization, together with a great increase in motorization and energy use. As a result, rise has taken place in the emission of various air pollutants. However, due to the lack of air quality management, the country is suffering from deterioration of air quality. From the air quality point of view, spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols and its variations are very important. The variations in the atmospheric aerosol, land surface properties, greenhouse gases, solar radiations and climatic changes alter the energy balance of the earth's atmospheric system. The addition of aerosol particles to the atmosphere is not only dependent upon the anthropogenic sources but these are also formed by physical and chemical atmospheric processes. Aerosols are a mixture of particles and these are characterized by their shape, their size (from nanometers (nm) to micrometers (µm) in radius) and their chemical composition. PM10 is the designation for particulate matter in the atmosphere that has an aerodynamic diameter of 10µm or less. The sources of PM10 may be natural (volcanoes, dust, storms, forest and grassland fires, living vegetation, or anthropogenic (burning of fossil fuels in vehicles, power plants and industrialization). The current interest in atmospheric particulate matter (PM10) is mainly due to its effect on human health and its role in climate change. Therefore, the particulate matter must be monitored continuously to understand their likely impact on the atmosphere, environment and particularly human

  1. 75 FR 26898 - Determination of Attainment for PM-10; Fort Hall PM-10 Nonattainment Area, Idaho

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... available. Certain other material, such as copyrighted material, is not placed on the Internet and will be publicly available only in hard copy form. Publicly available docket materials are available either...-based standards. On July 1, 1987 (52 FR 24634), EPA promulgated two primary standards for PM-10: a...

  2. Bioaccessibility of selected trace metals in urban PM2.5 and PM10 samples: a model study.

    PubMed

    Falta, Thomas; Limbeck, Andreas; Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan

    2008-02-01

    Bioaccessibility of trace metals originating from urban particulate matter was assessed in a worst case scenario to evaluate the uptake and thus the hazardous potential of these metals via gastric juice. Sampling was performed over a period of about two months at the Getreidemarkt in downtown Vienna. Concentrations of the assayed trace metals (Ti, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Tl and Pb) were determined in PM2.5 and PM10 samples by ICP-MS. The metal concentrations in sampled air were in the low picogram to high nanogram per cubic metre range. The concentrations in PM2.5 samples were generally lower than those in PM10 samples. The average daily intake of these metals by inhalation for a healthy adult was estimated to be in the range of <1 ng (Tl) to >1,000 ng (Zn). To estimate the accessibility of the inhaled and subsequently ingested metals (i.e. after lung clearance had taken place) in the size range from 2.5- to 10-microm aerodynamic equivalent diameter, a batch-extraction with synthetic gastric juice was performed. The data were used to calculate the bioaccessibility of the investigated trace metals. Extractable fractions ranged from 2.10% (Ti in PM2.5) to 91.0% (Cd in PM2.5), thus yielding bioaccessible fractions (PM(2.5-10)) from 0.16 ng (Ag) to 178 ng (Cu).

  3. Development of a PM-10 inlet for continuous operation and with recovery of the gt 10-. mu. m fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, G.; Pauley, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) manufactured nuclear weapons' components out of plutonium (Pu) metal until 1990. The plant is now in a decontamination and disposition phase. In both the manufacturing mode and the present mode, Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Colorado have required continuous monitoring of the air to detect releases of radionuclides. The air surveillance network established around the plant in the early 1950's was replaced in 1972 with a network of high-volume (40 cfm) samplers (hivols). This network extends into the community. The hivois were patterned after the EPA total suspended particle (TSP) samplers with an approximate cutoff at 30 micrometers ({mu}m); however, the RFP version of the TSP sampler was designed to operate continuously and had to be relatively inconspicuous. After nearly 20 years of operation, the RFP air surveillance samplers are in need of updating or replacement, in part because the EPA has now established a new criterion for sampling of suspended particles; i.e., the PM-10 criterion. Only particles of less than 10-{mu}m aerodynamic diameter are considered hazardous to health through inhalation pathways. This report discusses the development of a PM-10 inlet for continuous operation.

  4. Development of a PM-10 inlet for continuous operation and with recovery of the {gt}10-{mu}m fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, G.; Pauley, B.J.

    1992-09-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) manufactured nuclear weapons` components out of plutonium (Pu) metal until 1990. The plant is now in a decontamination and disposition phase. In both the manufacturing mode and the present mode, Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Colorado have required continuous monitoring of the air to detect releases of radionuclides. The air surveillance network established around the plant in the early 1950`s was replaced in 1972 with a network of high-volume (40 cfm) samplers (hivols). This network extends into the community. The hivois were patterned after the EPA total suspended particle (TSP) samplers with an approximate cutoff at 30 micrometers ({mu}m); however, the RFP version of the TSP sampler was designed to operate continuously and had to be relatively inconspicuous. After nearly 20 years of operation, the RFP air surveillance samplers are in need of updating or replacement, in part because the EPA has now established a new criterion for sampling of suspended particles; i.e., the PM-10 criterion. Only particles of less than 10-{mu}m aerodynamic diameter are considered hazardous to health through inhalation pathways. This report discusses the development of a PM-10 inlet for continuous operation.

  5. Spatial & temporal variations of PM10 and particle number concentrations in urban air.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Christer; Norman, Michael; Gidhagen, Lars

    2007-04-01

    The size of particles in urban air varies over four orders of magnitude (from 0.001 microm to 10 microm in diameter). In many cities only particle mass concentrations (PM10, i.e. particles <10 microm diameter) is measured. In this paper we analyze how differences in emissions, background concentrations and meteorology affect the temporal and spatial distribution of PM10 and total particle number concentrations (PNC) based on measurements and dispersion modeling in Stockholm, Sweden. PNC at densely trafficked kerbside locations are dominated by ultrafine particles (<0.1 microm diameter) due to vehicle exhaust emissions as verified by high correlation with NOx. But PNC contribute only marginally to PM10, due to the small size of exhaust particles. Instead wear of the road surface is an important factor for the highest PM10 concentrations observed. In Stockholm, road wear increases drastically due to the use of studded tires and traction sand on streets during winter; up to 90% of the locally emitted PM10 may be due to road abrasion. PM10 emissions and concentrations, but not PNC, at kerbside are controlled by road moisture. Annual mean urban background PM10 levels are relatively uniformly distributed over the city, due to the importance of long range transport. For PNC local sources often dominate the concentrations resulting in large temporal and spatial gradients in the concentrations. Despite these differences in the origin of PM10 and PNC, the spatial gradients of annual mean concentrations due to local sources are of equal magnitude due to the common source, namely traffic. Thus, people in different areas experiencing a factor of 2 different annual PM10 exposure due to local sources will also experience a factor of 2 different exposure in terms of PNC. This implies that health impact studies based solely on spatial differences in annual exposure to PM10 may not separate differences in health effects due to ultrafine and coarse particles. On the other hand

  6. Spatial & temporal variations of PM10 and particle number concentrations in urban air.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Christer; Norman, Michael; Gidhagen, Lars

    2007-04-01

    The size of particles in urban air varies over four orders of magnitude (from 0.001 microm to 10 microm in diameter). In many cities only particle mass concentrations (PM10, i.e. particles <10 microm diameter) is measured. In this paper we analyze how differences in emissions, background concentrations and meteorology affect the temporal and spatial distribution of PM10 and total particle number concentrations (PNC) based on measurements and dispersion modeling in Stockholm, Sweden. PNC at densely trafficked kerbside locations are dominated by ultrafine particles (<0.1 microm diameter) due to vehicle exhaust emissions as verified by high correlation with NOx. But PNC contribute only marginally to PM10, due to the small size of exhaust particles. Instead wear of the road surface is an important factor for the highest PM10 concentrations observed. In Stockholm, road wear increases drastically due to the use of studded tires and traction sand on streets during winter; up to 90% of the locally emitted PM10 may be due to road abrasion. PM10 emissions and concentrations, but not PNC, at kerbside are controlled by road moisture. Annual mean urban background PM10 levels are relatively uniformly distributed over the city, due to the importance of long range transport. For PNC local sources often dominate the concentrations resulting in large temporal and spatial gradients in the concentrations. Despite these differences in the origin of PM10 and PNC, the spatial gradients of annual mean concentrations due to local sources are of equal magnitude due to the common source, namely traffic. Thus, people in different areas experiencing a factor of 2 different annual PM10 exposure due to local sources will also experience a factor of 2 different exposure in terms of PNC. This implies that health impact studies based solely on spatial differences in annual exposure to PM10 may not separate differences in health effects due to ultrafine and coarse particles. On the other hand

  7. Capture of PM-10 and smaller particulate using pulse-jet filters

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg, W.W.

    1994-12-31

    Particle matter of 10 micron or smaller diameter (PM-10) has been identified as a hazard. This is due to the tendency of these particles to be inhaled and retained in the human body. Some studies have identified the particles in smaller ranges (e.g. PM-2.5) as even greater hazards. Regulatory authorities are placing emphasis on identifying PM-10 emissions and controlling such emissions. The four standard particulate control technologies (Mechanical Collector, Wet Scrubber, Fabric Filter, Electrostatic Precipitator) can capture particles in this PM-10 range but standard design mechanical collectors and wet scrubbers will not capture these particles efficiently. Fabric filters and electrostatic precipitators will capture these fine particles efficiently but capture larger particles with greater efficiency. Therefore, the emission from all these devices are predominantly in the PM-10 range.

  8. 40 CFR 52.2182 - PM10 Committal SIP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false PM10 Committal SIP. 52.2182 Section 52...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) South Dakota § 52.2182 PM10 Committal SIP. On July 12 1988, the State submitted a Committal SIP for the Rapid City Group II PM10 area, as required...

  9. 40 CFR 52.2182 - PM10 Committal SIP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false PM10 Committal SIP. 52.2182 Section 52...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) South Dakota § 52.2182 PM10 Committal SIP. On July 12 1988, the State submitted a Committal SIP for the Rapid City Group II PM10 area, as required...

  10. 75 FR 41379 - Finding of Attainment for PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... 1, 1987 (52 FR 24634), EPA promulgated two primary standards for PM 10 : a 24-hour standard of 150... revoked the annual PM 10 standard but retained the 24-hour PM 10 standard. 71 FR 61144 (October 17, 2006... areas identified on August 7, 1987 (52 FR 29383), as further clarified on October 31, 1990 (55 FR...

  11. 75 FR 64162 - Determination of Attainment for PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... Parkgate site and the Baronoff site. Both monitoring sites met EPA SLAMS network design and siting...-based standards. On July 1, 1987 (52 FR 24634), EPA promulgated two primary standards for PM 10 : A 24... December 18, 2006, EPA revoked the annual PM 10 standard but retained the 24-hour PM 10 standard. 71...

  12. Comparative inverse analysis of satellite (MODIS) and ground (PM10) observations to estimate dust emissions in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Bonyang; Park, Rokjin J.

    2013-01-01

    Soil dust aerosol is the largest contributor to aerosol mass concentrations in the troposphere and has considerable effects on air quality and climate. Arid and semi-arid areas of East Asia are one of the important dust source regions thus it is crucial to understand dust mobilization and accurately estimate dust emissions in East Asia. However, present dust models still contain large uncertainties with dust emissions that remain a significant contributor to the overall uncertainties in the model. In this study, we attempt to reduce these uncertainties by using an inverse modeling technique and obtain optimized dust emissions. We use Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depths (AODs) and groundbased mass concentrations of particles less than 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) observations over East Asia in May 2007. The MODIS AODs are validated with AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) AODs. The inversion uses the maximum a posteriori method and the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model (CTM) as a forward model. The model error is large over dust source regions including the Gobi Desert and Mongolia. We find that inverse modeling analyses from the MODIS and PM10 observations consistently result in decrease of dust emissions over Mongolia and the Gobi Desert. Whereas over the Taklamakan Desert and Manchuria, the inverse modeling analyses from both observations yield contrast results such as increase of dust sources using MODIS AODs, while decrease of those using PM10 observations. We discuss some limitations of both observations to obtain the optimized dust emissions and suggest several strategies for the improvement of dust emission estimates in the model.

  13. Seasonal variation, risk assessment and source estimation of PM 10 and PM10-bound PAHs in the ambient air of Chiang Mai and Lamphun, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pengchai, Petch; Chantara, Somporn; Sopajaree, Khajornsak; Wangkarn, Sunanta; Tengcharoenkul, Urai; Rayanakorn, Mongkon

    2009-07-01

    Daily PM10 concentrations were measured at four sampling stations located in Chiang Mai and Lamphun provinces, Thailand. The sampling scheme was conducted during June 2005 to June 2006; every 3 days for 24 h in each sampling period. The result revealed that all stations shared the same pattern, in which the PM10 (particulate matters with diameter of less than 10 microm) concentration increased at the beginning of dry season (December) and reached its peak in March before decreasing by the end of April. The maximum PM10 concentration for each sampling station was in the range of 140-182 microg/m(3) which was 1.1-1.5 times higher than the Thai ambient air quality standard of 120 microg/m(3). This distinctly high concentration of PM10 in the dry season (Dec. 05-Mar. 06) was recognized as a unique seasonal pattern for the northern part of Thailand. PM10 concentration had a medium level of negative correlation (r = -0.696 to -0.635) with the visibility data. Comparing the maximum PM10 concentration detected at each sampling station to the permitted PM10 level of the national air quality standard, the warning visibility values for the PM10 pollution-watch system were determined as 10 km for Chiang Mai Province and 5 km for Lamphun Province. From the analysis of PM10 constituents, no component exceeded the national air quality standard. The total concentrations of PM10-bond polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are calculated in terms of total toxicity equivalent concentrations (TTECs) using the toxicity equivalent factors (TEFs) method. TTECs in Chiang Mai and Lamphun ambient air was found at a level comparable to those observed in Nagasaki, Bangkok and Rome and at a lower level than those reported at Copenhagen. The annual number of lung cancer cases for Chiang Mai and Lamphun Provinces was estimated at two cases/year which was lower than the number of cases in Bangkok (27 cases/year). The principal component analysis/absolute principal component scores (PCA

  14. Validation of Satellite AOD Data with the Ground PM10 Data over Islamabad Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulbul, Gufran; Shahid, Imran

    2016-07-01

    Introduction The issue of air pollution affects the entire globe, but the countries having huge urban growth and industries are specially confronted with high amounts of suspended particles in atmosphere. According to WHO, for the areas where air pollution is monitored in Pakistan, the air pollution is deteriorating the air quality as time is passing. Pakistan, during the last decade, has seen an extensive rise in population growth, urbanization, and industrialization, together with a great increase in motorization and energy use. As a result, rise has taken place in the emission of various air pollutants. However, due to the lack of air quality management, the country is suffering from deterioration of air quality. From the air quality point of view, spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols and its variations are very important. The variations in the atmospheric aerosol, land surface properties, greenhouse gases, solar radiations and climatic changes alter the energy balance of the earth's atmospheric system. The addition of aerosol particles to the atmosphere is not only dependent upon the anthropogenic sources but these are also formed by physical and chemical atmospheric processes. Aerosols are a mixture of particles and these are characterized by their shape, their size (from nanometers (nm) to micrometers (µm) in radius) and their chemical composition. PM10 is the designation for particulate matter in the atmosphere that has an aerodynamic diameter of 10µm or less. The sources of PM10 may be natural (volcanoes, dust, storms, forest and grassland fires, living vegetation, or anthropogenic (burning of fossil fuels in vehicles, power plants and industrialization). The current interest in atmospheric particulate matter (PM10) is mainly due to its effect on human health and its role in climate change. Therefore, the particulate matter must be monitored continuously to understand their likely impact on the atmosphere, environment and particularly human

  15. Chemical mass balance source apportionment of PM10 and TSP in residential and industrial sites of an urban region of Kolkata, India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Karar, Kakoli; Srivastava, Anjali

    2007-04-01

    Daily average PM(10) (particulate matter which passes through a size selective impactor inlet with a 50% efficiency cut-off at 10 microm aerodynamic diameter), TSP (total suspended particulate matter) and their chemical species mass concentrations were measured at residential and industrial sites of an urban region of Kolkata during November 2003-November 2004. Source apportionment using chemical mass balance model revealed that the most dominant source throughout the study period at residential site was coal combustion (42%), while vehicular emission (47%) dominates at industrial site to PM(10). Paved road, field burning and wood combustion contributed 21%, 7% and 1% at residential site, while coal combustion, metal industry and soil dust contributed 34%, 1% and 1% at industrial site, respectively, to PM(10) during the study period. The contributors to TSP included coal combustion (37%), soil dust (19%), road dust (17%) and diesel combustion (15%) at residential site, while soil dust (36%), coal combustion (17%), solid waste (17%), road dust (16%) and tyre wear (7%) at industrial site. Significant seasonal variations of the particulate matters have been observed during the study period. In the monitoring sites total carbon, organic carbon and iron were found to be the marker species of road dust, while organic carbon, total carbon, chloride and sulfate have been observed as the marker species of soil dust in TSP. PMID:16987605

  16. Association between PM10 and respiratory hospital admissions in different seasons in heavily polluted Lanzhou City.

    PubMed

    An, Xingqin; Yan, Tao; Mi, Shengquan; Sun, Zhaobin; Hou, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Exposure-response relationship between particulate matter less than 10 μm in diameter (PM10) and human health in different seasons from 2001 to 2005 was examined based on hospital admissions data of respiratory system diseases from four major hospitals in Lanzhou, China. To quantify associations of respiratory system diseases with multiple air pollutants and meteorological conditions, a semiparametric generalized additive model was used in the authors' study by implementing daily ambient sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and PM10 data collected from the Lanzhou Environmental Monitoring Station and daily meteorological data from Lanzhou Meteorological Bureau. Results showed that daily averaged PM10 increased per interquartile range the hospital admissions number of respiratory diseases by 3.3% in spring, 1.4% in summer, 3.6% in autumn, and 4.0% in winter from a single-pollutant model, or 3.1%, 1.4%, 3.0%, and 4.0% from a multi-pollutant model, respectively. The effect of PM10 on respiratory hospital admissions was lowest in summer and highest in winter. The relative risks of PM10 on female or the elderly (≥ 65 yrs.) were higher, showing a stronger association of PM10 with respiratory diseases in female and elderly groups than in males and people younger than 65.

  17. Characterization of PM10 samples from Vanderbijlpark in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Moja, Shadung J; Mnisi, Jeremiah S; Nindi, Mathews M; Okonkwo, Jonathan O

    2013-01-01

    In this study, mass concentrations and physico-chemical characteristics of suspended particulates of aerodynamic size 10 μm (PM10) were evaluated. A dual E-Sampler which combines the light scatter and the gravimetric filter methods was used. Sampling occurred between August and December 2009. Scanning Electron Microscope - Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma 6000 were used for elemental and physical characterization. The highest daily average mass concentration measured was 0.03543 mg/m(3) and was below the international and national daily limit of 0.150 mg/m(3), as well as the strict Vaal Triangle regional standard of 0.075 μg/m(3). Relatively high daily average mass concentrations were obtained during the winter period. Concentrations of evaluated heavy metals decreased in the following order: iron (Fe) > manganese (Mn) > zinc (Zn) > copper (Cu) > vanadium (V) > titanium (Ti) > nickel (Ni) > lead (Pb). Positive correlations were established between Zn and Pb (r = 0.916); Zn and Mn (r = 0.883); Zn and V (0.984); Zn and Ni (r = 0.877); Zn and Fe (r = 0.914), which suggests common sources. However, Zn and Ti (r = 0.522); Zn and Cu (0.781) were poorly correlated.

  18. Seasonal variations and chemical characterization of ambient PM 10 at residential and industrial sites of an urban region of Kolkata (Calcutta), India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karar, Kakoli; Gupta, A. K.

    2006-07-01

    Monitoring of ambient PM 10 (particulate matter which passes through a size selective impactor inlet with a 50% efficiency cut-off at 10 μm aerodynamic diameter) has been done at residential (Kasba) and industrial (Cossipore) sites of an urban region of Kolkata during November 2003 to November 2004. The measurements have been performed once a week during the study period. PM 10 mass concentrations ranged from 68.2 to 280.6 μg/m 3 at a residential site and 62.4 to 401.2 μg/m 3 at an industrial site. Metal constituents of ambient PM 10 deposited on quartz microfibre filter papers were identified using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES). Chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) are the seven toxic trace metals quantified from the measured PM 10 concentrations. Results identified zinc with maximum contribution of PM 10 among measured metals having concentrations of 0.49 μg/m 3 at the residential site, and 0.53 μg/m 3 at the industrial site. The PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) compounds namely, fluoranthene (Fl), pyrene (Py), benzo(a)anthracene (BaA), benzo(b)fluoranthene (BbF) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) have been analyzed using gas chromatography. The major PAH compound at the monitoring sites was BbF with 0.03 μg/m 3 at the residential site and 0.02 μg/m 3 at the industrial site. Total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC) and organic carbon (OC) of PM 10 were analyzed using a carbon analyzer. Exposed quartz microfibre filter papers were also analyzed for water-soluble anions of fluoride (F -), chloride (Cl -), nitrate (NO 3-), phosphate (PO 43-) and sulfate (SO 42-) using ion chromatography. Sulfate was found in maximum concentration among anionic species with a value of 1.2 μg/m 3 at the residential site, and 1.7 μg/m 3 at the industrial site. Meteorological parameters such as wind speed, wind direction, rainfall, temperature and relative humidity were collected

  19. Isolated and synergistic effects of PM10 and average temperature on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Samya de Lara Lins de Araujo; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Schwartz, Joel; Zanobetti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the effect of air pollution and temperature on mortality due to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. METHODS We evaluated the isolated and synergistic effects of temperature and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 10 µm (PM10) on the mortality of individuals > 40 years old due to cardiovascular disease and that of individuals > 60 years old due to respiratory diseases in Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil, between 1998 and 2008. Three methodologies were used to evaluate the isolated association: time-series analysis using Poisson regression model, bidirectional case-crossover analysis matched by period, and case-crossover analysis matched by the confounding factor, i.e., average temperature or pollutant concentration. The graphical representation of the response surface, generated by the interaction term between these factors added to the Poisson regression model, was interpreted to evaluate the synergistic effect of the risk factors. RESULTS No differences were observed between the results of the case-crossover and time-series analyses. The percentage change in the relative risk of cardiovascular and respiratory mortality was 0.85% (0.45;1.25) and 1.60% (0.74;2.46), respectively, due to an increase of 10 μg/m3 in the PM10 concentration. The pattern of correlation of the temperature with cardiovascular mortality was U-shaped and that with respiratory mortality was J-shaped, indicating an increased relative risk at high temperatures. The values for the interaction term indicated a higher relative risk for cardiovascular and respiratory mortalities at low temperatures and high temperatures, respectively, when the pollution levels reached approximately 60 μg/m3. CONCLUSIONS The positive association standardized in the Poisson regression model for pollutant concentration is not confounded by temperature, and the effect of temperature is not confounded by the pollutant levels in the time-series analysis. The simultaneous exposure

  20. Extractable organic matter in PM10 from LiWan district of Guangzhou City, PR China.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xinhui; Sheng, Guoying; Peng, Peng an; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Fu, Jiamo

    2002-12-01

    PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <10 microm) samples were collected at LiWan District of Guangzhou, PR China during April and July 2001 using a high volume air sampler to determine the distributions of homologous compounds and biomarkers. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including non-alkylated PAHs, methyl-alkylated PAHs, and some PAHs containing S/O atoms and n-alkanes were measured using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. The sigma(n)-alkane and sigmaPAHs ranged from 26.4 to 719.2 ng/m3 and 7.4 to 159.4 ng/m3, respectively. A seasonal fluctuation was clearly evident with higher concentrations occurring during the colder months (April). In addition, some compositional differences are observed for the organic compounds in samples collected from different heights above ground level. Higher sites had a significant contribution from vascular plant wax. The presence of petroleum products with no carbon number preference, pristane, phytane and a significant unresolved complex mixture (UCM) with unresolved to resolved components ratio (U/R) of 6.2-13.2 confirm the petroleum component. The relative distribution of n-alkanes and the values of molecular diagnostic ratio, such as carbon preference index (CPI) values ranging from 1.0 to 1.4 (for the whole range of n-alkanes), indicated the importance of petroleum and diesel residues and gasoline emissions, as well as the minor contribution of n-alkanes emitted directly from epicuticular waxes. Indeed, the percent contribution of leaf 'wax' n-alkanes (5.2-19.4%) indicated a low contribution of biogenic sources. The fossil fuel biomarkers, hopanes and steranes were observed in the PM10 samples, which indicate a petroleum origin. The distribution pattern of PAHs was characteristic of anthropogenic emissions. Coupling carbon number maximum (Cmax), CPI, U/R values, molecular marker and molecular diagnostic ratios for alkanes and PAHs revealed a classification of natural biogenic and

  1. Assessment of Dust Emissions Model and PM10 in the United Arab Emirates during Dust Storms using the CMAQ-WRF Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooqui, M.; West, J. J.; Shankar, U.; Sexton, K.; Adelman, Z.; Omary, M.; Xin, A.; Arunachalam, S.; Davis, N.; Vizuete, W.

    2013-12-01

    An air quality model was applied to predict ambient concentrations of particulate matter (PM) below 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) from dust storms in the summer of 2007 in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), where dust emissions are the dominant source of PM10. The aim was to investigate the performance of an advanced dust emissions parameterization (DUST_EI) from the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model in predicting ambient concentrations of dust, compared to that of SimpleDust, a simplified dust emissions parameterization used to generate dust emissions for the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ). The DUST_EI model aggregates dust emissions calculated in each of 10 size bins, yielding a variable ratio of fine to coarse PM emissions, compared to the fixed ratio used in SimpleDust. It also uses a temporally and spatially varying threshold friction velocity, a key parameter for initiating dust events, in contrast to the constant value used in SimpleDust Dust emissions from the two dust models were combined with emissions from other sources and input into CMAQ version 4.7 in air quality simulations for May to August, 2007. Relative to the SimpleDust model, seasonal total (fine + coarse) dust emissions estimated by the DUST_EI model increased by a factor of 2.4, and by a factor of 5 when summed over the fine size bins only. The SimpleDust model shows a consistent low bias of up to -87% compared to PM10 surface observations. On the other hand, biases at four surface PM10 monitors ranged from -10% to +36% with DUST_EI, which was also able to reproduce the timing and location of dust storms, but tended to under-predict PM10 during dust storm days. The parameterized DUST_EI model should be revised using observations of both PM10 and PM2.5 collected over a longer duration and more locations to improve the representation of dust emissions in this region.

  2. Long-term Exposure to PM10 and NO2 in Association with Lung Volume and Airway Resistance in the MAAS Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Agius, Raymond M.; de Vocht, Frank; Lindley, Sarah; Gerrard, William; Lowe, Lesley; Belgrave, Danielle; Custovic, Adnan; Simpson, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Background: Findings from previous studies on the effects of air pollution exposure on lung function during childhood have been inconsistent. A common limitation has been the quality of exposure data used, and few studies have modeled exposure longitudinally throughout early life. Objectives: We sought to study the long-term effects of exposure to particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10) and to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on specific airway resistance (sRaw) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) before and after bronchodilator treatment. Subjects were from the Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study (MAAS) birth cohort (n = 1,185). Methods: Spirometry was performed during clinic visits at ages 3, 5, 8, and 11 years. Individual-level PM10 and NO2 exposures were estimated from birth to 11 years of age through a microenvironmental exposure model. Longitudinal and cross-sectional associations were estimated using generalized estimating equations and multivariable linear regression models. Results: Lifetime exposure to PM10 and NO2 was associated with significantly less growth in FEV1 (percent predicted) over time, both before (–1.37%; 95% CI: –2.52, –0.23 for a 1-unit increase in PM10 and –0.83%; 95% CI: –1.39, –0.28 for a 1-unit increase in NO2) and after bronchodilator treatment (–3.59%; 95% CI: –5.36, –1.83 and –1.20%; 95% CI: –1.97, –0.43, respectively). We found no association between lifetime exposure and sRaw over time. Cross-sectional analyses of detailed exposure estimates for the summer and winter before 11 years of age and lung function at 11 years indicated no significant associations. Conclusions: Long-term PM10 and NO2 exposures were associated with small but statistically significant reductions in lung volume growth in children of elementary-school age. Citation: Mölter A, Agius RM, de Vocht F, Lindley S, Gerrard W, Lowe L, Belgrave D, Custovic A, Simpson A. 2013. Long-term exposure to PM10 and NO2 in

  3. 75 FR 41421 - Finding of Attainment for PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 81 Finding of Attainment for PM10 for the Mendenhall Valley PM10 Nonattainment Area, Alaska AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA finds that...

  4. 40 CFR 52.378 - Control strategy: PM10

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: PM10 52.378 Section 52.378 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Connecticut § 52.378 Control strategy: PM10 (a)...

  5. 75 FR 35302 - Determination of Attainment for PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... has established health-based standards. On July 1, 1987 (52 FR 24634), EPA promulgated two primary... standard. 71 FR 61144 (October 17, 2006). The 24-hour PM 10 standard is attained when the expected number... former Group I PM 10 planning areas identified in 52 FR 29383 (August 7, 1987), as further clarified...

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Pomegranate Peel Extract in THP-1 Cells Exposed to Particulate Matter PM10

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soojin; Seok, Jin Kyung; Kwak, Jun Yup; Suh, Hwa-Jin; Kim, Young Mi; Boo, Yong Chool

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence support health risks associated with the exposure to airborne particulate matter with a diameter of <10 μM (PM10). PM10 stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory mediators. Thus, we assumed that natural antioxidants might provide health benefits attenuating hazardous effects of PM10. In the present study, we examined the effects of pomegranate peel extract (PPE) on THP-1 monocytic cells exposed to PM10. PM10 induced cytotoxicity and the production of ROS. It also increased the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cell adhesion molecules, such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). PPE at 10–100 μg mL−1 attenuated the production of ROS and the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, and ICAM-1, but not VCAM-1, in THP-1 cells stimulated by PM10 (100 μg mL−1). PPE also attenuated the adhesion of PM10-stimulated THP-1 cells to EA.hy926 endothelial cells. PPE constituents, punicalagin and ellagic acid, attenuated PM10-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, and punicalagin was less cytotoxic compared to ellagic acid. The present study suggests that PPE and punicalagin may be useful in alleviating inflammatory reactions due to particulate matter. PMID:27247608

  7. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Pomegranate Peel Extract in THP-1 Cells Exposed to Particulate Matter PM10.

    PubMed

    Park, Soojin; Seok, Jin Kyung; Kwak, Jun Yup; Suh, Hwa-Jin; Kim, Young Mi; Boo, Yong Chool

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence support health risks associated with the exposure to airborne particulate matter with a diameter of <10 μM (PM10). PM10 stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory mediators. Thus, we assumed that natural antioxidants might provide health benefits attenuating hazardous effects of PM10. In the present study, we examined the effects of pomegranate peel extract (PPE) on THP-1 monocytic cells exposed to PM10. PM10 induced cytotoxicity and the production of ROS. It also increased the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cell adhesion molecules, such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). PPE at 10-100 μg mL(-1) attenuated the production of ROS and the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, and ICAM-1, but not VCAM-1, in THP-1 cells stimulated by PM10 (100 μg mL(-1)). PPE also attenuated the adhesion of PM10-stimulated THP-1 cells to EA.hy926 endothelial cells. PPE constituents, punicalagin and ellagic acid, attenuated PM10-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, and punicalagin was less cytotoxic compared to ellagic acid. The present study suggests that PPE and punicalagin may be useful in alleviating inflammatory reactions due to particulate matter. PMID:27247608

  8. Particle size distribution and PM10 of volcanic ashes in Guadeloupe during the major eruption of Soufrière Hills in February 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinie, Jack; Bernard, Marie-Lise; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Euphrasie-Clotilde, Lovely; Brute, France-Nor; Roussas, Andre

    2014-05-01

    On the 11 February 2010, fifteen minutes after midday, an explosive eruption of Soufriere Hills volcano sent tephra over the neighbour Caribbean islands. The volcanic ashes benefit from the vertical wind distribution of the moment to reach Guadeloupe island and cover it ground near 5 hours after the ash venting. Since the first ashes arrival over the town of Pointe-a-Pitre (located at 80 km at the South East of Soufriere hills volcano) to the end of the event, we measured the mean particle concentrations and particle size distributions every twenty minutes. Measurements were performed at a building roof of the town using an optical particles counter Lighthouse IAQ 3016 mainly used in indoor air quality studies and which provides up to 6 particle size channels of simultaneous counting with aerodynamic diameters classes ranging from 0.3 to >10 µm. The airborne particulate matter mass concentration, with equivalent aerodynamic diameters less than 10 µm (PM10) were measured by the local air quality network Gwad'air, in the vicinity of the site used to study this ash fall.. The maximum concentration of small particles with diameter lesser than 1µm (D0.3-1) was observed one hour before the larger particles. This result may imply a difference in shape and density between particles D0.3-1 and particles D1-10 (1<diameter< 10), producing a difference in the dry deposition velocity. The mean hourly mass concentration of PM10 has reached a maximum value of 271µg/m3 eleven hours after the major eruption which followed a partial dome collapse in the crater. We found a poor correlation between the PM10 values and the mass concentration calculated from the mean particle concentrations of particles D0.3-1+ D1-10. This result is probably related to the large variability in the density distribution of the particles. Moreover, we observed a variation over time in the shape and the composition of the collected volcanic ashes which impacts on the exposed population, especially their

  9. Relationship between physico-chemical characteristics and potential toxicity of PM10.

    PubMed

    Megido, Laura; Suárez-Peña, Beatriz; Negral, Luis; Castrillón, Leonor; Suárez, Susana; Fernández-Nava, Yolanda; Marañón, Elena

    2016-11-01

    PM10 was sampled at a suburban location affected by traffic and industry in the north of Spain. The samples were analysed to determine the chemical components of PM10 (organic and elemental carbon, soluble chemical species and metals). The aim of this study was to assess the toxicity of PM10 in terms of the bulk analysis and the physico-chemical properties of the particles. Total carbon, sulphates, ammonium, chlorides and nitrates were found to be the major constituents of PM10. The contribution of the last of these was found to increase significantly with PM10 concentration (Pearson coefficient correlation of 0.7, p-value < 0.001). Individual airborne particles were characterised morphologically and chemically via a combination of Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). The subsequent image analysis revealed C-rich particles with shapes that pointed to combustion processes. Moreover, carbonaceous particles seemed to act as vehicles for sulphur compounds and metals (S, Na, Fe, Ca, Mg, K, Al, Mn, Zn and Cu). Coarse particles were found to be mainly constituted by crustal material and marine and carbonaceous particles. Although most of the studied individual particles in PM10 samples (86.0%) had a diameter within the 0.1-2.5 μm range, 1.8% of them had sizes lower than 0.1 μm 40.2% of the total studied particles were estimated to be inhaled and deposited in the human respiratory tract; 12.3% of these particles would reach the deepest zones, thereby posing a major risk to human health.

  10. 40 CFR 52.378 - Control strategy: PM10.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and the initial ten-year maintenance plan (2006-2015) meet the redesignation requirements in sections... maintenance plan (2006-2015). The State of Connecticut has committed to: maintain a PM10 monitoring network...

  11. 40 CFR 52.378 - Control strategy: PM10.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and the initial ten-year maintenance plan (2006-2015) meet the redesignation requirements in sections... maintenance plan (2006-2015). The State of Connecticut has committed to: maintain a PM10 monitoring network...

  12. Enhanced PM10 bounded PAHs from shipping emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongpiachan, S.; Hattayanone, M.; Choochuay, C.; Mekmok, R.; Wuttijak, N.; Ketratanakul, A.

    2015-05-01

    Earlier studies have highlighted the importance of maritime transport as a main contributor of air pollutants in port area. The authors intended to investigate the effects of shipping emissions on the enhancement of PM10 bounded polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and mutagenic substances in an industrial area of Rayong province, Thailand. Daily PM10 speciation data across two air quality observatory sites in Thailand during 2010-2013 were collected. Diagnostic binary ratios of PAH congeners, analysis of variances (ANOVA), and principal component analysis (PCA) were employed to evaluate the enhanced genotoxicity of PM10 during the docking period. Significant increase of PAHs and mutagenic index (MI) of PM10 were observed during the docking period in both sampling sites. Although stationary sources like coal combustions from power plants and vehicular exhausts from motorway can play a great role in enhancing PAH concentrations, regulating shipping emissions from diesel engine in the port area like Rayong is predominantly crucial.

  13. Stable sulfur isotope ratios and water-soluble inorganic compositions of PM10 in Yichang City, central China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhou; Li, Xiao-Dong; Deng, Jie; Wang, Hai-Yun

    2015-09-01

    Chemical and sulfate-sulfur isotopic compositions of water-soluble inorganic ions were analyzed for aerosol sample particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm (PM10) collected during 17-28 December 2012 at Yichang City, Hubei Province, central China. Most water-soluble inorganic ions, except for NO3 (-) and NH4 (+), showed slightly higher concentration in daytime than in nighttime, and the major detected ions followed the order of SO4 (2-) > NO3 (-) > Ca(2+) > Na(+) > NH4 (+) > Cl(-) in daytime and nighttime, of which SO4 (2-) is the most abundant ionic component that accounted for about 49.1 and 49.3 % of the total mass of analyzed ions in daytime and nighttime, respectively. According to the correlation coefficients among the mass concentrations of water-soluble inorganic ions, there may mainly exist in forms of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 in daytime and NH4NO3 in nighttime. The δ(34)S values of sulfate ranged from +2.82 to +4.63 ‰ (average +3.97 ‰) in daytime and from +2.90 to +5.39 ‰ (average +4.08 ‰) in nighttime, indicating that the source of sulfate in PM10 was mainly derived from coal burning (δ(34)S, +3.68 ‰) in Yichang City. The [NO3 (-)]/[SO4 (2-)] mass ratio varied between 0.2 and 0.6 with an average of 0.4 in daytime and 0.1 to 0.8 with an average of 0.4 in nighttime, which implying that the stationary source emissions would be more important than the vehicle emissions in the studied area. As a whole, the mixture of coal burning, vehicle exhaust, and resuspended road dust would be responsible for the sources of PM10 in Yichang City during wintertime. PMID:25960017

  14. PM10 retrieval in urban area from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H. S.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Abdullah, K.; Saleh, N. Mohd.

    2007-04-01

    This study determined the relationship between in situ and remote sensing observation to derive an algorithm for PM10 mapping. The main objective of this study was to test the feasibility of using Landsat TM imagery captured on 17 January 2002 for PM10 mapping over Penang Island, Malaysia. A new algorithm was developed based on the aerosol characteristic for air quality estimation. The corresponding PM10 data were measured simultaneously with the acquisition of satellite scene for algorithm regression analysis. Accuracy of the retrieved surface reflectance values is very importance to determine the atmospheric component from the remotely sensed data. In this study, we computed the surface component properties by using ACTOR2 in the PCI Geomatica 9.1 image processing software. The proposed algorithm produced high correlation coefficient (R) and low root-mean-square error (RMS) between the measured and estimated PM10 values. A PM10 map was generated using the proposed algorithm. Finally, the created PM10 map was geometrically corrected and colour-coded for visual interpretation. This study indicated the usefulness of remotely sensed data for air quality studies using the proposed algorithm.

  15. PM10 and gaseous pollutants trends from air quality monitoring networks in Bari province: principal component analysis and absolute principal component scores on a two years and half data set

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The chemical composition of aerosols and particle size distributions are the most significant factors affecting air quality. In particular, the exposure to finer particles can cause short and long-term effects on human health. In the present paper PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter lower than 10 μm), CO, NOx (NO and NO2), Benzene and Toluene trends monitored in six monitoring stations of Bari province are shown. The data set used was composed by bi-hourly means for all parameters (12 bi-hourly means per day for each parameter) and it’s referred to the period of time from January 2005 and May 2007. The main aim of the paper is to provide a clear illustration of how large data sets from monitoring stations can give information about the number and nature of the pollutant sources, and mainly to assess the contribution of the traffic source to PM10 concentration level by using multivariate statistical techniques such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Absolute Principal Component Scores (APCS). Results Comparing the night and day mean concentrations (per day) for each parameter it has been pointed out that there is a different night and day behavior for some parameters such as CO, Benzene and Toluene than PM10. This suggests that CO, Benzene and Toluene concentrations are mainly connected with transport systems, whereas PM10 is mostly influenced by different factors. The statistical techniques identified three recurrent sources, associated with vehicular traffic and particulate transport, covering over 90% of variance. The contemporaneous analysis of gas and PM10 has allowed underlining the differences between the sources of these pollutants. Conclusions The analysis of the pollutant trends from large data set and the application of multivariate statistical techniques such as PCA and APCS can give useful information about air quality and pollutant’s sources. These knowledge can provide useful advices to environmental policies in

  16. Seasonal variation of PM10 chemical constituents in different French urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salameh, Dalia; Golly, Benjamin; Besombes, Jean Luc; Alleman, Laurent; Favez, Olivier; Jaffrezo, Jean Luc

    2016-04-01

    Particulate matter (PM10, with a diameter less than 10 μm) is a heterogeneous mixture of natural and anthropogenic components including organic and elemental carbon (OC, and EC), sulfates, nitrates, ammonium, mineral dust, trace elements, seasalt, which has been linked to adverse impact on human health, visibility, and climate change. Atmospheric PM concentration and composition can vary widely due to different climatic conditions and local features such as anthropogenic source types, emission rates and dispersion patterns. Moreover, the contribution of natural sources (e.g. seasalt and dust) varies from one region to another. However, a fundamental step towards a better understanding and identification of the sources of PM10 is constituted by the study of aerosol chemical composition. Moreover, in order to define cost effective emission abatement strategies, research studies to interpret the variability of PM10 levels and components and to identify the main emission sources influencing ambient air PM10 levels is still needed. In a national context of a better understanding of PM composition and sources, and therefore the implementation of efficient reduction plans of PM in France, various monitoring campaigns were carried out recently within different air quality programs, where PM10 filter samples were collected on a 24 hour basis at various type of French sites (e.g. urban, rural, etc.,), located in different urban environments. An extensive chemical characterization of PM10 composition at these sites was performed, and a large range of analytical techniques was used to determine the concentrations of various chemical species which included the analysis of OC, and EC, major ionic species (SO42-, NO3-, Cl-, NH4+, K+, Na+, Mg2+, and Ca2+), metals and trace elements (e.g. Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, V, Zn, etc.,), and organic compounds (e.g. sugars, polyols, PAH, methyl PAH, sulfur PAH, alkanes, hopanes, and methoxyphenols). The seasonal and spatial

  17. Exceedance of PM10 and ozone concentration limits in Germany - Spatial variability and influence of climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidenreich, Majana; Bernhofer, Christian

    2014-05-01

    High concentrations of particulate matter (PM) and ground-level ozone (O3) have negative impacts on human health, e.g., increased risk of respiratory disease, and the environment. European Union (EU) air policy and air quality standards led to continuously reduced air pollution problems in recent decades. Nevertheless, the limit values for PM10 (particles with diameter of 10 micrometers or less) and ozone - defined by the directive 2008/50/EC of the European Parliament - are still exceeded frequently. Poor air quality and the exceedance of limits result mainly from the combination of high emissions and unfavourable weather conditions. Datasets from German monitoring stations are used to describe the spatial and temporal variability of the exceedance of concentration limits for PM10 and ozone for the federal states of Germany. Time series are analysed for the period 2000-2012 for PM10 and for the period 1990-2012 for ozone. Furthermore, the influence of weather patterns on the exceedance of concentration limits on a regional scale was investigated. Here, the "objective weather types" of the German Weather Service were used. As expected, for most regions anticyclonic weather types (with a negative cyclonality index for the two levels 950 and 500 hPa) show a high frequency on exeedance days, both for PM10 and ozone. The results could contribute to estimate the future exceedance frequency of concentration limits and to develop possible countermeasures.

  18. Improving Neural Network Prediction Accuracy for PM10 Individual Air Quality Index Pollution Levels.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qi; Wu, Shengjun; Du, Yun; Xue, Huaiping; Xiao, Fei; Ban, Xuan; Li, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    Fugitive dust deriving from construction sites is a serious local source of particulate matter (PM) that leads to air pollution in cities undergoing rapid urbanization in China. In spite of this fact, no study has yet been published relating to prediction of high levels of PM with diameters <10 μm (PM10) as adjudicated by the Individual Air Quality Index (IAQI) on fugitive dust from nearby construction sites. To combat this problem, the Construction Influence Index (Ci) is introduced in this article to improve forecasting models based on three neural network models (multilayer perceptron, Elman, and support vector machine) in predicting daily PM10 IAQI one day in advance. To obtain acceptable forecasting accuracy, measured time series data were decomposed into wavelet representations and wavelet coefficients were predicted. Effectiveness of these forecasters were tested using a time series recorded between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, at six monitoring stations situated within the urban area of the city of Wuhan, China. Experimental trials showed that the improved models provided low root mean square error values and mean absolute error values in comparison to the original models. In addition, these improved models resulted in higher values of coefficients of determination and AHPC (the accuracy rate of high PM10 IAQI caused by nearby construction activity) compared to the original models when predicting high PM10 IAQI levels attributable to fugitive dust from nearby construction sites. PMID:24381481

  19. An aerodynamic investigation of two 1.83-meter-diameter fan systems designed to drive a subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, V. R.; Eckert, W. T.; Mort, K. W.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental, aerodynamic investigation was made of two 1.83 m diameter fan systems which are being considered for the repowered drive section of the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. One system was low speed, the other was high speed. The low speed fan was tested at various stagger angles from 32.9 deg to 62.9 deg. At a fan blade stagger angle of 40.8 deg and operating at a tip speed of 1155 m/sec, the low speed fan developed 207.3 m of head. The high speed fan had a design blade stagger angle of 56.2 deg and was tested at this stagger angle only. The high speed fan operating at 191.5 m/sec developed 207.3 m of head. Radial distributions of static pressure coefficients, total pressure coefficients, and angles of swirl are presented. Radial surveys were conducted at four azimuth locations in front of the fan, and repeated downstream of the fan. Data were taken for various flow control devices and for two inlet contraction lengths.

  20. Monsoonal differences and probability distribution of PM(10) concentration.

    PubMed

    Md Yusof, Noor Faizah Fitri; Ramli, Nor Azam; Yahaya, Ahmad Shukri; Sansuddin, Nurulilyana; Ghazali, Nurul Adyani; Al Madhoun, Wesam

    2010-04-01

    There are many factors that influence PM(10) concentration in the atmosphere. This paper will look at the PM(10) concentration in relation with the wet season (north east monsoon) and dry season (south west monsoon) in Seberang Perai, Malaysia from the year 2000 to 2004. It is expected that PM(10) will reach the peak during south west monsoon as the weather during this season becomes dry and this study has proved that the highest PM(10) concentrations in 2000 to 2004 were recorded in this monsoon. Two probability distributions using Weibull and lognormal were used to model the PM(10) concentration. The best model used for prediction was selected based on performance indicators. Lognormal distribution represents the data better than Weibull distribution model for 2000, 2001, and 2002. However, for 2003 and 2004, Weibull distribution represents better than the lognormal distribution. The proposed distributions were successfully used for estimation of exceedences and predicting the return periods of the sequence year. PMID:19365611

  1. Factors influencing PM 10 emissions from road pavement wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Gudmundsson, Anders; Dahl, Andreas; Jonsson, Per; Swietlicki, Erik

    Accelerated pavement wear is one of the major environmental disadvantages of studded tyres in northern regions and results in increased levels of PM 10. Measurements of PM 10 in a road simulator hall have been used to study the influence of pavement properties, tyre type and vehicle speed on pavement wear. The test set-up included three different pavements (one granite and two quartzite with different aggregate sizes), three different tyre types (studded, non-studded, and summer tyres) and different speeds (30-70 km h -1). The results show that the granite pavement was more prone to PM 10 production compared to the quartzite pavements. Studded winter tyres yield tens of times higher PM 10 concentrations compared to non-studded winter tyres. Wear from summer tyres was negligible in comparison. It was also shown that wear is strongly dependent on speed; every 10 km h -1 increase yielded an increase of the PM 10 concentration of 680 μg m -3 in one of the simulator experiments.

  2. A combined analysis to identify airborne PM10 sources.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Dario R; Reich, Silvia L; Dawidowski, Laura E; Vázquez, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    A two step procedure that combines an air dispersion model with a receptor model was used to identify the key sources that contribute to air levels of suspended particulate matter. The contribution to PM(10) concentrations measured at four monitoring sites in San Nicolas, Argentina, of the following sources, a thermal power plant, an integrated steel mill, motor vehicle exhaust fumes, and finally dust from paved and unpaved roads, have been analysed. Moreover, an air dispersion model was used to estimate the contribution of the thermal power plant, emissions of which have been described in depth by means of hourly fuel consumption and specific emission factors. The ratio "apportionment coefficient" was introduced to relate the contribution of this source to the measured 24 h PM(10) concentrations by analysing the frequency of occurrence of connecting winds between the power plant and each monitoring site. In San Nicolas 70% of the PM(10) sampled at three of the four monitoring sites could be attributed to the power plant in those scenarios where winds connected the facility's tall point sources with the sampling locations. The contribution to the measured PM(10) levels of the rest of the sources that are present in the analysed area was confirmed by way of receptor models. For this purpose, the multielemental composition of 41 samples was determined by Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence analysis. In order to ascertain the underlying correlations between PM(10) samples and potential sources, Principal Component Analysis was performed on the standard matrix of composition profiles, which comprises the measured PM(10) samples being enlarged with the composition profiles of the potential contributing sources. The diagonalization of the covariance matrix was used as a screening procedure to differentiate the most likely contributing sources from those that were not significant.

  3. Spatio-temporal characteristics of PM10 concentration across Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneng, Liew; Latif, Mohd Talib; Tangang, Fredolin T.; Mansor, Haslina

    The recurrence of forest fires in Southeast Asia and associated biomass burning, has contributed markedly to the problem of trans-boundary haze and the long-range movement of pollutants in the region. Air pollutants, specifically particulate matter in the atmosphere, have received extensive attention, mainly because of their adverse effect on people's health. In this study, the spatial and temporal variability of the PM10 concentration across Malaysia was analyzed by means of the rotated principal component analysis. The results suggest that the variability of the PM10 concentration can be decomposed into four dominant modes, each characterizing different spatial and temporal variations. The first mode characterizes the southwest coastal region of the Malaysian Peninsular with the PM10 showing a peak concentration during the summer monsoon i.e. when the winds are predominantly southerlies or southwesterlies, and a minimal concentration during the winter monsoon. The second mode features the region of western Borneo with the PM10 exhibiting a concentration surge in August-September, which is likely to be the result of the northward shift of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and the subsequent rapid arrival of the rainy season. The third mode delineates the northern region of the Malaysian Peninsular with strong bimodality in the PM10 concentration. Seasonally, this component exhibits two concentration maxima during the late winter and summer monsoons, as well as two minima during the inter-monsoon periods. The fourth dominant mode characterizes the northern Borneo region which exhibits weaker seasonality of the PM10 concentration. Generally, the seasonal fluctuation of the PM10 concentration is largely associated with the seasonal variation of rainfall in the country. However, in addition to this, the PM10 concentration also fluctuates markedly in two timescale bands i.e. 10-20 days quasi-biweekly (QBW) and 30-60 days lower frequency (LF) band of the intra

  4. Source apportionment of indoor PM10 in Elderly Care Centre.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Silva, M; Faria, T; Saraga, D; Maggos, T; Wolterbeek, H T; Almeida, S M

    2016-04-01

    Source contribution to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) has been exhaustively modelled. However, people spend most of their time indoors where this approach is less explored. This evidence worsens considering elders living in Elderly Care Centres, since they are more susceptible. The present study aims to investigate the PM composition and sources influencing elderly exposure. Two 2-week sampling campaigns were conducted-one during early fall (warm phase) and another throughout the winter (cold phase). PM10 were collected with two TCR-Tecora(®) samplers that were located in an Elderly Care Centre living room and in the correspondent outdoor. Chemical analysis of the particles was performed by neutron activation analysis for element characterization, by ion chromatography for the determination of water soluble ions and by a thermal optical technique for the measurement of organic and elemental carbon. Statistical analysis showed that there were no statistical differences between seasons and environments. The sum of the indoor PM10 components measured in this work explained 57 and 53 % of the total PM10 mass measured by gravimetry in warm and cold campaigns, respectively. Outdoor PM10 concentrations were significantly higher during the day than night (p value < 0.05), as well as Ca(2+), Fe, Sb and Zn. The contribution of indoor and outdoor sources was assessed by principal component analysis and showed the importance of the highways and the airport located less than 500 m from the Elderly Care Centre for both indoor and outdoor air quality. PMID:26758302

  5. The construction of control chart for PM10 functional data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaadan, Norshahida; Jemain, Abdul Aziz; Deni, Sayang Mohd

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a statistical procedure to construct a control chart for monitoring air quality (PM10) using functional data is proposed. A set of daily indices that represent the daily PM10 curves were obtained using Functional Principal Component Analysis (FPCA). By means of an iterative charting procedure, a reference data set that represented a stable PM10 process was obtained. The data were then used as a reference for monitoring future data. The application of the procedure was conducted using seven-year (2004-2010) period of recorded data from the Klang air quality monitoring station located in the Klang Valley region of Peninsular Malaysia. The study showed that the control chart provided a useful visualization tool for monitoring air quality and was capable in detecting abnormality in the process system. As in the case of Klang station, the results showed that with reference to 2004-2008, the air quality (PM10) in 2010 was better than that in 2009.

  6. Source apportionment of indoor PM10 in Elderly Care Centre.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Silva, M; Faria, T; Saraga, D; Maggos, T; Wolterbeek, H T; Almeida, S M

    2016-04-01

    Source contribution to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) has been exhaustively modelled. However, people spend most of their time indoors where this approach is less explored. This evidence worsens considering elders living in Elderly Care Centres, since they are more susceptible. The present study aims to investigate the PM composition and sources influencing elderly exposure. Two 2-week sampling campaigns were conducted-one during early fall (warm phase) and another throughout the winter (cold phase). PM10 were collected with two TCR-Tecora(®) samplers that were located in an Elderly Care Centre living room and in the correspondent outdoor. Chemical analysis of the particles was performed by neutron activation analysis for element characterization, by ion chromatography for the determination of water soluble ions and by a thermal optical technique for the measurement of organic and elemental carbon. Statistical analysis showed that there were no statistical differences between seasons and environments. The sum of the indoor PM10 components measured in this work explained 57 and 53 % of the total PM10 mass measured by gravimetry in warm and cold campaigns, respectively. Outdoor PM10 concentrations were significantly higher during the day than night (p value < 0.05), as well as Ca(2+), Fe, Sb and Zn. The contribution of indoor and outdoor sources was assessed by principal component analysis and showed the importance of the highways and the airport located less than 500 m from the Elderly Care Centre for both indoor and outdoor air quality.

  7. 76 FR 5280 - Determination of Attainment for PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... monitoring sites met EPA SLAMS network design and siting requirements set forth at 40 CFR part 58, appendices... established health-based standards. On July 1, 1987 (52 FR 24634), EPA promulgated two primary standards for... standard.\\1\\ 71 FR 61144 (October 17, 2006). The 24-hour PM 10 standard is attained when the...

  8. The regional prediction model of PM10 concentrations for Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, Nevin; Güneri İşçi, Öznur

    2016-11-01

    This study is aimed to predict a regional model for weekly PM10 concentrations measured air pollution monitoring stations in Turkey. There are seven geographical regions in Turkey and numerous monitoring stations at each region. Predicting a model conventionally for each monitoring station requires a lot of labor and time and it may lead to degradation in quality of prediction when the number of measurements obtained from any õmonitoring station is small. Besides, prediction models obtained by this way only reflect the air pollutant behavior of a small area. This study uses Fuzzy C-Auto Regressive Model (FCARM) in order to find a prediction model to be reflected the regional behavior of weekly PM10 concentrations. The superiority of FCARM is to have the ability of considering simultaneously PM10 concentrations measured monitoring stations in the specified region. Besides, it also works even if the number of measurements obtained from the monitoring stations is different or small. In order to evaluate the performance of FCARM, FCARM is executed for all regions in Turkey and prediction results are compared to statistical Autoregressive (AR) Models predicted for each station separately. According to Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE) criteria, it is observed that FCARM provides the better predictions with a less number of models.

  9. Estimating the influence of different urban canopy cover types on atmospheric particulate matter (PM10) pollution abatement in London UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallis, Matthew; Freer-Smith, Peter; Sinnett, Danielle; Aylott, Matthew; Taylor, Gail

    2010-05-01

    In the urban environment atmospheric pollution by PM10 (particulate matter with a diameter less than 10 x 10-6 m) is a problem that can have adverse effects on human health, particularly increasing rates of respiratory disease. The main contributors to atmospheric PM10 in the urban environment are road traffic, industry and power production. The urban tree canopy is a receptor for removing PM10s from the atmosphere due to the large surface areas generated by leaves and air turbulence created by the structure of the urban forest. In this context urban greening has long been known as a mechanism to contribute towards PM10 removal from the air, furthermore, tree canopy cover has a role in contributing towards a more sustainable urban environment. The work reported here has been carried out within the BRIDGE project (SustainaBle uRban plannIng Decision support accountinG for urban mEtabolism). The aim of this project is to assess the fluxes of energy, water, carbon dioxide and particulates within the urban environment and develope a DSS (Decision Support System) to aid urban planners in sustainable development. A combination of published urban canopy cover data from ground, airborne and satellite based surveys was used. For each of the 33 London boroughs the urban canopy was classified to three groups, urban woodland, street trees and garden trees and each group quantified in terms of ground cover. The total [PM10] for each borough was taken from the LAEI (London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory 2006) and the contribution to reducing [PM10] was assessed for each canopy type. Deposition to the urban canopy was assessed using the UFORE (Urban Forest Effects Model) approach. Deposition to the canopy, boundary layer height and percentage reduction of the [PM10] in the atmosphere was assessed using both hourly meterological data and [PM10] and seasonal data derived from annual models. Results from hourly and annual data were compared with measured values. The model was then

  10. Association between PM10 concentrations and school absences in proximity of a cement plant in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Marcon, Alessandro; Pesce, Giancarlo; Girardi, Paolo; Marchetti, Pierpaolo; Blengio, Gianstefano; de Zolt Sappadina, Simona; Falcone, Salvatore; Frapporti, Guglielmo; Predicatori, Francesca; de Marco, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Dusts are one of the main air pollutants emitted during cement manufacturing. A substantial part of these are breathable particles that are less than 10 μm in diameter (PM10), which represent a potential threat for the health of the exposed population. This study aimed at evaluating the short-term effects of PM10 concentrations on the health of children, aged 6-14 years, who attended the schools in Fumane (Italy), in proximity (1.2 km) to a large cement plant. School absenteeism was used as a proxy indicator of child morbidity. Time series of daily school absences and PM10 concentrations were collected for 3 school-years from 2007 to 2010 (541 school-days, 462 children on average). The associations between PM10 concentrations and school absence rates in the same day (lag0) and in the following 4 days (lag1 to lag4) were evaluated using generalised additive models, smoothed for medium/long term trends and adjusted for day of the week, influenza outbreaks, daily temperature and rain precipitations. The average concentration of PM10 in the period was 34 (range: 4-183) μg/m(3). An average 10 μg/m(3) increase of PM10 concentration in the previous days (lag0-4) was associated with a statistically significant 2.5% (95%CI: 1.1-4.0%) increase in the rate of school absences. The highest increase in the absence rates (2.4%; 95%CI: 1.2-3.5%) was found 2 days after exposure (lag2). These findings provide epidemiological evidence of the acute health effects of PM10 in areas with annual concentrations that are lower than the legal European Union limit of 40 μg/m(3), and support the need to establish more restrictive legislative standards.

  11. 78 FR 7340 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Idaho: Sandpoint PM10 Nonattainment Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... for PM 10 (52 FR 24634). The EPA established a 24-hour standard of 150 g/m\\3\\ and an annual standard... retained the 24-hour PM 10 standard but revoked the annual PM 10 standard (71 FR 61144, effective December... nonattainment area due to measured violations of the 24-hour PM 10 standard (52 FR 29383). The notice...

  12. 40 CFR 52.823 - PM10 State Implementation Plan Development in Group II Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... committed to comply with the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... PM-10 data, to an extent consistent with minimum EPA requirements (note the network description... develop a PM-10 emission inventory for the areas submitted as part of any PM-10 SIP pursuant to items...

  13. 40 CFR 52.823 - PM10 State Implementation Plan Development in Group II Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... committed to comply with the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... PM-10 data, to an extent consistent with minimum EPA requirements (note the network description... develop a PM-10 emission inventory for the areas submitted as part of any PM-10 SIP pursuant to items...

  14. 40 CFR 52.823 - PM10 State Implementation Plan Development in Group II Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... committed to comply with the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... PM-10 data, to an extent consistent with minimum EPA requirements (note the network description... develop a PM-10 emission inventory for the areas submitted as part of any PM-10 SIP pursuant to items...

  15. 40 CFR 52.823 - PM10 State Implementation Plan Development in Group II Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... committed to comply with the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... PM-10 data, to an extent consistent with minimum EPA requirements (note the network description... develop a PM-10 emission inventory for the areas submitted as part of any PM-10 SIP pursuant to items...

  16. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a 1.83 meter (6 foot) diameter 1.2 pressure ratio fan (QF-6). [for short takeoff aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.; Stakolich, E. G.

    1974-01-01

    A 1.2-pressure-ratio, 1.83-meter-(6-ft-) diameter experimental fan stage with characteristics suitable for use in STOL aircraft engines was tested for acoustic and aerodynamic performance. The design incorporated features for low noise, including absence of inlet guide vanes, low rotor-blade-tip speed, low aerodynamic blade loading, and long axial spacing between the rotor and stator rows. The stage was run with four nozzles of different area. The perceived noise along a 152.4 meter (500-ft) sideline was rear-quadrant dominated with a maximum design-point level of 103.9 PNdb. The acoustic 1/3-octave results were analytically separated into broadband and pure-tone components. It was found that the stage noise levels generally increase with a decrease in nozzle area, with this increase observed primarily in the broadband noise component. A stall condition was documented acoustically with a 90-percent-of-design-area nozzle.

  17. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a 1.5-pressure-ratio, 1.83-meter (6 ft) diameter fan stage for turbofan engines (QF-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.; Balombin, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The fan was externally driven by an electric motor. Design features for low-noise generation included the elimination of inlet guide vanes, long axial spacing between the rotor and stator blade rows, and the selection of blade-vane numbers to achieve duct-mode cutoff. The fan QF-2 results were compared with those of another full-scale fan having essentially identical aerodynamic design except for nozzle geometry and the direction of rotation. The fan QF-2 aerodynamic results were also compared with those obtained from a 50.8 cm rotor-tip-diameter model of the reverse rotation fan QF-2 design. Differences in nozzle geometry other than exit area significantly affected the comparison of the results of the full-scale fans.

  18. Characterization of PM10 sources in the central Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzolai, G.; Nava, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Chiari, M.; Giannoni, M.; Becagli, S.; Traversi, R.; Marconi, M.; Frosini, D.; Severi, M.; Udisti, R.; di Sarra, A.; Pace, G.; Meloni, D.; Bommarito, C.; Monteleone, F.; Anello, F.; Sferlazzo, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Mediterranean Basin atmosphere is influenced by both strong natural and anthropogenic aerosol emissions and is also subject to important climatic forcings. Several programs have addressed the study of the Mediterranean basin; nevertheless important pieces of information are still missing. In this framework, PM10 samples were collected on a daily basis on the island of Lampedusa (35.5° N, 12.6° E; 45 m a.s.l.), which is far from continental pollution sources (the nearest coast, in Tunisia, is more than 100 km away). After mass gravimetric measurements, different portions of the samples were analyzed to determine the ionic content by ion chromatography (IC), the soluble metals by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), and the total (soluble + insoluble) elemental composition by particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE). Data from 2007 and 2008 are used in this study. The Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model was applied to the 2-year long data set of PM10 mass concentration and chemical composition to assess the aerosol sources affecting the central Mediterranean basin. Seven sources were resolved: sea salt, mineral dust, biogenic emissions, primary particulate ship emissions, secondary sulfate, secondary nitrate, and combustion emissions. Source contributions to the total PM10 mass were estimated to be about 40 % for sea salt, around 25 % for mineral dust, 10 % each for secondary nitrate and secondary sulfate, and 5 % each for primary particulate ship emissions, biogenic emissions, and combustion emissions. Large variations in absolute and relative contributions are found and appear to depend on the season and on transport episodes. In addition, the secondary sulfate due to ship emissions was estimated and found to contribute by about one-third to the total sulfate mass. Results for the sea-salt and mineral dust sources were compared with estimates of the same contributions obtained from independent approaches, leading to an

  19. Characterization of PM10 sources in the central Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzolai, G.; Nava, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Chiari, M.; Giannoni, M.; Becagli, S.; Traversi, R.; Marconi, M.; Frosini, D.; Severi, M.; Udisti, R.; di Sarra, A.; Pace, G.; Meloni, D.; Bommarito, C.; Monteleone, F.; Anello, F.; Sferlazzo, D. M.

    2015-07-01

    The Mediterranean Basin atmosphere is influenced by both strong natural and anthropogenic aerosol emissions, and is also subject to important climatic forcings. Several programs have addressed the study of the Mediterranean basin; nevertheless important pieces of information are still missing. In this framework, PM10 samples were collected on a daily basis on the island of Lampedusa (35.5° N, 12.6° E, 45 m a.s.l.), which is far from continental pollution sources (the nearest coast, in Tunisia, is more than 100 km away). After mass gravimetric measurements, different portions of the samples were analyzed to determine the ionic content by Ion Chromatography (IC), the soluble metals by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES), and the total (soluble + insoluble) elemental composition by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Data from years 2007 and 2008 are used in this study. The Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model was applied to the 2 year long data set of PM10 mass concentration and chemical composition to assess the aerosol sources affecting the Central Mediterranean basin. Seven sources were resolved: sea-salt, mineral dust, biogenic emissions, primary particulate ship emissions, secondary sulphate, secondary nitrate, and combustion emissions. Source contributions to the total PM10 mass were estimated to be about 40 % for sea-salt, around 25 % for mineral dust, 10 % each for secondary nitrate and secondary sulphate, and 5 % each for primary particulate ship emissions, biogenic emissions, and combustion emissions. Large variations in absolute and relative contributions are found and appear to depend on the season and on transport episodes. In addition, the secondary sulphate due to ship emissions was estimated, and found to contribute by about one third to the total sulphate mass. Results for the sea-salt and mineral dust sources were compared with estimates of the same contributions obtained from independent approaches, leading

  20. Black Carbon as an Additional Indicator of the Adverse Health Effects of Airborne Particles Compared with PM10 and PM2.5

    PubMed Central

    Hoek, Gerard; Simic-Lawson, Milena; Fischer, Paul; van Bree, Leendert; ten Brink, Harry; Keuken, Menno; Atkinson, Richard W.; Anderson, H. Ross; Brunekreef, Bert; Cassee, Flemming R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Current air quality standards for particulate matter (PM) use the PM mass concentration [PM with aerodynamic diameters ≤ 10 μm (PM10) or ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5)] as a metric. It has been suggested that particles from combustion sources are more relevant to human health than are particles from other sources, but the impact of policies directed at reducing PM from combustion processes is usually relatively small when effects are estimated for a reduction in the total mass concentration. Objectives: We evaluated the value of black carbon particles (BCP) as an additional indicator in air quality management. Methods: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of health effects of BCP compared with PM mass based on data from time-series studies and cohort studies that measured both exposures. We compared the potential health benefits of a hypothetical traffic abatement measure, using near-roadway concentration increments of BCP and PM2.5 based on data from prior studies. Results: Estimated health effects of a 1-μg/m3 increase in exposure were greater for BCP than for PM10 or PM2.5, but estimated effects of an interquartile range increase were similar. Two-pollutant models in time-series studies suggested that the effect of BCP was more robust than the effect of PM mass. The estimated increase in life expectancy associated with a hypothetical traffic abatement measure was four to nine times higher when expressed in BCP compared with an equivalent change in PM2.5 mass. Conclusion: BCP is a valuable additional air quality indicator to evaluate the health risks of air quality dominated by primary combustion particles. PMID:21810552

  1. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a 1.83-meter (6-ft) diameter 1.25-pressure-ratio fan (QF-8)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    A 1.25-pressure-ratio 1.83-meter (6-ft) tip diameter experimental fan stage with characteristics suitable for engine application on STOL aircraft was tested for acoustic and aerodynamic performance. The design incorporated proven features for low noise, including absence of inlet guide vanes, low rotor blade tip speed, low aerodynamic blade loading, and long axial spacing between the rotor and stator blade rows. The fan was operated with five exhaust nozzle areas. The stage noise levels generally increased with a decrease in nozzle area. Separation of the acoustic one-third octave results into broadband and pure-tone components showed the broadband noise to be greater than the corresponding pure-tone components. The sideline perceived noise was highest in the rear quadrants. The acoustic results of QF-8 were compared with those of two similar STOL application fans in the test series. The QF-8 had somewhat higher relative noise levels than those of the other two fans. The aerodynamic results of QF-8 and the other two fans were compared with corresponding results from 50.8-cm (20-in.) diam scale models of these fans and design values. Although the results for the full-scale and scale models of the other two fans were in reasonable agreement for each design, the full-scale fan QF-8 results showed poor performance compared with corresponding model results and design expectations. Facility effects of the full-scale fan QF-8 installation were considered in analyzing this discrepancy.

  2. Combined model for PM10 forecasting in a large city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Patricio

    2012-12-01

    We present the results of a PM10 forecasting model that has been applied for air quality management in Santiago, Chile during recent years. The daily operation of this model has served to inform in advance to the population about the air quality they will find in different areas of the city and to help environmental authorities in the decision to take actions on days when concentrations are in ranges considered significantly harmful and to impose restrictions to the activity of the city in advance, when extreme episodes are foreseen. At present, national PM10 standard for 24 h average is 150 μg m-3. According to the range where the concentrations fall, five levels or classes of air quality are defined: good (A), regular (B), bad (C), Critical (D) and Emergency (E). Forecasting is based on the combination of artificial neural networks and a nearest neighbor method. Inputs to the models are concentrations measured at several monitoring stations distributed throughout the city and meteorological information in the region. Outputs are the expected maxima concentrations for the following day at the site of the same monitoring stations. Results for last three years (2009, 2010, 2011) indicate that the model may be considered as an important tool for air pollution control.

  3. Multi-criteria analysis for PM10 planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisoni, Enrico; Carnevale, Claudio; Volta, Marialuisa

    To implement sound air quality policies, Regulatory Agencies require tools to evaluate outcomes and costs associated to different emission reduction strategies. These tools are even more useful when considering atmospheric PM10 concentrations due to the complex nonlinear processes that affect production and accumulation of the secondary fraction of this pollutant. The approaches presented in the literature (Integrated Assessment Modeling) are mainly cost-benefit and cost-effective analysis. In this work, the formulation of a multi-objective problem to control particulate matter is proposed. The methodology defines: (a) the control objectives (the air quality indicator and the emission reduction cost functions); (b) the decision variables (precursor emission reductions); (c) the problem constraints (maximum feasible technology reductions). The cause-effect relations between air quality indicators and decision variables are identified tuning nonlinear source-receptor models. The multi-objective problem solution provides to the decision maker a set of not-dominated scenarios representing the efficient trade-off between the air quality benefit and the internal costs (emission reduction technology costs). The methodology has been implemented for Northern Italy, often affected by high long-term exposure to PM10. The source-receptor models used in the multi-objective analysis are identified processing long-term simulations of GAMES multiphase modeling system, performed in the framework of CAFE-Citydelta project.

  4. Chemkar PM10: An extensive look at the local differences in chemical composition of PM10 in Flanders, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercauteren, Jordy; Matheeussen, Christina; Wauters, Eric; Roekens, Edward; van Grieken, René; Krata, Agnieszka; Makarovska, Yaroslava; Maenhaut, Willy; Chi, Xuguang; Geypens, Benny

    2011-01-01

    The results of Chemkar PM10, the first large scale chemical characterisation project of PM10 in Flanders are presented. Between September 2006 and September 2007 a total of 365 PM10 samples were collected by sampling every sixth day at six different sites in Flanders (Belgium) varying in character from urban background to rural. Samples were analysed for a series of elements, elemental and organic carbon, 13C/ 12C- and 15N/ 14N-isotopic ratios, and water-soluble ions. At three sites extra sampling was carried out to determine PAHs by means of a novel technique that uses sorption tubes consisting of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) foam, PDMS particles and a TENAX TA bed. Results showed that the most important fractions were secondary inorganic ions (nitrate, sulphate and ammonium): 41% (12.6 μg m -3), organic matter: 20% (6.1 μg m -3), crustal matter: 14% (4.3 μg m -3), sea salt: 8% (2.4 μg m -3) and elemental carbon: 4% (1.2 μg m -3). Although the general composition profile was rather similar for the six sites, substantial differences could be observed for some main components and for several trace metals such as chromium, copper, zinc, arsenic and lead. Although the average sum of the "PAH 16" was quite variable between the three sites (between 132 and 248 ng m -3) the average sum of the "PAH 7" was between 7 and 9 ng m -3 for the three sites. The largest relative differences between sites were found for elemental carbon and crustal matter, thereby indicating that there is some potential for local measures to reduce the concentrations of particulate matter by a few μg m -3. Both for carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios significant differences in time were observed. Isotopic differences in location could only be detected for carbon.

  5. 78 FR 34095 - Adequacy Status of the Idaho, Northern Ada County PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of adequacy... emissions budgets (MVEBs) for particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of a nominal 10 microns or... (Maintenance Plan Update) are adequate for transportation conformity purposes. The Maintenance Plan Update...

  6. 78 FR 924 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Alaska: Eagle River PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less... restricted by statute. Certain other material, such as copyrighted material, is not placed on the Internet and will be publicly available only in hard copy. Publicly available docket materials are...

  7. Decreased PM10 Exposure Attenuates Age-Related Lung Function Decline: Genetic Variants in p53, p21, and CCND1 Modify This Effect

    PubMed Central

    Imboden, Medea; Schwartz, Joel; Schindler, Christian; Curjuric, Ivan; Berger, Wolfgang; Liu, Sally L.J.; Russi, Erich W.; Ackermann-Liebrich, Ursula; Rochat, Thierry; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Decreasing exposure to airborne particulates was previously associated with reduced age-related decline in lung function. However, whether the benefit from improved air quality depends on genetic background is not known. Recent evidence points to the involvement of the genes p53 and p21 and of the cell cycle control gene cyclin D1 (CCND1) in the response of bronchial cells to air pollution. Objective We determined in 4,326 participants of the Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA) whether four single-nucleotide polymorphisms in three genes [CCND1 (rs9344 [P242P], rs667515), p53 (rs1042522 [R72P]), and p21 (rs1801270 [S31R])] modified the previously observed attenuation of the decline in the forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of the forced vital capacity (FEF25–75) associated with improved air quality. Methods Subjects of the prospective population-based SAPALDIA cohort were assessed in 1991 and 2002 by spirometry, questionnaires, and biological sample collection for genotyping. We assigned spatially resolved concentrations of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10) to each participant’s residential history 12 months before the baseline and follow-up assessments. Results The effect of diminishing PM10 exposure on FEF25–75 decline appeared to be modified by p53 R72P, CCND1 P242P, and CCND1 rs667515. For example, a 10-μg/m3 decline in aver-age PM10 exposure over an 11-year period attenuated the average annual decline in FEF25–75 by 21.33 mL/year (95% confidence interval, 10.57–32.08) among participants homozygous for the CCND1 (P242P) GG genotype, by 13.72 mL/year (5.38–22.06) among GA genotypes, and by 6.00 mL/year (−4.54 to 16.54) among AA genotypes. Conclusions Our results suggest that cell cycle control genes may modify the degree to which improved air quality may benefit respiratory function in adults. PMID:19750108

  8. Chemical composition of PM10 and PM2.5 collected at ground level and 100 meters during a strong winter-time pollution episode in Xi'an, China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhenxing; Cao, Junji; Liu, Suixin; Zhu, Chongshu; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Ting; Xu, Hongmei; Hu, Tafeng

    2011-11-01

    An intensive sampling of aerosol particles from ground level and 100 m was conducted during a strong pollution episode during the winter in Xi'an, China. Concentrations of water-soluble inorganic ions, carbonaceous compounds, and trace elements were determined to compare the composition of particulate matter (PM) at the two heights. PM mass concentrations were high at both stations: PM10 (PM with aerodynamic diameter < or =10 microm) exceeded the China National Air Quality Standard Class II value on three occasions, and PM2.5 (PM with aerodynamic diameter < or =2.5 microm) exceeded the daily U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard more than 10 times. The PM10 organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were slightly lower at the ground than at 100 m, both in terms of concentration and percentage of total mass, but OC and EC in PM2.5 exhibited the opposite pattern. Major ionic species, such as sulfate and nitrate, showed vertical variations similar to the carbonaceous aerosols. High sulfate concentrations indicated that coal combustion dominated the PM mass both at the ground and 100 m. Correlations between K+ and OC and EC at 100 m imply a strong influence from suburban biomass burning, whereas coal combustion and motor vehicle exhaust had a greater influence on the ground PM. Stable atmospheric conditions apparently led to the accumulation of PM, especially at 100 m, and these conditions contributed to the similarities in PM at the two elevations. Low coefficient of divergence (CD) values reflect the similarities in the composition of the aerosol between sites, but higher CDs for fine particles compared with coarse ones were consistent with the differences in emission sources between the ground and 100 m.

  9. 40 CFR Table C-4 to Subpart C of... - Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Table C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of Environment... Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-4 Table C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5...

  10. 40 CFR Table C-4 to Subpart C of... - Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Table C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of Environment... Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-4 Table C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Specifications for PM10, PM2.5...

  11. Assessment of the contribution from wood burning to the PM10 aerosol in Flanders, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Maenhaut, Willy; Vermeylen, Reinhilde; Claeys, Magda; Vercauteren, Jordy; Matheeussen, Christina; Roekens, Edward

    2012-10-15

    From February 2010 to February 2011 PM10 aerosol samples were simultaneously taken every 4th day at 7 monitoring sites in Flanders, Belgium. Two of the sites (i.e., Borgerhout and Gent) were urban background sites; one (i.e., Mechelen) a suburban background site, and the other four (i.e., Hamme, Lier, Retie, and Houtem) rural background sites, whereby Hamme and Lier were expected to be particularly impacted by biomass burning. The samplings were done for 24h and 47-mm diameter Pallflex® Tissuquartz™ 2500 QAT-UP filters were used. After sampling the PM10 mass concentration was determined by weighing; organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) were measured by thermal-optical transmission analysis and the wood burning tracers levoglucosan, mannosan, and galactosan were determined by means of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The atmospheric concentrations of levoglucosan and the other two monosaccharide anhydrides showed a very clear seasonal variation at each site, with highest levels in winter, followed by autumn, spring, and summer. The levoglucosan levels for 5 of our 7 sites (i.e., Retie, Lier, Mechelen, Borgerhout, and Gent) were very highly correlated with each other (all between site correlation coefficients r>0.9, except for one value of 0.86) and the levels in the parallel samples of these 5 sites were similar, indicating that wood burning at these 5 sites was a regional phenomenon and that it was taking place in many individual houses on similar occasions (e.g., on cold days, weekends or holidays). The levoglucosan levels at Houtem and the correlation coefficients of the 5 sites with Houtem were lower, which is explained by the fact that the latter site is at less than 20 km from the North Sea so that the air there is often diluted by rather clean westerly maritime air. A peculiar behavior was seen for Hamme, with on many occasions very high levoglucosan levels, which was attributed to the fact that there is wood burning going on in several houses

  12. Assessment of the contribution from wood burning to the PM10 aerosol in Flanders, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Maenhaut, Willy; Vermeylen, Reinhilde; Claeys, Magda; Vercauteren, Jordy; Matheeussen, Christina; Roekens, Edward

    2012-10-15

    From February 2010 to February 2011 PM10 aerosol samples were simultaneously taken every 4th day at 7 monitoring sites in Flanders, Belgium. Two of the sites (i.e., Borgerhout and Gent) were urban background sites; one (i.e., Mechelen) a suburban background site, and the other four (i.e., Hamme, Lier, Retie, and Houtem) rural background sites, whereby Hamme and Lier were expected to be particularly impacted by biomass burning. The samplings were done for 24h and 47-mm diameter Pallflex® Tissuquartz™ 2500 QAT-UP filters were used. After sampling the PM10 mass concentration was determined by weighing; organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) were measured by thermal-optical transmission analysis and the wood burning tracers levoglucosan, mannosan, and galactosan were determined by means of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The atmospheric concentrations of levoglucosan and the other two monosaccharide anhydrides showed a very clear seasonal variation at each site, with highest levels in winter, followed by autumn, spring, and summer. The levoglucosan levels for 5 of our 7 sites (i.e., Retie, Lier, Mechelen, Borgerhout, and Gent) were very highly correlated with each other (all between site correlation coefficients r>0.9, except for one value of 0.86) and the levels in the parallel samples of these 5 sites were similar, indicating that wood burning at these 5 sites was a regional phenomenon and that it was taking place in many individual houses on similar occasions (e.g., on cold days, weekends or holidays). The levoglucosan levels at Houtem and the correlation coefficients of the 5 sites with Houtem were lower, which is explained by the fact that the latter site is at less than 20 km from the North Sea so that the air there is often diluted by rather clean westerly maritime air. A peculiar behavior was seen for Hamme, with on many occasions very high levoglucosan levels, which was attributed to the fact that there is wood burning going on in several houses

  13. 40 CFR 52.1423 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... committed to conform to the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... classified as Group II areas for the purpose of PM10 State Implementation Plan (SIP) development. The... accordance with the requirements for PM10 SIP development, the State of Nebraska commits to perform...

  14. 40 CFR 52.1423 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... committed to conform to the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... classified as Group II areas for the purpose of PM10 State Implementation Plan (SIP) development. The... accordance with the requirements for PM10 SIP development, the State of Nebraska commits to perform...

  15. 40 CFR 52.1489 - Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP... Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments. (a) On March 29, 1989, the Air Quality Officer for the... inventory, and other tasks that may be necessary to satisfy the requirements of the PM-10 Group II SIPs....

  16. 40 CFR 52.1489 - Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP... Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments. (a) On March 29, 1989, the Air Quality Officer for the... inventory, and other tasks that may be necessary to satisfy the requirements of the PM-10 Group II SIPs....

  17. 78 FR 900 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Alaska: Eagle River PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... pollution. On July 1, 1987, EPA promulgated a NAAQS for PM 10 (52 FR 24634). EPA established a 24-hour... 10 standard (71 FR 61144, effective December 18, 2006). B. Eagle River NAA and Planning Background On...) area as a PM 10 nonattainment area due to measured violations of the 24-hour PM 10 standard (52...

  18. 40 CFR 52.1489 - Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP... Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments. (a) On March 29, 1989, the Air Quality Officer for the... inventory, and other tasks that may be necessary to satisfy the requirements of the PM-10 Group II SIPs....

  19. 40 CFR 52.146 - Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP... (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments. (a) On December 28, 1988, the Governor's designee for Arizona... inventory, and other tasks that may be necessary to satisfy the requirements of the PM-10 Group II SIPs....

  20. 40 CFR 52.634 - Particulate matter (PM-10) Group III SIP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Particulate matter (PM-10) Group III... (PM-10) Group III SIP. (a) On September 14, 1988, the Governor of Hawaii submitted a revision to the... necessary to satisfy the requirements of the PM-10 Group III SIP. (b) The Hawaii Department of Health...

  1. 40 CFR 52.146 - Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP... (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments. (a) On December 28, 1988, the Governor's designee for Arizona... inventory, and other tasks that may be necessary to satisfy the requirements of the PM-10 Group II SIPs....

  2. 40 CFR 52.1489 - Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP... Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments. (a) On March 29, 1989, the Air Quality Officer for the... inventory, and other tasks that may be necessary to satisfy the requirements of the PM-10 Group II SIPs....

  3. 40 CFR 52.146 - Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP... (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments. (a) On December 28, 1988, the Governor's designee for Arizona... inventory, and other tasks that may be necessary to satisfy the requirements of the PM-10 Group II SIPs....

  4. 77 FR 31268 - Determination of Attainment for the Paul Spur/Douglas PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... standards. 52 FR 24634; (July 1, 1987). Effective December 18, 2006, EPA revoked the annual PM 10 standard but retained the 24-hour PM 10 standard. 71 FR 61144; (October 17, 2006). An area attains the 24-hour... Group I PM 10 planning areas identified in 52 FR 29383, (August 7, 1987), as further clarified in 55...

  5. Levels, sources and seasonality of coarse particles (PM10-PM2.5) in three European capitals - Implications for particulate pollution control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassomenos, P.; Vardoulakis, S.; Chaloulakou, A.; Grivas, G.; Borge, R.; Lumbreras, J.

    2012-07-01

    Coarse particles of aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 and 10 μm (PMc) are produced by a range of natural (windblown dust and sea sprays) and anthropogenic processes (non-exhaust vehicle emissions, industrial, agriculture, construction and quarrying activities). Although current ambient air quality regulations focus on PM2.5 and PM10, coarse particles are of interest from a public health point of view as they have been associated with certain mortality and morbidity outcomes. In this paper, an analysis of coarse particle levels in three European capitals (London, Madrid and Athens) is presented and discussed. For all three cities we analysed data from both traffic and urban background monitoring sites. The results showed that the levels of coarse particles present significant seasonal, weekly and daily variability. Their wind driven and non-wind driven resuspension as well as their roadside increment due to traffic were estimated. Both the local meteorological conditions and the air mass history indicating long-range atmospheric transport of particles of natural origin are significant parameters that influence the levels of coarse particles in the three cities especially during episodic events.

  6. Characteristics of trace metals in fine (PM2.5) and inhalable (PM10) particles and its health risk assessment along with in-silico approach in indoor environment of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satsangi, P. Gursumeeran; Yadav, Suman; Pipal, Atar Singh; Kumbhar, Navanath

    2014-08-01

    Indoor concentrations of fine (PM2.5: aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5) and inhalable (PM10: aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm) particles and its associated toxic metals are of concern now-a-days due to its effects on human health and environment. PM10 and PM2.5 samples were collected from indoor microenvironments on glass fiber and PTFE filter paper using low volume air sampler in Pune. The average concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 were 89.7 ± 43.2 μg m-3 and 138.2 ± 68.2 μg m-3 at urban site while it was 197.5 ± 84.3 and 287 ± 92 μg m-3 at rural site. Trace metals such as Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Sb and Zn in particulate matter were estimated by ICP-AES. Concentrations of crustal metals were found to be higher than the carcinogenic metals in both the microenvironments. On the contrary the soluble and bio-availability fraction of carcinogenic metals were found higher thus it may cause the higher risk to human health. Therefore, cancer risk assessment of carcinogenic metals; Cr, Ni and Cd was calculated. Among the carcinogenic metals, Ni showed highest cancer risk in indoor PM. The higher cancer risk assessment of Ni has been supported by In-silico study which suggested that Ni actively formed co-ordination complex with histone proteins (i.e. H3-Ni/H4-Ni) by maintaining strong hydrogen bonding interactions with Asp and Glu residues of nucleosomal proteins. Present In-silico study of Ni-histone complexes will help to emphasize the possible role of Asp and Glu residues in DNA methylation, deacetylation and ubiquitinations of nucleosomal proteins. Hence, this study could pave the way to understand the structural consequence of Ni in nucleosomal proteins and its impact on epigenetic changes which ultimately cause lung and nasal cancer.

  7. Identifying the most hazardous synoptic meteorological conditions for Winter UK PM10 exceedences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Chris; Dacre, Helen; Collins, Bill; Masato, Giacomo

    2016-04-01

    Summary We investigate the relationship between synoptic scale meteorological variability and local scale pollution concentrations within the UK. Synoptic conditions representative of atmospheric blocking highlighted significant increases in UK PM10 concentration ([PM10]), with the probability of exceeding harmful [PM10] limits also increased. Once relationships had been diagnosed, The Met Office Unified Model (UM) was used to replicate these relationships, using idealised source regions of PM10. This helped to determine the PM10 source regions most influential throughout UK PM10 exceedance events and to test whether the model was capable of capturing the relationships between UK PM10 and atmospheric blocking. Finally, a time slice simulation for 2050-2060 helped to answer the question whether PM10 exceedance events are more likely to occur within a changing climate. Introduction Atmospheric blocking events are well understood to lead to conditions, conducive to pollution events within the UK. Literature shows that synoptic conditions with the ability to deflect the Northwest Atlantic storm track from the UK, often lead to the highest UK pollution concentrations. Rossby wave breaking (RWB) has been identified as a mechanism, which results in atmospheric blocking and its relationship with UK [PM10] is explored using metrics designed in Masato, et al., 2013. Climate simulations facilitated by the Met Office UM, enable these relationships between RWB and PM10 to be found within the model. Subsequently the frequency of events that lead to hazardous PM10 concentrations ([PM10]) in a future climate, can be determined, within a climate simulation. An understanding of the impact, meteorology has on UK [PM10] within a changing climate, will help inform policy makers, regarding the importance of limiting PM10 emissions, ensuring safe air quality in the future. Methodology and Results Three Blocking metrics were used to subset RWB into four categories. These RWB categories

  8. Differences in composition of above and below legal limit PM10 at two contrasting sites in the city of Oporto, Portugal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caseiro, Alexandre; Oliveira, César; Pio, Casimiro; Nunes, Teresa; Santos, Patrícia; Mao, Hongjun; Sokhi, Ranjeet; Luhanna, Lakhu

    2010-05-01

    Particulate matter, either with aerodynamical diameter below 10 μm (PM10) or the fine (aerodynamical diameter below 2.5 μm, PM2.5) or coarse (aerodynamical diameter between 2.5 and 10 μm, PM2.5-10) modes only, are presently regarded as one of the main threats to public health instigated by air pollution. The levels of ambient air particulates are regulated but the limits are frequently surpassed. It is therefore necessary to identify and quantify PM sources and their variability, as well as the biogenic processes that to some extent control their ambient load, in order to effectively regulate on the anthropogenic activities which originate PM. PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 were monitored in Oporto, NW Portugal, at two contrasting sites (directly impacted by traffic, roadside, and at the urban background) during two one-month campaigns (winter and summer). Sampling was conducted independently during daytime and night-time. Out of the 207 sampling periods analysed, 38 (18%) were above the European legal PM10 limit of 50 ?g m-3. PM2.5 concentrations above the limit of 25 ?g m-3 proposed by the EC occurred in 70 out of 202 sampling (35%). More exceedances occurred in winter than in summer and at roadside than at the urban background. Within the scope of this work, the relationship between PM concentrations, namely the occurrence of exceeding PM limit values, and meteorological variables or the sampling period (day/night, work day/weekend) and will be presented. Besides PM mass, the soluble ionic composition (Cl-, SO42-, NO3-, Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+) as well as the elemental composition (Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Sn, Ba and Pb) were also determined. This allowed the application of multivariate analysis (principal component analysis with multi-linear regression analysis, PCA-MLRA, and positive matrix factorisation, PMF). Five main sources were identified in the fine and coarse modes (direct road traffic emissions

  9. Assessment of population exposure to PM10 for respiratory disease in Lanzhou (China) and its health-related economic costs based on GIS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evaluation of the adverse health effects of PM10 pollution (particulate matter less than 10 microns in diameter) is very important for protecting human health and establishing pollution control policy. Population exposure estimation is the first step in formulating exposure data for quantitative assessment of harmful PM10 pollution. Methods In this paper, we estimate PM10 concentration using a spatial interpolation method on a grid with a spatial resolution 0.01° × 0.01°. PM10 concentration data from monitoring stations are spatially interpolated, based on accurate population data in 2000 using a geographic information system. Then, an interpolated population layer is overlaid with an interpolated PM10 concentration layer, and population exposure levels are calculated. Combined with the exposure-response function between PM10 and health endpoints, economic costs of the adverse health effects of PM10 pollution are analyzed. Results The results indicate that the population in Lanzhou urban areas is distributed in a narrow and long belt, and there are relatively large population spatial gradients in the XiGu, ChengGuan and QiLiHe districts. We select threshold concentration C0 at: 0 μg m-3 (no harmful health effects), 20 μg m-3 (recommended by the World Health Organization), and 50 μg m-3 (national first class standard in China) to calculate excess morbidity cases. For these three scenarios, proportions of the economic cost of PM10 pollution-related adverse health effects relative to GDP are 0.206%, 0.194% and 0.175%, respectively. The impact of meteorological factors on PM10 concentrations in 2000 is also analyzed. Sandstorm weather in spring, inversion layers in winter, and precipitation in summer are important factors associated with change in PM10 concentration. Conclusions The population distribution by exposure level shows that the majority of people live in polluted areas. With the improvement of evaluation criteria, economic damage of

  10. 40 CFR Table C-4 to Subpart C of... - Test Specifications for PM 10, PM 2.5 and PM 10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test Specifications for PM 10, PM 2.5 and PM 10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Table C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-4 Table C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Specifications for...

  11. 40 CFR Table C-4 to Subpart C of... - Test Specifications for PM 10, PM 2.5 and PM 10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test Specifications for PM 10, PM 2.5 and PM 10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Table C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-4 Table C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Specifications for...

  12. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fugitive PM10 emissions from an integrated iron and steel plant.

    PubMed

    Khaparde, V V; Bhanarkar, A D; Majumdar, Deepanjan; Rao, C V Chalapati

    2016-08-15

    Fugitive emissions of PM10 (particles <10μm in diameter) and associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were monitored in the vicinity of coking unit, sintering unit, blast furnace and steel manufacturing unit in an integrated iron and steel plant situated in India. Concentrations of PM10, PM10-bound total PAHs, benzo (a) pyrene, carcinogenic PAHs and combustion PAHs were found to be highest around the sintering unit. Concentrations of 3-ring and 4-ring PAHs were recorded to be highest in the coking unit whereas 5-and 6-ring PAHs were found to be highest in other units. The following indicatory PAHs were identified: indeno (1,2,3-cd) pyrene, dibenzo (a,h) anthracene, benzo (k) fluoranthene in blast furnace unit; indeno (1,2,3-cd) pyrene, dibenzo (a,h) anthracene, chrysene in sintering unit; Anthracene, fluoranthene, chrysene in coking unit and acenaphthene, fluoranthene, fluorene in steel making unit. Total-BaP-TEQ (Total BaP toxic equivalent quotient) and BaP-MEQ (Total BaP mutagenic equivalent quotient) concentration levels ranged from 2.4 to 231.7ng/m(3) and 1.9 to 175.8ng/m(3), respectively. BaP and DbA (dibenzo (a,h) anthracene) contribution to total-BaP-TEQ was found to be the highest. PMID:27099996

  13. Direct gravimetric measurements of the mass of the antarctic aerosol collected by high volume sampler: PM10 summer seasonal variation at Terra Nova Bay.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Cristina; Lambertucci, Luca; Illuminati, Silvia; Annibaldi, Anna; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    An on-site procedure was set up for direct gravimetric measurement of the mass of aerosol collected using high volume impactors (aerodynamic size cut point of 10 microm, PM10); this knowledge has hitherto been unavailable. Using a computerized microbalance in a clean chemistry laboratory, under controlled temperature (+/-0.5 degrees C) and relative humidity (+/-1%), continuous, long time filter mass measurements (hours) were carried out before and after exposure, after a 48 h minimun equilibration at the laboratory conditions. The effect of the electrostatic charge was exhausted in 30-60 min, after which stable measurements were obtained. Measurements of filters exposed for 7-11 days (1.13 m3 min(-1)) in a coastal site near Terra Nova Bay (December 2000 - February 2001), gave results for aerosol mass in the order of 10-20 mg (SD approximately 2 mg), corresponding to atmospheric concentrations of 0.52-1.27 microg m(-3). Data show a seasonal behaviour in the PM10 content with an increase during December - early January, followed by a net decrease. The above results compare well with estimates obtained from proxy data for the Antarctic Peninsula (0.30 microg m(-3)), the Ronne Ice Shelf (1.49 microg m(-3)), and the South Pole (0.18 microg m(-3), summer 1974-1975, and 0.37 microg m(-3), average summer seasons 1975-1976 and 1977-1978), and from direct gravimetric measurements recently obtained from medium volume samplers at McMurdo station (downwind 3.39 microg m(-3), upwind 4.15 microg m(-3)) and at King George Island (2.5 microg m(-3), summer, particle diameter <20 microm). This finding opens the way to the direct measurement of the chemical composition of the Antarctic aerosol and, in turn, to a better knowledge of the snow/air relationships as required for the reconstruction of the chemical composition of past atmospheres from deep ice core data.

  14. Direct gravimetric measurements of the mass of the antarctic aerosol collected by high volume sampler: PM10 summer seasonal variation at Terra Nova Bay.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Cristina; Lambertucci, Luca; Illuminati, Silvia; Annibaldi, Anna; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    An on-site procedure was set up for direct gravimetric measurement of the mass of aerosol collected using high volume impactors (aerodynamic size cut point of 10 microm, PM10); this knowledge has hitherto been unavailable. Using a computerized microbalance in a clean chemistry laboratory, under controlled temperature (+/-0.5 degrees C) and relative humidity (+/-1%), continuous, long time filter mass measurements (hours) were carried out before and after exposure, after a 48 h minimun equilibration at the laboratory conditions. The effect of the electrostatic charge was exhausted in 30-60 min, after which stable measurements were obtained. Measurements of filters exposed for 7-11 days (1.13 m3 min(-1)) in a coastal site near Terra Nova Bay (December 2000 - February 2001), gave results for aerosol mass in the order of 10-20 mg (SD approximately 2 mg), corresponding to atmospheric concentrations of 0.52-1.27 microg m(-3). Data show a seasonal behaviour in the PM10 content with an increase during December - early January, followed by a net decrease. The above results compare well with estimates obtained from proxy data for the Antarctic Peninsula (0.30 microg m(-3)), the Ronne Ice Shelf (1.49 microg m(-3)), and the South Pole (0.18 microg m(-3), summer 1974-1975, and 0.37 microg m(-3), average summer seasons 1975-1976 and 1977-1978), and from direct gravimetric measurements recently obtained from medium volume samplers at McMurdo station (downwind 3.39 microg m(-3), upwind 4.15 microg m(-3)) and at King George Island (2.5 microg m(-3), summer, particle diameter <20 microm). This finding opens the way to the direct measurement of the chemical composition of the Antarctic aerosol and, in turn, to a better knowledge of the snow/air relationships as required for the reconstruction of the chemical composition of past atmospheres from deep ice core data. PMID:16398350

  15. Soil water and particle size distribution influence laboratory-generated PM 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Nicholaus M.; Southard, Randal J.; Mitchell, Jeffrey P.

    2010-02-01

    Management of soils to reduce the amount of PM 10 emitted during agricultural tillage operations is important for attainment of air quality standards in California's San Joaquin Valley (SJV). The purpose of this study was to improve and expand upon earlier work of predicting tillage-generated dust emissions based on soil properties. We focus on gravimetric soil water content (GWC) and soil texture. A mechanical laboratory dust generator was used to test 23 soils collected for this study. Averaged results showed PM 10 concentrations (mg m -3) increased logarithmically as GWC decreased below soil water potentials of -1500 kPa. Soils with clay contents less than about 10% by weight began to emit PM 10 at GWCs 1.5-4 times their GWC at -1500 kPa. Soils with clay contents greater than about 10% began to emit PM 10 at GWC values closer to -1500 kPa. We found no correlation between maximum PM 10 concentrations, measured at low GWC values, and the %sand, %silt, or %clay in a soil. However, there was a significant correlation between the %silt to %clay ratio and PM 10 concentrations. This not only suggests the dependence of dust emission magnitudes on the supply of particles of PM 10 size, but also the importance of clay in stabilizing aggregates and maintaining higher amounts of capillary water at lower water potentials. Based on modeled results of pooled data, PM 10 concentrations increased linearly (slope = 564) for every unit increase in the %silt to %clay ratio. However, when soils were separated into groups based on clay content, the slopes for PM 10 concentrations vs. %silt to %clay ratio were texture dependent. The slope for soils with <10% clay (slope = 727) was 3.3 times greater than for soils with >20% clay (slope = 221). Improved PM 10 emission prediction based on soil properties should improve management decisions aimed at reducing tillage-generated PM 10.

  16. The Influence of Meteorological Conditions and Atmospheric Circulation Types on PM10 and Visibility in Tel Aviv.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayan, Uri; Levy, Ilan

    2005-05-01

    A 3-yr dataset (February 2000-November 2002) of 30-min averages for particulates, visibility, and meteorological data were analyzed to examine the dependence of particulate matter of less than 10 μm in diameter (PM10) mass concentrations and visibility in Tel Aviv, Israel, on seasonal meteorological conditions, synoptic weather patterns, and airmass history. The persistent nature of the summer synoptic weather pattern in the east Mediterranean (EM) region yielded the highest mean visibility (35 km) and lowest variability in PM10 concentrations, as compared with the higher variance for the other seasons, and spring in particular. The frequent passage of the “Sharav” cyclones during spring causes natural dust outbreaks with extreme values that result in a much higher PM10 annual mean (57 μg m-3) as compared with other larger cities. The history of the air mass dictating the physical and chemical properties of the particulate matter reaching Israel was assessed by back-trajectory analysis from predetermined transport sectors. The west and central European sectors, representing mostly the summer flow regime of European clean air masses that are advected over the Mediterranean, differ significantly in their reduced PM10 loading and high visual range from the Arabian Peninsula and North African sectors, originating from the surrounding deserts. Because the most frequent direction of air masses reaching the EM is from European origins, Tel Aviv experiences most of the time satisfying visibility conditions. Applying the definition “very good visibility” for visibility exceeding 19 km shows that about 90% of the time these conditions were met for this 3-yr period.

  17. Human health risks posed by exposure to PM10 for four life stages in a low socio-economic community in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Thabethe, Nomsa Duduzile Lina; Engelbrecht, Jacobus Christoffel; Wright, Caradee Yael; Oosthuizen, Maria Aletta

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mine ash dumps, industries and domestic fuel use have a great impact on air quality and PM10 (particles with a diameter equal to or less than 10 μm) is a pollutant of particular concern. Methods The objective of this study was to assess the human health risks posed by exposure to PM10 among a low socio-economic community. The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) framework (i.e. hazard assessment, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment and risk characterization) was applied. PM10 concentrations were monitored for one month during winter and summer, respectively. A HHRA was conducted to assess whether the community was exposed to PM10 concentrations that may pose carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health risks. Results Generally, the residents were exposed to higher concentrations of PM10 during winter than summer, resulting in a higher risk to health during winter. Results of the HHRA showed that infants were exposed to a higher dose of PM10 than the other life stages when exposed to the same concentration due to differences in inhalation rates and the ratio between inhalation and body weight. However, they were at the same risk of developing adverse effects from exposure to the same concentration of PM10 as the other life stages were exposed to, because the ‘safe’ dose was also higher for infants and since all life stages, in general, are similarly affected by PM unless the chemical composition of the PM is known. Conclusion This study recommends that infants and children, in particular, should not be exposed to air pollution from domestic fuel burning as one positive step to try and reduce their dose. PMID:25422691

  18. Update on the development of cotton gin PM10 emission factors for EPA's AP-42

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cotton ginning industry-supported project was initiated in 2008 to update the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Compilation of Air Pollution Emission Factors (AP-42) to include PM10 emission factors. This study develops emission factors from the PM10 emission factor data collected from ...

  19. 40 CFR 52.331 - Committal SIP for the Colorado Group II PM10 areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Committal SIP for the Colorado Group II... SIP for the Colorado Group II PM10 areas. On April 14, 1989, the Governor submitted a Committal SIP for the Colorado Group II PM10 areas. The SIP commits the State to continue to monitor for...

  20. 40 CFR 52.1638 - Bernalillo County particulate matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (PM10) Group II SIP commitments. 52.1638 Section 52.1638 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) New Mexico § 52.1638 Bernalillo County particulate matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments. (a) On December 7, 1988, the Governor of New Mexico submitted a revision to the State Implementation Plan...

  1. 40 CFR 52.2306 - Particulate Matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Particulate Matter (PM10) Group II SIP... Particulate Matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments. On July 18, 1988, the Governor of Texas submitted a revision to the State Implementation Plan (SIP) that contained commitments for implementing all of...

  2. 40 CFR 52.1638 - Bernalillo County particulate matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (PM10) Group II SIP commitments. 52.1638 Section 52.1638 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) New Mexico § 52.1638 Bernalillo County particulate matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments. (a) On December 7, 1988, the Governor of New Mexico submitted a revision to the State Implementation Plan...

  3. 40 CFR 52.935 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... committal SIP for the cities of Ashland and Catlettsburg in Boyd County. The committal SIP contains all the requirements identified in the July 1, 1987, promulgation of the SIP requirements for PM10 at 52 FR 24681. The SIP commits the State to submit an emissions inventory, continue to monitor for PM10, report data...

  4. 40 CFR 52.935 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... committal SIP for the cities of Ashland and Catlettsburg in Boyd County. The committal SIP contains all the requirements identified in the July 1, 1987, promulgation of the SIP requirements for PM10 at 52 FR 24681. The SIP commits the State to submit an emissions inventory, continue to monitor for PM10, report data...

  5. 40 CFR 52.881 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... State implementation plan development in group II areas. The state has submitted a committal SIP for Kansas City, Kansas. The committal SIP contains all the requirements identified in the July 1, 1987, promulgation of the SIP requirements for PM10 at 52 FR 24681, except the state will report the PM10 data...

  6. 40 CFR 52.146 - Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP... (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments. (a) On December 28, 1988, the Governor's designee for Arizona submitted a revision to the State Implementation Plan (SIP) for Casa Grande, Show Low, Safford,...

  7. 40 CFR 52.881 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... State implementation plan development in group II areas. The state has submitted a committal SIP for Kansas City, Kansas. The committal SIP contains all the requirements identified in the July 1, 1987, promulgation of the SIP requirements for PM10 at 52 FR 24681, except the state will report the PM10 data...

  8. 40 CFR 52.331 - Committal SIP for the Colorado Group II PM10 areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Committal SIP for the Colorado Group II... SIP for the Colorado Group II PM10 areas. On April 14, 1989, the Governor submitted a Committal SIP for the Colorado Group II PM10 areas. The SIP commits the State to continue to monitor for...

  9. 40 CFR 52.1637 - Particulate Matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Particulate Matter (PM10) Group II SIP... Particulate Matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments. (a) On August 19, 1988, the Governor of New Mexico submitted a revision to the State Implementation Plan (SIP) that contained commitments, from the Director...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1637 - Particulate Matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Particulate Matter (PM10) Group II SIP... Particulate Matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments. (a) On August 19, 1988, the Governor of New Mexico submitted a revision to the State Implementation Plan (SIP) that contained commitments, from the Director...

  11. 40 CFR 52.1489 - Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP... Particulate matter (PM-10) Group II SIP commitments. (a) On March 29, 1989, the Air Quality Officer for the State of Nevada submitted a revision to the State Implementation Plan for Battle Mountain that...

  12. 75 FR 54806 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans-Maricopa County (Phoenix) PM-10 Nonattainment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... modified,'' ``genetically modified organism,'' ``global position satellite system,'' ``green chop,'' ``high... (52 FR 24672), replacing the standards for total suspended particulates with new standards applying... annual PM-10 standards but retained the 24-hour PM-10 standards. 71 FR 61144 (October 17, 2006). The...

  13. 40 CFR 52.1423 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... committed to conform to the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... classified as Group II areas for the purpose of PM10 State Implementation Plan (SIP) development. The... development in group II areas. 52.1423 Section 52.1423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  14. 77 FR 38399 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Arizona; Nogales PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... identical to the primary standards. 52 FR 24634; (July 1, 1987). Because they are identical, we refer to the... revoked the annual PM 10 standard but retained the 24-hour PM 10 standard. 71 FR 61144; (October 17, 2006... planning areas identified in 52 FR 29383, (August 7, 1987), as further clarified in 55 FR 45799,...

  15. 40 CFR 52.2306 - Particulate Matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Texas § 52.2306 Particulate Matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments. On July 18, 1988, the Governor of Texas submitted a... necessary to satisfy the requirements of the PM10 Group II SIPs. The Texas Air Control Board adopted...

  16. 40 CFR 52.2306 - Particulate Matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Texas § 52.2306 Particulate Matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments. On July 18, 1988, the Governor of Texas submitted a... necessary to satisfy the requirements of the PM10 Group II SIPs. The Texas Air Control Board adopted...

  17. 40 CFR 52.2306 - Particulate Matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Texas § 52.2306 Particulate Matter (PM10) Group II SIP commitments. On July 18, 1988, the Governor of Texas submitted a... necessary to satisfy the requirements of the PM10 Group II SIPs. The Texas Air Control Board adopted...

  18. 40 CFR 52.1423 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Nebraska § 52.1423 PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas. The state of Nebraska committed to conform to the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... development in group II areas. 52.1423 Section 52.1423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  19. 40 CFR 50.6 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM10.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air quality standards for PM10. 50.6 Section 50.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS NATIONAL PRIMARY AND SECONDARY AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS § 50.6 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM10. (a) The level of the...

  20. Studies on particulate matter (PM10) and its precursors over urban environment of Reading, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavi Latha, K.; Highwood, E. J.

    2006-09-01

    The extent to which airborne particles penetrate into the human respiratory system is determined mainly by their size, with possible health effects. The research over the scientific evidence of the role of airborne particles in adverse health effects has been intensified in recent years. In the present study, seasonal variations of PM10 and its relation with anthropogenic activities have been studied by using the data from UK National Air Quality Archive over Reading, UK. The diurnal variation of PM10 shows a morning peak during 7:00 10:00 LT and an evening peak during 19:00 22:00 LT. The variation between 12:00 and 17:00 LT remains more or less steady for PM10 with the minimum value of ˜16 μg m-3. PM10 and black smoke (BS) concentrations during weekdays were found to be high compared to weekends. A reduction in the concentration of PM10 has been found during the Christmas holidays compared to normal days during December. Seasonal variations of PM10 showed high values during spring compared to other seasons. A linear relationship has been found between PM10 and NOx during March, July, November and December suggesting that most of the PM10 is due to local traffic exhaust emissions. PM10 and SO2 concentrations showed positive correlation with the correlation coefficient of R=0.65 over the study area. Seasonal variations of SO2 and NOx showed high concentrations during winter and low concentrations during spring. Fraction of BS in PM10 has been found to be 50% during 2004 over the study area.

  1. Source identification of PM10 pollution in subway passenger cabins using positive matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Duckshin; Oh, Miseok; Yoon, Younghun; Park, Eunyoung; Lee, Kiyoung

    2012-03-01

    Monitoring the air quality in subway passenger cabins is important because of the large number of passengers and potentially high levels of air pollution. This report characterized PM10 levels in subway cabins in Seoul, Korea, and identified PM10 sources using elemental analysis and receptor modeling. PM10 levels in subway cabins were continuously measured using a light scattering monitor during rush and non-rush hours. A total of 41 measurements were taken during rush and non-rush hours, and the measurements were repeated in all four seasons. Filter samples were also collected for elemental composition analysis. Major PM10 sources were identified using positive matrix factorization (PMF). The in-cabin PM10 concentrations were the highest in the winter at 152.8 μg m-3 during rush hours and 90.2 μg m-3 during non-rush hours. While PM10 levels were higher during rush hours than during non-rush hours in three seasons (excluding summer), these levels were not associated with number of passenger. Elemental analysis showed that the PM10 was composed of 52.5% inorganic elements, 10.2% anions, and 37.3% other. Fe was the most abundant element and significantly correlated (p < 0.01) with Mn (r = 0.97), Ti (r = 0.91), Cr (r = 0.88), Ni (r = 0.89), and Cu (r = 0.88). Fe, Mn, Cr, and Cu are indicators of railroad-related PM10 sources. The PM10 sources characterized by PMF were soil and road dust sources (27.2%), railroad-related sources (47.6%), secondary nitrate sources (16.2%), and a chlorine factor mixed with a secondary sulfate source (9.1%). Overall, railroad-related sources contributed the most PM10 to subway cabin air.

  2. Final Results from Mexnext-I: Analysis of detailed aerodynamic measurements on a 4.5 m diameter rotor placed in the large German Dutch Wind Tunnel DNW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepers, J. G.; Boorsma, K.; Munduate, X.

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the final results from the first phase of IEA Task 29 'Mexnext'. Mexnext was a joint project in which 20 parties from 11 different countries cooperated. The main aim of Mexnext was to analyse the wind tunnel measurements which have been taken in the EU project 'MEXICO'. In the MEXICO project 10 institutes from 6 countries cooperated in doing experiments on an instrumented, 3 bladed wind turbine of 4.5 m diameter placed in the 9.5 by 9.5 m2 open section of the Large Low-speed Facility (LLF) of DNW in the Netherlands. Pressure distributions on the blades were obtained from 148 Kulite pressure sensors, distributed over 5 sections at 25, 35, 60, 82 and 92 % radial position respectively. Blade loads were monitored through two strain-gauge bridges at each blade root. Most interesting however are the extensive PIV flow field measurements, which have been taken simultaneously with the pressure and load measurements. As a result of the international collaboration within this task a very thorough analysis of the data could be carried out and a large number of codes were validated not only in terms of loads but also in terms of underlying flow field. The paper will present several results from Mexnext-I, i.e. validation results and conclusion on modelling deficiencies and directions for model improvement. The future plans of the Mexnext consortium are also briefly discussed. Amongst these are Mexnext-II, a project in which also aerodynamic measurements other than MEXICO are included, and 'New MEXICO' in which additional measurement on the MEXICO model are performed.

  3. Lead isotopes decipher multiple origins within single PM10 samples in the atmosphere of Paris.

    PubMed

    Widory, David

    2006-03-01

    The atmospheric concentration of lead (Pb) in France has strongly decreased since its legal reduction in gasoline in 2000. Pb-isotope ratios are effective tracers of its origin. Pb in atmospheric particulate matter with a diameter <10 microm (PM10) in Paris is shown to have a dual origin: (1) an intrinsic fraction (leached by hydrofluoric acid) forms the cores of particles and (2) a labile fraction (complexation with hydrobromic acid) represents generally >90 % (mass) of the bulk Pb and aggregates on pre-existing particles in the atmosphere. Characterisation of the emissions from different pollution sources, however, indicates that Pb is entirely contained in the labile fraction. Our results show that, in air, the intrinsic fraction is consistently more radiogenic (the degree of enrichment being greater in summer), hinting at different origins. The labile fraction clearly identifies industrial activity as its main source, but the intrinsic fraction may result from either a different industrial-pollution source or, more likely, from a natural end-member (i.e. pre-industrial sediment).

  4. Pollution of PM10 in an underground enclosed loading dock in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abualqumboz, M. S.; Mohammed, N. I.; Malakahmad, A.; Nazif, A. N.; Albattniji, A. T.

    2016-06-01

    The enclosed nature of underground loading docks results in accumulation of motor vehicles emissions. Thus, concentration of numerous harmful air pollutants including PM10 particles can increase and reach dangerous levels. This paper aims to study short-term and long-term exposure of PM10 particles inside an underground loading dock located in Malaysia. In addition, the correlation with indoor temperature, relative humidity and vehicles flow will be measured. The concentrations of PM10 were measured for three consecutive weeks using the real-time air quality monitoring instrument AQM60. Series of statistical tests and multiple linear regression analysis were applied on the data using SPSS software and MATLAB R2013a. The results illustrated that PM10 daily average concentration was in compliance with the Malaysian guideline of 150 µg/m3. Actually, 95% of instantaneous PM10 concentration readings were below 75 μg/m3. In addition, significant correlation were found between PM10 concentration and indoor temperature, relative humidity and the previous concentration. The multiple R and R2 were 0.91 and 0.83, respectively. PM10 concentration was also correlated with motor vehicles flow. In conclusion, health effects of long-term exposure to small repetitive doses of air pollutant inside underground facilities should be studied and appropriate control measures need to be implemented.

  5. Estimating the contribution of industrial facilities to annual PM10 concentrations at industrially influenced sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladtke, Dieter; Volkhausen, Wolfgang; Bach, Bastian

    If measures to reduce the industrial discharge of PM10 shall be planned with high accuracy, a first step must be to estimate the contribution of single industrial facilities to the overall PM10 burden as accurately as possible. In northern Duisburg as an example, an area where iron and steel producing industry is concentrated, PM10 was measured at 4 sampling sites very close to an industrial complex of blast furnaces, a sinter plant, oxygen steel works and a coke oven plant for 9 months in 2006. At two sites metals in PM10 were determined. The results, together with analytical data of urban background sites in the region and data of wind direction and wind speed were used for an estimation of the contribution of single plants to the PM10 burden. A careful analysis of the data showed, that the data of PM10, calcium, iron and zinc measured at two sites close to the industrial area and information about the urban background aerosol were sufficient to calculate the PM10 contribution of the main single plants. The data could be compared with those of modelling.

  6. Source apportionment of speciated PM10 in the United Kingdom in 2008: Episodes and annual averages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redington, A. L.; Witham, C. S.; Hort, M. C.

    2016-11-01

    The Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model NAME (Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment), has been used to simulate the formation and transport of PM10 over North-West Europe in 2008. The model has been evaluated against UK measurement data and been shown to adequately represent the observed PM10 at rural and urban sites on a daily basis. The Lagrangian nature of the model allows information on the origin of pollutants (and hence their secondary products) to be retained to allow attribution of pollutants at receptor sites back to their sources. This source apportionment technique has been employed to determine whether the different components of the modelled PM10 have originated from UK, shipping, European (excluding the UK) or background sources. For the first time this has been done to evaluate the composition during periods of elevated PM10 as well as the annual average composition. The episode data were determined by selecting the model data for each hour when the corresponding measurement data was >50 μg/m3. All the modelled sites show an increase in European pollution contribution and a decrease in the background contribution in the episode case compared to the annual average. The European contribution is greatest in southern and eastern parts of the UK and decreases moving northwards and westwards. Analysis of the speciated attribution data over the selected sites reveals that for 2008, as an annual average, the top three contributors to total PM10 are UK primary PM10 (17-25%), UK origin nitrate aerosol (18-21%) and background PM10 (11-16%). Under episode conditions the top three contributors to modelled PM10 are UK origin nitrate aerosol (12-33%), European origin nitrate aerosol (11-19%) and UK primary PM10 (12-18%).

  7. Impact of mineral components and selected trace metals on ambient PM10 concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbeck, Andreas; Handler, Markus; Puls, Christoph; Zbiral, Johannes; Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans

    PM10 levels of the mineral components Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg and some trace metals were measured at three different sites in the urban area of Vienna (Austria). Observed trace metal concentrations varied between less than 0.1 ng m -3 (Cd) and approximately 200 ng m -3 (Zn), mineral components showed enhanced concentrations ranging from 0.01 μg m -3 (Ca) to 16.3 μg m -3 (Si). The contribution of the respective mineral oxides to PM10 mass concentrations accounted on average for 26.4 ± 16% (n = 1090) of the PM10 mass, with enhanced rates in spring and autumn (monthly averages of up to 40%) and decreased contributions in the cold season (monthly averages below 10%). The atmospheric occurrence of Al, Ti and Sr could be assigned to crustal sources, whereas for the elements Ba, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn and V an increased contribution of non-crustal origin was observed. PM10 levels of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn and Zn were predominantly derived from man-made emissions. Intersite comparison indicated that urban PM10 mass concentrations and PM10 levels of As, Pb and Zn were predominantly influenced from the transport of aerosols from outside into the city, whereas for the elements Ba, Mg, Ca, Cu and Fe a distinctly increased impact of local emissions was observed. The contribution of these urban emissions to total PM10 concentrations was estimated by calculating the so-called "urban impact", which was found to be 32.7 ± 18% (n = 392) in the case of PM10 mass concentrations. The investigated elements accounted on average for 31.3 ± 19% (n = 392) of the observed PM10 mass increase. The mean values for the "urban impacts" of individual elements varied between 25.5% (As) and 77.0% (Ba).

  8. [Distribution of heavy metals in PM10 and its release in the simulated acid rain].

    PubMed

    Feng, Xi-dan; Dang, Zhi; Wang, Huan-xiang; Lu, Yan-bo; Lü, Xan-wen; Huang, Wei-lin

    2006-12-01

    The distribution of heavy metals in inhalable particulate matter (PM10), which were collected in Foshan during December of 2004, was characterized by scanning electron microscope-X-ray energy dispersive analysis technique (SEM-EDS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The releases of Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd were also examined for their potential releases in simulated acid rain, which were quantified with batch reactors. The results showed that the daily average concentration of PM10 was 0.19 mg/m(3), about 79% higher than the secondary standard of China. The relatively contents of Zn and Pb in PM10 were much higher than Cd and Zn, whereas the releasing rates of Cd and Zn in simulated acid rain were greater than that of Cu and Pb. The releasing rates of heavy metals from PM10 were increased as the pH of the acid rain decreased.

  9. Using MAIAC Aerosol Products to Estimate PM10 Concentrations in the Southeastern U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinnagara Puttaswamy, S.; Hu, X.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Acute and chronic exposure to particulate matter has been linked to various adverse health effects. High PM levels including inhalable particles (PM10) and fine particles (PM2.5) are commonly found in large urban centers in the developing world. Unlike PM2.5 whose routine ground monitoring is very sparse, PM10 is regularly measured in many large cities in developing countries. In this analysis, we evaluate the potential for satellite aerosol remote sensing product to estimate PM10 levels. We chose AOD values in 2003 retrieved by the Multiangle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm based on MODIS measurements, which has a high spatial resolution of 1 km. Our study area is a 600 km x 600 km region centered in Atlanta, GA. Linear mixed effect (LME) models were developed with MAIAC AOD as the primary predictor variable, meteorology, PM10 emission locations and land use variables as secondary predictor variables. Daily PM10 concentrations measured at ~70 EPA air quality monitoring stations were used as the dependent variable. Model day of year was used as the grouping factor for the random effect of MAIAC AOD. We aggregated AOD and other covariates on 1 km, 3km, 5km and 10km resolution grids and similar LME models were developed for each spatial resolution to compare their abilities to capture the spatial patterns of PM10 mass concentrations at various scales. Our models show that MAIAC AOD, temperature, wind speed and PM 10 emissions source locations are statistically significant predictors of PM 10 at all the spatial scales. Model fitting R2 ranges from 0.35 in winter to 0.56 in the summer. Model performances show a slight decline as the grid resolution decreases. Although the performances of PM10 exposure models are not as good as those of PM2.5 models reported in the literature, these models can still provide spatially resolved PM10 levels at urban scale, which would enable preliminary PM10-related public health research in developing countries.

  10. Geochemistry and origin of PM10 in the Huelva region, Southwestern Spain.

    PubMed

    Sánchez de la Campa, Ana María; de la Rosa, Jesús; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Mantilla, Enrique

    2007-03-01

    The results of chemical analysis of PM(10) atmospheric dust samples collected between July 2001 and June 2002 in rural and urban background monitoring stations in Huelva (South-western Spain) are reported. In order to identify the sources and quantify their contribution to PM(10), principal component analysis and receptor modelling techniques were performed using independent variables of the complete series of concentrations of PM(10) contents. The Ria of Huelva is considered to be one of the high industrial estates in Spain, where several metallurgical, petrochemical and fertilizer industrial estates are located, surrounded by areas of a high ecological interest such as Doñana National Park. Annual means of 29-33 and 37 micro g PM(10)m(-3) were obtained for the study period in rural and urban monitoring stations, respectively. These values are below the mean annual limit value for 2005 and onwards from the Directive 1999/30/EC [EU, 1999. 1999/30/CE Council Directive relating to limit values for sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and oxide of nitrogen, particulate matter and lead in ambient air. The Council of the European Union]. High PM(10) episodes in rural and urban areas occurred during African dust events. Episodically, the emissions of plumes from industrial estates reach rural areas causing peak episodes of PO(4)(3-) Cu, Ti Pb and As. Anthropogenic particles arising from metallurgical emissions (pyrite, chalcopyrite and sphalerite) were observed in the rural sites. The annual mean As concentrations measured in PM(10) in the city of Huelva and surrounding rural areas (144 and 84-51mg Askg(-1) in PM(10), respectively) are several times high the concentrations obtained in other Spanish monitoring stations (7-57mg Askg(-1)). The source apportionment analyses allowed the quantification of the contribution to PM(10) of an industrial mixed source in the rural background. PMID:16949570

  11. Increase in dust storm related PM10 concentrations: A time series analysis of 2001-2015.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Helena; Katra, Itzhak; Friger, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Over the last decades, changes in dust storms characteristics have been observed in different parts of the world. The changing frequency of dust storms in the southeastern Mediterranean has led to growing concern regarding atmospheric PM10 levels. A classic time series additive model was used in order to describe and evaluate the changes in PM10 concentrations during dust storm days in different cities in Israel, which is located at the margins of the global dust belt. The analysis revealed variations in the number of dust events and PM10 concentrations during 2001-2015. A significant increase in PM10 concentrations was identified since 2009 in the arid city of Beer Sheva, southern Israel. Average PM10 concentrations during dust days before 2009 were 406, 312, and 364 μg m(-3) (median 337, 269,302) for Beer Sheva, Rehovot (central Israel) and Modi'in (eastern Israel), respectively. After 2009 the average concentrations in these cities during dust storms were 536, 466, and 428 μg m(-3) (median 382, 335, 338), respectively. Regression analysis revealed associations between PM10 variations and seasonality, wind speed, as well as relative humidity. The trends and periodicity are stronger in the southern part of Israel, where higher PM10 concentrations are found. Since 2009 dust events became more extreme with much higher daily and hourly levels. The findings demonstrate that in the arid area variations of dust storms can be quantified easier through PM10 levels over a relatively short time scale of several years. PMID:26874873

  12. [Relationship between wind velocity and PM10 concentration & emission flux of fugitive dust source].

    PubMed

    Tian, Gang; Fan, Shou-Bin; Huang, Yu-Hu; Nie, Lei; Li, Gang

    2008-10-01

    In the emission factor models of man-made fugitive dust, the wind velocity parameter has little been accounted for. PM10 concentration and wind velocity were measured near a unpaved road and in a construction site. PM10 emission flux was calculated using the measured data. The relationship between PM10 concentration and emission flux and wind velocity was studied. The results show that the PM10 concentration is high in the condition of static and slight wind. PM10 concentration descend with the wind velocity increased, and the concentration reaches to the minimum value when the wind velocity reach to 1.0-2.0 m/s, then with the wind velocity increasing (> 1.0-2.0 m/s), the PM10 concentration increases quickly. The emission flux increased with the wind velocity increasing, and the speed increasement become more after the wind velocity was faster than 2.0 m/s. The man-made fugitive dust was divided into mechanism operation and wind erosion dust to research the emission mechanism. The results based on theory analysis and the measured data are consistent.

  13. Respiratory hospital admissions associated with PM10 pollution in Utah, Salt Lake, and Cache Valleys

    SciTech Connect

    Pope CA, I.I.I. )

    1991-03-01

    This study assessed the association between respiratory hospital admissions and PM10 pollution in Utah, Salt Lake, and Cache valleys during April 1985 through March 1989. Utah and Salt Lake valleys had high levels of PM10 pollution that violated both the annual and 24-h standards issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Much lower PM10 levels occurred in the Cache Valley. Utah Valley experienced the intermittent operation of its primary source of PM10 pollution: an integrated steel mill. Bronchitis and asthma admissions for preschool-age children were approximately twice as frequent in Utah Valley when the steel mill was operating versus when it was not. Similar differences were not observed in Salt Lake or Cache valleys. Even though Cache Valley had higher smoking rates and lower temperatures in winter than did Utah Valley, per capita bronchitis and asthma admissions for all ages were approximately twice as high in Utah Valley. During the period when the steel mill was closed, differences in per capita admissions between Utah and Cache valleys narrowed considerably. Regression analysis also demonstrated a statistical association between respiratory hospital admissions and PM10 pollution. The results suggest that PM10 pollution plays a role in the incidence and severity of respiratory disease.

  14. The effect of different transport modes on urban PM(10) levels in two European cities.

    PubMed

    Makra, László; Ionel, Ioana; Csépe, Zoltán; Matyasovszky, István; Lontis, Nicolae; Popescu, Francisc; Sümeghy, Zoltán

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study is to identify transport patterns that may have an important influence on PM10 levels in two European cities, namely Szeged in East-Central Europe and Bucharest in Eastern Europe. 4-Day, 6-hourly three-dimensional (3D) backward trajectories arriving at these locations at 1200 GMT are computed using the HYSPLIT model over a 5-year period from 2004 to 2008. A k-means clustering algorithm using the Mahalanobis metric is applied in order to develop trajectory types. Two statistical indices are used to evaluate and compare exceedances of critical daily PM10 levels corresponding to the trajectory clusters. For Bucharest, the major PM10 transport can be clearly associated with air masses arriving from Central and Southern Europe, as well as the Western Mediterranean. Occasional North African dust intrusions over Romania are also found. For Szeged, Southern Europe with North Africa, Central Europe and Eastern Europe with regions over the West Siberian Plain are the most important sources of PM10. The occasional appearance of North-African-origin dust over Hungary is also detected. A statistical procedure is developed in order to separate medium- and long-range PM10 transport for both cities. Considering the 500 m arrival height, long-range transport plays a higher role in the measured PM10 concentration both for non-rainy and rainy days for Bucharest and Szeged, respectively.

  15. Estimation of PM10 concentrations over Seoul using multiple empirical models with AERONET and MODIS data collected during the DRAGON-Asia campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, S.; Kim, J.; Lee, H.; Jeong, U.; Kim, W.; Holben, B. N.; Kim, S.-W.; Song, C. H.; Lim, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of various empirical linear models to estimate the concentrations of surface-level particulate matter with a diameter less than 10 μm (PM10) was evaluated using Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer and Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data collected in Seoul during the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network (DRAGON)-Asia campaign from March to May 2012. An observed relationship between the PM10 concentration and the aerosol optical depth (AOD) was accounted for by several parameters in the empirical models, including boundary layer height (BLH), relative humidity (RH), and effective radius of the aerosol size distribution (Reff), which was used here for the first time in empirical modeling. Among various empirical models, the model which incorporates both BLH and Reff showed the highest correlation, which indicates the strong influence of BLH and Reff on the PM10 estimations. Meanwhile, the effect of RH on the relationship between AOD and PM10 appeared to be negligible during the campaign period (spring), when RH is generally low in northeast Asia. A large spatial dependency of the empirical model performance was found by categorizing the locations of the collected data into three different site types, which varied in terms of the distances between instruments and source locations. When both AERONET and MODIS data sets were used in the PM10 estimation, the highest correlations between measured and estimated values (R = 0.76 and 0.76 using AERONET and MODIS data, respectively) were found for the residential area (RA) site type, while the poorest correlations (R = 0.61 and 0.68 using AERONET and MODIS data, respectively) were found for the near-source (NS) site type. Significant seasonal variations of empirical model performances for PM10 estimation were found using the data collected at Yonsei University (one of the DRAGON campaign sites) over a period of 17 months including the DRAGON campaign

  16. Simulation And Forecasting of Daily Pm10 Concentrations Using Autoregressive Models In Kagithane Creek Valley, Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ağaç, Kübra; Koçak, Kasım; Deniz, Ali

    2015-04-01

    A time series approach using autoregressive model (AR), moving average model (MA) and seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average model (SARIMA) were used in this study to simulate and forecast daily PM10 concentrations in Kagithane Creek Valley, Istanbul. Hourly PM10 concentrations have been measured in Kagithane Creek Valley between 2010 and 2014 periods. Bosphorus divides the city in two parts as European and Asian parts. The historical part of the city takes place in Golden Horn. Our study area Kagithane Creek Valley is connected with this historical part. The study area is highly polluted because of its topographical structure and industrial activities. Also population density is extremely high in this site. The dispersion conditions are highly poor in this creek valley so it is necessary to calculate PM10 levels for air quality and human health. For given period there were some missing PM10 concentration values so to make an accurate calculations and to obtain exact results gap filling method was applied by Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA). SSA is a new and efficient method for gap filling and it is an state-of-art modeling. SSA-MTM Toolkit was used for our study. SSA is considered as a noise reduction algorithm because it decomposes an original time series to trend (if exists), oscillatory and noise components by way of a singular value decomposition. The basic SSA algorithm has stages of decomposition and reconstruction. For given period daily and monthly PM10 concentrations were calculated and episodic periods are determined. Long term and short term PM10 concentrations were analyzed according to European Union (EU) standards. For simulation and forecasting of high level PM10 concentrations, meteorological data (wind speed, pressure and temperature) were used to see the relationship between daily PM10 concentrations. Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) was also applied to the data to see the periodicity and according to these periods models were built

  17. Chemical composition of PM2.5 and PM10 in Mexico City during winter 1997.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Edgerton, Sylvia A; Vega, Elizabeth

    2002-03-27

    PM2.5 and PM10 were measured over 24-h intervals at six core sites and at 25 satellite sites in and around Mexico City from 23 February to 22 March 1997. In addition, four 6-h samples were taken each day at three of the core sites. Sampling locations were selected to represent regional, central city, commercial, residential, and industrial portions of the city. Mass and light transmission concentrations were determined on all of the samples, while elements, ions and carbon were measured on approximately two-thirds of the samples. PM10 concentrations were highly variable, with almost three-fold differences between the highest and lowest concentrations. Fugitive dust was the major cause of PM10 differences, although carbon concentrations were also highly variable among the sampling sites. Approximately 50% of PM10 was in the PM2.5 fraction. The majority of PM mass was comprised of carbon, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and crustal components, but in different proportions on different days and at different sites. The largest fine-particle components were carbonaceous aerosols, constituting approximately 50% of PM2.5 mass, followed by approximately 30% secondary inorganic aerosols and approximately 15% geological material. Geological material is the largest component of PM10, constituting approximately 50% of PM10 mass, followed by approximately 32% carbonaceous aerosols and approximately 17% secondary inorganic aerosols. Sulfate concentrations were twice as high as nitrate concentrations. Sulfate and nitrate were present as ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate. Approximately two-thirds of the ammonium sulfate measured in urban areas appears to have been transported from regions outside of the study domain, rather than formed from emissions in the urban area. Diurnal variations are apparent, with two-fold increases in concentration from night-time to daytime. Morning samples had the highest PM2.5 and PM10 mass, secondary inorganic aerosols and carbon concentrations

  18. Levels and major sources of PM2.5 and PM10 in Bangkok Metropolitan Region.

    PubMed

    Chuersuwan, Nares; Nimrat, Subuntith; Lekphet, Sukanda; Kerdkumrai, Tida

    2008-07-01

    This research was the first long-term attempt to concurrently measure and identify major sources of both PM(10) and PM(2.5) in Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR). Ambient PM(10) and PM(2.5) were evaluated at four monitoring stations and analyzed for elemental compositions, water-soluble ions, and total carbon during February 2002-January 2003. Fifteen chemical elements, four water-soluble ions, and total carbon were analyzed to assist major source identification by a receptor model approach, known as chemical mass balance. PM(10) and PM(2.5) were significantly different (p<0.05) at all sites and 24 h averages were high at traffic location while two separated residential sites were similar. Seasonal difference of PM(10) and PM(2.5) concentrations was distinct between dry and wet seasons. Major source of PM(10) at the traffic site indicated that automobile emissions and biomass burning-related sources contributed approximately 33% each. Automobiles contributed approximately 39 and 22% of PM(10) mass at two residential sites while biomass burning contributed about 36 and 28%. PM(10) from re-suspended soil and cooking sources accounted for 10 to 15% at a residential site. Major sources of PM(2.5) at traffic site were automobile and biomass burning, contributing approximately 32 and 26%, respectively. Biomass burning was the major source of PM(2.5) mass concentrations at residential sites. Meat cooking also accounted for 31% of PM(2.5) mass at a low impact site. Automobile, biomass burning, and road dust were less significant, contributed 10, 6, and 5%, respectively. Major sources identification at some location had difficulty to achieve performance criteria due to limited source profiles. Improved in characterize other sources profiles will help local authority to better air quality. PMID:18258301

  19. Composition and origin of PM10 in Cape Verde: Characterization of long-range transport episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, P.; Almeida, S. M.; Cardoso, J.; Almeida-Silva, M.; Nunes, T.; Cerqueira, M.; Alves, C.; Reis, M. A.; Chaves, P. C.; Artíñano, B.; Pio, C.

    2016-02-01

    A receptor modelling study was performed to identify source categories and their contributions to the PM10 total mass at the Cape Verde archipelago. Trajectory statistical methods were also used to characterize the main atmospheric circulation patterns causing the transport of air masses and to geographically identify the main potential source areas of each PM10 source category. Our findings point out that the variability of the PM10 levels at Cape Verde was prompted by the advections of African mineral dust. The mineral dust load was mainly composed by clay-silicates mineral derived elements (22% of the PM10 total mass on average) with lower amounts of carbonates (9%). A clear northward gradient was observed in carbonates concentration that illustrates the differences in the composition according to the source regions of mineral dust. Mineral dust was frequently linked to industrial emissions from crude oil refineries, fertilizer industries as well as oil and coal power plants, located in the northern and north-western coast of the African continent (29%). Sea salt was also registered in the PM10 mass during most part of the sampling period, with a lower impact in the PM10 levels than the mineral dust one (26%). Combustion aerosols (6%) reached the highest mean values in summer as a consequence of the emissions from local-regional sources. Biomass burning aerosols produced from October to November in sub-sahelian latitudes, had a clear influence in the content of elemental carbon (EC) recorded at Cape Verde but a small impact in the PM10 total mass levels. A minor contribution to the PM10 mass has been associated to secondary inorganic compounds-SIC. Namely, ammonium sulfate and nitrate (SIC 1-5%) and calcium sulfate and nitrate (SIC 2-3%). The main origin of SIC 1 was attributed to emissions of SO2 and NOx from industrial sources located in the northern and north-western African coast and from wildfires produced in the continent. SIC 2 had a clear regional origin

  20. Interpretation of roadside PM10 monitoring data from Sunderland, United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Price, Monica; O'Dowd, Colin; Dixon, Marion

    2003-03-01

    Roadside PM10 has been monitored by Partisol at three sites in Sunderland between August 1997 and February 1998. The sites chosen were an inner city kerbside site; a roadside site adjacent to a dual carriageway on the outskirts of Sunderland with an open aspect; and a rural site. The results indicate that there is a seasonal variation in the relationship between the sites in terms of monitored PM10. In the winter there is a poor correlation between the sites whereas in the summer significant correlations are obtained. Of the sites monitored PM10 is consistently highest at the inner city roadside site. During the summer, exceedances of the U.K. 50 microg m(-3) standard (DETR, 2000) are associated with conditions suitable for the build-up of photochemical pollution however during the winter period exceedances are recorded during a variety of weather conditions. At the dual carriageway site PM2.5 has also been recorded and contributions to measured PM10 are 77% in summer and 68% in winter. The results illustrate a number of inconsistencies between this study utilising the Partisol and others reporting results where PM10 has been monitored by TEOM.

  1. Factors influencing the variations of PM10 aerosol dust in Klang Valley, Malaysia during the summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneng, Liew; Latif, Mohd Talib; Tangang, Fredolin

    2011-08-01

    The associations between the variations of PM10 concentration during summer monsoon dry seasons over the Klang Valley, Malaysia and the local meteorological factors, synoptic weather conditions as well as the regional hotspots number were examined based on simple multiple linear regression analysis. The regressive relationships established, suggest that the variation of PM10 in Klang Valley was governed significantly by all of the examined factors. Local meteorological conditions are among those factors which governed the largest day-to-day variations of PM10 concentration in the Klang Valley areas during the dry season. When augmented by synoptic meteorological variables and foreign emission sources, a remarkable increase in the explained variance was apparent. On the other hand, domestic burning sources only had a minimal impact on PM10 fluctuations. Important synoptic weather patterns which influence the air pollution variations were also identified. These synoptic conditions include the strengthening of the summer monsoon southwesterly winds over the equatorial area. In addition, the formation of cyclonic circulation, associated with typhoon formation over the north-west Pacific and the South China Sea as well as over the Bay of Bengal, are found to have had a profound impact on PM10 variations over the Malaysian region through the modulation of regional moisture distributions.

  2. Incremental effect of festive biomass burning on wintertime PM10 in Brahmaputra Valley of Northeast India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Pratibha; Hoque, Raza Rafiqul

    2014-06-01

    PM10 concentration was monitored at a receptor site in the Brahmaputra Valley during a unique, local, episodic festive biomass burning called meji burning. Mean mass concentration of PM10 during monitoring was found to be 149 ± 45 μg m- 3 with maximum and minimum concentrations of 293 μg m- 3 and 93 μg m- 3 respectively. Elemental analysis by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer (EDX) revealed high carbonaceous and Br content in PM10 samples. Particulate carbon showed high significant correlation with PM10 and dominance in samples taken during night time. Back trajectory analysis supported long range transport of carbonaceous aerosol from the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) to the region under study. Prevailing meteorology - thermal inversion and low mixing heights - was found to have a strong influence on PM10 levels in the post festive burning period. Enrichment factors of several elements ranged above thousand which indicated a strong influence of anthropogenic activities and input of aged particulates driven from long distance. Incremental effect of meji burning, which we coined as Meji Burning Induced Enrichments (MBIEs), was calculated. MBIE values supported incremental effects explicitly.

  3. Comparison of particle lung doses from the fine and coarse fractions of urban PM-10 aerosols.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, C; Kao, A S

    1999-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently revised the national ambient air quality standards to include a new PM-2.5 particulate standard. We examine the contributions of fine (PM-2.5) and coarse (PM-2.5 to -10) fraction of typical urban aerosols to particle doses in different lung airways resulting from 24-h exposure to the standard concentration of 150 microg m-3. The aerosol is assumed to have a bimodal lognormal mass distribution with mass median diameters of 0.2 and 5 microm, and geometric standard deviation of 1.7 and 57% of the mass in the fine (PM-2.5) mode. The daily mass dose from exposure to 150 microg m-3 of PM-10 in the nasopharyngeal (NPL) region is 20-51 microg day-1 (1.5% of inhaled fines) and 377-687 microg day-1 (30% of inhaled coarse), respectively, of fine and coarse mass filtered in the nose. Similar daily mass doses from fine and coarse fractions, respectively, to the tracheobronchial (TBL) region are 28-38 (1.5%) and 40-52 (4%) microg day-1 and to the pulmonary (PUL) region are 18-194 (6%) and 32-55 microg day-1 (2%). The daily number dose in the NPL region is 5-15 x 10(8) (0.06% of inhaled fines) and 5-10 x 10(6) day-1 (13% of inhaled coarse) respectively, of fine and coarse particles. Similar number doses to the TBL region are 2.2-3.1 x 10(10) (2%) and 7.1-11. 1 x 10(5) (2%) day-1 and to the PUL region are 1.6-16.7 x 10(10) (9%) and 2.9-17.0 x 10(5) (3%) day-1. The daily surface mass dose (microg cm-2 day-1) from coarse fraction particles is large in generations 3-5. The daily number dose (particles day-1) and surface number dose (particles cm-2 day-1) are higher from the fine than the coarse fraction, by about 10(3) to 10(5) times in all lung airways. Fine fraction particles result in 10,000 times greater particle number dose per macrophage than coarse fraction particles. Particle number doses do not follow trends in mass doses, are much larger from fine than coarse fraction, and must be considered in assessing PM health

  4. Cluster analysis of particulate matter (PM10) and black carbon (BC) concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žibert, Janez; Pražnikar, Jure

    2012-09-01

    The monitoring of air-pollution constituents like particulate matter (PM10) and black carbon (BC) can provide information about air quality and the dynamics of emissions. Air quality depends on natural and anthropogenic sources of emissions as well as the weather conditions. For a one-year period the diurnal concentrations of PM10 and BC in the Port of Koper were analysed by clustering days into similar groups according to the similarity of the BC and PM10 hourly derived day-profiles without any prior assumptions about working and non-working days, weather conditions or hot and cold seasons. The analysis was performed by using k-means clustering with the squared Euclidean distance as the similarity measure. The analysis showed that 10 clusters in the BC case produced 3 clusters with just one member day and 7 clusters that encompasses more than one day with similar BC profiles. Similar results were found in the PM10 case, where one cluster has a single-member day, while 7 clusters contain several member days. The clustering analysis revealed that the clusters with less pronounced bimodal patterns and low hourly and average daily concentrations for both types of measurements include the most days in the one-year analysis. A typical day profile of the BC measurements includes a bimodal pattern with morning and evening peaks, while the PM10 measurements reveal a less pronounced bimodality. There are also clusters with single-peak day-profiles. The BC data in such cases exhibit morning peaks, while the PM10 data consist of noon or afternoon single peaks. Single pronounced peaks can be explained by appropriate cluster wind speed profiles. The analysis also revealed some special day-profiles. The BC cluster with a high midnight peak at 30/04/2010 and the PM10 cluster with the highest observed concentration of PM10 at 01/05/2010 (208.0 μg m-3) coincide with 1 May, which is a national holiday in Slovenia and has very strong tradition of bonfire parties. The clustering of

  5. Sources of atmospheric aerosols controlling PM10 levels in Heraklion, Crete during winter time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, Nikolaos; Kouvarakis, Giorgos; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Kandilogiannaki, Maria; Vavadaki, Katerina; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    High concentrations of Particulate Matter (PM) in the atmosphere have negative impact to human health. Thresholds for ambient concentrations that are defined by the directive 2008/50/EC are frequently exceeded even at background conditions in the Mediterranean region as shown in earlier studies. The sources of atmospheric particles in the urban environment of a medium size city of eastern Mediterranean are studied in the present work in order to better understand the causes and characteristics of exceedances of the daily mean PM10limit value of 50 μg m‑3. Measurements were performed at the atmospheric quality measurement station of the Region of Crete, at the Heraklion city center on Crete island, during the winter/spring period of 2014-2015 and 2015-2016. Special emphasis was given to the study of the contribution of Black Carbon (BC) to the levels of PM10. Continuous measurements were performed using a beta-attenuation PM10monitor and a 7-wavelength Aethalometer with a time resolution of 30 and 5 minutes respectively. For direct comparison to background regional conditions, concurrent routine measurements at the atmospheric research station of University of Crete at Finokalia were used as background reference. Analysis of exceedances in the daily PM10 mass concentration showed that the total of the exceedances was related to long range transport of Saharan dust rather than local sources. However, compared to the Finokalia station it was found that there were 20% more exceedances in Heraklion, the addition of transported dust on the local pollution was the reason for the additional exceedance days. Excluding dust events, it was found that the PM10variability was dependent on the BC abundance, traffic during rush hours in the morning and biomass burning for domestic heating in the evening contributed significantly to PM10levels in Heraklion.

  6. Biologic effects induced in vitro by PM10 from three different zones of Mexico City.

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro-Moreno, Ernesto; Martínez, Leticia; García-Cuellar, Claudia; Bonner, James C; Murray, J Clifford; Rosas, Irma; Rosales, Sergio Ponce de León; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro R

    2002-01-01

    Exposure to urban airborne particles is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality. There is little experimental evidence of the mechanisms involved and the role of particle composition. We assessed cytotoxicity (crystal violet assay), apoptosis [terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) or annexin V assay], DNA breakage (comet assay), and production of proinflammatory mediators [tumor necrosis factor Alpha (TNF-Alpha), interleukin 6 (IL-6), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)] (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), and E-selectin (flow cytometry) in cell lines exposed to particulate matter < 10 microm in size (PM10) obtained from the northern, central, and southern zones of Mexico City. Particle concentrations ranged from 2.5 to 160 microg/cm(2). We used epithelial, endothelial, fibroblastic, and monocytic cells and assessed DNA damage in Balb-c cells, TNF-Alpha and IL-6 production in mouse monocytes, and PGE2 in rat lung fibroblasts. We determined the expression of E-selectin in human endothelial cells and evaluated the cytotoxic potential of the PM10 samples in all cell types. PM10 from all three zones of Mexico City caused cell death, DNA breakage, and apoptosis, with particles from the north and central zones being the most toxic. All of these PM10 samples induced secretion of proinflammatory molecules, and particles from the central zone were the most potent. Endothelial cells exposed to PM10 from the three zones expressed similar E-selectin levels. Mexico City PM10 induced biologic effects dependent on the zone of origin, which could be caused by differences in the mixture or size distribution within particle samples. Our data suggest that particle composition as well as particle size should be considered in assessing the adverse effects of airborne particulate pollution. PMID:12117649

  7. Biologic effects induced in vitro by PM10 from three different zones of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Alfaro-Moreno, Ernesto; Martínez, Leticia; García-Cuellar, Claudia; Bonner, James C; Murray, J Clifford; Rosas, Irma; Rosales, Sergio Ponce de León; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro R

    2002-07-01

    Exposure to urban airborne particles is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality. There is little experimental evidence of the mechanisms involved and the role of particle composition. We assessed cytotoxicity (crystal violet assay), apoptosis [terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) or annexin V assay], DNA breakage (comet assay), and production of proinflammatory mediators [tumor necrosis factor Alpha (TNF-Alpha), interleukin 6 (IL-6), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)] (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), and E-selectin (flow cytometry) in cell lines exposed to particulate matter < 10 microm in size (PM10) obtained from the northern, central, and southern zones of Mexico City. Particle concentrations ranged from 2.5 to 160 microg/cm(2). We used epithelial, endothelial, fibroblastic, and monocytic cells and assessed DNA damage in Balb-c cells, TNF-Alpha and IL-6 production in mouse monocytes, and PGE2 in rat lung fibroblasts. We determined the expression of E-selectin in human endothelial cells and evaluated the cytotoxic potential of the PM10 samples in all cell types. PM10 from all three zones of Mexico City caused cell death, DNA breakage, and apoptosis, with particles from the north and central zones being the most toxic. All of these PM10 samples induced secretion of proinflammatory molecules, and particles from the central zone were the most potent. Endothelial cells exposed to PM10 from the three zones expressed similar E-selectin levels. Mexico City PM10 induced biologic effects dependent on the zone of origin, which could be caused by differences in the mixture or size distribution within particle samples. Our data suggest that particle composition as well as particle size should be considered in assessing the adverse effects of airborne particulate pollution.

  8. A wind-tunnel study on saltation and PM10 emission from agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avecilla, Fernando; Panebianco, Juan E.; Buschiazzo, Daniel E.

    2016-09-01

    PM10 emission depends on the texture and the aggregation state of a soil. A decisive but less studied factor is the saltation fraction of the soil (fraction between 100 and 500 μm). Six soils of contrasting textures were selected, and a wind tunnel study was carried out under three different saltation conditions: increased saltation, in which a sample of the saltation fraction was added to the air stream prior to the soil bed; no saltation added, in which the soil bed eroded without the addition of extra saltation fraction; and only saltation, in which the saltation fraction was injected into the air stream in the absence of the soil bed. Results indicated that the saltation efficiency for PM10 emission increased with the fine fraction content of the soil and decreased with the sand content, but this process showed a complex behavior depending on the cohesion and stability of the aggregates. An index for describing the saltation efficiency of the studied soils was proposed based on the combination of three parameters: the PM10 content, the amount of saltation fraction available in the soil surface, and an aggregation parameter (clay × organic matter content). Increasing the saltation rate increased the PM10 emission from the eroding soil bed, except for the sandy soil. Results suggest that the main mechanisms of PM10 emission under saltation conditions differ according to the soil texture: detachment of the PM10 adhered to the grains of sand predominates on sandy soils and fragmentation on finer soils, but both processes occur together on high-emitting soils of intermediate textures.

  9. Sources of atmospheric aerosols controlling PM10 levels in Heraklion, Crete during winter time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, Nikolaos; Kouvarakis, Giorgos; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Kandilogiannaki, Maria; Vavadaki, Katerina; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    High concentrations of Particulate Matter (PM) in the atmosphere have negative impact to human health. Thresholds for ambient concentrations that are defined by the directive 2008/50/EC are frequently exceeded even at background conditions in the Mediterranean region as shown in earlier studies. The sources of atmospheric particles in the urban environment of a medium size city of eastern Mediterranean are studied in the present work in order to better understand the causes and characteristics of exceedances of the daily mean PM10limit value of 50 μg m-3. Measurements were performed at the atmospheric quality measurement station of the Region of Crete, at the Heraklion city center on Crete island, during the winter/spring period of 2014-2015 and 2015-2016. Special emphasis was given to the study of the contribution of Black Carbon (BC) to the levels of PM10. Continuous measurements were performed using a beta-attenuation PM10monitor and a 7-wavelength Aethalometer with a time resolution of 30 and 5 minutes respectively. For direct comparison to background regional conditions, concurrent routine measurements at the atmospheric research station of University of Crete at Finokalia were used as background reference. Analysis of exceedances in the daily PM10 mass concentration showed that the total of the exceedances was related to long range transport of Saharan dust rather than local sources. However, compared to the Finokalia station it was found that there were 20% more exceedances in Heraklion, the addition of transported dust on the local pollution was the reason for the additional exceedance days. Excluding dust events, it was found that the PM10variability was dependent on the BC abundance, traffic during rush hours in the morning and biomass burning for domestic heating in the evening contributed significantly to PM10levels in Heraklion.

  10. Effect of ceramic industrial particulate emission control on key components of ambient PM10.

    PubMed

    Minguillón, María Cruz; Monfort, Eliseo; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Celades, Irina; Miró, José Vicente

    2009-06-01

    The relationship between specific particulate emission control and ambient levels of some PM(10) components (Zn, As, Pb, Cs, Tl) was evaluated. To this end, the industrial area of Castellón (Eastern Spain) was selected, where around 40% of the EU glazed ceramic tiles and a high proportion of EU ceramic frits are produced. The PM(10) emissions from the ceramic processes were calculated over the period 2000-2006, taking into account the degree of implementation of corrective measures throughout the study period. Abatement systems were implemented in the majority of the fusion kilns for frit manufacture in the area as a result of the application of the Directive 1996/61/EC, leading to a marked decrease in PM(10) emissions. By contrast, emissions from tile manufacture remained relatively constant because of the few changes in the implementation of corrective measures. On the other hand, ambient PM(10) levels and composition measurements were carried out from 2002 to 2006. A high correlation between PM(10) emissions from frit manufacture and ambient levels of Zn, As, Pb and Cs (R(2) from 0.61 to 0.98) was observed. On the basis of these results, the potential impact of the implementation of corrective measures to reduce emissions from tile manufacture was quantified, resulting in a possible decrease of 3-5 microg/m(3) and 2 microg/m(3) in ambient mineral PM(10) (on an annual basis) in urban and suburban areas, respectively. This relatively simple methodology allows us to estimate the direct effect of a reduction in primary particulate emissions on ambient levels of key particulate components, and to make a preliminary quantification of the possibilities of air quality improvement by means of further emission reduction. Therefore, it is a useful tool for developing future air quality plans in the study area and in other industrialised areas.

  11. Reduction of PM emissions from specific sources reflected on key components concentrations of ambient PM10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguillon, M. C.; Querol, X.; Monfort, E.; Alastuey, A.; Escrig, A.; Celades, I.; Miro, J. V.

    2009-04-01

    The relationship between specific particulate emission control and ambient levels of some PM10 components (Zn, As, Pb, Cs, Tl) was evaluated. To this end, the industrial area of Castellón (Eastern Spain) was selected, where around 40% of the EU glazed ceramic tiles and a high proportion of EU ceramic frits (middle product for the manufacture of ceramic glaze) are produced. The PM10 emissions from the ceramic processes were calculated over the period 2000 to 2007 taking into account the degree of implementation of corrective measures throughout the study period. Abatement systems (mainly bag filters) were implemented in the majority of the fusion kilns for frit manufacture in the area as a result of the application of the Directive 1996/61/CE, leading to a marked decrease in PM10 emissions. On the other hand, ambient PM10 sampling was carried out from April 2002 to July 2008 at three urban sites and one suburban site of the area and a complete chemical analysis was made for about 35 % of the collected samples, by means of different techniques (ICP-AES, ICP-MS, Ion Chromatography, selective electrode and elemental analyser). The series of chemical composition of PM10 allowed us to apply a source contribution model (Principal Component Analysis), followed by a multilinear regression analysis, so that PM10 sources were identified and their contribution to bulk ambient PM10 was quantified on a daily basis, as well as the contribution to bulk ambient concentrations of the identified key components (Zn, As, Pb, Cs, Tl). The contribution of the sources identified as the manufacture and use of ceramic glaze components, including the manufacture of ceramic frits, accounted for more than 65, 75, 58, 53, and 53% of ambient Zn, As, Pb, Cs and Tl levels, respectively (with the exception of Tl contribution at one of the sites). The important emission reductions of these sources during the study period had an impact on ambient key components levels, such that there was a high

  12. Pulmonary toxicity study in rats with PM 10 and PM 2.5: Differential responses related to scale and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Lei, Tian; Lin, Zhi-Qing; Zhang, Hua-Shan; Yang, Dan-Feng; Xi, Zhu-Ge; Chen, Jian-Hua; Wang, Wei

    2011-02-01

    ObjectionTo study the pollution of atmospheric particles at winter in Beijing and compare the lung toxicity which induced by particle samples from different sampling sites. MethodWe collected samples from two sampling points during the winter for toxicity testing and chemical analysis. Wistar rats were administered with particles by intratracheal instillation. After exposure, biochemically index, esimmunity indexes, histopathology and DNA damage were detected in rat pulmonary cells. ResultThe elements with enrichment factors (EF) larger than 10 were As, Cd, Cu, Zn, S and Pb in the four experiment groups. The priority control of the total concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM 10 and PM 2.5 of Near-traffic source was much higher than that of Far-traffic source, it demonstrated that near the traffic source of PAHs pollution was heavier than that of Far-traffic source, as it was close to main roads Beiyuan Road, motor vehicle emissions were much higher. The pathology of lung showed that the degree of inflammation was increased with the particle diameter minished, it was the same as the detection of biochemical parameters such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Total antioxidant status(T-AOC) and total protein (TP) in BALF and inflammation cytokine(interleukin-1, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) in lung homogenate. The indexes of DNA damage including the content of DNA and Olive empennage of PM 2.5 were significant higher than that of PM 10 at the same surveillance point ( P < 0.05), near-traffic particles were higher than the far-traffic particles at the same diameter, ( P < 0.05). ConclusionNear-traffic area particles had certain pollution at winter in Beijing. Meanwhile, atmospheric particulate matters on lung toxicity were related to the particles size and distance related sites which were exposed: smaller size, more toxicity; nearer from traffic, more toxicity.

  13. Inlet noise on 0.5-meter-diameter NASA QF-1 fan as measured in an unmodified compressor aerodynamic test facility and in an anechoic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelder, T. F.; Soltis, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Narrowband analysis revealed grossly similar sound pressure level spectra in each facility. Blade passing frequency (BPF) noise and multiple pure tone (MPT) noise were superimposed on a broadband (BB) base noise. From one-third octave bandwidth sound power analyses the BPF noise (harmonics combined), and the MPT noise (harmonics combined, excepting BPF's) agreed between facilities within 1.5 db or less over the range of speeds and flows tested. Detailed noise and aerodynamic performance is also presented.

  14. Development of cotton gin PM10 emission factors for EPA’s AP-42

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Compilation of Air Pollution Emission Factors (AP-42) emission factors are assigned ratings, from A (Excellent) to E (Poor), based on the quality of data used to develop them. All current PM10 cotton gin emission factors received quality ratings of D or lower. In an effort to improve these ratin...

  15. 40 CFR 52.63 - PM10 State Implementation Plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... committal SIP for the cities of Leeds and North Birmingham in Jefferson County. The committal SIP contains all the requirements identified in the July 1, 1987, promulgation of the SIP requirements for PM10 at 52 FR 24681. The SIP commits the State to submit an emissions inventory, continue to monitor for...

  16. 40 CFR 52.63 - PM10 State Implementation Plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... committal SIP for the cities of Leeds and North Birmingham in Jefferson County. The committal SIP contains all the requirements identified in the July 1, 1987, promulgation of the SIP requirements for PM10 at 52 FR 24681. The SIP commits the State to submit an emissions inventory, continue to monitor for...

  17. 40 CFR 52.634 - Particulate matter (PM-10) Group III SIP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SIP. 52.634 Section 52.634 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... (PM-10) Group III SIP. (a) On September 14, 1988, the Governor of Hawaii submitted a revision to the State Implementation Plan (SIP) for implementing the required monitoring activities and other...

  18. 40 CFR 52.634 - Particulate matter (PM-10) Group III SIP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Particulate matter (PM-10) Group III... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Hawaii § 52.634 Particulate matter... State Implementation Plan (SIP) for implementing the required monitoring activities and other...

  19. 40 CFR 52.634 - Particulate matter (PM-10) Group III SIP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Particulate matter (PM-10) Group III... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Hawaii § 52.634 Particulate matter... State Implementation Plan (SIP) for implementing the required monitoring activities and other...

  20. 40 CFR 52.823 - PM10 State Implementation Plan Development in Group II Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... committed to comply with the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... October 13, 1987, from Peter R. Hamlin to Carl Walter. The remainder of the State was classified as Group... contained in a letter of January 26, 1988, from Peter R. Hamlin to John Helvig). (b) Analyze and verify...

  1. 40 CFR 52.1423 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... committed to conform to the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA...: (a) An area in the City of Omaha and the area in and around the Village of Weeping Water have been... nonattainment problem exists and immediately notify the Regional Office. (4) Within 30 days of the...

  2. PM2.5 and PM10 Emission from Agricultural Soils by Wind Erosion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil tillage and wind erosion are a major source of particulate matter less than 2.5 and 10 µm (PM2.5 and PM10) emission from cultivated soil. Fifteen cultivated soils collected from 5 states were tested as crushed (<2.0 mm) and uncrushed (natural aggregation) at 8, 10, and 13 m s-1 wind velocity in...

  3. Investigating the capability of a control chart based on functional data for daily PM10 monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaadan, Norshahida; Jemain, Abdul Aziz; Deni, Sayang Mohd

    2015-02-01

    A control chart based on functional data (FD) has been proposed to be used as a tool for detecting anomalies and for assessing the trend of daily PM10. In this study, the capability of the FD control chart is investigated. The performance of the FD control chart is compared to the control charts based on the average (AV) and multivariate (MV) data. Daily PM10 indices for AV control chart are the average values while the indices for the MV and FD control charts are computed based on the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) model. The experimentation is conducted using real PM10 data from the Shah Alam air quality monitoring station located at the west of Peninsular Malaysia to investigate the performance of the control charts. The results of the first stage analysis have shown that the FD control chart outperforms the AV and MV control charts in detecting PM10 anomalies of extreme levels. Using a similar number of principal components, it is also found that the PCA model based on FD is able to capture more information compared to the PCA model based on MV. By means of the operating characteristics (OC) curve, the results from the subsequent analysis also reveal that the FD control chart is more sensitive to the changes in the control limits. Overall, the study results have indicated that the FD control chart is worth pursuing.

  4. [Emission characteristics of PM10 from coal-fired industrial boiler].

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Li, Xing-Hua; Duan, Lei; Zhao, Meng; Duan, Jing-Chun; Hao, Ji-Ming

    2009-03-15

    Through ELPI (electrical low-pressure impactor) based dilution sampling system, the emission characteristics of PM10 and PM2.5 was studied experimentally at the inlet and outlet of dust catchers at eight different coal-fired industrial boilers. Results showed that a peak existed at around 0.12-0.20 microm of particle size for both number size distribution and mass size distribution of PM10 emitted from most of the boilers. Chemical composition analysis indicated that PM2.5 was largely composed of organic carbon, elementary carbon, and sulfate, with mass fraction of 3.7%-21.4%, 4.2%-24.6%, and 1.5%-55.2% respectively. Emission factors of PM10 and PM2.5 measured were 0.13-0.65 kg x t(-1) and 0.08-0.49 kg x t(-1) respectively for grate boiler using raw coal, and 0.24 kg x t(-1) and 0.22 kg x t(-1) for chain-grate boiler using briquette. In comparison, the PM2.5 emission factor of fluidized bed boiler is 1.14 kg x t(-1), much her than that of grate boiler. Due to high coal consumption and low efficiency of dust separator, coal-fired industrial boiler may become the most important source of PM10, and should be preferentially controlled in China.

  5. A PROBABILISTIC POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR PM10 AND PM 2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    A first generation probabilistic population exposure model for Particulate Matter (PM), specifically for predicting PM10, and PM2.5, exposures of an urban, population has been developed. This model is intended to be used to predict exposure (magnitude, frequency, and duration) ...

  6. 76 FR 72404 - Adequacy Status of Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets in Submitted PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... outlined in 40 CFR 93.118(e)(4) which was promulgated in our August 15, 1997 final rule (62 FR 43780, 43781... our July 1, 2004 final rule (69 FR 40004, 40038), and we used the information in these resources in... AGENCY Adequacy Status of Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets in Submitted PM 10 Maintenance Plan...

  7. PREDICTING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO PM10 AND PM 2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved model for human exposure to particulate matter (PM), specifically PM10 and PM2.5 is under development by the U.S. EPA/NERL. This model will incorporate data from new PM exposure measurement and exposure factors research. It is intended to be used to predict exposure...

  8. 76 FR 10817 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Nevada; PM-10; Determinations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... Amendments of 1990 as a moderate nonattainment area for the PM-10 NAAQS. See 56 FR 11101 (March 15, 1991); 56... 71612, 71644-46 (November 29, 2005); 72 FR 20585, 20665 (April 25, 2007) (PM 2.5 Implementation Rule.... Rep. ] No. 490 101st Cong., 2d Sess. 267 (1990)).'' 57 FR 13539 (April 16, 1992). If an area has...

  9. INDOOR AND OUTDOOR PM10 AND ASSOCIATED METALS AND PESTICIDES IN ARIZONA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey study in Arizona (AZ NHEXAS) sampled trace metals in multimedia in and outside of 176 representative homes in Arizona. PM10 was collected using low-flow impactors indoors and out. Primary metals evaluated from monitoring of indoor...

  10. 40 CFR 52.634 - Particulate matter (PM-10) Group III SIP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Particulate matter (PM-10) Group III... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Hawaii § 52.634 Particulate matter... State Implementation Plan (SIP) for implementing the required monitoring activities and other...

  11. PM10, ozone, and hospital admissions for the elderly in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J

    1994-01-01

    Several recent studies have reported associations between airborne particles and/or ozone and hospital admissions for respiratory disease. PM10 has rarely been used as the particle exposure measure, however. This study examined whether such an association could be seen in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, which has daily monitoring data for PM10. Data on hospital admissions in persons aged 65 y and older were obtained from Medicare records for the years 1986 through 1989. Daily counts of admissions, by admit date, were computed for pneumonia (ICD9 480-487) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (ICD9 490-496). Classification was by discharge diagnosis. Daily air pollution data from all monitoring stations for ozone and PM10 in Minneapolis-St. Paul were obtained, and the daily average for each pollutant was computed. An average of approximately six pneumonia admissions and two admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease occurred each day. Poisson regression analysis was used to control for time trends, seasonal fluctuations, and weather. PM10 was a risk factor for pneumonia admissions (relative risk [RR] = 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.33-1.02) and COPD admissions (RR = 1.57, 95% CI = 2.06-1.20). Ozone was also associated with pneumonia admissions (RR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.36-0.97). The relative risks are for an increase of 100 micrograms/m3 in daily PM10 and 50 ppb in daily ozone concentration. Several alternative methods for controlling for seasonal patterns and weather were used, including nonparametric regression techniques. The results were not sensitive to the methods. When days exceeding the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for either pollutant were excluded, the association remained for both pneumonia (RR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.34-1.03 for PM10, and RR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.41-0.99 for ozone) and COPD (RR = 1.54, 95% CI = 2.06-1.16 for PM10).

  12. The distribution of PM10 and PM2.5 carbonaceous aerosol in Baotou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haijun; He, Jiang; Zhao, Boyi; Zhang, Lijun; Fan, Qingyun; Lü, Changwei; Dudagula; Liu, Tao; Yuan, Yinghui

    2016-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM), including PM10 and PM2.5, is one of the major impacts on air quality, visibility, climate change, earth radiation balance, and public health. Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) are the major components of PM. 804 samples (PM10 and PM2.5) were simultaneously collected from six urban sites covering 3 districts in Baotou, in January, April, September, and November 2014. As to a long-term study on the effects of carbonaceous aerosol, data were collected annually at Environmental Protection Agency of Baotou (EPB). The concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5, the spatial distribution and content of OC and EC, the relationship between OC and EC, and the formation of secondary organic carbon (SOC) have been investigated. The findings indicated that the concentrations of these particle matter are higher than that in US or European standards. The average concentrations of OC in PM10 and PM2.5 follow the order: January > November > April > September; and for EC in PM10 and PM2.5 follow the order: January > November > September > April. Affected by metrological factors, it was indicated that high wind speed and low relative humidity were beneficial for removal of OC and EC in January and November. Pearson correlations and cluster analysis on OC and EC concentrations in PM10 and PM2.5 with gaseous pollutants (SO2, NO2, and CO) suggested that OC shared the same emission sources with SO2 and CO from combustion, while EC's sources mainly came from vehicles exhaust and combustion which contributed to NO2 as well. The OC concentration is mainly primary in warm months, while it appears secondary in cold months in Baotou. There is a common characteristic among the cities with higher SOC in winter, wherever the coal combustion can lead to the severe pollution. This work is important for the construction of the database of OC and EC concentrations in PM10 and PM2.5 at spatial and time intervals, and it can provide scientific suggestion for similar PM

  13. Empirical Model for Evaluating PM10 Concentration Caused by River Dust Episodes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Yuan; Chiang, Mon-Ling; Lin, Cheng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Around the estuary of the Zhuo-Shui River in Taiwan, the waters recede during the winter, causing an increase in bare land area and exposing a large amount of fine earth and sand particles that were deposited on the riverbed. Observations at the site revealed that when northeastern monsoons blow over bare land without vegetation or water cover, the fine particles are readily lifted by the wind, forming river dust, which greatly endangers the health of nearby residents. Therefore, determining which factors affect river dust and constructing a model to predict river dust concentration are extremely important in the research and development of a prototype warning system for areas at risk of river dust emissions. In this study, the region around the estuary of the Zhuo-Shui River (from the Zi-Qiang Bridge to the Xi-Bin Bridge) was selected as the research area. Data from a nearby air quality monitoring station were used to screen for days with river dust episodes. The relationships between PM10 concentration and meteorological factors or bare land area were analyzed at different temporal scales to explore the factors that affect river dust emissions. Study results showed that no single factor alone had adequate power to explain daily average or daily maximum PM10 concentration. Stepwise regression analysis of multiple factors showed that the model could not effectively predict daily average PM10 concentration, but daily maximum PM10 concentration could be predicted by a combination of wind velocity, temperature, and bare land area; the coefficient of determination for this model was 0.67. It was inferred that river dust episodes are caused by the combined effect of multiple factors. In addition, research data also showed a time lag effect between meteorological factors and hourly PM10 concentration. This characteristic was applied to the construction of a prediction model, and can be used in an early warning system for local residents. PMID:27271642

  14. Empirical Model for Evaluating PM10 Concentration Caused by River Dust Episodes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Yuan; Chiang, Mon-Ling; Lin, Cheng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Around the estuary of the Zhuo-Shui River in Taiwan, the waters recede during the winter, causing an increase in bare land area and exposing a large amount of fine earth and sand particles that were deposited on the riverbed. Observations at the site revealed that when northeastern monsoons blow over bare land without vegetation or water cover, the fine particles are readily lifted by the wind, forming river dust, which greatly endangers the health of nearby residents. Therefore, determining which factors affect river dust and constructing a model to predict river dust concentration are extremely important in the research and development of a prototype warning system for areas at risk of river dust emissions. In this study, the region around the estuary of the Zhuo-Shui River (from the Zi-Qiang Bridge to the Xi-Bin Bridge) was selected as the research area. Data from a nearby air quality monitoring station were used to screen for days with river dust episodes. The relationships between PM10 concentration and meteorological factors or bare land area were analyzed at different temporal scales to explore the factors that affect river dust emissions. Study results showed that no single factor alone had adequate power to explain daily average or daily maximum PM10 concentration. Stepwise regression analysis of multiple factors showed that the model could not effectively predict daily average PM10 concentration, but daily maximum PM10 concentration could be predicted by a combination of wind velocity, temperature, and bare land area; the coefficient of determination for this model was 0.67. It was inferred that river dust episodes are caused by the combined effect of multiple factors. In addition, research data also showed a time lag effect between meteorological factors and hourly PM10 concentration. This characteristic was applied to the construction of a prediction model, and can be used in an early warning system for local residents.

  15. Empirical Model for Evaluating PM10 Concentration Caused by River Dust Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chao-Yuan; Chiang, Mon-Ling; Lin, Cheng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Around the estuary of the Zhuo-Shui River in Taiwan, the waters recede during the winter, causing an increase in bare land area and exposing a large amount of fine earth and sand particles that were deposited on the riverbed. Observations at the site revealed that when northeastern monsoons blow over bare land without vegetation or water cover, the fine particles are readily lifted by the wind, forming river dust, which greatly endangers the health of nearby residents. Therefore, determining which factors affect river dust and constructing a model to predict river dust concentration are extremely important in the research and development of a prototype warning system for areas at risk of river dust emissions. In this study, the region around the estuary of the Zhuo-Shui River (from the Zi-Qiang Bridge to the Xi-Bin Bridge) was selected as the research area. Data from a nearby air quality monitoring station were used to screen for days with river dust episodes. The relationships between PM10 concentration and meteorological factors or bare land area were analyzed at different temporal scales to explore the factors that affect river dust emissions. Study results showed that no single factor alone had adequate power to explain daily average or daily maximum PM10 concentration. Stepwise regression analysis of multiple factors showed that the model could not effectively predict daily average PM10 concentration, but daily maximum PM10 concentration could be predicted by a combination of wind velocity, temperature, and bare land area; the coefficient of determination for this model was 0.67. It was inferred that river dust episodes are caused by the combined effect of multiple factors. In addition, research data also showed a time lag effect between meteorological factors and hourly PM10 concentration. This characteristic was applied to the construction of a prediction model, and can be used in an early warning system for local residents. PMID:27271642

  16. Temporal and spatial PM10 concentration distribution using an inverse distance weighted method in Klang Valley, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarmizi, S. N. M.; Asmat, A.; Sumari, S. M.

    2014-02-01

    PM10 is one of the air contaminants that can be harmful to human health. Meteorological factors and changes of monsoon season may affect the distribution of these particles. The objective of this study is to determine the temporal and spatial particulate matter (PM10) concentration distribution in Klang Valley, Malaysia by using the Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) method at different monsoon season and meteorological conditions. PM10 and meteorological data were obtained from the Malaysian Department of Environment (DOE). Particles distribution data were added to the geographic database on a seasonal basis. Temporal and spatial patterns of PM10 concentration distribution were determined by using ArcGIS 9.3. The higher PM10 concentrations are observed during Southwest monsoon season. The values are lower during the Northeast monsoon season. Different monsoon seasons show different meteorological conditions that effect PM10 distribution.

  17. Estimation of PM10 in the traffic-related atmosphere for three road types in Beijing and Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Jiong; Cheng, Xiang; Lun, Xiaoxiu; Sun, Dezhi; Wang, Xingzu

    2014-01-01

    The levels of roadside PM10 in Beijing, China, were investigated in 2011 and 2012 on a seasonal basis to estimate the population exposure to particulates for three road types. The measurements of PM10 were also conducted in the southern Chinese megacity of Guangzhou for comparison purposes. The results showed that roadside PM10 in Beijing correlated strongly with the PM10 background in the urban atmosphere. The levels of PM10 in street canyons were markedly higher than those along the open roads and in crossroad areas because of limited ventilation. An elevation of PM10 was observed in April, which was possibly due to the sand storms that frequently occur in the spring. Based on these observations, roadside PM10 in Beijing could have multiple origins and was to some extent dispersion-governed. In Guangzhou, the roadside PM10 did not closely relate to the background values. The PM10 pollution was greatly affected by local traffic conditions. The simulation of PM10 for different road types was completed during the study period using the Motor Vehicle Emissions Factor Model (MOBILE6.2) as an emission model and the California Line Source Dispersion Model (CALINE4) and Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM) as dispersion models. The MOBILE6.2/CALINE4 software package was demonstrated to be sufficient for the simulation of PM10 in the open roads and crossroad areas in both Beijing and Guangzhou, and the simulation results of roadside PM10 in the street canyons by the MOBILE6.2/OSPM package were in close agreement with those of the measurements.

  18. Seasonal variation and source apportionment of organic tracers in PM10 in Chengdu, China.

    PubMed

    Yin, H L; Qiu, C Y; Ye, Z X; Li, S P; Liang, J F

    2015-02-01

    Organic compound tracers including n-alkanes, triterpane, sterane, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dicarboxylic acids of airborne particulate matter (PM10) were characterized for samples collected at five sites from July 2010 to March 2011 using GC/MS. Spatial and temporal variations of these organic tracers in PM10 were studied, and their sources were then identified respectively. Average daily concentrations of PM10 varied in different seasons with the trend of PM10 in winter (0.133 mg/m(3)) > autumn (0.120 mg/m(3)) > spring (0.103 mg/m(3)) > summer (0.098 mg/m(3)). Daily concentrations of n-alkanes (C11-C36) ranged from 12.11 to 163.58 ng/m(3) with a mean of 61.99 ng/m(3). The C max and CPI index of n-alkanes indicated that vehicle emissions were the major source in winter, while the contributions of high plant wax emissions became significant in other seasons. It was discovered that the main sources of triterpenoid and steranes were gasoline and diesel engine emissions. Concentrations of ∑15PAHs in PM10 also varied (12.25-58.56 ng/m(3)) in different seasons, and chrysene, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(ghi) perylene and fluoranthene were the dominant components. In the four seasons, the concentration of ∑15PAHs was relatively higher at the northern site because of traffic congestion. The main source of airborne PAHs was traffic emissions and coal combustion. Average daily concentrations of dicarboxylic acids (C4-C10) in PM10 ranged from 12.11 to 163.58 ng/m(3), of which azeleic acid was the major compound (0.49-52.04 ng/m(3), average 14.93 ng/m(3)), followed by succinic acid (0.56-19.08 ng/m(3), average 6.84 ng/m(3)). The ratio of C6/C9 showed that the major source in winter was biological, while the contributions of emissions from anthropogenic activities were much higher in summer. PMID:25119534

  19. Geochemical and isotopic analyses of PM10 in Lower Silesia - preeliminary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolińska, Elżbieta; Ciężka, Monika

    2013-09-01

    The main aim of the study was to determine the origin of particulate air pollution in Lower Silesia. Samples of PM10 dust were collected on quartz filters Whatman QM-A by employees of Voivodship Inspectorate for Environmental Protection (VIEP) in Wroclaw in 2011. As a pilot researches in Lower Silesia were selected two monitoring points of VIEP: (i) Osieczow and (ii) Zgorzelec. Air sampling point in Osieczow is a point of regional background and it is an excellent reference base for the analyses of PM10 in Lower Silesia. The aim of monitoring in this point is to assess the exposure of ecosystems to air pollution. Sampling point in Zgorzelec reflects the urban background and the measurements will be compared, in the future, to the results of the sampling points investigated the impact of industry and local transport on air quality in the whole Lower Silesia. For further geochemical and isotopic analyses were selected 25 samples from each sampling point, average every two weeks measurement. The concentration of PM10 dust for Osieczow ranged from 7 μg•m-3 (11.10.2011r.) to 89 μg•m-3 (4.03.2011r.) with an average of 24 μg•m-3 and for Zgorzelec between 10 μg•m-3 (11.10.2011r.) and 85 μg•m-3 (9.11.2011r.) with an average of 26 μg•m-3. The mean percentage contribution of carbon in PM10 samples from Osieczow was 47%, while in Zgorzelec 42%. The obtained values of δ03C (PM10) in Osieczow varied from -31.1‰ (5.02.2011r.) to -25.5‰ (26.10.2011r.) with an average of -27.6‰, whereas in Zgorzelec between -28.6‰ (15.07.2011r.) and -25.2‰ (6.01.2011r.) with an average of -26.8‰. At the current stage of research is clearly discernible the different carbon isotope record in the material dust (qualitative information), despite the identical range of concentrations of PM10 in both analysed points (quantitative information). This confirms the appropriateness of the choice both research method and monitoring points.

  20. A comparative study for results obtained using biomonitors and PM10 collectors in Sado Estuary.

    PubMed

    Costa, C J; Marques, A P; Freitas, M C; Reis, M A; Oliveira, O R

    2002-01-01

    In 1996 a program was started, financed by the Environmental Ministry of Portugal and IAEA, aiming to study the inorganic atmospheric pollutant dispersion in Sado Estuary. Gent PM10 air samplers were used for air particulate matter sampling. Three sampling sites were chosen, forming a triangle around the fuel power station of Setúbal. Transplants of Parmelia sulcata Taylor were suspended in nylon bags within a rectangle 15 km wide and 25 km long on a 2.5 x 2.5 km grid. Two sets of four transplants were hung in each of the 47 locations, one set facing the wind and the other set opposing the wind. The transplants were suspended in December 1997 for a 1-year period; every 3 months, one transplant of each set was collected. Both lichen transplants and PM10 filters were analysed by INAA and PIXE. A comparative study of results obtained for the two sampling procedures is presented in this work.

  1. Spatio-temporal modeling of chronic PM10 exposure for the Nurses' Health Study.

    PubMed

    Yanosky, Jeff D; Paciorek, Christopher J; Schwartz, Joel; Laden, Francine; Puett, Robin; Suh, Helen H

    2008-06-01

    Chronic epidemiological studies of airborne particulate matter (PM) have typically characterized the chronic PM exposures of their study populations using city- or countywide ambient concentrations, which limit the studies to areas where nearby monitoring data are available and which ignore within-city spatial gradients in ambient PM concentrations. To provide more spatially refined and precise chronic exposure measures, we used a Geographic Information System (GIS)-based spatial smoothing model to predict monthly outdoor PM(10) concentrations in the northeastern and midwestern United States. This model included monthly smooth spatial terms and smooth regression terms of GIS-derived and meteorological predictors. Using cross-validation and other pre-specified selection criteria, terms for distance to road by road class, urban land use, block group and county population density, point- and area-source PM(10) emissions, elevation, wind speed, and precipitation were found to be important determinants of PM(10) concentrations and were included in the final model. Final model performance was strong (cross-validation R(2)=0.62), with little bias (-0.4 mug m(-3)) and high precision (6.4 mug m(-3)). The final model (with monthly spatial terms) performed better than a model with seasonal spatial terms (cross-validation R(2)=0.54). The addition of GIS-derived and meteorological predictors improved predictive performance over spatial smoothing (cross-validation R(2)=0.51) or inverse distance weighted interpolation (cross-validation R(2)=0.29) methods alone and increased the spatial resolution of predictions. The model performed well in both rural and urban areas, across seasons, and across the entire time period. The strong model performance demonstrates its suitability as a means to estimate individual-specific chronic PM(10) exposures for large populations. PMID:19584946

  2. Arsenic speciation of atmospheric particulate matter (PM10) in an industrialised urban site in southwestern Spain.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rodas, Daniel; Sánchez de la Campa, Ana Ma; de la Rosa, Jesús D; Oliveira, Vanesa; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés

    2007-01-01

    An arsenic speciation study has been performed in PM10 samples collected on a fortnight basis in the city of Huelva (SW Spain) during 2001 and 2002. The arsenic species were extracted from the PM10 filters using a NH2OH x HCl solution and sonication, and determined by HPLC-HG-AFS. The mean bulk As concentration of the samples analyzed during 2001 and 2002 slightly exceed the mean annual 6 ng m(-3) target value proposed by the European Commission for 2013, arsenate [As(V)] being responsible for the high level of arsenic. The speciation analyses showed that As(V) was the main arsenic species found, followed by arsenite [As(III)] (mean 6.5 and 7.8 ng m(-3) for As(V), mean 1.2 and 2.1 ng m(-3) for As(III), in 2001 and 2002, respectively). The high levels of arsenic species found in PM10 in Huelva have a predominant industrial origin, such as the one from a nearby copper smelter, and do not present a seasonal pattern. The highest daily levels of arsenic species correspond to synoptic conditions in which the winds with S and SW components transport the contaminants from the main emission source. The frequent African dust outbreaks over Huelva may result in an increment of mass levels of PM10, but do not represent a significant input of arsenic in comparison to the anthropogenic source. The rural background levels of arsenic around Huelva are rather high, in comparison to other rural or urban areas in Spain, showing a relatively high atmosphere residence time of arsenic. This work shows the importance of arsenic speciation in studies of aerosol chemistry, due to the presence of arsenic species [As(III) and As(V)] with distinct toxicity. PMID:17097128

  3. Satellite-derived determination of PM10 concentration and of the associated risk on public health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarigiannis, Dimosthenis; Sifakis, Nicolaos I.; Soulakellis, Nikos; Tombrou, Maria; Schaefer, Klaus P.

    2004-02-01

    Recent studies worldwide have revealed the relation between urban air pollution, particularly fine aerosols, and human health. The current state of the art in air quality assessment, monitoring and management comprises analytical measurements and atmospheric transport modeling. Earth observation from satellites provides an additional information layer through the calculation of synoptic air pollution indicators, such as atmospheric turbidity. Fusion of these data sources with ancillary data, including classification of population vulnerability to the adverse health effects of fine particulate and, especially, PM10 pollution, in the ambient air, integrates them into an optimally managed environmental information processing tool. Several algorithms pertaining to urban air pollution assessment using HSR satellite imagery have been developed and applied to urban sites in Europe such as Athens, Greece, the Po valley in Northern Italy, and Munich, Germany. Implementing these computational procedures on moderate spatial resolution (MSR) satellite data and coupling the result with the output of HSR data processing provides comprehensive and dynamic information on the spatial distribution of PM10 concentration. The result of EO data processing is corrected to account for the relative importance of the signal due to anthropogenic fine particles, concentrated in the lower troposphere. Fusing the corrected maps of PM10 concentration with data on vulnerable population distribution and implementation of epidemiology-derived exposure-response relationships results in the calculation of indices of the public health risk from PM10 concentration in the ambient air. Results from the pilot application of this technique for integrated environmental and health assessment in the urban environment are given.

  4. Influence of tobacco smoke on indoor PM 10 particulate matter characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, L.; De Berardis, B.; Arrizza, L.; Granato, V.

    In this study we evaluate the influence of tobacco smoke on the physico-chemical characteristics of PM 10 in different environments: outdoors, a smoking room, the same room after a 7-day absence of smokers and in a smoke-free office. The latter office was close to the smoking room, separated by a corridor. The coarse (PM 10-2.1) and fine (PM 2.1) fractions of PM 10 collected in the monitored areas were analysed by scanning electron microscopy, equipped with a thin-window system for X-ray microanalysis (SEM/EDX). Photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to study the elemental composition of the particulate and to identify the chemical state of atomic species detected. Four clusters of particles for both "fine" and "coarse" fractions were identified: carbonaceous particles, soil erosion particles, Ca-sulphates and metal compound particles. EDX spectra showed that a percentage of carbonaceous particles carried S, Si and metal traces. High-resolution XPS spectra of the C1s region showed a significant greater occurrence of the C-O/C-N functional group in the particulate fine fraction collected in the smoking room compared to that collected outdoors. The carbonaceous component of coarse fraction collected in the smoking room appeared dissimilar from the same component detected in the other areas. After the 7-day absence of smokers this component of the PM 10-2.1 fraction was similar to the corresponding coarse fraction collected at the outdoor location. The carbonaceous component of fine fraction collected in the smoking room, containing tobacco smoke products, such as organic carbon and nicotine, was traceable in the neighbouring areas, even several days after suspension of smoking activity.

  5. PM(10) emission forecasting using artificial neural networks and genetic algorithm input variable optimization.

    PubMed

    Antanasijević, Davor Z; Pocajt, Viktor V; Povrenović, Dragan S; Ristić, Mirjana Đ; Perić-Grujić, Aleksandra A

    2013-01-15

    This paper describes the development of an artificial neural network (ANN) model for the forecasting of annual PM(10) emissions at the national level, using widely available sustainability and economical/industrial parameters as inputs. The inputs for the model were selected and optimized using a genetic algorithm and the ANN was trained using the following variables: gross domestic product, gross inland energy consumption, incineration of wood, motorization rate, production of paper and paperboard, sawn wood production, production of refined copper, production of aluminum, production of pig iron and production of crude steel. The wide availability of the input parameters used in this model can overcome a lack of data and basic environmental indicators in many countries, which can prevent or seriously impede PM emission forecasting. The model was trained and validated with the data for 26 EU countries for the period from 1999 to 2006. PM(10) emission data, collected through the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution - CLRTAP and the EMEP Programme or as emission estimations by the Regional Air Pollution Information and Simulation (RAINS) model, were obtained from Eurostat. The ANN model has shown very good performance and demonstrated that the forecast of PM(10) emission up to two years can be made successfully and accurately. The mean absolute error for two-year PM(10) emission prediction was only 10%, which is more than three times better than the predictions obtained from the conventional multi-linear regression and principal component regression models that were trained and tested using the same datasets and input variables.

  6. Spatio-temporal variation in chemical characteristics of PM10 over Indo Gangetic Plain of India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S K; Mandal, T K; Srivastava, M K; Chatterjee, A; Jain, Srishti; Saxena, M; Singh, B P; Saraswati; Sharma, A; Adak, A; K Ghosh, S

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents the spatio-temporal variation of chemical compositions (organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and water-soluble inorganic ionic components (WSIC)) of particulate matter (PM10) over three locations (Delhi, Varanasi, and Kolkata) of Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP) of India for the year 2011. The observational sites are chosen to represent the characteristics of upper (Delhi), middle (Varanasi), and lower (Kolkata) IGP regions as converse to earlier single-station observation. Average mass concentration of PM10 was observed higher in the middle IGP (Varanasi 206.2 ± 77.4 μg m(-3)) as compared to upper IGP (Delhi 202.3 ± 74.3 μg m(-3)) and lower IGP (Kolkata 171.5 ± 38.5 μg m(-3)). Large variation in OC values from 23.57 μg m(-3) (Delhi) to 12.74 μg m(-3) (Kolkata) indicating role of formation of secondary aerosols, whereas EC have not shown much variation with maximum concentration over Delhi (10.07 μg m(-3)) and minimum over Varanasi (7.72 μg m(-3)). As expected, a strong seasonal variation was observed in the mass concentration of PM10 as well as in its chemical composition over the three locations. Principal component analysis (PCA) identifies the contribution of secondary aerosol, biomass burning, fossil fuel combustion, vehicular emission, and sea salt to PM10 mass concentration at the observational sites of IGP, India. Backward trajectory analysis indicated the influence of continental type aerosols being transported from the Bay of Bengal, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Rajasthan, Gujarat, and surrounding areas to IGP region. PMID:27316652

  7. Intraurban variability of PM10 and PM2.5 in an Eastern Mediterranean city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoud, Rawad; Shihadeh, Alan. L.; Roumié, Mohamed; Youness, Myriam; Gerard, Jocelyne; Saliba, Nada; Zaarour, Rita; Abboud, Maher; Farah, Wehbeh; Saliba, Najat Aoun

    2011-09-01

    The results of the first large scale chemical characterization of PM10 and PM2.5 at three different sites in the urban city of Beirut, Lebanon, are presented. Between May 2009 and April 2010 a total of 304 PM10 and PM2.5 samples were collected by sampling every sixth day at three different sites in Beirut. Observed mass concentrations varied between 19.7 and 521.2 μg m - 3 for PM10 and between 8.4 and 72.2 μg m - 3 for PM2.5, respectively. Inorganic concentrations accounted for 29.7-35.6 μg m - 3 and 46.0-53.5 μg m - 3 of the total mass of PM10 and PM2.5, respectively. Intra-city temporal and spatial variations were assessed based on the study of three factors: correlation coefficients (R) for PM and chemical components, coefficient of divergence (CODs), and source apportionment using positive matrix factorization (PMF). Based on R and COD of PM concentrations, the three sites appear homogeneous. However, when individual elements were compared, heterogeneity among sites was found. This latter was attributed to the variability in the percent contribution of biogenic and local anthropogenic source factors such as traffic related sources and dust resuspension. Other factors included the proximity to the Mediterranean sea, the population density and the topographical structure of the city. Hence, despite its small size (20.8 km 2), one PM monitoring site does not reflect an accurate PM level in Beirut.

  8. Chemical characterization of extractable water soluble matter associated with PM10 from Mexico City during 2000.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Castillo, M E; Olivos-Ortiz, M; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, A; Cebrián, M E

    2005-11-01

    We report the chemical composition of PM10-associated water-soluble species in Mexico City during the second semester of 2000. PM10 samples were collected at four ambient air quality monitoring sites in Mexico City. We determined soluble ions (chloride, nitrate, sulfate, ammonium, sodium, potassium), ionizable transition metals (Zn, Fe, Ti, Pb, Mn, V, Ni, Cr, Cu) and soluble protein. The higher PM(10) levels were observed in Xalostoc (45-174 microg m(-3)) and the lowest in Pedregal (19-54 microg m(-3)). The highest SO2 average concentrations were observed in Tlalnepantla, NO2 in Merced and O3 and NO(x) in Pedregal. The concentration range of soluble sulfate was 6.7-7.9 and 19-25.5 microg m(-3) for ammonium, and 14.8-29.19 for soluble V and 3.2-7.7 ng m(-3) for Ni, suggesting a higher contribution of combustion sources. PM-associated soluble protein levels varied between 0.038 and 0.169 mg m(-3), representing a readily inhalable constituent that could contribute to adverse outcomes. The higher levels for most parameters studied were observed during the cold dry season, particularly in December. A richer content of soluble metals was observed when they were expressed by mass/mass units rather than by air volume units. Significant correlations between Ni-V, Ni-SO4(-2), V-SO4(-2), V-SO2, Ni-SO2 suggest the same type of emission source. The variable soluble metal and ion concentrations were strongly influenced by the seasonal meteoclimatic conditions and the differential contribution of emission sources. Our data support the idea that PM10 mass concentration by itself does not provide a clear understanding of a local PM air pollution problem.

  9. Chemical composition and mass closure of ambient PM10 at urban sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzi, Eleni; Argyropoulos, George; Bougatioti, Aikaterini; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Nikolaou, Kostas; Samara, Constantini

    2010-06-01

    The chemical composition of PM10 was studied during summer and winter sampling campaigns conducted at two different urban sites in the city of Thessaloniki, Greece (urban-traffic, UT and urban-industrial, UI). PM10 samples were chemically analysed for minerals (Si, Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, Ti, K), trace elements (Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, V, Zn, Te, Co, Ni, Se, Sr, As, and Sb), water-soluble ions (Cl -, NO 3-, SO 42-, Na +, K +, NH 4+, Ca 2+, Mg 2+) and carbonaceous compounds (OC, EC). Spatial variations of atmospheric concentrations showed significantly higher levels of minerals, some trace metals and TC at the UI site, while at the UT site significantly higher levels of elements like Cd, Ba, Sn, Sb and Te were observed. Crustal elements, excepting Ca at the UI site, did not exhibit significant seasonal variations at any site pointing to constant emissions throughout the year. In order to reconstruct the particle mass, the determined components were classified into six classes as follows: mineral matter (MIN), trace elements (TE), organic matter (OM), elemental carbon (EC), sea salt (SS) and secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA). Good correlations with slopes close to 1 were found between chemically determined and gravimetrically measured PM10 masses for both sites. According to the chemical mass closure obtained, the major components of PM10 at both sites were MIN (soil-derived compounds), followed by OM and SIA. The fraction unaccounted for by chemical analysis comprised on average 8% during winter and 15% during summer at the urban-industrial site, while at the urban-traffic site the percentages were 21.5% in winter and 4.8% in summer.

  10. Transcriptional modulation of a human monocytic cell line exposed to PM(10) from an urban area.

    PubMed

    Bastonini, Emanuela; Verdone, Loredana; Morrone, Stefania; Santoni, Angela; Settimo, Gaetano; Marsili, Giovanni; La Fortezza, Marco; Di Mauro, Ernesto; Caserta, Micaela

    2011-08-01

    Insight into the mechanisms by which ambient air particulate matter mediates adverse health effects is needed to provide biological plausibility to epidemiological studies demonstrating an association between PM(10) exposure and increased morbidity and mortality. In vitro studies of the effects of air pollution on human cells help to establish conditions for the analysis of cause-effect relationships. One of the major challenges is to test native atmosphere in its complexity, rather than the various components individually. We have developed an in vitro system in which human monocyte-macrophage U937 cells are directly exposed to filters containing different amounts of PM(10) collected in the city of Rome. Transcriptional profiling obtained after short exposure (1h) of cells to a filter containing 1666μg PM(10) (77.6μg/cm(2)) using a macroarray panel of 1176 genes reveals a significant change in the mRNA level (>2 fold) for 87 genes relative to cells exposed to a control filter. Overall, 9 out of 87 modulated genes were annotated as "lung cancer". qRT-PCR confirmed the induction of relevant genes involved in DNA repair and apoptosis, specifically: ERCC1, TDG, DAD1 and MCL1. In cells exposed for 10min, 1h and 3h to different amounts of PM(10), transcription of TNFα and TRAP1, which code for a key pro-inflammatory cytokine and a mitochondrial protein involved in cell protection from oxidative stress, respectively, was shown to be modulated in a time-dependent, but not a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these data indicate that it is possible to analyze the effects of untreated particulate matter on human cells by the direct-exposure approach we have developed, possibly providing new clues to traffic-related health hazard.

  11. Organic characterisation of PM10 in Cape Verde under Saharan dust influxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, C.; Alves, C.; Nunes, T.; Rocha, S.; Cardoso, J.; Cerqueira, M.; Pio, C.; Almeida, S. M.; Hillamo, R.; Teinilä, K.

    2014-06-01

    The current study presents, for the first time, a long-term organic speciation of aerosol at the Cape Verde archipelago. The Cape Verde location, in the Atlantic Ocean, provides a unique laboratory to study background aerosol, long-range transport, aerosol mixing with mineral dust, biomass burning and sea surface components. In order to contribute to a better understanding of this environment, a one-year long measurement campaign was performed in Praia City, Santiago Island. PM10 concentrations (20.5-370 μg/m3) and the organic composition of PM10 were influenced by the African dust influxes. The carbonaceous content of PM10 was very low, suggesting that most of the mass has mineral origin. The PM10 composition was essentially characterised by a large variety of organic compounds, which can be grouped into general compound classes, such as n-alkanes, n-alkanols, n-acids and sugars. The n-alkane total concentrations varied from 3.77 to 53.2 ng/m3. The n-alkanols distribution showed a significant biogenic contribution whether from microbial origin or from epicuticular plants during African dust outbreaks. The total concentrations of n-alkanoic acids varied from 0.011 to 4.51 ng/m3. The lower n-alkenoic acids content, obtained during the periods of long-range transport from Africa, indicated a more aged aerosol. The monosaccharide anhydrides were detected in all samples with a range of concentrations from 2.06 to 12.7 ng/m3.

  12. MULTI-SITE EVALUATIONS OF CANDIDATE METHODOLOGIES FOR DETERMINING COARSE PARTICULATE (PM 10-2.5) CONCENTRATIONS: AUGUST 2005 UPDATED REPORT REGARDING SECOND-GENERATION AND NEW PM 10-2.5 SAMPLERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-site field studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of sampling methods for measuring the coarse fraction of PM10 (PM10 2.5) in ambient air. The field studies involved the use of both time-integrated filter-based and direct continuous methods. Despite operationa...

  13. Inverse Modeling to Improve Emission Inventory for PM10 Forecasting in East Asia Region Focusing on Korea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Y. S.; Choi, D.; Kwon, H. Y.; Han, J.

    2014-12-01

    The aerosol transports from China and Mongolia along the Northwestern wind have large influence on the air quality in Korea and the assessment of the emission in the East Asia region is an important factor in air quality forecasting in Korea. In order to obtain working PM10 emission inventory for the PM10 forecast modeling over East Asia, the Bayesian approach with CAMx (Comprehensive Air-quality Model with extension) forward model was applied. The surface observations of PM10 from EANET (Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia), API (Air Pollution Index) sites over China and AAQMS (Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Stations) in Korea were used for the inverse modelling. The predicted PM10 concentrations with a priori emission were compared with observations at monitoring sites in China and Korea. The comparison showed that PM10 concentrations with a priori emissions were generally under-predicted. The result also indicated that anthropogenic PM10 emissions in the industrialized and urbanized areas in China were under-estimated in particular. Optimized a posteriori PM10 emissions over East Asia from inverse modelling analysis ware proposed. A posteriori PM10 emissions were much lower than the a priori emission where the soil dust emissions were prevailing. This implied that the dust emission module still had large uncertainty and it was necessary to further research on the improvement of in-line emission modelling for the soil dust. In contrast, a posteriori anthropogenic emissions from industrialized areas such as Beijing and Shenyang sites were slightly higher than a priori emission at regions. Especially, a posteriori PM10 emissions increased in Korea and in Northeast region of China. The predictions of PM10 with proposed a posteriori emission showed better agreement with the observations, implying that the inverse modelling minimized the discrepancies in the model estimation by improving PM10 emissions in East Asia. Further details of inverse modeling

  14. Developing a methodology to predict PM10 concentrations in urban areas using generalized linear models.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J M; Teodoro, F; Cerdeira, R; Coelho, L M R; Kumar, Prashant; Carvalho, M G

    2016-09-01

    A methodology to predict PM10 concentrations in urban outdoor environments is developed based on the generalized linear models (GLMs). The methodology is based on the relationship developed between atmospheric concentrations of air pollutants (i.e. CO, NO2, NOx, VOCs, SO2) and meteorological variables (i.e. ambient temperature, relative humidity (RH) and wind speed) for a city (Barreiro) of Portugal. The model uses air pollution and meteorological data from the Portuguese monitoring air quality station networks. The developed GLM considers PM10 concentrations as a dependent variable, and both the gaseous pollutants and meteorological variables as explanatory independent variables. A logarithmic link function was considered with a Poisson probability distribution. Particular attention was given to cases with air temperatures both below and above 25°C. The best performance for modelled results against the measured data was achieved for the model with values of air temperature above 25°C compared with the model considering all ranges of air temperatures and with the model considering only temperature below 25°C. The model was also tested with similar data from another Portuguese city, Oporto, and results found to behave similarly. It is concluded that this model and the methodology could be adopted for other cities to predict PM10 concentrations when these data are not available by measurements from air quality monitoring stations or other acquisition means. PMID:26839052

  15. Source apportionment of PM10 in the Western Mediterranean based on observations from a cruise ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schembari, C.; Bove, M. C.; Cuccia, E.; Cavalli, F.; Hjorth, J.; Massabò, D.; Nava, S.; Udisti, R.; Prati, P.

    2014-12-01

    Two intensive PM10 sampling campaigns were performed in the summers of 2009 and 2010 on the ship Costa Pacifica during cruises in the Western Mediterranean. Samples, mainly collected on an hourly basis, were analysed with different techniques (Particle Induced X-Ray Emission, PIXE; Energy Dispersive - X Ray Fluorescence, ED-XRF; Ion Chromatography, IC; Thermo-optical analysis) to retrieve the PM10 composition and its time pattern. The data were used for obtaining information about the sources of aerosol, with a focus on ship emissions, through apportionment using chemical marker compounds, correlation analysis and Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor modelling. For the campaign in 2010, 66% of the aerosol sulphate was found to be anthropogenic, only minor contributions of dust and sea salt sulphate were observed while the biogenic contribution, estimated based on the measurements of MSA, was found to be more important (26%), but influenced by large uncertainties. V and Ni were found to be suitable tracers of ship emissions during the campaigns. Four sources of aerosol were resolved by the PMF analysis; the source having the largest impact on PM10, BC and sulphate was identified as a mixed source, comprising emissions from ships. The correlations between sulphate and V and Ni showed the influence of ship emissions on sulphate in marine air masses. For the leg Palma-Tunis crossing a main ship route, the correlations between aerosol sulphate and V and Ni were particularly strong (r2 = 0.9 for both elements).

  16. Urban enhancement of PM10 bioaerosol tracers relative to background locations in the Midwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathnayake, Chathurika M.; Metwali, Nervana; Baker, Zach; Jayarathne, Thilina; Kostle, Pamela A.; Thorne, Peter S.; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T.; Stone, Elizabeth A.

    2016-05-01

    Bioaerosols are well-known immune-active particles that exacerbate respiratory diseases. Human exposures to bioaerosols and their resultant health impacts depend on their ambient concentrations, seasonal and spatial variation, and copollutants, which are not yet widely characterized. In this study, chemical and biological tracers of bioaerosols were quantified in respirable particulate matter (PM10) collected at three urban and three background sites in the Midwestern United States across four seasons in 2012. Endotoxins from Gram-negative bacteria (and a few Gram-positive bacteria), water-soluble proteins, and tracers for fungal spores (fungal glucans, arabitol, and mannitol) were ubiquitous and showed significant seasonal variation and dependence on temperature. Fungal spores were elevated in spring and peaked in summer, following the seasonal growing cycle, while endotoxins peaked in autumn during the row crop harvesting season. Paired comparisons of bioaerosols in urban and background sites revealed significant urban enhancements in PM10, fungal glucans, endotoxins, and water-soluble proteins relative to background locations, such that urban populations have a greater outdoor exposure to bioaerosols. These bioaerosols contribute, in part, to the urban excesses in PM10. Higher bioaerosol mass fractions in urban areas relative to background sites indicate that urban areas serve as a source of bioaerosols. Similar urban enhancements in water-soluble calcium and its correlation with bioaerosol tracers point toward windblown soil as an important source of bioaerosols in urban areas.

  17. A preliminary assessment of PM10 and TSP concentrations in Tuticorin, India

    PubMed Central

    Muthusubramanian, P.

    2009-01-01

    The respirable particulate matter (RPM; PM10) and total suspended particulate matter (TSP) concentrations in ambient air in Tuticorin, India, were preliminarily estimated. Statistical analyses on so-generated database were performed to infer frequency distributions and to identify dominant meteorological factor affecting the pollution levels. Both the RPM and TSP levels were well below the permissible limits set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. As expected, lognormal distribution always fit the data during the study period. However, fit with the normal was also acceptable except for very few seasons. The RPM concentrations ranged between 20.9 and 198.2 μg/m3, while the TSP concentrations varied from 51.5 to 333.3 μg/m3 during the study period. There was a better correlation between PM10–100 and TSP concentrations than that of PM10 (RPM) and TSP concentrations, but the correlation of RPM fraction was also acceptable. It was found that wind speed was the most important meteorological factor affecting the concentrations of the pollutants of present interest. Significant seasonal variations in the pollutant concentrations of present interest were found at 5% significance level except for TSP concentrations in the year 2006. PMID:20495598

  18. Developing a methodology to predict PM10 concentrations in urban areas using generalized linear models.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J M; Teodoro, F; Cerdeira, R; Coelho, L M R; Kumar, Prashant; Carvalho, M G

    2016-09-01

    A methodology to predict PM10 concentrations in urban outdoor environments is developed based on the generalized linear models (GLMs). The methodology is based on the relationship developed between atmospheric concentrations of air pollutants (i.e. CO, NO2, NOx, VOCs, SO2) and meteorological variables (i.e. ambient temperature, relative humidity (RH) and wind speed) for a city (Barreiro) of Portugal. The model uses air pollution and meteorological data from the Portuguese monitoring air quality station networks. The developed GLM considers PM10 concentrations as a dependent variable, and both the gaseous pollutants and meteorological variables as explanatory independent variables. A logarithmic link function was considered with a Poisson probability distribution. Particular attention was given to cases with air temperatures both below and above 25°C. The best performance for modelled results against the measured data was achieved for the model with values of air temperature above 25°C compared with the model considering all ranges of air temperatures and with the model considering only temperature below 25°C. The model was also tested with similar data from another Portuguese city, Oporto, and results found to behave similarly. It is concluded that this model and the methodology could be adopted for other cities to predict PM10 concentrations when these data are not available by measurements from air quality monitoring stations or other acquisition means.

  19. [Compositions of organic acids in PM10 emission sources in Xiamen urban atmosphere].

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing-Yu; Huang, Xing-Xing; Zheng, An; Liu, Bi-Lian; Wu, Shui-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The possible organic acid emission sources in PM10 in Xiamen urban atmosphere such as cooking, biomass burning, vehicle exhaust and soil/dust were obtained using a re-suspension test chamber. A total of 15 organic acids including dicarboxylic acids, fatty acids and aromatic acids were determined using GC/MS after derivatization with BF3/n-butanol. The results showed that the highest total concentration of 15 organic acids (53%) was found in cooking emission and the average concentration of the sum of linoleic acid and oleic acid was 24% +/- 14%. However, oxalic acid was the most abundant species followed by phthalic acid in gasoline vehicle exhaust. The ratios of adipic to azelaic acid in gasoline combustion emissions were significantly higher than those in other emission sources, which can be used to qualitatively differentiate anthropogenic and biological source of dicarboxylic acids in atmospheric samples. The ratios of malonic to succinic acid in source emissions (except gasoline generator emissions) were lower (0.07-0.44) than ambient PM10 samples (0.61-3.93), which can be used to qualitatively differentiate the primary source and the secondary source of dicarboxylic acids in urban PM10.

  20. Modeling the spatio-temporal heterogeneity in the PM10-PM2.5 relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hone-Jay; Huang, Bo; Lin, Chuan-Yao

    2015-02-01

    This paper explores the spatio-temporal patterns of particulate matter (PM) in Taiwan based on a series of methods. Using fuzzy c-means clustering first, the spatial heterogeneity (six clusters) in the PM data collected between 2005 and 2009 in Taiwan are identified and the industrial and urban areas of Taiwan (southwestern, west central, northwestern, and northern Taiwan) are found to have high PM concentrations. The PM10-PM2.5 relationship is then modeled with global ordinary least squares regression, geographically weighted regression (GWR), and geographically and temporally weighted regression (GTWR). The GTWR and GWR produce consistent results; however, GTWR provides more detailed information of spatio-temporal variations of the PM10-PM2.5 relationship. The results also show that GTWR provides a relatively high goodness of fit and sufficient space-time explanatory power. In particular, the PM2.5 or PM10 varies with time and space, depending on weather conditions and the spatial distribution of land use and emission patterns in local areas. Such information can be used to determine patterns of spatio-temporal heterogeneity in PM that will allow the control of pollutants and the reduction of public exposure.

  1. Persistent inversion dynamics and wintertime PM10 air pollution in Alpine valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Largeron, Yann; Staquet, Chantal

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigates persistent inversions dynamics during a whole winter in Alpine valleys of the area of Grenoble (French Alps), and their relationship to PM10 air pollution episodes and synoptic scale meteorology. For this purpose, hourly time series from November to March of PM10 concentration measurements at the bottom of the valleys and of ground-based temperature data at different altitudes are used. A methodology is developed to quantify a simple estimate of the inversion strength from temperature profiles deduced from the ground-based observations. This estimate is shown to be equivalent to the boundary layer heat deficit. A criterion based on this estimate is proposed to identify persistent (more than 3 days) inversions. Persistent inversions are found to occur from November to February and span 35% of the time. It is shown that they are closely related to PM10 pollution episodes, the PM10 concentration increasing with the boundary layer stability as the inversion develops. Polluted episodes are primarily driven by persistent inversions and consequently, pollution is of fully local origin from November to February. In March local dynamics become less important and long-range transport can dominate. Persistent inversions occur systematically during a high-pressure regime, which first triggers a synoptic scale elevated inversion due to the advection of warm air masses in the mid-troposphere. In valleys, the sheltered boundary layer becomes decoupled from the free troposphere, which allows a ground-based inversion to intensify in the following days. An inversion layer of quasi-constant temperature gradient, greater than 5 K km-1, then forms up to an altitude of about 1600 m, close to the average elevation of the summits. If the episode is sufficiently long, a stagnation stage is reached during which daytime insolation produces a shallow convective surface layer which does not destroy the persistent inversion. The inversion break-up occurs rapidly

  2. Indoor, outdoor, and regional summer and winter concentrations of PM10, PM2.5, SO4(2)-, H+, NH4+, NO3-, NH3, and nitrous acid in homes with and without kerosene space heaters.

    PubMed Central

    Leaderer, B P; Naeher, L; Jankun, T; Balenger, K; Holford, T R; Toth, C; Sullivan, J; Wolfson, J M; Koutrakis, P

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-four-hour samples of PM10 (mass of particles with aerodynamic diameter < or = 10 microm), PM2.5, (mass of particles with aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm), particle strong acidity (H+), sulfate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-), ammonia (NH3), nitrous acid (HONO), and sulfur dioxide were collected inside and outside of 281 homes during winter and summer periods. Measurements were also conducted during summer periods at a regional site. A total of 58 homes of nonsmokers were sampled during the summer periods and 223 homes were sampled during the winter periods. Seventy-four of the homes sampled during the winter reported the use of a kerosene heater. All homes sampled in the summer were located in southwest Virginia. All but 20 homes sampled in the winter were also located in southwest Virginia; the remainder of the homes were located in Connecticut. For homes without tobacco combustion, the regional air monitoring site (Vinton, VA) appeared to provide a reasonable estimate of concentrations of PM2.5 and SO42- during summer months outside and inside homes within the region, even when a substantial number of the homes used air conditioning. Average indoor/outdoor ratios for PM2.5 and SO42- during the summer period were 1.03 +/- 0.71 and 0.74 +/- 0.53, respectively. The indoor/outdoor mean ratio for sulfate suggests that on average approximately 75% of the fine aerosol indoors during the summer is associated with outdoor sources. Kerosene heater use during the winter months, in the absence of tobacco combustion, results in substantial increases in indoor concentrations of PM2.5, SO42-, and possibly H+, as compared to homes without kerosene heaters. During their use, we estimated that kerosene heaters added, on average, approximately 40 microg/m3 of PM2.5 and 15 microg/m3 of SO42- to background residential levels of 18 and 2 microg/m3, respectively. Results from using sulfuric acid-doped Teflon (E.I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, DE) filters in homes with

  3. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a variable-pitch 1.83-meter-(6-ft) diameter 1.20-pressure-ratio fan stage (QF-9)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, F. W.; Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Far field noise data and related aerodynamic performance are presented for a variable pitch fan stage having characteristics suitable for low noise, STOL engine application. However, no acoustic suppression material was used in the flow passages. The fan was externally driven by an electric motor. Tests were made at several forward thrust rotor blade pitch angles and one for reverse thrust. Fan speed was varied from 60 to 120 percent of takeoff (design) speed, and exhaust nozzles having areas 92 to 105 percent of design were tested. The fan noise level was at a minimum at the design rotor blade pitch angles of 64 deg for takeoff thrust and at 57 deg for approach (50 percent takeoff thrust). Perceived noise along a 152.4-m sideline reached 100.1 PNdb for the takeoff (design) configuration for a stage pressure ratio of 1.17 and thrust of 57,600 N. For reverse thrust the PNL values were 4 to 5 PNdb above the takeoff values at comparable fan speeds.

  4. 40 CFR 93.117 - Criteria and procedures: Compliance with PM10 and PM2.5 control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with PM10 and PM2.5 control measures. 93.117 Section 93.117 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Programs, and Projects Developed, Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.117 Criteria and procedures: Compliance with PM10 and PM2.5 control measures. The FHWA/FTA...

  5. 40 CFR 93.117 - Criteria and procedures: Compliance with PM10 and PM2.5 control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with PM10 and PM2.5 control measures. 93.117 Section 93.117 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Programs, and Projects Developed, Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.117 Criteria and procedures: Compliance with PM10 and PM2.5 control measures. The FHWA/FTA...

  6. Dust monitoring on the Hanford Site: An investigation into the relationship between TSP, PM-10 and PM-2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Tara L.; Fritz, Brad G.

    2004-12-01

    Samples were collected to determine TSP concentration in air on the central plateau of the Hanford Site. These were compared to PM-10 and PM-2.5 data collected over the same time period. Results provide a means to estimate TSP concentration based on PM-10 concentration.

  7. 78 FR 21547 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Oregon: Eugene-Springfield PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... pollution. On July 1, 1987, EPA promulgated a NAAQS for PM 10 (52 FR 24634). EPA established a 24-hour... 10 standard (71 FR 61144, effective December 18, 2006). B. Eugene-Springfield NAA and Planning... measured violations of the 24-hour PM 10 standard (52 FR 29383). The notice announcing the...

  8. Level, potential sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particulate matter (PM10) in Naples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vaio, Paola; Cocozziello, Beatrice; Corvino, Angela; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Frecentese, Francesco; Magli, Elisa; Onorati, Giuseppe; Saccone, Irene; Santagada, Vincenzo; Settimo, Gaetano; Severino, Beatrice; Perissutti, Elisa

    2016-03-01

    In Naples, particulate matter PM10 associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient air were determined in urban background (NA01) and urban traffic (NA02) sites. The principal objective of the study was to determine the concentration and distribution of PAHs in PM10 for identification of their possible sources (through diagnostic ratio - DR and principal component analysis - PCA) and an estimation of the human health risk (from exposure to airborne TEQ). Airborne PM10 samples were collected on quartz filters using a Low Volume Sampler (LVS) for 24 h with seasonal samples (autumn, winter, spring and summer) of about 15 days each between October 2012 and July 2013. The PM10 mass was gravimetrically determined. The PM10 levels, in all seasons, were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the urban-traffic site (NA02) than in the urban-background site (NA01). The filters were then extracted with dichloromethane using an ultrasonicator (SONICA) to perform a detailed characterization of 12 priority PAHs proposed by the USEPA, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) analysis. The concentration of Benzo[a]Pyrene, BaP (EU and National limit value: 1 ng m-3 in PM10), varied from 0.065 ng m-3 during autumn time to 0.872 ng m-3 in spring time (NA01) and from 0.120 ng m-3 during autumn time to 1.48 ng m-3 of winter time (NA02) with four overshoots. In NA02 the trend of Σ12 PAHs was comparable to NA01 but were observed higher values than NA01. In fact, the mean concentration of Σ12 PAHs, in urban-traffic site was generally 2 times greater than in urban-background site in all the campaigns. PAHs with 5 and 6 ring, many of which are suspected carcinogens or genotoxic agents, (i.e Benzo[a]Pyrene, Indeno[1,2,3-cd]Pyrene, Benzo[b]Fluoranthene, Benzo[k]Fluoranthene and Benzo[g,h,i]Perylene), had a large contribution (∼50-55%) of total PAHs concentration in PM10 in two sites and in each of the campaigns. Diagnostic ratio analysis and PCA suggested a

  9. Vertical and horizontal variability of PM10 source contributions in Barcelona during SAPUSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brines, Mariola; Dall'Osto, Manuel; Amato, Fulvio; Cruz Minguillón, María; Karanasiou, Angeliki; Alastuey, Andrés; Querol, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    During the SAPUSS campaign (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies) PM10 samples at 12-hour resolution were simultaneously collected at four monitoring sites located in the urban agglomerate of Barcelona (Spain). A total of 221 samples were collected from 20 September to 20 October 2010. The Road Site (RS) site and the Urban Background (UB) site were located at street level, whereas the Torre Mapfre (TM) and the Torre Collserola (TC) sites were located at 150 m a.s.l. by the sea side within the urban area and at 415 m a.s.l. 8 km inland, respectively. For the first time, we are able to report simultaneous PM10 aerosol measurements, allowing us to study aerosol gradients at both horizontal and vertical levels. The complete chemical composition of PM10 was determined on the 221 samples, and factor analysis (positive matrix factorisation, PMF) was applied. This resulted in eight factors which were attributed to eight main aerosol sources affecting PM10 concentrations in the studied urban environment: (1) vehicle exhaust and wear (2-9 µg m-3, 10-27 % of PM10 mass on average), (2) road dust (2-4 µg m-3, 8-12 %), (3) mineral dust (5 µg m-3, 13-26 %), (4) aged marine (3-5 µg m-3, 13-20 %), (5) heavy oil (0.4-0.6 µg m-3, 2 %), (6) industrial (1 µg m-3, 3-5 %), (7) sulfate (3-4 µg m-3, 11-17 %) and (8) nitrate (4-6 µg m-3, 17-21 %). Three aerosol sources were found to be enhanced at the ground levels (confined within the urban ground levels of the city) relative to the upper levels: (1) vehicle exhaust and wear (2.8 higher), (2) road dust (1.8 higher) and (3) local urban industries/crafts workshops (1.6 higher). Surprisingly, the other aerosol sources were relatively homogeneous at both horizontal and vertical levels. However, air mass origin and meteorological parameters also played a key role in influencing the variability of the factor concentrations. The mineral dust and aged marine factors were found to be a mixture of natural and

  10. Vertical and horizontal variability of PM10 source contributions in Barcelona during SAPUSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brines, M.; Dall'Osto, M.; Amato, F.; Minguillón, M. C.; Karanasiou, A.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.

    2015-11-01

    During the SAPUSS campaign (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies) PM10 samples at twelve hours resolution were simultaneously collected at four monitoring sites located in the urban agglomerate of Barcelona (Spain). A total of 221 samples were collected from 20 September to 20 October 2010. The Road Site (RS) site and the Urban Background (UB) site were located at street level, whereas the Torre Mapfre (TM) and the Torre Collserola (TC) sites were located at 150 m a.s.l. by the sea side within the urban area and at 415 m a.s.l. 8 km inland, respectively. For the first time, we are able to report simultaneous PM10 aerosol measurements allowing us to study aerosol gradients at both horizontal and vertical levels. The complete chemical composition of PM10 was determined on the 221 samples, and factor analysis (Positive Matrix Factorisation, PMF) was applied. This resulted in eight factors which were attributed to eight main aerosol sources affecting PM10 concentrations in the studied urban environment: (1) vehicle exhaust and wear (2-9 μg m-3, 10-27 % of PM10 mass on average), (2) road dust (2-4 μg m-3, 8-12 %), (3) mineral dust (5 μg m-3, 13-26 %), (4) aged marine (3-5 μg m-3, 13-20 %), (5) heavy oil (0.4-0.6 μg m-3, 2 %), (6) industrial (1 μg m-3, 3-5 %), (7) sulphate (3-4 μg m-3, 11-17 %) and (8) nitrate (4-6 μg m-3, 17-21 %). Three aerosol sources were found enhanced at the ground levels (confined within the urban ground levels of the city) relative to the upper levels: (1) vehicle exhaust and wear (2.8 higher), (2) road dust (1.8 higher) and (3) local urban industries/crafts workshops (1.6 higher). Surprisingly, the other aerosol sources were relatively homogeneous at both horizontal and vertical levels. However, air mass origin and meteorological parameters also played a key role in influencing the variability of the factors concentrations. The mineral dust and aged marine factors were found to be a mixture of natural and

  11. Assesment of PM10 pollution episodes in a ceramic cluster (NE Spain): proposal of a new quality index for PM10, As, Cd, Ni and Pb.

    PubMed

    Vicente, A B; Sanfeliu, T; Jordan, M M

    2012-10-15

    Environmental pollution control is one of the most important goals in pollution risk assessment today. In this sense, modern and precise tools that allow scientists to evaluate, quantify and predict air pollution are of particular interest. Monitoring atmospheric particulate matter is a challenge faced by the European Union. Specific rules on this subject are being developed (Directive 2004/107/EC, Directive 2008/50/EC) in order to reduce the potential adverse effects on human health caused by air pollution. Air pollution has two sources: natural and anthropogenic. Contributions from natural sources can be assessed but cannot be controlled, while emissions from anthropogenic sources can be controlled; monitoring to reduce this latter type of pollution should therefore be carried out. In this paper, we describe an air quality evaluation in terms of levels of atmospheric particles (PM10), as outlined by European Union legislation, carried out in an industrialised Spanish coastal area over a five-year period with the purpose of comparing these values with those of other areas in the Mediterranean Basin with different weather conditions from North of Europe. The study area is in the province of Castellón. This province is a strategic area in the frame work of European Union (EU) pollution control. Approximately 80% of European ceramic tiles and ceramic frit manufacturers are concentrated in two areas, forming the so-called "ceramics clusters"; ones in Modena (Italy) and the other in Castellón. In this kind of areas, there are a lot of air pollutants from this industry then it is difficult to fulfill de European limits of PM10 so it is necessary to control the air quality in them. The seasonal differences in the number of days in which pollutant level limits were exceeded were evaluated and the sources of contamination were identified. Air quality indexes for each pollutant have been established to determine easily and clearly the quality of air breathed. Furthermore

  12. Relationships between mild PM10 and ozone urban air levels and spontaneous abortion: clues for primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Di Ciaula, Agostino; Bilancia, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The effects of environmental pollution on spontaneous abortion (SAB) are still unclear. Records of SAB were collected from five cities (514,996 residents) and correlated with PM10, NO(2) and ozone levels. Median pollutant concentrations were below legal limits. Monthly SABs positively correlated with PM10 and ozone levels but not with NO(2) levels. The mean monthly SAB rate increase was estimated equal to 19.7 and 33.6 % per 10 μg/m(3) increase in PM10 or ozone concentration, respectively. Higher values of PM10 and SABs were evident in cities with- than in those without pollutant industries, with a number of SABs twofolds higher in the former group. In conclusion, SAB occurrence is affected by PM10 (particularly if industrial areas are present) and ozone concentrations, also at levels below the legal limits. Thus, SAB might be considered, at least in part, a preventable condition.

  13. Chemical characterization and mass closure of PM10 and PM2.5 at an urban site in Karachi - Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Imran; Kistler, Magdalena; Mukhtar, Azam; Ghauri, Badar M.; Ramirez-Santa Cruz, Carlos; Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans

    2016-03-01

    A mass balance method is applied to assess main source contributions to PM2.5 and PM10 levels in Karachi. Carbonaceous species (elemental carbon, organic carbon, carbonate carbon), soluble ions (Ca++, Mg++, Na+, K+, NH4+, Cl-, NO3-, SO4-), saccharides (levoglucosan, galactosan, mannosan, sucrose, fructose, glucose, arabitol and mannitol) were determined in atmospheric fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM10) aerosol samples collected under pre-monsoon conditions (March-April 2009) at an urban site in Karachi (Pakistan). The concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 were found to be 75 μg/m3 and 437 μg/m3 respectively. The large difference between PM10 and PM2.5 originated predominantly from mineral dust. "Calcareous dust" and "siliceous dust" were the over all dominating material in PM, with 46% contribution to PM2.5 and 78% to PM10-2.5. Combustion particles and secondary organics (EC + OM) comprised 23% of PM2.5 and 6% of PM10-2.5. EC, as well as OC ambient levels were higher (59% and 56%) in PM10-2.5 than in PM2.5. Biomass burning contributed about 3% to PM2.5, and had a share of about 13% of "EC + OM" in PM2.5. The impact of bioaerosol (fungal spores) was minor and had a share of 1 and 2% of the OC in the PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 size fractions. In case of secondary inorganic aerosols, ammonium sulphate (NH4)2SO4 contributes 4.4% to PM2.5 and no detectable quantity were found in fraction PM10-2.5. The sea salt contribution is about 2% both to PM2.5 and PM10-2.5.

  14. Assessment of PM10 enhancement by yellow sand on the air quality of Taipei, Taiwan in 2001.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuenn-Chin; Lee, Chung-Te

    2007-09-01

    The impact of long-range transport of yellow sand from Asian Continent to the Taipei Metropolitan Area (Taipei) not only deteriorates air quality but also poses health risks to all, especially the children and the elderly. As such, it is important to assess the enhancement of PM(10) during yellow sand periods. In order to estimate PM(10) enhancement, we adopted factor analysis to distinguish the yellow-sand (YS) periods from non-yellow-sand (NYS) periods based on air quality monitoring records. Eight YS events were identified using factor analysis coupling with an independent validation procedure by checking background site values, examining meteorological conditions, and modeling air mass trajectory from January 2001 to May 2001. The duration of each event varied from 11 to 132 h, which was identified from the time when the PM(10) level was high, and the CO and NOx levels were low. Subsequently, we used the artificial neural network (ANN) to simulate local PM(10) levels from related parameters including local gas pollutants and meteorological factors during the NYS periods. The PM(10) enhancement during the YS periods is then calculated by subtracting the simulated PM(10) from the observed PM(10) levels. Based on our calculations, the PM(10) enhancement in the maximum hour of each event ranged from 51 to 82%. Moreover, in the eight events identified in 2001, it was estimated that a total amount of 7,210 tons of PM(10) were transported by yellow sand to Taipei. Thus, in this study, we demonstrate that an integration of factor analysis with ANN model could provide a very useful method in identifying YS periods and in determining PM(10) enhancement caused by yellow sand. PMID:17171244

  15. Chemical characterization and mass closure of PM10 and PM2.5 at an urban site in Karachi - Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Imran; Kistler, Magdalena; Mukhtar, Azam; Ghauri, Badar M.; Ramirez-Santa Cruz, Carlos; Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans

    2016-03-01

    A mass balance method is applied to assess main source contributions to PM2.5 and PM10 levels in Karachi. Carbonaceous species (elemental carbon, organic carbon, carbonate carbon), soluble ions (Ca++, Mg++, Na+, K+, NH4+, Cl‑, NO3‑, SO4‑), saccharides (levoglucosan, galactosan, mannosan, sucrose, fructose, glucose, arabitol and mannitol) were determined in atmospheric fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM10) aerosol samples collected under pre-monsoon conditions (March-April 2009) at an urban site in Karachi (Pakistan). The concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 were found to be 75 μg/m3 and 437 μg/m3 respectively. The large difference between PM10 and PM2.5 originated predominantly from mineral dust. "Calcareous dust" and "siliceous dust" were the over all dominating material in PM, with 46% contribution to PM2.5 and 78% to PM10-2.5. Combustion particles and secondary organics (EC + OM) comprised 23% of PM2.5 and 6% of PM10-2.5. EC, as well as OC ambient levels were higher (59% and 56%) in PM10-2.5 than in PM2.5. Biomass burning contributed about 3% to PM2.5, and had a share of about 13% of "EC + OM" in PM2.5. The impact of bioaerosol (fungal spores) was minor and had a share of 1 and 2% of the OC in the PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 size fractions. In case of secondary inorganic aerosols, ammonium sulphate (NH4)2SO4 contributes 4.4% to PM2.5 and no detectable quantity were found in fraction PM10-2.5. The sea salt contribution is about 2% both to PM2.5 and PM10-2.5.

  16. The effect of refurbishing a UK steel plant on PM10 metal composition and ability to induce inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Gary R; Brown, David M; Hibbs, Leon R; Heal, Mathew R; Donaldson, Ken; Maynard, Robert L; Monaghan, Michelle; Nicholl, Andy; Stone, Vicki

    2005-01-01

    Background In the year 2000 Corus closed its steel plant operations in Redcar, NE of England temporarily for refurbishment of its blast furnace. This study investigates the impact of the closure on the chemical composition and biological activity of PM10 collected in the vicinity of the steel plant. Methods The metal content of PM10 samples collected before during and after the closure was measured by ICP-MS in order to ascertain whether there was any significant alteration in PM10 composition during the steel plant closure. Biological activity was assessed by instillation of 24 hr PM10 samples into male Wistar rats for 18 hr (n = 6). Inflammation was identified by the cellular and biochemical profile of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Metal chelation of PM10 samples was conducted using Chelex beads prior to treatment of macrophage cell line, J774, in vitro and assessment of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Results The total metal content of PM10 collected before and during the closure period were similar, but on reopening of the steel plant there was a significant 3-fold increase (p < 0.05) compared with the closure and pre-closure samples. Wind direction prior to the closure was predominantly from the north, compared to south westerly during the closure and re-opened periods. Of metals analysed, iron was most abundant in the total and acid extract, while zinc was the most prevalent metal in the water-soluble fraction. Elevated markers of inflammation included a significant increase (p < 0.01) in neutrophil cell numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage of rats instilled with PM10 collected during the reopened period, as well as significant increases in albumin (p < 0.05). Extracts of PM10 from the pre-closure and closure periods did not induce any significant alterations in inflammation or lung damage. The soluble and insoluble extractable PM10 components washed from the reopened period both induced a significant increase in neutrophil cell number (p < 0

  17. Reconciling PM10 analyses by different sampling methods for Iron King Mine tailings dust.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Félix, Omar I; Gonzales, Patricia; Sáez, Avelino Eduardo; Ela, Wendell P

    2016-03-01

    The overall project objective at the Iron King Mine Superfund site is to determine the level and potential risk associated with heavy metal exposure of the proximate population emanating from the site's tailings pile. To provide sufficient size-fractioned dust for multi-discipline research studies, a dust generator was built and is now being used to generate size-fractioned dust samples for toxicity investigations using in vitro cell culture and animal exposure experiments as well as studies on geochemical characterization and bioassay solubilization with simulated lung and gastric fluid extractants. The objective of this study is to provide a robust method for source identification by comparing the tailing sample produced by dust generator and that collected by MOUDI sampler. As and Pb concentrations of the PM10 fraction in the MOUDI sample were much lower than in tailing samples produced by the dust generator, indicating a dilution of Iron King tailing dust by dust from other sources. For source apportionment purposes, single element concentration method was used based on the assumption that the PM10 fraction comes from a background source plus the Iron King tailing source. The method's conclusion that nearly all arsenic and lead in the PM10 dust fraction originated from the tailings substantiates our previous Pb and Sr isotope study conclusion. As and Pb showed a similar mass fraction from Iron King for all sites suggesting that As and Pb have the same major emission source. Further validation of this simple source apportionment method is needed based on other elements and sites.

  18. Assessment of PM10 pollution level and required source emission reduction in Belgrade area.

    PubMed

    Todorović, Marija N; Perišić, Mirjana D; Kuzmanoski, Maja M; Stojić, Andreja M; Sostarić, Andrej I; Mijić, Zoran R; Rajšić, Slavica F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess PM10 pollution level and estimate required source emission reduction in Belgrade area, the second largest urban center in the Balkans. Daily mass concentrations and trace metal content (As, Cd, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb) of PM10 were evaluated for three air quality monitoring sites of different types: urban-traffic (Slavija), suburban (Lazarevac) and rural (Grabovac) under the industrial influence, during the period of 2012-13. Noncompliance with current Air Quality Standards (AQS) was noticeable: annual means were higher than AQS at Slavija and Lazarevac, and daily frequency threshold was exceeded at all three locations. Annual means of As at Lazarevac were about four times higher than the target concentration, which could be attributed to the proximity of coal-fired power plants, and dust resuspension from coal basin and nearby ash landfills. Additionally, levels of Ni and Cr were significantly higher than in other European cities. Carcinogenic health risk of inhabitants' exposure to trace metals was assessed as well. Cumulative cancer risk exceeded the upper limit of acceptable US EPA range at two sites, with Cr and As as the major contributors. To estimate source emission reduction, required to meet AQS, lognormal, Weibull and Pearson 5 probability distribution, functions (PDF) were used to fit daily PM10 concentrations. Based on the rollback equation and best fitting PDF, estimated reduction was within the range of 28-98%. Finally, the required reduction obtained using two-parameter exponential distribution suggested that risks associated to accidental releases of pollutants should be of greater concern.

  19. Assessment of selected metals in the ambient air PM10 in urban sites of Bangkok (Thailand).

    PubMed

    Pongpiachan, Siwatt; Iijima, Akihiro

    2016-02-01

    Estimating the atmospheric concentrations of PM10-bounded selected metals in urban air is crucial for evaluating adverse health impacts. In the current study, a combination of measurements and multivariate statistical tools was used to investigate the influence of anthropogenic activities on variations in the contents of 18 metals (i.e., Al, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Sb, Ba, La, Ce and Pb) in ambient air. The concentrations of PM10-bounded metals were measured simultaneously at eight air quality observatory sites during a half-year period at heavily trafficked roads and in urban residential zones in Bangkok, Thailand. Although the daily average concentrations of Al, V, Cr, Mn and Fe were almost equivalent to those of other urban cities around the world, the contents of the majority of the selected metals were much lower than the existing ambient air quality guidelines and standard limit values. The sequence of average values of selected metals followed the order of Al > Fe > Zn > Cu > Pb > Mn > Ba > V > Sb > Ni > As > Cr > Cd > Se > Ce > La > Co > Sc. The probability distribution function (PDF) plots showed sharp symmetrical bell-shaped curves in V and Cr, indicating that crustal emissions are the predominant sources of these two elements in PM10. The comparatively low coefficients of divergence (COD) that were found in the majority of samples highlight that site-specific effects are of minor importance. A principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that 37.74, 13.51 and 11.32 % of the total variances represent crustal emissions, vehicular exhausts and the wear and tear of brakes and tires, respectively.

  20. Assessment of selected metals in the ambient air PM10 in urban sites of Bangkok (Thailand).

    PubMed

    Pongpiachan, Siwatt; Iijima, Akihiro

    2016-02-01

    Estimating the atmospheric concentrations of PM10-bounded selected metals in urban air is crucial for evaluating adverse health impacts. In the current study, a combination of measurements and multivariate statistical tools was used to investigate the influence of anthropogenic activities on variations in the contents of 18 metals (i.e., Al, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Sb, Ba, La, Ce and Pb) in ambient air. The concentrations of PM10-bounded metals were measured simultaneously at eight air quality observatory sites during a half-year period at heavily trafficked roads and in urban residential zones in Bangkok, Thailand. Although the daily average concentrations of Al, V, Cr, Mn and Fe were almost equivalent to those of other urban cities around the world, the contents of the majority of the selected metals were much lower than the existing ambient air quality guidelines and standard limit values. The sequence of average values of selected metals followed the order of Al > Fe > Zn > Cu > Pb > Mn > Ba > V > Sb > Ni > As > Cr > Cd > Se > Ce > La > Co > Sc. The probability distribution function (PDF) plots showed sharp symmetrical bell-shaped curves in V and Cr, indicating that crustal emissions are the predominant sources of these two elements in PM10. The comparatively low coefficients of divergence (COD) that were found in the majority of samples highlight that site-specific effects are of minor importance. A principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that 37.74, 13.51 and 11.32 % of the total variances represent crustal emissions, vehicular exhausts and the wear and tear of brakes and tires, respectively. PMID:26631022

  1. Comparison of methods for the quantification of carbonate carbon in atmospheric PM10 aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, Nicole; Schmidl, Christoph; Marr, Iain L.; Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans

    Carbonate carbon (CC) represents an important fraction of atmospheric PM10 along with organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), if specific sources (e.g. street abrasion, construction sites, desert dust) contribute to its composition. However, analytical methods for an easy and unambiguous determination of CC in atmospheric aerosols collected on filter matrices are scarce. We propose here a method for the determination of CC based on a heating pretreatment of the sample to remove OC and EC, followed by a total carbon determination to measure CC. This procedure is used for the correction of EC also determined by a heating pretreatment (Cachier, H., Bremond, M.P., Buat-Ménard, P., 1989. Determination of atmospheric soot carbon with a simple thermal method. Tellus 41B, 379-390) but without previous HCl fumigation, as proposed. Comparison of the carbon remaining after the proposed thermal treatment at 460 °C for 60 min in an oxygen stream showed good correlation for the carbonate carbon derived by calculation from the ionic balance for ambient air and street dust samples. Using the "three step" combustion technique it is now possible to determine OC, EC and CC by the use of a TC analyser in the concentration range of 2-200 μg carbon per sample aliquot, with good precision (3-5% RSD for TC and 5-10% for CC) and accuracy. In ambient air samples from a sampling site in Vienna with elevated PM10 levels ("Liesing") CC values as high as 25% of TC and 27% CO 32-; for street dust samples 32% of TC and 25% CO 32- of total PM10 mass were observed.

  2. PM10 emissions and PAHs: The importance of biomass type and combustion conditions.

    PubMed

    Zosima, Angela T; Tzimou-Tsitouridou, Roxani D; Nikolaki, Spyridoula; Zikopoulos, Dimitrios; Ochsenkühn-Petropoulou, Maria Th

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the impact of biomass combustion with respect to conditions and fuel types on particle emissions (PM10) and their PAHs content. Special concern was on sampling, quantification and characterization of PM using different appliances, fuels and operating procedures. For this purpose different lab-scale burning conditions, two pellets stoves (8.5 and 10 kW) and one open fireplace were tested by using eight fuel types of biomass. An analytical method is described for the quantitative determination of 16 PAHs using liquid-liquid extraction and subsequent measurement by gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer (GC-MS). Average PM10 emissions ranged from about 65 to 170 mg/m(3) at lab-scale combustions with flow oxygen at 13% in the exhaust gas, 85-220 mg/m(3) at 20% O2, 47-83 mg/m(3) at pellet stove of 10 kW, 34-69 mg/m(3) at pellet stove of 8.5 kW and 106-194 mg/m(3) at the open fireplace. The maximum permitted particle emission limit is 150 mg/m(3). Pellets originated from olive trees and from nonmixture trees were found to emit the lowest particulate matter in relation to the others, so they are considered healthiest and suitable for domestic heating reasons. In general, the results show that biomass open burning is an important PM10 and PAHs emission source.

  3. [Particulate matter (PM10) air pollution, daily mortality, and hospital admissions: recent findings].

    PubMed

    Colucci, Maria Eugenia; Veronesi, Licia; Roveda, Anna Maria; Marangio, Emilio; Sansebastiano, Giuliano

    2006-01-01

    The first studies conducted to evaluate a possible association between air pollution and mortality date back to the serious events that occurred in the Mosa Valley, Belgium (1930), in the small city of Donora ("killer fog" incident of 1948) and in London (1952). The latter episode led to the introduction of air pollution control policies. Following the introduction of air pollution control measures in economically advanced cities in the 60s and 70s, the concentration levels of pollutants reached were believed, for many years, to be risk free. However, despite improvements in air quality achieved by many industrialized countries the negative effects of air pollution remain today an important public health problem. Among all air pollutants, particulate matter is the type of air pollution that causes the most numerous and serious effects on human health, because of the broad range of diverse toxic substances it contains,. For this reason, when assessing human health risk, PM10 may be considered to be a reliable indicator of the impact of global air pollution. Various epidemiologic studies conducted in the last 10 years, such as the Air Pollution and Health-European Approach (APHEA) project, the National Morbidity, Mortality and Air Pollution (NMMAPS) Study and Italian Meta-analysis of Studies on the short-term effects of Air pollution (MISA), have shown that current ambient concentrations of PM10 may lead to increased mortality and morbidity. Various studies have reported mean increases in mortality below 1% for 10 ?g/mc increases of ambient PM10. Studies have also underscored the role of particulate matter in aggravating cardiorespiratory diseases and consequently increasing hospital admissions. Air quality standards have been recently revised by legislation. The EU has issued a directive that sets limiting values and, where appropriate, threshold values, for the different air pollutants.

  4. PM10 composition during an intense Saharan dust transport event over Athens (Greece).

    PubMed

    Remoundaki, E; Bourliva, A; Kokkalis, P; Mamouri, R E; Papayannis, A; Grigoratos, T; Samara, C; Tsezos, M

    2011-09-15

    The influence of Saharan dust on the air quality of Southern European big cities became a priority during the last decade. The present study reports results on PM(10) monitored at an urban site at 14 m above ground level during an intense Saharan dust transport event. The elemental composition was determined by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF) for 12 elements: Si, Al, Fe, K, Ca, Mg, Ti, S, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mn. PM(10) concentrations exceeded the EU limit (50 μg/m(3)) several times during the sampling period. Simultaneous maxima have been observed for the elements of crustal origin. The concentrations of all the elements presented a common maximum, corresponding to the date where the atmosphere was heavily charged with particulate matter permanently for an interval of about 10h. Sulfur and heavy metal concentrations were also associated to local emissions. Mineral dust represented the largest fraction of PM(10) reaching 79%. Seven days back trajectories have shown that the air masses arriving over Athens, originated from Western Sahara. Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) revealed that particle agglomerates were abundant, most of them having sizes <2 μm. Aluminosilicates were predominant in dust particles also rich in calcium which was distributed between calcite, dolomite, gypsum and Ca-Si particles. These results were consistent with the origin of the dust particles and the elemental composition results. Sulfur and heavy metals were associated to very fine particles <1 μm. PMID:21724238

  5. Assessment of PM10 pollution level and required source emission reduction in Belgrade area.

    PubMed

    Todorović, Marija N; Perišić, Mirjana D; Kuzmanoski, Maja M; Stojić, Andreja M; Sostarić, Andrej I; Mijić, Zoran R; Rajšić, Slavica F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess PM10 pollution level and estimate required source emission reduction in Belgrade area, the second largest urban center in the Balkans. Daily mass concentrations and trace metal content (As, Cd, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb) of PM10 were evaluated for three air quality monitoring sites of different types: urban-traffic (Slavija), suburban (Lazarevac) and rural (Grabovac) under the industrial influence, during the period of 2012-13. Noncompliance with current Air Quality Standards (AQS) was noticeable: annual means were higher than AQS at Slavija and Lazarevac, and daily frequency threshold was exceeded at all three locations. Annual means of As at Lazarevac were about four times higher than the target concentration, which could be attributed to the proximity of coal-fired power plants, and dust resuspension from coal basin and nearby ash landfills. Additionally, levels of Ni and Cr were significantly higher than in other European cities. Carcinogenic health risk of inhabitants' exposure to trace metals was assessed as well. Cumulative cancer risk exceeded the upper limit of acceptable US EPA range at two sites, with Cr and As as the major contributors. To estimate source emission reduction, required to meet AQS, lognormal, Weibull and Pearson 5 probability distribution, functions (PDF) were used to fit daily PM10 concentrations. Based on the rollback equation and best fitting PDF, estimated reduction was within the range of 28-98%. Finally, the required reduction obtained using two-parameter exponential distribution suggested that risks associated to accidental releases of pollutants should be of greater concern. PMID:26252876

  6. Reconciling PM10 analyses by different sampling methods for Iron King Mine tailings dust.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Félix, Omar I; Gonzales, Patricia; Sáez, Avelino Eduardo; Ela, Wendell P

    2016-03-01

    The overall project objective at the Iron King Mine Superfund site is to determine the level and potential risk associated with heavy metal exposure of the proximate population emanating from the site's tailings pile. To provide sufficient size-fractioned dust for multi-discipline research studies, a dust generator was built and is now being used to generate size-fractioned dust samples for toxicity investigations using in vitro cell culture and animal exposure experiments as well as studies on geochemical characterization and bioassay solubilization with simulated lung and gastric fluid extractants. The objective of this study is to provide a robust method for source identification by comparing the tailing sample produced by dust generator and that collected by MOUDI sampler. As and Pb concentrations of the PM10 fraction in the MOUDI sample were much lower than in tailing samples produced by the dust generator, indicating a dilution of Iron King tailing dust by dust from other sources. For source apportionment purposes, single element concentration method was used based on the assumption that the PM10 fraction comes from a background source plus the Iron King tailing source. The method's conclusion that nearly all arsenic and lead in the PM10 dust fraction originated from the tailings substantiates our previous Pb and Sr isotope study conclusion. As and Pb showed a similar mass fraction from Iron King for all sites suggesting that As and Pb have the same major emission source. Further validation of this simple source apportionment method is needed based on other elements and sites. PMID:26820180

  7. A pragmatic approach to estimate the number of days in exceedance of PM10 limit value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchamp, Maxime; Malherbe, Laure; de Fouquet, Chantal

    2015-06-01

    European legislation on ambient air quality requests that Member States report the annual number of exceedances of short-term concentration regulatory thresholds for PM10 and delimit the concerned areas. Measurements at the monitoring stations do not allow to fully describe those areas. We present a methodology to estimate the number of exceedances of the daily limit value over a year, that can be extended to any similar issue. This methodology is applied to PM10 concentrations in France for which the daily limit value is 50 μg m-3, not to be exceeded more that 35 days. A probabilistic model is built using preliminary mapping of daily mean concentrations. First, daily atmospheric concentration fields are estimated at 1 km resolution by external drift kriging, combining surface monitoring observations and outputs from the CHIMERE chemistry transport model. Setting a conventional Gaussian hypothesis for the estimation error, the kriging variance is used to compute the probability of exceeding the daily limit value and to identify three areas: those where we can suppose as certain that the concentrations exceed or not the daily limit value and those where the situation is indeterminate because of the estimation uncertainty. Then, from the set of 365 daily mappings of the probability to exceed the daily limit value, the parameters of a translated Poisson distribution is fitted on the annual number of exceedances of the daily limit value at each grid cell, which enables to compute the probability for this number to exceed 35. The methodology is tested for three years (2007, 2009 and 2011) which present numerous exceedances of the daily limit concentration at some monitoring stations. A cross-validation analysis is carried out to check the efficiency of the methodology. The way to interpret probability maps is discussed. A comparison is made with simpler kriging approaches using indicator kriging of exceedances. Lastly, estimation of the population exposed to PM10

  8. PM10 modeling in the Oviedo urban area (Northern Spain) by using multivariate adaptive regression splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Paulino José García; Antón, Juan Carlos Álvarez; Vilán, José Antonio Vilán; García-Gonzalo, Esperanza

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this research work is to build a regression model of the particulate matter up to 10 micrometers in size (PM10) by using the multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) technique in the Oviedo urban area (Northern Spain) at local scale. This research work explores the use of a nonparametric regression algorithm known as multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) which has the ability to approximate the relationship between the inputs and outputs, and express the relationship mathematically. In this sense, hazardous air pollutants or toxic air contaminants refer to any substance that may cause or contribute to an increase in mortality or serious illness, or that may pose a present or potential hazard to human health. To accomplish the objective of this study, the experimental dataset of nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3) and dust (PM10) were collected over 3 years (2006-2008) and they are used to create a highly nonlinear model of the PM10 in the Oviedo urban nucleus (Northern Spain) based on the MARS technique. One main objective of this model is to obtain a preliminary estimate of the dependence between PM10 pollutant in the Oviedo urban area at local scale. A second aim is to determine the factors with the greatest bearing on air quality with a view to proposing health and lifestyle improvements. The United States National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) establishes the limit values of the main pollutants in the atmosphere in order to ensure the health of healthy people. Firstly, this MARS regression model captures the main perception of statistical learning theory in order to obtain a good prediction of the dependence among the main pollutants in the Oviedo urban area. Secondly, the main advantages of MARS are its capacity to produce simple, easy-to-interpret models, its ability to estimate the contributions of the input variables, and its computational efficiency. Finally, on the basis of

  9. Multiple-try Metropolis Hastings for modeling extreme PM10 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Nor Azrita Mohd; Adam, Mohd Bakri; Ibrahim, Noor Akma

    2014-07-01

    Awareness of catastrophic events brings the attention to work out the relationship of these events by using statistical analysis of Extreme Value Theory (EVT). This study focused on extreme PM10 data using a Gumbel distribution which is one of the Extreme Value distributions. The parameters were estimated using the new Bayesian approach in extreme called Multiple Try Metropolis-Hastings algorithms. We compared this approach with another Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach which is the classical Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and the frequentist approach, Maximum Likelihood Estimation. It appears that these three approaches provide comparable results. Data are taken for Pasir Gudang station for year 1996 to 2010.

  10. Forest fires and PM10 pollution: the March 2012 case in Northern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasilla Álvarez, Domingo; García Codron, Juan Carlos; Carracedo Martín, Virginia

    2016-04-01

    Forest fires are one of the largest sources of particulate matter, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and other pollutants at regional scale. They significantly impact on local air quality and human health, even far from their original sources. March 2012 was one of the largest fire activity late winter and early spring seasons across northern Spain and Portugal. Official statistics from the Spanish and Portuguese authorities show that, during that month, approximately 35.000 ha were burned, representing the top March season in Cantabria (N. Spain) and the northern distritos of Portugal since 1981, most of them occurring in the mountainous areas, as depicted from the FIRMS database (https://firms.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/). At the same time, an analysis of the pollution data (Airbase dataset; http://www.eea.europa.eu/) show an increase in PM10 average values and exceedences of the limit values across the same area simultaneously or immediately after the main fire activity episodes. A comprehensive analysis of this fire and pollution event was undertaken to analyze the possible contribution of forest fires and other sources of PM10 to the high levels of this pollutant at ground level. Besides statistics of fire activity, satellite "hot spots" and ground level pollution data, we have included in our analysis meteorological records (synoptic stations, upper air soundings), backtrajectories (http://ready.arl.noaa.gov/HYSPLIT.php) and dust forecast models (https://www.bsc.es/earth-sciences/mineral-dust/catalogo-datos-dust). The results show a good agreement between the spatial and temporal variability of the levels of PM10 and the direction of the pollution plumes downwind the forest fires. The activity was mostly concentrated during 3 events, the first one between February 25th to March 3rd; the second spanning from 10th to 17th, and the last one, the most severe of the three, at the end of March. The climatological background was favourable, because most of the

  11. Measurement and chemical speciation of PM10 in Mumbai City, India.

    PubMed

    Salunkhe, Abhaysinh; Gupta, Indrani; Shetye, Sugandha; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-10-01

    Mass concentrations of PM10 were high at all locations of Mumbai city in all seasons. From the enrichment analysis, it was observed that high enrichment of metals existed at all sites, the reason for which could be the effects of meteorology and trans-boundary movement of pollutants. Multivariate statistical analysis tools were used to identify common sources, viz. road dust, biomass burning, secondary aerosol, brake wear, residual oil combustion, smelting, natural soil, vehicles tyre wear, and marine aerosol. Findings indicate that most of the sites were dominated by local sources based on activities in the vicinity of the sampling locations.

  12. Feasibility of including fugitive PM-10 emissions estimates in the EPA emissions trends report

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, W.; Carlson, P.

    1990-09-01

    The report describes the results of Part 2 of a two part study. Part 2 was to evaluate the feasibility of developing regional emission trends for PM-10. Part 1 was to evaluate the feasibility of developing VOC emission trends, on a regional and temporal basis. These studies are part of the effort underway to improve the national emission trends. Part 1 is presented in a separate report. The categories evaluated for the feasibility of developing regional emissions estimates were: unpaved roads, paved roads, wind erosion, agricultural tilling, construction activities, feedlots, burning, landfills, mining and quarrying unpaved parking lots, unpaved airstrips and storage piles.

  13. Source Apportionment and Elemental Composition of PM2.5 and PM10 in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Khodeir, Mamdouh; Shamy, Magdy; Alghamdi, Mansour; Zhong, Mianhua; Sun, Hong; Costa, Max; Chen, Lung-Chi; Maciejczyk, Polina

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first comprehensive investigation of PM2.5 and PM10 composition and sources in Saudi Arabia. We conducted a multi-week multiple sites sampling campaign in Jeddah between June and September, 2011, and analyzed samples by XRF. The overall mean mass concentration was 28.4 ± 25.4 μg/m3 for PM2.5 and 87.3 ± 47.3 μg/m3 for PM10, with significant temporal and spatial variability. The average ratio of PM2.5/PM10 was 0.33. Chemical composition data were modeled using factor analysis with varimax orthogonal rotation to determine five and four particle source categories contributing significant amount of for PM2.5 and PM10 mass, respectively. In both PM2.5 and PM10 sources were (1) heavy oil combustion characterized by high Ni and V; (2) resuspended soil characterized by high concentrations of Ca, Fe, Al, and Si; and (3) marine aerosol. The two other sources in PM2.5 were (4) Cu/Zn source; (5) traffic source identified by presence of Pb, Br, and Se; while in PM10 it was a mixed industrial source. To estimate the mass contributions of each individual source category, the CAPs mass concentration was regressed against the factor scores. Cumulatively, resuspended soil and oil combustion contributed 77 and 82% mass of PM2.5 and PM10, respectively. PMID:24634602

  14. Release of IL-1 β triggered by Milan summer PM10: molecular pathways involved in the cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Bengalli, Rossella; Molteni, Elisabetta; Longhin, Eleonora; Refsnes, Magne; Camatini, Marina; Gualtieri, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) exposure is related to pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases, with increased inflammatory status. The release of the proinflammatory interleukin- (IL-) 1β, is controlled by a dual pathway, the formation of inactive pro-IL-1β, through Toll-like receptors (TLRs) activation, and its cleavage by NLRP3 inflammasome. THP-1-derived macrophages were exposed for 6 h to 2.5  μg/cm(2) of Milan PM10, and the potential to promote IL-1β release by binding TLRs and activating NLRP3 has been examined. Summer PM10, induced a marked IL-1β response in the absence of LPS priming (50-fold increase compared to unexposed cells), which was reduced by caspase-1 inhibition (91% of inhibition respect summer PM10-treated cells) and by TLR-2 and TLR-4 inhibitors (66% and 53% of inhibition, resp.). Furthermore, summer PM10 increased the number of early endosomes, and oxidative stress inhibition nearly abolished PM10-induced IL-1β response (90% of inhibition). These findings suggest that summer PM10 contains constituents both related to the activation of membrane TLRs and activation of the inflammasome NLPR3 and that TLRs activation is of pivotal importance for the magnitude of the response. ROS formation seems important for PM10-induced IL-1β response, but further investigations are needed to elucidate the molecular pathway by which this effect is mediated. PMID:23509682

  15. [Experimental study on emission characteristics of PM10 in coal-fired boilers].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Chen, Dan; Zheng, Chu-Guang; Sui, Jian-Cai; Xu, Ming-Hou

    2008-03-01

    Fly ash was sampled at the inlet and outlet of ash collectors in four different coal-fired utility boilers using 13-stage low pressure impactor (LPI). The mass distribution, emission characteristics and the composition at different size particle of PM10 were studied. The results show that PM10 of the four boilers have a similar himodal distribution, with two peaks formed around 0.1 microm and 2.36 - 3.95 microm, respectively. The lowest efficiency of ash collectors was between 50% - 65% when the particle sizes were around 0.1 - 1 microm, no matter Venturi water membrane dust collector or ESP was used. Ash collectors show different removal efficiencies to various particle sizes PM. The removal efficiency of ash collectors was about 96% around 10 microm, while under 1 microm it was between 62% - 83%. The chemical composition of the size-segregated ash showed that the element S and Na were obvious enrichment in finer ash, which is possibly formed via vaporization and subsequent condensation of inorganic matter. While the refractory oxides were the major composition in bigger size ash, which may be formed via char fragmentation, excluded mineral fragmentation and included mineral coalescence.

  16. A new dust transport approach to quantify anthropogenic sources of atmospheric PM10 deposition on lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Lee; Thé, Jesse; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Stainsby, Eleanor A.; Winter, Jennifer G.

    2014-10-01

    Windblown dust simulations are one of the most uncertain types of atmospheric transport models. This study presents an integrated PM10 emission, transport and deposition model which has been validated using monitored data. This model characterizes the atmospheric phosphorus load focusing on the major local sources within the Lake Simcoe airshed including paved and unpaved roads, agricultural sources, construction sites and aggregate mining sources. This new approach substantially reduces uncertainty by providing improved estimates of the friction velocities than those developed previously. Modeling improvements were also made by generating and validating an hourly windfield using detailed meteorology, topography and land use data for the study area. The model was used to estimate dust emissions generated in the airshed and to simulate the long-range transport and deposition of PM10 to Lake Simcoe. The deposition results from the model were verified against observed bulk collector phosphorus concentration data for both wet and dry deposition. Bulk collector data from stations situated outside the airshed in a remote, undeveloped area were also compared to determine the background contribution from distant sources.

  17. An interlaboratory comparison study on the measurement of elements in PM10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatkin, Sinan; Belis, Claudio A.; Gerboles, Michel; Calzolai, Giulia; Lucarelli, Franco; Cavalli, Fabrizia; Trzepla, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison study was conducted to measure elemental loadings on PM10 samples, collected in Ispra, a regional background/rural site in Italy, using three different XRF (X-ray Fluorescence) methods, namely Epsilon 5 by linear calibration, Quant'X by the standardless analysis, and PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) with linear calibration. A subset of samples was also analyzed by ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry). Several metrics including method detection limits (MDLs), precision, bias from a NIST standard reference material (SRM 2783) quoted values, relative absolute difference, orthogonal regression and the ratio of the absolute difference between the methods to claimed uncertainty were used to compare the laboratories. The MDLs were found to be comparable for many elements. Precision estimates were less than 10% for the majority of the elements. Absolute biases from SRM 2783 remained less than 20% for the majority of certified elements. The regression results of PM10 samples showed that the three XRF laboratories measured very similar mass loadings for S, K, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Br, Sr and Pb with slopes within 20% of unity. The ICP-MS results confirmed the agreement and discrepancies between XRF laboratories for Al, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cu, Sr and Pb. The ICP-MS results are inconsistent with the XRF laboratories for Fe and Zn. The absolute differences between the XRF laboratories generally remained within their claimed uncertainties, showing a pattern generally consistent with the orthogonal regression results.

  18. Atmospheric Visibility and PM10 as Indicators of New Particle Formation in an Urban Environment.

    PubMed

    Jayaratne, E R; Clifford, S; Morawska, L

    2015-11-01

    It is well-known that new particle formation (NPF) in the atmosphere is inhibited by pre-existing particles in the air that act as condensation sinks to decrease the concentration and, thus, the supersaturation of precursor gases. In this study, we investigate the effects of two parameters-atmospheric visibility, expressed as the particle backscatter coefficient (BSP), and PM10 particulate mass concentration-on the occurrences of NPF events in an urban environment where the majority of precursor gases originate from motor vehicle and industrial sources. This is the first attempt to derive direct relationships between these two parameters and the occurrence of NPF. NPF events were identified from data obtained with a neutral cluster and air ion spectrometer over 245 days within a calendar year. Bayesian logistic regression was used to determine the probability of observing NPF as functions of BSP and PM10. We show that the BSP at 08 h on a given day is a reliable indicator of an NPF event later that day. The posterior median probability of observing an NPF event was greater than 0.5 (95%) when the BSP at 08 h was less than 6.8 Mm(-1). PMID:26485451

  19. LC-MS characterization of contemporary pesticides in PM10 of Valencia Region, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coscollà, Clara; Hart, Elizabeth; Pastor, Agustín; Yusà, Vicent

    2013-10-01

    Pesticides in the inhalable fraction of particulate matter (PM10) should be well tracked in order to contribute information to future exposure assessment in individuals of the general public. A total of 40 current-used pesticides and metabolites were searched for in ambient air samples collected from January through December 2010. The samples were taken from one remote, one urban and three rural sites in Valencia Region (Spain) and analyzed using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in tandem (LC-MS/MS). In the PM10 fraction 17 pesticides and metabolites were detected overall, two of them currently banned (carbofuran and omethoate, although the latter is a metabolite of the permitted pesticide dimethoate). The detected pesticides appeared at frequencies ranging from 1 to 75%, with omethoate, terbuthylazine and its metabolites, and carbendazim presenting the highest frequencies. The concentrations detected ranged from few pg m-3 to thousands of pg m-3, with omethoate having the highest average concentration (141.15 pg m-3) in the 5 sites overall. Each station showed its own specific pesticide profile, which is linked to the different types of crops around each site. In the rural stations pesticide levels were greater in spring and early summer, which correlates with their application in agricultural practices. These findings suggest that more efforts are required to implement an extensive air monitoring network in Europe for pesticide control and to develop regulations or recommendations regarding safer pesticide levels in ambient air.

  20. Seasonal Variations of Quantified Organic Compounds in PM10 over Seoul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, N.; Lee, J.; Kim, Y. P.

    2014-12-01

    The concentrations of 87 individual organic matters in the PM10 samples, systematically collected on the roof of the School of Public Health building at Seoul National University (mixed commercial and residential area), Seoul, South Korea on a daily basis from April 2010 to April 2011, were quantified by mean of Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). The daily average concentrations of five organic groups, alkanes, PAHs, fatty acid, DCAs, and sugars were ranged from 498.40 ng m3 to 10.20 μg m3. The seasonal concentrations of the total quantified organic species were 1.73 μg m3 (Spring), 2.04 μg m3 (Summer), 3.11 μg m3 (Fall), and 3.60 μg m3 (Winter), respectively. All the organic groups showed higher average concentration in winter than in summer. However, some organic compounds among fatty acids, DCAs, and sugars showed reverse pattern. The seasonal concentration patterns and episode variation of individual organic compounds were studied to clarify the emission characteristics of organic matters in PM10.

  1. The contribution of Saharan dust in PM(10) concentration levels in Anatolian Peninsula of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kabatas, B; Unal, A; Pierce, R B; Kindap, T; Pozzoli, L

    2014-08-01

    Sahara-originated dust is the most significant natural source of particulate matter; however, this contribution is still unclear in the Eastern Mediterranean especially in Western Turkey, where significant industrial sources and metropolitan areas are located. The Real-time Air Quality Modeling System (RAQMS) is utilized to explore the possible effects of Saharan dust on high levels of PM10 measured in Turkey. RAQMS model is compared with 118-air quality stations distributed throughout Turkey (81 cities) for April 2008. MODIS aerosol product (MOD04 for Terra and MYD04 for Aqua) is used to see columnar aerosol loading of the atmosphere at 550 nm (Aerosol optical depth (AOD) values found to be between 0.6 and 0.8 during the episode). High-resolution vertical profiles of clouds and aerosols are provided from CALIOP, on board of CALISPO satellite. The results suggest a significant contribution of Sahara dust to high levels of PM10 in Turkey with RAQMS and in situ time series showing similar patterns. The two data sets are found to be in agreement with a correlation of 0.87.

  2. Solar diameter/s/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosch, J.; Yerle, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two definitions are possible for the solar diameter: astrophysical, relating to a specific physical parameter, or observational, relating to a given quantity that is to be measured. Since only the latter is directly accessible, astrophysical definitions should be linked to these quantities. All current solar diameter programs refer to the point of the limb where the brightness gradient is maximum, or to a higher order approximation of the profile shape. Two such programs, the Pic-du-Midi experiment which uses fast scans of the limb to define the injection point after a correction for atmospheric blurring, and the SCLERA experiment, employing an algorithm to obviate this correction, are compared. The advantage of a fast scan is noted.

  3. Comparative source apportionment of PM10 in Switzerland for 2008/2009 and 1998/1999 by Positive Matrix Factorisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianini, M. F. D.; Fischer, A.; Gehrig, R.; Ulrich, A.; Wichser, A.; Piot, C.; Besombes, J.-L.; Hueglin, C.

    2012-07-01

    PM10 speciation data from various sites in Switzerland for two time periods (January 1998-March 1999 and August 2008-July 2009) have been analysed for major sources by receptor modelling using Positive Matrix Factorisation (PMF). For the 2008/2009 period, it was found that secondary aerosols (sulphate- and nitrate-rich secondary aerosols, SSA and NSA) are the most abundant components of PM10 at sites north of the Alps. Road traffic and wood combustion were found to be the largest sources of PM10 at these sites. Except at the urban roadside site where road traffic is dominating (40% of PM10 -- including road salt), the annual average contribution of these two sources is of similar importance (17% and 14% of PM10, respectively). At a rural site south of the Alps wood combustion and road traffic contributions to PM10 were higher (31% and 24%, respectively), and the fraction of secondary aerosols lower (29%) than at similar site types north of the Alps. Comparison of PMF analyses for the two time periods (1998/1999 and 2008/2009) revealed decreasing average contributions of road traffic and SSA to PM10 at all sites. This indicates that the measures that were implemented in Switzerland and in neighbouring countries to reduce emissions of sulphur dioxide and PM10 from road traffic were successful. On the other hand, contributions of wood combustion did not change during this ten year period, and the contribution of nitrate-rich secondary aerosols has even increased. It is shown that PMF can be a helpful tool for the assessment of long-term changes of source contributions to ambient particulate matter.

  4. Wind erosion from a sagebrush steppe burned by wildfire: measurements of PM10 and total horizontal sediment flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagenbrenner, Natalie S.; Germino, Matthew J.; Lamb, Brian K.; Robichaud, Peter R.; Foltz, Randy B.

    2013-01-01

    above the soil surface, had a maximum PM10 vertical flux of 100 mg m-2 s-1, and generated a large dust plume that was visible in satellite imagery. The peak PM10 concentration measured on-site at a height of 2 m in the downwind portion of the burned area was 690 mg m-3. Our results indicate that wildfire can convert a relatively stable landscape into one that is a major dust source.

  5. Gravimetric and chemical features of airborne PM 10 AND PM 2.5 in mainland Portugal.

    PubMed

    Freitas, M C; Farinha, M M; Ventura, M G; Almeida, S M; Reis, M A; Pacheco, A M G

    2005-10-01

    This paper describes concentration amounts of arsenic (As), particulate mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni) and lead (Pb) in PM(10) and PM(2.5), collected since 1993 by the Technological and Nuclear Institute (ITN) at different locations in mainland Portugal, featuring urban, industrial and rural environments, and a control as well. Most results were obtained in the vicinity of coal- and oil-fired power plants. Airborne mass concentrations were determined by gravimetry. As and Hg concentrations were obtained through instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), and Ni and Pb concentrations through proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Comparison with the EU (European Union) and the US EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) directives for Ambient Air has been carried out, even though the sampling protocols herein--set within the framework of ITN's R&D projects and/or monitoring contracts--were not consistent with the former regulations. Taking this into account, 1) the EU daily limit for PM(10) was exceeded a few times in all sites except the control, even if the number of times was still inferior to the allowed one; 2) the EU annual mean for PM(10) was exceeded at one site; 3) the EPA daily limit for PM(2.5) was exceeded one time at three sites; 4) the EPA annual mean for PM(2.5) was exceeded at most sites; 5) the inner-Lisbon site approached or exceeded the legislated PMs; 6) Pb levels stayed far below the EU limit value; and 7) concentrations of As, Ni and Hg were also far less than the reference values adopted by EU. In every location, Ni appeared more concentrated in PM(2.5) than in coarser particles, and its levels were not that different from site to site, excluding the control. The highest As and Hg concentrations were found in the neighbourhood of the coal-fired, utility power plants. The results may be viewed as a "worst-case scenario" of atmospheric pollution, since they have been obtained in busy urban-industrial areas and/or near major power

  6. The contribution of biomass burning to PAH levels in PM10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belis, Claudio; Larsen, Bo; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Vecchi, Roberta; Colombi, Cristina; Gianelle, Vorne

    2010-05-01

    The objective of the present study is to identify the contribution of wood burning and biomass burning to the levels of toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the atmospheric particulate matter. Benzo(a)pyrene has been selected as a marker of PAHs since it is predominantly present in the solid phase and is the only isomer having a target value for its atmospheric concentrations in the European Union. The levels of BaP have been evaluated both as ambient air concentration (ng/m3) as required by directive 2007/104/EC and as mass fraction of PM10 (mg/g). The levels of BaP were estimated by computing multiple linear regression and non linear factorial regression. The model parameters were fitted using two independent datasets of PM10 samples collected between 2005 and 2007 in 3 urban sites located in the Po Valley and in the southern Alps. The explanatory variables used for estimating BaP were selected using forward selection based on F test from a pool of variables representing: biomass burning (levoglucosan), emissions from unspecified combustion processes (CO, NOx, EC, OC and trace elements) and atmospheric properties (wind speed, temperature, and height of the mixing layer). The uncertainty of the model was estimated by propagating the standard uncertainties of the corresponding variables. An analysis of sensitivity was conducted by evaluating the influence of the variation of the measured variables along a range comparable to their standard deviations on the model outputs. In the background sites levoglucosan explained between 55% (s.e. 16%) and 87% (s.e. 8 %) of the BaP contribution to the PM10 mass and between 53% (s.e.16%) and 84% (s.e.10%) of the BaP concentration. Levoglucosan was the most important single variable to explain BaP levels. Other variables explaning significant part of BaP variance were NOx, CO , OC, wind speed, and air temperature. In a kerbside site, the influence of levoglucosan on BaP variance decreased but was still relevant (44

  7. Influence of road traffic, residential heating and meteorological conditions on PM10 concentrations during air pollution critical episodes.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Giovanni; Toscano, Piero; Crisci, Alfonso; Di Lonardo, Sara; Tartaglia, Mario; Vagnoli, Carolina; Zaldei, Alessandro; Gioli, Beniamino

    2015-12-01

    The importance of road traffic, residential heating and meteorological conditions as major drivers of urban PM10 concentrations during air pollution critical episodes has been assessed in the city of Florence (Italy) during the winter season. The most significant meteorological variables (wind speed and atmospheric stability) explained 80.5-85.5% of PM10 concentrations variance, while a marginal role was played by major emission sources such as residential heating (12.1%) and road traffic (5.7%). The persistence of low wind speeds and unstable atmospheric conditions was the leading factor controlling PM10 during critical episodes. A specific PM10 critical episode was analysed, following a snowstorm that caused a "natural" scenario of 2-day dramatic road traffic abatement (-43%), and a massive (up to +48%) and persistent (8 consecutive days) increase in residential heating use. Even with such a strong variability in local PM10 emissions, the role of meteorological conditions was prominent, revealing that short-term traffic restrictions are insufficient countermeasures to reduce the health impacts and risks of PM10 critical episodes, while efforts should be made to anticipate those measures by linking them with air quality and weather forecasts.

  8. Linking Endotoxins, African Dust PM10 and Asthma in an Urban and Rural Environment of Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Martínez, Mario G.; Rodríguez-Cotto, Rosa I.; Ortiz-Rivera, Mónica A.; Pluguez-Turull, Cedric W.; Jiménez-Vélez, Braulio D.

    2015-01-01

    African Dust Events (ADE) are a seasonal phenomenon that has been suggested to exacerbate respiratory and proinflammatory diseases in Puerto Rico (PR). Increases in PM10 concentration and the effects of biological endotoxins (ENX) are critical factors to consider during these storms. ENX promote proinflammatory responses in lungs of susceptible individuals through activation of the Toll-like receptors (TLR2/4) signaling pathways. The objective of the study was to evaluate the toxicological and proinflammatory responses stimulated by ADE PM10 ENX reaching PR using human bronchial epithelial cells. PM10 organic extracts from a rural and urban site in PR (March 2004) were obtained from ADE and non-ADE and compared. A retrospective data analysis (PM10 concentration, aerosol images, and pediatric asthma claims) was performed from 2000 to 2012 with particular emphasis in 2004 to classify PM samples. Urban extracts were highly toxic, proinflammatory (IL-6/IL-8 secretion), and induced higher TLR4 expression and NF-κB activation compared to rural extracts. ENX were found to contribute to cytotoxicity and inflammatory responses provoked by urban ADE PM10 exposure suggesting a synergistic potency of local and natural ENX incoming from ADE. The contribution of ADE PM10 ENX is valuable in order to understand interactions and action mechanisms of airborne pollutants as asthma triggers in PR. PMID:26681839

  9. Modeling of the mineral contribution of dust to PM10 directly from the measurements of VIIRS Aerosol Optical Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albina, D. T.

    2015-12-01

    Northern Africa is well known as the largest producing region of dust, which is transported across the Atlantic to the Caribbean, under specific weather conditions. Saharan dust was observed, over the Caribbean Basin, to try to determine the roles they may play in human health, and in the fertilization of Amazon Forest. Scientists have not only used the satellite sensors MODIS and VIIRS to measure the volume of dust that makes this trans-Atlantic journey, but also the AERONET network of photometers, and PM10 Suspended Particulate Matter. We have successfully compared and shown a high correlation between the measurements from VIIRS aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and PM10 so that to be able to determine an accurate modeling of the mineral contribution of dust to PM10 directly from the measurements of VIIRS. The aim of this work is to show that it is possible to accurately forecast the daily mean concentration of PM10 using linear regression models. In this way, countries of the Caribbean region which cannot afford Particle Sensor for Pm10 will be able to have a precise idea of the PM10 daily forecast upon there region.

  10. Source apportionment and health risk assessment of PM10 in a naturally ventilated school in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Noorlin; Latif, Mohd Talib; Khan, Md Firoz

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the chemical composition and potential sources of PM10 as well as assess the potential health hazards it posed to school children. PM10 samples were taken from classrooms at a school in Kuala Lumpur's city centre (S1) and one in the suburban city of Putrajaya (S2) over a period of eight hours using a low volume sampler (LVS). The composition of the major ions and trace metals in PM10 were then analysed using ion chromatography (IC) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), respectively. The results showed that the average PM10 concentration inside the classroom at the city centre school (82µg/m(3)) was higher than that from the suburban school (77µg/m(3)). Principal component analysis-absolute principal component scores (PCA-APCS) revealed that road dust was the major source of indoor PM10 at both school in the city centre (36%) and the suburban location (55%). The total hazard quotient (HQ) calculated, based on the formula suggested by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), was found to be slightly higher than the acceptable level of 1, indicating that inhalation exposure to particle-bound non-carcinogenic metals of PM10, particularly Cr exposure by children and adults occupying the school environment, was far from negligible. PMID:26590697

  11. Source apportionment and health risk assessment of PM10 in a naturally ventilated school in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Noorlin; Latif, Mohd Talib; Khan, Md Firoz

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the chemical composition and potential sources of PM10 as well as assess the potential health hazards it posed to school children. PM10 samples were taken from classrooms at a school in Kuala Lumpur's city centre (S1) and one in the suburban city of Putrajaya (S2) over a period of eight hours using a low volume sampler (LVS). The composition of the major ions and trace metals in PM10 were then analysed using ion chromatography (IC) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), respectively. The results showed that the average PM10 concentration inside the classroom at the city centre school (82µg/m(3)) was higher than that from the suburban school (77µg/m(3)). Principal component analysis-absolute principal component scores (PCA-APCS) revealed that road dust was the major source of indoor PM10 at both school in the city centre (36%) and the suburban location (55%). The total hazard quotient (HQ) calculated, based on the formula suggested by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), was found to be slightly higher than the acceptable level of 1, indicating that inhalation exposure to particle-bound non-carcinogenic metals of PM10, particularly Cr exposure by children and adults occupying the school environment, was far from negligible.

  12. Influence of road traffic, residential heating and meteorological conditions on PM10 concentrations during air pollution critical episodes.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Giovanni; Toscano, Piero; Crisci, Alfonso; Di Lonardo, Sara; Tartaglia, Mario; Vagnoli, Carolina; Zaldei, Alessandro; Gioli, Beniamino

    2015-12-01

    The importance of road traffic, residential heating and meteorological conditions as major drivers of urban PM10 concentrations during air pollution critical episodes has been assessed in the city of Florence (Italy) during the winter season. The most significant meteorological variables (wind speed and atmospheric stability) explained 80.5-85.5% of PM10 concentrations variance, while a marginal role was played by major emission sources such as residential heating (12.1%) and road traffic (5.7%). The persistence of low wind speeds and unstable atmospheric conditions was the leading factor controlling PM10 during critical episodes. A specific PM10 critical episode was analysed, following a snowstorm that caused a "natural" scenario of 2-day dramatic road traffic abatement (-43%), and a massive (up to +48%) and persistent (8 consecutive days) increase in residential heating use. Even with such a strong variability in local PM10 emissions, the role of meteorological conditions was prominent, revealing that short-term traffic restrictions are insufficient countermeasures to reduce the health impacts and risks of PM10 critical episodes, while efforts should be made to anticipate those measures by linking them with air quality and weather forecasts. PMID:26233744

  13. [Characteristics of PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations in mountain background region of East China].

    PubMed

    Su, Bin-Bin; Liu, Xin-Dong; Tao, Jun

    2013-02-01

    The online PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were measured from March 2011 'to February 2012 at the national atmospheric background monitoring station in Wuyishan of Fujian Province to discuss the characteristic of PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations and the impact factors in forest and mountain background region of East China. HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) Model was used to investigate the potential sources of particulates during the pollution episodes. The results showed that the background concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were (23 +/- 16) microg.m-3 and (18 +/- 12) microg.m-3, respectively. Seasonal variations of PMl0 and PM2.5 loadings were observed, and loadings decreased in the same order: spring > autumn > winter > summer. PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were obviously higher in spring than in other seasons because of the transportation of dust storm. The fine particles were the dominant pollutant which accounted for 76% of PM10. The good correlation between PM10/PM2.5 and gas pollutants suggested that regional transportation and secondary aerosol were the major sources in the background station. One episode occurring in April 2011 was related with the transportation of dust storm. However, another episode occurring in September 2011 had close relationship with the transportation of higher pollutant loadings in East China. PMID:23668109

  14. [Spatial-temporal variations of extractable organic matter in atmospheric PM10 and PM2.5 in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Dong, Xue-Ling; Liu, Da-Meng; Yuan, Yang-Sen; Che, Rui-Jun

    2009-02-15

    PM10 and PM2.5 samples were collected in parallel in different function zones of Beijing during four seasons of 2005. The pollution level, distribution characteristics of the extractable organic matter (EOM) and relationship between EOM (PM10) and EOM (PM2.5) were illustrated. The results show that: the annual mean concentrations of organic compound in PM10 and PM2.5 are 41.39 microg/m3 and 34.84 microg/m3, being 1.44 times and 1.26 times higher than Ming Tombs site. The concentrations of EOM in winter are 67.04 microg/m3 (PM10) and 64.64 microg/m3 (PM2.5), which are 1.15 and 1.82 times, 2.06 and 2.26 times, 4.53 and 6.26 times higher than that in spring, autumn, summer, respectively. Ratios of EOM in PM2.5 to that in PM10 in different seasons exceed 0.60. In different function zones the concentrations of EOM present industrial and commercial zones > living, traffic and contrast zones. The influence of EOM (PM2.5) on EOM (PM10) in different districts are various. The order of annual concentrations of organic compositions is non-hydrocarbons > asphaltenes > aromatics > saturated hydrocarbon. The seasonal emissions of pollution sources play an important role in seasonality of compositions of EOM. PMID:19402477

  15. [Characteristics of PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations in mountain background region of East China].

    PubMed

    Su, Bin-Bin; Liu, Xin-Dong; Tao, Jun

    2013-02-01

    The online PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were measured from March 2011 'to February 2012 at the national atmospheric background monitoring station in Wuyishan of Fujian Province to discuss the characteristic of PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations and the impact factors in forest and mountain background region of East China. HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) Model was used to investigate the potential sources of particulates during the pollution episodes. The results showed that the background concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were (23 +/- 16) microg.m-3 and (18 +/- 12) microg.m-3, respectively. Seasonal variations of PMl0 and PM2.5 loadings were observed, and loadings decreased in the same order: spring > autumn > winter > summer. PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were obviously higher in spring than in other seasons because of the transportation of dust storm. The fine particles were the dominant pollutant which accounted for 76% of PM10. The good correlation between PM10/PM2.5 and gas pollutants suggested that regional transportation and secondary aerosol were the major sources in the background station. One episode occurring in April 2011 was related with the transportation of dust storm. However, another episode occurring in September 2011 had close relationship with the transportation of higher pollutant loadings in East China.

  16. The Exposure Uncertainty Analysis: The Association between Birth Weight and Trimester Specific Exposure to Particulate Matter (PM2.5 vs. PM10)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Often spatiotemporal resolution/scale of environmental and health data do not align. Therefore, researchers compute exposure by interpolation or by aggregating data to coarse spatiotemporal scales. The latter is often preferred because of sparse geographic coverage of environmental monitoring, as interpolation method cannot reliably compute exposure using the small sample of sparse data points. This paper presents a methodology of diagnosing the levels of uncertainty in exposure at a given distance and time interval, and examines the effects of particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5 µm and ≤10 µm in diameter (PM2.5 and PM10, respectively) on birth weight (BW) and low birth weight (LBW), i.e., birth weight <2500 g in Chicago (IL, USA), accounting for exposure uncertainty. Two important findings emerge from this paper. First, uncertainty in PM exposure increases significantly with the increase in distance from the monitoring stations, e.g., 50.6% and 38.5% uncertainty in PM10 and PM2.5 exposure respectively for 0.058° (~6.4 km) distance from the monitoring stations. Second, BW was inversely associated with PM2.5 exposure, and PM2.5 exposure during the first trimester and entire gestation period showed a stronger association with BW than the exposure during the second and third trimesters. But PM10 did not show any significant association with BW and LBW. These findings suggest that distance and time intervals need to be chosen with care to compute exposure, and account for the uncertainty to reliably assess the adverse health risks of exposure. PMID:27649214

  17. The Exposure Uncertainty Analysis: The Association between Birth Weight and Trimester Specific Exposure to Particulate Matter (PM2.5 vs. PM10).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Often spatiotemporal resolution/scale of environmental and health data do not align. Therefore, researchers compute exposure by interpolation or by aggregating data to coarse spatiotemporal scales. The latter is often preferred because of sparse geographic coverage of environmental monitoring, as interpolation method cannot reliably compute exposure using the small sample of sparse data points. This paper presents a methodology of diagnosing the levels of uncertainty in exposure at a given distance and time interval, and examines the effects of particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5 µm and ≤10 µm in diameter (PM2.5 and PM10, respectively) on birth weight (BW) and low birth weight (LBW), i.e., birth weight <2500 g in Chicago (IL, USA), accounting for exposure uncertainty. Two important findings emerge from this paper. First, uncertainty in PM exposure increases significantly with the increase in distance from the monitoring stations, e.g., 50.6% and 38.5% uncertainty in PM10 and PM2.5 exposure respectively for 0.058° (~6.4 km) distance from the monitoring stations. Second, BW was inversely associated with PM2.5 exposure, and PM2.5 exposure during the first trimester and entire gestation period showed a stronger association with BW than the exposure during the second and third trimesters. But PM10 did not show any significant association with BW and LBW. These findings suggest that distance and time intervals need to be chosen with care to compute exposure, and account for the uncertainty to reliably assess the adverse health risks of exposure. PMID:27649214

  18. The behaviour of PM10 and ozone in Malaysia through non-linear dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sapini, Muhamad Luqman; Rahim, Nurul Zahirah binti Abd; Noorani, Mohd Salmi Md.

    2015-10-22

    Prediction of ozone (O3) and PM10 is very important as both these air pollutants affect human health, human activities and more. Short-term forecasting of air quality is needed as preventive measures and effective action can be taken. Therefore, if it is detected that the ozone data is of a chaotic dynamical systems, a model using the nonlinear dynamic from chaos theory data can be made and thus forecasts for the short term would be more accurate. This study uses two methods, namely the 0-1 Test and Lyapunov Exponent. In addition, the effect of noise reduction on the analysis of time series data will be seen by using two smoothing methods: Rectangular methods and Triangle methods. At the end of the study, recommendations were made to get better results in the future.

  19. Uncertainties in future ozone and PM10 projections over Europe from a regional climate multiphysics ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Guerrero, P.; Jerez, S.; Montávez, J. P.; Trigo, R. M.

    2013-11-01

    Due to the computational time required for modeling air quality climatologies, the characterization of processes introducing the largest uncertainty in air quality-climate projections is a sound field of research. Here an air quality ensemble is assessed over Europe for present (1971-2000) and future (2071-2100, SRES A2) periods to characterize the sensitivity of regional air quality projections to the physics of the regional climate model driving the simulations. The ensemble comprises eight members resulting from combining two options of parameterization schemes for the planetary boundary layer, cumulus, and microphysics. The differences in the ensemble members (spread) for the concentration of tropospheric ozone and particulate matter (PM10) are strongly affected by the physics selected and could be considered as a matter of uncertainty in the change signals. Also, the leading processes causing the largest uncertainties in air quality projections have been identified and are mainly related to the election of the cumulus schemes.

  20. The behaviour of PM10 and ozone in Malaysia through non-linear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapini, Muhamad Luqman; Rahim, Nurul Zahirah binti Abd; Noorani, Mohd Salmi Md.

    2015-10-01

    Prediction of ozone (O3) and PM10 is very important as both these air pollutants affect human health, human activities and more. Short-term forecasting of air quality is needed as preventive measures and effective action can be taken. Therefore, if it is detected that the ozone data is of a chaotic dynamical systems, a model using the nonlinear dynamic from chaos theory data can be made and thus forecasts for the short term would be more accurate. This study uses two methods, namely the 0-1 Test and Lyapunov Exponent. In addition, the effect of noise reduction on the analysis of time series data will be seen by using two smoothing methods: Rectangular methods and Triangle methods. At the end of the study, recommendations were made to get better results in the future.

  1. Short-time particulate matter PM10 forecasts using predictive modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A.; Gocheva-Ilieva, S.

    2013-10-01

    Two types of predictive modeling techniques - seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) and a new Generalized PathSeeker (GPS) Regularized Regression method have been used for modeling data related to ambient air quality. The models are built for the measured data for the primary air pollutant - particulate matter PM10 in the town of Shumen, Bulgaria. The time series analysis was carried out based on hourly data with respect to six meteorological variables during a period of one month. The constructed models have been used for short-term four-days-ahead forecasts. The obtained results demonstrate some advantages of the GPS method over seasonal ARIMA stochastic modeling and its applicability. This gives a new perspective for analyzing and preventing the possible pollution problems in urban areas.

  2. Global emissions of PM10 and PM2.5 from agricultural tillage and harvesting operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Tong, D.; Lee, P.

    2014-12-01

    Soil particles emitted during agricultural activities is a major recurring source contributing to atmospheric aerosol loading. Emission inventories of agricultural dust emissions have been compiled in several regions. These inventories, compiled based on historic survey and activity data, may reflect the current emission strengths that introduce large uncertainties when they are used to drive chemical transport models. In addition, there is no global emission inventory of agricultural dust emissions required to support global air quality and climate modeling. In this study, we present our recent efforts to develop a global emission inventory of PM10 and PM2.5 released from field tillage and harvesting operations using an emission factors-based approach. Both major crops (e.g., wheat and corn) and forage production were considered. For each crop or forage, information of crop area, crop calendar, farming activities and emission factors of specified operations were assembled. The key issue of inventory compilation is the choice of suitable emission factors for specified operations over different parts of the world. Through careful review of published emission factors, we modified the traditional emission factor-based model by multiplying correction coefficient factors to reflect the relationship between emission factors, soil texture, and climate conditions. Then, the temporal (i.e., monthly) and spatial (i.e., 0.5º resolution) distribution of agricultural PM10 and PM2.5 emissions from each and all operations were estimated for each crop or forage. Finally, the emissions from individual crops were aggregated to assemble a global inventory from agricultural operations. The inventory was verified by comparing the new data with the existing agricultural fugitive dust inventory in North America and Europe, as well as satellite observations of anthropogenic agricultural dust emissions.

  3. Study of Pb sources by Pb isotope ratios in the airborne PM(10) of Zaragoza, Spain.

    PubMed

    Teresa de la Cruz, María; Laborda, Francisco; Callén, María Soledad; López, José Manuel; Mastral, Ana María

    2009-11-01

    Lead is a toxic trace element which produces harmful effects on human health, even at low concentrations, and it can be useful as ambient pollution tracer because the relative abundance of its four stable isotopes (204, 206, 207 and 208) depends on the emission source. This study was focused on the lead concentrations and isotope ratios in the PM10 of Zaragoza, in order to determine the main Pb pollution sources and to check whether the influence of the prohibition of leaded fuel was worthwhile. Two sampling campaigns from 2001 until 2004, the first one in which leaded gasoline was still effective and the second one with the phase-out, were carried out by using a high-volume air sampler able to trap the particulate matter equal to or less than 10 microm (PM10) on Teflon-coated fibre glass filters. Firstly, the Pb concentrations for the two sampling campaigns were analysed by inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). No statistically significant decrease in the Pb average concentration was obtained from the first to the second sampling. Enrichment factors showed that anthropogenic sources were prevalent during both samplings, in particular during 2001-2002. Afterwards, only those samples with higher concentrations than the limit of quantification of Pb were analysed to determine the lead isotopic composition by inductively-coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS). To apply this analytical technique successfully, it was necessary to optimize the parameters affecting the measurement accuracy and precision. Differences were found regarding the lead isotope ratios for both periods finding that anthropogenic sources related to industrial processes were reflected on both campaigns. The gasoline contribution for the first campaign was 23% whereas for the second sampling this contribution was negligible, corroborating the success of the lead policies on the quality of the environment.

  4. Characterisation of PM 10 emissions from woodstove combustion of common woods grown in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Cátia; Alves, Célia; Evtyugina, Margarita; Mirante, Fátima; Pio, Casimiro; Caseiro, Alexandre; Schmidl, Christoph; Bauer, Heidi; Carvalho, Fernando

    2010-11-01

    A series of source tests was performed to evaluate the chemical composition of particle emissions from the woodstove combustion of four prevalent Portuguese species of woods: Pinus pinaster (maritime pine), Eucalyptus globulus (eucalyptus), Quercus suber (cork oak) and Acacia longifolia (golden wattle). Analyses included water-soluble ions, metals, radionuclides, organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), humic-like substances (HULIS), cellulose and approximately l80 organic compounds. Particle (PM 10) emission factors from eucalyptus and oak were higher than those from pine and acacia. The carbonaceous matter represented 44-63% of the particulate mass emitted during the combustion process, regardless of species burned. The major organic components of smoke particles, for all the wood species studied, with the exception of the golden wattle (0.07-1.9% w/w), were anhydrosugars (0.2-17% w/w). Conflicting with what was expected, only small amounts of cellulose were found in wood smoke. As for HULIS, average particle mass concentrations ranged from 1.5% to 3.0%. The golden wattle wood smoke presented much higher concentrations of ions and metal species than the emissions from the other wood types. The results of the analysis of radionuclides revealed that the 226Ra was the naturally occurring radionuclide more enriched in PM 10. The chromatographically resolved organics included n-alkanes, n-alkenes, PAH, oxygenated PAH, n-alkanals, ketones, n-alkanols, terpenoids, triterpenoids, phenolic compounds, phytosterols, alcohols, n-alkanoic acids, n-di-acids, unsaturated acids and alkyl ester acids.

  5. An hourly PM10 diagnosis model for the Bilbao metropolitan area using a linear regression methodology.

    PubMed

    González-Aparicio, I; Hidalgo, J; Baklanov, A; Padró, A; Santa-Coloma, O

    2013-07-01

    There is extensive evidence of the negative impacts on health linked to the rise of the regional background of particulate matter (PM) 10 levels. These levels are often increased over urban areas becoming one of the main air pollution concerns. This is the case on the Bilbao metropolitan area, Spain. This study describes a data-driven model to diagnose PM10 levels in Bilbao at hourly intervals. The model is built with a training period of 7-year historical data covering different urban environments (inland, city centre and coastal sites). The explanatory variables are quantitative-log [NO2], temperature, short-wave incoming radiation, wind speed and direction, specific humidity, hour and vehicle intensity-and qualitative-working days/weekends, season (winter/summer), the hour (from 00 to 23 UTC) and precipitation/no precipitation. Three different linear regression models are compared: simple linear regression; linear regression with interaction terms (INT); and linear regression with interaction terms following the Sawa's Bayesian Information Criteria (INT-BIC). Each type of model is calculated selecting two different periods: the training (it consists of 6 years) and the testing dataset (it consists of 1 year). The results of each type of model show that the INT-BIC-based model (R(2) = 0.42) is the best. Results were R of 0.65, 0.63 and 0.60 for the city centre, inland and coastal sites, respectively, a level of confidence similar to the state-of-the art methodology. The related error calculated for longer time intervals (monthly or seasonal means) diminished significantly (R of 0.75-0.80 for monthly means and R of 0.80 to 0.98 at seasonally means) with respect to shorter periods.

  6. Residential indoor PM 10 and PM 2.5 in Hong Kong and the elemental composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Christopher Y.; Wong, Kelvin K.

    Indoor air particulate samples were collected in 34 homes and their adjacent outdoor environments in Hong Kong during the fall and winter seasons. It was found that the mean indoor PM 2.5 and PM 10 concentrations were 45.0 and 63.3 μg m -3, respectively. The corresponding mean outdoor levels were 47.0 and 69.5 μg m -3, respectively. The indoor particulate levels were found to be about 2-4 times higher than those in the homes in western countries where most are located in suburb areas with a much better ambient air quality. Pearson paired t-tests were conducted on the data and it was found that poor correlation was seen in the indoor and the outdoor particulate concentrations. This was probably due to the fact that windows were closed more often in the fall and winter seasons keeping the ventilation rate low, plus the factor that window type air conditioners were used commonly in Hong Kong, which again, constituted to a low air change rate. Both the indoor and the outdoor elemental compositions of the particulate samples collected in these 34 homes were identified by proton-induced X-ray emission analysis. Seventeen elements were identified. The mean inorganic elemental compositions in the indoor PM 2.5 and PM 10 samples were 6.4 and 10.2 μg m -3, respectively while those in the outdoor samples were 7.9 and 14.1 μg m -3, respectively. Enrichment factor analysis was performed and it was noted that those species existing in fine mode were highly enriched (bromine, lead, nickel, potassium, sulfur, vanadium and zinc) while those species existing in the coarse mode had their enrichment factors close to 1 (aluminum, calcium, iron, magnesium, silicon, sodium and titanium).

  7. An hourly PM10 diagnosis model for the Bilbao metropolitan area using a linear regression methodology.

    PubMed

    González-Aparicio, I; Hidalgo, J; Baklanov, A; Padró, A; Santa-Coloma, O

    2013-07-01

    There is extensive evidence of the negative impacts on health linked to the rise of the regional background of particulate matter (PM) 10 levels. These levels are often increased over urban areas becoming one of the main air pollution concerns. This is the case on the Bilbao metropolitan area, Spain. This study describes a data-driven model to diagnose PM10 levels in Bilbao at hourly intervals. The model is built with a training period of 7-year historical data covering different urban environments (inland, city centre and coastal sites). The explanatory variables are quantitative-log [NO2], temperature, short-wave incoming radiation, wind speed and direction, specific humidity, hour and vehicle intensity-and qualitative-working days/weekends, season (winter/summer), the hour (from 00 to 23 UTC) and precipitation/no precipitation. Three different linear regression models are compared: simple linear regression; linear regression with interaction terms (INT); and linear regression with interaction terms following the Sawa's Bayesian Information Criteria (INT-BIC). Each type of model is calculated selecting two different periods: the training (it consists of 6 years) and the testing dataset (it consists of 1 year). The results of each type of model show that the INT-BIC-based model (R(2) = 0.42) is the best. Results were R of 0.65, 0.63 and 0.60 for the city centre, inland and coastal sites, respectively, a level of confidence similar to the state-of-the art methodology. The related error calculated for longer time intervals (monthly or seasonal means) diminished significantly (R of 0.75-0.80 for monthly means and R of 0.80 to 0.98 at seasonally means) with respect to shorter periods. PMID:23247520

  8. Assessing the contribution of water to the mass closure of PM10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrino, C.; Catrambone, M.; Farao, C.; Canepari, S.

    2016-09-01

    The data obtained during a number of field studies aimed at determining the chemical composition of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) have shown that the measurement of the main PM components (main elements, ions, elemental carbon, organic carbon) was generally sufficient to obtain a reasonable mass closure. Notwithstanding, a wide gap between PM mass concentration and reconstructed mass was observed in two peculiar environmental conditions: desert dust intrusion and severe atmospheric stability episodes characterized by very high ammonium nitrate concentration. In these two cases, the mass closure improved significantly by adding the concentration of PM-bound water. Water was determined by using a coulometric Karl-Fisher system equipped with a controlled heating device; the method was able to separate different water contributions released in different temperature ranges from 50 to 250 °C. In our field studies the amount of water associated to ammonium salts in winter stability conditions was mostly dependent on ammonium nitrate concentration and constituted up to 22% of the total PM10 mass; the specific water contribution linked to ammonium salts (released in the temperature range 180-250 °C) constituted up to 30% of the ammonium nitrate mass. It was confirmed that in these extreme conditions quartz and Teflon filters behave differently: when measured on quartz filters, PM concentration was lower than on Teflon, the mass closure was satisfactory and the concentration of water was presumably very low. In the case of desert dust episodes, water was up to 10% of total PM10 mass; the specific water contribution linked to desert dust (released in the temperature range 100-180 °C) constituted about 5% of the mass of soil components. In other environmental situations, such as urban environments, marine atmosphere and rural areas, the concentration of PM-bound water was below 2-3 μg/m3.

  9. Data preparation for functional data analysis of PM10 in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaadan, Norshahida; Jemain, Abdul Aziz; Deni, Sayang Mohd

    2014-07-01

    The use of curves or functional data in the study analysis is increasingly gaining momentum in the various fields of research. The statistical method to analyze such data is known as functional data analysis (FDA). The first step in FDA is to convert the observed data points which are repeatedly recorded over a period of time or space into either a rough (raw) or smooth curve. In the case of the smooth curve, basis functions expansion is one of the methods used for the data conversion. The data can be converted into a smooth curve either by using the regression smoothing or roughness penalty smoothing approach. By using the regression smoothing approach, the degree of curve's smoothness is very dependent on k number of basis functions; meanwhile for the roughness penalty approach, the smoothness is dependent on a roughness coefficient given by parameter λ Based on previous studies, researchers often used the rather time-consuming trial and error or cross validation method to estimate the appropriate number of basis functions. Thus, this paper proposes a statistical procedure to construct functional data or curves for the hourly and daily recorded data. The Bayesian Information Criteria is used to determine the number of basis functions while the Generalized Cross Validation criteria is used to identify the parameter λ The proposed procedure is then applied on a ten year (2001-2010) period of PM10 data from 30 air quality monitoring stations that are located in Peninsular Malaysia. It was found that the number of basis functions required for the construction of the PM10 daily curve in Peninsular Malaysia was in the interval of between 14 and 20 with an average value of 17; the first percentile is 15 and the third percentile is 19. Meanwhile the initial value of the roughness coefficient was in the interval of between 10-5 and 10-7 and the mode was 10-6. An example of the functional descriptive analysis is also shown.

  10. Large chemical characterisation of PM10 emitted from graphite material production: Application in source apportionment.

    PubMed

    Golly, B; Brulfert, G; Berlioux, G; Jaffrezo, J-L; Besombes, J-L

    2015-12-15

    This work focuses on emissions from industrial sources that are still poorly understood in Europe, especially the "carbon industry". The study is based on two intensive sampling campaigns performed in a graphite material production plant for 2weeks in July 2013 and November 2013 in alpine valleys. The chemical characterization of PM10 was conducted at three sampling sites (outdoor and indoor sites) located inside one industrial area, which is considered as the highest emissions source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Arve valley. The identification of specific tracers among metals and trace elements is commonly used to characterize industrial emissions. In our study, original enrichment factors relative to the "rural exposed background" have been calculated, and the metallic fraction was not affected by this industrial source. In contrast, the organic fraction of PM10 has a number of features, providing a complete organic source profile and referred to as the "carbon industry". In particular, polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASH) have been largely detected from fugitive emissions with rather large concentrations. The average concentrations of benzo(b)naphtho(2,1-d)thiophene (BNT(2,1)) reached 2.35-6.56ng·m(-3) and 60.5-376ng·m(-3) for outdoor and indoor sites, respectively. The use of this reference profile in the chemical mass balance model (CMB) applied to samples collected in two sites near industrial areas shows that this source had an average contribution of 6% of the organic matter (OM) mass during the sampling period during the winter of 2013.

  11. A robust calibration approach for PM10 prediction from MODIS aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, X. Q.; Hashim, M.

    2012-12-01

    Investigating the human health effects of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) using satellite data are gaining more attention due to their wide spatial coverage and temporal advantages. Such epidemiological studies are, however, susceptible to bias errors and resulted in poor predictive output in some locations. Current methods calibrate aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from MODIS to further predict PM. The recent satellite-based AOD calibration uses a mixed effects model to predict location-specific PM on a daily basis. The shortcomings of this daily AOD calibration are for areas of high probability of persistent cloud cover throughout the year such as in the humid tropical region along the equatorial belt. Contaminated pixels due to clouds causes radiometric errors in the MODIS AOD, thus causes poor predictive power on air quality. In contrary, a periodic assessment is more practical and robust especially in minimizing these cloud-related contaminations. In this paper, a simple yet robust calibration approach based on monthly AOD period is presented. We adopted the statistical fitting method with the adjustment technique to improve the predictive power of MODIS AOD. The adjustment was made based on the long-term observation (2001-2006) of PM10-AOD residual error characteristic. Besides, we also incorporated the ground PM measurement into the model as a weighting to reduce the bias of the MODIS-derived AOD value. Results indicated that this robust approach with monthly AOD calibration reported an improved average accuracy of PM10 retrieval from MODIS data by 50% compared to widely used calibration methods based on linear regression models, in addition to enabling further spatial patterns of periodic PM exposure to be undertaken.

  12. A robust calibration approach for PM10 prediction from MODIS aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, X. Q.; Hashim, M.

    2013-03-01

    Investigating the human health effects of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) using satellite data are gaining more attention due to their wide spatial coverage and temporal advantages. Such epidemiological studies are, however, susceptible to bias errors and resulted in poor predictive output in some locations. Current methods calibrate aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from MODIS to further predict PM. The recent satellite-based AOD calibration uses a mixed effects model to predict location-specific PM on a daily basis. The shortcomings of this daily AOD calibration are for areas of high probability of persistent cloud cover throughout the year such as in the humid tropical region along the equatorial belt. Contaminated pixels due to clouds causes radiometric errors in the MODIS AOD, thus causes poor predictive power on air quality. In contrary, a periodic assessment is more practical and robust especially in minimizing these cloud-related contaminations. In this paper, a simple yet robust calibration approach based on monthly AOD period is presented. We adopted the statistical fitting method with the adjustment technique to improve the predictive power of MODIS AOD. The adjustment was made based on the long-term observation (2001-2006) of PM10-AOD residual error characteristic. Furthermore, we also incorporated the ground PM measurement into the model as a weighting to reduce the bias of the MODIS-derived AOD value. Results indicated that this robust approach with monthly AOD calibration reported an improved average accuracy of PM10 retrieval from MODIS data by 50% compared to widely used calibration methods based on linear regression models, in addition to enabling further spatial patterns of periodic PM exposure to be undertaken.

  13. PM10 concentration levels at an urban and background site in Cyprus: the impact of urban sources and dust storms.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, Souzana; Evans, John S; Yiallouros, Panayiotis K; Kleanthous, Savvas; Schwartz, Joel; Koutrakis, Petros

    2014-12-01

    Air quality in Cyprus is influenced by both local and transported pollution, including desert dust storms. We examined PM10 concentration data collected in Nicosia (urban representative) from April 1, 1993, through December 11, 2008, and in Ayia Marina (rural background representative) from January 1, 1999, through December 31, 2008. Measurements were conducted using a Tapered Element Oscillating Micro-balance (TEOM). PM10 concentrations, meteorological records, and satellite data were used to identify dust storm days. We investigated long-term trends using a Generalized Additive Model (GAM) after controlling for day of week, month, temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity. In Nicosia, annual PM10 concentrations ranged from 50.4 to 63.8 μg/m3 and exceeded the EU annual standard limit enacted in 2005 of 40 μg/m3 every year A large, statistically significant impact of urban sources (defined as the difference between urban and background levels) was seen in Nicosia over the period 2000-2008, and was highest during traffic hours, weekdays, cold months, and low wind conditions. Our estimate of the mean (standard error) contribution of urban sources to the daily ambient PM10 was 24.0 (0.4) μg/m3. The study of yearly trends showed that PM10 levels in Nicosia decreased from 59.4 μg/m3 in 1993 to 49.0 μg/m3 in 2008, probably in part as a result of traffic emission control policies in Cyprus. In Ayia Marina, annual concentrations ranged from 27.3 to 35.6 μg/m3, and no obvious time trends were observed. The levels measured at the Cyprus background site are comparable to background concentrations reported in other Eastern Mediterranean countries. Average daily PM10 concentrations during desert dust storms were around 100 μg/m3 since 2000 and much higher in earlier years. Despite the large impact ofdust storms and their increasing frequency over time, dust storms were responsible for a small fraction of the exceedances of the daily PM10 limit. Implications: This

  14. Spatial Correlation Analysis between Particulate Matter 10 (PM10) Hazard and Respiratory Diseases in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trang, N. Ha; Tripathi, N. K.

    2014-11-01

    Every year, during dry season, Chiang Mai and other northern provinces of Thailand face the problem of haze which is mainly generated by the burning of agricultural waste and forest fire, contained high percentage of particulate matter. Particulate matter 10 (PM10), being very small in size, can be inhaled easily to the deepest parts of the human lung and throat respiratory functions. Due to this, it increases the risk of respiratory diseases mainly in the case of continuous exposure to this seasonal smog. MODIS aerosol images (MOD04) have been used for four weeks in March 2007 for generating the hazard map by linking to in-situ values of PM10. Simple linear regression model between PM10 and AOD got fair correlation with R2 = 0.7 and was applied to transform PM10 pattern. The hazard maps showed the dominance of PM10 in northern part of Chiang Mai, especially in second week of March when PM10 level was three to four times higher than standard. The respiratory disease records and public health station of each village were collected from Provincial Public Health Department in Chiang Mai province. There are about 300 public health stations out of 2070 villages; hence thiessen polygon was created to determine the representative area of each public health station. Within each thiessen polygon, respiratory disease incident rate (RDIR) was calculated based on the number of patients and population. Global Moran's I was computed for RDIR to explore spatial pattern of diseases through four weeks of March. Moran's I index depicted a cluster pattern of respiratory diseases in 2nd week than other weeks. That made sense for a relationship between PM10 and respiratory diseases infections. In order to examine how PM10 affect the human respiratory system, geographically weighted regression model was used to observe local correlation coefficient between RDIR and PM10 across study area. The result captured a high correlation between respiratory diseases and high level of PM10 in

  15. Identification of PM10 characteristics involved in cellular responses in human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas-2B).

    PubMed

    Van Den Heuvel, Rosette; Den Hond, Elly; Govarts, Eva; Colles, Ann; Koppen, Gudrun; Staelens, Jeroen; Mampaey, Maja; Janssen, Nicole; Schoeters, Greet

    2016-08-01

    Notwithstanding evidence is present that physicochemical characteristics of ambient particles attribute to adverse health effects, there is still some lack of understanding in this complex relationship. At this moment it is not clear which properties (such as particle size, chemical composition) or sources of the particles are most relevant for health effects. This study investigates the in vitro toxicity of PM10 in relation to PM chemical composition, black carbon (BC), endotoxin content and oxidative potential (OP). In 2013-2014 PM10 was sampled (24h sampling, 108 sampling days) in ambient air at three sites in Flanders (Belgium) with different pollution characteristics: an urban traffic site (Borgerhout), an industrial area (Zelzate) and a rural background location (Houtem). To characterize the toxic potential of PM10, airway epithelial cells (Beas-2B cells) have been exposed to particles in vitro. Different endpoints were studied including cell damage and death (cell viability) using the Neutral red Uptake assay, the production of pro-inflammatory molecules by interleukin 8 (IL-8) induction and DNA-damaging activity using the FPG-modified Comet assay. The endotoxin levels in the collected samples were analysed and the capacity of PM10 particles to produce reactive oxygen species (OP) was evaluated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Chemical characteristics of PM10 (BC, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) and meteorological conditions were recorded on the sampling days. PM10 particles exhibited dose-dependent cytotoxicity in Beas-2B cells and were found to significantly induce the release of IL-8 in samples from the three locations. Oxidatively damaged DNA was observed in exposed Beas-2B cells. Endotoxin levels above the detection limit were detected in half of the samples. OP was measurable in all samples. Associations between PM10 characteristics and biological effects of PM10 were assessed by single and multiple regression analyses. The

  16. Aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.00563 scale 142-inch diameter solid rocket booster (MSFC model 449 and 480) with side mounted stings in the NASA/MSFC 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel (SA14FA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, P. E.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation (SA14FA, TWT 620) was conducted in the MSFC 14-inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel (TWT) to determine the entry static stability of a 0.00563 scale shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB). The primary objective was to determine the effects of four side mounted sting configurations and to improve the definition of the aerodynamic characteristics in the vicinity of the SRB entry trim point. Data were obtained for two 60 and two 90 degree side mounted stings and a straight nose mounted sting. The angle of attack range for the side-mounted stings was 100 to 170 degrees while that for the nose mounted sting was 150 to 170 degrees. The Mach number range consisted of 0.6 to 3.48. Except for the aft attach ring, no protuberances were considered and the side slip and roll angles were zero. The test model was scaled from the 142-inch diameter SRB known as configuration 139 which was used during test TWT 572 (SA5F).

  17. Meteo-climatic conditions influence the contribution of endotoxins to PM10 in an urban polluted environment.

    PubMed

    Traversi, D; Alessandria, L; Schilirò, T; Chiadò Piat, S; Gilli, G

    2010-02-01

    A decrease in inhalable particulate matter (PM10) pollution is a top priority in urban areas of northern Italy. The sources of PM10 are both anthropogenic and natural. The former have been broadly investigated while the latter are less well known. Endotoxins are natural compounds of PM10 and are potentially toxic. Endotoxins are part of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Their health effects are linked to environmental exposure. The effects mainly consist of respiratory symptoms, including pulmonary function decline. The occurrence of endotoxins has been proven in several occupational environments where organic materials supply an optimal substrate for bacteria growth. Knowledge about the presence of these contaminants in the environment is limited. The aim of this work is to evaluate the endotoxin levels of PM10 in the urban air of Turin, and to investigate the influence of seasonal and meteo-climatic factors. The sampling was conducted from January to December 2007. Endotoxin determination was performed by an LAL assay after extraction optimization. The PM10 levels ranged from 11.90 to 104.74 microg/m(3) (48.28 +/- 23.09) while the endotoxin levels ranged between 0.09 and 0.94 EU/m(3) (0.42 +/- 0.23). The seasonal trends of PM10 and endotoxin are inversely proportional. There is a statistically significant correlation between endotoxin and temperature (r = 0.532 p < 0.01), as well as between endotoxin and relative humidity (r = -0.457 p < 0.01). However, temperature has a predominant role. We observed that urban endotoxin concentrations are narrow in range and that the contribution of endotoxins to the total PM10 is only two millionths.

  18. Assessment of resident's exposure level and health economic costs of PM10 in Beijing from 2008 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qing; An, Xingqin; Tao, Yan; Sun, Zhaobin

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have asserted a negative association between atmospheric particulates and human health, especially particulate matter (PM10), which can cause a noticeable damage to human health. In recent years, PM10 has become the primary pollutant in major cities in China. It is crucial to evaluate the health impacts of PM10 to make pollution control policies and protect public health. For health-based assessments, human exposure evaluation is a key step, which is related to offering an exact exposure date for assessment. Using high-density PM10 and population data based on the Geographic Information System (GIS), this study estimated the impact of PM10 on human exposure levels and combined the exposure-response function with the health-economic loss relationship to assess the effect of PM10 on human health in Beijing from 2008 to 2012 quantitatively. The results showed that the population distribution was highly centralized in urban areas, especially inside the fifth ring road. A high proportion, 63.4% of the population, was exposed to the range of 120 to 130μg/m(3). Approximately 44.1% of that population was located inside the fifth ring road, and approximately 55.9% of it was located outside of the fifth ring road. The spatial distribution of the economic cost associated with PM10 from 2008 to 2012 was uneven, being highly centralized in urban areas, especially inside the fifth ring road, similar to the population densities. The economic cost increased from 2008 to 2012, similar to GDP. The proportion of economic cost to Beijing's GDP decreased from 2008 to 2012. The average economic cost of 5years inside the fifth ring road was 4.55billion US$; that of the outside was 4.95billion US$. The proportions of average economic losses compared with GDP inside and outside of the fifth ring road changed slightly in the period from 2008 to 2012. PMID:27155078

  19. 40 CFR 93.116 - Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots). 93.116 Section 93.116 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....116 Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots). (a) This paragraph... hot-spot analysis in PM10 and PM2.5 nonattainment and maintenance areas for FHWA/FTA projects that...

  20. 40 CFR 93.116 - Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots). 93.116 Section 93.116 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....116 Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots). (a) This paragraph... hot-spot analysis in PM10 and PM2.5 nonattainment and maintenance areas for FHWA/FTA projects that...

  1. 40 CFR 93.116 - Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots). 93.116 Section 93.116 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....116 Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots). (a) This paragraph... hot-spot analysis in PM10 and PM2.5 nonattainment and maintenance areas for FHWA/FTA projects that...

  2. Urban aerosol in Oporto, Portugal: Chemical characterization of PM10 and PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custódio, Danilo; Ferreira, Catarina; Alves, Célia; Duarte, Mácio; Nunes, Teresa; Cerqueira, Mário; Pio, Casimiro; Frosini, Daniele; Colombi, Cristina; Gianelle, Vorne; Karanasiou, Angeliki; Querol, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Several urban and industrial areas in Southern Europe are not capable of meeting the implemented EU standards for particulate matter. Efficient air quality management is required in order to ensure that the legal limits are not exceeded and that the consequences of poor air quality are controlled and minimized. Many aspects of the direct and indirect effects of suspended particulate matter on climate and public health are not well understood. The temporal variation of the chemical composition is still demanded, since it enables to adopt off-set strategies and to better estimate the magnitude of anthropogenic forcing on climate. This study aims to provide detailed information on concentrations and chemical composition of aerosol from Oporto city, an urban center in Southern Europe. This city is located near the coast line in the North of Portugal, being the country's second largest urban area. Moreover, Oporto city economic prospects depend heavily on a diversified industrial park, which contribute to air quality degradation. Another strong source of air pollution is traffic. The main objectives of this study are: 1) to characterize the chemical composition of PM10 and PM2.5 by setting up an orchestra of aerosol sampling devices in a strategic place in Oporto; 2) to identify the sources of particles exploring parameters such as organic and inorganic markers (e.g. sugars as tracers for biomass burning; metals and elemental carbon for industrial and vehicular emissions); 3) to evaluate long range transport of pollutants using back trajectory analysis. Here we present data obtained between January 2013 and January 2014 in a heavy traffic roadside sampling site located in the city center. Different PM10 and PM2.5 samplers were operated simultaneously in order to collect enough mass on different filter matrixes and to fulfill the requirements of analytical methodologies. More than 100 aerosol samples were collected and then analysed for their mass concentration and

  3. Assessment of PM10 and heavy metals concentration in a Ceramic Cluster (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belen Vicente, Ana; Pardo, Francisco; Sanfeliu, Teofilo; Bech, Joan

    2013-04-01

    Environmental pollution control is one of the most important goals in pollution risk assessment today. The aim of this study is conducting a retrospective view of the evolution of particulate matter (PM10) and heavy metals (As, Cd, Ni and Pb) at different localities in the Spanish cluster ceramic in the period between January 2007 and December 2011. The study area is in the province of Castellón. This province is a strategical area in the framework of European Union Pollution control. Approximately 80% of European ceramic tiles and ceramic frits manufacturers are concentrated in two areas, forming the so-called "Ceramics Clusters"; one is in Modena (Italy) and the other in Castellón (Spain). In this kind of areas, there are a lot of pollutants from this industry that represent an important contribution to soil contamination so it is necessary to control the air quality in them. These atmospheric particles are deposited in the ground through both dry and wet deposition. Soil is a major sink for heavy metals released into the environment. The level of pollution of soils by heavy metals depends on the retention capacity of the soil, especially on physical-chemical properties (mineralogy, grain size, organic matter) affecting soil particle surfaces and also on the chemical properties of the metal. The most direct consequences on the ground of air pollutants are acidification, salinization and the pollutions that can cause heavy metals as components of suspended particulate matter. For this purpose the levels of PM10 in ambient air and the corresponding annual and weekly trend were calculated. The results of the study show that the PM10 and heavy metals concentrations are below the limit values recommended by European Union Legislation for the protection of human health and ecosystems in the study period. There is an important reduction of them from 2009 in all control stations due to the economic crisis. References Moral, R., Gilkes, R.J., Jordán, M.M., 2005

  4. Concentrations and emission factors for PM2.5 and PM10 from road traffic in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferm, Martin; Sjöberg, Karin

    2015-10-01

    PM10 concentrations exceed the guidelines in some Swedish cities and the limit values will likely be further reduced in the future. In order to gain more knowledge of emission factors for road traffic and concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5, existing monitoring stations in two cities, Gothenburg and Umeå, with international E-road thoroughfares, were complemented with some PM2.5 measurements. Emission factors for PM10 and PM2.5 were estimated using NOX as a tracer. Monitoring data from kerbside and urban background sites in Gothenburg during 2006-2010 and in Umeå during 2006-2012 were used. NOX emissions were estimated from the traffic flow and emission factors calculated from the HBEFA3.1 model. PM2.5 constitutes the finer part of PM10. Emissions of the coarser part of PM10 (PM10-PM2.5) are suppressed when roads are wet and show a maximum during spring when the roads dry up and studded tyres are still used. Less than 1% of the road wear caused by studded tyres give rise to airborne PM2.5-10 particles. The NOX emission factors decrease with time in the used model, due to the renewal of the vehicle fleet. However, the NOX concentrations resulting from the roads show no clear trend. The air dispersion is an important factor controlling the PM concentration near the road. The dispersion has a minimum in winter and during midnight. The average street level concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 in Gothenburg were 21 ± 20 and 8 ± 6 μg m-3 respectively, which is 36% and 22% higher than the urban background concentrations. Despite the four times lower traffic flow in Umeå compared to Gothenburg, the average particle concentrations were very similar; 21 ± 31 and 7 ± 5 μg m-3 for PM10 and PM2.5 respectively. These concentrations were, however, 108% and 55% higher than the urban background concentrations in Umeå. The emission factors for PM10 decreased with time, and the average factor was 0.06 g km-1 vehichle-1. The emission factors for PM2.5 are very uncertain due to the

  5. PM10 mass concentration, chemical composition, and sources in the typical coal-dominated industrial city of Pingdingshan, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoyan; Yang, Shushen; Shao, Longyi; Fan, Jingsen; Liu, Yanfei

    2016-11-15

    The atmospheric pollution created by coal-dominated industrial cities in China cannot be neglected. This study focuses on the atmospheric PM10 in the typical industrial city of Pingdingshan City in North China. A total of 44 PM10 samples were collected from three different sites (power plant, mining area, and roadside) in Pingdingshan City during the winter of 2013, and were analyzed gravimetrically and chemically. The Pingdingshan PM10 samples were composed of mineral matter (average of 118.0±58.6μg/m(3), 20.6% of the total PM10 concentration), secondary crystalline particles (338.7±122.0μg/m(3), 59.2%), organic matter (77.3±48.5μg/m(3), 13.5%), and elemental carbon (38.0±28.3μg/m(3), 6.6%). Different sources had different proportions of these components in PM10. The power plant pollutant source was characterized by secondary crystalline particles (377.1μg/m(3)), elemental carbon (51.5μg/m(3)), and organic matter (90.6μg/m(3)) due to coal combustion. The mining area pollutant source was characterized by mineral matter (124.0μg/m(3)) due to weathering of waste dumps. The roadside pollutant source was characterized by mineral matter (130.0μg/m(3)) and organic matter (81.0μg/m(3)) due to road dust and vehicle exhaust, respectively. A positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis was performed for PM10 source apportionment to identify major anthropogenic sources of PM10 in Pingdingshan. Six factors-crustal matter, coal combustion, vehicle exhaust and abrasion, local burning, weathering of waste dumps, and industrial metal smelting-were identified and their contributions to Pingdingshan PM10 were 19.0%, 31.6%, 7.4%, 6.3%, 9.8%, and 25.9%, respectively. Compared to other major cities in China, the source of PM10 in Pingdingshan was characterized by coal combustion, weathering of waste dumps, and industrial metal smelting. PMID:27450962

  6. Contamination characteristics and possible sources of PM10 and PM2.5 in different functional areas of Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Hu, Zimei; Chen, Yuanyuan; Chen, Zhenlou; Xu, Shiyuan

    2013-04-01

    From July 2009 through September 2010, PM10 and PM2.5 were collected at two different functional areas in Shanghai (Baoshan district, an industrial area, and Putuo district, a mixed-use area of residential, commercial, and educational compounds). In our analysis, 15 elements were determined using a 710-ES Inductively Coupled Plasma-Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES). The contents of PM2.5, PM10, and metal elements at the two different sites were comparatively analyzed. The results show that the mean annual concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 (149.22 μg m-3 and 103.07 μg m-3, respectively) in Baoshan district were significantly higher than those in Putuo district (97.44 μg m-3 and 62.25 μg m-3 respectively). The concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were both greatest in winter and lowest in summer, with the two different sites exhibiting the same seasonal variation. It was found that the proportions of 15 metal elements in PM10 and PM2.5 in Baoshan district were 20.49% and 20.56%, respectively, while the proportions in Putuo district were higher (25.98% and 25.93%, respectively). In addition, the proportions of eight heavy metals in PM10 and PM2.5 were 5.50% and 3.07%, respectively, for Baoshan district, while these proportions in Putuo district were 3.18% and 2.77%, respectively, indicating that heavy metal pollution is more pronounced in Baoshan district. Compared with cities in developed countries, the total levels of PM10, PM2.5 and heavy metals in Shanghai were slightly higher. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and principal component analysis (PCA) suggested that the possible sources of PM10 in Baoshan district were ground level fugitive dust, traffic sources, and industrial activities, whereas PM2.5 mainly originated from industrial activities, coal combustion, and traffic sources. The sources are same for PM10 and PM2.5 in Putuo region, which originate from traffic sources and ground level fugitive dust.

  7. Spatial distribution of particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) in Seoul Metropolitan Subway stations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Youn; Kim, Yoon Shin; Roh, Young Man; Lee, Cheol Min; Kim, Chi Nyon

    2008-06-15

    The aims of this study are to examine the concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 in areas within the Seoul Metropolitan Subway network and to provide fundamental data in order to protect respiratory health of subway workers and passengers from air pollutants. A total of 22 subway stations located on lines 1-4 were selected based on subway official's guidance. At these stations both subway worker areas (station offices, rest areas, ticket offices and driver compartments) and passengers areas (station precincts, subway carriages and platforms) were the sites used for measuring the levels of PM. The mean concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were relatively higher on platforms, inside subway carriages and in driver compartments than in the other areas monitored. The levels of PM10 and PM2.5 for station precincts and platforms exceeded the 24-h acceptable threshold limits of 150 microg/m3 for PM10 and 35 microg/m3 for PM2.5, which are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). However, levels measured in station and ticket offices fell below the respective threshold. The mean PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations on platforms located underground were significantly higher than those at ground level (p<0.05). PMID:18036738

  8. Performance of Passive Samplers Analyzed by Computer-Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy to Measure PM10-2.5.

    PubMed

    Peters, Thomas M; Sawvel, Eric J; Willis, Robert; West, Roger R; Casuccio, Gary S

    2016-07-19

    We report on the precision and accuracy of measuring PM10-2.5 and its components with particles collected by passive aerosol samplers and analyzed by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Passive samplers were deployed for week-long intervals in triplicate and colocated with a federal reference method sampler at three sites and for 5 weeks in summer 2009 and 5 weeks in winter 2010 in Cleveland, OH. The limit of detection of the passive method for PM10-2.5 determined from blank analysis was 2.8 μg m(-3). Overall precision expressed as root-mean-square coefficient of variation (CVRMS) improved with increasing concentrations (37% for all samples, n = 30; 19% for PM10-2.5 > 10 μg m(-3), n = 9; and 10% for PM10-2.5 > 15 μg m(-3), n = 4). The linear regression of PM10-2.5 measured passively on that measured with the reference sampler exhibited an intercept not statistically different than zero (p = 0.46) and a slope not statistically different from unity (p = 0.92). Triplicates with high CVs (CV > 40%, n = 5) were attributed to low particle counts (and mass concentrations), spurious counts attributed to salt particles, and Al-rich particles. This work provides important quantitative observations that can help guide future development and use of passive samplers for measuring atmospheric particulate matter. PMID:27300163

  9. Analysis of the possible measurement errors for the PM10 concentration measurement at Gosan, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, S.; Kim, Y.; Jung, C.

    2010-12-01

    The reliability of the measurement of ambient trace species is an important issue, especially, in a background area such as Gosan in Jeju Island, Korea. In a previous episodic study in Gosan (NIER, 2006), it was found that the measured PM10 concentration by the β-ray absorption method (BAM) was higher than the gravimetric method (GMM) and the correlation between them was low. Based on the previous studies (Chang et al., 2001; Katsuyuki et al., 2008) two probable reasons for the discrepancy are identified; (1) negative measurement error by the evaporation of volatile ambient species at the filter in GMM such as nitrate, chloride, and ammonium and (2) positive error by the absorption of water vapor during measurement in BAM. There was no heater at the inlet of BAM in Gosan during the sampling period. In this study, we have analyzed negative and positive error quantitatively by using a gas/particle equilibrium model SCAPE (Simulating Composition of Atmospheric Particles at Equilibrium) for the data between May 2001 and June 2008 with the aerosol and gaseous composition data. We have estimated the degree of the evaporation at the filter in GMM by comparing the volatile ionic species concentration calculated by SCAPE at thermodynamic equilibrium state under the meteorological conditions during the sampling period and mass concentration measured by ion chromatography. Also, based on the aerosol water content calculated by SCAPE, We have estimated quantitatively the effect of ambient humidity during measurement in BAM. Subsequently, this study shows whether the discrepancy can be explained by some other factors by applying multiple regression analyses. References Chang, C. T., Tsai, C. J., Lee, C. T., Chang, S. Y., Cheng, M. T., Chein, H. M., 2001, Differences in PM10 concentrations measured by β-gauge monitor and hi-vol sampler, Atmospheric Environment, 35, 5741-5748. Katsuyuki, T. K., Hiroaki, M. R., and Kazuhiko, S. K., 2008, Examination of discrepancies between beta

  10. MLP based models to predict PM10, O3 concentrations, in Sines industrial area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durao, R.; Pereira, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    Sines is an important Portuguese industrial area located southwest cost of Portugal with important nearby protected natural areas. The main economical activities are related with this industrial area, the deep-water port, petrochemical and thermo-electric industry. Nevertheless, tourism is also an important economic activity especially in summer time with potential to grow. The aim of this study is to develop prediction models of pollutant concentration categories (e.g. low concentration and high concentration) in order to provide early warnings to the competent authorities who are responsible for the air quality management. The knowledge in advanced of pollutant high concentrations occurrence will allow the implementation of mitigation actions and the release of precautionary alerts to population. The regional air quality monitoring network consists in three monitoring stations where a set of pollutants' concentrations are registered on a continuous basis. From this set stands out the tropospheric ozone (O3) and particulate matter (PM10) due to the high concentrations occurring in the region and their adverse effects on human health. Moreover, the major industrial plants of the region monitor SO2, NO2 and particles emitted flows at the principal chimneys (point sources), also on a continuous basis,. Therefore Artificial neuronal networks (ANN) were the applied methodology to predict next day pollutant concentrations; due to the ANNs structure they have the ability to capture the non-linear relationships between predictor variables. Hence the first step of this study was to apply multivariate exploratory techniques to select the best predictor variables. The classification trees methodology (CART) was revealed to be the most appropriate in this case.. Results shown that pollutants atmospheric concentrations are mainly dependent on industrial emissions and a complex combination of meteorological factors and the time of the year. In the second step, the Multi

  11. Investigations into formation of atmospheric sulfate under high PM 10 concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mukesh; Kiran, Y. N. V. M.; Shandilya, Kaushik K.

    This study was primarily initiated to understand the consistently low levels of SO 2 in cities in India in spite of rising SO 2 emissions. A literature review suggested the possibility of chemical transformation of SO 2 to SO 4. Thus, the objective of research was to understand the formation of SO 4 as a function of SO 2, and other constituents of atmosphere such as PM 10, water content, Ca (in aerosol) and pH (of aerosol). For this purpose, air quality monitoring was conducted at five locations in the city of Kanpur, India (during October 1999-April 2000) representing various land-use patterns. It was found that the SO 4 levels were considerably high (2.8-43.6 μg m -3) compared to levels in cities in the US (1.9-3.6 μg m -3, Sandberg et al. (J. Air Pollut. Control Assoc. 26 (1976) 559; 15.7-18.4 μg m -3, Altshuller (J. Air Pollut. Control Assoc. 26 (1976) 318; 4.0-14.0 μg m -3 Dockery et al. (J. Med. 329 (1993) 1753), UK (3.2-9.0 μg m -3, QUARG, 1996 http://www.environment.detr.gov.uk/airq/consult/naqs/index.htm), and 25 locations in Europe (0.34-1.68 μg m -3 (1991-1999), EMEP website), but were comparable to the levels observed at Agra (14.67 μg m -3, Kulshrestha et al. Indian J. Radio Space Phys. 24 (1995) 178) and at New Delhi (12.9-27.5 μg m -3, Shandilya, M.E. Thesis, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur, India, 2000). The high SO 4 levels could provide a plausible explanation for low SO 2 concentration levels in the city of Kanpur. It was concluded that high levels of PM 10, Ca and high pH of aerosols in atmosphere provide a conducive environment for conversion of SO 2 to SO 4. It was also concluded that the important migration pathway in study area for the transformation of SO 2 to SO 4 appears to be oxidation of SO 2 on the surfaces (of particulate) available in the ambient atmosphere.

  12. PM 2.5 and PM 10: The influence of sugarcane burning on potential cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Flavio S.; Cristale, Joyce; André, Paulo A.; Saldiva, Paulo H. N.; Marchi, Mary R. R.

    2010-12-01

    In Brazil, sugarcane fields are often burned to facilitate manual harvesting, and this burning causes environmental pollution from the large amounts of soot released into the atmosphere. This material contains numerous organic compounds such as PAHs. In this study, the concentrations of PAHs in two particulate-matter fractions (PM 2.5 and PM 10) in the city of Araraquara (SE Brazil, with around 200,000 inhabitants and surrounded by sugarcane plantations) were determined during the sugarcane harvest (HV) and non-harvest (NHV) seasons in 2008 and 2009. The sampling strategy included four campaigns, with 60 samples in the NHV season and 220 samples in the HV season. The PM 2.5 and PM 10 fractions were collected using a dichotomous sampler (10 L min -1, 24 h) with Teflon™ filters. The filter sets were extracted (ultrasonic bath with hexane/acetone (1:1 v/v)) and analyzed by HPLC/Fluorescence. The median concentration for total PAHs (PM 2.5 in 2009) was 0.99 ng m -3 (NHV) and 3.3 ng m -3 (HV). In the HV season, the total concentration of carcinogenic PAHs (benz(a)anthracene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene) was 5 times higher than in the NHV season. B(a)P median concentrations were 0.017 ng m -3 and 0.12 ng m -3 for the NHV and HV seasons, respectively. The potential cancer risk associated with exposure through inhalation of these compounds was estimated based on the benzo[a]pyrene toxic equivalence (BaP eq), where the overall toxicity of a PAH mixture is defined by the concentration of each compound multiplied by its relative toxic equivalence factor (TEF). BaP eq median (2008 and 2009 years) ranged between 0.65 and 1.0 ng m -3 and 1.2-1.4 ng m -3 for the NHV and HV seasons, respectively. Considering that the maximum permissible BaP eq in ambient air is 1 ng m -3, related to the increased carcinogenic risk, our data suggest that the level of human exposure to PAHs in cities surrounded by sugarcane crops where the burning process is used

  13. Environmental justice in the context of commuters' exposure to CO and PM10 in Bangalore, India.

    PubMed

    Sabapathy, Ashwin; Saksena, Sumeet; Flachsbart, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Information Technology (IT) industry in the globalizing city of Bangalore has transformed the socio-economic characteristics of the city. The intent of this study, developed from an environmental justice framework, was to determine whether air pollutant exposure while commuting to and from work is related to a commuter's income characteristics and whether differences are larger for the IT economy when compared with a traditional manufacturing-oriented economy of the city. The study measured exposures to CO and PM10 using personal samplers for a sample of employees of a traditional public sector manufacturing industry (n=20) and an IT industry (n=26). This approach overcomes the methodological limitations of previous environmental justice studies. Socio-economic characteristics were obtained from a questionnaire-based survey of 436 employees in two firms. The results do not support the environmental justice hypothesis for commuting in Bangalore mainly because longer commuting times of higher-income groups offsets the benefits of lower pollutant concentrations. The study nevertheless demonstrates the use of personal exposure for environmental justice assessments.

  14. Seasonal variation of PM 10-bound PAHs in the atmosphere of Xiamen, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, HuaSheng; Yin, HongLing; Wang, XinHong; Ye, CuiXing

    2007-09-01

    PM 10 samples from a garden site (site A), an industrial-traffic intersection (site B), a residential site (site C) and an island site (site D) were collected at December 21-29, 2004; March 18-22, 2005; July 4-13, 2005 and October 24-28, 2005 in Xiamen. 15 priority PAHs compounds were analyzed by using a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The abundance and origin of PAHs are discussed to reveal seasonal variations in Xiamen air quality. Average concentrations of Σ15PAHs were 17.5 ng/m 3, 3.7 ng/m 3, 32.6 ng/m 3 and 10.5 ng/m 3 from spring to winter with the highest value in autumn. The dominant PAHs components in every season were low and middle molecular weight PAHs including phenanthrene, pyrene, fluoranthene and chrysene. Diagnostic ratios and PCA analysis identified the main sources of particle bound PAHs: mainly from both gasoline and diesel vehicles exhaust, with some contribution from coal combustion, industry emission and cooking sources.

  15. Exposure assessment of a cyclist to PM10 and ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Berghmans, P; Bleux, N; Int Panis, L; Mishra, V K; Torfs, R; Van Poppel, M

    2009-02-01

    Estimating personal exposure to air pollution is a crucial component in identifying high-risk populations and situations. It will enable policy makers to determine efficient control strategies. Cycling is again becoming a favorite mode of transport both in developing and in developed countries due to increasing traffic congestion and environmental concerns. In Europe, it is also seen as a healthy sports activity. However, due to high levels of hazardous pollutants in the present day road microenvironment the cyclist might be at a higher health risk due to higher breathing rate and proximity to the vehicular exhaust. In this paper we present estimates of the exposure of a cyclist to particles of various size fractions including ultrafine particles (UFP) in the town of Mol (Flanders, Belgium). The results indicate relatively higher UFP concentration exposure during morning office hours and moderate UFP levels during afternoon. The major sources of UFP and PM(10) were identified, which are vehicular emission and construction activities, respectively. We also present a dust mapping technique which can be a useful tool for town planners and local policy makers.

  16. Environmental justice in the context of commuters' exposure to CO and PM10 in Bangalore, India.

    PubMed

    Sabapathy, Ashwin; Saksena, Sumeet; Flachsbart, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Information Technology (IT) industry in the globalizing city of Bangalore has transformed the socio-economic characteristics of the city. The intent of this study, developed from an environmental justice framework, was to determine whether air pollutant exposure while commuting to and from work is related to a commuter's income characteristics and whether differences are larger for the IT economy when compared with a traditional manufacturing-oriented economy of the city. The study measured exposures to CO and PM10 using personal samplers for a sample of employees of a traditional public sector manufacturing industry (n=20) and an IT industry (n=26). This approach overcomes the methodological limitations of previous environmental justice studies. Socio-economic characteristics were obtained from a questionnaire-based survey of 436 employees in two firms. The results do not support the environmental justice hypothesis for commuting in Bangalore mainly because longer commuting times of higher-income groups offsets the benefits of lower pollutant concentrations. The study nevertheless demonstrates the use of personal exposure for environmental justice assessments. PMID:24849797

  17. Synergistic inflammatory effect of PM10 with mycotoxin deoxynivalenol on human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Laura; Longhin, Eleonora; Caloni, Francesca; Camatini, Marina; Gualtieri, Maurizio

    2015-09-15

    The presence of deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium species, has been reported worldwide in food and feedstuffs. Even though oral intake is the main route of exposure, DON inhalation is also of concern in workers and exposed population. Particulate matter (PM) is one of the most important causes of air quality detriment and it induces several adverse health effects. Therefore it is of primary importance to understand possible combined effects of DON and PM. The alveolar type II, A549, and the bronchial epithelial, BEAS-2B, cell lines were exposed for 24 h to different concentrations of DON (10-1000 ng/ml), PM10 (5 μg/cm(2), sampled in summer or winter season), and a combination of these pollutants. Cell death, interleukins release and cell cycle alteration were analysed; protein array technique was also applied to evaluate proteins activation related to MAP-kinases cascade. Our results demonstrate that low doses of PM and DON used alone have scarce toxic effects, while induce cytotoxicity and inflammation when used in combination. This observation outlines the importance of investigation on the combined effects of air pollutants for their possible outcomes on human health. PMID:26263889

  18. Transformation of phosphorus during combustion of coal and sewage sludge and its contributions to PM10

    SciTech Connect

    Lian Zhang; Yoshihiko Ninomiya

    2007-07-01

    Emission of airborne P-bearing particulates from combustion of both coal and sewage sludge samples has been studied in a lab-scale drop tube furnace. The results indicate that both the organically bound fraction of phosphorus and its inorganic species in a complex form containing Si, Al, Ca, Fe, P and O at non-stoichiometric ratios appear to vaporize readily. The resultant phosphorus vapors undergo oxidation, chemical reactions with other metallic vapors including Na/K/Zn, nucleation, and homogeneous/heterogeneous coagulation to form a mixture of their oxides and phosphates with particle sizes smaller than 1.0 {mu}m. On the other hand, phosphorus in the larger fractions, {gt}1.0 {mu}m, mainly consist of apatite and condensed melting phases, which may have been formed through the direct liberation of inherent apatite in raw fuels and the shedding of melting P-bearing particles from the char surface. The amounts of phosphorus in each fraction of PM10 vary considerably with fuel type and combustion conditions. 15 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Dispersion of TSP and PM(10) emissions from quarries in complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Tartakovsky, Dmitry; Stern, Eli; Broday, David M

    2016-01-15

    This study evaluates AERMOD and CALPUFF dispersion calculations of particulate matter emissions from stone quarries in two mountainous regions against TSP and PM10 measurements, using both observational and WRF-modeled meteorological data. Due to different model parameterization, AERMOD dispersion predictions were in better agreement with the measured concentrations than those obtained by CALPUFF. As expected, the smaller the distance between the meteorological station, the source (quarry) and the receptors, the better the predictions of both AERMOD and CALPUFF. In contrast, using in-situ wind field obtained by runs of the WRF meteorological model for the complex terrain study area provided, in general, less accurate dispersion estimates than when using (even remote) meteorological observations. In particular, using the three-dimensional WRF-modeled wind field within CALPUFF did not provide any advantage over using the two-dimensional wind field, which is the common procedure of AERMOD and CALPUFF. Dry deposition was more significant for ambient concentration estimation in AERMOD than in CALPUFF.

  20. Synergistic inflammatory effect of PM10 with mycotoxin deoxynivalenol on human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Laura; Longhin, Eleonora; Caloni, Francesca; Camatini, Marina; Gualtieri, Maurizio

    2015-09-15

    The presence of deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium species, has been reported worldwide in food and feedstuffs. Even though oral intake is the main route of exposure, DON inhalation is also of concern in workers and exposed population. Particulate matter (PM) is one of the most important causes of air quality detriment and it induces several adverse health effects. Therefore it is of primary importance to understand possible combined effects of DON and PM. The alveolar type II, A549, and the bronchial epithelial, BEAS-2B, cell lines were exposed for 24 h to different concentrations of DON (10-1000 ng/ml), PM10 (5 μg/cm(2), sampled in summer or winter season), and a combination of these pollutants. Cell death, interleukins release and cell cycle alteration were analysed; protein array technique was also applied to evaluate proteins activation related to MAP-kinases cascade. Our results demonstrate that low doses of PM and DON used alone have scarce toxic effects, while induce cytotoxicity and inflammation when used in combination. This observation outlines the importance of investigation on the combined effects of air pollutants for their possible outcomes on human health.

  1. Assessment of microbial communities in PM1 and PM10 of Urumqi during winter.

    PubMed

    Gou, Huange; Lu, Jianjiang; Li, Shanman; Tong, Yanbin; Xie, Chunbin; Zheng, Xiaowu

    2016-07-01

    Recently, inhalable particulate matter has been reported to carry microorganisms responsible for human allergy and respiratory disease. The unique geographical environment and adverse weather conditions of Urumqi cause double pollution of dust and smog, but research on the microbial content of the atmosphere has not been commenced. In this study, 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequencing were conducted to investigate the microbial composition of Urumqi's PM1 and PM10 pollutants in winter. Results showed that the bacterial community is mainly composed of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria accounted for the most proportion which was significant difference in some aforementioned studies. Ascomycota and Basidiomycota constitute the main part of the fungal microbial community. The difference of bacterial relative abundance in sample point is greater than in particle sizes. The sequences of several pathogenic bacteria and opportunistic pathogens were also detected, such as Acinetobacter, Delftia, Serratia, Chryseobacterium, which may impact on immunocompromised populations (elderly, children and postoperative convalescence patients), and some fungal genera may cause several plant diseases. Our findings may serve an important reference value in the global air microbial propagation and air microbial research in desert. PMID:27086076

  2. Contribution of vehicular traffic and industrial facilities to PM10 concentrations in a suburban area of Caserta (Italy).

    PubMed

    Iovino, Pasquale; Canzano, Silvana; Leone, Vincenzo; Berto, Chiara; Salvestrini, Stefano; Capasso, Sante

    2014-12-01

    PM10 levels have been recorded in the suburban area of Caserta (Italy) from February to October 2012. The daily limit was exceeded in 13 % of the determinations, with no significant difference between weekdays and weekends. Benzo[a]pyrene concentrations were in the range 0.01-0.46 ng/m(3), thus, never exceeding the National Standard. The B(a)P-eq was 0.20 ng/m(3). PM10 peaks were associated with wind from east-northeast. The same was observed for Ca concentrations, whereas no relation with wind direction was observed for organic pollutants. The results point to a local limestone quarry and cement factory as the likely major source of PM10 pollution in the area investigated. PMID:24136577

  3. Repeated Intratracheal Instillation of PM10 Induces Lipid Reshaping in Lung Parenchyma and in Extra-Pulmonary Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Angela Maria; Montorfano, Gigliola; Pani, Giuseppe; Battaglia, Cristina; Sancini, Giulio; Palestini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Adverse health effects of air pollution attributed mainly to airborne particulate matter have been well documented in the last couple of decades. Short term exposure, referring to a few hours exposure, to high ambient PM10 concentration is linked to increased hospitalization rates for cardiovascular events, typically 24 h after air pollution peaks. Particulate matter exposure is related to pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases, with increased oxidative stress and inflammatory status. Previously, we have demonstrated that repeated intratracheal instillation of PM10sum in BALB/c mice leads to respiratory tract inflammation, creating in lung a condition which could potentially evolve in a systemic toxic reaction. Additionally, plasma membrane and tissue lipids are easily affected by oxidative stress and directly correlated with inflammatory products. With this aim, in the present investigation using the same model, we analyzed the toxic potential of PM10sum exposure on lipid plasma membrane composition, lipid peroxidation and the mechanisms of cells protection in multiple organs such as lung, heart, liver and brain. Obtained results indicated that PM10 exposure led to lung lipid reshaping, in particular phospholipid and cholesterol content increases; concomitantly, the generation of oxidative stress caused lipid peroxidation. In liver we found significant changes in lipid content, mainly due to an increase of phosphatidylcholine, and in total fatty acid composition with a more pronounced level of docosahexaenoic acid; these changes were statistically correlated to lung molecular markers. Heart and brain were similarly affected; heart was significantly enriched in triglycerides in half of the PM10sum treated mice. These results demonstrated a direct involvement of PM10sum in affecting lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in peripheral tissues that might be related to the serious systemic air-pollution effects on human health. PMID:25259850

  4. Repeated intratracheal instillation of PM10 induces lipid reshaping in lung parenchyma and in extra-pulmonary tissues.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Angela Maria; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Farina, Francesca; Montorfano, Gigliola; Pani, Giuseppe; Battaglia, Cristina; Sancini, Giulio; Palestini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Adverse health effects of air pollution attributed mainly to airborne particulate matter have been well documented in the last couple of decades. Short term exposure, referring to a few hours exposure, to high ambient PM10 concentration is linked to increased hospitalization rates for cardiovascular events, typically 24 h after air pollution peaks. Particulate matter exposure is related to pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases, with increased oxidative stress and inflammatory status. Previously, we have demonstrated that repeated intratracheal instillation of PM10sum in BALB/c mice leads to respiratory tract inflammation, creating in lung a condition which could potentially evolve in a systemic toxic reaction. Additionally, plasma membrane and tissue lipids are easily affected by oxidative stress and directly correlated with inflammatory products. With this aim, in the present investigation using the same model, we analyzed the toxic potential of PM10sum exposure on lipid plasma membrane composition, lipid peroxidation and the mechanisms of cells protection in multiple organs such as lung, heart, liver and brain. Obtained results indicated that PM10 exposure led to lung lipid reshaping, in particular phospholipid and cholesterol content increases; concomitantly, the generation of oxidative stress caused lipid peroxidation. In liver we found significant changes in lipid content, mainly due to an increase of phosphatidylcholine, and in total fatty acid composition with a more pronounced level of docosahexaenoic acid; these changes were statistically correlated to lung molecular markers. Heart and brain were similarly affected; heart was significantly enriched in triglycerides in half of the PM10sum treated mice. These results demonstrated a direct involvement of PM10sum in affecting lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in peripheral tissues that might be related to the serious systemic air-pollution effects on human health. PMID:25259850

  5. PM10 and PM2.5 composition over the Central Black Sea: origin and seasonal variability.

    PubMed

    Koçak, M; Mihalopoulos, N; Tutsak, E; Theodosi, C; Zarmpas, P; Kalegeri, P

    2015-11-01

    Daily PM10 and PM2.5 samples were collected between April 2009 and July 2010 at a rural site (Sinop) situated on the coast of the Central Black Sea. The concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were 23.2 ± 16.7 and 9.8 ± 6.9 μg m(-3), respectively. Coarse and fine filters were analyzed for Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), C2O4(2-), PO4(3-), Na(+), NH4(+), K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) by using ion chromatography. Elemental and organic carbon content in bulk quartz filters were also analyzed. The highest PM2.5 contribution to PM10 was found in summer with a value of 0.54 due to enhanced secondary aerosols in relation to photochemistry. Cl(-), Na(+), and Mg(2+) illustrated their higher concentrations and variability during winter. Chlorine depletion was chiefly attributed to nitrate. Higher nssCa(2+) concentrations were ascribed to episodic mineral dust intrusions from North Africa into the region. Crustal material (31%) and sea salt (13%) were found to be accounted for the majority of the PM10. The ionic mass (IM), particulate organic matter (POM), and elemental carbon (EC) explained 13, 20, and 3% of the PM10 mass, correspondingly. The IM, POM, and EC dominated the PM2.5 (~74%) mass. Regarding EU legislation, the exceeded PM2.5 values were found to be associated with secondary aerosols, with a particular dominance of POM. For the exceeded PM10 values, six of the events were dominated by dust while two and four of these exceedances were caused by sea salt and mix events, respectively. PMID:26174981

  6. Repeated intratracheal instillation of PM10 induces lipid reshaping in lung parenchyma and in extra-pulmonary tissues.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Angela Maria; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Farina, Francesca; Montorfano, Gigliola; Pani, Giuseppe; Battaglia, Cristina; Sancini, Giulio; Palestini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Adverse health effects of air pollution attributed mainly to airborne particulate matter have been well documented in the last couple of decades. Short term exposure, referring to a few hours exposure, to high ambient PM10 concentration is linked to increased hospitalization rates for cardiovascular events, typically 24 h after air pollution peaks. Particulate matter exposure is related to pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases, with increased oxidative stress and inflammatory status. Previously, we have demonstrated that repeated intratracheal instillation of PM10sum in BALB/c mice leads to respiratory tract inflammation, creating in lung a condition which could potentially evolve in a systemic toxic reaction. Additionally, plasma membrane and tissue lipids are easily affected by oxidative stress and directly correlated with inflammatory products. With this aim, in the present investigation using the same model, we analyzed the toxic potential of PM10sum exposure on lipid plasma membrane composition, lipid peroxidation and the mechanisms of cells protection in multiple organs such as lung, heart, liver and brain. Obtained results indicated that PM10 exposure led to lung lipid reshaping, in particular phospholipid and cholesterol content increases; concomitantly, the generation of oxidative stress caused lipid peroxidation. In liver we found significant changes in lipid content, mainly due to an increase of phosphatidylcholine, and in total fatty acid composition with a more pronounced level of docosahexaenoic acid; these changes were statistically correlated to lung molecular markers. Heart and brain were similarly affected; heart was significantly enriched in triglycerides in half of the PM10sum treated mice. These results demonstrated a direct involvement of PM10sum in affecting lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in peripheral tissues that might be related to the serious systemic air-pollution effects on human health.

  7. Spatial and temporal variations in airborne particulate matter (PM 10 and PM 2.5) across Spain 1999-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Moreno, T.; Viana, M. M.; Castillo, S.; Pey, J.; Rodríguez, S.; Artiñano, B.; Salvador, P.; Sánchez, M.; Garcia Dos Santos, S.; Herce Garraleta, M. D.; Fernandez-Patier, R.; Moreno-Grau, S.; Negral, L.; Minguillón, M. C.; Monfort, E.; Sanz, M. J.; Palomo-Marín, R.; Pinilla-Gil, E.; Cuevas, E.; de la Rosa, J.; Sánchez de la Campa, A.

    Average ranges of particulate matter (PM 10 and PM 2.5) concentrations and chemical composition in Spain show significant variations across the country, with current PM 10 levels at several industrial and traffic hotspots exceeding recommended pollution limits. Such variations and exceedances are linked to patterns of anthropogenic and natural PM emissions, climate, and reactivity/stability of particulate species. PM 10 and PM 2.5 concentrations reach 14-22 μg PM 10 m -3 and 8-12 μg PM 2.5 m -3 at most rural/regional background sites, 25-30 μg PM 10 m -3 and 15-20μg PM 2.5 m -3 at suburban sites, 30-46 μg PM 10 m -3 and 20-30 μg PM 2.5 m -3 at urban background and industrial sites, and 46-50 μg PM 10 m -3 and 30-35 μg PM 2.5 m -3 at heavy traffic hotpots. Spatial distributions show sulphate and carbon particle levels reach maxima in industrialised areas and large cities (where traffic emissions are higher), and nitrate levels increase from the Atlantic to the Mediterranean (independent of the regional NO x emissions). African dust outbreaks have an influence on the number of exceedances of the daily limit value, but its additional load on the mean annual PM 10 levels is only highly significant in Southern Iberia and Canary and Balearic islands. The marine aerosol contribution is near one order of magnitude higher in the Canaries compared to the other regions. Important temporal influences include PM intrusion events from Africa (more abundant in February-March and spring-summer), regional-scale pollution episodes, and weekday versus weekend activity. Higher summer insolation enhances (NH 4) 2SO 4 but depletes particulate NO 3- (as a consequence of the thermal instability of ammonium nitrate in summer) and Cl - (due to HCl volatilisation resulting from the interaction of gaseous HNO 3 with the marine NaCl), as well as generally increasing dry dust resuspension under a semi-arid climate. Average trace metal concentrations rise with the highest levels at

  8. The oxidative potential of PM10 from coal, briquettes and wood charcoal burnt in an experimental domestic stove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Longyi; Hou, Cong; Geng, Chunmei; Liu, Junxia; Hu, Ying; Wang, Jing; Jones, Tim; Zhao, Chengmei; BéruBé, Kelly

    2016-02-01

    Coal contains many potentially harmful trace elements. Coal combustion in unvented stoves, which is common in most parts of rural China, can release harmful emissions into the air that when inhaled cause health issues. However, few studies have dealt specifically with the toxicological mechanisms of the particulate matter (PM) released by coal and other solid fuel combustion. In this paper, PM10 particles that were generated during laboratory stove combustion of raw powdered coal, clay-mixed honeycomb briquettes, and wood charcoal were analysed for morphology, trace element compositions, and toxicity as represented by oxidative DNA damage. The analyses included Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Plasmid Scission Assay (PSA). Gravimetric analysis indicated that the equivalent mass concentration of PM10 emitted by burning raw powdered coal was higher than that derived by burning honeycomb briquette. FESEM observation revealed that the coal burning-derived PM10 particles were mainly soot aggregates. The PSA results showed that the PM10 emitted by burning honeycomb briquettes had a higher oxidative capacity than that from burning raw powdered coal and wood charcoal. It is also demonstrated that the oxidative capacity of the whole particle suspensions were similar to those of the water soluble fractions; indicating that the DNA damage induced by coal burning-derived PM10 were mainly a result of the water-soluble fraction. An ICP-MS analysis revealed that the amount of total analysed water-soluble elements in the PM10 emitted by burning honeycomb briquettes was higher than that in PM produced by burning raw powdered coal, and both were higher than PM from burning wood charcoal. The total analysed water-soluble elements in these coal burning-derived PM10 samples had a significantly positive correlation with the level of DNA damage; indicating that the oxidative capacity of the coal burning

  9. PM10 and PM2.5 and health risk assessment for heavy metals in a typical factory for cathode ray tube television recycling.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wenxiong; Yang, Yichen; Xu, Zhenming

    2013-01-01

    The representative waste television recycling process was chosen as the object of this study, including manual dismantling and mechanical separation of printed circuit boards (PCBs) and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) in two independent workshops. During these recycling processes, fine particulate matter and heavy metals will be released into the air to impact the environment and the health of the workers. The mass concentrations of PM2.5 (particles below 2.5 μm diameter) in mechanical and dismantling workshops ranged from 252.6 to 290.8 μg/m(3) and from 112.7 to 169.4 μg/m(3), respectively. The average concentration of PM2.5 around the workshop was 98.5 μg/m(3). Meanwhile, the contents of PM10 (particles below 10 μm diameter) were all below the risk threshold, except that (360.4 μg/m(3)) monitored in the mechanical workshop. In two workshops, Pb (20.46 and 6.935 mg/g) was the most enriched metal in the PM2.5 samples, while in PM10, the concentration of Cu (27.76 and 31.80 mg/g) was the largest. The concentration of Cd was the least in both PM10 and PM2.5. Health risk assessment showed that the total hazard indexes for non-carcinogenic metal in PM2.5 monitored in mechanical and dismantling workshops and in the southeast of the workshops were 7.61, 3.01, and 1.57, respectively, all above the safety level. Furthermore, Pb (7.28 and 3.01) might possibly have a non-carcinogenic effect on the workers in two workshops, and the sequence of the hazard quotient (HQ) through the three exposure ways was ingestion > dermal contact > inhalation. The lifetime cancer risk of four targeted metals was Cr > Ni > Pb > Cd, which could be proven in all monitoring samples. This study aims to provide a large amount of valid data for the State Environmental Protection Department to develop relevant environmental standards and for companies to improve the waste television recycling system to be more efficiently and environmentally friendly.

  10. Assessment of ozone and PM-10 precursor emissions from the dairy industry

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, C.E.; Ungvarsky, J.; Winegar, E.

    1997-12-31

    Many new regulations have resulted in the need to assess and better understand a variety of industries with air emission sources that have not been studied in the past. The dairy industry is one such industry with area air emission sources that are now being studied for evaluation and ranking with the intent to control air emissions that exceed regulatory acceptance standards, especially for ozone precursors. The area sources at a dairy include facility processes such as dry feed lot, flushed lanes, settling ponds, liquid waste storage, waste windrows, cow washing area, milk parlor, dry cow area birthing area, feed storage, and livestock waste fertilizer usage areas. Given that these processes are area sources and dynamic and highly variable, assessment requires proper selection of measurement technology and innovative applications. Direct assessment flux chamber technology was used to assess the air emissions from dairies located in northern California. All process were screened and evaluated for testing, and all significant air emission sources were studied. A variety of compounds were studied in order to satisfy program objectives, including: volatile organic compounds, semi-volatile organic compounds, amine, ammonia, reduced sulfur compounds, aldehydes, ketones, and fixed gases. Analytical development work extending applicability of methods, such as EPA TO-14 for semi-volatile compounds, assessing total content was also conducted. This paper presents a summary of the assessment approach used to gain a better understanding of air emissions from livestock waste at California dairies. Data are presented as emission factors (per surface area and per head) and as emissions from various size dairies. These data were used to evaluate ozone and PM-10 precursor emissions from the dairy industry.

  11. Contribution of Fugitive Emissions for PM10 Concentrations in an Industrial Area of Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marta Almeida, Susana; Viana Silva, Alexandra; Garcia, Silvia; Miranda, Ana Isabel

    2013-04-01

    Significant atmospheric dust arises from the mechanical disturbance of granular material exposed to the air. Dust generated from these open sources is termed "fugitive" because it is not discharged to the atmosphere in a confined flow stream. Common sources of fugitive dust include unpaved roads, agricultural tilling operations, aggregate storage piles, heavy construction and harbor operations. The objective of this work was to identify the likeliness and extend of the PM10 limit value exceedences due to fugitive emissions in a particularly zone where PM fugitive emissions are a core of environmental concerns - Mitrena, Portugal. Mitrena, is an industrial area that coexists with a high-density urban region (Setúbal) and areas with an important environmental concern (Sado Estuary and Arrábida which belongs to the protected area Natura 2000 Network). Due to the typology of industry sited in Mitrena (e.g. power plant, paper mill, cement, pesticides and fertilized productions), there are a large uncontrolled PM fugitive emissions, providing from heavy traffic and handling and storage of raw material on uncover stockyards in the harbor and industries. Dispersion modeling was performed with the software TAPM (The Air Pollution Model) and results were mapped over the study area, using GIS (Geographic Information Systems). Results showed that managing local particles concentrations can be a frustrating affair because the weight of fugitive sources is very high comparing with the local anthropogenic stationary sources. In order to ensure that the industry can continue to meet its commitments in protecting air quality, it is essential to warrant that the characteristics of releases from all fugitive sources are fully understood in order to target future investments in those areas where maximum benefit will be achieved.

  12. The use of total susceptibility in the analysis of long term PM10 (PM2.5) collected at Hungarian air quality monitoring stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márton, Emö; Domján, Ádám; Lautner, Péter; Szentmarjay, Tibor; Uram, János

    2013-04-01

    Air monitoring stations in Hungary are operated by Environmental, Nature Conservancy and Water Pollution Inspectorates, according to the CEN/TC 264 European Union standards. PM10 samples are collected on a 24-hour basis, for two weeks in February, in May, in August and in November. About 720m3 air is pumped through quartz filters daily. Mass measurements and toxic metal analysis (As, Pb, Cd, Ni) are made on each filter (Whatmann DHA-80 PAH, 150 mm diameter) by the inspectorates. We have carried out low field magnetic susceptibility measurements using a KLY-2 instrument on all PM10 samples collected at 9 stations from 2009 on (a total of more than 2000 filters). One station, located far from direct sources, monitors background pollution. Here PM2.5 was also collected in two-week runs, seven times during the period of 2009-2012 and made available for the non-destructive magnetic susceptibility measurements. Due to the rather weak magnetic signal, the susceptibility of each PM-10 sample was computed from 10, that of each PM2.5 sample from 20 measurements. Corrections were made for the susceptibility of the sample holder, for the unpolluted filter (provided with each of the two-week runs), and for the plastic bag containing the samples. The susceptibilities of the PM10 samples were analyzed from different aspects, like the degree of magnetic pollution at different stations, daily and seasonal variations of the total and mass susceptibilities compared to the mass of the pollutants and in relation to the concentrations of the toxic elements. As expected, the lowest total and mass susceptibilities characterize the background station (pollution arrives mostly from distant sources, Vienna, Bratislava or even the Sudeten), while the highest values were measured for an industrial town with heavy traffic. At the background station the mass of the PM10 and PM2.5, respectively for the same period are quite similar, while the magnetic susceptibilities are usually higher in the

  13. PM10 source apportionment applying PMF and chemical tracer analysis to ship-borne measurements in the Western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, M. C.; Brotto, P.; Calzolai, G.; Cassola, F.; Cavalli, F.; Fermo, P.; Hjorth, J.; Massabò, D.; Nava, S.; Piazzalunga, A.; Schembari, C.; Prati, P.

    2016-01-01

    A PM10 sampling campaign was carried out on board the cruise ship Costa Concordia during three weeks in summer 2011. The ship route was Civitavecchia-Savona-Barcelona-Palma de Mallorca-Malta (Valletta)-Palermo-Civitavecchia. The PM10 composition was measured and utilized to identify and characterize the main PM10 sources along the ship route through receptor modelling, making use of the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) algorithm. A particular attention was given to the emissions related to heavy fuel oil combustion by ships, which is known to be also an important source of secondary sulphate aerosol. Five aerosol sources were resolved by the PMF analysis. The primary contribution of ship emissions to PM10 turned out to be (12 ± 4)%, while secondary ammonium sulphate contributed by (35 ± 5)%. Approximately, 60% of the total sulphate was identified as secondary aerosol while about 20% was attributed to heavy oil combustion in ship engines. The measured concentrations of methanesulphonic acid (MSA) indicated a relevant contribution to the observed sulphate loading by biogenic sulphate, formed by the atmospheric oxidation of dimethyl sulphide (DMS) emitted by marine phytoplankton.

  14. Development of cotton gin PM10 emission factors for EPA’s AP-42-DUPLICATE DO NOT USE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Compilation of Air Pollution Emission Factors (AP-42) emission factors are assigned ratings, from A (Excellent) to E (Poor), based on the quality of data used to develop them. All current PM10 cotton gin emission factors received quality ratings of D or lower. In an effort to improve these ratin...

  15. 76 FR 8300 - Finding of Failure To Submit State Implementation Plan Revisions for Particulate Matter, PM-10...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    .... ] On July 1, 1987 EPA revised the health-based NAAQS (52 FR 24672), replacing the standards for total.... 71 FR 61144 (October 17, 2006). The 24-hour PM-10 standards of 150 micrograms per cubic meter ( g/m\\3... of section 107(d)(4)(B) of the amended Act were designated nonattainment by operation of law. 56...

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF PM-10 EMISSIONS FROM ANTISKID MATERIALS APPLIED TO ICE- AND SNOW-COVERED ROADWAYS - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of field sampling on 47th Street in Kansas City, MO, during February and March 1993 to quantify the PM-10 emissions associated with the use of rock salt (NaCl) for ice and snow control. A baseline test was conducted in September 1993. The emissions were d...

  17. TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 emissions from a beef cattle feedlot using the flux-gradient technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions data on air pollutants from large open-lot beef cattle feedlots are limited. This research was conducted to determine emissions of total suspended particulates (TSP) and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) from a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Kansas (USA). Vertical particulate concentr...

  18. CONTENDING WITH SPACE-TIME INTERACTION IN THE SPATIAL PREDICTION OF POLLUTION: VANCOUVER'S HOURLY AMBIENT PM 10 FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this article we describe an approach for predicting average hourly concentrations of ambient PM10 in Vancouver. We know our solution also applies to hourly ozone fields and believe it may be quite generally applicable. We use a hierarchal Bayesian approach. At the primary ...

  19. The PM10 fraction of road dust in the UK and India: Characterization, source profiles and oxidative potential.

    PubMed

    Pant, Pallavi; Baker, Stephen J; Shukla, Anuradha; Maikawa, Caitlin; Godri Pollitt, Krystal J; Harrison, Roy M

    2015-10-15

    Most studies of road dust composition have sampled a very wide range of particle sizes, but from the perspective of respiratory exposure to resuspended dusts, it is the PM10 fraction which is of most importance. The PM10 fraction of road dust samples was collected at two sites in Birmingham, UK (major highway and road tunnel) and one site in New Delhi, India. Dust loadings were found to be much higher for New Delhi compared to Birmingham, while concentrations of several species were much higher in the case of Birmingham. Detailed chemical source profiles were prepared for both cities and previously generated empirical factors for source attribution to brake wear, tyre wear, and crustal dust were successfully applied to the UK sites. However, 100% of the mass for the Indian site could not be accounted for using these factors. This study highlights the need for generation of local empirical estimation factors for non-exhaust vehicle emissions. A limited number of bulk road dust and brake pad samples were also characterized. Oxidative potential (OP) was also determined for a limited number of PM10 and bulk road dust samples, and Cu was found to be a factor significantly associated with OP in PM10 and bulk road dust. PMID:26033216

  20. Contribution of incense burning to indoor PM10 and particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under two ventilation conditions.

    PubMed

    Lung, S-C C; Kao, M-C; Hu, S-C

    2003-06-01

    Burning incense to worship Gods and ancestors is a traditional practice prevalent in Asian societies. This work investigated indoor PM10 concentrations resulting from incense burning in household environments under two conditions: closed and ventilated. The exposure concentrations of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were estimated. The factors of potential exposure were also evaluated. Under both conditions, samples were taken at three locations: 0.3, 3.5 and 7 m away from the altar during three periods: incense burning, the first 3 h, and the 4-6 h after cessation of combustion. PAH concentrations of incense smoke were assessed in the laboratory. Personal environment monitors were used as sampling instruments. The results showed a significant contribution of incense burning to indoor PM10 and particulate PAH concentrations. PM10 concentrations near the altar during incense burning were 723 and 178 microg/m3, more than nine and 1.6 times background levels, under closed and ventilated conditions, respectively. Exposure concentrations of particle-bound PAHs were 0.088-0.45 microg/m3 during incense burning. On average, PM10 and associated PAH concentrations were about 371 and 0.23 microg/m3 lower, respectively, in ventilated environments compared with closed conditions. Concentrations were elevated for at least 6 h under closed conditions.

  1. Influence of tobacco smoke on carcinogenic PAH composition in indoor PM 10 and PM 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slezakova, K.; Castro, D.; Pereira, M. C.; Morais, S.; Delerue-Matos, C.; Alvim-Ferraz, M. C.

    2009-12-01

    Because of the mutagenic and/or carcinogenic properties, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), have a direct impact on human population. Consequently, there is a widespread interest in analysing and evaluating the exposure to PAH in different indoor environments, influenced by different emission sources. The information on indoor PAH is still limited, mainly in terms of PAH distribution in indoor particles of different sizes; thus, this study evaluated the influence of tobacco smoke on PM 10 and PM 2.5 characteristics, namely on their PAH compositions, with further aim to understand the negative impact of tobacco smoke on human health. Samples were collected at one site influenced by tobacco smoke and at one reference (non-smoking) site using low-volume samplers; the analyses of 17 PAH were performed by Microwave Assisted Extraction combined with Liquid Chromatography (MAE-LC). At the site influenced by tobacco smoke PM concentrations were higher 650% for PM 10, and 720% for PM 2.5. When influenced by smoking, 4 ring PAH (fluoranthene, pyrene, and chrysene) were the most abundant PAH, with concentrations 4600-21 000% and 5100-20 800% higher than at the reference site for PM 10 and PM 2.5, respectively, accounting for 49% of total PAH (Σ PAH). Higher molecular weight PAH (5-6 rings) reached concentrations 300-1300% and 140-1700% higher for PM 10 and PM 2.5, respectively, at the site influenced by tobacco smoke. Considering 9 carcinogenic PAH this increase was 780% and 760% in PM 10 and PM 2.5, respectively, indicating the strong potential risk for human health. As different composition profiles of PAH in indoor PM were obtained for reference and smoking sites, those 9 carcinogens represented at the reference site 84% and 86% of Σ PAH in PM 10 and PM 2.5, respectively, and at the smoking site 56% and 55% of Σ PAH in PM 10 and PM 2.5, respectively. All PAH (including the carcinogenic ones) were mainly present in fine particles, which corresponds to a strong risk

  2. PM10 Concentration levels at an urban and background site in Cyprus: The impact of urban sources and dust storms

    PubMed Central

    Achilleos, Souzana; Evans, John S.; Yiallouros, Panayiotis K.; Kleanthous, Savvas; Schwartz, Joel; Koutrakis, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Air quality in Cyprus is influenced by both local and transported pollution including desert dust storms. We examined PM10 concentration data collected in Nicosia (urban representative) from April 1, 1993 through December 11, 2008, and Ayia Marina (rural background representative) from January 1, 1999 through December 31, 2008. Measurements were conducted using a Tapered Element Oscillating Micro-balance (TEOM). PM10 concentrations, meteorological records and satellite data were used to identify dust storm days. We investigated long term trends using a Generalized Additive Model (GAM) after controlling for day of week, month, temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity. In Nicosia, annual PM10 concentrations ranged from 50.4 to 63.8 μg/m3 and exceeded the EU annual standard limit enacted in 2005 of 40 μg/m3 every year. A large, statistically significant impact of urban sources (defined as the difference between urban and background levels) was seen in Nicosia over the period 2000–2008, and was highest during traffic hours, weekdays, cold months, and low wind conditions. Our estimate of the mean (standard error) contribution of urban sources to the daily ambient PM10 was 24.0 (0.4) μg/m3. The study of yearly trends showed that PM10 levels in Nicosia decreased from 59.4 μg/m3 in 1993 to 49.0 μg/m3 in 2008, probably in part as a result of traffic emission control policies in Cyprus. In Ayia Marina, annual concentrations ranged from 27.3 to 35.6 μg/m3, and no obvious time trends were observed. The levels measured at the Cyprus background site are comparable to background concentrations reported in other Eastern Mediterranean countries. Average daily PM10 concentrations during desert dust storms were around 100 μg/m3 since 2000 and much higher in earlier years. Despite the large impact of dust storms and their increasing frequency over time, dust storms were responsible for a small fraction of the exceedances of the daily PM10 limit. PMID:25562931

  3. Aerodynamic potpourri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic developments for vertical axis and horizontal axis wind turbines are given that relate to the performance and aerodynamic loading of these machines. Included are: (1) a fixed wake aerodynamic model of the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine; (2) experimental results that suggest the existence of a laminar flow Darrieus vertical axis turbine; (3) a simple aerodynamic model for the turbulent windmill/vortex ring state of horizontal axis rotors; and (4) a yawing moment of a rigid hub horizontal axis wind turbine that is related to blade coning.

  4. Aerodynamic potpourri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1981-05-01

    Aerodynamic developments for vertical axis and horizontal axis wind turbines are given that relate to the performance and aerodynamic loading of these machines. Included are: (1) a fixed wake aerodynamic model of the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine; (2) experimental results that suggest the existence of a laminar flow Darrieus vertical axis turbine; (3) a simple aerodynamic model for the turbulent windmill/vortex ring state of horizontal axis rotors; and (4) a yawing moment of a rigid hub horizontal axis wind turbine that is related to blade coning.

  5. Influence of synoptic and local atmospheric patterns on PM10 air pollution levels: a model application to Naples (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortelli, Alberto; Scafetta, Nicola; Mazzarella, Adriano

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the relationship between synoptic/local meteorological patterns and PM10 air pollution levels in the metropolitan area of Naples, Italy. We found that severe air pollution crises occurred when the 850 and 500 hpa geopotential heights and their relative temperatures present maximum values above the city. The most relevant synoptic parameter was the 850 hPa geopotential height, which is located about 1500 m of altitude. We compared local meteorological conditions (specifically wind stress, rain amount and thermal inversion) against the urban air pollution levels from 2009 to 2013. We found several empirical criteria for forecasting high daily PM10 air pollution levels in Naples. Pollution crises occurred when (a) the wind stress was between 1 and 2 m/s, (b) the thermal inversion between two strategic locations was at least 3°C/200 m and (c) it did not significantly rain for at least 7 days. Beside these meteorological conditions, severe pollution crises occurred also during festivals when fireworks and bonfires are lighted, and during anomalous breeze conditions and severe fire accidents. Finally, we propose a basic model to predict PM10 concentration levels from local meteorological conditions that can be easily forecast a few days in advance. The synthetic PM10 record predicted by the model was found to correlate with the PM10 observations with a correlation coefficient close to 0.80 with a confidence level greater than 99%. The proposed model is expected to provide reliable information to city officials to carry out practical strategies to mitigate air pollution effects. Although the proposed model equation is calibrated on the topographical and meteorological conditions of Naples, it should be easily adaptable to alternative locations.

  6. Trends in arsenic levels in PM10 and PM 2.5 aerosol fractions in an industrialized area.

    PubMed

    García-Aleix, J R; Delgado-Saborit, J M; Verdú-Martín, G; Amigó-Descarrega, J M; Esteve-Cano, V

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic element that affects human health and is widely distributed in the environment. In the area of study, the main Spanish and second largest European industrial ceramic cluster, the main source of arsenic aerosol is related to the impurities in some boracic minerals used in the ceramic process. Epidemiological studies on cancer occurrence in Spain points out the study region as one with the greater risk of cancer. Concentrations of particulate matter and arsenic content in PM10 and PM2.5 were measured and characterized by ICP-MS in the area of study during the years 2005-2010. Concentrations of PM10 and its arsenic content range from 27 to 46 μg/m(3) and from 0.7 to 6 ng/m(3) in the industrial area, respectively, and from 25 to 40 μg/m(3) and from 0.7 to 2.8 ng/m(3) in the urban area, respectively. Concentrations of PM2.5 and its arsenic content range from 12 to 14 μg/m(3) and from 0.5 to 1.4 ng/m(3) in the urban background area, respectively. Most of the arsenic content is present in the fine fraction, with ratios of PM2.5/PM10 in the range of 0.65-0.87. PM10, PM2.5, and its arsenic content show a sharp decrease in recent years associated with the economic downturn, which severely hit the production of ceramic materials in the area under study. The sharp production decrease due to the economic crisis combined with several technological improvements in recent years such as substitution of boron, which contains As impurities as raw material, have reduced the concentrations of PM10, PM2.5, and As in air to an extent that currently meets the existing European regulations.

  7. Understanding intra-neighborhood patterns in PM2.5 and PM10 using mobile monitoring in Braddock, PA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Braddock, Pennsylvania is home to the Edgar Thomson Steel Works (ETSW), one of the few remaining active steel mills in the Pittsburgh region. An economically distressed area, Braddock exceeds average annual (>15 μg/m3) and daily (>35 μg/m3) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter (PM2.5). Methods A mobile air monitoring study was designed and implemented in morning and afternoon hours in the summer and winter (2010–2011) to explore the within-neighborhood spatial and temporal (within-day and between-day) variability in PM2.5 and PM10. Results Both pollutants displayed spatial variation between stops, and substantial temporal variation within and across study days. For summer morning sampling runs, site-specific mean PM2.5 ranged from 30.0 (SD = 3.3) to 55.1 (SD = 13.0) μg/m3. Mean PM10 ranged from 30.4 (SD = 2.5) to 69.7 (SD = 51.2) μg/m3, respectively. During summer months, afternoon concentrations were significantly lower than morning for both PM2.5 and PM10, potentially owing to morning subsidence inversions. Winter concentrations were lower than summer, on average, and showed lesser diurnal variation. Temperature, wind speed, and wind direction predicted significant variability in PM2.5 and PM10 in multiple linear regression models. Conclusions Data reveals significant morning versus afternoon variability and spatial variability in both PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations within Braddock. Information obtained on peak concentration periods, and the combined effects of industry, traffic, and elevation in this region informed the design of a larger stationary monitoring network. PMID:23051204

  8. Insights into PM10 sources in Houston, Texas: Role of petroleum refineries in enriching lanthanoid metals during episodic emission events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozlaker, Ayşe; Buzcu-Güven, Birnur; Fraser, Matthew P.; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2013-04-01

    Petroleum refineries may emit large quantities of pollutants during non-routine operations that include start-ups and shutdowns, planned maintenance, and unplanned equipment failures. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) tracks such events by requiring industries to self-report estimates of these emissions because they often have a detrimental impact on local air quality and potentially, public health. An inventory of non-routine episodic emission events is available via TCEQ's website. However, there is on-going concern that such episodic emissions are sometimes under-reported or even not cataloged. Herein, we present concentrations of 42 main group, transition, and lanthanoid elements in 114 time-resolved (3 or 6 h) samples collected over a 1-month period. We also develop strategies to identify aerosol sources using elemental tracers and compare source apportionment (performed by positive matrix factorization) based on ambient measurements to inventoried non-routine emission events. Through interpretation of key marker elements, five sources impacting concentrations of metals in PM10 were identified and calculated to contribute 73% of the measured PM10 mass. On average, primary emissions from fluidized-bed catalytic cracking (FCC) units negligibly contributed to apportioned PM10 mass. However, 35 samples were identified as impacted by transient PM10 emissions from FCC units because of elevated levels of lanthanoid metals and their ratios. Only 31 of these 35 samples coincided with self-reported non-routine emission events. Further, roughly half of the emission event self-reports detailed only emissions of gaseous pollutants. Based on this, we posit that not all PM10 emission events are reported and even self-reported emission events are incomplete - those that only catalog gaseous pollutants may also include unreported PM emissions.

  9. Concentrations and source apportionment of PM10 and associated major and trace elements in the Rhodes Island, Greece.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulos, Georgios; Manoli, Evangelia; Kouras, Athanasios; Samara, Constantini

    2012-08-15

    Ambient concentrations of PM(10) and associated major and trace elements were measured over the cold and the warm season of 2007 at two sites located in the Rhodes Island (Greece), in Eastern Mediterranean, aimed at source apportionment by Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor modeling. Source chemical profiles, necessary in CMB modeling, were obtained for a variety of emission sources that could possibly affect the study area, including sea spray, geological material, soot emissions from the nearby oil-fuelled thermal power plant, and other anthropogenic activities, such as vehicular traffic, residential oil combustion, wood burning, and uncontrolled open-air burning of agricultural biomass and municipal waste. Source apportionment of PM(10) and elemental components was carried out by employing an advanced CMB version, the Robotic Chemical Mass Balance model (RCMB). Vehicular emissions were found to be major PM(10) contributor accounting, on average, for 36.8% and 31.7% during the cold period, and for 40.9% and 39.2% in the warm period at the two sites, respectively. The second largest source of ambient PM(10), with minor seasonal variation, was secondary sulfates (mainly ammonium and calcium sulfates), with total average contribution around 16.5% and 18% at the two sites. Soil dust was also a remarkable source contributing around 22% in the warm period, whereas only around 10% in the cold season. Soot emitted from the thermal power plant was found to be negligible contributor to ambient PM(10) (<1%), however it appeared to appreciably contribute to the ambient V and Ni (11.3% and 5.1%, respectively) at one of the sites during the warm period, when electricity production is intensified. Trajectory analysis did not indicate any transport of Sahara dust; on the contrary, long range transport of soil dust from arid continental regions of Minor Asia and of biomass burning aerosol from the countries surrounding the Black Sea was considered possible.

  10. Characterization and source apportionment of health risks from ambient PM10 in Hong Kong over 2000-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Yuan, Zibing; Li, Ying; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Louie, Peter K. K.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) pollution is a major public health concern in Hong Kong. In this study, the spatiotemporal variations of health risks from ambient PM10 from seven air quality monitoring stations between 2000 and 2011 were analyzed. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was adopted to identify major source categories of ambient PM10 and quantify their contributions. Afterwards, a point-estimated risk model was used to identify the inhalation cancer and non-cancer risks of PM10 sources. The long-term trends of the health risks from classified local and non-local sources were explored. Furthermore, the reason for the increase of health risks during high PM10 days was discussed. Results show that vehicle exhaust source was the dominant inhalation cancer risk (ICR) contributor (72%), whereas trace metals and vehicle exhaust sources contributed approximately 27% and 21% of PM10 inhalation non-cancer risk (INCR), respectively. The identified local sources accounted for approximately 80% of the ICR in Hong Kong, while contribution percentages of the non-local and local sources for INCR are comparable. The clear increase of ICR at high PM days was mainly attributed to the increase of contributions from coal combustion/biomass burning and secondary sulfate, while the increase of INCR at high PM days was attributed to the increase of contributions from the sources coal combustion/biomass burning, secondary nitrate, and trace metals. This study highlights the importance of health risk-based source apportionment in air quality management with protecting human health as the ultimate target.

  11. 40 CFR Table C-3 to Subpart C of... - Test Specifications for Pb in TSP and Pb in PM10 Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Pb in PM10 Methods C Table C-3 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Subpt. C, Table C-3 Table C-3 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Specifications for Pb in TSP and Pb in PM10 Methods Table C-3 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Specifications for Pb in TSP and Pb in PM10...

  12. 40 CFR Table C-3 to Subpart C of... - Test Specifications for Pb in TSP and Pb in PM10 Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Pb in PM10 Methods C Table C-3 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Subpt. C, Table C-3 Table C-3 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Specifications for Pb in TSP and Pb in PM10 Methods Table C-3 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Specifications for Pb in TSP and Pb in PM10...

  13. Comparison between light scattering and gravimetric samplers for PM10 mass concentration in poultry and pig houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambra-López, María; Winkel, Albert; Mosquera, Julio; Ogink, Nico W. M.; Aarnink, André J. A.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare co-located real-time light scattering devices and equivalent gravimetric samplers in poultry and pig houses for PM10 mass concentration, and to develop animal-specific calibration factors for light scattering samplers. These results will contribute to evaluate the comparability of different sampling instruments for PM10 concentrations. Paired DustTrak light scattering device (DustTrak aerosol monitor, TSI, U.S.) and PM10 gravimetric cyclone sampler were used for measuring PM10 mass concentrations during 24 h periods (from noon to noon) inside animal houses. Sampling was conducted in 32 animal houses in the Netherlands, including broilers, broiler breeders, layers in floor and in aviary system, turkeys, piglets, growing-finishing pigs in traditional and low emission housing with dry and liquid feed, and sows in individual and group housing. A total of 119 pairs of 24 h measurements (55 for poultry and 64 for pigs) were recorded and analyzed using linear regression analysis. Deviations between samplers were calculated and discussed. In poultry, cyclone sampler and DustTrak data fitted well to a linear regression, with a regression coefficient equal to 0.41, an intercept of 0.16 mg m-3 and a correlation coefficient of 0.91 (excluding turkeys). Results in turkeys showed a regression coefficient equal to 1.1 (P = 0.49), an intercept of 0.06 mg m-3 (P < 0.0001) and a correlation coefficient of 0.98. In pigs, we found a regression coefficient equal to 0.61, an intercept of 0.05 mg m-3 and a correlation coefficient of 0.84. Measured PM10 concentrations using DustTraks were clearly underestimated (approx. by a factor 2) in both poultry and pig housing systems compared with cyclone pre-separators. Absolute, relative, and random deviations increased with concentration. DustTrak light scattering devices should be self-calibrated to investigate PM10 mass concentrations accurately in animal houses. We recommend linear regression

  14. Source apportionment of PM 10 at residential and industrial sites of an urban region of Kolkata, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karar, Kakoli; Gupta, A. K.

    2007-03-01

    PM 10 and its chemical species mass concentrations were measured once in a week at residential (Kasba) and industrial (Cossipore) sites of an urban region of Kolkata for a period of 24 h during November 2003 to November 2004. At each monitoring site, 53 sets of daily average PM 10 samples were collected during the study period. Approximately 55% of the monitoring days are weekdays, while 45% are weekends. The PM 10 mass concentrations ranged from 68.2 to 280.6 μg m - 3 at the residential site, and 62.4 to 401.2 μg m - 3 at the industrial site. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAH), fluoranthene (Fl), pyrene (Py), benzo(a)anthracene (BaA), benzo(b)fluoranthene (BbF) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) have been analyzed using Gas Chromatoghaphy. Metals in PM 10 deposited on quartz microfibre filter papers were measured using an Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometer. Chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) are the seven toxic trace metals quantified from the measured PM 10 concentrations. Total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC) and organic carbon (OC) were analyzed using a Carbon analyzer. Exposed quartz microfibre filter papers were also analyzed for water-soluble anions of fluoride (F -), chloride (Cl -), nitrate (NO 3-), phosphate (PO 43-) and sulfate (SO 42-) using ion chromatography. In this study, principal component analysis (PCA)/absolute principal component scores (APCS) model was applied to the mass concentrations of PM 10 and its chemical species. Principal component analysis with varimax rotation identified five possible sources; solid waste dumping, vehicular emission, coal combustion, cooking and soil dust at residential site. The extracted possible sources at the industrial site were vehicular emissions, coal combustion, electroplating industry, tyre wear and secondary aerosol. A quantitative estimation by principal component analysis-multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR) model

  15. Sources of the PM10 aerosol in Flanders, Belgium, and re-assessment of the contribution from wood burning.

    PubMed

    Maenhaut, Willy; Vermeylen, Reinhilde; Claeys, Magda; Vercauteren, Jordy; Roekens, Edward

    2016-08-15

    From 30 June 2011 to 2 July 2012 PM10 aerosol samples were simultaneously taken every 4th day at four urban background sites in Flanders, Belgium. The sites were in Antwerpen, Gent, Brugge, and Oostende. The PM10 mass concentration was determined by weighing; organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) were measured by thermal-optical analysis, the wood burning tracers levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, 8 water-soluble ions were measured by ion chromatography, and 15 elements were determined by a combination of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry. The multi-species dataset was subjected to receptor modeling by PMF. The 10 retained factors (with their overall average percentage contributions to the experimental PM10 mass) were wood burning (9.5%), secondary nitrate (24%), secondary sulfate (12.6%), sea salt (10.0%), aged sea salt (19.2%), crustal matter (9.7%), non-ferrous metals (1.81%), traffic (10.3%), non-exhaust traffic (0.52%), and heavy oil burning (3.0%). The average contributions of wood smoke for the four sites were quite substantial in winter and ranged from 12.5 to 20% for the PM10 mass and from 47 to 64% for PM10 OC. Wood burning appeared to be also a notable source of As, Cd, and Pb. The contribution from wood burning to the PM10 mass and OC was also assessed by making use of levoglucosan as single marker compound and the conversion factors of Schmidl et al. (2008), as done in our previous study on wood burning in Flanders (Maenhaut et al., 2012). However, the apportionments were much lower than those deduced from PMF. It seems that the conversion factors of Schmidl et al. (2008) may not be applicable to wood burning in Flanders. From scatter plots of the PMF-derived wood smoke OC and PM versus levoglucosan, we arrived at conversion factors of 9.7 and 22.6, respectively. PMID:27110969

  16. Particle-induced oxidative damage of indoor PM10 from coal burning homes in the lung cancer area of Xuan Wei, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Longyi; Hu, Ying; Wang, Jing; Hou, Cong; Yang, Yuanyuan; Wu, Mingyuan

    2013-10-01

    The lung cancer mortality rate in the rural area of the Xuan Wei, Yunnan, is among the highest in China, especially in women. In this paper, the coal-burning indoor and corresponding outdoor PM10 samples were collected at the Hutou village, representing the case of high lung cancer rate, and the Xize village, representing the case of low lung cancer rate. Plasmid scission assay was used to investigate the bioreactivity of the PM10. The inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was employed to investigate the trace element compositions of the PM10. The results showed that the oxidative damage caused by both indoor and outdoor PM10 at the Hutou village was obviously higher than that at the Xize village, with the indoor PM10 having higher oxidative damage than corresponding outdoors. Among all analyzed samples, the indoor night PM10 samples from the Hutou village have the highest oxidative capacity. The levels of total water-soluble elements had a higher level in the PM10 of the Hutou village than that of the Xize village. It is interesting that the levels of water-soluble As, Cd, Cs, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn in PM10 had better positive correlation with DNA damage rates, implying that these elements in their water-soluble state should be one of the main factors responsible for the high oxidative capacity of PM10, thus possibly the higher lung cancer rates, at the Hutou village.

  17. Size-fractionated PM10 monitoring in relation to the contribution of endotoxins in different polluted areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traversi, D.; Alessandria, L.; Schilirò, T.; Gilli, G.

    2011-07-01

    Particulate pollution is an environmental concern that is widespread and difficult to resolve. Recently various regulatory improvements around the world have been agreed upon to tackle this problem, especially as related to the fine fraction of particulates, which more closely correlates to human health effects than other fractions. The size-fractionation of inhalable particles and their organic composition represent a new area of research that has been poorly explored thus far. Endotoxins are a type of natural organic compound that can be found in particulate matter. They are correlated with Gram-negative bacterial contamination. Health outcomes associated with exposure to these toxins are not specific and often overlap with the health effects of PM (Particulate Matter) exposure, including asthma, bronchitis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and organic dust toxic syndrome. Very little information is available on the endotoxin distribution in different PM10 size fractions. This study examined PM10 size fractions and their endotoxin content. Sampling was conducted at five different locations: one urban, two rural and two rural sites that were highly influenced by large-scale farm animal production facilities. For each location, six different PM10 fractions were evaluated. PM10 sub-fractions were categorised as follows: PM 10-7.2 (1.15-31.30 μg m -3); PM 7.2-3.0 (1.86-30.73 μg m -3); PM 3.0-1.5 (1.74-13.90 μg m -3); PM 1.5-0.95 (0.24-10.57 μg m -3); PM 0.95-0.49 (1.22-14.33 μg m -3) and PM <0.49 (13.15-85.49 μg m -3). The ranges of endotoxin levels determined were: PM 10-7.2 (0.051-5.401 endotoxin units (EU) m -3); PM 7.2-3.0 (0.123-7.801 EU m -3); PM 3.0-1.5 (0.057-1.635 EU m -3); PM 1.5-0.95 (0.040-2.477 EU m -3); PM 0.95-0.49 (0.007-3.159 EU m -3) and PM <0.49 (0.039-3.975 EU m -3). Our results indicated consistency of the PM1 fraction at all of the sites and the predominant presence of endotoxins in the coarse fraction. The observed abatement of the PM

  18. Relative risk of lung obstruction in relation to PM10 concentration as assessed by pulmonary function tests.

    PubMed

    Adamkiewicz, Łukasz; Gayer, Anna; Mucha, Dominika; Badyda, Artur J; Dąbrowiecki, Piotr; Grabski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that long-term exposure to air pollution may increase the relative risk of obstructive lung diseases such as COPD or asthma. The risk of increased obstruction is higher among residents living in close proximity to high traffic routes where there are high concentrations of PM(10). The present study consists of two parts: the measurement of the concentration of air pollutants and of pulmonary function in selected groups of people. The study was conducted in Warsaw, Poland, in seven localizations with typical urban canyon characteristics and roads with high traffic. The control group consisted of people living in other regions of Poland with a significantly lower (p < 0.05) concentration of air pollutants. The study was performed in the years 2008-2012. The incidence of obstructive lung disease was determined according to the GOLD guidelines. The study subjects were all non-smokers. The relative risk of disease took into account different exposure times to air pollutants. The findings indicate that an increase in PM(10) concentration by each 10 μg/m(3) caused an increase in the relative risk of lung obstruction by a factor of 1.27, 1.24, and 1.19 for the residence period in the vicinity to heavy traffic city roads for 20, 30, and 40 years, respectively as compared with the residence of rural unpolluted areas. A decrease in the number of people with lung obstruction with the length of residence actually indicates that people exposed to high concentrations of PM(10) become affected by lung obstruction at a lower age. The study shows a positive relative risk of lung obstruction due to an exposure to high PM(10) emission.

  19. Determining the influence of different atmospheric circulation patterns on PM10 chemical composition in a source apportionment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiol, Mauro; Squizzato, Stefania; Ceccato, Daniele; Rampazzo, Giancarlo; Pavoni, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    This study combines a set of chemometric analyses with a source apportionment model for discriminating the weather conditions, local processes and remote contributions having an impact on particulate matter levels and chemical composition. The proposed approach was tested on PM10 data collected in a semi-rural coastal site near Venice (Italy). The PM10 mass, elemental composition and the water soluble inorganic ions were quantified and seven sources were identified and apportioned using the positive matrix factorization: sea spray, aged sea salt, mineral dust, mixed combustions, road traffic, secondary sulfate and secondary nitrate. The influence of weather conditions on PM10 composition and its sources was investigated and the importance of air temperature and relative humidity on secondary components was evaluated. Samples collected in days with similar atmospheric circulation patterns were clustered on the basis of wind speed and direction. Significant differences in PM10 levels and chemical composition pointed out that the production of sea salt is strongly depending on the intensity of local winds. Differently, typical primary pollutants (i.e. from combustion and road traffic) increased during slow wind regimes. External contributions were also investigated by clustering the backward trajectories of air masses. The increase of combustion and traffic-related pollutants was observed when air masses originated from Central and Northwestern Europe and secondary sulfate was observed to rise when air masses had passed over the Po Valley. Conversely, anthropogenic contributions dropped when the origin was in the Mediterranean area and Northern Europe. The chemometric approach adopted can discriminate the role local and external sources play in determining the level and composition of airborne particulate matter and points out the weather circumstances favoring the worst pollution conditions. It may be of significant help in designing local and national air pollution

  20. Wintertime PM 2.5 and PM 10 carbonaceous and inorganic constituents from urban site in western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengarajan, R.; Sudheer, A. K.; Sarin, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    Daily variability in the chemical composition of atmospheric PM 2.5 and PM 10 has been studied from an urban site (Ahmedabad) in western India over a span of 30 days during winter. The PM 2.5 and PM 10 mass concentrations ranged from 32 to 106 μg m - 3 and 121 to 327 μg m - 3 , respectively. On average, PM 2.5 constitutes ~ 33% of PM 10, indicating dominance of coarse mode aerosols in the urban atmosphere. The particulate EC and OC show higher abundances in PM 2.5 (average: 3.0 ± 0.9 and 18.3 ± 5.9 μg m - 3 respectively) whereas those in PM 10 are 4.4 ± 2.4 and 29.8 ± 11.2 μg m - 3 respectively. A linear increasing trend and representative OC/EC ratio of 6.2 indicate their primary source from biomass burning emissions. The water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC: 4.0-14.7 μg m - 3 ) and its linear relationship with K + (0.6-1.7 μg m - 3 ) in PM 2.5 further support biomass burning emissions as a dominant source for carbonaceous aerosol. Among water-soluble inorganic species, SO 42- is the most abundant (range: 3.2-22.5 μg m - 3 ); almost all of it occurs in fine mode (PM 2.5) and exhibits near-quantitative neutralization with NH 4+ (r = 0.98, slope: 1.3). The water-soluble Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ mainly abundant in the coarse mode, suggest significant contribution from mineral dust. Documenting large temporal variability in the chemical composition of coarse and fine mode aerosol is essential in order to assess the changing regional emission scenario over mega-cities and their down-wind transport.

  1. Neural network model for the prediction of PM10 daily concentrations in two sites in the Western Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    de Gennaro, Gianluigi; Trizio, Livia; Di Gilio, Alessia; Pey, Jorge; Pérez, Noemi; Cusack, Michael; Alastuey, Andrés; Querol, Xavier

    2013-10-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) was developed and tested to forecast PM10 daily concentration in two contrasted environments in NE Spain, a regional background site (Montseny), and an urban background site (Barcelona-CSIC), which was highly influenced by vehicular emissions. In order to predict 24-h average PM10 concentrations, the artificial neural network previously developed by Caselli et al. (2009) was improved by using hourly PM concentrations and deterministic factors such as a Saharan dust alert. In particular, the model input data for prediction were the hourly PM10 concentrations 1-day in advance, local meteorological data and information about air masses origin. The forecasted performance indexes for both sites were calculated and they showed better results for the regional background site in Montseny (R(2)=0.86, SI=0.75) than for urban site in Barcelona (R(2)=0.73, SI=0.58), influenced by local and sometimes unexpected sources. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis conducted to understand the importance of the different variables included among the input data, showed that local meteorology and air masses origin are key factors in the model forecasts. This result explains the reason for the improvement of ANN's forecasting performance at the Montseny site with respect to the Barcelona site. Moreover, the artificial neural network developed in this work could prove useful to predict PM10 concentrations, especially, at regional background sites such as those on the Mediterranean Basin which are primarily affected by long-range transports. Hence, the artificial neural network presented here could be a powerful tool for obtaining real time information on air quality status and could aid stakeholders in their development of cost-effective control strategies.

  2. Odor, gaseous and PM10 emissions from small scale combustion of wood types indigenous to Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistler, Magdalena; Schmidl, Christoph; Padouvas, Emmanuel; Giebl, Heinrich; Lohninger, Johann; Ellinger, Reinhard; Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the emissions, including odor, from log wood stoves, burning wood types indigenous to mid-European countries such as Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Switzerland, as well as Baden-Württemberg and Bavaria (Germany) and South Tyrol (Italy). The investigations were performed with a modern, certified, 8 kW, manually fired log wood stove, and the results were compared to emissions from a modern 9 kW pellet stove. The examined wood types were deciduous species: black locust, black poplar, European hornbeam, European beech, pedunculate oak (also known as “common oak”), sessile oak, turkey oak and conifers: Austrian black pine, European larch, Norway spruce, Scots pine, silver fir, as well as hardwood briquettes. In addition, “garden biomass” such as pine cones, pine needles and dry leaves were burnt in the log wood stove. The pellet stove was fired with softwood pellets. The composite average emission rates for log wood and briquettes were 2030 mg MJ-1 for CO; 89 mg MJ-1 for NOx, 311 mg MJ-1 for CxHy, 67 mg MJ-1 for particulate matter PM10 and average odor concentration was at 2430 OU m-3. CO, CxHy and PM10 emissions from pellets combustion were lower by factors of 10, 13 and 3, while considering NOx - comparable to the log wood emissions. Odor from pellets combustion was not detectable. CxHy and PM10 emissions from garden biomass (needles and leaves) burning were 10 times higher than for log wood, while CO and NOx rise only slightly. Odor levels ranged from not detectable (pellets) to around 19,000 OU m-3 (dry leaves). The odor concentration correlated with CO, CxHy and PM10. For log wood combustion average odor ranged from 536 OU m-3 for hornbeam to 5217 OU m-3 for fir, indicating a considerable influence of the wood type on odor concentration.

  3. Estimation of the temporal and spatial distribution of dust concentration over China by combining PM10 and conventional meteorological observations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fengsheng; Li, Xiaoqing; Gai, Changsong; Gao, Wenhua

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we will present a simple algorithm to estimate the temporal and spatial distribution of dust mass concentration by combining PM10 and conventional meteorological observations. The efficiency of the algorithm has been demonstrated by applying it to analyze the dust source, transport, and dissipation of the dust storm which occurred in the west region of Pa-tan-chi-lin Desert at 0200 BST 27 March, 2004.

  4. Evaluation of a road dust suspension model for predicting the concentrations of PM 10 in a street canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauhaniemi, M.; Kukkonen, J.; Härkönen, J.; Nikmo, J.; Kangas, L.; Omstedt, G.; Ketzel, M.; Kousa, A.; Haakana, M.; Karppinen, A.

    2011-07-01

    We have slightly refined, evaluated and tested a mathematical model for predicting the vehicular suspension emissions of PM 10. The model describes particulate matter generated by the wear of road pavement, traction sand, and the processes that control the suspension of road dust particles into the air. However, the model does not address the emissions from the wear of vehicle components. The performance of this suspension emission model has been evaluated in combination with the street canyon dispersion model OSPM. We used data from a measurement campaign that was conducted in the street canyon Runeberg Street in Helsinki from 8 January to 2 May, 2004. The model reproduced fairly well the seasonal variation of the PM 10 concentrations, also during the time periods, when studded tyres and anti-skid treatments were commonly in use. For instance, the index of agreement (IA) was 0.83 for the time series of the hourly predicted and observed concentrations of PM 10. The predictions of the model were found to be sensitive to precipitation and street traction sanding. The main uncertainties in the predictions are probably caused by (i) the cleaning processes of the streets, which are currently not included in the model, (ii) the uncertainties in the estimation of the sanding days, and (iii) the uncertainties in the evaluation of precipitation. This study provides more confidence that this model could potentially be a valuable tool of assessment to evaluate and forecast the suspension PM 10 emissions worldwide. However, a further evaluation of the model is needed against other datasets in various vehicle fleet, speed and climatic conditions.

  5. The empirical correlations between PM2.5, PM10 and AOD in the Beijing metropolitan region and the PM2.5, PM10 distributions retrieved by MODIS.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingbin; Xin, Jinyuan; Zhang, Wenyu; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-09-01

    We observed PM2.5, PM10 concentration, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and Ångström exponents (α) in three typical stations, the Beijing city, the Xianghe suburban and the Xinglong background station in the Beijing metropolitan region, from 2009 to 2010, synchronously. The annual means of PM2.5 (PM10) were 62 ± 45 (130 ± 88) μg m(-3) and 79 ± 61 (142 ± 96) μg m(-3) in the city and suburban region, which were much higher than the regional background (PM2.5: 36 ± 29 μg m(-3)). The annual means of AOD were 0.53 ± 0.47 and 0.54 ± 0.46 and 0.24 ± 0.22 in the city, suburban and the background region, respectively. The annual means of Ångström exponents were 1.11 ± 0.31, 1.09 ± 0.31 and 1.02 ± 0.31 in three typical stations. Meanwhile, the rates of PM2.5 accounting for PM10 were 44%-54% and 46%-70% in the city and suburban region during four seasons. The pollution of fine particulate was more serious in winter than other seasons. The linear regression functions of PM2.5 (y) and ground-observed AOD (x) were similarly with high correlation coefficient in the three typical areas, which were y = 74x + 18 (R(2) = 0.58, N = 337, in the City), y = 80x + 25 (R(2) = 0.55, N = 306, in the suburban) and y = 87x + 9 (R(2) = 0.64, N = 350, in the background). The functions of PM10 (y) and ground-observed AOD (x) were y = 112x + 57 (R(2) = 0.54, N = 337, in the city) and y = 114x + 68 (R(2) = 0.47, N = 304, in the suburban). But the functions had large differences in four seasons. The correlations between PM2.5, PM10 and MODIS AOD were similar with the correlations between PM2.5, PM10 and the ground-observed AOD. With MODIS C6 AOD, the distributions of PM2.5 and PM10 concentration were retrieved by the seasonal functions. The absolute retrieval errors of seasonal PM2.5 distribution were less than 5 μg m(-3) in the pollutant city and suburb, and less than 7 μg m(-3) in the clean background. PMID

  6. Impacts of long-range transports of PM10 on air quality in Gwangju, South Korea using satellite and in-situ measured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, R.; Han, K.; Song, C.; Kang, Y.; Jung, W.; Ahan, S.

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the impact of long-range transported particular matter on the city of Gwangju which is one of metropolitan cities in the South Korea and is located in the southwestern part of the Korean peninsula, the PM10 concentrations measured at six measurement sites in Gwangju area were used. A decadal trend (2002-2011) of PM10 was analyzed and then the monthly and daily variations of PM10 for the years of 2002, 2003, 2006, and 2011 were investigated. The events of long-range transport were selected from peaks of daily PM10 and were evaluated through 72-hours backward trajectory analysis using NOAA HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model. In addition, the events were evaluated using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)-retrieved AI (Aerosol Index), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI)-retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). Then the daily PM10 influenced by the long-range transport was filtered and the monthly variations calculated from the filtered daily PM10 and the daily PM10 influenced by the long-range transport were compared. For the year of 2002, up to ~50% of the PM10 concentration was influenced by Asian dust in March and April, respectively. In contrast, for the year of 2003, the impact of LRT on the PM10 concentrations were relatively small in the Gwangju areas. The monthly variations and annual mean values for 2002, 2003, 2006, and 2011, calculated from the filtered daily PM10, were similar and therefore, the annual variations of PM10 in Gwangju could be mainly affected by the long-range transport.

  7. Origins of PM10 determined by the micro-proton induced X-ray emission spectra of single aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Yue, Weisheng; Li, Xiaolin; Wan, Tianmin; Liu, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Guilin; Li, Yan

    2006-06-01

    The micro-proton induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectrum of a single aerosol particle (SAP) was considered as its fingerprint for tracing its origin. A proton microprobe was used to extract fingerprints of SAPs. Environmental monitoring samples of PM(10) were collected from a heavy industrial area of Shanghai and were analyzed by proton microprobe for finding their pollution sources. In order to find the sources of SAPs collected from environmental monitoring sites, a fingerprint database of SAPs collected from various pollution sources was established. The origins of samples collected through environmental monitoring were identified by comparison of the micro-PIXE spectra of SAPs with those of SAPs in the fingerprint database using a pattern recognition technique. The results of this study show that most of the measured PM(10) is derived from metallurgic industry, soil dust, coal combustion, automobile exhaust, and motorcycle exhaust. The study also shows that the proton microprobe is an ideal tool for the analysis of SAPs. The unidentified particles of PM(10) are classified into seven classes by hierarchical cluster analysis based on the element peak intensity in the spectra. PMID:16808872

  8. Evaluation of static pressure drops and PM10 and TSP emissions for modified 1D-3D cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, G.A.; Baker, R.V.; Hughs, S.E.

    1999-12-01

    Five modifications of a standard 1D3D cyclone were tested and compared against the standard 1D3D design in the areas of particulate emissions and static pressure drop across the cyclone. The modifications to the 1D3D design included a 2D2D inlet, a 2D2D air outlet, a D/3 trash exit, an expansion chamber with a D/3 trash exit, and a tapered air outlet duct. The 1D3D modifications that exhibited a significant improvement in reducing both PM10 and total suspended particulate (TSP) emissions were the designs with the 2D2D inlet and air exhaust combined with either the conical D/3 tail cone or the expansion chamber. In reference to the standard 1D3D cyclone, the average reduction in PM10 emissions was 24 to 29% with a 29 to 35% reduction observed in TSP emissions. The modifications with the tapered air outlets did not show any significant improvements in controlling PM10 emissions. However, the modification with the tapered air outlet/expansion chamber combination exhibited statistical significance in reducing TSP emissions by 18% compared to the 1D3D cyclone. All modifications tested exhibited lower static pressure drops than the standard 1D3D.

  9. Comprehensive analysis of PM10 in Belgrade urban area on the basis of long-term measurements.

    PubMed

    Stojić, A; Stojić, S Stanišić; Reljin, I; Čabarkapa, M; Šoštarić, A; Perišić, M; Mijić, Z

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of potential emission sources and transport pathways on annual and seasonal PM10 loadings in an urban area of Belgrade (Serbia). The analyzed dataset comprised PM10 mass concentrations for the period 2003-2015, as well as their chemical composition (organic/elemental carbon, benzo[a]pyrene, As, Cd, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb, Cl(-), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), K(+), NO3 (-), SO4 (2-), and NH4 (+)), meteorological parameters, and concentrations of inorganic gaseous pollutants and soot for the period 2011-2015. The combination of different methods, such as source apportionment (Unmix), ensemble learning method (random forest), and multifractal and inverse multifractal analysis, was utilized in order to obtain a detailed description of the PM10 origin and spatio-temporal distribution and to determine their relationship with other pollutants and meteorological parameters. The contribution of long-range and regional transport was estimated by means of trajectory sector analysis, whereas the hybrid receptor models were applied to identify potential areas of concern. PMID:26888527

  10. Air quality in urban parking garages (PM10, major and trace elements, PAHs): Instrumental measurements vs. active moss biomonitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuković, Gordana; Aničić Urošević, Mira; Razumenić, Ivana; Kuzmanoski, Maja; Pergal, Miodrag; Škrivanj, Sandra; Popović, Aleksandar

    2014-03-01

    This study was performed in four parking garages in downtown of Belgrade with the aim to provide multi-pollutant assessment. Concentrations of 16 US EPA priority PAHs and Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn were determined in PM10 samples. The carcinogenic health risk of employees' occupational exposure to heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb) and PAHs (B[a]A, Cry, B[b]F, B[k]F, B[a]P and DB[ah]A) was estimated. A possibility of using Sphagnum girgensohnii moss bags for monitoring of trace element air pollution in semi-enclosed spaces was evaluated as well. The results showed that concentrations of PM10, Cd, Ni and B[a]P exceeded the EU Directive target values. Concentration of Zn, Ba and Cu were two orders of magnitude higher than those measured at different urban sites in European cities. Cumulative cancer risk obtained for heavy metals and PAHs was 4.51 × 10-5 and 3.75 × 10-5 in M and PP, respectively; upper limit of the acceptable US EPA range is 10-4. In the moss, higher post-exposure than pre-exposure (background) element concentrations was observed. In comparison with instrumental monitoring data, similar order of abundances of the most elements in PM10 and moss samples was found. However, using of the S. girgensohnii moss bag technique in indoor environments needs further justification.

  11. Six-day PM 10 air quality forecasts for the Netherlands with the chemistry transport model Lotos-Euros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruyter de Wildt, Martijn; Eskes, Henk; Manders, Astrid; Sauter, Ferd; Schaap, Martijn; Swart, Daan; van Velthoven, Peter

    2011-10-01

    In this work we study the ability of the chemistry transport model Lotos-Euros to forecast, with a range of six days, PM 10 concentrations and exceedances thereof. For both rural and non-rural locations in The Netherlands and based on one year of data, model performance does not deteriorate up to a lead time of three days. Thereafter the PM 10 forecast is increasingly affected by uncertainty in the meteorological forecast. However, up to a lead time of 6 days the forecast still has skill, beats persistence and complies with several performance criteria. The correlation between forecast and observations is between 0.66 and 0.70 for the first half of the forecast and remains above 0.54 until the end of the forecast range. Exceedances of the PM 10 concentration over thresholds are also forecasted with reasonable skill up to a forecast range of three days, after which a gradual deterioration sets in. The stability of the forecast displays the same behaviour. Up to a lead time of three days, the forecast remains reasonably stable with more than 80% of forecasted exceedances still present in all later shorter-term forecasts for the same date. Because exceedances can be forecasted with considerable skill a number of days in advance, the forecast can be used for applications that require a range of a few days, such as outdoor activities and the scheduling and implementation of short-term emission reduction measures.

  12. Origins of PM10 determined by the micro-proton induced X-ray emission spectra of single aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, W.S.; Li, X.L.; Wan, T.M.; Liu, J.F.; Zhang, G.L.; Li, Y.

    2006-06-15

    The micro-proton induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectrum of a single aerosol particle (SAP) was considered as its fingerprint for tracing its origin. A proton microprobe was used to extract fingerprints of SAPs. Environmental monitoring samples of PM10 were collected from a heavy industrial area of Shanghai and were analyzed by proton microprobe for finding their pollution sources. In order to find the sources of SAPs collected from environmental monitoring sites, a fingerprint database of SAPS collected from various pollution Sources was established. The origins of samples collected through environmental monitoring were identified by comparison of the micro-PIXE spectra of SAPs with those of SAPs in the fingerprint database using a pattern recognition technique. The results of this study show that most of the measured PM10 is derived from metallurgic industry, soil dust, coal combustion, automobile exhaust, and motorcycle exhaust. The study also shows that the proton microprobe is an ideal tool for the analysis of SAPs. The unidentified particles of PM10 are classified into seven classes by hierarchical cluster analysis based on the element peak intensity in the spectra.

  13. Emissions inventory of anthropogenic PM 2.5 and PM 10 in Delhi during Commonwealth Games 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Saroj Kumar; Beig, Gufran; Parkhi, Neha S.

    2011-11-01

    As part of the System of Air quality Forecasting and Research (SAFAR) project developed for air quality forecasting during the Commonwealth Games (CWG) - 2010, a high resolution Emission Inventory (EI) of PM 10 and PM 2.5 has been developed for the metropolitan city Delhi for the year 2010. The comprehensive inventory involves detailed activity data and developed for a domain of 70 km × 65 km with a 1.67 km × 1.67 km resolution covering Delhi and surrounding region using Geographical Information System (GIS) technique. The major sectors considered are, transport, thermal power plants, industries, residential and commercial cooking along with windblown road dust which is found to play a major role for Delhi environment. It has been found that total emissions of PM 10 and PM 2.5 including wind blown dust over the study area are found to be 236 Gg yr -1 and 94 Gg yr -1 respectively. The contribution of windblown road dust is found to be as high as 131 Gg yr -1 for PM 10.

  14. Source apportionment of PM10 and PM2.5 near a large mining zone in Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorquera, H.

    2008-12-01

    Chile's economic growth is mainly driven by intensive mining activities; currently Chile produces ~ 40% of copper worldwide. Most of those activities are located in northern Chile, in a desert region where strong regional winds contribute with soil erosion as well. The city of Calama (22.4°S, 68.9°W) is about 17 km south of Chuquicamata, one of the largest open pit copper mines in the world, both located on the west edge of the Andes; Calama is at 2,400 m asl and it is 215 km east of the Pacific Ocean. The mining complex releases ~ 21 kton/y of PM10 and ~ 78 kton/y of SO2 from a copper smelter. The levels of ambient PM10 have steadily increased at Calama in the last 5 years, so there is concern about the impacts from copper industry in the city´s inhabitants, most of who work in mining or related economic activities. A campaign was conducted at Calama between October and December 2007, sampling ambient PM10 and PM2.5 at several sites across the city. Filters were analyzed at the Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV for elemental composition by XRF and for elemental and organic carbon using thermal analysis. The application of positive matrix factorization (PMF) model identified four sources contributing to ambient PM2.5: secondary sulfates (49%), traffic emissions (37%), dust street (9%) and copper smelter emissions (5%). In the coarse fraction, four sources were identified: dust street (45%), wind erosion (34%), mineral processing (14%) and copper smelter emissions (7%). No natural background was found for PM2.5. For ambient PM10 the source apportionment obtained is: mining activities (33%), street dust (34%), wind erosion (22%) and traffic emissions (12%). With a current PM10 annual average of 58 μg/m3 and further mining activities projected in the area, there is a big challenge to improve air quality in the populated area close to the mining operations.

  15. Opposing seasonal trends for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and PM10: Health risk and sources in southwest Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador-Muñoz, Omar; Bazán-Torija, S.; Villa-Ferreira, S. A.; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Bravo-Cabrera, José Luis; Munive-Colín, Zenaida; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; Saldarriaga-Noreña, H.; Murillo-Tovar, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    This study reports the measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in airborne particles ≤ 10 μm (PM10) during four years. Seasonal variation was observed for PM10 and PAH in southwest Mexico City, with major mass concentrations during the dry season (November-April). A non linear decreasing trend of PM10 was observed during this period, while a linear increase (in the four years) was obtained for benzo[a]pyrene (88 pg m- 3), phenanthrene (29 pg m- 3), fluoranthene (88 pg m- 3), and benzo[ghi]perylene (438 pg m- 3). Coronene also showed an increasing trend but it was nonlinear. This suggests that air control strategies implemented by the government contributed to maintaining PM10 under the 24 h maximum limit and resulted in a decreasing trend during this period. However, these strategies did not result in controlling some organic constituents with mutagenic and/or carcinogenic properties as it is the case of benzo[a]pyrene. The annual average of this PAH exceeded the UK recommendation. It was estimated a median (10th-90th) lifetime health risk of 7.6 (3.4-17.2) additional cases of cancer per 10 million people in this zone exists and the health risk of PAH is almost three times greater in dry seasons than it is in rainy seasons. Specific humidity, temperature and wind speed acted as cleaners for PM10 and PAH from the atmosphere. PAH diagnostic ratios and correlation and principal component analyses suggest incomplete combustion from gasoline and diesel engines as the main contributor to PAH found in southwest Mexico City, where factor 1 grouped all PAH emitted from gasoline engines during first three years. During last year, factor 1 only grouped PAH markers of diesel engines. This suggests a change of emission amounts between gasoline and diesel combustion sources or a contribution of other source(s) which changed the PAH profiles. During four years retene was always separated from factors which grouped the rest of PAH, due to its wood combustion

  16. European characterization factors for human health damage of PM 10 and ozone in life cycle impact assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zelm, Rosalie; Huijbregts, Mark A. J.; den Hollander, Henri A.; van Jaarsveld, Hans A.; Sauter, Ferd J.; Struijs, Jaap; van Wijnen, Harm J.; van de Meent, Dik

    This paper presents characterization factors (CFs) for human health effects of fine particulate (PM 10) and ozone in Europe for the purpose of life cycle impact assessment. The CFs express the change in disability adjusted life years (DALYs) of European inhabitants due to a change in emissions of PM 10, ammonia (NH 3), nitrogen oxides (NO x), sulfur dioxide (SO 2), and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs). The CF consists of an intake factor, an effect factor, and a damage factor. The intake factor was modeled as the change in population exposure to primary and secondary aerosols, and ozone due to a change in emission of a substance. This was done with the models EUTREND (aerosols) and LOTOS-EUROS (ozone). A combined human effect and damage factor, represented by the change in DALY due to a change in population intake was derived from epidemiological-based relative risks of short-term mortality, long-term mortality, and morbidity. Primary PM 10 causes 260 DALYs per kton emission, while secondary aerosol formation results in CFs between 51 and 83 DALYs per kton of precursor emitted. Applying CFs for high and low stack sources separately for PM 10 and SO 2 life cycle emissions can lead to a better estimation of human health damage due to these pollutants. CF related to ozone formation emissions appear to be much lower (0.04 DALY per kton, calculated based on maximum daily 8-h average ozone concentration) compared to the CF for primary and secondary PM 10. When calculating CF based on 24-h average ozone concentration, NMVOC causes 0.04 DALYs per kton, while the CF for NO x causing ozone formation is negative due to reactivity of ozone with NO in areas with high NO x levels (-0.12 DALYs per kton). Total European emissions of the five priority air pollutants in year 2000 are attributed to 4.2 million DALYs for the European population, which corresponds on average to 0.25 DALYs per person over a lifetime (80 years).

  17. 40 CFR 93.116 - Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots). 93.116 Section 93.116 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Programs, and Projects Developed, Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93... applies at all times. The FHWA/FTA project must not cause or contribute to any new localized CO, PM10,...

  18. 40 CFR 93.116 - Criteria and procedures: Localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., PM10, and PM2.5 violations (hot-spots). 93.116 Section 93.116 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Programs, and Projects Developed, Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93... applies at all times. The FHWA/FTA project must not cause or contribute to any new localized CO, PM10,...

  19. 40 CFR 53.34 - Test procedure for methods for PM 10 and Class I methods for PM 2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test procedure for methods for PM 10 and Class I methods for PM 2.5. 53.34 Section 53.34 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... procedure for methods for PM 10 and Class I methods for PM 2.5. (a) Comparability. Comparability is...

  20. 40 CFR 53.34 - Test procedure for methods for PM 10 and Class I methods for PM 2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test procedure for methods for PM 10 and Class I methods for PM 2.5. 53.34 Section 53.34 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... procedure for methods for PM 10 and Class I methods for PM 2.5. (a) Comparability. Comparability is...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix O to Part 50 - Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere O Appendix O to Part 50 Protection of... Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere 1.0Applicability and Definition 1.1This...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix O to Part 50 - Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere O Appendix O to Part 50 Protection of... Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere 1.0Applicability and Definition 1.1This...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix O to Part 50 - Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere O Appendix O to Part 50 Protection of... Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere 1.0Applicability and Definition 1.1This...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix O to Part 50 - Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere O Appendix O to Part 50 Protection of... Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere 1.0Applicability and Definition 1.1This...

  5. 40 CFR 53.34 - Test procedure for methods for PM10 and Class I methods for PM2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Class I methods for PM2.5. 53.34 Section 53.34 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... for PM10 and Class I methods for PM2.5. (a) Comparability. Comparability is shown for PM10 methods and for Class I methods for PM2.5 when the relationship between: (1) Measurements made by a...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix O to Part 50 - Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reference Method for the Determination of Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere O Appendix O to Part 50 Protection of... Coarse Particulate Matter as PM10-2.5 in the Atmosphere 1.0Applicability and Definition 1.1This...

  7. Influence of atmospheric ozone, PM 10 and meteorological factors on the concentration of airborne pollen and fungal spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, S. I. V.; Martins, F. G.; Pereira, M. C.; Alvim-Ferraz, M. C. M.; Ribeiro, H.; Oliveira, M.; Abreu, I.

    The increase of allergenic symptoms has been associated with air contaminants such as ozone, particulate matter, pollen and fungal spores. Considering the potential relevance of crossed effects of non-biological pollutants and airborne pollens and fungal spores on allergy worsening, the aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of non-biological pollutants and meteorological parameters on the concentrations of pollen and fungal spores using linear correlations and multiple linear regressions. For that, the seasonal variation of ozone, particulate matter with an equivalent aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm, pollen and fungal spores were assessed and statistical correlations were analysed between those parameters. The data were collected through 2003-2005 in Porto, Portugal. The linear correlations showed that ozone and particulate matter had no significant influence on the concentration of pollen and fungal spores. On the contrary, when using multiple linear regressions those parameters showed to have some influence on the biological pollutants, although results were different depending on the year analysed. Among the meteorological parameters analysed, temperature was the one that most influenced the pollen and fungal spores airborne concentrations, both when using linear and multiple linear correlations. Relative humidity also showed to have some influence on the fungal spore dispersion when multiple linear regressions were used. Nevertheless, the conclusions for each pollen and fungal spore were different depending on the analysed period, which means that the correlations identified as statistically significant may not be, even so, consistent enough. Furthermore, the comparison of the results here presented with those obtained by other authors for only one period should be made carefully.

  8. Comparisons of urban and rural PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 mass concentrations and semi-volatile fractions in northeastern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Nicholas; Hannigan, Michael P.; Miller, Shelly L.; Peel, Jennifer L.; Milford, Jana B.

    2016-06-01

    Coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter in the atmosphere adversely affect human health and influence climate. While PM2.5 is relatively well studied, less is known about the sources and fate of PM10-2.5. The Colorado Coarse Rural-Urban Sources and Health (CCRUSH) study measured PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 mass concentrations, as well as the fraction of semi-volatile material (SVM) in each size regime (SVM2.5, SVM10-2.5), from 2009 to early 2012 in Denver and comparatively rural Greeley, Colorado. Agricultural operations east of Greeley appear to have contributed to the peak PM10-2.5 concentrations there, but concentrations were generally lower in Greeley than in Denver. Traffic-influenced sites in Denver had PM10-2.5 concentrations that averaged from 14.6 to 19.7 µg m-3 and mean PM10-2.5 / PM10 ratios of 0.56 to 0.70, higher than at residential sites in Denver or Greeley. PM10-2.5 concentrations were more temporally variable than PM2.5 concentrations. Concentrations of the two pollutants were not correlated. Spatial correlations of daily averaged PM10-2.5 concentrations ranged from 0.59 to 0.62 for pairs of sites in Denver and from 0.47 to 0.70 between Denver and Greeley. Compared to PM10-2.5, concentrations of PM2.5 were more correlated across sites within Denver and less correlated between Denver and Greeley. PM10-2.5 concentrations were highest during the summer and early fall, while PM2.5 and SVM2.5 concentrations peaked in winter during periodic multi-day inversions. SVM10-2.5 concentrations were low at all sites. Diurnal peaks in PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 concentrations corresponded to morning and afternoon peaks of traffic activity, and were enhanced by boundary layer dynamics. SVM2.5 concentrations peaked around noon on both weekdays and weekends. PM10-2.5 concentrations at sites located near highways generally increased with wind speeds above about 3 m s-1. Little wind speed dependence was observed for the residential sites in Denver and Greeley. The mass

  9. Identification of fine (PM1) and coarse (PM10-1) sources of particulate matter in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Lyamani, H.; Pandolfi, M.; Alastuey, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2014-06-01

    PM10 and PM1 samples were collected at an urban site in southeastern Spain during 2006-2010. The chemical composition of all samples has been determined and analyzed by Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) technique for fine and coarse source identification. The PMF results have been analyzed for working and non-working days in order to evaluate the change in PM sources contribution and possible future abatement strategies. A decreasing trend in PM10 levels and in its constituents has been observed, being partly associated to a reduction in anthropogenic activities due to the economic crisis. The use of fine and coarse PM in the PMF analysis allowed us for the identification of additional sources that could not be identified using only one size fraction. The mineral dust source was identified in both fractions and comprised 36 and 22% of the total mass in the coarse and fine fractions, respectively. This high contribution of the mineral source to the fine fraction may be ascribed to contamination of the source profile. The regional re-circulation source was traced by secondary sulfate, V and Ni. It was the most important source concerning PM1 mass concentration (41% of the total mass in this fraction). Although V and Ni are commonly associated to fuel oil combustion the seasonality of this source with higher concentrations in summer compared with winter suggest that the most important part of this source can be ascribed to regional pollution episodes. A traffic exhaust source was identified but only in the fine fraction, comprising 29% of the fine mass. The celestite mines source associated with nearby open-pit mines was typified by strontium, sulfate and mineral matter. PM10-1 levels were higher in working days, whereas PM1 levels remained fairly constant throughout the whole week. As a conclusion, traffic seems to be the main source to target in Granada.

  10. Chemical characterisation of PM10 emissions from combustion in a closed stove of common woods grown in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, C.; Alves, C.; Pio, C.; Rzaca, M.; Schmidl, C.; Puxbaum, H.

    2009-04-01

    A series of source tests were conducted to determine the wood elemental composition, combustion gases and the chemical constitution of PM10 emissions from the closed stove combustion of four species of woods grown in Portugal: Eucalyptus globulos, Pinus pinaster, Quercus suber and Acacia longifolia. The burning tests were made in a closed stove with a dilution source sampler. To ascertain the combustion phase and conditions, continuous emission monitors measured O2, CO2, CO, NO, hydrocarbons, temperature and pressure, during each burning cycle. Woodsmoke samples have been collected and analysed to estimate the contribution of plant debris and biomass smoke to atmospheric aerosols. At this stage of work, cellulose, anhydrosugars and humic-like substances (HULIS) have been measured. Cellulose was determined photometrically after its conversion to D-Glucose. The determination of levoglucosan and other anhydrosugars, including mannosan and galactosan, was carried out by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. HULIS determination was made with a total organic carbon analyser and an infrared non dispersive detector, after the isolation of substances. Cellulose was present in PM10 at mass fractions (w/w) of 0.13%, 0.13%, 0.05% and 0.08% for Eucalyptus globulos, Pinus pinaster, Quercus suber and Acacia longifolia, respectively. Levoglucosan was the major anhydrosugar present in the samples, representing mass fractions of 14.71%, 3.80%, 6.78% and 1.91%, concerning the above mentioned wood species, respectively. The levoglucosan-to-mannosan ratio, usually used to evaluate the proportion of hardwood or softwood smoke in PM10, gave average values of 34.9 (Eucalyptus globulos), 3.40 (Pinus pinaster), 24.8 (Quercus suber) and 10.4 (Acacia longifolia). HULIS were present at mass fractions of 2.35%, 2.99%, 1.52% and 1.72% for the four wood species listed in the same order as before.

  11. Geochemistry of PM10 over Europe during the EMEP intensive measurement periods in summer 2012 and winter 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alastuey, Andrés; Querol, Xavier; Aas, Wenche; Lucarelli, Franco; Pérez, Noemí; Moreno, Teresa; Cavalli, Fabrizia; Areskoug, Hans; Balan, Violeta; Catrambone, Maria; Ceburnis, Darius; Cerro, José C.; Conil, Sébastien; Gevorgyan, Lusine; Hueglin, Christoph; Imre, Kornelia; Jaffrezo, Jean-Luc; Leeson, Sarah R.; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Mitosinkova, Marta; O'Dowd, Colin D.; Pey, Jorge; Putaud, Jean-Philippe; Riffault, Véronique; Ripoll, Anna; Sciare, Jean; Sellegri, Karine; Spindler, Gerald; Espen Yttri, Karl

    2016-05-01

    The third intensive measurement period (IMP) organised by the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) under the UNECE CLTRAP took place in summer 2012 and winter 2013, with PM10 filter samples concurrently collected at 20 (16 EMEP) regional background sites across Europe for subsequent analysis of their mineral dust content. All samples were analysed by the same or a comparable methodology. Higher PM10 mineral dust loadings were observed at most sites in summer (0.5-10 µg m-3) compared to winter (0.2-2 µg m-3), with the most elevated concentrations in the southern- and easternmost countries, accounting for 20-40 % of PM10. Saharan dust outbreaks were responsible for the high summer dust loadings at western and central European sites, whereas regional or local sources explained the elevated concentrations observed at eastern sites. The eastern Mediterranean sites experienced elevated levels due to African dust outbreaks during both summer and winter. The mineral dust composition varied more in winter than in summer, with a higher relative contribution of anthropogenic dust during the former period. A relatively high contribution of K from non-mineral and non-sea-salt sources, such as biomass burning, was evident in winter at some of the central and eastern European sites. The spatial distribution of some components and metals reveals the influence of specific anthropogenic sources on a regional scale: shipping emissions (V, Ni, and SO42-) in the Mediterranean region, metallurgy (Cr, Ni, and Mn) in central and eastern Europe, high temperature processes (As, Pb, and SO42-) in eastern countries, and traffic (Cu) at sites affected by emissions from nearby cities.

  12. Characterization of PM10 chemical composition and its variability in relation to different sources in the central Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzolai, Giulia; Nava, Silvia; Chiari, Massimo; Lucarelli, Franco; Becagli, Silvia; Traversi, Rita; Marconi, Miriam; Rugi, Francesco; Udisti, Roberto; di Sarra, Alcide; Pace, Giovanni; Meloni, Daniela; Bommarito, Carlo; Sferlazzo, Damiano

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are estimated to play a relevant role in climate change, also in relation to global warming and to the hydrological cycle; information on aerosol sources and impact are among the data needed to constrain uncertainties in climate change models. This is particularly important in the Mediterranean basin, whose atmosphere is heavily polluted and characterized by strong influences from both natural and anthropogenic emissions. An investigation aimed at assessing the aerosol sources affecting the Central Mediterranean basin has been carried out by applying the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model to a 2-year long data set of PM10 mass concentration and chemical composition of samples collected on the island of Lampedusa (35.5° N, 12.6° E, 45 m a.s.l.). Lampedusa is an ideal site for this kind of studies, as it is far from continental pollution sources (the nearest coast, in Tunisia, is more than 100 km away). Samples were collected on a daily basis; after mass gravimetric measurements, different portions of the samples were analyzed for the ionic content by Ion Cromatography (IC), for soluble metals by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES), and for the total (soluble + insoluble) elemental composition by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Data from years 2007 and 2008 are used in this study. Seven sources were resolved: sea-salt, mineral dust, biogenic emissions, primary ship emissions, secondary sulphate, secondary nitrate, and biomass burning emissions. The chemical profiles of each source were identified and compared with literature data; the temporal evolution of each source was studied, in relation to seasonal changes and influence of different source regions. Air mass backward trajectories were also used in the analysis. Daily absolute and relative contributions of the aerosol produced by each of the seven resolved sources to the PM10 in Lampedusa were also obtained. On average, each of the sources

  13. Chemical and morphological properties of particulate matter (PM 10, PM 2.5) in school classrooms and outdoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, H.; Diemer, J.; Dietrich, S.; Cyrys, J.; Heinrich, J.; Lang, W.; Kiranoglu, M.; Twardella, D.

    Studies have shown high concentrations of particulate matter (PM) in schools. Further insights into the sources and the composition of these particles are needed. During school hours for a period of 6 weeks, outdoor air and the air in two classrooms were sampled. PM was measured gravimetrically, and PM filters were used for the determination of the elemental and organic carbon, light absorbance, and 10 water-soluble ions. Some filters were further analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive microanalysis (EDX). The median PM 10 concentrations were 118.2 μg m -3 indoors and 24.2 μg m -3 outdoors; corresponding results for PM 2.5 were 37.4 μg m -3 indoors and 17.0 μg m -3 outdoors. Using PM 10 and PM 2.5 data, we calculated the following indoor/outdoor ratios: 0.3 and 0.4 (sulfate), 0.1 and 0.2 (nitrate), 0.1 and 0.3 (ammonium), and 1.4 and 1.6 (calcium). Using the measured sulfate content on PM filters as an indicator for ambient PM sources, we estimated that 43% of PM 2.5 and 24% of PM 10, respectively, were of ambient origin. The composition of the classrooms' PM (e.g., high calcium concentrations) and the findings from SEM/EDX suggest that the indoor PM consists mainly of earth crustal materials, detrition of the building materials and chalk. Physical activity of the pupils leads to resuspension of mainly indoor coarse particles and greatly contributes to increased PM 10 in classrooms. The concentration of fine particles caused by combustion processes indoors and outdoors is comparable. We conclude that PM measured in classrooms has major sources other than outdoor particles. Assuming that combustion-related particles and crustal materials vary in toxicity, our results support the hypothesis that indoor-generated PM may be less toxic compared to PM in ambient air.

  14. Odor, gaseous and PM10 emissions from small scale combustion of wood types indigenous to Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, Magdalena; Schmidl, Christoph; Padouvas, Emmanuel; Giebl, Heinrich; Lohninger, Johann; Ellinger, Reinhard; Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the emissions, including odor, from log wood stoves, burning wood types indigenous to mid-European countries such as Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Switzerland, as well as Baden-Württemberg and Bavaria (Germany) and South Tyrol (Italy). The investigations were performed with a modern, certified, 8 kW, manually fired log wood stove, and the results were compared to emissions from a modern 9 kW pellet stove. The examined wood types were deciduous species: black locust, black poplar, European hornbeam, European beech, pedunculate oak (also known as “common oak”), sessile oak, turkey oak and conifers: Austrian black pine, European larch, Norway spruce, Scots pine, silver fir, as well as hardwood briquettes. In addition, “garden biomass” such as pine cones, pine needles and dry leaves were burnt in the log wood stove. The pellet stove was fired with softwood pellets. The composite average emission rates for log wood and briquettes were 2030 mg MJ−1 for CO; 89 mg MJ−1 for NOx, 311 mg MJ−1 for CxHy, 67 mg MJ−1 for particulate matter PM10 and average odor concentration was at 2430 OU m−3. CO, CxHy and PM10 emissions from pellets combustion were lower by factors of 10, 13 and 3, while considering NOx – comparable to the log wood emissions. Odor from pellets combustion was not detectable. CxHy and PM10 emissions from garden biomass (needles and leaves) burning were 10 times higher than for log wood, while CO and NOx rise only slightly. Odor levels ranged from not detectable (pellets) to around 19,000 OU m−3 (dry leaves). The odor concentration correlated with CO, CxHy and PM10. For log wood combustion average odor ranged from 536 OU m−3 for hornbeam to 5217 OU m−3 for fir, indicating a considerable influence of the wood type on odor concentration. PMID:23471123

  15. Spatial distribution and potential sources of trace elements in PM10 monitored in urban and rural sites of Piedmont Region.

    PubMed

    Padoan, Elio; Malandrino, Mery; Giacomino, Agnese; Grosa, Mauro M; Lollobrigida, Francesco; Martini, Sara; Abollino, Ornella

    2016-02-01

    The results on elemental composition of aerosol (PM10) sampled during 2011 in Piedmont region (Italy) are interpreted using meteorological data, Enrichment Factors (EF), chemometric processing by Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Factor Analysis (FA) and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA). Daily concentrations of about 30 elements were measured using HR-ICP-MS in five monitoring sites. A clear seasonal pattern, with higher concentrations in autumn and winter, was observed, particularly in the urban sites. Levels of As, Cd, Ni and Pb in most of the samples were within the limits imposed by the European legislation. Spatial differences in PM10 and metal concentrations were significant, with rural and urban sites showing different metal patterns, indicating different sources. K and Ca were used, respectively, as marker of biomass burning and industrial marker (cement plant); EFs showed that Ca was enriched just in one area and K was enriched only in the winter period considered and in some stations. Data analysis through PCA, FA and HCA allowed us to identify correlations among the investigated elements and similarities between sampling sites in order to individuate specific emission sources, such as non-exhaust vehicle emission.

  16. Assessment of Reliability when Using Diagnostic Binary Ratios of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Ambient Air PM10.

    PubMed

    Pongpiachan, Siwatt

    2015-01-01

    The reliability of using diagnostic binary ratios of particulate carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as chemical tracers for source characterisation was assessed by collecting PM10 samples from various air quality observatory sites in Thailand. The major objectives of this research were to evaluate the effects of day and night on the alterations of six different PAH diagnostic binary ratios: An/(An + Phe), Fluo/(Fluo + Pyr), B[a]A/(B[a]A + Chry), B[a]P/(B[a]P + B[e]P), Ind/(Ind + B[g,h,i]P), and B[k]F/Ind, and to investigate the impacts of site-specific conditions on the alterations of PAH diagnostic binary ratios by applying the concept of the coefficient of divergence (COD). No significant differences between day and night were found for any of the diagnostic binary ratios of PAHs, which indicates that the photodecomposition process is of minor importance in terms of PAH reduction. Interestingly, comparatively high values of COD for An/(An + Phe) in PM10 collected from sites with heavy traffic and in residential zones underline the influence of heterogeneous reactions triggered by oxidising gaseous species from vehicular exhausts. Therefore, special attention must be paid when interpreting the data of these diagnostic binary ratios, particularly for cases of low-molecular-weight PAHs. PMID:26745124

  17. [Analysis of Component Spectral Characteristics of PM10-Bound PAHs and the Influence of Weather Conditions During Spring in Xiamen].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Fan, Shu-xian; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Yue; Wei, Jin-cheng

    2015-04-01

    In order to study pollution status and distribution characteristics of PAHs in PM10 during the spring in city and suburban Xiamen. A total of 18 PAHs were analyzed in the aerosol samples collected in daytime and nighttime during 11th to 21st of April, 2013 in city and suburban Xiamen. Results showed diurnal variation of Σ PAHs in suburban was weaker than that in city. In the city, the concentration of PAHs during daytimes was higher than that during nighttimes, close to 1.83 times, and it is still under the national environmental standards. In different times and space scales, PAHs were a bimodal distribution, the components of PAHs gave the priority to low and middle rings in urban and suburban during daytimes and nighttimes. PAHs with high molecular weight decreased gradually by the increase of particle size, and the proportion of low molecular weight PAHs increased gradually in the meantime. In the city, the change of size distribution among 2-4 rings PAHs in PM10 during days and nights was bigger than these among 5-7 rings. The main sources of PAHs were estimated by DR, the main contributions included gasoline and diesel combustion, the smelting furnace exhaust emissions. During sampling periods, the relationship between the concentration of PAHs, temperature and WD is negative, PAHs had a positive correlation with the visibility and WS in suburban. And in urban, the relationship with temperature during the day was negative, and with an opposite correlation between other meteorological elements.

  18. The sulphur stable isotope compositions of urban sources and atmospheric particles (PM2.5 & PM10) from Paris (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widory, D.; Landry, J.; Helie, J.; Ravelomanantsoa, H.

    2013-12-01

    Sulphur (S) in atmospheric particles in the environment can be derived from a variety of primary sources and cycled through numerous secondary processes, complicating identification of its origin. Using the PM10 fraction of aerosols from Paris and its vicinity, we are investigating the suitability of sulphur stable isotope compositions (δ34S) as tracers of origins and processes affecting the atmospheric S budget. Characterization of S isotope compositions of emissions from the different potential sources (e.g. waste incinerators, coal-fired power plants, metal refining plants, road traffic and heating sources) shows these are clearly discriminated by specific coupled S-δ34S isotope signatures. While S concentrations vary from 0.7 to 11.5%, δ34S display a large range of values from -2.2 and 13.4‰. PM10 samples from Paris and its vicinity show that S is usually present at low levels, around 1 μg.m-3 in average, but that concentrations as high as 100 μg.m-3 can punctually be observed. By the time of the conference, we will have analysed and interpreted the corresponding δ34S in order to help elucidate the origin(s) of sulphur in the atmosphere of the city.

  19. Aerodynamic performance of 0.5 meter-diameter, 337 meter-per-second tip speed, 1.5 pressure-ratio, single-stage fan designed for low noise aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelder, T. F.; Lewis, G. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Overall and blade-element aerodynamic performance of a 0.271-scale model of QF-1 are presented, examined, and then compared and evaluated with that from similar low noise fan stage designs. The tests cover a wide range of speeds and weight flows along with variations in stator setting angle and stator axial spacing from the rotor. At design speed with stator at design setting angle and a fixed distance between stage measuring stations, there were no significant effects of increasing the axial spacing between rotor stator from 1.0 to 3.5 rotor chords on stage overall pressure ratio, efficiency or stall margin.

  20. Application technology progress report: Evaluation of PM-10 commercial inlets and development of an inlet for new Rocky Flats Plant surveillance air sampler, January 1986-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, G.; Deitesfeld, C.A. (ed.0

    1987-09-10

    Work during 1986 was concerned with developing a new PM-10 inlet for use at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), Golden, Colorado. The commercial units that we evaluated did not allow for recovery of the >10-..mu..m dust fraction as may be required by EPA and DOE for nuclear installations. One of them, the Wedding PM-10 Inlet, did not meet the PM-10 cut-point requirement, because of the build-up of vegetative fibers in the cyclone type separator. Therefore, we developed a new PM-10 inlet (patent applied for) to meet our needs, and especially one that is adaptable to our existing 60 surveillance air samplers at minimum cost. The inlet utilizes a modified slotted impactor design. This device is directly adaptable to existing EPA high-volume samplers. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Temporal profile of PM10 and associated health effects in one of the most polluted cities of the world (Ahvaz, Iran) between 2009 and 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Heidar; Sorooshian, Armin; Goudarzi, Gholamreza; Nikfal, Amirhossein; Baneshi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Ahvaz, Iran ranks as the most polluted city of the world in terms of PM10 concentrations that lead to deleterious effects on its inhabitants. This study examines diurnal, weekly, monthly and annual fluctuations of PM10 between 2009 and 2014 in Ahvaz. Health effects of PM10 levels are also assessed using the World Health Organization AirQ software. Over the study period, the mean PM10 level in Ahvaz was 249.5 μg m-3, with maximum and minimum values in July (420.5 μg m-3) and January (154.6 μg m-3), respectively. The cumulative diurnal PM10 profile exhibits a dominant peak between 08:00-11:00 (local time) with the lowest levels in the afternoon hours. While weekend PM10 levels are not significantly reduced as compared to weekdays, an anthropogenic signature is instead observed diurnally on weekdays, which exhibit higher PM10 levels between 07:00-17:00 by an average amount of 14.2 μg m-3 as compared to weekend days. PM10 has shown a steady mean-annual decline between 2009 (315.2 μg m-3) and 2014 (143.5 μg m-3). The AirQ model predicts that mortality was a health outcome for a total of 3777 individuals between 2009 and 2014 (i.e., 630 per year). The results of this study motivate more aggressive strategies in Ahvaz and similarly polluted desert cities to reduce the health effects of the enormous ambient aerosol concentrations.

  2. Characterization of PM 10 source profiles for fugitive dust in Fushun-a city famous for coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shaofei; Ji, Yaqin; Lu, Bing; Chen, Li; Han, Bin; Li, Zhiyong; Bai, Zhipeng

    2011-09-01

    A total of 120 fugitive dust samples were collected to acquire chemical source profiles of PM 10 in Fushun including 27 soil dust samples, 32 road dust samples, 19 construction dust samples, 13 coal storage pile samples, 2 cement production samples, 13 coal-fired power plant fly ash samples, 5 fly ash samples from iron smelt plant and 9 samples from industrial raw material and production piles. The samples were classified as 20 subtypes. The dust samples were dried, sieved, resuspended and sampled through a PM 10 inlet onto filters, and then chemically analyzed. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, ion chromatograph and thermal/optical reflectance methods were adopted for analyzing twenty elements including Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Pb and Hg and nine ions including Na +, NH 4+, K +, Mg 2+, Ca 2+, F -, Cl -, NO 3- and SO 42- as well as OC and EC, respectively. The chemical compositions were compared for 20 subtypes. Si and Ca were the most abundant elements in all the fugitive dust profiles. Enrichment factors of elements in fly ashes compared to raw coal were calculated with Fe as reference element. The highest enriched elements were Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb. Significant difference existed among PM 10 profiles with the coefficient of divergence values ranging from 0.28 to 0.78. Profiles were compared with others. Si exhibited lower content in this study for soil and road dust while EC and Cr showed much higher content compared to others indicating the influence of coal mining and industries activities in Fushun. This was validated by source signatures analysis which indicated almost all the fugitive dust were relative to coal and may also be influenced by metallurgy. The ratios of Mn/V, V/Ni, Zn/Pb and Zn/Cd were calculated for source identification. Elemental ratios may vary widely even for the same source types with different processing courses. Chemical profiles of fugitive dust should be established based

  3. Size fractionation in mercury-bearing airborne particles (HgPM 10) at Almadén, Spain: Implications for inhalation hazards around old mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Teresa; Higueras, Pablo; Jones, Tim; McDonald, Iain; Gibbons, Wes

    Almadén has a >2000y mining history and an unprecedented legacy of mercury contamination. Resuspended airborne particles were extracted from mine waste (Las Cuevas), retort site soil (Almadenejos), and urban car park dust (Almadén), separated into fine (PM 10) and coarse (PM >10 μm ) fractions, analysed for mercury using ICP-MS, and individual HgPM characterised using SEM. Cold extractable mercury concentrations in PM 10 range from 100 to 150 μg g -1 (car parks), to nearly 6000 μg g -1 (mine waste), reaching a world record of 95,000 μg g -1 above the abandoned retort at Almadenejos where ultrafine HgPM have pervaded the brickwork and soil and entered the food chain: edible wild asparagus stem material from here contains 35-65 μg g -1 Hg, and pig hair from animals living, inhaling and ingesting HgPM 10 at the site yielded 8-10 μg g -1. The PM 10 fraction (dusts easily wind transported and deeply inhaled) contains much more mercury than the coarser fraction. The contribution of HgPM 10 to ecosystem contamination and potential human health effects around old mercury mines has been underestimated.

  4. NASP aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the critical aerodynamic technologies needed to support the development of a class of aircraft represented by the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The air-breathing, single-stage-to-orbit mission presents a severe challenge to all of the aeronautical disciplines and demands an extension of the state-of-the-art in each technology area. While the largest risk areas are probably advanced materials and the development of the scramjet engine, there remains a host of design issues and technology problems in aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and propulsion integration. The paper presents an overview of the most significant propulsion integration problems, and defines the most critical fluid flow phenomena that must be evaluated, defined, and predicted for the class of aircraft represented by the Aero-Space Plane.

  5. Estimating urban ground-level PM10 using MODIS 3km AOD product and meteorological parameters from WRF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghotbi, Saba; Sotoudeheian, Saeed; Arhami, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    Satellite remote sensing products of AOD from MODIS along with appropriate meteorological parameters were used to develop statistical models and estimate ground-level PM10. Most of previous studies obtained meteorological data from synoptic weather stations, with rather sparse spatial distribution, and used it along with 10 km AOD product to develop statistical models, applicable for PM variations in regional scale (resolution of ≥10 km). In the current study, meteorological parameters were simulated with 3 km resolution using WRF model and used along with the rather new 3 km AOD product (launched in 2014). The resulting PM statistical models were assessed for a polluted and largely variable urban area, Tehran, Iran. Despite the critical particulate pollution problem, very few PM studies were conducted in this area. The issue of rather poor direct PM-AOD associations existed, due to different factors such as variations in particles optical properties, in addition to bright background issue for satellite data, as the studied area located in the semi-arid areas of Middle East. Statistical approach of linear mixed effect (LME) was used, and three types of statistical models including single variable LME model (using AOD as independent variable) and multiple variables LME model by using meteorological data from two sources, WRF model and synoptic stations, were examined. Meteorological simulations were performed using a multiscale approach and creating an appropriate physic for the studied region, and the results showed rather good agreements with recordings of the synoptic stations. The single variable LME model was able to explain about 61%-73% of daily PM10 variations, reflecting a rather acceptable performance. Statistical models performance improved through using multivariable LME and incorporating meteorological data as auxiliary variables, particularly by using fine resolution outputs from WRF (R2 = 0.73-0.81). In addition, rather fine resolution for PM

  6. PM 10 metal concentrations and source identification using positive matrix factorization and wind sectoring in a French industrial zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alleman, Laurent Y.; Lamaison, Laure; Perdrix, Esperanza; Robache, Antoine; Galloo, Jean-Claude

    2010-06-01

    The elemental composition data of ambient aerosols collected upon selected wind sectors in the highly industrialised harbour of Dunkirk (France) were interpreted using pollution roses, elemental ratios, Enrichment Factors (EF), Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model. The objective was to identify the possible sources of PM10 aerosols, their respective chemical tracers and to determine their relative contribution at the sampling site. PM10 particles samples were collected from June 2003 to March 2005 in order to analyse up to 35 elements (Ag, Al, As, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Eu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Rb, S, Sb, Sc, Si, Sm, Sr, Th, Ti, U, V, Zn and Zr) using Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP)-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (AES) and ICP-Mass Spectrometry (MS). A significant effort has been made on estimating the total uncertainty of each result by regularly analysing blanks, quality controls and SRM NIST standards. Based on this procedure, a selected set of 24 "robust" elements was compared to the 35-element matrix in order to evaluate the sturdiness of our PMF statistical treatment. Eight source factors were resolved by PCA for all the wind sectors explaining 90% of the total data variance. The PMF results confirmed that eight physically interpretable factors contributed to the ambient particulate pollution at the sampling site: crustal dust (11%), marine aerosols (12%), petrochemistry activities (9.2%), metallurgical sintering plant (8.6%), metallurgical coke plant (12.6%), ferromanganese plant (6.6%), road transport (15%) and a less clearly interpretable profile probably associated to dust resuspension (13%). These weighted contributions against wind direction frequencies demonstrate that industrial sources are the most important contributors to this site (37%) followed by the natural sources (detrital and marine sources) (23%) and the road transport (15%).

  7. Improved aerosol retrieval algorithm using Landsat images and its application for PM10 monitoring over urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Nana; Wong, Man Sing; Zhao, Wenji; Yan, Xing; Xiao, Fei

    2015-02-01

    Aerosol retrieval using MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has been well researched over the past decade. However, the application is limited to global- and regional-scale studies, which may not be applicable for urban areas due to its low spatial resolution. To overcome the limitation, this paper proposed an improved aerosol retrieval algorithm for Landsat images (ImAero-Landsat) at spatial resolution of 30 m. This ImAero-Landsat algorithm has been improved in the following two aspects: (i) it does not require a comprehensive look up table and thus it is more efficient in AOT retrieval; and (ii) it can be operated in both bright and dark surfaces. The derived aerosol optical thickness (AOT) images were validated with AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) measurements as well as MODIS MOD04 AOT products. Small root mean square errors (RMSEs) of 0.11 and 0.14 and mean absolute difference (MAD) of 0.07 and 0.11 between ImAero-Landsat AOT, with MODIS MOD04 and AERONET products were observed. By correlating with ground based PM10 concentrations, the ImAero-Landsat method outperforms (r2 = 0.32) than MOD04 AOT products (r2 = 0.23). In addition, the accuracy of estimating PM10 can be improved to r2 = 0.55 when the derived AOT was integrated with meteorological parameters. The accuracy is similar to the results derived from AERONET AOT (r2 = 0.62). This study offers a simple and accurate method to investigate aerosol optical thickness at detailed city-scale. Environmental authorities may use the derived methods for deriving aerosol distribution maps and pinpointing the sources of pollutants in urban areas.

  8. [Effect of sand dust weather on major water-soluble ions in PM10 in Lanzhou, China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Wen-Yu; Guo, Yong-Tao; Zhao, Lian-Biao

    2014-07-01

    The major water-soluble ions (Ca(2+), NH(4+), Mg(2+), K(+), Na(+), SO4(2-), NO3(-) and Cl-(-) in PM10 at 1-h interval were measured by an online analyzer for monitoring of Aerosols and Gases (MARGA) at the campus of Lanzhou University, from April 1 to June 30, 2011. There were 15 days of dust weather during the monitoring period. The main water-soluble ions in PM10 were Ca(2+), SO4(2-) and NO3(-). The concentration of NO3(-) and NH4(+) decreased during blowing sand weather comparing with non-dust, this phenomenon showed that the dust weather had the function of eliminating the local anthropogenic emissions. As the soil pollution marker, the concentration of Mg(2+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) increased during dust weather comparing with non-dust. The correlation coefficients between Na(+) and Mg(2+), Na(+) and Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) during dust weather were 0.520, 0.659 and 0.671, respectively. The similar correlation coefficients indicated that some fraction of these species was derived from the same sources, such as soil dust. The correlation coefficients between Na(+) and Mg(2+), Na(+) and Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) during non-dust weather were not strong, only 0.065, 0.131 and 0.163, respectively. The low correlation coefficients indicated that these species were derived from different sources. The mass concentration of Cl(-) in the dust weather was significantly higher than that of floating dust and non dust, indicating that soil dust was the main source of Cl(-).

  9. Maternal exposure to air pollutant PM2.5 and PM10 during pregnancy and risk of congenital heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Liang, Shengwen; Zhao, Jinzhu; Qian, Zhengmin; Bassig, Bryan A; Yang, Rong; Zhang, Yiming; Hu, Ke; Xu, Shunqing; Zheng, Tongzhang; Yang, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    Maternal exposure to ambient air pollution has increasingly been linked to congenital heart defects (CHDs). The objective of this study was to evaluate whether high levels of maternal exposure to PM2.5 and PM10 are related to increased risk of CHDs in Wuhan, China. We conducted a cohort study with a total of 105,988 live-born infants, stillbirths, and fetal deaths. The study included mothers living in the urban district of Wuhan during pregnancy over the 2-year period from 10 June 2011 to 9 June 2013. For each study participant, we assigned 1-month and 1-week averages of PM10 and PM2.5 exposure based on measurements obtained from the nearest exposure monitor to the living residence of mothers during their early pregnancy period. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to calculate the adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between exposure to these ambient air pollutants during early pregnancy and CHDs. We observed an increased risk of CHDs, particularly ventricular septal defect (VSD), with increasing PM2.5 exposure. Using 1-week averages, we also observed significant monotonically increasing associations between PM2.5 exposure during weeks 7–10 of pregnancy and risk of VSD, with aORs ranging from 1.11 to 1.17 (95% CI: 1.02–1.20, 1.03–1.22, 1.05–1.24, and 1.08–1.26 separately) per a 10 μg/m3 change in PM2.5 concentration. Our study contributes to the small body of knowledge regarding the association between in utero exposure to air pollution and CHDs, but confirmation of these associations will be needed in future studies. PMID:26883477

  10. Comparative PM10-PM2.5 source contribution study at rural, urban and industrial sites during PM episodes in Eastern Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Sergio; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Viana, María-Mar; Alarcón, Marta; Mantilla, Enrique; Ruiz, C R

    2004-07-26

    In this study a set of 340 PM10 and PM2.5 samples collected throughout 16 months at rural, an urban kerbside and an industrial background site (affected by the emissions from the ceramic manufacture and other activities) were interpreted. On the regional scale, the main PM10 sources were mineral dust (mainly Al2O3, Fe, Ti, Sr, CaCO3, Mg, Mn and K), emissions derived from power generation (SO4=, V, Zn and Ni), vehicle exhausts (organic and elemental carbon, NO3- and trace elements) and marine aerosol (Na, Cl and Mg). The latter was not identified in PM2.5. At the industrial site, additional PM10 sources were identified (tile covering in the ceramic production, petrochemical emissions and bio-mass burning from a large orange tree cultivation area). The contribution of each PM source to PM10 and PM2.5 levels experiences significant variations depending on the type of PM episode (Local-urban mainly in autumn-winter, regional mainly in summer, African or Atlantic episode), which are discussed in this study. The results show that it would be very difficult to meet the EU limit values for PM10 established for 2010. The annual mean PM levels are 22.0 microg PM10/m3 at the rural and 49.5 microg PM10/m3 and 33.9 microg PM2.5/m3 at the urban site. The natural contribution in this region, estimated at 6 microg/m3 of natural mineral dust (resulting from the African events and natural resuspension) and 2 microg/m3 of marine aerosol, accounts for 40% of the 2010 EU annual limit value (20 microg PM10/m3). Mineral dust concentrations at the urban and industrial sites are higher than those at the rural site because of the urban road dust and the ceramic-production contributions, respectively. At the urban site, the vehicle exhaust contribution (17 microg/m3) alone is very close to the 2010 EU PM10 limit value. At the rural site, the African dust is the main contributor to PM10 levels during the highest daily mean PM10 events (100th-97th percentile range). At the urban site, the

  11. The influence of tropical cyclone Melor on PM 10 concentrations during an aerosol episode over the Pearl River Delta region of China: Numerical modeling versus observational analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yerong; Wang, Anyu; Wu, Dui; Xu, Xiangde

    In this article, numerical simulations and observational analyses have been made for the aerosol episode that occurred over the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in China during 1-3 November 2003. An air quality modeling system that consisted of the mesoscale model MM5, chemical transport model MODELS-3/CMAQ, and air pollutant emission model SMOKE, was employed. Studies have shown that this particulate matter (PM) pollution episode was apparently associated with the activity of tropical cyclone (TC) Melor. Model simulations revealed that Melor spawned this PM episode through dynamic and thermodynamic processes. The strong compensating subsidence induced by Melor's peripheral circulations created favorable meteorological conditions that enhanced local aerosol pollution. This strong downward motion produced significant adiabatic warming (2-4 °C daily) and dramatic drying in the low-level troposphere over the PRD. As a result, the PRD region was blanketed with a dry and warm air layer that strengthened the static stability of the lower troposphere. The descending motion also tended to dramatically lower the heights of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) through its dynamic effect. The fair weather created by this synoptic pattern further intensified the nocturnal temperature inversions through enhanced radiative cooling. All of these factors promoted a stagnant local atmosphere with very light winds near the surface. The horizontal and vertical dispersions of locally emitted aerosol particles were largely suppressed, leading to the accumulation of large amounts of PMs near local emission sources in the PRD region. As Melor drew near, changes in surface winds strengthened the horizontal transport of aerosol particles from inland sources to the area of Hong Kong downstream. This horizontal advection greatly contributed to the high PM 10 (particulate matters less than 10 μm in diameters) concentrations in Hong Kong.

  12. Elemental characterization and source apportionment of PM10 and PM2.5 in the western coastal area of central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chin-Yu; Chiang, Hung-Che; Lin, Sheng-Lun; Chen, Mu-Jean; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Chen, Yu-Cheng

    2016-01-15

    This study investigated seasonal variations in PM10 and PM2.5 mass and associated trace metal concentrations in a residential area in proximity to the crude oil refinery plants and industrial parks of central Taiwan. Particle measurements were conducted during winter, spring and summer in 2013 and 2014. Twenty-six trace metals in PM10 and PM2.5 were analyzed using ICP-MS. Multiple approaches of the backward trajectory model, enrichment factor (EF), Lanthanum enrichment and positive matrix fraction (PMF) were used to identify potential sources of particulate metals. Mean concentrations of PM10 in winter, spring and summer were 76.4 ± 22.6, 33.2 ± 9.9 and 37.4 ± 17.0 μg m(-3), respectively, while mean levels of PM2.5 in winter, spring and summer were 47.8 ± 20.0, 23.9 ± 11.2 and 16.3 ± 8.2 μg m(-3), respectively. The concentrations of carcinogenic metals (Ni, As and adjusted Cr(VI)) in PM10 and PM2.5 exceeded the guideline limits published by WHO. The result of EF analysis confirmed that Mo, Sb, Cd, Zn, Mg, Cr, As, Pb, Cu, Ni and V were attributable to anthropogenic emission. PMF analysis demonstrated that trace metals in PM10 and PM2.5 were from the similar sources, such as coal combustion, oil combustion and traffic-related emission, except for soil dust and crustal element emissions only observed in PM10 and secondary aluminum smelter only observed in PM2.5. Considering health-related particulate metals, the traffic-related emission and coal combustion for PM10 and PM2.5, respectively, are important to control for reducing potential carcinogenic risk. The results could aid efforts to clarify the impact of source-specific origins on human health.

  13. Chemical composition of PM10 and its in vitro toxicological impacts on lung cells during the Middle Eastern Dust (MED) storms in Ahvaz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Naimabadi, Abolfazl; Ghadiri, Ata; Idani, Esmaeil; Babaei, Ali Akbar; Alavi, Nadali; Shirmardi, Mohammad; Khodadadi, Ali; Marzouni, Mohammad Bagherian; Ankali, Kambiz Ahmadi; Rouhizadeh, Ahmad; Goudarzi, Gholamreza

    2016-04-01

    Reports on the effects of PM10 from dust storm on lung cells are limited. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and in vitro toxicological impacts of PM10 suspensions, its water-soluble fraction, and the solvent-extractable organics extracted from Middle Eastern Dust storms on the human lung epithelial cell (A549). Samples of dust storms and normal days (PM10 < 200 μg m(-3)) were collected from December 2012 until June 2013 in Ahvaz, the capital of Khuzestan Province in Iran. The chemical composition and cytotoxicity were analyzed by ICP- OES and Lactase Dehydrogenase (LDH) reduction assay, respectively. The results showed that PM10 suspensions, their water-soluble fraction and solvent-extractable organics from both dust storm and normal days caused a decrease in the cell viability and an increase in LDH in supernatant in a dose-response manner. Although samples of normal days showed higher cytotoxicity than those of dust storm at the highest treated dosage, T Test showed no significant difference in cytotoxicity between normal days and dust event days (P value > 0.05). These results led to the conclusions that dust storm PM10 as well as normal day PM10 could lead to cytotoxicity, and the organic compounds (PAHs) and the insoluble particle-core might be the main contributors to cytotoxicity. Our results showed that cytotoxicity and the risk of PM10 to human lung may be more severe during dust storm than normal days due to inhalation of a higher mass concentration of airborne particles. Further research on PM dangerous fractions and the most responsible components to make cytotoxicity in exposed cells is recommended.

  14. Efficiency of Big Spring Number Eight (BSNE) and Modified Wilson and Cook (MWAC) samplers to collect PM10, PM2.5 and PM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Mariano J.; Funk, Roger; Buschiazzo, Daniel E.

    2016-06-01

    The internal efficiency of Big Spring Number Eight (BSNE) and Modified Wilson and Cook (MWAC) samplers for trapping PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 were tested in a wind tunnel, at two wind speeds (3.0 and 6.8 m s-1) in the saltation zone (SAZ) and the suspension zone (SAZ). PM concentrations measured in the inlet and the outlet of both samplers were correlated and the slopes of fitting equations were used for calculating sampling efficiencies. Results showed that BSNE efficiencies ranged from 12% to 32% for PM10, from 0% to 19% for PM2.5 and from 0% to 12% for PM1. The BSNE's efficiency decreased with decreasing particle sizes in SAZ and SUZ at both wind speeds as a consequence of the very low deposition velocity of the finest size particles. The BSNE's efficiency increased with increasing wind speed in SAZ for PM10 and PM2.5 and in SUZ for PM2.5. The MWAC's efficiency ranged from 1% to 20% for PM10, from 0% to 15% for PM2.5 and from 0% to 16% for PM1. The MWAC efficiency was 0% for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 in the SUZ at 3 m s-1 and for PM2.5 and PM1 in the SUZ at 6.8 m s-1. These results provide evidence that the efficiency of BSNE and MWAC for trapping PM10 change with wind speed and position of the sampler. Results also show that BSNEs and MWACs can potentially be used for PM10 emission studies but more research is needed in order to understand and improve their efficiency.

  15. Chemical composition of PM10 and its in vitro toxicological impacts on lung cells during the Middle Eastern Dust (MED) storms in Ahvaz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Naimabadi, Abolfazl; Ghadiri, Ata; Idani, Esmaeil; Babaei, Ali Akbar; Alavi, Nadali; Shirmardi, Mohammad; Khodadadi, Ali; Marzouni, Mohammad Bagherian; Ankali, Kambiz Ahmadi; Rouhizadeh, Ahmad; Goudarzi, Gholamreza

    2016-04-01

    Reports on the effects of PM10 from dust storm on lung cells are limited. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and in vitro toxicological impacts of PM10 suspensions, its water-soluble fraction, and the solvent-extractable organics extracted from Middle Eastern Dust storms on the human lung epithelial cell (A549). Samples of dust storms and normal days (PM10 < 200 μg m(-3)) were collected from December 2012 until June 2013 in Ahvaz, the capital of Khuzestan Province in Iran. The chemical composition and cytotoxicity were analyzed by ICP- OES and Lactase Dehydrogenase (LDH) reduction assay, respectively. The results showed that PM10 suspensions, their water-soluble fraction and solvent-extractable organics from both dust storm and normal days caused a decrease in the cell viability and an increase in LDH in supernatant in a dose-response manner. Although samples of normal days showed higher cytotoxicity than those of dust storm at the highest treated dosage, T Test showed no significant difference in cytotoxicity between normal days and dust event days (P value > 0.05). These results led to the conclusions that dust storm PM10 as well as normal day PM10 could lead to cytotoxicity, and the organic compounds (PAHs) and the insoluble particle-core might be the main contributors to cytotoxicity. Our results showed that cytotoxicity and the risk of PM10 to human lung may be more severe during dust storm than normal days due to inhalation of a higher mass concentration of airborne particles. Further research on PM dangerous fractions and the most responsible components to make cytotoxicity in exposed cells is recommended. PMID:26774778

  16. Temporal variability of mineral dust in southern Tunisia: analysis of 2 years of PM10 concentration, aerosol optical depth, and meteorology monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouet, Christel; Taieb Labiadh, Mohamed; Bergametti, Gilles; Rajot, Jean Louis; Marticorena, Béatrice; Sekrafi, Saâd; Ltifi, Mohsen; Féron, Anaïs; des Tureaux, Thierry Henry

    2016-04-01

    The south of Tunisia is a region very prone to wind erosion. During the last decades, changes in soil management have led to an increase in wind erosion. In February 2013, a ground-based station dedicated to the monitoring of mineral dust (that can be seen in this region as a proxy of the erosion of soils by wind) was installed at the Institut des Régions Arides (IRA) of Médenine (Tunisia) to document the temporal variability of mineral dust concentrations. This station allows continuous measurements of surface PM10 concentration (TEOM™), aerosol optical depth (CIMEL sunphotometer), and total atmospheric deposition of insoluble dust (CARAGA automatic sampler). The simultaneous monitoring of meteorological parameters (wind speed and direction, relative humidity, air temperature, atmospheric pressure, and precipitations) allows to analyse the factors controlling the variations of mineral dust concentration from the sub-daily to the annual scale. The results from the two first years of measurements of PM10 concentration are presented and discussed. In average on year 2014, PM10 concentration is 56 μg m-3. However, mineral dust concentration highly varies throughout the year: very high PM10 concentrations (up to 1,000 μg m-3 in daily mean) are frequently observed during wintertime and springtime, hardly ever in summer. These episodes of high PM10 concentration (when daily average PM10 concentration is higher than 240 μg m-3) sometimes last several days. By combining local meteorological data, air-masses trajectories, sunphotometer measurements, and satellite imagery, the part of the high PM10concentration due to local emissions and those linked to an advection of dusty air masses by medium and long range transport from the Sahara desert is quantified.

  17. Is PM(10) mass measurement a reliable index for air quality assessment? An environmental study in a geographical area of north-eastern Italy.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, F; Adami, G; Barbieri, P; Reisenhofer, E; Bovenzi, M

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the concentration of some metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Ti) in PM(10) samples collected in one urban and one industrial site and to assess that PM(10) total mass measurement may be not sufficient as air quality index due to its complex composition. Metals were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and differential pulsed anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV). The measured concentrations were used to calculate the content of metals in the PM(10) total mass, and to estimate the enrichment factors and the correlations between PM(10), metal concentrations and meteorological data for the two sites. The mean PM10 concentration during the sampling period in the urban site exceeded the annual European Union (EU) standard (40 microg/m(3)) and, for some sampling days, the daily EU standard (50 microg/m(3)) was also exceeded. In opposite, both EU standards were never exceeded in the industrial site. The overall metal content was nearly double in the industrial site compared to the urban one, and the mean Ni concentration exceeded the EU annual limit value (10 ng/m(3)). The metals with the highest enrichment factor were Cd, Cu, Ni and Pb for both sites, suggesting a dominant anthropogenic source for these metals. Metal concentrations were very low and typical of rural background during Christmas holidays, when factories were closed. PM(10) total mass measurement is not a sufficient air quality index since the metal content of PM(10) is not related to its total mass, especially in sites with industrial activities. This measurement should be associated with the analysis of toxic metals.

  18. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE). Aerodynamic and aeromechanical performance of a 50.8 cm (20 inch) diameter 1.34 PR variable pitch fan with core flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, R. G.; Mcfalls, R. A.; Beacher, B. F.

    1977-01-01

    The fan aerodynamic and aeromechanical performance tests of the quiet clean short haul experimental engine under the wing fan and inlet with a simulated core flow are described. Overall forward mode fan performance is presented at each rotor pitch angle setting with conventional flow pressure ratio efficiency fan maps, distinguishing the performance characteristics of the fan bypass and fan core regions. Effects of off design bypass ratio, hybrid inlet geometry, and tip radial inlet distortion on fan performance are determined. The nonaxisymmetric bypass OGV and pylon configuration is assessed relative to both total pressure loss and induced circumferential flow distortion. Reverse mode performance, obtained by resetting the rotor blades through both the stall pitch and flat pitch directions, is discussed in terms of the conventional flow pressure ratio relationship and its implications upon achievable reverse thrust. Core performance in reverse mode operation is presented in terms of overall recovery levels and radial profiles existing at the simulated core inlet plane. Observations of the starting phenomena associated with the initiation of stable rotor flow during acceleration in the reverse mode are briefly discussed. Aeromechanical response characteristics of the fan blades are presented as a separate appendix, along with a description of the vehicle instrumentation and method of data reduction.

  19. Source apportionment of elevated BaP concentrations in PM10 aerosols in an alpine valley in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans; Jankowski, Nicole; Sampaio Cordeiro Wagner, Lylian

    2010-05-01

    INTRODUCTION: In a village situated at 1215 m a.s.l. in a natural preserve in an Austrian alpine valley elevated BaP concentrations have been measured in the last years. A highly frequented highway leading from Italy to Germany passes near the village. Monthly means of particulate BaP concentrations show a clear seasonal trend with values below 1 ng/m³ during the warmer months and with concentrations up to 9 ng/m³ in the cold season. Annual averages in the years 2000 - 2005 ranged between 1.4 and 2.8 ng/m³ - much higher than the EU target value of 1 ng/m³. We used a macrotracer model developed at the Vienna University of Technology to determine the contributions of the sources for BaP emissions, which were mainly space heating with wood and traffic from the highway. EXPERIMENTAL: The macrotracer concept is a nine component model to derive source contribution and explains 80-100% of PM10 aerosols in Austria. The amount of traffic exhaust is derived by using EC as tracer, whereas EC produced by wood burning is subtracted, the amount of wood smoke is derived by the anhydro-sugar levoglucosan and the ratio between the anhydro-sugars levoglucosan and mannosan. For the source apportionment of BaP the applied factors reflect on the one hand the composition of the automotive fleet in Austria and on the other hand the composition of the fire wood in the region. Filter samples collected with a high volume sampler in winter were analyzed for PM10 aerosol mass, total, organic, elemental and carbonate carbon, HULIS, anhydro-sugars, polyols and ions (major ions and organic acids) and PAHs. In the same way emission samples taken at a motor test stand and at a test stand for wood combustion were analyzed (Schmidl et al. 2008). The sacchari