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Sample records for aerodynamic flow field

  1. Aerodynamic Flow Field Measurements for Automotive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepner, Timothy E.

    1999-01-01

    The design of a modern automotive air handling system is a complex task. The system is required to bring the interior of the vehicle to a comfortable level in as short a time as possible. A goal of the automotive industry is to predict the interior climate of an automobile using advanced computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods. The development of these advanced prediction tools will enable better selection of engine and accessory components. The goal of this investigation was to predict methods used by the automotive industry. To accomplish this task three separate experiments were performed. The first was a laboratory setup where laser velocimeter (LV) flow field measurements were made in the heating and air conditioning unit of a Ford Windstar. The second involved flow field measurements in the engine compartment of a Ford Explorer, with the engine running idle. The third mapped the flow field exiting the center dashboard panel vent inside the Explorer, while the circulating fan operated at 14 volts. All three experiments utilized full-coincidence three-component LV systems. This enabled the mean and fluctuating velocities to be measured along with the Reynolds stress terms.

  2. Joint influences of aerodynamic flow field and aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of airborne optical systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Haosu; Zuo, Baojun; Tian, Yi; Zhang, Wang; Hao, Chenglong; Liu, Chaofeng; Li, Qi; Li, Fan; Zhang, Li; Fan, Zhigang

    2012-12-20

    We investigated the joint influences exerted by the nonuniform aerodynamic flow field surrounding the optical dome and the aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of an airborne optical system. The Spalart-Allmaras model provided by FLUENT was used for flow computations. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm based ray tracing program was used to simulate optical transmission through the aerodynamic flow field and the dome. Four kinds of imaging quality evaluation parameters were presented: wave aberration of the exit pupil, point spread function, encircled energy, and modulation transfer function. The results show that the aero-optical disturbance of the aerodynamic flow field and the aerodynamic heating of the dome significantly affect the imaging quality of an airborne optical system.

  3. Application of strand meshes to complex aerodynamic flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Aaron; Wissink, Andrew M.; Sankaran, Venkateswaran; Meakin, Robert L.; Chan, William M.

    2011-07-01

    We explore a new approach for viscous computational fluid dynamics calculations for external aerodynamics around geometrically complex bodies that incorporates nearly automatic mesh generation and efficient flow solution methods. A prismatic-like grid using "strands" is grown a short distance from the body surface to capture the viscous boundary layer, and adaptive Cartesian grids are used throughout the rest of the domain. The approach presents several advantages over established methods: nearly automatic grid generation from triangular or quadrilateral surface tessellations, very low memory overhead, automatic mesh adaptivity for time-dependent problems, and fast and efficient solvers from structured data in both the strand and Cartesian grids.The approach is evaluated for complex geometries and flow fields. We investigate the effects of strand length and strand vector smoothing to understand the effects on computed solutions. Results of three applications using the strand-adaptive Cartesian approach are given, including a NACA wing, isolated V-22 (TRAM) rotor in hover, and the DLR-F6 wing-body transport. The results from these cases show that the strand approach can successfully resolve near-body and off-body features as well as or better than established methods.

  4. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 1: Orbiter aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the steady and unsteady aerodynamics of the space shuttle orbiter has been performed. It is shown that slender wing theory can be modified to account for the effect of Mach number and leading edge roundness on both attached and separated flow loads. The orbiter unsteady aerodynamics can be computed by defining two equivalent slender wings, one for attached flow loads and another for the vortex-induced loads. It is found that the orbiter is in the transonic speed region subject to vortex-shock-boundary layer interactions that cause highly nonlinear or discontinuous load changes which can endanger the structural integrity of the orbiter wing and possibly cause snap roll problems. It is presently impossible to simulate these interactions in a wind tunnel test even in the static case. Thus, a well planned combined analytic and experimental approach is needed to solve the problem.

  5. Effects of a Rotating Aerodynamic Probe on the Flow Field of a Compressor Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2008-01-01

    An investigation of distortions of the rotor exit flow field caused by an aerodynamic probe mounted in the rotor is described in this paper. A rotor total pressure Kiel probe, mounted on the rotor hub and extending up to the mid-span radius of a rotor blade channel, generates a wake that forms additional flow blockage. Three types of high-response aerodynamic probes were used to investigate the distorted flow field behind the rotor. These probes were: a split-fiber thermo-anemometric probe to measure velocity and flow direction, a total pressure probe, and a disk probe for in-flow static pressure measurement. The signals acquired from these high-response probes were reduced using an ensemble averaging method based on a once per rotor revolution signal. The rotor ensemble averages were combined to construct contour plots for each rotor channel of the rotor tested. In order to quantify the rotor probe effects, the contour plots for each individual rotor blade passage were averaged into a single value. The distribution of these average values along the rotor circumference is a measure of changes in the rotor exit flow field due to the presence of a probe in the rotor. These distributions were generated for axial flow velocity and for static pressure.

  6. Rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith

    1992-01-01

    Means for relatively simple and quick procedures are examined for estimating aerodynamic coefficients of lifting reentry vehicles. The methods developed allow aerospace designers not only to evaluate the aerodynamics of specific shapes but also to optimize shapes under given constraints. The analysis was also studied of the effect of thermomolecular flow on pressures measured by an orifice near the nose of a Space Shuttle Orbiter at altitudes above 75 km. It was shown that pressures corrected for thermomolecular flow effect are in good agreement with values predicted by independent theoretical methods. An incidental product was the insight gained about the free molecular thermal accommodation coefficient applicable under 'real' conditions of high speed flow in the Earth's atmosphere. The results are presented as abstracts of referenced papers. One reference paper is presented in its entirety.

  7. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 3: Unsteady aerodynamics of bodies with concave nose geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the unsteady aerodynamics of bodies with concave nose geometries was performed. The results show that the experimentally observed pulsating flow on spiked bodies and in forward facing cavities can be described by the developed simple mathematical model of the phenomenon. Static experimental data is used as a basis for determination of the oscillatory frequency of spike-induced flow pulsations. The agreement between predicted and measured reduced frequencies is generally very good. The spiked-body mathematical model is extended to describe the pulsations observed in forward facing cavities and it is shown that not only the frequency but also the pressure time history can be described with the accuracy needed to predict the experimentally observed time average effects. This implies that it should be possible to determine analytically the impact of the flow pulsation on the structural integrity of the nozzles for the jettisoned empty SRM-shells.

  8. Rotorcraft Downwash Flow Field Study to Understand the Aerodynamics of Helicopter Brownout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadcock, Alan J.; Ewing, Lindsay A.; Solis, Eduardo; Potsdam, Mark; Rajagopalan, Ganesh

    2008-01-01

    Rotorcraft brownout is caused by the entrainment of dust and sand particles in helicopter downwash, resulting in reduced pilot visibility during low, slow flight and landing. Recently, brownout has become a high-priority problem for military operations because of the risk to both pilot and equipment. Mitigation of this problem has focused on flight controls and landing maneuvers, but current knowledge and experimental data describing the aerodynamic contribution to brownout are limited. This paper focuses on downwash characteristics of a UH-60 Blackhawk as they pertain to particle entrainment and brownout. Results of a full-scale tuft test are presented and used to validate a high-fidelity Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation. CFD analysis for an EH-101 Merlin helicopter is also presented, and its flow field characteristics are compared with those of the UH-60.

  9. The effect of inlet stagnation supercooling degree on the aerodynamics of the steam flow field around a rotor tip section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti Amiri, H.; Kermani, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of inlet stagnation supercooling degree on the aerodynamics of the flow field around the rotor tip section of a steam turbine are investigated. To do so, non-equilibrium thermodynamics model for simulating the condensing flow is employed. The results show that formation of liquid droplets and their further growth can remarkably change the design parameters like deviation angle, pressure loss coefficient, mass flow rate and shock wave pattern.

  10. Comprehensive analysis of imaging quality degradation of an airborne optical system for aerodynamic flow field around the optical window.

    PubMed

    Hao, Chenglong; Chen, Shouqian; Zhang, Wang; Ren, Jinhan; Li, Chong; Pang, Hongjun; Wang, Honghao; Liu, Qian; Wang, Chao; Zou, Huiying; Fan, Zhigang

    2013-11-20

    We investigated the influences exerted by the nonuniform aerodynamic flow field surrounding the optical window on the imaging quality degradation of an airborne optical system. The density distribution of flow fields around three typical optical windows, including a spherical window, an ellipsoidal window, and a paraboloidal window, were calculated by adopting the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the Spalart-Allmaras model provided by FLUENT. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm based ray-tracing program was used to simulate the optical transmission through the aerodynamic flow field. Four kinds of imaging quality evaluation parameters were presented: wave aberration of the entrance pupil, point spread function, encircled energy, and modulation transfer function. The results show that the imaging quality of the airborne optical system was affected by the shape of the optical window and angle of attack of the aircraft.

  11. Vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H. B.; Campbell, J. F.; Young, A. D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The principal emphasis of the meeting was to be on the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads. This report shows that a substantial amount of the papers covering this area were received from a wide range of countries, together with an attendance that was even more diverse. In itself, this testifies to the current interest in the subject and to the appropriateness of the Panel's choice of topic and approach. An attempt is made to summarize each paper delivered, and to relate the contributions made in the papers and in the discussions to some of the important aspects of vortex flow aerodynamics. This reveals significant progress and important clarifications, but also brings out remaining weaknesses in predictive capability and gaps in understanding. Where possible, conclusions are drawn and areas of continuing concern are identified.

  12. RCS jet-flow field interaction effects on the aerodynamics of the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, J. R.; Roberge, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the external effects caused by operation of the reaction control system during entry of the space shuttle orbiter. The effects of jet plume-external flow interactions were emphasized. Force data were obtained for the basic airframe characteristics plus induced effects when the reaction control system is operating. Resulting control amplification and/or coupling were derived and their effects on the aerodynamic stability and control of the orbiter and the reaction control system thrust were determined.

  13. Bumblebee program, aerodynamic data. Part 2: Flow fields at Mach number 2.0. [supersonic missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, G. A.; Cronvich, L. L.

    1979-01-01

    Available flow field data which can be used in validating theoretical procedures for computing flow fields around supersonic missiles are presented. Tabulated test data are given which define the flow field around a conical-nosed cylindrical body in a crossflow plane corresponding to a likely tail location. The data were obtained at a Mach number of 2.0 for an angle of attack of 0 to 23 degrees. The data define the flow field for cases both with and without a forward wing present.

  14. Rotorcraft Downwash Flow Field Study to Understand the Aerodynamics of Helicopter Brownout

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    ground) are presented in Figures 11 through 15. These results were obtained using the code OVERFLOW 2 [14, 15] with the Spalart - Allmaras ...validate a high-fidelity Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation. CFD analysis for an EH-101 Merlin helicopter is also presented, and...its flow field characteristics are compared with those of the UH-60. Notation 1 CT = thrust coefficient IGE = in ground effect OGE = out of

  15. Volumetric Rendering Techniques for the Display of Three-Dimensional Aerodynamic Flow Field Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

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  16. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 4: 747/orbiter aeroelastic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    A quasi-steady analysis of the aeroelastic stability of the lateral (antisymmetric) modes of the 747/orbiter vehicle was accomplished. The interference effect of the orbiter wake on the 747 tail furnishes an aerodynamic undamping contribution to the elastic modes. Likewise, the upstream influence of the 747 tail and aft fuselage on the orbiter beaver-tail rail fairing also is undamping. Fortunately these undamping effects cannot overpower the large damping contribution of the 747 tail and the modes are damped for the configurations analyzed. However, significant interference effects of the orbiter on the 747 tail have been observed in the pitch plane. The high response of the 747 vertical tail in the orbiter wave was also considered. Wind tunnel data points to flapping of the OMS pod wakes as the source of the wake resonance phenomenon.

  17. Aerodynamic Design of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, R. O. (Editor); Johnsen, I. A.

    1965-01-01

    An overview of 'Aerodynamic systems design of axial flow compressors' is presented. Numerous chapters cover topics such as compressor design, ptotential and viscous flow in two dimensional cascades, compressor stall and blade vibration, and compressor flow theory. Theoretical aspects of flow are also covered.

  18. Passive flow control by membrane wings for aerodynamic benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timpe, Amory; Zhang, Zheng; Hubner, James; Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    The coupling of passive structural response of flexible membranes with the flow over them can significantly alter the aerodynamic characteristic of simple flat-plate wings. The use of flexible wings is common throughout biological flying systems inspiring many engineers to incorporate them into small engineering flying systems. In many of these systems, the motion of the membrane serves to passively alter the flow over the wing potentially resulting in an aerodynamic benefit. In this study, the aerodynamic loads and the flow field for a rigid flat-plate wing are compared to free trailing-edge membrane wings with two different pre-tensions at a chord-based Reynolds number of approximately 50,000. The membrane was silicon rubber with a scalloped free trailing edge. The analysis presented includes load measurements from a sting balance along with velocity fields and membrane deflections from synchronized, time-resolved particle image velocimetry and digital image correlation. The load measurements demonstrate increased aerodynamic efficiency and lift, while the synchronized flow and membrane measurements show how the membrane motion serves to force the flow. This passive flow control introduced by the membranes motion alters the flows development over the wing and into the wake region demonstrating how, at least for lower angles of attack, the membranes motion drives the flow as opposed to the flow driving the membrane motion.

  19. Numerical calculations of flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D.; Vogel, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical calculations were made of flow fields generated by various aerodynamic configurations. Data cover flow fields generated by a finitely thick lifting three dimensional wing with subsonic tips moving at supersonic speeds, cross flow instability associated with lifting delta wing configurations such as space shuttles, and flow fields produced by a lifting elliptic cone. Finite difference techniques were used to determine elliptic cone flow.

  20. Aerodynamic properties of turbulent combustion fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiao, C. C.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    Flow fields involving turbulent flames in premixed gases under a variety of conditions are modeled by the use of a numerical technique based on the random vortex method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations and a flame propagation algorithm to trace the motion of the front and implement the Huygens principle, both due to Chorin. A successive over-relaxation hybrid method is applied to solve the Euler equation for flows in an arbitrarily shaped domain. The method of images, conformal transformation, and the integral-equation technique are also used to treat flows in special cases, according to their particular requirements. Salient features of turbulent flame propagation in premixed gases are interpreted by relating them to the aerodynamic properties of the flow field. Included among them is the well-known cellular structure of flames stabilized by bluff bodies, as well as the formation of the characteristic tulip shape of flames propagating in ducts. In its rudimentary form, the mechanism of propagation of a turbulent flame is shown to consist of: (1) rotary motion of eddies at the flame front, (2) self-advancement of the front at an appropriate normal burning speed, and (3) dynamic effects of expansion due to exothermicity of the combustion reaction. An idealized model is used to illustrate these fundamental mechanisms and to investigate basic aerodynamic features of flames in premixed gases. The case of a confined flame stabilized behind a rearward-facing step is given particular care and attention. Solutions are shown to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental results, especially with respect to global properties such as the average velocity profiles and reattachment length.

  1. Rarefield-Flow Shuttle Aerodynamics Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moats, Christina D.

    1994-01-01

    A model of the Shuttle Orbiter rarefied-flow aerodynamic force coefficients has been derived from the ratio of flight acceleration measurements. The in-situ, low-frequency (less than 1Hz), low-level (approximately 1 x 10(exp -6) g) acceleration measurements are made during atmospheric re-entry. The experiment equipment designed and used for this task is the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), one of the sensor packages in the Orbiter Experiments Program. To date, 12 HiRAP re-entry mission data sets spanning a period of about 10 years have been processed. The HiRAP-derived aerodynamics model is described in detail. The model includes normal and axial hypersonic continuum coefficient equations as function of angle of attack, body-flap deflection, and elevon deflection. Normal and axial free molecule flow coefficient equations as a function of angle of attack are also presented, along with flight-derived rarefied-flow transition bridging formulae. Comparisons are made between the aerodynamics model, data from the latest Orbiter Operational Aerodynamic Design Data Book, applicable computer simulations, and wind-tunnel data.

  2. Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. Subba

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic space vehicles is an important factor to be considered in their design. Therefore the designers of such vehicles need reliable heat transfer data in this respect for a successful design. Such data is usually produced by testing the models of hypersonic surfaces in wind tunnels. Most of the hypersonic test facilities at present are conventional blow-down tunnels whose run times are of the order of several seconds. The surface temperatures on such models are obtained using standard techniques such as thin-film resistance gages, thin-skin transient calorimeter gages and coaxial thermocouple or video acquisition systems such as phosphor thermography and infrared thermography. The data are usually reduced assuming that the model behaves like a semi-infinite solid (SIS) with constant properties and that heat transfer is by one-dimensional conduction only. This simplifying assumption may be valid in cases where models are thick, run-times short, and thermal diffusivities small. In many instances, however, when these conditions are not met, the assumption may lead to significant errors in the heat transfer results. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this aspect. Specifically, the objectives are as follows: (1) to determine the limiting conditions under which a model can be considered a semi-infinite body; (2) to estimate the extent of errors involved in the reduction of the data if the models violate the assumption; and (3) to come up with correlation factors which when multiplied by the results obtained under the SIS assumption will provide the results under the actual conditions.

  3. Vortex Flow Aerodynamics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F. (Editor); Osborn, R. F. (Editor); Foughner, J. T., Jr. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Vortex modeling techniques and experimental studies of research configurations utilizing vortex flows are discussed. Also discussed are vortex flap investigations using generic and airplane research models and vortex flap theoretical analysis and design studies.

  4. Transient platoon aerodynamics and bluff body flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuei, Lun

    There are two components of this experimental work: transient vehicle platoon aerodynamics and bluff-body flows. The transient aerodynamic effects in a four-vehicle platoon during passing maneuvers and in-line oscillations are investigated. A vehicle model is moved longitudinally parallel to a four-car platoon to simulate passing maneuvers. The drag and side forces experienced by each platoon member are measured using strain gauge balances. The resulting data are presented as dimensionless coefficients. It is shown that each car in the platoon experiences a repulsive side force when the passing vehicle is in the neighborhood of its rear half. The side force reverses its direction and becomes an attractive force when the passing vehicle moves to the neighborhood of its front half. The drag force experienced by each platoon member is increased when the passing vehicle is in its proximity. The effects of the lateral spacing and relative velocity between the platoon and the passing vehicle, as well as the shape of the passing vehicle, are also investigated. Similar trends are observed in simulations of both a vehicle passing a platoon and a platoon overtaking a vehicle. During the in-line oscillation experiments, one of the four platoon members is forced to undergo longitudinal periodic motions. The drag force experienced by each platoon member is determined simultaneously during the oscillations. The effects of the location of the oscillating vehicle, the shape of the vehicles and the displacement and velocity amplitudes of the oscillation are examined. The results from the transient conditions are compared to those from the steady tests in the same setup. In the case of a four-car platoon, the drag variations experienced by the vehicles adjacent to the oscillating vehicle are discussed using a cavity model. It is found that when the oscillating car moves forward and approaches its upstream neighbor, itself and its downstream neighbor experiences an increased drag

  5. Rarefied-flow Shuttle aerodynamics model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moats, Christina D.

    1993-01-01

    A rarefied-flow shuttle aerodynamic model spanning the hypersonic continuum to the free molecule-flow regime was formulated. The model development has evolved from the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP) experiment conducted on the Orbiter since 1983. The complete model is described in detail. The model includes normal and axial hypersonic continuum coefficient equations as functions of angle-of-attack, body flap deflection, and elevon deflection. Normal and axial free molecule flow coefficient equations as a function of angle-of-attack are presented, along with flight derived rarefied-flow transition bridging formulae. Comparisons are made with data from the Operational Aerodynamic Design Data Book (OADDB), applicable wind-tunnel data, and recent flight data from STS-35 and STS-40. The flight-derived model aerodynamic force coefficient ratio is in good agreement with the wind-tunnel data and predicts the flight measured force coefficient ratios on STS-35 and STS-40. The model is not, however, in good agreement with the OADDB. But, the current OADDB does not predict the flight data force coefficient ratios of either STS-35 or STS-40 as accurately as the flight-derived model. Also, the OADDB differs with the wind-tunnel force coefficient ratio data.

  6. Arcjets for Aerodynamic and Materials Testing: Flow Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Fletcher, Doug; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Potential use of Arcjets as a hypersonic ground test facility for aerodynamic testing of future space vehicles is examined. Since high fidelity simulation of flight freestream conditions is a basic requirement for any useful ground test facility, it is imperative that the Arcjet flow field be thoroughly investigated in a systematic and orderly manner. At the same time we must know how and to what extent an inaccurate simulation of the flight freestream will effect the test data. The paper after discussing these two topics, describes various experimental techniques for Arcjet flow characterization. Results from an on-going Arcjet flow characterization program are also presented.

  7. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  8. A collection of flow visualization techniques used in the Aerodynamic Research Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental research on unsteady aerodynamic flows is discussed. Complex flow fields that involve separations, vortex interactions, and transonic flow effects were investigated. Flow visualization techniques are used to obtain a global picture of the flow phenomena before detailed quantitative studies are undertaken. A wide variety of methods are used to visualize fluid flow and a sampling of these methods is presented. It is emphasized that the visualization technique is a thorough quantitative analysis and subsequent physical understanding of these flow fields.

  9. Effects of reaction control system jet flow field interactions on the aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.010-scale space shuttle orbiter model in the Langley Research Center 31 inch CFHT (OA85)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daileda, J. J.; Marroquin, J.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to obtain detailed effects on supersonic vehicle hypersonic aerodynamic and stability and control characteristics of reaction control system jet flow field interactions with the local vehicle flow field. A 0.010-scale model was used. Six-component force data and wing, elevon, and body flap surface pressure data were obtained through an angle-of-attack range of -10 to +35 degrees with 0 deg angle of sideslip. The test was conducted with yaw, pitch and roll jet simulation at a free-stream Mach number of 10.3 and reaction control system plume simulation of flight dynamic pressures of 5, 10 and 20 PSF.

  10. Aerodynamic Analysis of Multistage Turbomachinery Flows in Support of Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the state of 3D CFD based models of the time average flow field within axial flow multistage turbomachines. Emphasis is placed on models which are compatible with the industrial design environment and those models which offer the potential of providing credible results at both design and off-design operating conditions. The need to develop models which are free of aerodynamic input from semi-empirical design systems is stressed. The accuracy of such models is shown to be dependent upon their ability to account for the unsteady flow environment in multistage turbomachinery. The relevant flow physics associated with some of the unsteady flow processes present in axial flow multistage machinery are presented along with procedures which can be used to account for them in 3D CFD simulations. Sample results are presented for both axial flow compressors and axial flow turbines which help to illustrate the enhanced predictive capabilities afforded by including these procedures in 3D CFD simulations. Finally, suggestions are given for future work on the development of time average flow models.

  11. Coupled flow, thermal and structural analysis of aerodynamically heated panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1986-01-01

    A finite element approach to coupling flow, thermal and structural analyses of aerodynamically heated panels is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible flow are solved together with the energy equation and quasi-static structural equations of the panel. Interactions between the flow, panel heat transfer and deformations are studied for thin stainless steel panels aerodynamically heated by Mach 6.6 flow.

  12. A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics of a blunt lifting body is being developed by NASA. This experiment, called the Rarefied-Flow Aerodynamic Measurement Experiment (RAME), is part of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) mission, which is a Pathfinder design tool for aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles. The RAME will use flight measurements from accelerometers, rate gyros, and pressure transducers, combined with knowledge of AFE in-flight mass properties and trajectory, to infer aerodynamic forces and moments in the rarefied-flow environment, including transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Preflight estimates of the aerodynamic measurements are based upon environment models, existing computer simulations, and ground test results. Planned maneuvers at several altitudes will provide a first-time opportunity to examine gas-surface accommondation effects on aerodynamic coefficients in an environment of changing atmospheric composition. A description is given of the RAME equipment design.

  13. Control of flow separation and mixing by aerodynamic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J.; Abbott, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The recent research progress in the control of shear flows using unsteady aerodynamic excitation conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center is reviewed. The program is of fundamental nature concentrating on the physics of the unsteady aerodynamic processes. This field of research is a fairly new development with great promise in the areas of enhanced mixing and flow separation control. Enhanced mixing research reported in this paper include influence of core turbulence, forced pairing of coherent structures, and saturation of mixing enhancement. Separation flow control studies included are for a two-dimensional diffuser, conical diffusers, and single airfoils. Ultimate applications of this research include aircraft engine inlet flow control at high angle of attack, wide angle diffusers, highly loaded airfoils as in turbomachinery, and ejector/suppressor nozzles for the supersonic transport. An argument involving the Coanda Effect is made here that all of the above mentioned application areas really only involve forms of shear layer mixing enhancement. The program also includes the development of practical excitation devices which might be used in aircraft applications.

  14. Control of flow separation and mixing by aerodynamic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J.; Abbott, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The recent research in the control of shear flows using unsteady aerodynamic excitation conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center is reviewed. The program is of a fundamental nature, concentrating on the physics of the unsteady aerodynamic processes. This field of research is a fairly new development with great promise in the areas of enhanced mixing and flow separation control. Enhanced mixing research includes influence of core turbulence, forced pairing of coherent structures, and saturation of mixing enhancement. Separation flow control studies included are for a two-dimensional diffuser, conical diffusers, and single airfoils. Ultimate applications include aircraft engine inlet flow control at high angle of attack, wide angle diffusers, highly loaded airfoils as in turbomachinery, and ejector/suppressor nozzles for the supersonic transport. An argument involving the Coanda Effect is made that all of the above mentioned application areas really only involve forms of shear layer mixing enhancement. The program also includes the development of practical excitation devices which might be used in aircraft applications.

  15. Air flow testing on aerodynamic truck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    After leasing a cab-over tractor-trailer from a Southern California firm, Dryden researchers added sheet metal modifications like those shown here. They rounded the front corners and edges, and placed a smooth fairing on the cab's roofs and sides extending back to the trailer. During the investigation of truck aerodynamics, the techniques honed in flight research proved highly applicable. By closing the gap between the cab and the trailer, for example, researchers discovered a significant reduction in aerodynamic drag, one resulting in 20 to 25 percent less fuel consumption than the standard design. Many truck manufacturers subsequently incorporated similar modifications on their products.

  16. The Effects of Surfaces on the Aerodynamics and Acoustics of Jet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew J.; Miller, Steven A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft noise mitigation is an ongoing challenge for the aeronautics research community. In response to this challenge, low-noise aircraft concepts have been developed that exhibit situations where the jet exhaust interacts with an airframe surface. Jet flows interacting with nearby surfaces manifest a complex behavior in which acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics are altered. In this paper, the variation of the aerodynamics, acoustic source, and far-field acoustic intensity are examined as a large at plate is positioned relative to the nozzle exit. Steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solutions are examined to study the aerodynamic changes in the field-variables and turbulence statistics. The mixing noise model of Tam and Auriault is used to predict the noise produced by the jet. To validate both the aerodynamic and the noise prediction models, results are compared with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and free-field acoustic data respectively. The variation of the aerodynamic quantities and noise source are examined by comparing predictions from various jet and at plate configurations with an isolated jet. To quantify the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic installation effects on the aerodynamic noise source, a non-dimensional number is formed that contains the flow-conditions and airframe installation parameters.

  17. Three dimensional aerodynamics of an annular cascade in a non-uniform inlet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manwaring, S. R.; Fleeter, S.

    1985-01-01

    Three-dimensional viscous and inviscid numerical analyses are currently being developed to predict the complex flow through turbomachine blade passages. To be of value to the designer, these numerical solutions must be evaluated and subsequent refinements directed by correlating predicted flow fields with data obtained from experiments which model the fundamental three-dimensional flow phenomena inherent in blade rows. This paper describes a series of experiments to provide such data. In particular, the effect of a potential and a rotational inlet flow field on the detailed three-dimensional aerodynamic performance of an extensively instrumented cambered airfoil cascade has been determined at two levels of aerodynamic loading. Data presented quantify the pressure and suction surface static pressure chordwise distributions on the hub, mean, and tip streamlines; the velocity distribution in the cascade aft-passage region; and the cascade exit region flow field. Appropriate data are correlated with predictions.

  18. Cross Flow Parameter Calculation for Aerodynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, David, Jr. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system and method for determining a cross flow angle for a feature on a structure. A processor unit receives location information identifying a location of the feature on the structure, determines an angle of the feature, identifies flow information for the location, determines a flow angle using the flow information, and determines the cross flow angle for the feature using the flow angle and the angle of the feature. The flow information describes a flow of fluid across the structure. The flow angle comprises an angle of the flow of fluid across the structure for the location of the feature.

  19. Aerodynamic sound of flow past an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1995-01-01

    The long term objective of this project is to develop a computational method for predicting the noise of turbulence-airfoil interactions, particularly at the trailing edge. We seek to obtain the energy-containing features of the turbulent boundary layers and the near-wake using Navier-Stokes Simulation (LES or DNS), and then to calculate the far-field acoustic characteristics by means of acoustic analogy theories, using the simulation data as acoustic source functions. Two distinct types of noise can be emitted from airfoil trailing edges. The first, a tonal or narrowband sound caused by vortex shedding, is normally associated with blunt trailing edges, high angles of attack, or laminar flow airfoils. The second source is of broadband nature arising from the aeroacoustic scattering of turbulent eddies by the trailing edge. Due to its importance to airframe noise, rotor and propeller noise, etc., trailing edge noise has been the subject of extensive theoretical (e.g. Crighton & Leppington 1971; Howe 1978) as well as experimental investigations (e.g. Brooks & Hodgson 1981; Blake & Gershfeld 1988). A number of challenges exist concerning acoustic analogy based noise computations. These include the elimination of spurious sound caused by vortices crossing permeable computational boundaries in the wake, the treatment of noncompact source regions, and the accurate description of wave reflection by the solid surface and scattering near the edge. In addition, accurate turbulence statistics in the flow field are required for the evaluation of acoustic source functions. Major efforts to date have been focused on the first two challenges. To this end, a paradigm problem of laminar vortex shedding, generated by a two dimensional, uniform stream past a NACA0012 airfoil, is used to address the relevant numerical issues. Under the low Mach number approximation, the near-field flow quantities are obtained by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations numerically at chord

  20. Accurate measurement of streamwise vortices in low speed aerodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldman, Rye M.; Kudo, Jun; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2010-11-01

    Low Reynolds number experiments with flapping animals (such as bats and small birds) are of current interest in understanding biological flight mechanics, and due to their application to Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) which operate in a similar parameter space. Previous PIV wake measurements have described the structures left by bats and birds, and provided insight to the time history of their aerodynamic force generation; however, these studies have faced difficulty drawing quantitative conclusions due to significant experimental challenges associated with the highly three-dimensional and unsteady nature of the flows, and the low wake velocities associated with lifting bodies that only weigh a few grams. This requires the high-speed resolution of small flow features in a large field of view using limited laser energy and finite camera resolution. Cross-stream measurements are further complicated by the high out-of-plane flow which requires thick laser sheets and short interframe times. To quantify and address these challenges we present data from a model study on the wake behind a fixed wing at conditions comparable to those found in biological flight. We present a detailed analysis of the PIV wake measurements, discuss the criteria necessary for accurate measurements, and present a new dual-plane PIV configuration to resolve these issues.

  1. Higher-Order Panel Method for Aerodynamic Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, L.; Carmichael, R. L.; Levin, A. D.; Magnus, A.; Epton, M.; Baruah, P.; Massena, B.; Bussoletti, J.; Sidwell, K.; Johnson, F.; Zeppa, J.; Bates, G.; Clemens, D.; Derbyshire, T.; Purdon, D.; Chiang, D.; Rubbert, P.; Nelson, F.; Wai, J.; Tsurusaki, K.; Smith, N.; Snyder, J. R.; Sotomayer, W.; Dejongh, J.; Thomas, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    PANAIR uses high-order panel method to predict inviscid subsonic or supersonic flows about arbitrary configuration. Panel method solves linear partial differential equation numerically by approximating configuration surface with panels on which unknown "singularity strengths" are defined. PANAIR includes advanced software technology as well as advanced aerodynamic technology.

  2. Adaptive flow control of low-Reynolds number aerodynamics using dielectric barrier discharge actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Chang; Shyy, Wei

    2011-10-01

    Aerodynamic performance of low-Reynolds number flyers, for a chord-based Reynolds number of 10 5 or below, is sensitive to wind gusts and flow separation. Active flow control offers insight into fluid physics as well as possible improvements in vehicle performance. While facilitating flow control by introducing feedback control and fluidic devices, major challenges of achieving a target aerodynamic performance under unsteady flow conditions lie on the high-dimensional nonlinear dynamics of the flow system. Therefore, a successful flow control framework requires a viable as well as accessible control scheme and understanding of underlying flow dynamics as key information of the flow system. On the other hand, promising devices have been developed recently to facilitate flow control in this flow regime. The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) actuator is such an example; it does not have moving parts and provides fast impact on the flow field locally. In this paper, recent feedback flow control studies, especially those focusing on unsteady low-Reynolds number aerodynamics, are reviewed. As an example of an effective flow control framework, it is demonstrated that aerodynamic lift of a high angle-of-attack wing under fluctuating free-stream conditions can be stabilized using the DBD actuator and an adaptive algorithm based on general input-output models. System nonlinearities and control challenges are discussed by assessing control performance and the variation of the system parameters under various flow and actuation conditions. Other fundamental issues from the flow dynamics view point, such as the lift stabilization mechanism and the influence on drag fluctuation are also explored. Both potentiality and limitation of the linear modeling approach are discussed. In addition, guidelines on system identification and the controller and actuator setups are suggested.

  3. Dynamic control of aerodynamic forces on a moving platform using active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.

    The unsteady interaction between trailing edge aerodynamic flow control and airfoil motion in pitch and plunge is investigated in wind tunnel experiments using a two degree-of-freedom traverse which enables application of time-dependent external torque and forces by servo motors. The global aerodynamic forces and moments are regulated by controlling vorticity generation and accumulation near the trailing edge of the airfoil using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The effect of the unsteady motion on the model-embedded flow control is assessed in both trajectory tracking and disturbance rejection maneuvers. The time-varying aerodynamic lift and pitching moment are estimated from a PIV wake survey using a reduced order model based on classical unsteady aerodynamic theory. These measurements suggest that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within 2--3 convective time scales, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales that are commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is primarily limited by the inertia of the platform.

  4. Multi-colored layers for visualizing aerodynamic flow effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Ronald N. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for visualizing aerodynamic flow effects on a test surface. First, discrete quantities of a sublimating chemical such as naphthalene are distinctively colored via appropriate dyes or paints. Next, a uniform layer of the sublimating chemical having a particular color is applied to the test surface. This layer is covered with a second uniform layer of a different colored sublimating chemical, and so on until a composite of multi-colored layers is formed having a discrete thickness. Friction caused by an airflow results in the distinctly colored layers being removed in proportion to such aerodynamic flow characteristics as velocity and temperature, resulting in a multi-colored portrait which approximates the air flow on the underlying test surface.

  5. Effects of Leading Edge Defect on the Aerodynamic and Flow Characteristics of an S809 Airfoil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiaojing; Hu, Ruifeng; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Unexpected performance degradation occurs in wind turbine blades due to leading edge defect when suffering from continuous impacts with rain drops, hails, insects, or solid particles during its operation life. To assess this issue, this paper numerically investigates the steady and dynamic stall characteristics of an S809 airfoil with various leading edge defects. More leading edge defect sizes and much closer to practical parameters are investigated in the paper. Methodology Numerical computation is conducted using the SST k-ω turbulence model, and the method has been validated by comparison with existed published data. In order to ensure the calculation convergence, the residuals for the continuity equation are set to be less than 10−7 and 10−6 in steady state and dynamic stall cases. The simulations are conducted with the software ANSYS Fluent 13.0. Results It is found that the characteristics of aerodynamic coefficients and flow fields are sensitive to leading edge defect both in steady and dynamic conditions. For airfoils with the defect thickness of 6%tc, leading edge defect has a relative small influence on the aerodynamics of S809 airfoil. For other investigated defect thicknesses, leading edge defect has much greater influence on the flow field structures, pressure coefficients and aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil at relative small defect lengths. For example, the lift coefficients decrease and drag coefficients increase sharply after the appearance of leading edge defect. However, the aerodynamic characteristics could reach a constant value when the defect length is large enough. The flow field, pressure coefficient distribution and aerodynamic coefficients do not change a lot when the defect lengths reach to 0.5%c,1%c, 2%c and 3%c with defect thicknesses of 6%tc, 12%tc,18%tc and 25%tc, respectively. In addition, the results also show that the critical defect length/thickness ratio is 0.5, beyond which the aerodynamic characteristics

  6. Unsteady Aerodynamic Flow Control of a Suspended Axisymmetric Moving Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Thomas; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2011-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces on an axisymmetric wind tunnel model are altered by fluidic interaction of an azimuthal array of integrated synthetic jet actuators with the cross flow. Four-quadrant actuators are integrated into a Coanda surface on the aft section of the body, and the jets emanate from narrow, azimuthally segmented slots equally distributed around the model's perimeter. The model is suspended in the tunnel using eight wires each comprising miniature in-line force sensors and shape-memory-alloy (SMA) strands that are used to control the instantaneous forces and moments on the model and its orientation. The interaction of the actuation jets with the flow over the moving model is investigated using PIV and time-resolved force measurements to assess the transitory aerodynamic loading effected by coupling between the induced motion of the aerodynamic surface and the fluid dynamics that is driven by the actuation. It is shown that these interactions can lead to effective control of the aerodynamic forces and moments, and thereby of the model's motion. Supported by ARO.

  7. Aerodynamics and interaction noise of streamlined bodies in nonuniform flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atassi, H. M.; Logue, M. M.

    2011-08-01

    The unsteady aerodynamics and interaction noise of streamlined bodies are modeled in terms of the Euler equations linearized about a nonuniform flow. The validity of the inviscid approach is supported by recent LES simulations of an airfoil in a gust indicating that for not-too-small impinging excitations, the interaction process is dominated by inertia forces. Results in the present paper are focused on the aerodynamics and interaction noise of a turbofan modeled as an annular cascade. The model accounts for the inflow-fan-duct coupling and the high frequency of the interaction process. Two high-order numerical algorithms are developed with body-fitted coordinate system. One algorithm uses a primitive variable formulation, the other uses an efficient velocity splitting algorithm and is suitable for broadband computations. Analytical and numerical analysis of disturbances in rotational flows is developed and exact inflow/outflow boundary conditions are derived, yielding directly the radiated acoustics. The upstream disturbances evolve in rotational flows and as a result the aerodynamic-aeroacoustic response of the annular cascade depends on the initial conditions location. Computational results show that the three-dimensional geometry of the annular cascade, the mean flow swirl, and the blade geometry have strong influence on the blade sectional lift and the radiated sound. These results also show the inadequacy of using the popular linear cascade model particularly for realistic fan geometry and inflow conditions.

  8. An Aerodynamic Analysis of a Mixed Flow Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Chan M.; Civinskas, Kestutis C.

    1994-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a high-work Mixed Flow Turbine (MFT) is computed and compared with experimental data. A three dimensional (3-D) viscous analysis is applied to the single stage MFT geometry with a relatively long upstream transition duct. Predicted vane surface static pressures and circumferentially averaged spanwise quantities at stator and rotor exits agree favorably with data. Compared to the results of axisymmetric flow analysis from design intent, the 3-D computation agrees much better especially in the endwall regions where throughflow prediction fails to assess the loss mechanism properly. Potential sources of performance loss such as tip leakage and secondary flows are also properly captured by the analysis.

  9. Modeling of turbulent separated flows for aerodynamic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Steady, high speed, compressible separated flows modeled through numerical simulations resulting from solutions of the mass-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on benchmark flows that represent simplified (but realistic) aerodynamic phenomena. These include impinging shock waves, compression corners, glancing shock waves, trailing edge regions, and supersonic high angle of attack flows. A critical assessment of modeling capabilities is provided by comparing the numerical simulations with experiment. The importance of combining experiment, numerical algorithm, grid, and turbulence model to effectively develop this potentially powerful simulation technique is stressed.

  10. Numerical and experimental study on aerodynamic performance of small axial flow fan with splitter blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lifu; Jin, Yingzi; Li, Yi; Jin, Yuzhen; Wang, Yanping; Zhang, Li

    2013-08-01

    To improve the aerodynamic performance of small axial flow fan, in this paper the design of a small axial flow fan with splitter blades is studied. The RNG k-ɛ turbulence model and SIMPLE algorithm were applied to the steady simulation calculation of the flow field, and its result was used as the initial field of the large eddy simulation to calculate the unsteady pressure field. The FW-H noise model was adopted to predict aerodynamic noise in the six monitoring points. Fast Fourier transform algorithm was applied to process the pressure signal. Experiment of noise testing was done to further investigate the aerodynamic noise of fans. And then the results obtained from the numerical simulation and experiment were described and analyzed. The results show that the static characteristics of small axial fan with splitter blades are similar with the prototype fan, and the static characteristics are improved within a certain range of flux. The power spectral density at the six monitoring points of small axial flow fan with splitter blades have decreased to some extent. The experimental results show sound pressure level of new fan has reduced in most frequency bands by comparing with prototype fan. The research results will provide a proof for parameter optimization and noise prediction of small axial flow fans with high performance.

  11. Numerical and Physical Aspects of Aerodynamic Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-15

    elenmet about 20 % fewer grid points, it takes a little less comput- in this regon. ing time. The major difference between these approaches is the...8217 5 10 15’ 20 geometries in this work. Alpha OM 0.7S6 &12 - O - Fig. 2.6 Coefficient of lift versus angle of attack as computed by the overlaid grid ...55,000 points were used in the resulting composite grid in order to resolve the . 20 - flow physics adequately in the boundary layers and wakes. -15 The

  12. Aerodynamic Design on Unstructured Grids for Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Bonhaus, Daryl L.

    1997-01-01

    An aerodynamic design algorithm for turbulent flows using unstructured grids is described. The current approach uses adjoint (costate) variables for obtaining derivatives of the cost function. The solution of the adjoint equations is obtained using an implicit formulation in which the turbulence model is fully coupled with the flow equations when solving for the costate variables. The accuracy of the derivatives is demonstrated by comparison with finite-difference gradients and a few example computations are shown. In addition, a user interface is described which significantly reduces the time required for setting up the design problems. Recommendations on directions of further research into the Navier Stokes design process are made.

  13. Aerodynamic control in compressible flow using microwave driven discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAndrew, Brendan

    A new aerodynamic control scheme based on heating of the free stream flow is developed. The design, construction, and operation of a unique small scale wind tunnel to perform experiments involving this control scheme is detailed. Free stream heating is achieved by means of microwave driven discharges, and the resulting flow perturbations are used to alter the pressure distribution around a model in the flow. The experimental facility is also designed to allow the injection of an electron beam into the free stream for control of the discharge. Appropriate models for the fluid flow and discharge physics are developed, and comparisons of calculations based on those models are made with experimental results. The calculations have also been used to explore trends in parameters beyond the range possible in the experiments. The results of this work have been (1) the development of an operating facility capable of supporting free stream heat addition experiments in supersonic flow, (2) the development of a compatible instrumented model designed to make lift and drag measurements in a low pressure, high electrical noise environment, (3) a theoretical model to predict the change in breakdown threshold in the presence of an electron beam or other source of ionization, and (4) successful demonstration of aerodynamic control using free stream heat addition.

  14. Blunt Body Aerodynamics for Hypersonic Low Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Glass, Christopher E.; Greene, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed for the Apollo capsule from the hypersonic rarefied to the continuum regimes. The focus is on flow conditions similar to those experienced by the Apollo 6 Command Module during the high altitude portion of its reentry. The present focus is to highlight some of the current activities that serve as a precursor for computational tool assessments that will be used to support the development of aerodynamic data bases for future capsule flight environments, particularly those for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Results for aerodynamic forces and moments are presented that demonstrate their sensitivity to rarefaction; that is, free molecular to continuum conditions. Also, aerodynamic data are presented that shows their sensitivity to a range of reentry velocities, encompassing conditions that include reentry from low Earth orbit, lunar return, and Mars return velocities (7.7 to 15 km/s). The rarefied results obtained with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) codes are anchored in the continuum regime with data from Navier-Stokes simulations.

  15. Knowledge-based flow field zoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Alison E.

    1988-01-01

    Automation flow field zoning in two dimensions is an important step towards easing the three-dimensional grid generation bottleneck in computational fluid dynamics. A knowledge based approach works well, but certain aspects of flow field zoning make the use of such an approach challenging. A knowledge based flow field zoner, called EZGrid, was implemented and tested on representative two-dimensional aerodynamic configurations. Results are shown which illustrate the way in which EZGrid incorporates the effects of physics, shape description, position, and user bias in a flow field zoning.

  16. Aerodynamic Disturbances on Spacecraft in Free-Molecular Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    SMC-TR-03-06 AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TR-2003(3397)- 1 Aerodynamic Disturbances on Spacecraft in Free-Molecular Flow 17 October 2002 Prepared by J. A...AXE Form Approved REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 ...valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1 . REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To

  17. On least-order flow decompositions for aerodynamics and aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, Michael; Noack, Bernd R.; Jordan, Peter

    2012-11-01

    A generalisation of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) for optimal flow resolution of linearly related observables is presented, as proposed in the identically named publication of Schlegel, Noack, Jordan, Dillmann, Groeschel, Schroeder, Wei, Freund, Lehmann and Tadmor (Journal of Fluid Mechanics 2012, vol. 697, pp. 367-398). This Galerkin expansion, termed ``observable inferred decomposition'' (OID), addresses a need in aerodynamic and aeroacoustic applications by identifying the modes contributing most to these observables. Thus, OID constitutes a building block for physical understanding, least-biased conditional sampling, state estimation and control design. From a continuum of OID versions, two variants are tailored for purposes of observer and control design, respectively. Three aerodynamic and aeroacoustic observables are studied: (1) lift and drag fluctuation of a two-dimensional cylinder wake flow, (2) aeroacoustic density fluctuations measured by a sensor array and emitted from a two-dimensional compressible mixing layer, and (3) aeroacoustic pressure monitored by a sensor array and emitted from a three-dimensional compressible jet. The most ``drag-related,'' ``lift-related'' and ``loud'' structures are distilled and interpreted in terms of known physical processes. This work was partially funded by the DFG under grants SCHL 586/2-1 and ANR, Chair of Excellence, TUCOROM.

  18. Investigations on the Aerodynamic Characteristics and Blade Excitations of the Radial Turbine with Pulsating Inlet Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixiong; Yang, Ce; Yang, Dengfeng; Zhang, Rui

    2016-04-01

    The aerodynamic performance, detailed unsteady flow and time-based excitations acting on blade surfaces of a radial flow turbine have been investigated with pulsation flow condition. The results show that the turbine instantaneous performance under pulsation flow condition deviates from the quasi-steady value significantly and forms obvious hysteretic loops around the quasi-steady conditions. The detailed analysis of unsteady flow shows that the characteristic of pulsation flow field in radial turbine is highly influenced by the pulsation inlet condition. The blade torque, power and loading fluctuate with the inlet pulsation wave in a pulse period. For the blade excitations, the maximum and the minimum blade excitations conform to the wave crest and wave trough of the inlet pulsation, respectively, in time-based scale. And toward blade chord direction, the maximum loading distributes along the blade leading edge until 20% chord position and decreases from the leading to trailing edge.

  19. Diagnostic techniques for measurement of aerodynamic noise in free field and reverberant environment of wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Sum, H. M. A.; Mawardi, O. K.

    1973-01-01

    Techniques for studying aerodynamic noise generating mechanisms without disturbing the flow in a free field, and in the reverberation environment of the ARC wind tunnel were investigated along with the design and testing of an acoustic antenna with an electronic steering control. The acoustic characteristics of turbojet as a noise source, detection of direct sound from a source in a reverberant background, optical diagnostic methods, and the design characteristics of a high directivity acoustic antenna. Recommendations for further studies are included.

  20. Study of aerodynamic structure of flow in a model of vortex furnace using Stereo PIV method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufriev, I. S.; Kuibin, P. A.; Shadrin, E. Yu.; Sharaborin, D. K.; Sharypov, O. V.

    2016-07-01

    The aerodynamic structure of flow in a lab model of a perspective design of vortex furnace was studied. The chamber has a horizontal rotation axis, tangential inlet for fuel-air jets and vertical orientation of secondary injection nozzles. The Stereo PIV method was used for visualization of 3D velocity field for selected cross sections of the vortex combustion chamber. The experimental data along with "total pressure minimum" criterion were used for reconstruction of the vortex core of the flow. Results fit the available data from LDA and simulation.

  1. High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Shape Optimization for Natural Laminar Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashad, Ramy

    To ensure the long-term sustainability of aviation, serious effort is underway to mitigate the escalating economic, environmental, and social concerns of the industry. Significant improvement to the energy efficiency of air transportation is required through the research and development of advanced and unconventional airframe and engine technologies. In the quest to reduce airframe drag, this thesis is concerned with the development and demonstration of an effective design tool for improving the aerodynamic efficiency of subsonic and transonic airfoils. The objective is to advance the state-of-the-art in high-fidelity aerodynamic shape optimization by incorporating and exploiting the phenomenon of laminar-turbulent transition in an efficient manner. A framework for the design and optimization of Natural Laminar Flow (NLF) airfoils is developed and demonstrated with transition prediction capable of accounting for the effects of Reynolds number, freestream turbulence intensity, Mach number, and pressure gradients. First, a two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver has been extended to incorporate an iterative laminar-turbulent transition prediction methodology. The natural transition locations due to Tollmien-Schlichting instabilities are predicted using the simplified eN envelope method of Drela and Giles or, alternatively, the compressible form of the Arnal-Habiballah-Delcourt criterion. The boundary-layer properties are obtained directly from the Navier-Stokes flow solution, and the transition to turbulent flow is modeled using an intermittency function in conjunction with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The RANS solver is subsequently employed in a gradient-based sequential quadratic programming shape optimization framework. The laminar-turbulent transition criteria are tightly coupled into the objective and gradient evaluations. The gradients are obtained using a new augmented discrete-adjoint formulation for non-local transition

  2. Algorithms for automatic feedback control of aerodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, Karthik

    This thesis focuses on deriving algorithmic frameworks for the control of Aerodynamic Phenomena. The application of one such control law to the control of Flutter is discussed in detail. Flutter is an aero-structural instability that arises due to the adverse transfer of energy between the airplane structure and the surrounding fluid. CFD is now a mature technology and can be used as a design tool in addition to being used as an analysis tool. This is the motivation for much of the research that takes place at the Aerospace Computing Lab at Stanford. Shape optimization involves finding the shape (2-d or 3-d) that optimizes a certain performance index. Clearly, any optimum shape will be optimum only at the design point. It has been found that the aerodynamic performance at neighboring operating points is a lot less optimal than the original shapes. What we need to do is to design and develop a feasible way of controlling the flow at any operating point such that the resulting performance is optimal. In designing control laws, our philosophy has been to develop an algorithmic framework that enables treating a broad class of control problems rather than design control laws for specific isolated cases. This ensures that once a framework is established, extensions to particular problems can be done with very little effort. The framework we develop is problem independent and controller independent. Moreover, it has been shown that this leads to control laws that are feedback based, hence robust.

  3. Vacuum chamber with a supersonic-flow aerodynamic window

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, C.L.

    1980-10-14

    A supersonic flow aerodynamic window is disclosed whereby a steam ejector situated in a primary chamber at vacuum exhausts superheated steam toward an orifice to a region of higher pressure, creating a barrier to the gas in the region of higher pressure which attempts to enter through the orifice. In a mixing chamber outside and in fluid communication with the primary chamber, superheated steam and gas are combined into a mixture which then enters the primary chamber through the orifice. At the point of impact of the ejector/superheated steam and the incoming gas/superheated steam mixture, a barrier is created to the gas attempting to enter the ejector chamber. This barrier, coupled with suitable vacuum pumping means and cooling means, serves to keep the steam ejector and primary chamber at a negative pressure, even though the primary chamber has an orifice to a region of higher pressure.

  4. Vacuum chamber with a supersonic flow aerodynamic window

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Clark L.

    1982-01-01

    A supersonic flow aerodynamic window, whereby a steam ejector situated in a primary chamber at vacuum exhausts superheated steam toward an orifice to a region of higher pressure, creating a barrier to the gas in the region of higher pressure which attempts to enter through the orifice. In a mixing chamber outside and in fluid communication with the primary chamber, superheated steam and gas are combined into a mixture which then enters the primary chamber through the orifice. At the point of impact of the ejector/superheated steam and the incoming gas/superheated steam mixture, a barrier is created to the gas attempting to enter the ejector chamber. This barrier, coupled with suitable vacuum pumping means and cooling means, serves to keep the steam ejector and primary chamber at a negative pressure, even though the primary chamber has an orifice to a region of higher pressure.

  5. Analysis of the Hessian for Aerodynamic Optimization: Inviscid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal; Ta'asan, Shlomo

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we analyze inviscid aerodynamic shape optimization problems governed by the full potential and the Euler equations in two and three dimensions. The analysis indicates that minimization of pressure dependent cost functions results in Hessians whose eigenvalue distributions are identical for the full potential and the Euler equations. However the optimization problems in two and three dimensions are inherently different. While the two dimensional optimization problems are well-posed the three dimensional ones are ill-posed. Oscillations in the shape up to the smallest scale allowed by the design space can develop in the direction perpendicular to the flow, implying that a regularization is required. A natural choice of such a regularization is derived. The analysis also gives an estimate of the Hessian's condition number which implies that the problems at hand are ill-conditioned. Infinite dimensional approximations for the Hessians are constructed and preconditioners for gradient based methods are derived from these approximate Hessians.

  6. Computer graphics in aerodynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cozzolongo, J. V.

    1984-01-01

    The use of computer graphics and its application to aerodynamic analyses on a routine basis is outlined. The mathematical modelling of the aircraft geometries and the shading technique implemented are discussed. Examples of computer graphics used to display aerodynamic flow field data and aircraft geometries are shown. A future need in computer graphics for aerodynamic analyses is addressed.

  7. Effect of Trailing Edge Shape on the Unsteady Aerodynamics of Reverse Flow Dynamic Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2015-11-01

    This work considers dynamic stall in reverse flow, where flow travels over an oscillating airfoil from the geometric trailing edge towards the leading edge. An airfoil with a sharp geometric trailing edge causes early formation of a primary dynamic stall vortex since the sharp edge acts as the aerodynamic leading edge in reverse flow. The present work experimentally examines the potential merits of using an airfoil with a blunt geometric trailing edge to delay flow separation and dynamic stall vortex formation while undergoing oscillations in reverse flow. Time-resolved and phase-averaged flow fields and pressure distributions are compared for airfoils with different trailing edge shapes. Specifically, the evolution of unsteady flow features such as primary, secondary, and trailing edge vortices is examined. The influence of these flow features on the unsteady pressure distributions and integrated unsteady airloads provide insight on the torsional loading of rotor blades as they oscillate in reverse flow. The airfoil with a blunt trailing edge delays reverse flow dynamic stall, but this leads to greater downward-acting lift and pitching moment. These results are fundamental to alleviating vibrations of high-speed helicopters, where much of the rotor operates in reverse flow.

  8. The influence of incidence angle on the aerodynamics of condensing flow around a rotor tip section of steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti Amiri, H.; Salmaniyeh, F.; Izadi, A.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the influence of incidence angle on the aerodynamics of the steam flow field around a rotor tip section is investigated. An Eulerian-Eulerian method, based on a non-equilibrium thermodynamics model for simulating the wet flow is employed. In this study, the effects of incidence angle on different design parameters such as: outflow Mach number, outflow gas phase mass fraction, loss coefficient and deviation angle are studied.

  9. A hybrid numerical technique for predicting the aerodynamic and acoustic fields of advanced turboprops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homicz, G. F.; Moselle, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid numerical procedure is presented for the prediction of the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of advanced turboprops. A hybrid scheme is proposed which in principle leads to a consistent simultaneous prediction of both fields. In the inner flow a finite difference method, the Approximate-Factorization Alternating-Direction-Implicit (ADI) scheme, is used to solve the nonlinear Euler equations. In the outer flow the linearized acoustic equations are solved via a Boundary-Integral Equation (BIE) method. The two solutions are iteratively matched across a fictitious interface in the flow so as to maintain continuity. At convergence the resulting aerodynamic load prediction will automatically satisfy the appropriate free-field boundary conditions at the edge of the finite difference grid, while the acoustic predictions will reflect the back-reaction of the radiated field on the magnitude of the loading source terms, as well as refractive effects in the inner flow. The equations and logic needed to match the two solutions are developed and the computer program implementing the procedure is described. Unfortunately, no converged solutions were obtained, due to unexpectedly large running times. The reasons for this are discussed and several means to alleviate the situation are suggested.

  10. Modeling and Simulation of Radiative Compressible Flows in Aerodynamic Heating Arc-Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensassi, Khalil; Laguna, Alejandro A.; Lani, Andrea; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations of an arc heated flow inside NASA's 20 [MW] Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF) are performed in order to investigate the three-dimensional swirling flow and the current distribution inside the wind tunnel. The plasma is considered in Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium(LTE) and is composed of Air-Argon gas mixture. The governing equations are the Navier-Stokes equations that include source terms corresponding to Joule heating and radiative cooling. The former is obtained by solving an electric potential equation, while the latter is calculated using an innovative massively parallel ray-tracing algorithm. The fully coupled system is closed by the thermodynamics relations and transport properties which are obtained from Chapman-Enskog method. A novel strategy was developed in order to enable the flow solver and the radiation calculation to be preformed independently and simultaneously using a different number of processors. Drastic reduction in the computational cost was achieved using this strategy. Details on the numerical methods used for space discretization, time integration and ray-tracing algorithm will be presented. The effect of the radiative cooling on the dynamics of the flow will be investigated. The complete set of equations were implemented within the COOLFluiD Framework. Fig. 1 shows the geometry of the Anode and part of the constrictor of the Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF). Fig. 2 shows the velocity field distribution along (x-y) plane and the streamline in (z-y) plane.

  11. Time Series Vegetation Aerodynamic Roughness Fields Estimated from MODIS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borak, Jordan S.; Jasinski, Michael F.; Crago, Richard D.

    2005-01-01

    Most land surface models used today require estimates of aerodynamic roughness length in order to characterize momentum transfer between the surface and atmosphere. The most common method of prescribing roughness is through the use of empirical look-up tables based solely on land cover class. Theoretical approaches that employ satellite-based estimates of canopy density present an attractive alternative to current look-up table approaches based on vegetation cover type that do not account for within-class variability and are oftentimes simplistic with respect to temporal variability. The current research applies Raupach s formulation of momentum aerodynamic roughness to MODIS data on a regional scale in order to estimate seasonally variable roughness and zero-plane displacement height fields using bulk land cover parameters estimated by [Jasinski, M.F., Borak, J., Crago, R., 2005. Bulk surface momentum parameters for satellite-derived vegetation fields. Agric. For. Meteorol. 133, 55-68]. Results indicate promising advances over look-up approaches with respect to characterization of vegetation roughness variability in land surface and atmospheric circulation models.

  12. Effect of Trailing Edge Flow Injection on Fan Noise and Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian; Woodward, Richard P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental investigation using trailing edge blowing for reducing fan rotor/guide vane wake interaction noise was completed in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Data were acquired to measure noise, aerodynamic performance, and flow features for a 22" tip diameter fan representative of modern turbofan technology. The fan was designed to use trailing edge blowing to reduce the fan blade wake momentum deficit. The test objective was to quantify noise reductions, measure impacts on fan aerodynamic performance, and document the flow field using hot-film anemometry. Measurements concentrated on approach, cutback, and takeoff rotational speeds as those are the primary conditions of acoustic interest. Data are presented for a 2% (relative to overall fan flow) trailing edge injection rate and show a 2 dB reduction in Overall Sound Power Level (OAPWL) at all fan test speeds. The reduction in broadband noise is nearly constant and is approximately 1.5 dB up to 20 kHz at all fan speeds. Measurements of tone noise show significant variation, as evidenced by reductions of up to 6 dB in the 2 BPF tone at 6700 rpm.: and increases of nearly 2 dB for the 4 BPF tone at approach speed. Aerodynamic performance measurements show the fan with 2 % injection has an overall efficiency that is comparable to the baseline fan and operates, as intended, with nearly the same pressure ratio and mass flow parameters. Hot-film measurements obtained at the approach operating condition indicate that mean blade wake filling in the tip region was not as significant as expected. This suggests that additional acoustic benefits could be realized if the trailing edge blowing could be modified to provide better filling of the wake momentum deficit. Nevertheless, the hot-film measurements indicate that the trailing edge blowing provided significant reductions in blade wake turbulence. Overall, these results indicate that further work may be required to fully understand the proper

  13. Building Integrated Active Flow Control: Improving the Aerodynamic Performance of Tall Buildings Using Fluid-Based Aerodynamic Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menicovich, David

    respond to fluctuating environmental conditions such as changes in wind direction or velocity over the height of building which could be of consequence if the conditions for which the building was designed for change due to, for example, changes in the built environment surrounding it. Fluidic-based Aerodynamic Modification (FAM) is a fundamentally different approach; instead of adjusting the solid material to improve the aerodynamic 'shape' of the structure, fluid-based flow control is used to manipulate the boundary layer characteristics. The local flow field is modified to 'view' the solid as a different shape, and thus, that solid will experience reduced loads.

  14. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar-Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation related to the paper of the same name describing Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of low speed stall aerodynamics of a swept wing with a laminar flow wing glove.

  15. Correlation-based Transition Modeling for External Aerodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medida, Shivaji

    Conventional turbulence models calibrated for fully turbulent boundary layers often over-predict drag and heat transfer on aerodynamic surfaces with partially laminar boundary layers. A robust correlation-based model is developed for use in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations to predict laminar-to-turbulent transition onset of boundary layers on external aerodynamic surfaces. The new model is derived from an existing transition model for the two-equation k-omega Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model, and is coupled with the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model. The transition model solves two transport equations for intermittency and transition momentum thickness Reynolds number. Experimental correlations and local mean flow quantities are used in the model to account for effects of freestream turbulence level and pressure gradients on transition onset location. Transition onset is triggered by activating intermittency production using a vorticity Reynolds number criterion. In the new model, production and destruction terms of the intermittency equation are modified to improve consistency in the fully turbulent boundary layer post-transition onset, as well as ensure insensitivity to freestream eddy viscosity value specified in the SA model. In the original model, intermittency was used to control production and destruction of turbulent kinetic energy. Whereas, in the new model, only the production of eddy viscosity in SA model is controlled, and the destruction term is not altered. Unlike the original model, the new model does not use an additional correction to intermittency for separation-induced transition. Accuracy of drag predictions are improved significantly with the use of the transition model for several two-dimensional single- and multi-element airfoil cases over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The new model is able to predict the formation of stable and long laminar separation bubbles on low-Reynolds number airfoils that

  16. The calculation of steady non-linear transonic flow over finite wings with linear theory aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of calculating steady mean flow solutions for nonlinear transonic flow over finite wings with a linear theory aerodynamic computer program is studied. The methodology is based on independent solutions for upper and lower surface pressures that are coupled through the external flow fields. Two approaches for coupling the solutions are investigated which include the diaphragm and the edge singularity method. The final method is a combination of both where a line source along the wing leading edge is used to account for blunt nose airfoil effects; and the upper and lower surface flow fields are coupled through a diaphragm in the plane of the wing. An iterative solution is used to arrive at the nonuniform flow solution for both nonlifting and lifting cases. Final results for a swept tapered wing in subcritical flow show that the method converges in three iterations and gives excellent agreement with experiment at alpha = 0 deg and 2 deg. Recommendations are made for development of a procedure for routine application.

  17. DSMC method on aerodynamic heating and temperature characteristic of hypersonic rarefied flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jing; Bao, Xingdong; Mao, Hongxia; Dong, Yanbing

    2016-10-01

    Aerodynamic heating is one of important factors affecting hypersonic aircraft design. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC) has evolved years into a powerful numerical technique for the computation of complex, non-equilibrium gas flows. In atmospheric target, non-equilibrium conditions occur at high altitude and in regions of flow fields with small length scales. In this paper, the theoretical basis of the DSMC technique is discussed. In addition, the methods used in DSMC are described for simulation of high temperature, real gas effects and gas-surface interactions. Combined with the solution of heat transfer in material, heat-flux distribution and temperature distribution of the different shape structures was calculated in rarefied conditions.

  18. Effects of plasma aerodynamic actuation on oblique shock wave in a cold supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Li, Yinghong; Cheng, Bangqin; Su, Changbing; Song, Huimin; Wu, Yun

    2009-08-01

    Wedge oblique shock wave control using an arc discharge plasma aerodynamic actuator was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Schlieren photography measurements in a small-scale short-duration supersonic wind tunnel indicated that the shock wave angle decreased and its start point shifted upstream with the plasma aerodynamic actuation. Also the shock wave intensity weakened, as shown by the decrease in the gas static pressure ratio of flow downstream and upstream of the shock wave. Moreover, the shock wave control effect was intensified when a static magnetic field was applied. Under test conditions of Mach 2.2, magnetic control and input voltage 3 kV, the start point of the shock wave shifted 4 mm upstream, while its angle and intensity decreased 8.6% and 8.8%, respectively. A thermal choking model was proposed to deduce the change laws of oblique shock wave control by surface arc discharge. The theoretical result was consistent with the experimental result, which demonstrated that the thermal choking model can effectively forecast the effect of plasma actuation on an oblique shock wave in a cold supersonic flow.

  19. Effects of perforation number of blade on aerodynamic performance of dual-rotor small axial flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongjun; Wang, Yanping; Li, Guoqi; Jin, Yingzi; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2015-04-01

    Compared with single rotor small axial flow fans, dual-rotor small axial flow fans is better regarding the static characteristics. But the aerodynamic noise of dual-rotor small axial flow fans is worse than that of single rotor small axial flow fans. In order to improve aerodynamic noise of dual-rotor small axial flow fans, the pre-stage blades with different perforation numbers are designed in this research. The RANS equations and the standard k-ɛ turbulence model as well as the FW-H noise model are used to simulate the flow field within the fan. Then, the aerodynamic performance of the fans with different perforation number is compared and analyzed. The results show that: (1) Compared to the prototype fan, the noise of fans with perforation blades is reduced. Additionally, the noise of the fans decreases with the increase of the number of perforations. (2) The vorticity value in the trailing edge of the pre-stage blades of perforated fans is reduced. It is found that the vorticity value in the trailing edge of the pre-stage blades decreases with the increase of the number of perforations. (3) Compared to the prototype fan, the total pressure rising and efficiency of the fans with perforation blades drop slightly.

  20. Bumblebee program: Aerodynamic data. Part 3: Pressure fields at Mach numbers 1.5 and 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, G. A.; Cronvich, L. L.

    1979-01-01

    A large amount of fundamental aerodynamic missile data, which were stored for a number of years at the Applied Physics Laboratory, are reported. Data that supplements the M = 2.0 flow field data are provided. The Mach number effect by means of pressure fields only, at M = 1.5 and 2.0, and at angles of attack up to 23 deg at a mid-body station where a wing might be located is described.

  1. Real-Time Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation without Air Flow Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for estimating aerodynamic parameters in real time from flight data without air flow angle measurements is described and demonstrated. The method is applied to simulated F-16 data, and to flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Modeling results obtained with the new approach using flight data without air flow angle measurements were compared to modeling results computed conventionally using flight data that included air flow angle measurements. Comparisons demonstrated that the new technique can provide accurate aerodynamic modeling results without air flow angle measurements, which are often difficult and expensive to obtain. Implications for efficient flight testing and flight safety are discussed.

  2. Computer program for aerodynamic and blading design of multistage axial-flow compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.; Gorrell, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    A code for computing the aerodynamic design of a multistage axial-flow compressor and, if desired, the associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis codes is presented. Compressible flow, which is assumed to be steady and axisymmetric, is the basis for a two-dimensional solution in the meridional plane with viscous effects modeled by pressure loss coefficients and boundary layer blockage. The radial equation of motion and the continuity equation are solved with the streamline curvature method on calculation stations outside the blade rows. The annulus profile, mass flow, pressure ratio, and rotative speed are input. A number of other input parameters specify and control the blade row aerodynamics and geometry. In particular, blade element centerlines and thicknesses can be specified with fourth degree polynomials for two segments. The output includes a detailed aerodynamic solution and, if desired, blading coordinates that can be used for internal flow analysis codes.

  3. Grid sensitivity for aerodynamic optimization and flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadrehaghighi, I.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    After reviewing relevant literature, it is apparent that one aspect of aerodynamic sensitivity analysis, namely grid sensitivity, has not been investigated extensively. The grid sensitivity algorithms in most of these studies are based on structural design models. Such models, although sufficient for preliminary or conceptional design, are not acceptable for detailed design analysis. Careless grid sensitivity evaluations, would introduce gradient errors within the sensitivity module, therefore, infecting the overall optimization process. Development of an efficient and reliable grid sensitivity module with special emphasis on aerodynamic applications appear essential. The organization of this study is as follows. The physical and geometric representations of a typical model are derived in chapter 2. The grid generation algorithm and boundary grid distribution are developed in chapter 3. Chapter 4 discusses the theoretical formulation and aerodynamic sensitivity equation. The method of solution is provided in chapter 5. The results are presented and discussed in chapter 6. Finally, some concluding remarks are provided in chapter 7.

  4. Numerical simulation of aerodynamic derivatives and critical wind speed for long-span bridges based on simplified steady wind field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Dabo; Ou, Jinping

    2007-06-01

    Combining the computational fluid dynamics-based numerical simulation with the forced vibration technique for extraction of aerodynamic derivatives, an approach for calculating the aerodynamic derivatives and the critical flutter wind speed for long-span bridges is presented in this paper. The RNG k-ɛ turbulent model is introduced to establish the governing equations, including the continuity equation and the Navier-Stokes equations, for solving the wind flow field around a two-dimensional bridge section. To illustrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed approach, a simple application to the Hume Bridge in China is provided, and the numerical results show that the aerodynamic derivatives and the critical flutter wind speed obtained agree well with the wind tunnel test results.

  5. Field-Flow Fractionation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Karin D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a technique for separating samples that range over 15 orders of magnitude in molecular weight. Discusses theory, apparatus, and sample preparation techniques. Lists several types of field-flow fractionation (FFF) and their uses: sedimentation FFF, thermal FFF, flow FFF, electrical FFF, and steric FFF. (ML)

  6. [The influence of nasal flow aerodynamics on the nasal physiology].

    PubMed

    Betlejewski, Stanisław; Betlejewski, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The ability of the human nose to warm and humidify the respiratory air is important to maintaining the internal environment of the lungs, since ambient air is conditioned to nearly alveolar conditions (body temperature and fully saturated with water vapour) upon reaching the nasopharynx. Because of very short time of the inspiratory phase duration, as well as expiratory phase, only the rich vascularization of the nasal mucosa and specific organization of the submucosal vessels are not able to assure such effective physiological activity. Therefore the type of airflow during the respiration is essential to understanding the functional possibilities of the nasal mucosa. Most studies have investigated the airflow only in steady-flow conditions, where the laminar flow was observed. Anatomically accurate physical models of real nasal cavities and particle image velocimetry allow evaluation of the entire flow field in the nasal cavity. In these investigations a partially turbulent flow was observed even at low air velocities in most part of the nasal cavity. From a physiological perspective, a turbulent flow would seem sensible, since it enhances contact between air and the mucosal layer. By doing so, the nasal physiological functions - humidification, cleaning and warming are optimized.

  7. Unsteady Aerodynamics of Static Airfoils in Reverse Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2013-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments have been conducted on two-dimensional blunt and sharp trailing edge airfoils held at static angles of attack in reverse flow for three Reynolds numbers. The current work is aimed at advancing the understanding of fully developed reverse flow for high-speed helicopter applications, and evaluates the potential for blunt trailing edge airfoils to mitigate unsteady rotor blade airloads in this flow regime. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements at post-stall angles of attack have revealed the evolution of a trailing edge vortex formed by the roll-up of vorticity generated in a separated shear layer. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) was applied to the flow field measurements to improve the identification and tracking of dominant flow structures. Unsteady force balance measurements have captured non-structural vibrations with frequency content which correlates well with that of the temporal coefficients for the first two POD spatial modes. These vibrations vary in frequency with angle of attack and are shown to be linked with trailing edge vortex shedding. The findings presented here give fundamental insight towards the development of efficient rotor blades for high-speed helicopters.

  8. The Aerodynamic Performance of the Houck Configuration Flow Guides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Vortices.............................................................................................13 2.5 Winglets ...associated with the Houck configuration. This includes winglets , biplanes, and joined-wing aircraft. After that the chapter will discuss the evolution...efficiency factor (e = 1 for elliptical wing). 2.5 Winglets A winglet is best described by Jean Chattot’s quote: “ Winglets are aerodynamic components

  9. Near- and far-field aerodynamics in insect hovering flight: an integrated computational study.

    PubMed

    Aono, Hikaru; Liang, Fuyou; Liu, Hao

    2008-01-01

    We present the first integrative computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of near- and far-field aerodynamics in insect hovering flight using a biology-inspired, dynamic flight simulator. This simulator, which has been built to encompass multiple mechanisms and principles related to insect flight, is capable of 'flying' an insect on the basis of realistic wing-body morphologies and kinematics. Our CFD study integrates near- and far-field wake dynamics and shows the detailed three-dimensional (3D) near- and far-field vortex flows: a horseshoe-shaped vortex is generated and wraps around the wing in the early down- and upstroke; subsequently, the horseshoe-shaped vortex grows into a doughnut-shaped vortex ring, with an intense jet-stream present in its core, forming the downwash; and eventually, the doughnut-shaped vortex rings of the wing pair break up into two circular vortex rings in the wake. The computed aerodynamic forces show reasonable agreement with experimental results in terms of both the mean force (vertical, horizontal and sideslip forces) and the time course over one stroke cycle (lift and drag forces). A large amount of lift force (approximately 62% of total lift force generated over a full wingbeat cycle) is generated during the upstroke, most likely due to the presence of intensive and stable, leading-edge vortices (LEVs) and wing tip vortices (TVs); and correspondingly, a much stronger downwash is observed compared to the downstroke. We also estimated hovering energetics based on the computed aerodynamic and inertial torques, and powers.

  10. Aerodynamic Design of Axial-flow Compressors. Volume III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Irving A; Bullock, Robert O; Graham, Robert W; Costilow, Eleanor L; Huppert, Merle C; Benser, William A; Herzig, Howard Z; Hansen, Arthur G; Jackson, Robert J; Yohner, Peggy L; Dugan, Ames F , Jr

    1956-01-01

    Chapters XI to XIII concern the unsteady compressor operation arising when compressor blade elements stall. The fields of compressor stall and surge are reviewed in Chapters XI and XII, respectively. The part-speed operating problem in high-pressure-ratio multistage axial-flow compressors is analyzed in Chapter XIII. Chapter XIV summarizes design methods and theories that extend beyond the simplified two-dimensional approach used previously in the report. Chapter XV extends this three-dimensional treatment by summarizing the literature on secondary flows and boundary layer effects. Charts for determining the effects of errors in design parameters and experimental measurements on compressor performance are given in Chapters XVI. Chapter XVII reviews existing literature on compressor and turbine matching techniques.

  11. Wind tunnel experiments on flow separation control of an Unmanned Air Vehicle by nanosecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Chen; Hua, Liang

    2016-02-01

    Plasma flow control (PFC) is a new kind of active flow control technology, which can improve the aerodynamic performances of aircrafts remarkably. The flow separation control of an unmanned air vehicle (UAV) by nanosecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation (NDPAA) is investigated experimentally in this paper. Experimental results show that the applied voltages for both the nanosecond discharge and the millisecond discharge are nearly the same, but the current for nanosecond discharge (30 A) is much bigger than that for millisecond discharge (0.1 A). The flow field induced by the NDPAA is similar to a shock wave upward, and has a maximal velocity of less than 0.5 m/s. Fast heating effect for nanosecond discharge induces shock waves in the quiescent air. The lasting time of the shock waves is about 80 μs and its spread velocity is nearly 380 m/s. By using the NDPAA, the flow separation on the suction side of the UAV can be totally suppressed and the critical stall angle of attack increases from 20° to 27° with a maximal lift coefficient increment of 11.24%. The flow separation can be suppressed when the discharge voltage is larger than the threshold value, and the optimum operation frequency for the NDPAA is the one which makes the Strouhal number equal one. The NDPAA is more effective than the millisecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation (MDPAA) in boundary layer flow control. The main mechanism for nanosecond discharge is shock effect. Shock effect is more effective in flow control than momentum effect in high speed flow control. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61503302, 51207169, and 51276197), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M562446), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2015JM1001).

  12. On-orbit free molecular flow aerodynamic characteristics of a proposal space operations center configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romere, P. O.

    1982-01-01

    A proposed configuration for a Space Operations Center is presented in its eight stages of buildup. The on orbit aerodynamic force and moment characteristics were calculated for each stage based upon free molecular flow theory. Calculation of the aerodynamic characteristics was accomplished through the use of an orbital aerodynamic computer program, and the computation method is described with respect to the free molecular theory used. The aerodynamic characteristics are presented in tabulated form for each buildup stage at angles of attack from 0 to 360 degrees and roll angles from -60 to +60 degrees. The reference altitude is 490 kilometers, however, the data should be applicable for altitudes below 490 kilometers down to approximately 185 kilometers.

  13. Effects of Shrouded Stator Cavity Flows on Multistage Axial Compressor Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellborn, Steven R.; Okiishi, Theodore H.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were performed on a low-speed multistage axial-flow compressor to assess the effects of shrouded stator cavity flows on aerodynamic performance. Five configurations, which involved changes in seal-tooth leakage rates and/or elimination of the shrouded stator cavities, were tested. Data collected enabled differences in overall individual stage and the third stage blade element performance parameters to be compared. The results show conclusively that seal-tooth leakage ran have a large impact on compressor aerodynamic performance while the presence of the shrouded stator cavities alone seemed to have little influence. Overall performance data revealed that for every 1% increase in the seal-tooth clearance to blade-height ratio the pressure rise dropped up to 3% while efficiency was reduced by 1 to 1.5 points. These observed efficiency penalty slopes are comparable to those commonly reported for rotor and cantilevered stator tip clearance variations. Therefore, it appears that in order to correctly predict overall performance it is equally important to account for the effects of seal-tooth leakage as it is to include the influence of tip clearance flows. Third stage blade element performance data suggested that the performance degradation observed when leakage was increased was brought about in two distinct ways. First, increasing seal-tooth leakage directly spoiled the near hub performance of the stator row in which leakage occurred. Second, the altered stator exit now conditions caused by increased leakage impaired the performance of the next downstream stage by decreasing the work input of the downstream rotor and increasing total pressure loss of the downstream stator. These trends caused downstream stages to progressively perform worse. Other measurements were acquired to determine spatial and temporal flow field variations within the up-and-downstream shrouded stator cavities. Flow within the cavities involved low momentum fluid traveling primarily

  14. Interaction of unsteady separated flow over multi-bodies moving relatively in the same flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Sheng; Zheng, Xin-qian; Hou, An-ping; Lu, Ya-jun

    2005-12-01

    Unsteady separated flow is one of research frontiers in current aerodynamic. Great accomplishments have been acquired; however, most studies are on single body in a stream, such as studies on unsteady separated flows over airfoils. There are typical cases in the nature and engineering applications, in which several interacting bodies with relative motions are within the same flow field. These interacting unsteady separated flow fields not only are closely related to the phenomena of noise and flutter induced by flows, but also have strong influences on aerodynamic performances. With axial flow compressors as background, the present paper carried out studies on 'interaction of unsteady separated flow over multi-bodies moving relatively in the same flow field'. Experiment investigations carried out in the stationary annular cascade wind tunnel and the single-stage low-speed axial flow compressor experimental facility as well as relevant CFD simulations demonstrate that under properly organized interactions between all unsteady components, the time-space structure of unsteady separated flow field can be remarkably improved and the time-averaged aerodynamic performances be significantly enhanced accordingly. The maximum reduction of the loss coefficient reached 27.4% and 76.5% in the stationary annular cascade wind tunnel and the CFD simulation for single-stage axial flow compressor, respectively.

  15. User's manual for an aerodynamic optimization scheeme that updates flow variables and design parameters simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    This user's manual is presented for an aerodynamic optimization program that updates flow variables and design parameters simultaneously. The program was developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The program was tested by applying it to the problem of optimizing propeller designs. Some reference to this particular application is therefore made in the manual. However, the optimization scheme is suitable for application to general aerodynamic design problems. A description of the approach used in the optimization scheme is first presented, followed by a description of the use of the program.

  16. Aerodynamic forces induced by controlled transitory flow on a body of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, Christopher S.

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on an axisymmetric body of revolution are controlled in a low-speed wind tunnel by induced local flow attachment. Control is effected by an array of aft-facing synthetic jets emanating from narrow, azimuthally segmented slots embedded within an axisymmetric backward facing step. The actuation results in a localized, segmented vectoring of the separated base flow along a rear Coanda surface and induced asymmetric aerodynamic forces and moments. The observed effects are investigated in both quasi-steady and transient states, with emphasis on parametric dependence. It is shown that the magnitude of the effected forces can be substantially increased by slight variations of the Coanda surface geometry. Force and velocity measurements are used to elucidate the mechanisms by which the synthetic jets produce asymmetric aerodynamic forces and moments, demonstrating a novel method to steer axisymmetric bodies during flight.

  17. Computational analysis of hypersonic airbreathing aircraft flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, Douglas L.; Kumar, Ajay

    1987-01-01

    The general problem of calculating the flow fields associated with hypersonic airbreathing aircraft is presented. Unique aspects of hypersonic aircraft aerodynamics are introduced and their demands on computational fluid dynamics are outlined. Example calculations associated with inlet/forebody integration and hypersonic nozzle design are presented to illustrate the nature of the problems considered.

  18. Flow-Visualization Techniques Used at High Speed by Configuration Aerodynamics Wind-Tunnel-Test Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes a variety of optically based flow-visualization techniques used for high-speed research by the Configuration Aerodynamics Wind-Tunnel Test Team of the High-Speed Research Program during its tenure. The work of other national experts is included for completeness. Details of each technique with applications and status in various national wind tunnels are given.

  19. Aerodynamic Design of Axial-flow Compressors. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    Available experimental two-dimensional-cascade data for conventional compressor blade sections are correlated. The two-dimensional cascade and some of the principal aerodynamic factors involved in its operation are first briefly described. Then the data are analyzed by examining the variation of cascade performance at a reference incidence angle in the region of minimum loss. Variations of reference incidence angle, total-pressure loss, and deviation angle with cascade geometry, inlet Mach number, and Reynolds number are investigated. From the analysis and the correlations of the available data, rules and relations are evolved for the prediction of the magnitude of the reference total-pressure loss and the reference deviation and incidence angles for conventional blade profiles. These relations are developed in simplified forms readily applicable to compressor design procedures.

  20. Experimental static aerodynamics of a regular hexagonal prism in a low density hypervelocity flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, R. W.; Mueller, J. N.; Lee, L. P.

    1972-01-01

    A regular hexagonal prism, having a fineness ratio of 1.67, has been tested in a wind tunnel to determine its static aerodynamic characteristics in a low-density hypervelocity flow. The prism tested was a 1/4-scale model of the graphite heat shield which houses the radioactive fuel for the Viking spacecraft auxiliary power supply. The basic hexagonal prism was also modified to simulate a prism on which ablation of one of the six side flats had occurred. This modified hexagonal prism was tested to determine the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of a shape change caused by ablation during a possible side-on stable reentry.

  1. Effects of flow curvature on the aerodynamics of Darrieus wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P. G.; Wolfe, W. P.

    1980-07-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation was conducted which clearly showed the effects of flow curvature to be significant determinants of Darrieus turbine blade aerodynamics; qualitatively, these results apply equally to straight or curved bladed machines. Unusually large boundary layer radial pressure gradients and virtually altered camber and incidence are the phenomena of primary importance. Conformal mapping techniques were developed which transform the geometric turbine airfoils in curved flow to their virtual equivalents in rectilinear flow, thereby permitting the more accurate selection of airfoil aerodynamic coefficients from published sectional data. It is demonstrated that once the flow idiosyncracies are fully understood, they may be used to advantage to improve the wind energy extraction efficiency of these machines.

  2. Current Trends in Modeling Research for Turbulent Aerodynamic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, Thomas B.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Manceau, Remi

    2007-01-01

    The engineering tools of choice for the computation of practical engineering flows have begun to migrate from those based on the traditional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach to methodologies capable, in theory if not in practice, of accurately predicting some instantaneous scales of motion in the flow. The migration has largely been driven by both the success of Reynolds-averaged methods over a wide variety of flows as well as the inherent limitations of the method itself. Practitioners, emboldened by their ability to predict a wide-variety of statistically steady, equilibrium turbulent flows, have now turned their attention to flow control and non-equilibrium flows, that is, separation control. This review gives some current priorities in traditional Reynolds-averaged modeling research as well as some methodologies being applied to a new class of turbulent flow control problems.

  3. The Fifth Symposium on Numerical and Physical Aspects of Aerodynamic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at the Fifth Symposium on Numerical and Physical Aspects of Aerodynamic Flows, held at the California State University, Long Beach, from 13 to 15 January 1992. The symposium, like its immediate predecessors, considers the calculation of flows of relevance to aircraft, ships, and missiles with emphasis on the solution of two-dimensional unsteady and three-dimensional equations.

  4. Aircraft aerodynamic prediction method for V/STOL transition including flow separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmer, B. R.; Miner, G. A.; Bristow, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed for the aerodynamic force and moment analysis of V/STOL aircraft operating in the transition regime between hover and conventional forward flight. The trajectories, cross sectional area variations, and mass entrainment rates of the jets are calculated by the Adler-Baron Jet-in-Crossflow Program. The inviscid effects of the interaction between the jets and airframe on the aerodynamic properties are determined by use of the MCAIR 3-D Subsonic properties are determined by use of the MCAIR 3-D Subsonic Potential Flow Program, a surface panel method. In addition, the MCAIR 3-D Geometry influence Coefficient Program is used to calculate a matrix of partial derivatives that represent the rate of change of the inviscid aerodynamic properties with respect to arbitrary changes in the effective wing shape.

  5. A novel potential/viscous flow coupling technique for computing helicopter flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summa, J. Michael; Strash, Daniel J.; Yoo, Sungyul

    1990-01-01

    Because of the complexity of helicopter flow field, a zonal method of analysis of computational aerodynamics is required. Here, a new procedure for coupling potential and viscous flow is proposed. An overlapping, velocity coupling technique is to be developed with the unique feature that the potential flow surface singularity strengths are obtained directly from the Navier-Stokes at a smoother inner fluid boundary. The closed-loop iteration method proceeds until the velocity field is converged. This coupling should provide the means of more accurate viscous computations of the near-body and rotor flow fields with resultant improved analysis of such important performance parameters as helicopter fuselage drag and rotor airloads.

  6. Aerodynamic analysis of the aerospaceplane HyPlane in supersonic rarefied flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuppardi, Gennaro; Savino, Raffaele; Russo, Gennaro; Spano'Cuomo, Luca; Petrosino, Eliano

    2016-06-01

    HyPlane is the Italian aerospaceplane proposal targeting, at the same time, both the space tourism and point-to-point intercontinental hypersonic flights. Unlike other aerospaceplane projects, relying on boosters or mother airplanes that bring the vehicle to high altitude, HyPlane will take off and land horizontally from common runways. According to the current project, HyPlane will fly sub-orbital trajectories under high-supersonic/low-hypersonic continuum flow regimes. It can go beyond the von Karman line at 100 km altitude for a short time, then starting the descending leg of the trajectory. Its aerodynamic behavior up to 70 km have already been studied and the results published in previous works. In the present paper some aspects of the aerodynamic behavior of HyPlane have been analyzed at 80, 90 and 100 km. Computer tests, calculating the aerodynamic parameters, have been carried out by a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code. The effects of the Knudsen, Mach and Reynolds numbers have been evaluated in clean configuration. The effects of the aerodynamic surfaces on the rolling, pitching and yawing moments, and therefore on the capability to control attitude, have been analyzed at 100 km altitude. The aerodynamic behavior has been compared also with that of another aerospaceplane at 100 km both in clean and flapped configuration.

  7. Recent theoretical developments and experimental studies pertinent to vortex flow aerodynamics - With a view towards design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.; Luckring, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    A review is presented of recent progress in a research program directed towards the development of an improved vortex-flow technology base. It is pointed out that separation induced vortex-flows from the leading and side edges play an important role in the high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of a wide range of modern aircraft. In the analysis and design of high-speed aircraft, a detailed knowledge of this type of separation is required, particularly with regard to critical wind loads and the stability and performance at various off-design conditions. A description of analytical methods is presented. The theoretical methods employed are divided into two classes which are dependent upon the underlying aerodynamic assumptions. One conical flow method is considered along with three different nonconical flow methods. Comparisons are conducted between the described methods and available aerodynamic data. Attention is also given to a vortex flow drag study and a vortex flow wing design using suction analogy.

  8. Flow Physics and Control for Internal and External Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, I.

    2010-01-01

    Exploiting instabilities rather than forcing the flow is advantageous. Simple 2D concepts may not always work. Nonlinear effects may result in first order effect. Interaction between spanwise and streamwise vortices may have a paramount effect on the mean flow, but this interaction may not always be beneficial.

  9. Workshop on Aircraft Surface Representation for Aerodynamic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J. (Editor); Ashbaugh, J. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Papers and discussions on surface representation and its integration with aerodynamics, computers, graphics, wind tunnel model fabrication, and flow field grid generation are presented. Surface definition is emphasized.

  10. Role of jet asymmetry in glottal flow aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, Joel; Krane, Michael; Medvitz, Richard

    2008-11-01

    Finite element computations of flow through a constriction are used to illuminate the role of the Coanda effect in glottal flow and voice production. Steady-state computations were performed for a series of constriction openings. One set of simulations enforced transverse flow symmetry, while the other allowed the flow to develop naturally. Comparisons of measures relevant to vocal fold vibration and sound production are presented. These comparisons show that the Coanda effect primarily affects the differential transverse force on the vocal fold walls, while the axial force differs little from the symmetric case. These results suggest strongly that the primary role of the Coanda effect in speech is to drive asymmetric vocal fold vibration patterns, and that glottal jet instability contributes to voice perturbations and fluctuations.

  11. Computational Methods for Feedback Controllers for Aerodynamics Flow Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-15

    include the massively separated flow around an F-1i5E at 650 angle of attack reported by Forsythe et a/. (2004) (the first eddy-resolving simulation...to one step prediction, of MIMO (multi-input, multi- output) systems. A schematic representation of the feed-forward ANN-ARX network topology is...present, and can also accommodate multiple actuator interaction allowing for MIMO control. We did not intend it to be used for random turbulent flows, but

  12. Aerodynamics of 3-dimensional bodies in transitional flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith

    1987-01-01

    Based on considerations of fluid dynamic simulation appropriate to hypersonic, viscous flow over blunt-nosed lifting bodies, a method was presented earlier for estimating drag coefficients in the transitional-flow regime. The extension of the same method to prediction of lift coefficients is presented. Correlation of available experimental data by a simulation parameter appropriate for this purpose is the basis for the procedure described. The ease of application of the method makes it useful for preliminary studies which involve a wide variety of three-dimensional vehicle configurations or a range of angles of attack of a given vehicle.

  13. Numerical Analysis on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Delta Wing with Variable Geometry Device in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Masashi; Imamura, Osamu; Suzuki, Kojiro

    The application of the variable geometry (VG) wing to a lifting re-entry body is expected to enhance the control capability of its aerodynamic characteristics and, as a result, to widen the corridor for the flight trajectory. In the present study, the flow field around a plain delta wing having three chord-wise hinges, one is on the wing root and the others on both sides of the mid-span of the wing, at Mach number 3 is numerically investigated by solving the Euler equations. The effects of the angle of attack and the “tip-down” bending angles around these hinges are clarified. The results show that the lift-to-drag ratio is hardly affected by the tip-down angle and that the overall lift and drag forces vary almost proportional to the change in the projected wing area by taking the tip-down configuration. The center of pressure moves backward by the tip-down effect.

  14. Influence matrix program for aerodynamic lifting surface theory. [in subsonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medan, R. T.; Ray, K. S.

    1973-01-01

    A users manual is described for a USA FORTRAN 4 computer program which computes an aerodynamic influence matrix and is one of several computer programs used to analyze lifting, thin wings in steady, subsonic flow according to a kernel function method lifting surface theory. The most significant features of the program are that it can treat unsymmetrical wings, control points can be placed on the leading and/or trailing edges, and a stable, efficient algorithm is used to compute the influence matrix.

  15. High performance parallelized implicit Euler solver for the analysis of unsteady aerodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borel, C.; Bredif, M.

    Simulation of transient flows is more and more useful for industrial applications in aeronautics. For instance, the unsteady aerodynamic coefficients can be of great importance in order to predict the behavior of flying bodies: this is in particular the case for missiles which are spun around their longitudinal axis. It is also well known that the experimental tools used to evaluate the unsteady aerodynamic characteristics present a certain number of limitations: complexity of the experiments, limited degree of accuracy, high costs and delays. In this context, the Computational Aerodynamics Department of Matra Defense has been developing a software library called AEROLOG for the prediction of the steady and unsteady aerodynamics of tactical missiles using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. The aim of this paper is as follows: (1) Detailed presentation of the numerical method, with particular emphasis on the high performances in terms of computational time achieved thanks to the use of an implicit scheme combined with a domain decomposition of structured mesh well suited for vector and parallel implementation, and (2) Analysis of 2-D and 3-D unsteady numerical simulations corresponding to academic and industrial cases, showing the accuracy of the method together with its range of applications.

  16. Thermal Mechanisms for High Amplitude Aerodynamic Flow Control (YIP 2012)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-15

    like behavior (high energy single frequency forcing) or a more standard convective nature (high frequency burst at lower pulse energies). These...instability in BFS flows is near Stθo ≈ 0.012 (Hasan 1992). As shear layer vortices convect downstream, their size increases and pairing occurs...locally convectively unstable throughout (Huerre and Monkewitz 1985). The reattachment behavior is strongly dependent on characteristics of the

  17. Global aerodynamic instability of twin cylinders in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md. Mahbub; Meyer, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    This paper comprises an in-depth physical discussion of the flow-induced vibration of two circular cylinders in view of the time-mean lift force on stationary cylinders and interaction mechanisms. The gap-spacing ratio T/D is varied from 0.1 to 5 and the attack angle α from 0° to 180° where T is the gap width between the cylinders and D is the diameter of a cylinder. Mechanisms of interaction between two cylinders are discussed based on time-mean lift, fluctuating lift, flow structures and flow-induced responses. The whole regime is classified into seven interaction regimes, i.e., no interaction regime; boundary layer and cylinder interaction regime; shear-layer/wake and cylinder interaction regime; shear-layer and shear-layer interaction regime; vortex and cylinder interaction regime; vortex and shear-layer interaction regime; and vortex and vortex interaction regime. Though a single non-interfering circular cylinder does not correspond to a galloping following quasi-steady galloping theory, two circular cylinders experience violent galloping vibration due to shear-layer/wake and cylinder interaction as well as boundary layer and cylinder interaction. A larger magnitude of fluctuating lift communicates to a larger amplitude vortex excitation.

  18. Unsteady Analysis of Separated Aerodynamic Flows Using an Unstructured Multigrid Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelaez, Juan; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Kandil, Osama

    2001-01-01

    An implicit method for the computation of unsteady flows on unstructured grids is presented. The resulting nonlinear system of equations is solved at each time step using an agglomeration multigrid procedure. The method allows for arbitrarily large time steps and is efficient in terms of computational effort and storage. Validation of the code using a one-equation turbulence model is performed for the well-known case of flow over a cylinder. A Detached Eddy Simulation model is also implemented and its performance compared to the one equation Spalart-Allmaras Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence model. Validation cases using DES and RANS include flow over a sphere and flow over a NACA 0012 wing including massive stall regimes. The project was driven by the ultimate goal of computing separated flows of aerodynamic interest, such as massive stall or flows over complex non-streamlined geometries.

  19. Symposium on Numerical and Physical Aspects of Aerodynamic Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-15

    approach uses excellent job of capturing the wake from the main element about 20 % fewer grid points, it takes a little less comput- in this region...geometry. It is for these reasons that the overlaid 1. grid approach was adopted for the rest of the cases and -5 0 5 10 15 20 geometries in this work... grid in order to resolve the 20 - -I" /flow physics adequately in the boundary layers and wakes. -15 - -- . The grid spacing next to the surfaces of the

  20. An engineering aerodynamic heating method for hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; Dejarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  1. An Engineering Aerodynamic Heating Method for Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; DeJarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  2. Ground vortex flow field investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Richard E.; Delfrate, John H.; Eshleman, James E.

    1988-01-01

    Flow field investigations were conducted at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flow Visualization Facility (water tunnel) to investigate the ground effect produced by the impingement of jets from aircraft nozzles on a ground board in a STOL operation. Effects on the overall flow field with both a stationary and a moving ground board were photographed and compared with similar data found in other references. Nozzle jet impingement angles, nozzle and inlet interaction, side-by-side nozzles, nozzles in tandem, and nozzles and inlets mounted on a flat plate model were investigated. Results show that the wall jet that generates the ground effect is unsteady and the boundary between the ground vortex flow field and the free-stream flow is unsteady. Additionally, the forward projection of the ground vortex flow field with a moving ground board is one-third less than that measured over a fixed ground board. Results also showed that inlets did not alter the ground vortex flow field.

  3. Hypersonic rarefied-flow aerodynamics inferred from Shuttle Orbiter acceleration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Hinson, E. W.

    1989-01-01

    Data obtained from multiple flights of sensitive accelerometers on the Space Shuttle Orbiter during reentry have been used to develop an improved aerodynamic model for the Orbiter normal- and axial-force coefficients in hypersonic rarefied flow. The lack of simultaneous atmospheric density measurements was overcome in part by using the ratio of normal-to-axial acceleration, in which density cancels, as a constraint. Differences between the preflight model and the flight-acceleration-derived model in the continuum regime are attributed primarily to real gas effects. New insights are gained into the variation of the force coefficients in the transition between the continuum regime and free molecule flow.

  4. Flow Quality Measurements in an Aerodynamic Model of NASA Lewis' Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canacci, Victor A.; Gonsalez, Jose C.

    1999-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to improve the aerodynamic flow characteristics of the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT), a modular scale model of the facility was fabricated. This 1/10th-scale model was used to gain further understanding of the flow characteristics in the IRT. The model was outfitted with instrumentation and data acquisition systems to determine pressures, velocities, and flow angles in the settling chamber and test section. Parametric flow quality studies involving the insertion and removal of a model of the IRT's distinctive heat exchanger (cooler) and/or of a honeycomb in the settling chamber were performed. These experiments illustrate the resulting improvement or degradation in flow quality.

  5. Aerodynamic detuning analysis of an unstalled supersonic turbofan cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyniak, D.; Fleeter, S.

    1985-01-01

    An approach to passive flutter control is aerodynamic detuning, defined as designed passage-to-passage differences in the unsteady aerodynamic flow field of a rotor blade row. Thus, aerodynamic detuning directly affects the fundamental driving mechanism for flutter. A model to demonstrate the enhanced supersonic aeroelastic stability associated with aerodynamic detuning is developed. The stability of an aerodynamically detuned cascade operating in a supersonic inlet flow field with a subsonic leading edge locus is analyzed, with the aerodynamic detuning accomplished by means of nonuniform circumferential spacing of adjacent rotor blades. The unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments on the blading are defined in terms of influence coefficients in a manner that permits the stability of both a conventional uniformally spaced rotor configuration as well as the detuned nonuniform circumferentially spaced rotor to be determined. With Verdon's uniformly spaced Cascade B as a baseline, this analysis is then utilized to demonstrate the potential enhanced aeroelastic stability associated with this particular type of aerodynamic detuning.

  6. Inlet flow field investigation. Part 1: Transonic flow field survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yetter, J. A.; Salemann, V.; Sussman, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the local inlet flow field characteristics of an advanced tactical supersonic cruise airplane. A data base for the development and validation of analytical codes directed at the analysis of inlet flow fields for advanced supersonic airplanes was established. Testing was conducted at the NASA-Langley 16-foot Transonic Tunnel at freestream Mach numbers of 0.6 to 1.20 and angles of attack from 0.0 to 10.0 degrees. Inlet flow field surveys were made at locations representative of wing (upper and lower surface) and forebody mounted inlet concepts. Results are presented in the form of local inlet flow field angle of attack, sideflow angle, and Mach number contours. Wing surface pressure distributions supplement the flow field data.

  7. Orbiter Aerodynamic Acceleration Flight Measurements in the Rarefied-Flow Transition Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; LeBeau, Gerald J.

    1996-01-01

    Acceleration data taken from the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) during reentry on STS-62 have been analyzed using calibration factors taken on orbit. This is the first Orbiter mission which collected OARE data during the Orbiter reentry phase. The data examined include the flight regime from orbital altitudes down to about 90 km which covers the free-molecule-flow regime and the upper altitude fringes of the rarefied-flow transition into the hypersonic continuum. Ancillary flight data on Orbiter position, orientation, velocity, and rotation rates have been used in models to transform the measured accelerations to the Orbiter center-of-gravity, from which aerodynamic accelerations along the Orbiter body axes have been calculated. Residual offsets introduced in the measurements by unmodeled Orbiter forces are identified and discussed. Direct comparisons are made between the OARE flight data and an independent micro-gravity accelerometer experiment, the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), which also obtained flight data on reentry during the mission down to about 95 km. The resulting OARE aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's body axis, aid the normal to axial acceleration ratio in the free-molecule-flow and transition-flow regimes are presented and compared with numerical simulations from three direct simulation Monte Carlo codes.

  8. Aerodynamic pressure and flow-visualization measurement from a rotating wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C P

    1988-11-01

    Aerodynamic, load, flow-visualization, and inflow measurements have been made on a 10-m, three-bladed, downwind, horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). A video camera mounted on the rotor was used to record nighttime and daytime video images of tufts attached to the low-pressure side of a constant-chord, zero-twist blade. Load measurements were made using strain gages mounted at every 10% of the blade's span. Pressure measurements were made at 80% of the blade's span. Pressure taps were located at 32 chordwise positions, revealing pressure distributions comparable with wind tunnel data. Inflow was measured using a vertical-plane array of eight propvane and five triaxial (U-V-W) prop-type anemometers located 10 m upwind in the predominant wind direction. One objective of this comprehensive research program was to study the effects of blade rotation on aerodynamic behavior below, near, and beyond stall. To this end, flow patterns are presented here that reveal the dynamic and steady behavior of flow conditions on the blade. Pressure distributions are compared to flow patterns and two-dimensional wind tunnel data. Separation boundary locations are shown that change as a function of spanwise location, pitch angle, and wind speed. 6 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Aircraft Aerodynamic Parameter Detection Using Micro Hot-Film Flow Sensor Array and BP Neural Network Identification

    PubMed Central

    Que, Ruiyi; Zhu, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Air speed, angle of sideslip and angle of attack are fundamental aerodynamic parameters for controlling most aircraft. For small aircraft for which conventional detecting devices are too bulky and heavy to be utilized, a novel and practical methodology by which the aerodynamic parameters are inferred using a micro hot-film flow sensor array mounted on the surface of the wing is proposed. A back-propagation neural network is used to model the coupling relationship between readings of the sensor array and aerodynamic parameters. Two different sensor arrangements are tested in wind tunnel experiments and dependence of the system performance on the sensor arrangement is analyzed. PMID:23112638

  10. Aircraft aerodynamic parameter detection using micro hot-film flow sensor array and BP neural network identification.

    PubMed

    Que, Ruiyi; Zhu, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Air speed, angle of sideslip and angle of attack are fundamental aerodynamic parameters for controlling most aircraft. For small aircraft for which conventional detecting devices are too bulky and heavy to be utilized, a novel and practical methodology by which the aerodynamic parameters are inferred using a micro hot-film flow sensor array mounted on the surface of the wing is proposed. A back-propagation neural network is used to model the coupling relationship between readings of the sensor array and aerodynamic parameters. Two different sensor arrangements are tested in wind tunnel experiments and dependence of the system performance on the sensor arrangement is analyzed.

  11. Integrated flow field (IFF) structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pien, Shyhing M. (Inventor); Warshay, Marvin (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present disclosure relates in part to a flow field structure comprising a hydrophilic part and a hydrophobic part communicably attached to each other via a connecting interface. The present disclosure further relates to electrochemical cells comprising the aforementioned flow fields.

  12. Evaluation of aerodynamic and rolling resistances in mountain-bike field conditions.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, William M; Rogier, Simon; Reiser, Raoul F

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic and rolling resistances are the two major resistances that affect road cyclists on level ground. Because of reduced speeds and markedly different tyre-ground interactions, rolling resistance could be more influential in mountain biking than road cycling. The aims of this study were to quantify 1) aerodynamic resistance of mountain-bike cyclists in the seated position and 2) rolling resistances of two types of mountain-bike tyre (smooth and knobby) in three field surfaces (road, sand and grass) with two pressure inflations (200 and 400 kPa). Mountain-bike cyclists have an effective frontal area (product of projected frontal area and drag coefficient) of 0.357 ± 0.023 m², with the mean aerodynamic resistance representing 8-35% of the total resistance to cyclists' motion depending on the magnitude of the rolling resistance. The smooth tyre had 21 ± 15% less rolling resistance than the knobby tyre. Field surface and inflation pressure also affected rolling resistance. These results indicate that aerodynamic resistance influences mountain-biking performance, even with lower speeds than road cycling. Rolling resistance is increased in mountain biking by factors such as tyre type, surface condition and inflation pressure that may also alter performance.

  13. Minnowbrook VI: 2009 Workshop on Flow Physics and Control for Internal and External Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John E.; Povinelli, Louis A.; Gostelow, J. Paul; Glauser, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Topics covered include: Flow Physics and control for Internal and External Aerodynamics (not in TOC...starts on pg13); Breaking CFD Bottlenecks in Gas-Turbine Flow-Path Design; Streamwise Vortices on the Convex Surfaces of Circular Cylinders and Turbomachinery Blading; DNS and Embedded DNS as Tools for Investigating Unsteady Heat Transfer Phenomena in Turbines; Cavitation, Flow Structure and Turbulence in the Tip Region of a Rotor Blade; Development and Application of Plasma Actuators for Active Control of High-Speed and High Reynolds Number Flows; Active Flow Control of Lifting Surface With Flap-Current Activities and Future Directions; Closed-Loop Control of Vortex Formation in Separated Flows; Global Instability on Laminar Separation Bubbles-Revisited; Very Large-Scale Motions in Smooth and Rough Wall Boundary Layers; Instability of a Supersonic Boundary-Layer With Localized Roughness; Active Control of Open Cavities; Amplitude Scaling of Active Separation Control; U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory's Need for Flow Physics and Control With Applications Involving Aero-Optics and Weapon Bay Cavities; Some Issues Related to Integrating Active Flow Control With Flight Control; Active Flow Control Strategies Using Surface Pressure Measurements; Reduction of Unsteady Forcing in a Vaned, Contra-Rotating Transonic Turbine Configuration; Active Flow Control Stator With Coanda Surface; Controlling Separation in Turbomachines; Flow Control on Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoils Using Vortex Generator Jets; Reduced Order Modeling Incompressible Flows; Study and Control of Flow Past Disk, and Circular and Rectangular Cylinders Aligned in the Flow; Periodic Forcing of a Turbulent Axisymmetric Wake; Control of Vortex Breakdown in Critical Swirl Regime Using Azimuthal Forcing; External and Turbomachinery Flow Control Working Group; Boundary Layers, Transitions and Separation; Efficiency Considerations in Low Pressure Turbines; Summary of Conference; and Final Plenary Session

  14. Hydrodynamic and Aerodynamic Tests of Models of Flying-boat Hulls Designed Flow Aerodynamic Drag - NACA Models 74, 74-A, and 75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truscott, Starr; Parkinson, J B; Ebert, John W , Jr; Valentine, E Floyd

    1938-01-01

    The present tests illustrate how the aerodynamic drag of a flying boat hull may be reduced by following closely the form of a low drag aerodynamic body and the manner in which the extent of the aerodynamic refinement is limited by poorer hydrodynamic performance. This limit is not sharply defined but is first evidenced by an abnormal flow of water over certain parts of the form accompanied by a sharp increase in resistance. In the case of models 74-A and 75, the resistance (sticking) occurs only at certain combinations of speed, load, and trim and can be avoided by proper control of the trim at high water speeds. Model 75 has higher water resistance at very high speeds than does model 74-A. With constant speed propellers and high takeoff speeds, it appears that the form of model 75 would give slightly better takeoff performance. Model 74-A, however, has lower aerodynamic drag than does model 75 for the same volume of hull.

  15. Recent advances in applying Free Vortex Sheet theory to the estimation of vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Schoonover, W. E., Jr.; Frink, N. T.

    1982-01-01

    Free Vortex Sheet theory has been applied to a variety of configurations for the estimation of three-dimensional pressure distributions for wings developing separation-induced leading-edge vortex flows. Correlations with experiment show reasonable estimates for the effects of compressibility, side-slip, side edges, swept-wing blast-induced loads, and leading-edge vortex flaps. Theoretical studies expand upon these correlations to show general aerodynamic trends. Consideration is also given to simple, yet effective techniques which expedite convergence and therefore reduce computational expense.

  16. High Reynolds Number Hybrid Laminar Flow Control (HLFC) Flight Experiment. Report 2; Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the aerodynamic design of an experimental hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) wing panel intended for use on a Boeing 757 airplane to provide a facility for flight research on high Reynolds number HLFC and to demonstrate practical HLFC operation on a full-scale commercial transport airplane. The design consists of revised wing leading edge contour designed to produce a pressure distribution favorable to laminar flow, definition of suction flow requirements to laminarize the boundary layer, provisions at the inboard end of the test panel to prevent attachment-line boundary layer transition, and a Krueger leading edge flap that serves both as a high lift device and as a shield to prevent insect accretion on the leading edge when the airplane is taking off or landing.

  17. A fast and accurate method to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2014-12-01

    A quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic flows. This method is suitable for offshore wind turbine design software as it is a very accurate and computationally reasonably cheap method. This study shows the results for a NACA 0012 airfoil. The two applied solvers converge to the experimental values when the grid is refined. We also show that in separation the eigenvalues remain positive thus avoiding the Goldstein singularity at separation. In 3D we show a flow over a dent in which separation occurs. A rotating flat plat is used to show the applicability of the method for rotating flows. The shown capabilities of the method indicate that the quasi-simultaneous interaction method is suitable for design methods for offshore wind turbine blades.

  18. A comparative numerical analysis of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic sound generation by vortex disturbances in homentropic constant shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, Jan-Niklas Oberlack, Martin; Chagelishvili, George; Khujadze, George; Tevzadze, Alexander

    2015-12-15

    Aerodynamic sound generation in shear flows is investigated in the light of the breakthrough in hydrodynamics stability theory in the 1990s, where generic phenomena of non-normal shear flow systems were understood. By applying the thereby emerged short-time/non-modal approach, the sole linear mechanism of wave generation by vortices in shear flows was captured [G. D. Chagelishvili, A. Tevzadze, G. Bodo, and S. S. Moiseev, “Linear mechanism of wave emergence from vortices in smooth shear flows,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3178-3181 (1997); B. F. Farrell and P. J. Ioannou, “Transient and asymptotic growth of two-dimensional perturbations in viscous compressible shear flow,” Phys. Fluids 12, 3021-3028 (2000); N. A. Bakas, “Mechanism underlying transient growth of planar perturbations in unbounded compressible shear flow,” J. Fluid Mech. 639, 479-507 (2009); and G. Favraud and V. Pagneux, “Superadiabatic evolution of acoustic and vorticity perturbations in Couette flow,” Phys. Rev. E 89, 033012 (2014)]. Its source is the non-normality induced linear mode-coupling, which becomes efficient at moderate Mach numbers that is defined for each perturbation harmonic as the ratio of the shear rate to its characteristic frequency. Based on the results by the non-modal approach, we investigate a two-dimensional homentropic constant shear flow and focus on the dynamical characteristics in the wavenumber plane. This allows to separate from each other the participants of the dynamical processes — vortex and wave modes — and to estimate the efficacy of the process of linear wave-generation. This process is analyzed and visualized on the example of a packet of vortex modes, localized in both, spectral and physical, planes. Further, by employing direct numerical simulations, the wave generation by chaotically distributed vortex modes is analyzed and the involved linear and nonlinear processes are identified. The generated acoustic field is anisotropic in the wavenumber

  19. A Numerical Methodology for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization in Turbulent Flow Enabling Large Geometric Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osusky, Lana Maria

    The increase in the availability and power of computational resources over the last fifteen years has contributed to the development of many different types of numerical optimization methods and created a large area of research focussed on numerical aerodynamic shape optimization and, more recently, high-fidelity multidisciplinary optimization. Numerical optimization provides dramatic savings when designing new aerodynamic configurations, as it allows the designer to focus more on the development of a well-posed design problem rather than on performing an exhaustive search of the design space via the traditional cut-and-try approach, which is expensive and time-consuming. It also reduces the dependence on the designer's experience and intuition, which can potentially lead to more optimal designs. Numerical optimization methods are particularly attractive when designing novel, unconventional aircraft for which the designer has no pre-existing studies or experiences from which to draw; these methods have the potential to discover new designs that might never have been arrived at without optimization. This work presents an extension of an efficient gradient-based numerical aerodynamic shape optimization algorithm to enable optimization in turbulent flow. The algorithm includes an integrated geometry parameterization and mesh movement scheme, an efficient parallel Newton-Krylov-Schur algorithm for solving the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations, which are fully coupled with the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model, and a discrete-adjoint gradient evaluation. In order to develop an efficient methodology for optimization in turbulent flows, the viscous and turbulent terms in the ii governing equations were linearized by hand. Additionally, a set of mesh refinement tools was introduced in order to obtain both an acceptable control volume mesh and a sufficiently refined computational mesh from an initial coarse mesh. A series of drag minimization

  20. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Performance of Two Choked-Flow Inlets Under Static Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. A.; Abbott, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of two choking flow inlets under static conditions. One inlet choked the flow in the cowl throat by an axial translation of the inlet centerbody. The other inlet employed a translating grid of airfoils to choke the flow. Both inlets were sized to fit a 13.97 cm diameter fan with a design weight flow of 2.49 kg/sec. The inlets were operated in both the choked and unchoked modes over a range of weight flows. Measurements were made of inlet pressure recovery, flow distortion, surface static pressure distribution, and fan noise suppression. Choking of the translating centerbody inlet reduced blade passing frequency noise by 29 db while yielding a total pressure recovery of 0.985. Noise reductions were also measured at 1/3-octave band center frequencies of 2500, 5000, and 20,000 cycles. The translating grid inlet gave a total pressure recovery of 0.968 when operating close to the choking weight flow. However, an intermittent high intensity noise source was encountered with this inlet that precluded an accurate measurement of inlet noise suppression.

  1. Analysis of Low Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2014-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft's swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  2. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar-Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2014-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft's swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  3. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar-Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong

    2013-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft s swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First AIAA CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  4. Aerodynamic performance of a 1.25-pressure-ratio axial-flow fan stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Steinke, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Aerodynamic design parameters and overall and blade-element performances of a 1.25-pressure-ratio fan stage are reported. Detailed radial surveys were made over the stable operating flow range at rotative speeds from 70 to 120 percent of design speed. At design speed, the measured stage peak efficiency of 0.872 occurred at a weight flow of 34.92 kilograms per second and a pressure ratio of 1.242. Stage stall margin is about 20 percent based on the peak efficiency and stall conditions. The overall peak efficiency for the rotor was 0.911. The overall stage performance showed no significant change when the stators were positioned at 1, 2, or 4 chords downstream of the rotor.

  5. Results of test MA22 in the NASA/LaRC 31-inch CFHT on an 0.010-scale model (32-0) of the space shuttle configuration 3 to determine RCS jet flow field interaction, volume 1. [wind tunnel tests for interactions of aerodynamic heating on jet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanipe, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted in the Langley Research Center 31-inch Continuous Flow Hypersonic Wind Tunnel from May 6, 1975 through June 3, 1975. The primary objectives of this test were the following: (1) to study the ability of the wind tunnel to repeat, on a run-to-run basis, data taken for identical configurations to determine if errors in repeatability could have a significant effect on jet interaction data, (2) to determine the effect of aerodynamic heating of the scale model on jet interaction, (3) to investigate the effects of elevon and body flap deflections on jet interaction, (4) to determine if the effects from jets fired separately along different axes can be added to equal the effects of the jets fired simultaneously (super position effects), (5) to study multiple jet effects, and (6) to investigate area ratio effects, i.e., the effect on jet interaction measurements of using wind tunnel nozzles with different area ratios in the same location. The model used in the test was a .010-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Configuration 3. The test was conducted at Mach 10.3 and a dynamic pressure of 150 psf. RCS chamber pressure was varied to simulate free flight dynamic pressures of 5, 7.5, 10, and 20 psf.

  6. Classical Aerodynamic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A collection of papers on modern theoretical aerodynamics is presented. Included are theories of incompressible potential flow and research on the aerodynamic forces on wing and wing sections of aircraft and on airship hulls.

  7. Special opportunities in helicopter aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccroskey, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Aerodynamic research relating to modern helicopters includes the study of three dimensional, unsteady, nonlinear flow fields. A selective review is made of some of the phenomenon that hamper the development of satisfactory engineering prediction techniques, but which provides a rich source of research opportunities: flow separations, compressibility effects, complex vortical wakes, and aerodynamic interference between components. Several examples of work in progress are given, including dynamic stall alleviation, the development of computational methods for transonic flow, rotor-wake predictions, and blade-vortex interactions.

  8. Unsteady transonic aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, D.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on unsteady transonic aerodynamics are presented. The topics addressed include: physical phenomena associated with unsteady transonic flows, basic equations for unsteady transonic flow, practical problems concerning aircraft, basic numerical methods, computational methods for unsteady transonic flows, application of transonic flow analysis to helicopter rotor problems, unsteady aerodynamics for turbomachinery aeroelastic applications, alternative methods for modeling unsteady transonic flows.

  9. Flow field interactions between two tandem cyclists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Nathan; Burton, David; Sheridan, John; Thompson, Mark; Brown, Nicholas A. T.

    2016-12-01

    Aerodynamic drag is the primary resistive force acting on cyclists at racing speeds. Many events involve cyclists travelling in very close proximity. Previous studies have shown that interactions result in significant drag reductions for inline cyclists. However, the interaction between cyclist leg position (pedalling) and the vortical flow structures that contribute significantly to the drag on an isolated cyclist has not previously been quantified or described for tandem cyclists of varying separation. To this end, scale model cyclists were constructed for testing in a water channel for inline tandem configurations. Particle image velocimetry was used to capture time-averaged velocity fields around two tandem cyclists. Perhaps surprisingly, the wake of a trailing cyclist maintains strong similarity to the characteristic wake of a single cyclist despite a significant disturbance to the upstream flow. Together with streamwise velocity measurements through the wake and upstream of the trailing cyclist, this work supports previous findings, which showed that the trailing cyclist drag reduction is primarily due to upstream sheltering effects reducing the stagnation pressure on forward-facing surfaces.

  10. Ultra high bypass Nacelle aerodynamics inlet flow-through high angle of attack distortion test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Michael J.; Schweiger, Paul S.

    1992-01-01

    A flow-through inlet test program was conducted to evaluate inlet test methods and determine the impact of the fan on inlet separation when operating at large angles of attack. A total of 16 model configurations of approximately 1/6 scale were tested. A comparison of these flow-through results with powered data indicates the presence of the fan increased separation operation 3 degrees to 4 degrees over the flow through inlet. Rods and screens located at the fan face station, that redistribute the flow, achieved simulation of the powered-fan results for separation angle of attack. Concepts to reduce inlet distortion and increase angle of attack capability were also evaluated. Vortex generators located on the inlet surface increased inlet angle of attack capability up to 2 degrees and reduced inlet distortion in the separated region. Finally, a method of simulating the fan/inlet aerodynamic interaction using blockage sizing method has been defined. With this method, a static blockage device used with a flow-through model will approximate the same inlet onset of separation angle of attack and distortion pattern that would be obtained with an inlet model containing a powered fan.

  11. Newton-Krylov-Schwarz methods for aerodynamics problems : compressible and incompressible flows on unstructured grids.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaushik, D. K.; Keyes, D. E.; Smith, B. F.

    1999-02-24

    We review and extend to the compressible regime an earlier parallelization of an implicit incompressible unstructured Euler code [9], and solve for flow over an M6 wing in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic regimes. While the parallelization philosophy of the compressible case is identical to the incompressible, we focus here on the nonlinear and linear convergence rates, which vary in different physical regimes, and on comparing the performance of currently important computational platforms. Multiple-scale problems should be marched out at desired accuracy limits, and not held hostage to often more stringent explicit stability limits. In the context of inviscid aerodynamics, this means evolving transient computations on the scale of the convective transit time, rather than the acoustic transit time, or solving steady-state problems with local CFL numbers approaching infinity. Whether time-accurate or steady, we employ Newton's method on each (pseudo-) timestep. The coupling of analysis with design in aerodynamic practice is another motivation for implicitness. Design processes that make use of sensitivity derivatives and the Hessian matrix require operations with the Jacobian matrix of the state constraints (i.e., of the governing PDE system); if the Jacobian is available for design, it may be employed with advantage in a nonlinearly implicit analysis, as well.

  12. Method for obtaining aerodynamic data on hypersonic configurations with scramjet exhaust flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartill, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    A hypersonic wind tunnel test method for obtaining credible aerodynamic data on a complete hypersonic vehicle (generic X-24c) with scramjet exhaust flow simulation is described. The general problems of simulating the scramjet exhaust as well as accounting for scramjet inlet flow and vehicle forces are analyzed, and candidate test methods are described and compared. The method selected as most useful makes use of a thrust-minus-drag flow-through balance with a completely metric model. Inlet flow is diverted by a fairing. The incremental effect of the fairing is determined in the testing of two reference models. The net thrust of the scramjet module is an input to be determined in large-scale module tests with scramjet combustion. Force accounting is described, and examples of force component levels are predicted. Compatibility of the test method with candidate wind tunnel facilities is described, and a preliminary model mechanical arrangement drawing is presented. The balance design and performance requirements are described in a detailed specification. Calibration procedures, model instrumentation, and a test plan for the model are outlined.

  13. Experimental Aerodynamic Derivatives of a Sinusoidally Oscillating Airfoil in Two-Dimensional Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halfman, Robert L

    1952-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the aerodynamic reactions on a symmetrical airfoil oscillating harmonically in a two-dimensional flow are presented and analyzed. Harmonic motions include pure pitch and pure translation, for several amplitudes and superimposed on an initial angle of attack, as well as combined pitch and translation. The apparatus and testing program are described briefly and the necessary theoretical background is presented. In general, the experimental results agree remarkably well with the theory, especially in the case of the pure motions. The net work per cycle for a motion corresponding to flutter is experimentally determined to be zero. Considerable consistent data for pure pitch were obtained from a search of available reference material, and several definite Reynolds number effects are evident.

  14. Shock Structure Analysis and Aerodynamics in a Weakly Ionized Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saeks, R.; Popovic, S.; Chow, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is analyzed using an electrofluid dynamics model composed of classical conservation laws and Gauss Law. A viscosity model is included to correctly model the spatial scale of the shock structure, and quasi-neutrality is not assumed. A detailed analysis of the structure of a shock wave propagating in a weakly ionized gas is presented, together with a discussion of the physics underlying the key features of the shock structure. A model for the flow behind a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is developed and used to analyze the effect of the ionization on the aerodynamics and performance of a two-dimensional hypersonic lifting body.

  15. Development of the method of an electrohydrodynamic force effect on a boundary layer for active control of aerodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, B. S.; Khomich, V. Yu.; Chernyshev, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    The results of investigations on the possibility of an electrohydrodynamic force effect on a gas flow implemented with the help of a barrier discharge are presented. A new method of controlling the laminar flow around a base with suppression of instabilities of the incoming flow due to electrohydrodynamic force action on the boundary layer near the forward edge of a swept wing is proposed. An efficient multidischarge actuator system is developed and created for active control of aerodynamic flows with induced-air-flow characteristics exceeding the world analogues.

  16. A knowledge-based approach to automated flow-field zoning for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1989-01-01

    An automated three-dimensional zonal grid generation capability for computational fluid dynamics is shown through the development of a demonstration computer program capable of automatically zoning the flow field of representative two-dimensional (2-D) aerodynamic configurations. The applicability of a knowledge-based programming approach to the domain of flow-field zoning is examined. Several aspects of flow-field zoning make the application of knowledge-based techniques challenging: the need for perceptual information, the role of individual bias in the design and evaluation of zonings, and the fact that the zoning process is modeled as a constructive, design-type task (for which there are relatively few examples of successful knowledge-based systems in any domain). Engineering solutions to the problems arising from these aspects are developed, and a demonstration system is implemented which can design, generate, and output flow-field zonings for representative 2-D aerodynamic configurations.

  17. The Effect of Break Edge Configuration on the Aerodynamics of Anti-Ice Jet Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, V.; Yildizay, H.; Aras, H.

    2015-05-01

    One of the components of a turboprop gas turbine engine is the Front Bearing Structure (FBS) which leads air into the compressor. FBS directly encounters with ambient air, as a consequence ice accretion may occur on its static vanes. There are several aerodynamic parameters which should be considered in the design of anti-icing system of FBS, such as diameter, position, exit angle of discharge holes, etc. This research focuses on the effects of break edge configuration over anti-ice jet flow. Break edge operation is a process which is applied to the hole in order to avoid sharp edges which cause high stress concentration. Numerical analyses and flow visualization test have been conducted. Four different break edge configurations were used for this investigation; without break edge, 0.35xD, 74xD, 0.87xD. Three mainstream flow conditions at the inlet of the channel are defined; 10m/s, 20 m/s and 40 m/s. Shear stresses are extracted from numerical analyses near the trailing edge of pressure surface where ice may occur under icing conditions. A specific flow visualization method was used for the experimental study. Vane surface near the trailing edge was dyed and thinner was injected into anti-ice jet flow in order to remove dye from the vane surface. Hence, film effect on the surface could be computed for each testing condition. Thickness of the dye removal area of each case was examined. The results show noticeable effects of break edge operation on jet flow, and the air film effectiveness decreases when mainstream inlet velocity decreases.

  18. Evaluating the catching performance of aerodynamic rain gauges through field comparisons and CFD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Michael; Colli, Matteo; Stagnaro, Mattia; Lanza, Luca; Quinn, Paul; Dutton, Mark; O'Donnell, Greg; Wilkinson, Mark; Black, Andrew; O'Connell, Enda

    2016-04-01

    observed in the vicinity of the collector, compared to the standard gauge shapes. Both the air velocity and the turbulent kinetic energy fields present structures that may improve the interception of particles by the aerodynamic gauge collector. To provide empirical validation, a field-based experimental campaign was undertaken at four UK research stations to compare the results of aerodynamic and conventional gauges, mounted in juxtaposition. The reference measurement is recorded using a rain gauge pit, as specified by the WMO. The results appear to demonstrate how the effect of the wind on rainfall measurements is influenced by the gauge shape and the mounting height. Significant undercatch is observed compared to the reference measurement. Aerodynamic gauges mounted on the ground catch more rainfall than juxtaposed straight-sided gauges, in most instances. This appears to provide some preliminary validation of the CFD model. The indication that an aerodynamic profile improves the gauge catching capability could be confirmed by tracking the hydrometeor trajectories with a Lagrangian method, based on the available set of airflows; and investigating time-dependent aerodynamic features by means of dedicated CFD simulations. Furthermore, wind-tunnel tests could be carried out to provide more robust physical validation of the CFD model.

  19. Flow visualization and unsteady aerodynamics in the flight of the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta

    PubMed Central

    Willmott, A. P.; Ellington, C. P.; Thomas, A. L. R.

    1997-01-01

    The aerodynamic mechanisms employed durng the flight of the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, have been investigated through smoke visualization studies with tethered moths. Details of the flow around the wings and of the overall wake structure were recorded as stereophotographs and high-speed video sequences. The changes in flow which accompanied increases in flight speed from 0.4 to 5.7 m s-1 were analysed. The wake consists of an alternating series of horizontal and vertical vortex rings which are generated by successive down- and upstrokes, respectively. The downstroke produces significantly more lift than the upstroke due to a leading-edge vortex which is stabilized by a radia flow moving out towards the wingtip. The leading-edge vortex grew in size with increasing forward flight velocity. Such a phenomenon is proposed as a likely mechanism for lift enhancement in many insect groups. During supination, vorticity is shed from the leading edge as postulated in the 'flex' mechanism. This vorticity would enhance upstroke lift if it was recaptured diring subsequent translation, but it is not. Instead, the vorticity is left behind and the upstroke circulation builds up slowly. A small jet provides additional thrust as the trailing edges approach at the end of the upstroke. The stereophotographs also suggest that the bound circulation may not be reversed between half strokes at the fastest flight speeds.

  20. Subsonic Aerodynamic Assessment of Vortex Flow Management Devices on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Applin, Zachary T.; Kemmerly, Guy T.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of leading-edge vortex management devices on the subsonic performance of a high-speed civil transport (HSCT) configuration was conducted in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.14 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 3.08 x 10 (sup 6) to 5.47 x 10 (sup 6). The test model was designed for a cruise Mach number of 2.7. During the subsonic high-lift phase of flight, vortical flow dominates the upper surface flow structure, and during vortex breakdown, this flow causes adverse pitch-up and a reduction of usable lift. The experimental results showed that the beneficial effects of small leading-edge vortex management devices located near the model reference center were insufficient to substantially affect the resulting aerodynamic forces and moments. However, devices located at or near the wiring apex region demonstrated potential for pitch control with little effect on overall lift.

  1. Novel method and apparatus for controlling aerodynamic performance of an operating axial-flow fluid machine

    SciTech Connect

    Langebrake, C.O.

    1980-07-11

    This invention is an improved method and arrangement for controlling the aerodynamic performance of an axial-flow fluid machine during its operation. In one form of the invention, the improved control is effected by providing the machine with at least one annular row of tandem airfoils, each consisting of a trailing vane and a fixed leading vane. The trailing vane and leading vane of the typical airfoil cooperatively define a gap whose width affects the boundary-layer flow over the airfoil and thus the gas-exist angle of the mainstream flow leaving the airfoil. The trailing vanes are affixed to a ring which is mounted for independent, arcuate movement about the axis of rotor rotation, so as to translate the trailing vanes circumferentially to alter the widths of their associated gaps. External means are provided for adjusting the position of the ring during operation of the machine in order to vary the gas-exist angles for the row of tandem airfoils and thereby control selected operating characteristics of the machine, such as suction volume or compression ratio.

  2. Elasto-Aerodynamics-Driven Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Scavenging Air-Flow Energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhua; Mu, Xiaojing; Wang, Xue; Gu, Alex Yuandong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2015-10-27

    Efficient scavenging the kinetic energy from air-flow represents a promising approach for obtaining clean, sustainable electricity. Here, we report an elasto-aerodynamics-driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on contact electrification. The reported TENG consists of a Kapton film with two Cu electrodes at each side, fixed on two ends in an acrylic fluid channel. The relationship between the TENG output power density and its fluid channel dimensions is systematically studied. TENG with a fluid channel size of 125 × 10 × 1.6 mm(3) delivers the maximum output power density of about 9 kW/m(3) under a loading resistance of 2.3 MΩ. Aero-elastic flutter effect explains the air-flow induced vibration of Kapton film well. The output power scales nearly linearly with parallel wiring of multiple TENGs. Connecting 10 TENGs in parallel gives an output power of 25 mW, which allows direct powering of a globe light. The TENG is also utilized to scavenge human breath induced air-flow energy to sustainably power a human body temperature sensor.

  3. Three-dimensional flow structure and aerodynamic loading on a revolving wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmann, Daniel J.; Visbal, Miguel R.; Orkwis, Paul D.

    2013-03-01

    A numerical study is conducted to examine the vortex structure and aerodynamic loading on a revolving wing in quiescent flow. A high-fidelity, implicit large eddy simulation technique is employed to simulate a revolving wing configuration consisting of a single, aspect-ratio-one rectangular plate extended out a distance of half a chord from the rotational axis at a fixed angle relative to the axis. Shortly after the onset of the motion, the rotating wing generates a coherent vortex system along the leading-edge. This vortex system remains attached throughout the motion for the range of Reynolds numbers explored, despite the unsteadiness and vortex breakdown observed at higher Reynolds numbers. The average and instantaneous wing loading also increases with Reynolds number. At a fixed Reynolds number, the attachment of the leading-edge vortex is also shown to be insensitive to the geometric angle of the wing. Additionally, the flow structure and forcing generated by a purely translating wing is investigated and compared with that of the revolving wing. Similar features are present at the inception of the motion, however, the two flows evolve very differently for the remainder of the maneuver. Comparisons of the revolving wing simulations with recent experimental particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements using a new PIV-like data reduction technique applied to the computational solution show very favorable agreement. The success of the data reduction technique demonstrates the need to compare computations and experiments of differing resolutions using similar data-analysis techniques.

  4. Particle and flow field holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trolinger, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The current status of particle field and flow field holography is examined, and the methods based on the principles of either class of imagery are described. Special consideration is given to the automated data reduction technology. Current applications of flow diagnostics, which can provide thousands of holograms during a one-day experiment, include NASA applications in wind tunnel holography, in a Laser Doppler Velocimeter, in holographic movies, and in an optical device for recording crystal growth at zero gravity, to be used in the Space Lab 3 shuttle mission scheduled for May 1985. Military applications of the flow diagnostics include the use of holographic tomography for visualizing flow fields around airborne structures, in wind tunnels, and in the analyses of rocket exhausts and gun ranges. The information provided by the particle sizing holography, concerning the size, shape, number, and velocity of particles and the records of the particle break-up phenomenon, can be used in various military field oriented and airborne applications and in meteorology and environment protection science.

  5. Evaluation of the Lattice-Boltzmann Equation Solver PowerFLOW for Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Luo, Li-Shi; Singer, Bart A.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A careful comparison of the performance of a commercially available Lattice-Boltzmann Equation solver (Power-FLOW) was made with a conventional, block-structured computational fluid-dynamics code (CFL3D) for the flow over a two-dimensional NACA-0012 airfoil. The results suggest that the version of PowerFLOW used in the investigation produced solutions with large errors in the computed flow field; these errors are attributed to inadequate resolution of the boundary layer for reasons related to grid resolution and primitive turbulence modeling. The requirement of square grid cells in the PowerFLOW calculations limited the number of points that could be used to span the boundary layer on the wing and still keep the computation size small enough to fit on the available computers. Although not discussed in detail, disappointing results were also obtained with PowerFLOW for a cavity flow and for the flow around a generic helicopter configuration.

  6. Aerodynamic Performance of an Active Flow Control Configuration Using Unstructured-Grid RANS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Viken, Sally A.

    2001-01-01

    This research is focused on assessing the value of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methodology for active flow control applications. An experimental flow control database exists for a TAU0015 airfoil, which is a modification of a NACA0015 airfoil. The airfoil has discontinuities at the leading edge due to the implementation of a fluidic actuator and aft of mid chord on the upper surface. This paper documents two- and three-dimensional computational results for the baseline wing configuration (no control) with tile experimental results. The two-dimensional results suggest that the mid-chord discontinuity does not effect the aerodynamics of the wing and can be ignored for more efficient computations. The leading-edge discontinuity significantly affects tile lift and drag; hence, the integrity of the leading-edge notch discontinuity must be maintained in the computations to achieve a good match with the experimental data. The three-dimensional integrated performance results are in good agreement with the experiments inspite of some convergence and grid resolution issues.

  7. Comparison of aerodynamic characteristics of pentagonal and hexagonal shaped bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Md. Naimul; Katsuchi, Hiroshi; Yamada, Hitoshi; Nishio, Mayuko

    2016-07-01

    Aerodynamics of the long-span bridge deck should be well understood for an efficient design of the bridge system. For practical bridges various deck shapes are being recommended and adopted, yet not all of their aerodynamic behaviors are well interpreted. In the present study, a numerical investigation was carried out to explore the aerodynamic characteristics of pentagonal and hexagonal shaped bridge decks. A relative comparison of steady state aerodynamic responses was made and the flow field was critically analyzed for better understanding the aerodynamic responses. It was found that the hexagonal shaped bridge deck has better aerodynamic characteristics as compared to the pentagonal shaped bridge deck.

  8. Basic aerodynamic research facility for comparative studies of flow diagnostic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Gartrell, Luther R.; Stainback, P. Calvin

    1987-01-01

    Current flow diagnostic research efforts are focusing on higher order flow field data bases, such as those generated by laser velocimetry (LV), hot-wire anemometry, and multi-hole pressure probes. Recent low-speed comparisons of results obtained with LV and hot wires have revealed strengths and weaknesses of each instrument. A seeding study will be initiated to determine particulate tracking ability.

  9. Supersonic reacting internal flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip

    1989-01-01

    The national program to develop a trans-atmospheric vehicle has kindled a renewed interest in the modeling of supersonic reacting flows. A supersonic combustion ramjet, or scramjet, has been proposed to provide the propulsion system for this vehicle. The development of computational techniques for modeling supersonic reacting flow fields, and the application of these techniques to an increasingly difficult set of combustion problems are studied. Since the scramjet problem has been largely responsible for motivating this computational work, a brief history is given of hypersonic vehicles and their propulsion systems. A discussion is also given of some early modeling efforts applied to high speed reacting flows. Current activities to develop accurate and efficient algorithms and improved physical models for modeling supersonic combustion is then discussed. Some new problems where computer codes based on these algorithms and models are being applied are described.

  10. Aerodynamic sound generation due to vortex-aerofoil interaction. Part 2: Analysis of the acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parasarathy, R.; Karamcheti, K.

    1972-01-01

    The Lighthill method was the basic procedure used to analyze the sound field associated with a vortex of modified strength interacting with an airfoil. A free vortex interacting with an airfoil in uniform motion was modeled in order to determine the sound field due to all the acoustic sources, not only on the airfoil surfaces (dipoles), but also the ones distributed on the perturbed flow field (quadrupoles) due to the vortex-airfoil interaction. Because inviscid flow is assumed in the study of the interaction, the quadrupoles considered in the perturbed flow field are entirely due to an unsteady flow field. The effects of airfoil thickness on the second radiation are examined by using a symmetric Joukowski airfoil for the vortex-airfoil interaction. Sound radiation in a plane, far field simplification, and computation of the sound field are discussed.

  11. Nonstationary flow about a wing-aileron-tab combination including aerodynamic balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodorsen, Theodore; Garrick, I E

    1942-01-01

    This paper presents a continuation of the work published in Technical Report no. 496. The results of that paper have been extended to include the effect of aerodynamic balance and the effect of a tab added to the aileron. The aerodynamic coefficients are presented in a form convenient for application to the flutter problem.

  12. Computational study of the aerodynamics and control by blowing of asymmetric vortical flows over delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Ken

    1991-01-01

    Some of the work is described which was done in a study of the flow field produced by tangential leading edge blowing on a 60 deg. delta wing. The flow is studied computationally by solving the Thin Layer Navier-Stokes equations. Steady state flow fields are calculated for various angles of attack and yaw, with and without the presence of tangential leading edge blowing. The effectiveness of blowing as a rolling moment control mechanism to extend the envelope of controllability is illustrated at pre- and post-stall angles of attack. The numerical grid is generated using algebraic grid generation and various interpolation and blending techniques. The jet emanates from a slot with linearly varying thickness and is introduced into the flow field using the concept of an actuator plane, thereby not requiring resolution of the jet slot geometry. The Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model is used to provide turbulent closure. The computational results are compared with those of experiments.

  13. Advanced Small Perturbation Potential Flow Theory for Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced small perturbation (ASP) potential flow theory has been developed to improve upon the classical transonic small perturbation (TSP) theories that have been used in various computer codes. These computer codes are typically used for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses in the nonlinear transonic flight regime. The codes exploit the simplicity of stationary Cartesian meshes with the movement or deformation of the configuration under consideration incorporated into the solution algorithm through a planar surface boundary condition. The new ASP theory was developed methodically by first determining the essential elements required to produce full-potential-like solutions with a small perturbation approach on the requisite Cartesian grid. This level of accuracy required a higher-order streamwise mass flux and a mass conserving surface boundary condition. The ASP theory was further developed by determining the essential elements required to produce results that agreed well with Euler solutions. This level of accuracy required mass conserving entropy and vorticity effects, and second-order terms in the trailing wake boundary condition. Finally, an integral boundary layer procedure, applicable to both attached and shock-induced separated flows, was incorporated for viscous effects. The resulting ASP potential flow theory, including entropy, vorticity, and viscous effects, is shown to be mathematically more appropriate and computationally more accurate than the classical TSP theories. The formulaic details of the ASP theory are described fully and the improvements are demonstrated through careful comparisons with accepted alternative results and experimental data. The new theory has been used as the basis for a new computer code called ASP3D (Advanced Small Perturbation - 3D), which also is briefly described with representative results.

  14. Importance of Aerodynamic Resistance to Water Use Efficiency in Three Conifers under Field Conditions 1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, William K.

    1980-01-01

    The quantitative importance of aerodynamic resistance to H2O vapor and CO2 exchange was determined for shoots from saplings of three conifers (Abies lasiocarpa [Hook] Nutt., Pinus contorta Dougl., Juniperus communis L.) under natural conditions in the field. A combination of relatively low stomatal resistances (<300 seconds per centimeter) and low wind speeds (<30 centimeters per second) led to substantial contributions of the aerodynamic resistance (Rwva) to water use efficiency (WUE = photosynthesis/transpiration) for all three species. For A. lasiocarpa, transpiration was calculated to be 44% less and photosynthesis 17% less due to the presence of Rwva, which led to a predicted increase in WUE of 57% compared to the calculated WUE when Rwva was assumed negligible. Similar increases in WUE were computed for P. contorta (48%) with somewhat smaller values for J. communis (34%). These results are discussed in terms of the estimated importance of Rwva on water and photosynthetic relations of plants that have relatively low stomatal resistances and grow in microhabitats with low winds. PMID:16661128

  15. Fiber-optic-based laser vapor screen flow visualization system for aerodynamic research in larger scale subsonic and transonic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Inenaga, Andrew S.

    1994-01-01

    Laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization systems that are fiber-optic based were developed and installed for aerodynamic research in the Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel and the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel. Fiber optics are used to deliver the laser beam through the plenum shell that surrounds the test section of each facility and to the light-sheet-generating optics positioned in the ceiling window of the test section. Water is injected into the wind tunnel diffuser section to increase the relative humidity and promote condensation of the water vapor in the flow field about the model. The condensed water vapor is then illuminated with an intense sheet of laser light to reveal features of the flow field. The plenum shells are optically sealed; therefore, video-based systems are used to observe and document the flow field. Operational experience shows that the fiber-optic-based systems provide safe, reliable, and high-quality off-surface flow visualization in smaller and larger scale subsonic and transonic wind tunnels. The design, the installation, and the application of the Langley Research Center (LaRC) LVS flow visualization systems in larger scale wind tunnels are highlighted. The efficiency of the fiber optic LVS systems and their insensitivity to wind tunnel vibration, the tunnel operating temperature and pressure variations, and the airborne contaminants are discussed.

  16. The aerodynamic performance of several flow control devices for internal flow systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, W. T.; Wettlaufer, B. M.; Mort, K. W.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental reseach and development program was undertaken to develop and document new flow-control devices for use in the major modifications to the 40 by 80 Foot wind tunnel at Ames Research Center. These devices, which are applicable to other facilities as well, included grid-type and quasi-two-dimensional flow straighteners, louver panels for valving, and turning-vane cascades with net turning angles from 0 deg to 90 deg. The tests were conducted at model scale over a Reynolds number range from 2 x 100,000 to 17 x 100,000, based on chord. The results showed quantitatively the performance benefits of faired, low-blockage, smooth-surface straightener systems, and the advantages of curved turning-vanes with hinge-line gaps sealed and a preferred chord-to-gap ratio between 2.5 and 3.0 for 45 deg or 90 deg turns.

  17. Numerical and experimental investigation on aerodynamic performance of small axial flow fan with hollow blade root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhang; Jin, Yingzi; Huashu, Dou; Yuzhen, Jin

    2013-10-01

    To reduce the influence of adverse flow conditions at the fan hub and improve fan aerodynamic performance, a modification of conventional axial fan blades with numerical and experimental investigation is presented. Hollow blade root is manufactured near the hub. The numerical and experimental results show that hollow blade root has some effect on the static performance. Static pressure of the modified fan is generally the same with that of the datum fan, while, the efficiency curve of the modified fan has a different trend with that of the datum fan. The highest efficiency of the modified fan is 10% greater than that of the datum fan. The orthogonal experimental results of fan noise show that hollow blade root is a feasible method of reducing fan noise, and the maximum value of noise reduction is about 2 dB. The factors affecting the noise reduction of hollow blade root are in the order of importance as follows: hollow blade margin, hollow blade height and hollow blade width. The much smoother pressure distribution of the modified fan than that of the datum fan is the main mechanism of noise reduction of hollow blade root. The research results will provide the proof of the parameter optimization and the structure design for high performance and low noise small axial fans.

  18. Aerodynamic roughness measured in the field and simulated in a wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Robert; Greeley, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluates how well values of aerodynamic surface roughness, z sub 0, measured over scale models in wind tunnels correlate with values of z sub 0 measured at full scale in the field. A field experiment was conducted in which values of z sub 0 and u* (wind friction speed) were measured over three arrays of non-erodible roughness elements on a dry lake bed. Wind profiles were measured by ten anemometers on a 15 m mast under thermally neutral atmospheric conditions. Values of z sub 0 increased from .00014 m (dry lake bed only) to .026 m with increasing roughness element density. The three roughness element arrays were simulated at 1/10 and 1/20 scale in an open-circuit atmospheric boundary-layer wind tunnel. Velocities were measured with a boundary-layer pitot-tube rake from the same relative position within the scale model arrays as the anemometers were relative to the field arrays. Each array at each scale was sampled three times at five freestream velocities. Average values of z sub 0 for each model array at each scale were compared with full-scale values of z sub 0 obtained in the field. The field vs. wind tunnel correspondence of z sub 0 is found to be z sub 0 field = 0.2661 x (z sub(0 model) x scale(exp -1))exp .8159.

  19. Improvement of aerodynamic characteristics of a thick airfoil with a vortex cell in sub- and transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, Sergey; Baranov, Paul; Popov, Igor; Sudakov, Alexander; Usachov, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    The modified SST model (2005) is verified using Rodi- Leschziner-Isaev's approach and the multiblock computational technologies are validated in the VP2/3 code on different-structure overlapping grids by comparing the numerical predictions with the experimental data on transonic flow around an NACA0012 airfoil at an angle of attack of 4o for M=0.7 and Re=4×106. It is proved that the aerodynamic characteristics of a thick (20% of the chord) MQ airfoil mounted at an angle of attack of 2o for Re=107 and over the Mach number range 0.3-0.55 are significantly improved because an almost circular small-size (0.12) vortex cell with a defined volumetric flow rate coefficient of 0.007 during slot suction has been located on the upper airfoil section and an intense trapped vortex has been formed in it. A detailed analysis of buffeting within the self-oscillatory regime of flow around the MQ airfoil with a vortex cell has demonstrated the periodic changes in local and integral characteristics; the lift and the aerodynamic efficiency remain quite high, but inferior to the similar characteristics at M=0.55. It is found that the vortex cell at M=0.7 is inactive, and the aerodynamic characteristics of the MQ airfoil with a vortex cell are close to those of a smooth airfoil without a cell.

  20. Parallel CFD Algorithms for Aerodynamical Flow Solvers on Unstructured Meshes. Parts 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD) has requested my participation in the lecture series entitled Parallel Computing in Computational Fluid Dynamics to be held at the von Karman Institute in Brussels, Belgium on May 15-19, 1995. In addition, a request has been made from the US Coordinator for AGARD at the Pentagon for NASA Ames to hold a repetition of the lecture series on October 16-20, 1995. I have been asked to be a local coordinator for the Ames event. All AGARD lecture series events have attendance limited to NATO allied countries. A brief of the lecture series is provided in the attached enclosure. Specifically, I have been asked to give two lectures of approximately 75 minutes each on the subject of parallel solution techniques for the fluid flow equations on unstructured meshes. The title of my lectures is "Parallel CFD Algorithms for Aerodynamical Flow Solvers on Unstructured Meshes" (Parts I-II). The contents of these lectures will be largely review in nature and will draw upon previously published work in this area. Topics of my lectures will include: (1) Mesh partitioning algorithms. Recursive techniques based on coordinate bisection, Cuthill-McKee level structures, and spectral bisection. (2) Newton's method for large scale CFD problems. Size and complexity estimates for Newton's method, modifications for insuring global convergence. (3) Techniques for constructing the Jacobian matrix. Analytic and numerical techniques for Jacobian matrix-vector products, constructing the transposed matrix, extensions to optimization and homotopy theories. (4) Iterative solution algorithms. Practical experience with GIVIRES and BICG-STAB matrix solvers. (5) Parallel matrix preconditioning. Incomplete Lower-Upper (ILU) factorization, domain-decomposed ILU, approximate Schur complement strategies.

  1. The Aeroacoustics and Aerodynamics of High-Speed Coanda Devices, Part 2: Effects of Modifications for Flow Control and Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, P. W.; Smith, C.

    1997-12-01

    The paper describes two studies of the effects of flow control devices on the aerodynamics and aeroacoustics of a high-speed Coanda flow that is formed when a supersonic jet issues from a radial nozzle and adheres to a tulip-shaped body of revolution. Shadowgraphy and other flow-visualization techniques are used to reveal the various features of the complex flow fields. The acoustic characteristics are obtained from far- and near-field measurements with an array of microphones in an anechoic chamber. First the effects of incorporating a step between the annular exit slot and the Coanda surface are investigated. The step is incorporated to ensure that the breakaway pressure is raised to a level well above the maximum operating pressure. It substantially increases the complexity of the flow field and acoustic characteristics. In particular, it promotes the generation of two groups of discrete tones. A theoretical model based on a self-generated feedback loop is proposed to explain how these tones are generated. The second study investigates the effects of replacing the annular exit slot with a saw-toothed one with the aim of eliminating the discrete tones and thereby substantially reducing the level of noise generated.

  2. Aerodynamic measurements of methyl bromide volatilization from tarped and nontarped fields

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, M.S.; McChesney, M.M.; Woodrow, J.E.; Seiber, J.N.

    1995-07-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) is used extensively in agriculture as a soil fumigant and there is growing concern over the role it may play in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Methyl bromide is applied using various techniques and very little is known about how much of the applied fumigant volatilizes into the atmosphere after the application. This field study was designed to estimate the post-application methyl bromide volatilization loss rates from two different application practices. The fields were approximately 6 km apart in Monterey County, California, and were treated in conformity with local practices as of 1992. The MeBr was injected at a depth of 25 to 30 cm. One field was covered simultaneously with a high-barrier plastic film tarp during the application, and the other was left uncovered, but the furrows made by the injection shanks were bedded over. Volatilization fluxes were estimated using an aerodynamic-gradient technique immediately following the completion of the application process and continued for 9 d for the tarped field and 6 d for the nontarped field. The cumulative volatilization losses from the tarped field were 22% of the nominal application within the first 5 d of the experiment and about 32% of the nominal application within 9 d including the one day after the tarp was removed on Day 8 after application. In contrast, the nontarped field lost 89% of the nominal application by volatilization in 5 d. The volatilization rate from the tarped field was shown to be significantly lower than the nontarped field at a 95% confidence level. 43 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Aerodynamic forces and flow structures of the leading edge vortex on a flapping wing considering ground effect.

    PubMed

    Van Truong, Tien; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Min Jun; Yoon, Kwang Joon; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide an insight into the aerodynamic performance of the beetle during takeoff, which has been estimated in previous investigations. We employed a scaled-up electromechanical model flapping wing to measure the aerodynamic forces and the three-dimensional flow structures on the flapping wing. The ground effect on the unsteady forces and flow structures were also characterized. The dynamically scaled wing model could replicate the general stroke pattern of the beetle's hind wing kinematics during takeoff flight. Two wing kinematic models have been studied to examine the influences of wing kinematics on unsteady aerodynamic forces. In the first model, the angle of attack is asymmetric and varies during the translational motion, which is the flapping motion of the beetle's hind wing. In the second model, the angle of attack is constant during the translational motion. The instantaneous aerodynamic forces were measured for four strokes during the beetle's takeoff by the force sensor attached at the wing base. Flow visualization provided a general picture of the evolution of the three-dimensional leading edge vortex (LEV) on the beetle hind wing model. The LEV is stable during each stroke, and increases radically from the root to the tip, forming a leading-edge spiral vortex. The force measurement results show that the vertical force generated by the hind wing is large enough to lift the beetle. For the beetle hind wing kinematics, the total vertical force production increases 18.4% and 8.6% for the first and second strokes, respectively, due to the ground effect. However, for the model with a constant angle of attack during translation, the vertical force is reduced during the first stroke. During the third and fourth strokes, the ground effect is negligible for both wing kinematic patterns. This finding suggests that the beetle's flapping mechanism induces a ground effect that can efficiently lift its body from the ground during takeoff.

  4. Numerical and experimental study of unsteady flow field and vibration in radial inflow turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuz-Ihli, T.; Filsinger, D.; Schulz, A.; Wittig, S.

    2000-04-01

    The blades of turbocharger impellers are exposed to unsteady aerodynamic forces, which cause blade vibrations and may lead to failures. An indispensable requirement for a safe design of radial inflow turbines is a detailed knowledge of the exciting forces. Up to now, only a few investigations relating to unsteady aerodynamic forces in radial turbines have been presented. To give a detailed insight into the complex phenomena, a comprehensive research project was initiated at the Institut fuer Thermische Stroemungsmaschinen, at the University of Karlsruhe. A turbocharger test rig was installed in the high-pressure, high-temperature laboratory of the institute. The present paper gives a description of the test rig design and the measuring techniques. The flow field in a vaneless radial inflow turbine was analyzed using laser-Doppler anemometry. First results of unsteady flow field investigations in the turbine scroll and unsteady phase-resolved measurements of the flow field in the turbine rotor will be discussed. Moreover, results from finite element calculations analyzing frequencies and mode shapes are presented. As vibrations in turbines of turbochargers are assumed to be predominantly excited by unsteady aerodynamic forces, a method to predict the actual transient flow in a radial turbine utilizing the commercial Navier-Stokes solver TASCflow3d was developed. Results of the unsteady calculations are presented and comparisons with the measured unsteady flow field are made. As a major result, the excitation effect of the tongue region in a vaneless radial inflow turbine can be demonstrated.

  5. Visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James L.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1991-01-01

    Methods of automating the analysis and display of vector field topology in general and flow topology in particular are discussed. Two-dimensional vector field topology is reviewed as the basis for the examination of topology in three-dimensional separated flows. The use of tangent surfaces and clipping in visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows is addressed.

  6. Flow Field Classification Using Critical Point Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Paul S.; Williams, Sheila; Hahsler, Michael; Olinick, Eli V.

    2016-11-01

    Classification of flow fields according to topological similarities can help reveal features of the flow generation and evolution for bluff body flows, and characterize different swimming maneuvers in aquatic locomotion, to name a few. Rigorous classification can be challenging, however, especially when complex flows are distorted by measurement uncertainties or variable flow generating conditions. The present work uses critical points of the velocity field to characterize the global flow topology. Flow fields are compared by finding a best match of critical points in two flow fields based on topological and location characteristics of the critical points together with general point set distance measures. The similarity between the flow fields is quantified based on the matched critical points. Applying clustering algorithms to a set of flow fields with quantified similarity can then be used to group flows with similar characteristics. This approach has been applied to generic 2D flow fields constructed using potential flow results and is able to correctly identify similar flow fields even after large distortions (up to 20% of the vortex separation) have been applied to the flows. Support of NSF Grant Nos. 1115139 and 1557698, and the Lyle School of Engineering is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Comparison of Orbiter PRCS Plume Flow Fields Using CFD and Modified Source Flow Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochelle, Wm. C.; Kinsey, Robin E.; Reid, Ethan A.; Stuart, Phillip C.; Lumpkin, Forrest E.

    1997-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter will use Reaction Control System (RCS) jets for docking with the planned International Space Station (ISS). During approach and backout maneuvers, plumes from these jets could cause high pressure, heating, and thermal loads on ISS components. The object of this paper is to present comparisons of RCS plume flow fields used to calculate these ISS environments. Because of the complexities of 3-D plumes with variable scarf-angle and multi-jet combinations, NASA/JSC developed a plume flow-field methodology for all of these Orbiter jets. The RCS Plume Model (RPM), which includes effects of scarfed nozzles and dual jets, was developed as a modified source-flow engineering tool to rapidly generate plume properties and impingement environments on ISS components. This paper presents flow-field properties from four PRCS jets: F3U low scarf-angle single jet, F3F high scarf-angle single jet, DTU zero scarf-angle dual jet, and F1F/F2F high scarf-angle dual jet. The RPM results compared well with plume flow fields using four CFD programs: General Aerodynamic Simulation Program (GASP), Cartesian (CART), Unified Solution Algorithm (USA), and Reacting and Multi-phase Program (RAMP). Good comparisons of predicted pressures are shown with STS 64 Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) data.

  8. A title-gap flow model for use in aerodynamic loads assessment of space shuttle thermal protection system: Parallel gap faces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, D. L.; Newman, P. A.; Thames, F. C.; Melson, N. D.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of predicting aerodynamic loads on the insulating tiles of the space shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) is discussed and seen to require a method for predicting pressure and mass flux in the gaps between tiles. A mathematical model of the tile-gap flow is developed, based upon a slow viscous (Stokes) flow analysis, and is verified against experimental data. The tile-gap pressure field is derived from a solution of the two-dimensional Laplace equation; the mass-flux vector is then calculated from the pressure gradient. The means for incorporating this model into a lumped-parameter network analogy for porous-media flow is given. The means for incorporating this model into a lumped-parameter network analogy for porous-media flow is given. The flow model shows tile-gap mass flux to be very sensitive to the gap width indicating a need for coupling the TPS flow and tile displacement calculation. Analytical and experimental work to improve TPS flow predictions and a possible shuttle TPS hardware modification are recommended.

  9. The effect of prewhirl on the internal aerodynamics and performance of a mixed flow research centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, William B.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1987-01-01

    The internal three-dimensional steady and time-varying flow through the diffusing elements of a centrifugal impeller were investigated using a moderate scale, subsonic, mixed flow research compressor facility. The characteristics of the test facility which permit the measurement of internal flow conditions throughout the entire research compressor and radial diffuser for various operating conditions are described. Results are presented in the form of graphs and charts to cover a range of mass flow rates with inlet guide vane settings varying from minus 15 degrees to plus 45 degrees. The static pressure distributions in the compressor inlet section and on the impeller and exit diffuser vanes, as well as the overall pressure and temperature rise and mass flow rate, were measured and analyzed at each operating point to determine the overall performance as well as the detailed aerodynamics throughout the compressor.

  10. Aerodynamic measurements of methyl bromide volatilization from tarped and nontarped fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, M.S.; McChesney, M.M.; Woodrow, J.E.; Prueger, J.H.; Seiber, J.N.

    1995-01-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) is used extensively in agriculture as a soil fumigant and there is growing concern over the role it may play in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Methyl bromide is applied using various techniques and very little is known about how much of the applied fumigant volatilizes into the atmosphere after the application. This held study was designed to estimate the post-application methyl bromide volatilization loss rates from two different application practices. The fields were approximately 6 km apart in Monterey County, California, and were treated in conformity with local practices as of 1992. The MeBr was injected at a depth of 25 to 30 cm. One field was covered simultaneously with a high-barrier plastic film tarp during the application, and the other was left uncovered, but the furrows made by the injection shanks were bedded over. Volatilization fluxes were estimated using an aerodynamic-gradient technique immediately following the completion of the application process and continued for 9 d for the tarped held and 6 d for the nontarped field. The cumulative volatilization losses from the tarped field were 22% of the nominal application within the first 5 d of the experiment and about 32% of the nominal application within 9 d including the one day after the tarp was removed on Day 8 after application. In contrast, the nontarped field lost 89% of the nominal application by volatilization in 5 d. The volatilization rate from the tarped field was shown to he significantly lower than the nontarped field at a 95% confidence level.

  11. Flow aerodynamics modeling of an MHD swirl combustor - Calculations and experimental verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A. K.; Beer, J. M.; Louis, J. F.; Busnaina, A. A.; Lilley, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    The paper describes a computer code for calculating the flow dynamics of a constant-density flow in the second-stage trumpet shaped nozzle section of a two-stage MHD swirl combustor for application to a disk generator. The primitive pressure-velocity variable, finite-difference computer code has been developed for the computation of inert nonreacting turbulent swirling flows in an axisymmetric MHD model swirl combustor. The method and program involve a staggered grid system for axial and radial velocities, and a line relaxation technique for the efficient solution of the equations. The code produces as output the flow field map of the nondimensional stream function, axial and swirl velocity. It was found that the best location for seed injection to obtain a uniform distribution at the combustor exit is in the central location for seed injected at the entrance to the second stage combustor.

  12. Transonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of Two Wedge Airfoil Sections Including Unsteady Flow Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick J.

    1959-01-01

    A two-dimensional wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted on a 20-percent-thick single-wedge airfoil section. Steady-state forces and moments were determined from pressure measurements at Mach numbers from 0.70 to about 1.25. Additional information on the flows about the single wedge is provided by means of instantaneous pressure measurements at Mach numbers up to unity. Pressure distributions were also obtained on a symmetrical double-wedge or diamond-shaped profile which had the same leading-edge included angle as the single-wedge airfoil. A comparison of the data on the two profiles to provide information on the effects of the afterbody showed that with the exception of drag, the single-wedge profile proved to be aerodynamically superior to the diamond profile in all respects. The lift effectiveness of the single-wedge airfoil section far exceeded that of conventional thin airfoil sections over the speed range of the investigation. Pitching-moment irregularities, caused by negative loadings near the trailing edge, generally associated with conventional airfoils of equivalent thicknesses were not exhibited by the single-wedge profile. Moderately high pulsating pressures existing over the base of the single-wedge airfoil section were significantly reduced as the Mach number was increased beyond 0.92 and the boundaries of the dead airspace at the base of the model converged to eliminate the vortex street in the wake. Increasing the leading-edge radius from 0 to 1 percent of the chord had a minor effect on the steady-state forces and generally raised the level of pressure pulsations over the forward part of the single-wedge profile.

  13. An interaction algorithm for prediction of mean and fluctuating velocities in two-dimensional aerodynamic wake flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Orzechowski, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented yielding sets of partial differential equations for determination of turbulent aerodynamic flowfields in the vicinity of an airfoil trailing edge. A four phase interaction algorithm is derived to complete the analysis. Following input, the first computational phase is an elementary viscous corrected two dimensional potential flow solution yielding an estimate of the inviscid-flow induced pressure distribution. Phase C involves solution of the turbulent two dimensional boundary layer equations over the trailing edge, with transition to a two dimensional parabolic Navier-Stokes equation system describing the near-wake merging of the upper and lower surface boundary layers. An iteration provides refinement of the potential flow induced pressure coupling to the viscous flow solutions. The final phase is a complete two dimensional Navier-Stokes analysis of the wake flow in the vicinity of a blunt-bases airfoil. A finite element numerical algorithm is presented which is applicable to solution of all partial differential equation sets of inviscid-viscous aerodynamic interaction algorithm. Numerical results are discussed.

  14. Vertical Landing Aerodynamics of Reusable Rocket Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Satoshi; Nishida, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Inatani, Yoshifumi

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a vertical landing rocket are affected by its engine plume in the landing phase. The influences of interaction of the engine plume with the freestream around the vehicle on the aerodynamic characteristics are studied experimentally aiming to realize safe landing of the vertical landing rocket. The aerodynamic forces and surface pressure distributions are measured using a scaled model of a reusable rocket vehicle in low-speed wind tunnels. The flow field around the vehicle model is visualized using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) method. Results show that the aerodynamic characteristics, such as the drag force and pitching moment, are strongly affected by the change in the base pressure distributions and reattachment of a separation flow around the vehicle.

  15. Improvement of the cruise performances of a wing by means of aerodynamic optimization. Validation with a Far-Field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Varona, J.; Ponsin Roca, J.

    2015-06-01

    Under a contract with AIRBUS MILITARY (AI-M), an exercise to analyze the potential of optimization techniques to improve the wing performances at cruise conditions has been carried out by using an in-house design code. The original wing was provided by AI-M and several constraints were posed for the redesign. To maximize the aerodynamic efficiency at cruise, optimizations were performed using the design techniques developed internally at INTA under a research program (Programa de Termofluidodinámica). The code is a gradient-based optimizaa tion code, which uses classical finite differences approach for gradient computations. Several techniques for search direction computation are implemented for unconstrained and constrained problems. Techniques for geometry modifications are based on different approaches which include perturbation functions for the thickness and/or mean line distributions and others by Bézier curves fitting of certain degree. It is very e important to afford a real design which involves several constraints that reduce significantly the feasible design space. And the assessment of the code is needed in order to check the capabilities and the possible drawbacks. Lessons learnt will help in the development of future enhancements. In addition, the validation of the results was done using also the well-known TAU flow solver and a far-field drag method in order to determine accurately the improvement in terms of drag counts.

  16. Active unsteady aerodynamic suppression of rotating stall in an incompressible flow centrifugal compressor with vaned diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, Patrick B.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to analyze the suppression of rotating stall in an incompressible flow centrifugal compressor with a vaned diffuser, thereby addressing the important need for centrifugal compressor rotating stall and surge control. In this model, the precursor to to instability is a weak rotating potential velocity perturbation in the inlet flow field that eventually develops into a finite disturbance. To suppress the growth of this potential disturbance, a rotating control vortical velocity disturbance is introduced into the impeller inlet flow. The effectiveness of this control is analyzed by matching the perturbation pressure in the compressor inlet and exit flow fields with a model for the unsteady behavior of the compressor. To demonstrate instability control, this model is then used to predict the control effectiveness for centrifugal compressor geometries based on a low speed research centrifugal compressor. These results indicate that reductions of 10 to 15 percent in the mean inlet flow coefficient at instability are possible with control waveforms of half the magnitude of the total disturbance at the inlet.

  17. Motion field and optical flow: Qualitative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verri, Alessandro; Poggio, Tomaso

    1986-12-01

    The optical flow, a 2-D field that can be associated with the variation of the image brightness pattern, and the 2-D motion field, the projection on the image plane of the 3-D velocity field of a moving scene, are in general different, unless very special conditions are satisfied. The optical flow, therefore, is ill suited for computing structure from motion, and for reconstructing the 3-D velocity field, problems that require an accurate estimate of the 2-D motion field. A different use of the optical flow is suggested. Stable field and the 3-D structure of the scene, and they can usually be obtained from the optical flow. The smoothed optical flow and 2-D motion field, interpreted as vector fields tangent to flows of planar dynamical systems, may have the same qualitative properties from the point of view of the theory of structural stability of dynamical systems.

  18. Optimum Tilt Angle of Flow Guide in Steam Turbine Exhaust Hood Considering the Effect of Last Stage Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CAO, Lihua; LIN, Aqiang; LI, Yong; XIAO, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Heat transfer and vacuum in condenser are influenced by the aerodynamic performance of steam turbine exhaust hood. The current research on exhaust hood is mainly focused on analyzing flow loss and optimal design of its structure without consideration of the wet steam condensing flow and the exhaust hood coupled with the front and rear parts. To better understand the aerodynamic performance influenced by the tilt angle of flow guide inside a diffuser, taking a 600 MW steam turbine as an example, a numerical simulator CFX is adopted to solve compressible three-dimensional (3D) Reynolds time-averaged N-S equations and standard k-ɛ turbulence model. And the exhaust hood flow field influenced by different tilt angles of flow guide is investigated with consideration of the wet steam condensing flow and the exhaust hood coupled with the last stage blades and the condenser throat. The result shows that the total pressure loss coefficient and the static pressure recovery coefficient of exhaust hood change regularly and monotonously with the gradual increase of tilt angle of flow guide. When the tilt angle of flow guide is within the range of 30° to 40°, the static pressure recovery coefficient is in the range of 15.27% to 17.03% and the total pressure loss coefficient drops to approximately 51%, the aerodynamic performance of exhaust hood is significantly improved. And the effective enthalpy drop in steam turbine increases by 0.228% to 0.274%. It is feasible to obtain a reasonable title angle of flow guide by the method of coupling the last stage and the condenser throat to exhaust hood in combination of the wet steam model, which provides a practical guidance to flow guide transformation and optimal design in exhaust hood.

  19. Graphics and Flow Visualization of Computer Generated Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kathong, M.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1987-01-01

    Flow field variables are visualized using color representations described on surfaces that are interpolated from computational grids and transformed to digital images. Techniques for displaying two and three dimensional flow field solutions are addressed. The transformations and the use of an interactive graphics program for CFD flow field solutions, called PLOT3D, which runs on the color graphics IRIS workstation are described. An overview of the IRIS workstation is also described.

  20. Calculation of Compressible Flows past Aerodynamic Shapes by Use of the Streamline Curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perl, W

    1947-01-01

    A simple approximate method is given for the calculation of isentropic irrotational flows past symmetrical airfoils, including mixed subsonic-supersonic flows. The method is based on the choice of suitable values for the streamline curvature in the flow field and the subsequent integration of the equations of motion. The method yields limiting solutions for potential flow. The effect of circulation is considered. A comparison of derived velocity distributions with existing results that are based on calculation to the third order in the thickness ratio indicated satisfactory agreement. The results are also presented in the form of a set of compressibility correction rules that lie between the Prandtl-Glauert rule and the von Karman-Tsien rule (approximately). The different rules correspond to different values of the local shape parameter square root sign YC sub a, in which Y is the ordinate and C sub a is the curvature at a point on an airfoil. Bodies of revolution, completely supersonic flows, and the significance of the limiting solutions for potential flow are also briefly discussed.

  1. Aerodynamics of knuckle ball: Flow-structure interaction problem on a pitched baseball without spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Kiura, Toshiro

    2012-07-01

    In the game of baseball, the knuckleball—so-called because the baseball is gripped with the knuckles in a certain position—is pitched in a way that introduces nearly no rotation, resulting in erratic flight paths which confuse batters. The “knuckleball” effect is believed to be caused by asymmetric flow separation over the baseball, but little is known about its flow physics. In the experiment described in this paper, the flow near the seams of the baseball is visualized thoroughly and the velocity vector fields near the surface and in the wake are obtained with Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. Depending on its position, the seam is found to trigger the boundary layer transition thus delaying the separation, or to cause separation itself. Three-dimensional wake patterns associated with specific ball orientations are identified and related to the force variations on the ball.

  2. Investigation of aerodynamic characteristics of a hypersonic flow around bodies of revolution with a permeable tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidnyaev, N. I.

    2007-03-01

    Results of experimental investigations of aerodynamic characteristics of models of high-velocity flying vehicles consisting of a combination of a blunt cone, a cylinder, and a conical tail fin are presented. The model forebody is cooled by porous blowing. The choice of such a configuration is determined by the necessity of optimizing the arrangement of high-velocity flying vehicles on the launcher and their aerodynamic characteristics under conditions of intense surface mass transfer (decrease in drag and heat transfer and increase in static and dynamic stability).

  3. Integration of Research for an Exhaust Thermoelectric Generator and the Outer Flow Field of a Car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, T.; Su, C. Q.; Deng, Y. D.; Wang, Y. P.

    2016-11-01

    The exhaust thermoelectric generator (TEG) can generate electric power from a car engine's waste heat. It is important to maintain a sufficient temperature difference across the thermoelectric modules. The radiator is connected to the cooling units of the thermoelectric modules and used to take away the heat from the TEG system. This paper focuses on the research for the integration of a TEG radiator and the flow field of the car chassis, aiming to cool the radiator by the high speed flow around the chassis. What is more, the TEG radiator is designed as a spoiler to optimize the flow field around the car chassis and even reduce the aerodynamic drag. Concentrating on the flow pressure of the radiator and the aerodynamic drag force, a sedan model with eight different schemes of radiator configurations are studied by computational fluid dynamics simulation. Finally, the simulation results indicate that a reasonable radiator configuration can not only generate high flow pressure to improve the cooling performance, which provides a better support for the TEG system, but also acts as a spoiler to reduce the aerodynamic drag force.

  4. CSCM Navier-Stokes thermal/aerodynamic analysis of hypersonic nozzle flows with slot injection and wall cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Codding, William H.; Lombard, C. K.; Yang, J. Y.

    1988-01-01

    The Conservative Supra-Characteristic Method (CSCM) Navier-Stokes solver is applied to ascertain the problems inherent in the design of a nominal Mach 14 nozzle for NASA-Ames' 3.5-ft Hypersonic Wind Tunnel; attention is given to the effects of boundary layer cooling systems on the aerodynamic redesign of the nozzle throat region. Complete nozzle flowfields are calculated with and without slot injection of either hot or cold fluid into the boundary layer just upstream of the throat, as well as with alternatively adiabatic and cold walls. The CSCM method is capable of resolving subtle differences in the flows.

  5. Numerical Investigation of Aerodynamics of Canard-Controlled Missile Using Planar and Grid Tail Fins. Part 1. Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSpirito, James; Vaughn, Milton E., Jr.; Washington, W. D.

    2002-09-01

    Viscous computational fluid dynamic simulations were used to predict the aerodynamic coefficients and flowfield around a generic canard-controlled missile configuration in supersonic flow. Computations were performed for Mach 1.5 and 3.0, at six angles of attack between 0 and 10, with 0 and 10 canard deflection, and with planar and grid tail fins, for a total of 48 cases. Validation of the computed results was demonstrated by the very good agreement between the computed aerodynamic coefficients and those obtained from wind tunnel measurements. Visualizations of the flowfield showed that the canard trailing vortices and downwash produced a low-pressure region on the starboard side of the missile that in turn produced an adverse side force. The pressure differential on the leeward fin produced by the interaction with the canard trailing vortices is primarily responsible for the adverse roll effect observed when planar fins are used. Grid tail fins improved the roll effectiveness of the canards at low supersonic speed. No adverse rolling moment was observed with no canard deflection, or at the higher supersonic speed for either tail fin type due to the lower intensity of the canard trailing vortices in these cases. Flow visualizations from the simulations performed in this study help in the understanding of the flow physics and can lead to improved canard and tail fin designs for missiles and rockets.

  6. Modeling of pulverized coal combustion processes in a vortex furnace of improved design. Part 1: Flow aerodynamics in a vortex furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasinsky, D. V.; Salomatov, V. V.; Anufriev, I. S.; Sharypov, O. V.; Shadrin, E. Yu.; Anikin, Yu. A.

    2015-02-01

    Some results of the complex experimental and numerical study of aerodynamics and transfer processes in a vortex furnace, whose design was improved via the distributed tangential injection of fuel-air flows through the upper and lower burners, were presented. The experimental study of the aerodynamic characteristics of a spatial turbulent flow was performed on the isothermal laboratory model (at a scale of 1 : 20) of an improved vortex furnace using a laser Doppler measurement system. The comparison of experimental data with the results of the numerical modeling of an isothermal flow for the same laboratory furnace model demonstrated their agreement to be acceptable for engineering practice.

  7. Influence of flow velocity on flow field's optical tomography diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun-yun; Yu, Yang; Zhong, Xia; Zhang, Ying-ying

    2017-01-01

    The effect of flow velocity is usually neglected when optical computerized tomography (OCT) methods are chosen to measure the temperature distribution of the flow fields up to now. In this paper, two sets of experiment are supplied to verify the effect of flow velocity on flow field's moiré tomography. Specifically speaking, the temperature results with the assumption that it is an isobaric process (omit the effect of flow velocity) in the measured flame flow fields, manifest that the isobaric supposition is not suitable for all the flames. And then, a condition, which can be adopted to judge that when the effect of flow velocity on its temperature reconstruction can not be neglected any more, is proposed. This study would provide some reference to the temperature diagnosis by the optical methods which are based on the measurement of the refractive index.

  8. Detection of airborne viruses using electro-aerodynamic deposition and a field-effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyu-Tae; Cho, Dong-Guk; Park, Ji-Woon; Hong, Seunghun; Hwang, Jungho

    2015-01-01

    We report a technique for the detection of aerosolized viruses. Conventional field-effect-transistor (FET)-based techniques use solution-based processes, thus require antibody binding to the detection region of the FET prior to the supply of the analyte. With the method described here, virus–antibody-bound particles are delivered to the FET during detection; therefore, neither a pre-treatment antibody binding step on the FET channel nor washing process for virus–antibody-binding are necessary. Our method is based on the concept that virus–antibody-bound particles are larger than the virus or antibody alone, and thus have larger charge numbers following aerosol charging. When these particles are charged by negative ions and electro-aerodynamically deposited on a substrate, there exists a location on the substrate where neither lone virus nor antibody particles land, and where only virus–antibody-bound particles are deposited. If this location coincides with the channel of the FET, the resulting variation in the current can be used to indicate the existence of a virus. By aerosolizing a mixed solution of the virus and the antibody, only the virus–antibody-bound particles were transported to the swCNT-FET, and the electric current in the swCNT-FET decreased to 30% of that measured with no deposited particles. PMID:26642822

  9. Real-Time Aerodynamic Flow and Data Visualization in an Interactive Virtual Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Richard J.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2005-01-01

    Significant advances have been made to non-intrusive flow field diagnostics in the past decade. Camera based techniques are now capable of determining physical qualities such as surface deformation, surface pressure and temperature, flow velocities, and molecular species concentration. In each case, extracting the pertinent information from the large volume of acquired data requires powerful and efficient data visualization tools. The additional requirement for real time visualization is fueled by an increased emphasis on minimizing test time in expensive facilities. This paper will address a capability titled LiveView3D, which is the first step in the development phase of an in depth, real time data visualization and analysis tool for use in aerospace testing facilities.

  10. Examination of forced unsteady separated flow fields on a rotating wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Huyer, S

    1993-04-01

    The wind turbine industry faces many problems regarding the construction of efficient and predictable wind turbine machines. Steady state, two-dimensional wind tunnel data are generally used to predict aerodynamic loads on wind turbine blades. Preliminary experimental evidence indicates that some of the underlying fluid dynamic phenomena could be attributed to dynamic stall, or more specifically to generation of forced unsteady separated flow fields. A collaborative research effort between the University of Colorado and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory was conducted to systematically categorize the local and global effects of three- dimensional forced unsteady flow fields.

  11. Effect of coolant flow ejection on aerodynamic performance of low-aspect-ratio vanes. 2: Performance with coolant flow ejection at temperature ratios up to 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, J. E.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a 0.5 aspect ratio turbine vane configuration with coolant flow ejection was experimentally determined in a full annular cascade. The vanes were tested at a nominal mean section ideal critical velocity ratio of 0.890 over a range of primary to coolant total temperature ratio from 1.0 to 2.08 and a range of coolant to primary total pressure ratio from 1.0 to 1.4 which corresponded to coolant flows from 3.0 to 10.7 percent of the primary flow. The variations in primary and thermodynamic efficiency and exit flow conditions with circumferential and radial position were obtained.

  12. Vortex flap flow reattachment line and subsonic longitudinal aerodynamic data on 50 deg to 74 deg Delta wings on common fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, N. T.; Huffman, J. K.; Johnson, T. D., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Positions of the primary vortex flow reattachment line and longitudinal aerodynamic data were obtained at Mach number 0.3 for a systematic series of vortex flaps on delta wing body configurations with leading edge sweeps of 50, 58, 66, and 74 deg. The investigation was performed to study the parametric effects of wing sweep, vortex flap geometry and deflection, canards, and trailing edge flaps on the location of the primary vortex reattachment line relative to the flap hinge line. The vortex reattachment line was located via surface oil flow photographs taken at selected angles of attack. Force and moment measurements were taken over an angle of attack range of -1 deg to 22 deg at zero sideslip angle for many configurations to further establish the data base and to assess the aforementioned parametric effects on longitudinal aerodynamics. Both the flow reattachment and aerodynamic data are presented.

  13. Plasma Influence on Characteristics of Aerodynamic Friction and Separation Flow Location

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Mirror- galvanometer oscillograph NO43.1 (6); • · Shadow Schlieren device IAB-451 (7-10). After a modernization the oscilloscope “Tektronix TDS...amplifier is transmitted to the mirror- galvanometer oscillograph (6), which in turn records the pressure variation diagram on a Plasma Aerodynamics...balance (4) is used, the signal from which is also transmitted to the 8-ANCh amplifier and then to the mirror- galvanometer oscillograph and is

  14. Io: Heat flow from dark volcanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2009-11-01

    Dark flow fields on the jovian satellite Io are evidence of current or recent volcanic activity. We have examined the darkest volcanic fields and quantified their thermal emission in order to assess their contribution to Io's total heat flow. Loki Patera, the largest single source of heat flow on Io, is a convenient point of reference. We find that dark volcanic fields are more common in the hemisphere opposite Loki Patera and this large scale concentration is manifested as a maximum in the longitudinal distribution (near ˜200 °W), consistent with USGS global geologic mapping results. In spite of their relatively cool temperatures, dark volcanic fields contribute almost as much to Io's heat flow as Loki Patera itself because of their larger areal extent. As a group, dark volcanic fields provide an asymmetric component of ˜5% of Io's global heat flow or ˜5 × 10 12 W.

  15. Low-speed wind-tunnel investigation of the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a translating grid choked flow inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, J. M.; Miller, B. A.; Golladay, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a translating grid choked-flow inlet was determined in a low-speed wind tunnel at free-stream velocities of 24, 32, and 45 m/sec and incidence angles of 0, 10, 20, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50 deg. The inlet was sized to fit a 13.97- centimeter-diameter fan with a design weight flow of 2.49 kg/sec. Measurements were made to determine inlet total pressure recovery, flow distortion, and sound pressure level for both choked and unchoked geometries over a range of inlet weight flows. For the unchoked geometry, inlet total pressure recovery ranged from 0.983 to 0.989 at incidence angles less than 40 deg. At 40 deg incidence angle, inlet cowl separation was encountered which resulted in lower values of pressure recovery and higher levels of fan broadband noise. For the choked geometry, increasing total pressure losses occurred with increasing inlet weight flow that prevented the inlet from reaching full choked conditions with the particular fan used. These losses were attributed to the high Mach number drag rise characteristics of airfoil grid. At maximum attainable inlet weight flow, the total pressure recovery at static conditions was 0.935. The fan blade passing frequency and other fan generated pure tones were eliminated from the noise spectrum, but the broadband level was increased.

  16. SRMAFTE facility checkout model flow field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Richard A.; Whitesides, Harold R.

    1992-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motor Air Flow Equipment (SRMAFTE) facility was constructed for the purpose of evaluating the internal propellant, insulation, and nozzle configurations of solid propellant rocket motor designs. This makes the characterization of the facility internal flow field very important in assuring that no facility induced flow field features exist which would corrupt the model related measurements. In order to verify the design and operation of the facility, a three-dimensional computational flow field analysis was performed on the facility checkout model setup. The checkout model measurement data, one-dimensional and three-dimensional estimates were compared, and the design and proper operation of the facility was verified. The proper operation of the metering nozzles, adapter chamber transition, model nozzle, and diffuser were verified. The one-dimensional and three-dimensional flow field estimates along with the available measurement data are compared.

  17. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    The modern theory of aerodynamic sound originates from Lighthill's two papers in 1952 and 1954, as is well known. I have heard that Lighthill was motivated in writing the papers by the jet-noise emitted by the newly commercialized jet-engined airplanes at that time. The technology of aerodynamic sound is destined for environmental problems. Therefore the theory should always be applied to newly emerged public nuisances. This issue of Fluid Dynamics Research (FDR) reflects problems of environmental sound in present Japanese technology. The Japanese community studying aerodynamic sound has held an annual symposium since 29 years ago when the late Professor S Kotake and Professor S Kaji of Teikyo University organized the symposium. Most of the Japanese authors in this issue are members of the annual symposium. I should note the contribution of the two professors cited above in establishing the Japanese community of aerodynamic sound research. It is my pleasure to present the publication in this issue of ten papers discussed at the annual symposium. I would like to express many thanks to the Editorial Board of FDR for giving us the chance to contribute these papers. We have a review paper by T Suzuki on the study of jet noise, which continues to be important nowadays, and is expected to reform the theoretical model of generating mechanisms. Professor M S Howe and R S McGowan contribute an analytical paper, a valuable study in today's fluid dynamics research. They apply hydrodynamics to solve the compressible flow generated in the vocal cords of the human body. Experimental study continues to be the main methodology in aerodynamic sound, and it is expected to explore new horizons. H Fujita's study on the Aeolian tone provides a new viewpoint on major, longstanding sound problems. The paper by M Nishimura and T Goto on textile fabrics describes new technology for the effective reduction of bluff-body noise. The paper by T Sueki et al also reports new technology for the

  18. Flow field studies on a micro-air-vehicle-scale cycloidal rotor in forward flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew H.; Jarugumilli, Tejaswi; Benedict, Moble; Lakshminarayan, Vinod K.; Jones, Anya R.; Chopra, Inderjit

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines the flow physics and principles of force production on a cycloidal rotor (cyclorotor) in forward flight. The cyclorotor considered here consists of two blades rotating about a horizontal axis, with cyclic pitch angle variation about the blade quarter-chord. The flow field at the rotor mid-span is analyzed using smoke flow visualization and particle image velocimeV are compared with flow fields predicted using 2D CFD and time-averaged force measurements acquired in an open-jet wind tunnel at three advance ratios. It is shown that the experimental flow field is nearly two dimensional at μ = 0.73 allowing for qualitative comparisons to be made with CFD. The incoming flow velocity decreases in magnitude as the flow passes through the retreating (upper) half of the rotor and is attributed to power extraction by the blades. A significant increase in flow velocity is observed across the advancing (lower) half of the rotor. The aerodynamic analysis demonstrates that the blades accelerate the flow through the lower aft region of the rotor, where they operate in a high dynamic pressure environment. This is consistent with CFD-predicted values of instantaneous aerodynamic forces which reveal that the aft section of the rotor is the primary region of force production. Phase-averaged flow field measurements showed two blade wakes in the flow, formed by each of the two blades. Analysis of the blades at several azimuthal positions revealed two significant blade-wake interactions. The locations of these blade-wake interactions are correlated with force peaks in the CFD-predicted instantaneous blade forces and highlight their importance to the generation of lift and propulsive force of the cyclorotor.

  19. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  20. Numerical calculations of flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. M.; Vogel, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    The solutions to the equations of motion for inviscid fluid flow around a pointed elliptic cone at incidence are presented. The numerical method used, MacCormack's second order preferential predictor-corrector finite difference approximation, is applied to the fluid flow equations derived in conservation-law form. The entropy boundary condition, hitherto unused for elliptic cone problems, is investigated and compared to reflection boundary condition solutions. The stagnation streamline movement of the inclined elliptic cone is noted and surface pressure coefficients are plotted. Also presented are solutions for an elliptic cone and a circular cone at zero incidence and a circular cone at a small angle of attack. Comparisons are made between these present solutions and previously published theory.

  1. Aerodynamic characteristics of the orbital reentry vehicle experimental probe fins in a supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Mitsunori; Sekine, Hideo; Tate, Atsushi; Noda, Junichi

    1994-04-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of probe fins with a sweep angle of 60 deg, which are equipped on the Orbital Reentry Experiment (OREX) vehicle to measure the surrounding ionized gas temperature and electron number density distributions in the high temperature communication black out regions, have been measured in the supersonic wind tunnel of the National Aerospace Laboratory and compared with those of the fins of 0 deg sweep angles. Since the probes are to be embedded in the boundary layer where the local Mach number is less than 2.5 over the OREX surface at a hypersonic flight speed, the aerodynamic characteristics in supersonic regions are needed to estimate the rolling moments of fins caused by the error of the installation angles. The lift coefficient slope of the probe fins decreases as the Mach number increases, being less than the values for the 0 deg sweep fins. The drag coefficient depends highly on the sweep angle of the fins in Mach number regions less than 2.5.

  2. Decorrelation Times of Photospheric Fields and Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsch, B. T.; Kusano, K.; Yamamoto, T. T.; Muglach, K.

    2012-01-01

    We use autocorrelation to investigate evolution in flow fields inferred by applying Fourier Local Correlation Tracking (FLCT) to a sequence of high-resolution (0.3 "), high-cadence (approx = 2 min) line-of-sight magnetograms of NOAA active region (AR) 10930 recorded by the Narrowband Filter Imager (NFI) of the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite over 12 - 13 December 2006. To baseline the timescales of flow evolution, we also autocorrelated the magnetograms, at several spatial binnings, to characterize the lifetimes of active region magnetic structures versus spatial scale. Autocorrelation of flow maps can be used to optimize tracking parameters, to understand tracking algorithms f susceptibility to noise, and to estimate flow lifetimes. Tracking parameters varied include: time interval Delta t between magnetogram pairs tracked, spatial binning applied to the magnetograms, and windowing parameter sigma used in FLCT. Flow structures vary over a range of spatial and temporal scales (including unresolved scales), so tracked flows represent a local average of the flow over a particular range of space and time. We define flow lifetime to be the flow decorrelation time, tau . For Delta t > tau, tracking results represent the average velocity over one or more flow lifetimes. We analyze lifetimes of flow components, divergences, and curls as functions of magnetic field strength and spatial scale. We find a significant trend of increasing lifetimes of flow components, divergences, and curls with field strength, consistent with Lorentz forces partially governing flows in the active photosphere, as well as strong trends of increasing flow lifetime and decreasing magnitudes with increases in both spatial scale and Delta t.

  3. Io: Heat Flow from Dark Volcanic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Davies, A. G.; Johnson, T. V.

    2008-03-01

    We focus on the heat flow contribution from dark volcanic fields on Io. These are concentrated in the anti-Loki hemisphere. We use the areas and estimated effective temperatures of dark flucti to derive their total power.

  4. A flow visualization and aerodynamic force data evaluation of spanwise blowing on full and half span delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visser, K. D.; Nelson, R. C.; Ng, T. T.

    1989-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been performed to quantify the effects of a jet on the leading-edge vortices generated by a 70-deg-sweep sharp-edged delta wing at low Reynolds numbers. Efforts were made ot optimize the jet nozzle position with respect to maximum lift increments. Both half-span force-balance testing and half- and full-span flow visualization tests were conducted. Two angles of attack were investigated, 30 and 35 deg, at Reynolds numbers of 150,000 and 200,000. Aerodynamic enhancement, including lift and drag gains of about 20 and 17 percent respectively, were measured. Results indicate an optimum jet nozzle location to be close to the leading edge, tangent to the upper wing surface, and in a direction aligned parallel to the leading edge. Nozzle interference effects, especially near the apex, were not negligible.

  5. Predicting aerodynamic characteristics of vortical flows on three-dimensional configurations using a surface-singularity panel method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskew, B.

    1983-01-01

    A general low-order surface-singularity panel method is used to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of a problem where a wing-tip vortex from one wing closely interacts with an aft mounted wing in a low Reynolds Number flow; i.e., 125,000. Nonlinear effects due to wake roll-up and the influence of the wings on the vortex path are included in the calculation by using a coupled iterative wake relaxation scheme. The interaction also affects the wing pressures and boundary layer characteristics: these effects are also considered using coupled integral boundary layer codes and preliminary calculations using free vortex sheet separation modelling are included. Calculated results are compared with water tunnel experimental data with generally remarkably good agreement.

  6. Closed-Loop Flow Control of the Coupled Wake Dynamics and Aerodynamic Loads of a Freely-Pivoting 3-DOF Bluff Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, T.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    2016-11-01

    The motion of an axisymmetric bluff body model that is free to pivot in pitch, yaw, and roll in a uniform stream in response to flow-induced aerodynamic loads is controlled in wind tunnel experiments using fluidic actuation. The model is attached to an upstream, wire-supported short streamwise sting through a low-friction hinge, and each of the support wires is individually-controlled by a servo actuator through an in-line load cell. The aerodynamic loads on the body, and thereby its motion, are controlled through fluidic modification of its aerodynamic coupling to its near wake using four independent aft mounted synthetic jet actuators that effect azimuthally-segmented flow attachment over the model's tail end. The effects of actuation-induced, transitory changes in the model's aerodynamic loads are measured by its motion response using motion tracking, while the coupled evolution of the near-wake is captured by high-speed stereo PIV. Flow control authority is demonstrated by feedback-controlled manipulation of the model's dynamic response, and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) of the wake is used to characterize changes in the wake structure and stability. It is shown that this flow control approach can modify the stability and damping of the model's motion (e.g., suppression or amplification of its natural oscillations), and impose desired directional attitude. Supported by the ARO.

  7. Launch vehicle aerodynamic data base development comparison with flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, J. T.; Wallace, R. O.; Dill, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The aerodynamic development plan for the Space Shuttle integrated vehicle had three major objectives. The first objective was to support the evolution of the basic configuration by establishing aerodynamic impacts to various candidate configurations. The second objective was to provide continuing evaluation of the basic aerodynamic characteristics in order to bring about a mature data base. The third task was development of the element and component aerodynamic characteristics and distributed air loads data to support structural loads analyses. The complexity of the configurations rendered conventional analytic methods of little use and therefore required extensive wind tunnel testing of detailed complex models. However, the ground testing and analyses did not predict the aerodynamic characteristics that were extracted from the Space Shuttle flight test program. Future programs that involve the use of vehicles similar to the Space Shuttle should be concerned with the complex flow fields characteristics of these types of complex configurations.

  8. Aeroacoustics. [analysis of properties of sound generated by aerodynamic forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M., E.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis was conducted to determine the properties of sound generated by aerodynamic forces or motions originating in a flow, such as the unsteady aerodynamic forces on propellers or by turbulent flows around an aircraft. The acoustics of moving media are reviewed and mathematical models are developed. Lighthill's acoustic analogy and the application to turbulent flows are analyzed. The effects of solid boundaries are calculated. Theories based on the solution of linearized vorticity and acoustic field equations are explained. The effects of nonuniform mean flow on the generation of sound are reported.

  9. Flow pattern similarities in the near wake of three bird species suggest a common role for unsteady aerodynamic effects in lift generation.

    PubMed

    Gurka, Roi; Krishnan, Krishnamoorthy; Ben-Gida, Hadar; Kirchhefer, Adam J; Kopp, Gregory A; Guglielmo, Christopher G

    2017-02-06

    Analysis of the aerodynamics of flapping wings has yielded a general understanding of how birds generate lift and thrust during flight. However, the role of unsteady aerodynamics in avian flight due to the flapping motion still holds open questions in respect to performance and efficiency. We studied the flight of three distinctive bird species: western sandpiper (Calidris mauri), European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) and American robin (Turdus migratorius) using long-duration, time-resolved particle image velocimetry, to better characterize and advance our understanding of how birds use unsteady flow features to enhance their aerodynamic performances during flapping flight. We show that during transitions between downstroke and upstroke phases of the wing cycle, the near wake-flow structures vary and generate unique sets of vortices. These structures appear as quadruple layers of concentrated vorticity aligned at an angle with respect to the horizon (named 'double branch'). They occur where the circulation gradient changes sign, which implies that the forces exerted by the flapping wings of birds are modified during the transition phases. The flow patterns are similar in (non-dimensional) size and magnitude for the different birds suggesting that there are common mechanisms operating during flapping flight across species. These flow patterns occur at the same phase where drag reduction of about 5% per cycle and lift enhancement were observed in our prior studies. We propose that these flow structures should be considered in wake flow models that seek to account for the contribution of unsteady flow to lift and drag.

  10. Flow field visualization about external axial corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to visualize the flow field about external axial corners. The investigation was initiated to provide answers to questions about the inviscid flow pattern for continuing numerical investigations. Symmetrical and asymmetrical corner models were tested at a Reynolds number per meter of 60,700,000. Oil-flow and vapor-screen photographs were taken for both models at angle of attack and yaw. The paper presents the results of the investigation in the form of oil-flow photographs and the surrounding shock wave location obtained from the vapor screens.

  11. Hypervelocity atmospheric flight: Real gas flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John T.

    1989-01-01

    Flight in the atmosphere is examined from the viewpoint of including real gas phenomena in the flow field about a vehicle flying at hypervelocity. That is to say, the flow field is subject not only to compressible phenomena, but is dominated by energetic phenomena. There are several significant features of such a flow field. Spatially, its composition can vary by both chemical and elemental species. The equations which describe the flow field include equations of state and mass, species, elemental, and electric charge continuity; momentum; and energy equations. These are nonlinear, coupled, partial differential equations that have been reduced to a relatively compact set of equations in a self-consistent manner (which allows mass addition at the surface at a rate comparable to the free-stream mass flux). The equations and their inputs allow for transport of these quantities relative to the mass-average behavior of the flow field. Thus transport of mass by chemical, thermal, pressure, and forced diffusion; transport of momentum by viscosity; and transport of energy by conduction, chemical considerations, viscosity, and radiative transfer are included. The last of these complicate the set of equations by making the energy equations a partial integrodifferential equation. Each phenomenon is considered and represented mathematically by one or more developments. The coefficients which pertain are both thermodynamically and chemically dependent. Solutions of the equations are presented and discussed in considerable detail, with emphasis on severe energetic flow fields. Hypervelocity flight in low-density environments where gaseous reactions proceed at finite rates chemical nonequilibrium is considered, and some illustrations are presented. Finally, flight where the flow field may be out of equilibrium, both chemically and thermodynamically, is presented briefly.

  12. Hypervelocity atmospheric flight: Real gas flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Flight in the atmosphere is examined from the viewpoint of including real gas phenomena in the flow field about a vehicle flying at hypervelocity. That is to say, the flow field is subject not only to compressible phenomena, but is dominated by energetic phenomena. There are several significant features of such a flow field. Spatially, its composition can vary by both chemical and elemental species. The equations which describe the flow field include equations of state and mass, species, elemental, and electric charge continuity; momentum; and energy equations. These are nonlinear, coupled, partial differential equations that were reduced to a relatively compact set of equations of a self-consistent manner (which allows mass addition at the surface at a rate comparable to the free-stream mass flux). The equations and their inputs allow for transport of these quantities relative to the mass-averaged behavior of the flow field. Thus transport of mass by chemical, thermal, pressure, and forced diffusion; transport of momentum by viscosity; and transport of energy by conduction, chemical considerations, viscosity, and radiative transfer are included. The last of these complicate the set of equations by making the energy equation a partial integrodifferential equation. Each phenomenon is considered and represented mathematically by one or more developments. The coefficients which pertain are both thermodynamically and chemically dependent. Solutions of the equations are presented and discussed in considerable detail, with emphasis on severe energetic flow fields. For hypervelocity flight in low-density environments where gaseous reactions proceed at finite rates, chemical nonequilibrium is considered and some illustrations are presented. Finally, flight where the flow field may be out of equilibrium, both chemically and thermodynamically, is presented briefly.

  13. Optical visualisation of the flow around a cylinder in electrolyte under strong axial magnetic field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, O.; Kobzev, A.; Kolesnikov, Yu.; Thess, A.

    Flows around obstacles are among the most common problems encountered in the fluid mechanics literature, and cylindrical obstacles definitely received the most extensive attention. The reason for this is that this relatively simple geometry already encompasses most of the important physical effects likely to play a role in flow around more complicated obstacles. This means that understanding the cylinder problem provides relevant insight on a wide variety of problem ranging from aerodynamics, with the flow around a wing or a vehicle, to pollutant dispersion around building, flows in turbines … When the working fluid conducts electricity additional effects are involved. In particular, the presence of a magnetic field tends to homogenise the flow in the direction of the magnetic field lines which leads to strong alterations of the flow patterns known from the classical nonconducting case. This configuration is also a very generic one as Magnetohydrodynamic flows around obstacle also occur in a wide variety of applications: for instance, the space vehicle re-entry problem features the flow of a conducting plasma around an obstacle: [1] and [2] have shown that it could be influenced by a strong magnetic field in order to reduce heat transfer. The cooling blanket of the future nuclear fusion reactor ITER soon to be built in France, features a complex flow of liquid metal in a very high magnetic field (typically 10 T), in which the occurrence of obstacles cannot be avoided.

  14. Flow Field Around a Hovering Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tung, C.; Low, S.

    1997-01-01

    A lifting surface hover code developed by the Analytical Method Inc. (AMI) was used to compute the average and unsteady velocity flow field of an isolated rotor without ground effect. The predicted velocity field compares well with experimental data obtained by hot-wire anemometry and by Laser Doppler Velocimetry. A subroutine 'DOWNWASH' was written to predict the velocity field at any given point in the wake for a given blade position.

  15. Fluid Dynamic Mechanisms and Interactions within Separated Flows and Their Effects on Missile Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    incompressihle potential flow problems suitable for this method include the following: (1) Free overfall ; (2) Flow past a sluice gate; (3) Flow past a sharp...of recompression-reattachment of a turbu- lent free shear layer , it was learned that this same integral analysis can be employed to study the base ...approaches zero as the free stream Mach number increases toward unity, while the base pressure coefficient decreases toward more negative values. It was

  16. Aerodynamic optimization by simultaneously updating flow variables and design parameters with application to advanced propeller designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    A scheme is developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The scheme updates the design parameter iterative solutions and the flow variable iterative solutions simultaneously. It is applied to an advanced propeller design problem with the Euler equations used as the flow governing equations. The scheme's accuracy, efficiency and sensitivity to the computational parameters are tested.

  17. A Computational and Experimental Investigation of a Three-Dimensional Hypersonic Scramjet Inlet Flow Field. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott Douglas

    1991-01-01

    A combined computational and experimental parametric study of the internal aerodynamics of a generic three dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlet configuration was performed. The study was designed to demonstrate the utility of computational fluid dynamics as a design tool in hypersonic inlet flow fields, to provide a detailed account of the nature and structure of the internal flow interactions, and to provide a comprehensive surface property and flow field database to determine the effects of contraction ratio, cowl position, and Reynolds number on the performance of a hypersonic scramjet inlet configuration.

  18. Study of aerodynamic noise in low supersonic operation of an axial flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldi, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A study of compressor noise is presented, based upon supersonic, part-speed operation of a high hub/tip ratio compressor designed for spanwise uniformity of aerodynamic conditions, having straight cylindrical inlet and exit passages for acoustic simplicity. Acoustic spectra taken in the acoustically-treated inlet plenum, are presented for five operating points at each of two speeds, corresponding to relative rotor tip Mach numbers of about 1.01 and 1.12 (60 and 67 percent design speed). These spectra are analyzed for low and high frequency broadband noise, blade passage frequency noise, combination tone noise and "haystack' noise (a very broad peak somewhat below blade passage frequency, which is occasionally observed in engines and fan test rigs). These types of noise are related to diffusion factor, total pressure ratio, and relative rotor tip Mach number. Auxiliary measurements of fluctuating wall static pressures and schlieren photographs of upstream shocks in the inlet are also presented and related to the acoustic and performance data.

  19. Images constructed from computed flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Leslie A.

    1992-01-01

    A method for constructing interferograms, schlieren, and shadowgraphs from ideal- and real-gas, two- and three-dimensional computed flow fields is described. The computational grids can be structured or unstructured, and multiple grids are an option. The constructed images are compared to experimental images for several types of flow, including a ramp, a blunt-body, a nozzle, and a reacting flow. The constructed images simulate the features observed in the experimental images. They are sensitive to errors in the flow-field solutions and can be used to identify solution errors. In addition, techniques for obtaining phase shifts from experimental finite-fringe interferograms and for removing experimentally induced phase-shift errors are discussed. Both the constructed images and calculated phase shifts can be used for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes.

  20. The Current Status of Unsteady CFD Approaches for Aerodynamic Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Singer, Bart A.; Yamaleev, Nail; Vatsa, Veer N.; Viken, Sally A.; Atkins, Harold L.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the current status of time dependent algorithms is presented. Special attention is given to algorithms used to predict fluid actuator flows, as well as other active and passive flow control devices. Capabilities for the next decade are predicted, and principal impediments to the progress of time-dependent algorithms are identified.

  1. Low thrust viscous nozzle flow fields prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, G. S.; Mo, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes code was developed for low thrust viscous nozzle flow field prediction. An implicit finite volume in an arbitrary curvilinear coordinate system lower-upper (LU) scheme is used to solve the governing Navier-Stokes equations and species transportation equations. Sample calculations of carbon dioxide nozzle flow are presented to verify the validity and efficiency of this code. The computer results are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Near field flow structure of isothermal swirling flows and reacting non-premixed swirling flames

    SciTech Connect

    Olivani, Andrea; Solero, Giulio; Cozzi, Fabio; Coghe, Aldo

    2007-04-15

    Two confined lean non-premixed swirl-stabilized flame typologies were investigated in order to achieve detailed information on the thermal and aerodynamic field in the close vicinity of the burner throat and provide correlation with the exhaust emissions. Previous finding indicated the generation of a partially premixed flame with radial fuel injection and a purely diffusive flame with co-axial injection in a swirling co-flow. In the present work, the experimental study is reported which has been conducted on a straight exit laboratory burner with no quarl cone, fuelled by natural gas and air, and fired vertically upwards with the flame stabilized at the end of two concentric pipes with the annulus supplying swirled air and the central pipe delivering the fuel. Two fuel injection typologies, co-axial and radial (i.e., transverse), leading to different mixing mechanisms, have been characterized through different techniques: particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) for a comprehensive analysis of the velocity field, still photography for the detection of flame front and main visible features, and thermocouples for the temperature distribution. Isothermal flow conditions have been included in the experimental investigation to provide a basic picture of the flow field and to comprehend the modifications induced by the combustion process. The results indicated that, although the global mixing process and the main flame structure are governed by the swirl motion imparted to the air stream, the two different fuel injection methodologies play an important role on mixture formation and flame stabilization in the primary mixing zone. Particularly, it has been found that, in case of axial injection, the turbulent interaction between the central fuel jet and the backflow generated by the swirl can induce an intermittent fuel penetration in the recirculated hot products and the formation of a central sooting luminous plume, a phenomenon totally

  3. Development of a model of entrained flow coal gasification and study of aerodynamic mechanisms of action on gasifier operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaimov, N. A.; Ryzhkov, A. F.

    2015-11-01

    Problems requiring solution in development of modern highly efficient gasification reactor of a promising high power integrated gasification combined-cycle plant are formulated. The task of creating and testing a numerical model of an entrained-flow reactor for thermochemical conversion of pulverized coal is solved. The basic method of investigation is computational fluid dynamics. The submodel of thermochemical processes, including a single-stage scheme of volatile substances outlet and three heterogeneous reactions of carbon residue conversion (complete carbon oxidation, Boudouard reaction and hydrogasification), is given. The mass loss rate is determined according to the basic assumptions of the diffusion-kinetic theory. The equations applied for calculation of the process of outlet of volatile substances and three stages of fuel gasifi-cation (diffusion of reagent gas toward the surface of the coal particle, heterogeneous reactions of gas with carbon on its surface, and homogeneous reactions beyond the particle surface) are presented. The universal combined submodel Eddy Dissipation/Finite Rate Chemistry with standard (built-in) constants is used for numerical estimates. Aerodynamic mechanisms of action on thermochemical processes of solid fuel gasification are studied, as exemplified by the design upgrade of a cyclone reactor of preliminary thermal fuel preparation. Volume concentrations of combustible gases and products of complete combustion in the syngas before and after primary air and pulverized coal flows' redistribution are given. Volume concentrations of CO in syngas at different positions of tangential secondary air inlet nozzle are compared.

  4. An unstructured mesh arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian unsteady incompressible flow solver and its application to insect flight aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiaohui; Cao, Yuanwei; Zhao, Yong

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an unstructured mesh Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) incompressible flow solver is developed to investigate the aerodynamics of insect hovering flight. The proposed finite-volume ALE Navier-Stokes solver is based on the artificial compressibility method (ACM) with a high-resolution method of characteristics-based scheme on unstructured grids. The present ALE model is validated and assessed through flow passing over an oscillating cylinder. Good agreements with experimental results and other numerical solutions are obtained, which demonstrates the accuracy and the capability of the present model. The lift generation mechanisms of 2D wing in hovering motion, including wake capture, delayed stall, rapid pitch, as well as clap and fling are then studied and illustrated using the current ALE model. Moreover, the optimized angular amplitude in symmetry model, 45°, is firstly reported in details using averaged lift and the energy power method. Besides, the lift generation of complete cyclic clap and fling motion, which is simulated by few researchers using the ALE method due to large deformation, is studied and clarified for the first time. The present ALE model is found to be a useful tool to investigate lift force generation mechanism for insect wing flight.

  5. A Study of the Impact of Variations on Aerodynamic Flow in Gas Turbine Engines via Monte-Carlo Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Khiem Viet; Tumer, Irem Y.

    2003-01-01

    The unsteady compressible inviscid flow is characterized by the conservations of mass, momentum, and energy; or simply the Euler equations. In this paper, a study of the subsonic one-dimensional Euler equations with local preconditioning is presented with a modal analysis approach. Specifically, this study investigates the behavior of airflow in a gas turbine engine using the specified conditions at the inflow and outflow boundaries of the compressor, combustion chamber, and turbine, under the impact of variations in pressure, velocity, temperature, and density at low Mach numbers. Two main questions that motivate this research are: 1) Is there any aerodynamic problem with the existing gas turbine engines that could impact aircraft performance? 2) If yes, what aspect of a gas turbine engine could be improved via design to alleviate that impact and to optimize aircraft performance. This paper presents an initial attempt to the flow behavior in terms (perturbation) using simulation outputs from a customer-deck model obtained from Pratt&Whitney, (i.e., pressure, temperature, velocity, density) about their mean states at the inflow and outflow boundaries of the compressor, combustion chamber, and turbine. Flow behavior is analyzed for the high pressure compressor and combustion chamber employing the conditions on their left and right boundaries. In the same fashion, similar analyses are carried out for the high and low-pressure turbines. In each case, the eigenfrequencies that are obtained for different boundary conditions are examined closely based on their probabilistic distributions, a result of a Monte Carlo 10,000-sample simulation. Furthermore, the characteristic waves and eave response are analyzed and contrasted among different cases, with and without preconditioners. The results reveal the existence of flow instabilities due to the combined effect of variations and excessive pressures; which are clearly the case in the combustion chamber and high

  6. Fluid dynamic mechanisms and interactions within separated flows and their effects on missile aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addy, A. L.; Chow, W. L.; Korst, H. H.; White, R. A.

    1983-05-01

    Significant data and detailed results of a joint research effort investigating the fluid dynamic mechanisms and interactions within separated flows are presented. The results were obtained through analytical, experimental, and computational investigations of base flow related configurations. The research objectives focus on understanding the component mechanisms and interactions which establish and maintain separated flow regions. Flow models and theoretical analyses were developed to describe the base flowfield. The research approach has been to conduct extensive small-scale experiments on base flow configurations and to analyze these flows by component models and finite-difference techniques. The modeling of base flows of missiles (both powered and unpowered) for transonic and supersonic freestreams has been successful by component models. Research on plume effects and plume modeling indicated the need to match initial plume slope and plume surface curvature for valid wind tunnel simulation of an actual rocket plume. The assembly and development of a state-of-the-art laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system for experiments with two-dimensional small-scale models has been completed and detailed velocity and turbulence measurements are underway. The LDV experiments include the entire range of base flowfield mechanisms - shear layer development, recompression/reattachment, shock-induced separation, and plume-induced separation.

  7. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  8. Improved visualization of flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1991-01-01

    A capability was developed that makes it possible to apply to measured flow field data the visualization tools developed to display numerical solutions for computational fluid dynamic problems. The measurement monitor surface (MMS) procedure was applied to the analysis of flow field measurements within a low aspect ratio transonic axial flow fan rotor obtained with 2-D laser anemometry. The procedure generates input for the visualization tools developed to display numerical solutions for computational fluid dynamics problems. The relative Mach number contour plots obtained by this method resemble the conventional contour plots obtained by more traditional methods. The results show that the MMS procedure can be used to generate input for the multidimensional processing and analysis tools developed for data from numerical flow field simulations. They show that an experimenter can apply the MMS procedure to his data and then use an interactive graphics program to display scalar quantities like the Mach number by profiles, carpet plots, contour lines, and surfaces using various colors. Also, flow directionality can be shown by display of vector fields and particle traces.

  9. Flow Transitions in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    1996-01-01

    Critical Rayleigh numbers have been measured in a liquid metal cylinder of finite height in the presence of a rotating magnetic field. Several different stability regimes were observed, which were determined by the values of the Rayleigh and Hartmann numbers. For weak rotating magnetic fields and small Rayleigh numbers, the experimental observations can be explained by the existence of a single non-axisymmetric meridional roll rotating around the cylinder, driven by the azimuthal component of the magnetic field. The measured dependence of rotational velocity on magnetic field strength is consistent with the existence of laminar flow in this regime.

  10. Complex conservative difference schemes for computing supersonic flows past simple aerodynamic forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarova, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    Complex conservative modifications of two-dimensional difference schemes on a minimum stencil are presented for the Euler equations. The schemes are conservative with respect to the basic divergent variables and the divergent variables for spatial derivatives. Approximations of boundary conditions for computing flows around variously shaped bodies (plates, cylinders, wedges, cones, bodies with cavities, and compound bodies) are constructed without violating the conservation properties in the computational domain. Test problems for computing flows with shock waves and contact discontinuities and supersonic flows with external energy sources are described.

  11. A stochastic aerodynamic model for stationary blades in unsteady 3D wind fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluck, Manuel; Crawford, Curran

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic loads play an important roll in the design of wind turbines, but establishing the life-time aerodynamic loads (e.g. extreme and fatigue loads) is a computationally expensive task. Conventional (deterministic) methods to analyze long term loads, which rely on the repeated analysis of multiple different wind samples, are usually too expensive to be included in optimization routines. We present a new stochastic approach, which solves the aerodynamic system equations (Lagrangian vortex model) in the stochastic space, and thus arrive directly at a stochastic description of the coupled loads along a turbine blade. This new approach removes the requirement of analyzing multiple different realizations. Instead, long term loads can be extracted from a single stochastic solution, a procedure that is obviously significantly faster. Despite the reduced analysis time, results obtained from the stochastic approach match deterministic result well for a simple test-case (a stationary blade). In future work, the stochastic method will be extended to rotating blades, thus opening up new avenues to include long term loads into turbine optimization.

  12. A source flow characteristic technique for the analysis of scramjet exhaust flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delguidice, P.; Dash, S.; Kalben, P.

    1974-01-01

    The factors which influence the design and selection of a nozzle for a hypersonic scramjet are described. A two dimensional second-order characteristic procedure capable of analyzing the aerodynamic performance of typical nozzle configurations is presented. Equations of motion governing the two dimensional, axisymmetric, or axially expanding inviscid flow of a gas mixture, with frozen chemistry, are provided. Diagrams of the flow conditions for various configurations are included.

  13. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbo-machinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tensor. Penn State will lead the effort to make direct measurements of the momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors in high-speed multistage compressor flow field in the turbomachinery laboratory at Penn State. They will also process the data by both conventional and conditional spectrum analysis to derive momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors due to blade-to-blade periodic and aperiodic components, revolution periodic and aperiodic components arising from various blade rows and non-deterministic (which includes random components) correlations. The modeling results from this program will be publicly available and generally applicable to steady-state Navier-Stokes solvers used for turbomachinery component (compressor or turbine) flow field predictions. These models will lead to improved methodology, including loss and efficiency prediction, for the design of high-efficiency turbomachinery and drastically reduce the time required for the design and development cycle of turbomachinery.

  14. Recent theoretical developments and experimental studies pertinent to vortex flow aerodynamics, with a view towards design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.; Luckring, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Recent progress in a research program directed toward an improved vortex flow technology base was reviewed. Analysis methods for conical flow and analysis and design methods for nonconical flows are presented. Applications are made for a variety of planar, nonplanar, and interferring lifting surfaces. Several methods are shown to provide reasonable estimates of over-all forces and moments for simple wing planforms with the suction analogy method currently offering the most versatility for arbitrary configuration applications. For the prediction of surface loadings the free vortex sheet method being developed by Boeing is shown to have considerable promise and further development of this type of method is encouraged. A data base for ogee strake-wing configurations is summarized with an emphasis on the requirements for maximizing the interference lift. A strake planform design procedure is discussed and a first solution (gothic in planview) is integrated with a wing body. The data show the strake to exhibit expected stable vortex characteristics. It was found that, apart from increasing sweep, conically cambered delta wings developed drag levels approaching that of attached flow with increasing either the lift or the wing camber height, lastly, an approximate vortex flow design method, based on the suction analogy, is outlined and an example is given.

  15. Digital enhancement of flow field images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudlinski, Robert A.; Park, Stephen K.

    1988-01-01

    Most photographs of experimentally generated fluid flow fields have inherently poor photographic quality, specifically low contrast. Thus, there is a need to establish a process for quickly and accurately enhancing these photographs to provide improved versions for physical interpretation, analysis, and publication. A sequence of digital image processing techniques which have been demonstrated to effectively enhance such photographs is described.

  16. Flow fields of low pressure vent exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1989-01-01

    The flow field produced by low pressure gas vents are described based on experimental data obtained from tests in a large vacuum chamber. The gas density, pressure, and flux at any location in the flow field are calculated based on the vent plume description and the knowledge of the flow rate and velocity of the venting gas. The same parameters and the column densities along a specified line of sight traversing the plume are also obtained and shown by a computer-generated graphical representation. The fields obtained with a radially scanning Pitot probe within the exhausting gas are described by a power of the cosine function, the mass rate and the distance from the exit port. The field measurements were made for gas at pressures ranging from 2 to 50 torr venting from pipe fittings with diameters of 3/16 inch to 1-1/2 inches I.D. (4.76 mm to 38.1 mm). The N(2) mass flow rates ranged from 2E-4 to 3.7E-1 g/s.

  17. Flow fields of low pressure vent exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1990-01-01

    The flow field produced by low pressure gas vents are described based on experimental data obtained from tests in a large vacuum chamber. The gas density, pressure, and flux at any location in the flow field are calculated based on the vent plume description and the knowledge of the flow rate and velocity of the venting gas. The same parameters and the column densities along a specified line of sight traversing the plume are also obtained and shown by a computer generated graphical representation. The fields obtained with a radically scanning Pitot probe within the exhausting gas are described by a power of the cosine function, the mass rate, and the distance from the exit port. The field measurements were made for gas at pressures ranging from 2 to 50 torr venting from pipe fittings with diameters to 3/16 to 1-1/2 inches I.D. (4.76 to 38.1 mm). The N2 mass flow rates ranged from 2E-4 to 3.7E-1 g/s.

  18. Numerical simulation of scramjet inlet flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay

    1986-01-01

    A computer program was developed to analyze supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) inlet flow fields. The program solves the three-dimensional Euler or Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations in full conservation form by either the fully explicit or explicit-implicit, predictor-corrector method of MacCormack. Turbulence is modeled by an algebraic eddy-viscosity model. The analysis allows inclusion of end effects which can significantly affect the inlet flow field. Detailed laminar and turbulent flow results are presented for a symmetric-wedge corner, and comparisons are made with the available experimental results to allow assessment of the program. Results are then presented for two inlet configurations for which experimental results exist at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  19. Sensitivity of aerodynamic forces in laminar and turbulent flow past a square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliga, Philippe; Boujo, Edouard; Pujals, Gregory; Gallaire, François

    2014-10-01

    We use adjoint-based gradients to analyze the sensitivity of the drag force on a square cylinder. At Re = 40, the flow settles down to a steady state. The quantity of interest in the adjoint formulation is the steady asymptotic value of drag reached after the initial transient, whose sensitivity is computed solving a steady adjoint problem from knowledge of the stable base solution. At Re = 100, the flow develops to the time-periodic, vortex-shedding state. The quantity of interest is rather the time-averaged mean drag, whose sensitivity is computed integrating backwards in time an unsteady adjoint problem from knowledge of the entire history of the vortex-shedding solution. Such theoretical frameworks allow us to identify the sensitive regions without computing the actually controlled states, and provide a relevant and systematic guideline on where in the flow to insert a secondary control cylinder in the attempt to reduce drag, as established from comparisons with dedicated numerical simulations of the two-cylinder system. For the unsteady case at Re = 100, we also compute an approximation to the mean drag sensitivity solving a steady adjoint problem from knowledge of only the mean flow solution, and show the approach to carry valuable information in view of guiding relevant control strategy, besides reducing tremendously the related numerical effort. An extension of this simplified framework to turbulent flow regime is examined revisiting the widely benchmarked flow at Reynolds number Re = 22 000, the theoretical predictions obtained in the frame of unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes modeling being consistent with experimental data from the literature. Application of the various sensitivity frameworks to alternative control objectives such as increasing the lift and reducing the fluctuating drag and lift is also discussed and illustrated with a few selected examples.

  20. Aerodynamic and flow-visualization studies of two delta-wing entry vehicles at a Mach number of 20.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, J. P.; Stone, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    The longitudinal, lateral, and directional aerodynamic characteristics of two space shuttle concepts have been obtained in helium for operational flight Reynolds numbers at angles of attack from minus 10 to 55 deg. Included are elevon control deflections, roll control due to ailerons, and the effects of a nose modification. Selected results were compared with those derived from tangent-cone and Newtonian theories. Also included are results of a flow-visualization study consisting of electron-beam-illuminated flow and surface oil-flow patterns.

  1. Solid rocket motor aft field joint flow field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabnis, Jayant S.; Gibeling, Edward J.; Mcdonald, Henry

    1987-01-01

    An efficient Navier-Stokes analysis was successfully applied to simulate the complex flow field in the vicinity of a slot in a solid rocket motor with segment joints. The capability of the computer code to resolve the flow near solid surfaces without using a wall function assumption was demonstrated. In view of the complex nature of the flow field in the vicinity of the slot, this approach is considered essential. The results obtained from these calculations provide valuable design information, which would otherwise be extremely difficult to obtain. The results of the axisymmetric calculations indicate the presence of a region of reversed axial flow at the aft-edge of the slot and show the over-pressure in the slot to be only about 10 psi. The results of the asymmetric calculations indicate that a pressure asymmetry more than two diameters downstream of the slot has no noticeable effect on the flow field in the slot. They also indicate that the circumferential pressure differential caused in the slot due to failure of a 15 deg section of the castable inhibitor will be approximately 1 psi.

  2. Accelerated iteration schemes for transonic flow calculations using fast poisson solvers. [aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, A.

    1975-01-01

    The use of a fast elliptic solver in combination with relaxation is presented as an effective way to accelerate the convergence of transonic flow calculations, particularly when a marching scheme can be used to treat the supersonic zone in the relaxation process.

  3. Investigation of Active Flow Control to Improve Aerodynamic Performance of Oscillating Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narducci, Robert P.; Bowersox, Rodney; Bussom, Richard; McVeigh, Michael; Raghu, Surya; White, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to design a promising active flow control concept on an oscillating airfoil for on-blade alleviation of dynamic stall. The concept must be designed for a range of representative Mach numbers (0.2 to 0.5) and representative reduced frequency characteristics of a full-scale rotorcraft. Specifications for a sweeping-jet actuator to mitigate the detrimental effects of retreating blade stall experienced by edgewise rotors in forward flight has been performed. Wind tunnel modifications have been designed to accommodate a 5x6 test section in the Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel at Texas A&M University that will allow the tunnel to achieve Mach 0.5. The flow control design is for a two-dimensional oscillating VR-7 blade section with a 15- inch chord at rotor-relevant flow conditions covering the range of reduced frequencies from 0.0 to 0.15 and Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.5. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to influence the placement of the flow control devices for optimal effectiveness.

  4. Photographing flow fields and heat-transfer patterns in color simultaneously.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, T. R., Jr.; Hunt, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A color-schlieren technique is described that combines the flow-field shock shapes and the phase-change coating to give a very descriptive account of aerodynamic heating. This technique employs, in addition to the conventional schlieren system, a temperature-sensitive material as a thin surface coating that undergoes a visible phase change from opaque solid to clear liquid at a known temperature. The resulting pictures can lead to a better understanding of shock/boundary layer interactions, as shown with the aid of a specific example.

  5. Computational and theoretical investigation of Mars's atmospheric impact on the descent module "Exomars-2018" under aerodynamic deceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golomazov, M. M.; Ivankov, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Methods for calculating the aerodynamic impact of the Martian atmosphere on the descent module "Exomars-2018" intended for solving the problem of heat protection of the descent module during aerodynamic deceleration are presented. The results of the investigation are also given. The flow field and radiative and convective heat exchange are calculated along the trajectory of the descent module until parachute system activation.

  6. The application of general aerodynamic lifting surface elements to problems in unsteady transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using combined subsonic and supersonic linear theory as a means for solving unsteady transonic flow problems in an economical and yet realistic manner. With some modification, existing linear theory methods are combined into a single program and a simple algorithm is derived for determining interference between lifting surface elements of different Mach number. The method is applied to a wide variety of problems for which measured unsteady pressure distributions and Mach number distributions are available. By comparing theory and experiment, the transonic method solutions show a significant improvement over uniform flow solutions. It is concluded that with these refinements the method will provide a means for performing realistic transonic flutter and dynamic response analyses at costs which are compatible with current linear theory based solutions.

  7. Aerodynamics of the Large-Volume, Flow-Through Detector System. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, H.; Saric, W.; Laananen, D.; Martinez, C.; Carrillo, R.; Myers, J.; Clevenger, D.

    1996-03-01

    The Large-Volume Flow-Through Detector System (LVFTDS) was designed to monitor alpha radiation from Pu, U, and Am in mixed-waste incinerator offgases; however, it can be adapted to other important monitoring uses that span a number of potential markets, including site remediation, indoor air quality, radon testing, and mine shaft monitoring. Goal of this effort was to provide mechanical design information for installation of LVFTDS in an incinerator, with emphasis on ability to withstand the high temperatures and high flow rates expected. The work was successfully carried out in three stages: calculation of pressure drop through the system, materials testing to determine surrogate materials for wind-tunnel testing, and wind-tunnel testing of an actual configuration.

  8. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Suei; Lan, C. Edward

    1990-01-01

    Due to the requirement of increased performance and maneuverability, the flight envelope of a modern fighter is frequently extended to the high angle-of-attack regime. Vehicles maneuvering in this regime are subjected to nonlinear aerodynamic loads. The nonlinearities are due mainly to three-dimensional separated flow and concentrated vortex flow that occur at large angles of attack. Accurate prediction of these nonlinear airloads is of great importance in the analysis of a vehicle's flight motion and in the design of its flight control system. A satisfactory evaluation of the performance envelope of the aircraft may require a large number of coupled computations, one for each change in initial conditions. To avoid the disadvantage of solving the coupled flow-field equations and aircraft's motion equations, an alternate approach is to use a mathematical modeling to describe the steady and unsteady aerodynamics for the aircraft equations of motion. Aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a rapidly maneuvering aircraft are, in general, nonlinear functions of motion variables, their time rate of change, and the history of maneuvering. A numerical method was developed to analyze the nonlinear and time-dependent aerodynamic response to establish the generalized indicial function in terms of motion variables and their time rates of change.

  9. Modulating flow and aerodynamic characteristics of a square cylinder in crossflow using a rear jet injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong F.; Hsu, Ching M.; Chen, Yu T.

    2017-01-01

    The temporally evolved flow behaviors around a square cylinder subject to modulation of a planar jet issued from the cylinder's downstream surface into the wake were studied using the laser-assisted smoke flow visualization method and synchronized hot-wire anemometers. The drag force asserted on the square cylinder was obtained by measuring the surface pressures. Four characteristic flow modes (wake-dominated, transitional, critical, and jet-dominated) were observed in different regimes of freestream Reynolds number and jet injection ratio. In the wake-dominated mode, the jet swung periodically back and forth on the downstream surface due to the wake vortex shedding. In the transitional mode, the vortex shedding in the wake vanished so that the flow around the cylinder presented no periodic oscillations. In the critical mode, the wake width became smaller and therefore made the vortex shedding frequency larger than that observed in the wake dominated mode. In the jet-dominated mode, the jet had a large momentum that entrained wake fluids and therefore stabilized the instabilities of the wake, separated boundary layers on lateral surfaces, and stagnation point on the upstream surface. Two standing vortices appeared in the near wake beside the high-momentum jet. The width of the wake was decreased substantially by jet entrainment. The drag coefficient decreased with an increase in the jet injection ratio. The downstream surface jet injection caused the pressure coefficients to decrease at the upstream surface and to increase at the downstream surface. Therefore, the drag coefficients were decreased significantly by 26%, 33%, and 38% at the injection ratios of 0.5, 1.5, and 2.5, respectively.

  10. Inflow/Outflow Conditions for Unsteady Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics in Nonuniform Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, Oliver V.; Grady, Joseph E. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The effect of a nonuniform mean flow on the normal modes; the inflow/outflow nonreflecting boundary conditions; and the sound power are studied. The normal modes in an annular duct are computed using a spectral method in combination with a shooting method. The swirl causes force imbalance which couples the acoustic and vortical modes. The acoustic modes are distinguished from the vortical modes by their large pressure and small vorticity content. The mean swirl also produces a Doppler shift in frequency. This results in more counter-spinning modes cut-on at a given frequency than modes spinning with the swirl. Nonreflecting boundary conditions are formulated using the normal mode solutions. The inflow/outflow boundary conditions are implemented in a linearized Euler scheme and validated by computing the propagation of acoustic and vortical waves in a duct for a variety of swirling mean flows. Numerical results show that the evolution of the vortical disturbances is sensitive to the inflow conditions and the details of the wake excitations. All three components of the wake velocity must be considered to correctly compute the wake evolution and the blade upwash. For high frequencies, the acoustic-vortical mode coupling is weak and a conservation equation for the acoustic energy can be derived. Sound power calculations show significant mean flow swirl effects, but mode interference effects are small.

  11. Flow visualization of mast-mounted-sight/main rotor aerodynamic interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghee, Terence A.; Kelley, Henry L.

    1993-01-01

    Flow visualization tests were conducted on a 27 percent-scale AH-64 attack helicopter model fitted with various mast-mounted-sight configurations in an attempt to identify the cause of adverse vibration encountered during full-scale flight tests of an Apache/Longbow configuration. The tests were conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. A symmetric and an asymmetric mast-mounted-sight oriented at several skew angles were tested at forward and rearward flight speeds of 30 and 45 knots. A laser light sheet seeded with vaporized propylene glycol was used to visualize the wake of the sight in planes parallel and perpendicular to the freestream flow. Analysis of the flow visualization data identified the frequency of the wake shed from the sight, the angle-of-attack at the sight, and the location where the sight wake crossed the rotor plane. Differences in wake structure were observed between the various sight configurations and slew angles. Postulations into the cause of the adverse vibration found in flight test are given along with considerations for future tests.

  12. Field emission microplasma actuation for microchannel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sashank Tholeti, Siva; Shivkumar, Gayathri; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2016-06-01

    Microplasmas offer attractive flow control methodology for gas transport in microsystems where large viscous losses make conventional pumping methods highly inefficient. We study microscale flow actuation by dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) with field emission (FE) of electrons, which allows lowering the operational voltage from kV to a few hundred volts and below. A feasibility study of FE-DBD for flow actuation is performed using 2D particle-in-cell method with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC/MCC) at 10 MHz in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. The free diffusion dominated, high velocity field emission electrons create a large positive space charge and a body force on the order of 106 N m-3. The body force and Joule heat decrease with increase in dielectric thickness and electrode thickness. The body force also decreases at lower pressures. The plasma body force distribution along with the Joule heating is then used in the Navier-Stokes simulations to quantify the flow actuation in a microchannel. Theoretical analysis and simulations for plasma actuated planar Poiseuille flow show that the gain in flow rate is inversely proportional to Reynolds number. This theoretical analysis is in good agreement with the simulations for a microchannel with closely placed actuators under incompressible conditions. Flow rate of FE-DBD driven 2D microchannel is around 100 ml min-1 mm-1 for an input power of 64 μW mm-1. The gas temperature rises by 1500 K due to the Joule heating, indicating FE-DBD’s potential for microcombustion, micropropulsion and chemical sensing in addition to microscale pumping and mixing applications.

  13. Aerodynamic Performance of Missile Configurations at Transonic Speeds Including the Effects of a Jet Plume

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-02-18

    speeds. The goal of the entire research project is to develop calculation techniques that allow the aerodynamic characteristics of missile ...Shock attachment angle and Mach number relationship . . II. ANALYSIS OF INVISCID FLOW In order to calculate the aerodynamic performance of missile ...and a change in any part of the flow field affects every other part. Along each characteristic line the dependent variables have to satisfy the

  14. Combined Numerical/Analytical Perturbation Solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations for Aerodynamic (Ejector Nozzle) Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeChant, Lawrence J.

    1997-01-01

    In spite of the rapid advances in both scalar and parallel computational tools, the large number and breadth of variables involved in aerodynamic systems make the use of parabolized or even boundary layer fluid flow models impractical for both preliminary design and inverse design problems. Given this restriction, we have concluded that reduced or approximate models are an important family of tools for design purposes. This study of a combined perturbation/numerical modeling methodology with an application to ejector-mixer nozzles (shown schematically in the following figure) is nearing completion. The work is being funded by a grant from the NASA Lewis Research Center to Texas A&M University. These ejector-mixer nozzle models are designed to be of use to the High Speed Civil Transport Program and may be adopted by both NASA and industry. A computer code incorporating the ejector-mixer models is under development. This code, the Differential Reduced Ejector/Mixer Analysis (DREA), can be run fast enough to be used as a subroutine or to be called by a design optimization routine. Simplified conservation equations--x-momentum, energy, and mass conservation--are used to define the model. Unlike other preliminary design models, DREA requires minimal empirical input and includes vortical mixing and a fully compressible formulation among other features. DREA is being validated by comparing it with results obtained from open literature and proprietary industry data. Preliminary results for a subsonic ejector and a supersonic ejector are shown. In addition, dedicated experiments have been performed at Texas A&M. These experiments use a hydraulic/gas flow analog to provide information about the inviscid mixing interface structure. Final validation and documentation of this work is expected by May of 1997. However, preliminary versions of DREA can be expected in early 1997. In summary, DREA provides a sufficiently detailed and realistic ejector-mixer nozzle model at a

  15. The Flow Field Inside Ventricle Assist Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einav, Shmuel; Rosenfeld, Moshe; Avrahami, Idit

    2000-11-01

    The evaluation of innovative ventricle assist devices (VAD), is of major importance. A New Left Heart Assist Device, with an improved energy converter unit, has been investigated both numerically and experimentally. For this purpose, an experimental Continuous Digital Particle Imagining Velocimetry (CDPIV) is combined with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. These tools complement each other to result into a comprehensive description of the complex 3D, viscous and time-dependent flow field inside the artificial ventricle. A 3D numerical model was constructed to simulate the VAD pump and a time-depended CFD analysis with moving walls was performed to predict the flow behaviour in the VAD during the cardiac cycle. A commercial finite element package was used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations (FIDAP, Fluent Inc., Evanston). In the experimental analysis, an optically clear elastic model of the VAD was placed inside a 2D CDPIV system. The CDPIV system is capable of sampling 15 velocity vector fields per second based on image-pairs intervals lower than 0.5 millisecond. Continuous sequences of experimental images, followed by their calculated velocity transient fields, are given as animated presentation of the distensible VAD. These results are used for validating the CFD simulations. Once validated, the CFD results provide a detailed 3D and time dependent description of the flow field, allowing the identification of stagnation or high shear stress regions.

  16. Electro-hydrodynamic force field and flow patterns generated by a DC corona discharge in the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monrolin, Nicolas; Plouraboue, Franck; Praud, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    Ionic wind refers to the electro-convection of ionised air between high voltage electrodes. Microscopic ion-neutral collisions are responsible for momentum transfer from accelerated ions, subjected to the electric field, to the neutral gas molecules resulting in a macroscopic airflow acceleration. In the past decades it has been investigated for various purposes from food drying through aerodynamic flow control and eventually laptop cooling. One consequence of air acceleration between the electrodes is thrust generation, often referred to as the Biefeld-Brown effect or electro-hydrodynamic thrust. In this experimental study, the ionic wind velocity field is measured with the PIV method. From computing the acceleration of the air we work out the electrostatic force field for various electrodes configurations. This enables an original direct evaluation of the force distribution as well as the influence of electrodes shape and position. Thrust computation based on the flow acceleration are compared with digital scale measurements. Complex flow features are highlighted such as vortex shedding, indicating that aerodynamic effects may play a significant role. Furthermore, the aerodynamic drag force exerted on the electrodes is quantified by choosing an appropriate control volume. Authors thank Region Midi-Pyrenee and CNES Launcher Directorate for financial support.

  17. Aerodynamic flow control of a high lift system with dual synthetic jet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alstrom, Robert Bruce

    Implementing flow control systems will mitigate the vibration and aeroacoustic issues associated with weapons bays; enhance the performance of the latest generation aircraft by reducing their fuel consumption and improving their high angle-of-attack handling qualities; facilitate steep climb out profiles for military transport aircraft. Experimental research is performed on a NACA 0015 airfoil with a simple flap at angle of attack of 16o in both clean and high lift configurations. The results of the active control phase of the project will be discussed. Three different experiments were conducted; they are Amplitude Modulated Dual Location Open Loop Control, Adaptive Control with Amplitude Modulation using Direct Sensor Feedback and Adaptive Control with Amplitude Modulation using Extremum Seeking Control. All the closed loop experiments are dual location. The analysis presented uses the spatial variation of the root mean square pressure fluctuations, power spectral density estimates, Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs), and time frequency analysis which consists of the application of the Morlet and Mexican Hat wavelets. Additionally, during the course of high speed testing in the wind tunnel, some aeroacoustic phenomena were uncovered; those results will also be presented. A cross section of the results shows that the shape of the RMS pressure distributions is sensitive to forcing frequency. The application of broadband excitation in the case adaptive control causes the flow to select a frequency to lock in to. Additionally, open loop control results in global synchronization via switching between two stable states and closed loop control inhibits the switching phenomena, but rather synchronizes the flow about multiple stable shedding frequencies.

  18. Flow Induced Vibration and Glottal Aerodynamics in a Three-Dimensional Laryngeal Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian; Mittal, Rajat; Bielamowicz, Steven

    2009-11-01

    Three-dimensional effects associated with phonation remain unclear due to the lack of capability of simulating 3D fluid-tissue interaction in the past. To advance the state-of-the-art in this arena, an immersed-boundary method based flow solver coupled with a finite-element solid dynamics solver is employed to conduct high-fidelity direct-numerical simulations of phonation in a 3D model of the human larynx. Three-dimensional vibration patterns are captured along with turbulence effects and three-dimensional vortex structures in the glottal jet. Results from these simulations are presented.

  19. A "TEST OF CONCEPT" COMPARISON OF AERODYNAMIC AND MECHANICAL RESUSPENSION MECHANISMS FOR PARTICLES DEPOSITED ON FIELD RYE GRASS (SECALE CERCELE). PART I. RELATIVE PARTICLE FLUX RATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resuspension of uniform latex micro spheres deposited on a single seed pod of field rye grass stalk and head was investigated experimentally in a wind tunnel. The experiment was designed to distinguish aerodynamic (viscous and turbulent) mechanisms from mechanical resuspension re...

  20. Flow-Field Surveys for Rectangular Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2012-01-01

    Flow field survey results for three rectangular nozzles are presented for a low subsonic condition obtained primarily by hot-wire anemometry. The three nozzles have aspect ratios of 2:1, 4:1 and 8:1. A fourth case included has 2:1 aspect ratio with chevrons added to the long edges. Data on mean velocity, turbulent normal and shear stresses as well as streamwise vorticity are presented covering a streamwise distance up to sixteen equivalent diameters from the nozzle exit. These detailed flow properties, including initial boundary layer characteristics, are usually difficult to measure in high speed flows and the primary objective of the study is to aid ongoing and future computational and noise modeling efforts.

  1. Flow Field of a Human Cough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Jean

    2005-11-01

    Cough generated infectious aerosols are of interest while developing strategies for the mitigation of disease risks ranging from the common cold to SARS. In this work, the velocity field of human cough was measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The project subjects (total 29) coughed into an enclosure seeded with stage fog for most measurements. Cough flow speed profiles, average widths of the cough jet, waveform, and maximum cough speeds were measured. Maximum cough speeds ranged from 1.5 m/s to 28.8 m/s. No correlation was found for maximum cough flow speeds to height or gender. The slow growth of the width of the cough flow suggests that a cough may penetrate farther into a room than a steady jet of similar volume. The velocity profile was found to scale with the square root of downstream distance.

  2. Aerodynamic forces acting on a passive flow control equipped airfoil in turbulent inflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampers, Gerrit; Peinke, Joachim; Hölling, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Wind turbines work within turbulent atmospheric flows, with their well known challenging features of intermittent two point statistics. These intermittent statistics have a big impact on wind turbines, concerning fluctuating mechanical loads. Flow control is a promising approach for the reduction of these fluctuations. In this project, an airfoil profile is equipped with mechanically coupled flexible leading and trailing edge flaps, enabling to passively adapt its camber. We expose the profile to different reproducible turbulent inflow conditions, generated with an active grid in a wind tunnel and study the profile's ability to alleviate lift fluctuations. The first experiment is concerned with repeated mexican hat shaped inflow gusts. The corresponding lift reactions of the profile show, that the adaptive camber mechanism is able to alleviate lift fluctuations caused by the inflow gust. In the second experiment, we use different grid excitations to vary the flatness of the inflow angle increments and study the influence of the statistics at different angles of attack. We propose a stochastic Langevin approach to decompose the lift dynamics into a deterministic response and a stochastic part, allowing for a quantitative analysis of the response dynamics. Funded by the German Research Foundation, Ref. No. PE 478/15-1.

  3. Field Emission Microplasma Actuated Microchannel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholeti, Siva Sashank; Shivkumar, Gayathri; Alexeenko, Alina

    2015-11-01

    Flow actuation by dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) involve no moving parts and provide high power density for flow enhancement, heating and mixing applications in microthrusters, micropumps and microcombustors. Conventional micro-DBDs require voltages ~ kV for flow enhancement of a few m/s for 500 μm high channel. However for gaps <10 microns, field emission lowers the breakdown voltage following modified Paschen curve. We consider a micropump concept that takes advantage of the field emission from a micro-DBD with dielectric thickness of 3 μm and a peak voltage of -325 V at 10 MHz. At 760 Torr, for electrode thickness of 1 μm, Knudsen number with respect to the e-nitrogen collisions is 0.1. So, kinetic approach of particle-in-cell method with Monte Carlo collisions is applied in nitrogen at 300 K to resolve electron (ne) and ion (ni) number densities. Body force, fb = eE(ni-ne) , where, e is electron charge and E is electric field. The major source of heating from plasma is Joule heating, J.E, where J is current density. At 760 Torr, for fb,avg = 1 mN/cubic mm and J.E = 8 W/cubic mm, micro-DBD induced a flow with a velocity of 4.1 m/s for a 64 mW/m power input for a channel height of 500 μm. The PIC/MCC plasma simulations are coupled to a CFD solver for analysis of the resulting flow actuation in microchannels at various Reynolds numbers. This work was supported by NSF ECCS Grant No. 1202095.

  4. System Identification and POD Method Applied to Unsteady Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Deman; Kholodar, Denis; Juang, Jer-Nan; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The representation of unsteady aerodynamic flow fields in terms of global aerodynamic modes has proven to be a useful method for reducing the size of the aerodynamic model over those representations that use local variables at discrete grid points in the flow field. Eigenmodes and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) modes have been used for this purpose with good effect. This suggests that system identification models may also be used to represent the aerodynamic flow field. Implicit in the use of a systems identification technique is the notion that a relative small state space model can be useful in describing a dynamical system. The POD model is first used to show that indeed a reduced order model can be obtained from a much larger numerical aerodynamical model (the vortex lattice method is used for illustrative purposes) and the results from the POD and the system identification methods are then compared. For the example considered, the two methods are shown to give comparable results in terms of accuracy and reduced model size. The advantages and limitations of each approach are briefly discussed. Both appear promising and complementary in their characteristics.

  5. Computer Program for Aerodynamic and Blading Design of Multistage Axial-Flow Compressors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    reference 1. In M2+ 1 ) equation form it is [M sin a+d sec(a+ X) tan(of (7) Vi A( rVo ) D=l- F c(r+r 2 )Vj (2) A velocity gradient procedure is used to...mdl - T / dl station path, the solution for Vm is dlnP d( rVo ) V2 / . \\! +V2.2b(l-,10 ) a-ldl 4+ ( &7 A two-step procedure is used in the program...aVm a( rVO ) 0 an r an When steady flow is assumed and the local friction force is ignored, equation (CI) reduces to =6a0) + fn[0) + ,[ V, a( rVo ) VH= Vx

  6. Progress on a Taylor weak statement finite element algorithm for high-speed aerodynamic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Freels, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    A new finite element numerical Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) algorithm has matured to the point of efficiently solving two-dimensional high speed real-gas compressible flow problems in generalized coordinates on modern vector computer systems. The algorithm employs a Taylor Weak Statement classical Galerkin formulation, a variably implicit Newton iteration, and a tensor matrix product factorization of the linear algebra Jacobian under a generalized coordinate transformation. Allowing for a general two-dimensional conservation law system, the algorithm has been exercised on the Euler and laminar forms of the Navier-Stokes equations. Real-gas fluid properties are admitted, and numerical results verify solution accuracy, efficiency, and stability over a range of test problem parameters.

  7. A Synthesis of Hybrid RANS/LES CFD Results for F-16XL Aircraft Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.; Park, Michael A.; Hitzel, Stephan M.; Jirasek, Adam; Lofthouse, Andrew J.; Morton, Scott A.; McDaniel, David R.; Rizzi, Arthur M.

    2015-01-01

    A synthesis is presented of recent numerical predictions for the F-16XL aircraft flow fields and aerodynamics. The computational results were all performed with hybrid RANS/LES formulations, with an emphasis on unsteady flows and subsequent aerodynamics, and results from five computational methods are included. The work was focused on one particular low-speed, high angle-of-attack flight test condition, and comparisons against flight-test data are included. This work represents the third coordinated effort using the F-16XL aircraft, and a unique flight-test data set, to advance our knowledge of slender airframe aerodynamics as well as our capability for predicting these aerodynamics with advanced CFD formulations. The prior efforts were identified as Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project International, with the acronyms CAWAPI and CAWAPI-2. All information in this paper is in the public domain.

  8. A numerical study of turbulent flow over complex aeolian dune fields: the White Sands National Monument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. W.; Chamecki, M.; Kocurek, G.; Mohrig, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    The structure and dynamics of fully-developed turbulent flows responding to aeolian dune fields are studied using large-eddy simulation with an immersed boundary method. An aspect of particular importance in these flows is the downwind migration of coherent motions associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities which originate at the dune crests. These instabilities are responsible for enhanced downward transport of high momentum fluid via the so-called turbulent sweep mechanism. However, the presence of such structures and their role in determining the bulk characteristics of fully developed dune field sublayer aerodynamics has received relatively limited attention. Moreover, many existing studies address mostly symmetric or mildly asymmetric dune forms. The White Sands National Monument is a field of aeolian gypsum sand dunes located in the Tularosa Basin in southern New Mexico. Aeolian processes at the site result in a complex, anisotropic dune field. In the dune field sublayer, the flow statistics resemble a mixing layer: at approximately the dune crest height, vertical profiles of streamwise velocity exhibit an inflection and turbulent Reynolds stresses are maximum; below this, the streamwise and vertical velocity fluctuations are positively and negatively skewed, respectively. We evaluate the spatial structure of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities present in the dune field sublayer -- shear length, Ls, and vortex spacing, Lambda_x -- and show that Ls = m Lambda_x, where m is approximately 8 in the different sections considered (for turbulent mixing layers, 7 < m < 10, Rogers and Moser, 1994: Phys. Fluids A, 6, 903-922). These results guide discussion on the statistics of aerodynamic drag across the dunes; probability density functions of time-series of aerodynamic drag for the dunes are shown to exhibit skewness and variance much greater than values reported for turbulent boundary layer flow over an homogeneous roughness distribution. Thus, we propose that

  9. Unsteady Flow Field in a Multistage Axial Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suryavamshi, N.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Prato, J.

    1997-01-01

    The flow field in a multistage compressor is three-dimensional, unsteady, and turbulent with substantial viscous effects. Some of the specific phenomena that has eluded designers include the effects of rotor-stator and rotor-rotor interactions and the physics of mixing of velocity, pressure, temperature and velocity fields. An attempt was made, to resolve experimentally, the unsteady pressure and temperature fields downstream of the second stator of a multistage axial flow compressor which will provide information on rotor-stator interaction effects and the nature of the unsteadiness in an embedded stator of a three stage axial flow compressor. Detailed area traverse measurements using pneumatic five hole probe, thermocouple probe, semi-conductor total pressure probe (Kulite) and an aspirating probe downstream of the second stator were conducted at the peak efficiency operating condition. The unsteady data was then reduced through an ensemble averaging technique which splits the signal into deterministic and unresolved components. Auto and cross correlation techniques were used to correlate the deterministic total temperature and velocity components (acquired using a slanted hot-film probe at the same measurement locations) and the gradients, distributions and relative weights of each of the terms of the average passage equation were then determined. Based on these measurements it was observed that the stator wakes, hub leakage flow region, casing endwall suction surface corner region, and the casing endwall region away from the blade surfaces were the regions of highest losses in total pressure, lowest efficiency and highest levels of unresolved unsteadiness. The deterministic unsteadiness was found to be high in the hub and casing endwall regions as well as on the pressure side of the stator wake. The spectral distribution of hot-wire and kulite voltages shows that at least eight harmonics of all three rotor blade passing frequencies are present at this

  10. Effect of nacelles on aerodynamic characteristics of an executive-jet model with simulated, partial-chord, laminar-flow-control wing glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley High-Speed 7- by 10-Foot Tunnel using a 1/10-scale model of an executive jet to examine the effects of the nacelles on the wing pressures and model longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics. For the present investigation, each wing panel was modified with a simulated, partial-chord, laminar-flow-control glove. Horizontal-tail effects were also briefly examined. The tests covered a range of Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.82 and lift coefficients from 0.20 to 0.55. Oil-flow photographs of the wing at selected conditions are included.

  11. Flow Field Analysis of a Future Launcher Configuration during Start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozic, O.; Otto, H.

    2005-02-01

    Within the German Future Space Launcher Technology Research Program ASTRA several reusable concepts have been investigated. Particularly one dedicated for near-term application consists of an Ariane 5-type expendable core stage and two liquid fly back boosters (LFBB). The present investigation focused on the interaction between the booster and the core stage during ascent phase. The analysis is carried out numerically by means of the DLR unstructured code TAU. The numerical results allow a compressive study of the complicate flow pattern between the boosters and the central core and address the changes on aerodynamic drag between the three configurations considered. Key words: launcher, ASTRA, LFBB, flow simulation, CFD simulation, unstructured grid

  12. Incremental Aerodynamic Coefficient Database for the USA2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Annie Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In March through May of 2016, a wind tunnel test was conducted by the Aerosciences Branch (EV33) to visually study the unsteady aerodynamic behavior over multiple transition geometries for the Universal Stage Adapter 2 (USA2) in the MSFC Aerodynamic Research Facility's Trisonic Wind Tunnel (TWT). The purpose of the test was to make a qualitative comparison of the transonic flow field in order to provide a recommended minimum transition radius for manufacturing. Additionally, 6 Degree of Freedom force and moment data for each configuration tested was acquired in order to determine the geometric effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients (Normal Force, Axial Force, and Pitching Moment). In order to make a quantitative comparison of the aerodynamic effects of the USA2 transition geometry, the aerodynamic coefficient data collected during the test was parsed and incorporated into a database for each USA2 configuration tested. An incremental aerodynamic coefficient database was then developed using the generated databases for each USA2 geometry as a function of Mach number and angle of attack. The final USA2 coefficient increments will be applied to the aerodynamic coefficients of the baseline geometry to adjust the Space Launch System (SLS) integrated launch vehicle force and moment database based on the transition geometry of the USA2.

  13. Aerodynamic flow quality and acoustic characteristics of the 40- by 80-foot test section circuit of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Lawrence E.; Zell, Peter T.; Soderman, Paul T.; Falarski, Michael D.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Edenborough, H. Kipling

    1988-01-01

    The 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel circuit of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex (NFAC) has recently undergone major modifications and subsequently completed final acceptance testing. The initial testing and calibration of the wind tunnel are described and in many cases these results are compared with predictions derived from model tests and theoretical analyses. The wind tunnel meets or exceeds essentially all performance objectives. The facility runs smoothly and routinely at its maximum test-section velocity of 300 knots (Mach number = 0.45). An effective cooling air exchange system enables the wind tunnel to operate indefinitely at this maximum power condition. Throughout the operating envelope of the wind tunnel the test-section dynamic pressure is uniform to within + or - 0.5 deg, and the axial component of turbulence is generally less than 0.5 percent. Acoustic measurements indicate that, due to the low noise fans and acoustic treatment in the wind-tunnel circuit and test section, the background noise level in the test section is comparable to other large-scale acoustic wind tunnels in the United States and abroad.

  14. A theoretical note on aerodynamic lifting in dust devils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-Ting

    2016-02-01

    The stress distribution of a known rotating flow near the ground in fluid mechanics indicates that the horizontal aerodynamic entrainment of particles within dust devils is attributed to friction force rather than pressure force. The expression of dust emission rate on Earth was theoretically discussed based on simulated flow field and our current understanding of the physics of aeolian dust. It seems that transition flow is vital to dust devils on Mars.

  15. Langley Symposium on Aerodynamics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, Sharon H. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to present current work and results of the Langley Aeronautics Directorate covering the areas of computational fluid dynamics, viscous flows, airfoil aerodynamics, propulsion integration, test techniques, and low-speed, high-speed, and transonic aerodynamics. The following sessions are included in this volume: theoretical aerodynamics, test techniques, fluid physics, and viscous drag reduction.

  16. Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, N. R.; Bergman, R. O.; Bonstrom, D. B.; Brinkman, T. W.; Chiu, S. H. J.; Green, S. S.; Hansen, S. D.; Klein, D. L.; Krohn, H. E.; Prow, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    A Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) was designed for the simulation of fluid flow around three-dimensional bodies, both in wind tunnel environments and in free space. The application of numerical simulation to this field of endeavor promised to yield economies in aerodynamic and aircraft body designs. A model for a NASF/FMP (Flow Model Processor) ensemble using a possible approach to meeting NASF goals is presented. The computer hardware and software are presented, along with the entire design and performance analysis and evaluation.

  17. Aerodynamic sound generation caused by viscous processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermeier, F.

    1985-03-01

    A theoretical investigation of the effects of viscosity on aerodynamic sound generation by unheated low Mach-number flow is discussed. By means of the method of matched asymptotic expansions, which allows for a consistent estimation of the order of magnitude of each term in the hydrodynamic flow field as well as in the sound field, an analytical solution in terms of a multipole expansion is derived. The physical interpretation of the mathematical outcome of various theories by Morfey (1976), Kempton (1976), Hardin, and Kambe and Minota (1983) is compared and re-examined.

  18. Zonal Two Equation Kappa-Omega Turbulence Models for Aerodynamic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menter, Florian R.

    1993-01-01

    Two new versions of the kappa-omega two-equation turbulence model will be presented. The new Baseline (BSL) model is designed to give results similar to those of the original kappa-omega model of Wilcox, but without its strong dependency on arbitrary freestream values. The BSL model is identical to the Wilcox model in the inner 50% of the boundary-layer but changes gradually to the standard kappa-epsilon model (in a kappa- omega formulation) towards the boundary-layer edge. The free shear layers. The second version of the model is called Shear-Stress Transport (SST) model. It is a variation of the BSL model with the additional ability to account for the transport of the principal turbulent shear stress in adverse pressure gradient boundary-layers. The model is based on Bradshaw's assumption that the principal shear-stress is proportional to the turbulent kinetic energy, which is introduced into the definition of the eddy-viscosity. Both models are tested for a large number of different flowfields. The results of the BSL model are similar to those of the original kappa-omega model, but without the undesirable freestream dependency. The predictions of the SST model are also independent of the freestream values but show better agreement with experimental data for adverse pressure gradient boundary-layer flows.

  19. Improved two-equation k-omega turbulence models for aerodynamic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menter, Florian R.

    1992-01-01

    Two new versions of the k-omega two-equation turbulence model will be presented. The new Baseline (BSL) model is designed to give results similar to those of the original k-omega model of Wilcox, but without its strong dependency on arbitrary freestream values. The BSL model is identical to the Wilcox model in the inner 50 percent of the boundary-layer but changes gradually to the high Reynolds number Jones-Launder k-epsilon model (in a k-omega formulation) towards the boundary-layer edge. The new model is also virtually identical to the Jones-Lauder model for free shear layers. The second version of the model is called Shear-Stress Transport (SST) model. It is based on the BSL model, but has the additional ability to account for the transport of the principal shear stress in adverse pressure gradient boundary-layers. The model is based on Bradshaw's assumption that the principal shear stress is proportional to the turbulent kinetic energy, which is introduced into the definition of the eddy-viscosity. Both models are tested for a large number of different flowfields. The results of the BSL model are similar to those of the original k-omega model, but without the undesirable freestream dependency. The predictions of the SST model are also independent of the freestream values and show excellent agreement with experimental data for adverse pressure gradient boundary-layer flows.

  20. Directed Plasma Flow across Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presura, R.; Stepanenko, Y.; Neff, S.; Sotnikov, V. I.

    2008-04-01

    The Hall effect plays a significant role in the penetration of plasma flows across magnetic field. For example, its effect may become dominant in the solar wind penetration into the magnetosphere, in the magnetic field advection in wire array z-pinch precursors, or in the arcing of magnetically insulated transmission lines. An experiment performed at the Nevada Terawatt Facility explored the penetration of plasma with large Hall parameter (˜10) across ambient magnetic field. The plasma was produced by ablation with the short pulse high intensity laser Leopard (0.35 ps, 10^17W/cm^2) and the magnetic field with the pulsed power generator Zebra (50 T). The expanding plasma assumed a jet configuration and propagated beyond a distance consistent with a diamagnetic bubble model. Without magnetic field, the plasma expansion was close to hemispherical. The ability to produce the plasma and the magnetic field with distinct generators allows a controlled, quasi-continuous variation of the Hall parameter and other plasma parameters making the experiments useful for benchmarking numerical simulations.

  1. Flow field simulation for a corncob incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.H.

    1999-02-01

    This article utilizes the standard k-{epsilon} turbulent model to simulate a corncob incinerator using the PISO algorithm with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The flow patterns of the incinerator equipped with secondary air inlets are predicted and compared for the various geometrical layouts. It is demonstrated that a wider recirculation zone can be found while the inclined angles of inlets increased, so a longer residence time and higher combustion efficiency will be expected. The longer distance between primary and secondary inlets will facilitate the formation of recirculation zone in this bigger space. The more the number of the secondary air inlets, the less the resident air in the top recirculation zone near the exit of the furnace. By using the CFD technique, the flow field of the incinerator can be understood more precisely, and it can serve as an excellent design tool. Furthermore, the computational program can be composed with FORTRAN and set up on a PC, and can easily be analyzed to get the flow field of the corncob incinerator.

  2. Unsteady aerodynamics of blade rows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.

    1989-01-01

    The requirements placed on an unsteady aerodynamic theory intended for turbomachinery aeroelastic or aeroacoustic applications are discussed along with a brief description of the various theoretical models that are available to address these requirements. The major emphasis is placed on the description of a linearized inviscid theory which fully accounts for the affects of a nonuniform mean or steady flow on unsteady aerodynamic response. Although this linearization was developed primarily for blade flutter prediction, more general equations are presented which account for unsteady excitations due to incident external aerodynamic disturbances as well as those due to prescribed blade motions. The motivation for this linearized unsteady aerodynamic theory is focused on, its physical and mathematical formulation is outlined and examples are presented to illustrate the status of numerical solution procedures and several effects of mean flow nonuniformity on unsteady aerodynamic response.

  3. Aerodynamic forces and flows of the full and partial clap-fling motions in insects

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mao

    2017-01-01

    Most of the previous studies on Weis-Fogh clap-fling mechanism have focused on the vortex structures and velocity fields. Detailed pressure distribution results are provided for the first time in this study to reveal the differences between the full and the partial clap-fling motions. The two motions are studied by numerically solving the Navier–Stokes equations in moving overset grids. The Reynolds number is set to 20, relevant to the tiny flying insects. The following has been shown: (1) During the clap phase, the wings clap together and create a high pressure region in the closing gap between wings, greatly increasing the positive pressure on the lower surface of wing, while pressure on the upper surface is almost unchanged by the interaction; during the fling phase, the wings fling apart and create a low pressure region in the opening gap between wings, greatly increasing the suction pressure on the upper surface of wing, while pressure on the lower surface is almost unchanged by the interaction; (2) The interference effect between wings is most severe at the end of clap phase and the start of the fling phase: two sharp force peaks (8–9 times larger than that of the one-winged case) are generated. But the total force peaks are manifested mostly as drag and barely as lift of the wing, owing to the vertical orientation of the wing section; (3) The wing–wing interaction effect in the partial clap-fling case is much weaker than that in the full clap-fling case, avoiding the generation of huge drag. Compared with a single wing flapping with the same motion, mean lift in the partial case is enhanced by 12% without suffering any efficiency degradation, indicating that partial clap-fling is a more practical choice for tiny insects to employ. PMID:28289562

  4. Performance and test section flow characteristics of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.; Flack, Karen

    1989-01-01

    Results from the performance and test section flow calibration of the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented. A flow calibration test was conducted in May and June 1987. The goal of the flow calibration test was to determine detailed spatial variations in the 40- by 80-ft test section flow quality throughout the tunnel operational envelope. Data were collected for test section speeds up to 300 knots and for air exchange rates of 0, 5, and 10 percent. The tunnel performance was also calibrated during the detailed mapping of the test section flow field. Experimental results presented indicate that the flow quality in the test section, with the exception of temperature, is relatively insensitive to the level of dynamic pressure and the air exchange rate. The dynamic pressure variation in the test section is within + or - 0.5 deg at all test section velocities. Cross-stream temperature gradients in the test section caused by the air exchange system were documented, and a correction method was established. Streamwise static pressure variation on the centerline is about 1 percent of test section dynamic pressure over 30 ft of the test section length.

  5. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Flow field measurements of three subsonic rectangular cold air jets are presented. The three cases had aspect ratios of 1x2, 1x4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1x2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. The data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data are presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made.

  6. Vibrational relaxation in hypersonic flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Willard E.; Miner, Gilda A.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical formulations of vibrational relaxation are derived from first principles for application to fluid dynamic computations of hypersonic flow fields. Relaxation within and immediately behind shock waves is shown to be substantially faster than that described in current numerical codes. The result should be a significant reduction in nonequilibrium radiation overshoot in shock layers and in radiative heating of hypersonic vehicles; these results are precisely the trends needed to bring theoretical predictions more in line with flight data. Errors in existing formulations are identified and qualitative comparisons are made.

  7. Transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doig, G.

    2014-08-01

    A review of recent and historical work in the field of transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics has been conducted, focussing on applied research on wings and aircraft, present and future ground transportation, projectiles, rocket sleds and other related bodies which travel in close ground proximity in the compressible regime. Methods for ground testing are described and evaluated, noting that wind tunnel testing is best performed with a symmetry model in the absence of a moving ground; sled or rail testing is ultimately preferable, though considerably more expensive. Findings are reported on shock-related ground influence on aerodynamic forces and moments in and accelerating through the transonic regime - where force reversals and the early onset of local supersonic flow is prevalent - as well as more predictable behaviours in fully supersonic to hypersonic ground effect flows.

  8. Aerodynamic shape optimization of arbitrary hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Sheffer, Scott G.

    1991-01-01

    A new method was developed to optimize, in terms of aerodynamic wave drag minimization, arbitrary (nonaxisymmetric) hypersonic vehicles in modified Newtonian flow, while maintaining the initial volume and length of the vehicle. This new method uses either a surface fitted Fourier series to represent the vehicle's geometry or an independent point motion algorithm. In either case, the coefficients of the Fourier series or the spatial locations of the points defining each cross section were varied and a numerical optimization algorithm based on a quasi-Newton gradient search concept was used to determine the new optimal configuration. Results indicate a significant decrease in aerodynamic wave drag for simple and complex geometries at relatively low CPU costs. In the case of a cone, the results agreed well with known analytical optimum ogive shapes. The procedure is capable of accepting more complex flow field analysis codes.

  9. Symposium on numerical and physical aspects of aerodynamic flows, 3rd, California State University, Long Beach, CA, January 21-24, 1985, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are hydrodynamic stability and turbulent transition, separated flow simulations employing finite difference methods, a quasi-simultaneous finite difference approach for strongly interacting flow, the Newton solution of coupled Euler and boundary layer equations, multielement airfoil aerodynamics, vorticity dynamics, the significance of the thin layer Navier-Stokes approximation, a comparison of interactive and Navier-Stokes calculations of separating boundary layer flows, and a Navier-Stokes analysis for the mechanism of shock wave/boundary layer interactions. Also discussed are transonic interactions of unsteady vortical flows, boundary layers on oscillating airfoils, a laser-interferometer skin friction meter, flow over surface-mounted semibluff bodies, computations for spinning and spin-stabilized supersonic projectiles, transition calculations in three-dimensional flows, the effect of projectile boattailing in transonic flow, flow characteristics of a body of revolution at incidence, the influence of the boundary layer on the leading edge flow of a swept wing, and an interactive scheme for three-dimensional transonic flows.

  10. Inviscid Flow Field Effects: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, L. J., III; Gilbert, K. G.

    1980-04-01

    The aero-optical distortions due to invisid flow effects over airborne laser turrets is investigated. Optical path differences across laser turret apertures are estimated from two data sources. The first is a theoretical study of main flow effects for a spherical turret assembly for a Mach number (M) of 0.6. The second source is an actual wind tunnel density field measurement on a 0.3 scale laser turret/fairing assembly, with M = 0.75. A range of azimuthal angles from 0 to 90 deg was considered, while the elevation angle was always 0 deg (i.e., in the plane of the flow). The calculated optical path differences for these two markedly different geometries are of the same order. Scaling of results to sea level conditions and an aperture diameter of 50 cm indicated up to 0.0007 cm of phase variation across the aperture for certain forward look angles and a focal length of F = -11.1 km. These values are second order for a 10.6 micron system.

  11. Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented which deal with results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include: viscous flows, boundary layer equations, turbulence modeling and Navier-Stokes equations, and internal flows.

  12. Applied computational aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The present volume discusses the original development of the panel method, the mapping solutions and singularity distributions of linear potential schemes, the capabilities of full-potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes schemes, the use of the grid-generation methodology in applied aerodynamics, subsonic airfoil design, inverse airfoil design for transonic applications, the divergent trailing-edge airfoil innovation in CFD, Euler and potential computational results for selected aerodynamic configurations, and the application of CFD to wing high-lift systems. Also discussed are high-lift wing modifications for an advanced-capability EA-6B aircraft, Navier-Stokes methods for internal and integrated propulsion system flow predictions, the use of zonal techniques for analysis of rotor-stator interaction, CFD applications to complex configurations, CFD applications in component aerodynamic design of the V-22, Navier-Stokes computations of a complete F-16, CFD at supersonic/hypersonic speeds, and future CFD developments.

  13. Performance and test section flow characteristics of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.

    1993-01-01

    Results from the performance and test section flow calibration of the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented. Measurements indicating the 80- by 120-ft test section flow quality were obtained throughout the tunnel operational envelope and for atmospheric wind speeds up to approximately 20 knots. Tunnel performance characteristics and a dynamic pressure system calibration were also documented during the process of mapping the test section flow field. Experimental results indicate that the test section flow quality is relatively insensitive to dynamic pressure and the level of atmospheric winds experienced during the calibration. The dynamic pressure variation in the test section is within +/-75 percent of the average. The axial turbulence intensity is less than 0.5 percent up to the maximum test section speed of 100 knots, and the vertical and lateral flow angle variations are within +/-5 deg and +/-7 deg, respectively. Atmospheric winds were found to affect the pressure distribution in the test section only at high ratios of wind speed to test section speed.

  14. Comparison of computational modelling and field testing of a small wind turbine operating in unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradney, D. R.; Evans, S. P.; Salles Pereira Da Costa, M.; Clausen, P. D.

    2016-09-01

    Small horizontal-axis wind turbines are likely to operate in a broad range of operating flow conditions, often in highly turbulent flow, due, in part, to their varied site placements. This paper compares the computational simulations of the performance of a 5 kW horizontal-axis wind turbine to detailed field measurements, with a particular focus on the impact of unsteady operating conditions on the drivetrain performance and generator output. Results indicate that the current Blade Element Momentum Theory based aerodynamic models under-predict the effect of high turbine yaw on the rotor torque, leading to a difference between predicted and measured shaft speed and power production. Furthermore, the results show discrepancies between the predicted instantaneous turbine yaw performance and measurements.

  15. Field comparison of an eddy accumulation and an aerodynamic-gradient system for measuring pesticide volatilization fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, M.; Desjardina, R.; Rochette, P.; Pattey, E.; Selber, J.; Glotfelty, D.

    1993-01-01

    The field experiment reported here applied the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) technique to the measurement of triallate (TA) and trifluralin (TF) volatilization from fallow soil. A critical analysis of the REA system used in this experiment is done, and the fluxes are compared to those obtained by the aerodynamic-gradient (AG) technique. The measured cumulative volatilization losses, corrected for the effective upwind source area (footprint), for the AG system were higher than with the REA system. The differences between the methods over the first 5 days of the experiment were 27 and 13% for TA and TF, respectively. A mass balance based on the amount of parent compounds volatilized from soil during the first 5 days of the experiment showed a 110 and 70% and a 79 and 61% accountability for triallate and trifluralin by the AG and REA methods, respectively. These results also show that the non-footprint-corrected AG flux values underestimated the volatilization flux by approximately 16%. The footprint correction model used in this experiment does not presently have the capability of accounting for changes in atmospheric stability. However, these values still provide an indication of the most likely upwind area affecting the evaporative flux estimations. The soil half-lives for triallate and trifluralin were 9.8 and 7.0 days, respectively. ?? 1992 American Chemical Society.

  16. Phase-locked flow field analysis in a synthetic human larynx model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodermeyer, Alexander; Becker, Stefan; Döllinger, Michael; Kniesburges, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The fluid flow within a human larynx plays an essential role in the fluid-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. This study addresses the flow field downstream of aerodynamically driven, synthetic vocal folds. In order to quantitatively investigate the supraglottal formation of the flow field within one oscillation cycle of the vocal folds, a phase-locked PIV technique is introduced. The pseudo-time-resolved measurement results were averaged for each phase angle. When including a supraglottal channel, the jet was deflected from the centerline of the supraglottal channel and changed the direction of deflection in different cycles. The result is a bistable flow field. Therefore, a sorting method based on the mean cyclic supraglottal pressure difference was introduced. For both states of the flow field, a recirculation area was detected, interacting with the arising glottal jet in every oscillation cycle. This interaction could be identified as the major cause for supraglottal jet deflection, and the sense of rotation of the recirculation area defined the direction of deflection. The asymmetric structure of the flow field was caused by the geometric boundary condition, i.e., due to the present supraglottal channel. An additional key factor was found to be the contact between the two vocal folds in each oscillation cycle which interrupted the jet flow periodically. Removing the supraglottal channel resulted in a symmetric jet location. When avoiding vocal fold contact, the bistable behavior vanished and the jet was steadily deflected to one lateral side. In the present study, it cannot be confirmed that the Coanda effect is responsible for the deflection.

  17. Aerodynamic calculations related to tethered sub-satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith; Rockaway, J. Kent

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of four aerodynamic studies that were in support of a broader, preliminary inquiry concerning the potential use of downward-deployed tethered sub-satellites for in-flight aerothermodynamic research. There are a multitude of questions regarding the general tethered satellite concept and the present report addresses only a few of these. A method for estimating drag and local surface pressure and shear on orbiting or re-entereing bodies is described, and examples based on the planned TSS-2 (Tethered Satellite System) are given. The problem of pressure measurement are explored, taking into account thermal transpiration, lag time, and the disturbed flow field created by the satellite body. The performance of an aerodynamic stabilizer, a ring-tail design, is calculated and its influence on satellite motion is illustrated. A method for optimizing future satellite shapes for desired aerodynamic properties is transitional rarefied flow with given geometric constraints is proposed and examples are shown.

  18. Investigations of Internal Flow Fields of Constant-Area Mixing-Tubes under Starting-Limit Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Eijiro; Tomioka, Sadatake; Sakuranaka, Noboru; Watanabe, Syuichi; Masuya, Goro

    Flow fields in the constant-area mixing tubes of ejector jets were investigated under the starting-limit conditions of an aerodynamic choking mode by performing numerical simulations and cold flow experiments. Pressure recovery was almost completed in the shock-train region. The length of the shock-train region (Lst) was measured under various conditions. Lst was proportional to the mass flow rate ratio of the secondary flow to the primary flow when this ratio was less than 0.15. On the other hand, Lst became almost constant when the mass flow rate ratio exceeded 0.15. Numerical studies showed that this change was caused by the difference in the mechanism of the flow fields. In the cases with low air mass flow rates, the primary and secondary flows almost mixed in a region between the inlets of the mixing tubes and the choking points. The pressure was recovered by a pseudo-shock-wave generated downstream of the choking point. On the other hand, when the mass flow rate ratio was higher than 0.15, the primary and secondary flows were clearly separated at the choking point. The pressure recovery was achieved by the mixing between the primary and secondary flows downstream of the choking point.

  19. AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 10th, Palo Alto, CA, June 22-24, 1992, Technical Papers. Pts. 1 AND 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to vortex physics and aerodynamics; supersonic/hypersonic aerodynamics; STOL/VSTOL/rotors; missile and reentry vehicle aerodynamics; CFD as applied to aircraft; unsteady aerodynamics; supersonic/hypersonic aerodynamics; low-speed/high-lift aerodynamics; airfoil/wing aerodynamics; measurement techniques; CFD-solvers/unstructured grid; airfoil/drag prediction; high angle-of-attack aerodynamics; and CFD grid methods. Particular attention is given to transonic-numerical investigation into high-angle-of-attack leading-edge vortex flow, prediction of rotor unsteady airloads using vortex filament theory, rapid synthesis for evaluating the missile maneuverability parameters, transonic calculations of wing/bodies with deflected control surfaces; the static and dynamic flow field development about a porous suction surface wing; the aircraft spoiler effects under wind shear; multipoint inverse design of an infinite cascade of airfoils, turbulence modeling for impinging jet flows; numerical investigation of tail buffet on the F-18 aircraft; the surface grid generation in a parameter space; and the flip flop nozzle extended to supersonic flows.

  20. Dynamics of turbulent front at the correlation between atmospheric pressure plasma jet & gas flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Maede; Xu, Haitao; Pei, Xuekai; Lu, Xinpei

    2016-09-01

    Among variety of plasma applications, there is significant interest recently in the use of plasma as an actuator in flow control for aerodynamic applications in which the correlation between atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) and gas flow field is a crucial role. In this contribution, dynamic characterizations of the turbulent flow field in APPj are investigated by focusing on the effect of different parameters of APPJ, such as applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, gas flow rate, and time duration of the pulse We utilized Schlieren photography and photomultiplier tubes (PMT) as a signal triggering of an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) and also a high speed camera to examine the formation of the turbulent front and its dynamics. The results reveal that the turbulent front will appear earlier and closer to the tube nozzle by increasing the gas flow rate and applied voltage amplitude. It is found that the pulse time duration and repetition frequency cannot change the dynamics and formation of the turbulent front. Further investigation demonstrated that every pulse can excite one turbulent front which is created in a specific position in a laminar region and propagates downstream and the effect of increasing frequency results in the increasing of the number of turbulent front and expansion of their region of formation.

  1. Fluctuating pressures in flow fields of jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. C.; Haviland, J. K.

    1976-01-01

    The powered lift configurations under present development for STOL aircraft are the externally blown flap (EBF), involving direct jet impingement on the aircraft flaps, and the upper surface blown (USB), where the jet flow is attached on the upper surface of the wing and directed downwards. Towards the goal of developing scaling laws to predict unsteady loads imposed on the structural components of these STOL aircraft from small model tests, the near field fluctuating pressure behavior for the simplified cases of a round free cold jet and the same jet impinging on a flat plate was investigated. Examples are given of coherences, phase lags (giving convection velocities), and overall fluctuating pressure levels measured. The fluctuating pressure levels measured on the flat plate are compared to surface fluctuating pressure levels measured on full-scale powered-lift configuration models.

  2. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Flow field measurements are presented of 3 subsonic rectangular cold air jets. The 3 cases presented had aspect ratios of 1 x 2, 1 x 4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1 x 2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemoneter system. The presented data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data is presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made. All tabular data are available in ASCII format on MS-DOS compatible disks.

  3. Low thrust viscous nozzle flow fields prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Goang-Shin

    1987-01-01

    An existing Navier-Stokes code (PARC2D) was used to compute the nozzle flow field. Grids were generated by the interactive grid generator codes TBGG and GENIE. All computations were made on the NASA/MSFC CRAY X-MP computer. Comparisons were made between the computations and MSFC in-house wall pressure measurements for CO2 flow through a conical nozzle having an area ratio of 40. Satisfactory agreements exist between the computations and measurements for different stagnation pressures of 29.4, 14.7, and 7.4 psia, at stagnation temperature of 1060 R. However, agreements did not match precisely near the nozzle exit. Several reasons for the lack of agreement are possible. The computational code assumes a constant gas gamma, whereas the gamma i.e. the specific heat ratio for CO2 varied from 1.22 in the plenum chamber to 1.38 at the nozzle exit. The computations also assumes adiabatic and no-slip walls. Both assumptions may not be correct. Finally, it is possible that condensation occurs during the nozzle expansion at the low stagnation pressure. The next phase of the work will incorporate variable gamma and slip wall boundary conditions in the computational code and develop a more accurate computer code.

  4. Microgravity Geyser and Flow Field Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, J. I.; Marchetta, J. G.; Thornton, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling and prediction of flow fields and geyser formation in microgravity cryogenic propellant tanks was investigated. A computational simulation was used to reproduce the test matrix of experimental results performed by other investigators, as well as to model the flows in a larger tank. An underprediction of geyser height by the model led to a sensitivity study to determine if variations in surface tension coefficient, contact angle, or jet pipe turbulence significantly influence the simulations. It was determined that computational geyser height is not sensitive to slight variations in any of these items. An existing empirical correlation based on dimensionless parameters was re-examined in an effort to improve the accuracy of geyser prediction. This resulted in the proposal for a re-formulation of two dimensionless parameters used in the correlation; the non-dimensional geyser height and the Bond number. It was concluded that the new non-dimensional geyser height shows little promise. Although further data will be required to make a definite judgement, the reformulation of the Bond number provided correlations that are more accurate and appear to be more general than the previously established correlation.

  5. Future Challenges and Opportunities in Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Hefner, Jerry N.

    2000-01-01

    Investments in aeronautics research and technology have declined substantially over the last decade, in part due to the perception that technologies required in aircraft design are fairly mature and readily available. This perception is being driven by the fact that aircraft configurations, particularly the transport aircraft, have evolved only incrementally, over last several decades. If however, one considers that the growth in air travel is expected to triple in the next 20 years, it becomes quickly obvious that the evolutionary development of technologies is not going to meet the increased demands for safety, environmental compatibility, capacity, and economic viability. Instead, breakthrough technologies will he required both in traditional disciplines of aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, materials, controls, and avionics as well as in the multidisciplinary integration of these technologies into the design of future aerospace vehicles concepts. The paper discusses challenges and opportunities in the field of aerodynamics over the next decade. Future technology advancements in aerodynamics will hinge on our ability, to understand, model, and control complex, three-dimensional, unsteady viscous flow across the speed range. This understanding is critical for developing innovative flow and noise control technologies and advanced design tools that will revolutionize future aerospace vehicle systems and concepts. Specifically, the paper focuses on advanced vehicle concepts, flow and noise control technologies, and advanced design and analysis tools.

  6. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of a Spacecraft Cabin Ventilation Fan Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    Quieter working environments for astronauts are needed if future long-duration space exploration missions are to be safe and productive. Ventilation and payload cooling fans are known to be dominant sources of noise, with the International Space Station being a good case in point. To address this issue cost effectively, early attention to fan design, selection, and installation has been recommended, leading to an effort by NASA to examine the potential for small-fan noise reduction by improving fan aerodynamic design. As a preliminary part of that effort, the aerodynamics of a cabin ventilation fan designed by Hamilton Sundstrand has been simulated using computational fluid dynamics codes, and the computed solutions analyzed to quantify various aspects of the fan aerodynamics and performance. Four simulations were performed at the design rotational speed: two at the design flow rate and two at off-design flow rates. Following a brief discussion of the computational codes, various aerodynamic- and performance-related quantities derived from the computed flow fields are presented along with relevant flow field details. The results show that the computed fan performance is in generally good agreement with stated design goals.

  7. Development of the 1990 Kalapana Flow Field, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattox, T.N.; Heliker, C.; Kauahikaua, J.; Hon, K.

    1993-01-01

    The 1990 Kalapana flow field is a complex patchwork of tube-fed pahoehoe flows erupted from the Kupaianaha vent at a low effusion rate (approximately 3.5 m3/s). These flows accumulated over an 11-month period on the coastal plain of Kilauea Volcano, where the pre-eruption slope angle was less than 2??. the composite field thickened by the addition of new flows to its surface, as well as by inflation of these flows and flows emplaced earlier. Two major flow types were identified during the development of the flow field: large primary flows and smaller breakouts that extruded from inflated primary flows. Primary flows advanced more quickly and covered new land at a much higher rate than breakouts. The cumulative area covered by breakouts exceeded that of primary flows, although breakouts frequently covered areas already buried by recent flows. Lava tubes established within primary flows were longer-lived than those formed within breakouts and were often reoccupied by lava after a brief hiatus in supply; tubes within breakouts were never reoccupied once the supply was interrupted. During intervals of steady supply from the vent, the daily areal coverage by lava in Kalapana was constant, whereas the forward advance of the flows was sporadic. This implies that planimetric area, rather than flow length, provides the best indicator of effusion rate for pahoehoe flow fields that form on lowangle slopes. ?? 1993 Springer-Verlag.

  8. The unsteady aerodynamics of slender wings and aircraft undergoing large amplitude maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert C.; Pelletier, Alain

    2003-04-01

    Aircraft that maneuver through large angles of attack will experience large regions of flow separation over the wing and fuselage. The separated flow field is characterized by unsteadiness and strong vortical flow structures that can interact with various components of the aircraft. These complicated flow interactions are the primary cause of most flight dynamic instabilities, airload nonlinearities and flow field time lags. The aerodynamic and the vortical flow structure over simple delta wings undergoing either a pitching or rolling motion is presented. This article reviews experimental information on the flow structure over delta wings and complete aircraft configurations. First, the flow structure of leading-edge vortices and their influence on delta wing aerodynamics for stationary models is presented. This is followed by a discussion of the effect of large amplitude motion on the vortex structure and aerodynamic characteristic of pitching and rolling delta wings. The relationship between the flow structure and the unsteady airloads is reviewed. The unsteady motion of the delta wing results in a modification of the flow field. Delays in flow separation, vortex formation, vortex position and the onset of vortex breakdown are all affected by the model motion. These flow changes cause a corresponding modification in the aerodynamic loads. Data is presented which shows the importance of flow field hysteresis in either vortex position or breakdown and the influence on the aerodynamic characteristics of a maneuvering delta wing. The free-to-roll motion of a double-delta wing is also presented. The complicated flow structure over a double-delta wing gives rise to damped, chaotic and wing rock motions as the angle of attack is increased. The concept of a critical state is discussed and it is shown that crossing a critical state produces large transients in the dynamic airloads. Next, several aircraft configurations are examined to show the importance of unsteady

  9. Validation of the virtual elevation field test method when assessing the aerodynamics of para-cyclists with a uni-lateral trans-tibial amputation.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Bryce; Disley, B Xavier

    2017-03-12

    Lower-limb amputees typically require some form of prosthetic limb to ride a bicycle for recreation or when competing. At elite-level racing speeds, aerodynamic drag can represent the majority of the resistance acting against a cyclists' forward motion. As a result, the reduction of such resistance is beneficial to an amputee whereby the form and function of the prosthetic limb can be optimized through engineering. To measure the performance of such limbs, field testing provides a cost-effective and context-specific method of aerodynamic drag measurement. However, few methods have been formally validated and none have been applied to amputees with lower-limb amputations. In this paper, an elite level para-cyclist wore two different prosthetic limb designs and had their total aerodynamic drag of a wind tunnel reference method statistically correlated against a velodrome-based virtual elevation field test method. The calculated coefficient of variation was in the range of 0.7-0.9% for the wind tunnel method and 2-3% for the virtual elevation method. A 0.03 m(2) difference was identified in the absolute values recorded between the two methods. Ultimately, both methods exhibited high levels of precision, yet relative results to each other. The virtual elevation method is proposed as a suitable technique to assess the aerodynamic drag of amputee para-cyclists. Implications for rehabilitation This assessment method will provide practitioners a reliable means of assessing the impact of changes made to prosthetics design for cyclists with limb absence. The proposed method offers a low cost and geographically accessible solution compared to others proposed in the past. This assessment method has significant potential for impact among prosthetic limb users looking to improve their cycling performance whereas previous attention in this field has been extremely limited.

  10. A parametric study of planform and aeroelastic effects on aerodynamic center, alpha- and q- stability derivatives. Appendix C: Method for computing the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix of nonplanar wing-body-tail configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1972-01-01

    Expressions are derived for computing the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix for nonplanar wing-body-tail configurations. An aerodynamic influence coefficient is defined as the load in lbs. induced on a panel as a result of a unit angle of attack on another panel. Fuselage, wing and tail thickness are assumed to be small with the result that the thickness effect on the flow-field is negligible. The method for determining the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix is based on the lifting solution to the small perturbation, steady potential flow equation.

  11. Unsteady Aerodynamic Analysis of Supersonic Through-Flow Fan with Vibrating Blades Under Non-Zero Mean Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, T.; Namba, M.

    1996-08-01

    The double linearization concept is applied to a rotating annular cascade model operating at supersonic axial velocity. It is assumed that each blade vibrates with infinitesimal displacement amplitude under small but non-zero mean loading. Vibration modes normal and parallel to the blade chord are considered. Numerical results indicate that the mean loading effects play a crucial role on the aerodynamic instability of the blade motion. The bending motion can be unstable due to the presence of mean loading. Both the steady performance and the flutter boundary are highly sensitive to the blade camber. The bending motion instability is substantially influenced also by the chordwise component of the blade motion. Some numerical results compared with strip theory prediction demonstrate significant three-dimensional effects on the unsteady aerodynamic force under non-zero mean loading.

  12. Use of a generalized Stokes number to determine the aerodynamic capture efficiency of non-Stokesian particles from a compressible gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, R.; Rosner, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    The aerodynamic capture efficiency of small but nondiffusing particles suspended in a high-speed stream flowing past a target is known to be influenced by parameters governing small particle inertia, departures from the Stokes drag law, and carrier fluid compressibility. By defining an effective Stokes number in terms of the actual (prevailing) particle stopping distance, local fluid viscosity, and inviscid fluid velocity gradient at the target nose, it is shown that these effects are well correlated in terms of a 'standard' (cylindrical collector, Stokes drag, incompressible flow, sq rt Re much greater than 1) capture efficiency curve. Thus, a correlation follows that simplifies aerosol capture calculations in the parameter range already included in previous numerical solutions, allows rational engineering predictions of deposition in situations not previously specifically calculated, and should facilitate the presentation of performance data for gas cleaning equipment and aerosol instruments.

  13. Numerical Study for Detailed Flow Fields and Performance of the Savonius-Type Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong; Rempfer, Dietmar

    2011-11-01

    The Savonius-type rotor is simple in structure, has good starting characteristics, relatively low operating speeds, and an ability to accept wind from any direction, although it has a lower efficiency than other vertical axis wind turbines. So far a number of experimental investigations have been carried out to study the performance of the Savonius rotor, however, there is a lack of detailed descriptions of the flow field. The aim of this paper is to numerically explore the non-linear two-dimensional unsteady flow over a Savonius rotor and develop a simulation method for predicting its aerodynamic performance. The simulations are based on Star CCM+. The motion of the blades is solved by using a moving mesh. Different turbulence models are compared. Parameters such as mesh density, wall y+, and boundary conditions will be discussed. Numerical simulation results are compared with experimental data. Separation of the flow at the blade tips is well modeled. The characteristics of flow fields details are studied, including boundary layer, moment coefficient, and pressure distribution. The wall shear on each surface of the blades is studied to look into the position of the separation point. Computational fluid dynamics is proven to be an effective approach for the investigation of the Savonius-type rotor, on the premise of proper theory and reasonable assumption. It also provides a basis for optimization of the Savonius wind turbine.

  14. Numerical computations of Orbiter flow fields and heating rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, W. D.; Li, C. P.; Houston, C. K.; Chiu, P.; Olmedo, L.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical computations of flow fields around an analytical description of the Space Shuttle Orbiter windward surface, including the root of the wing leading edge, are presented to illustrate the sensitivity of these calculations to several flow field modeling assumptions. Results of parametric flow field and boundary layer computations using the axisymmetric analogue concept to obtain three-dimensional heating rates, in conjunction with exact three-dimensional inviscid floe field solutions and two-dimensional boundary layer analysis - show the sensitivity of boundary layer edge conditions and heating rates to considerations of the inviscid flow field entropy layer, equilibrium air versus chemically and vibrationally frozen flow, and nonsimilar terms in the boundary layer computations. A cursory comparison between flow field predictions obtained from these methods and current Orbiter design methods has established a benchmark for selecting and adjusting these and future design methodologies.

  15. Three-dimensional aerodynamics of an annular airfoil cascade including loading effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleeter, S.; Stauter, R. C.; Manwaring, S. R.

    1989-10-01

    A series of experiments are described which investigate and quantify the effect of loading on the three-dimensional flow through a subsonic annular cascade of cambered airfoils. At two levels of loading, detailed data quantify the cascade inlet velocity, the intrapassage flow field, the airfoil surface pressure distributions, the exit flow field, and the total pressure loss distributions. Aerodynamic loading is shown to strengthen the radial pressure gradient, the passage vortex structure, the vortex-endwall boundary layer interactions, and the losses.

  16. Three-dimensional aerodynamics of an annular airfoil cascade including loading effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleeter, S.; Stauter, R. C.; Manwaring, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    A series of experiments are described which investigate and quantify the effect of loading on the three-dimensional flow through a subsonic annular cascade of cambered airfoils. At two levels of loading, detailed data quantify the cascade inlet velocity, the intrapassage flow field, the airfoil surface pressure distributions, the exit flow field, and the total pressure loss distributions. Aerodynamic loading is shown to strengthen the radial pressure gradient, the passage vortex structure, the vortex-endwall boundary layer interactions, and the losses.

  17. Aerodynamic Characteristic of the Active Compliant Trailing Edge Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Rui; Qiu, Jinhao; Ji, Hongli; Li, Dawei

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel Morphing Wing structure known as the Active Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE). ACTE structures are designed using the concept of “distributed compliance” and wing skins of ACTE are fabricated from high-strength fiberglass composites laminates. Through the relative sliding between upper and lower wing skins which are connected by a linear guide pairs, the wing is able to achieve a large continuous deformation. In order to present an investigation about aerodynamics and noise characteristics of ACTE, a series of 2D airfoil analyses are established. The aerodynamic characteristics between ACTE and conventional deflection airfoil are analyzed and compared, and the impacts of different ACTE structure design parameters on aerodynamic characteristics are discussed. The airfoils mentioned above include two types (NACA0012 and NACA64A005.92). The computing results demonstrate that: compared with the conventional plane flap airfoil, the morphing wing using ACTE structures has the capability to improve aerodynamic characteristic and flow separation characteristic. In order to study the noise level of ACTE, flow field analysis using LES model is done to provide noise source data, and then the FW-H method is used to get the far field noise levels. The simulation results show that: compared with the conventional flap/aileron airfoil, the ACTE configuration is better to suppress the flow separation and lower the overall sound pressure level.

  18. Predicting aerodynamic characteristic of typical wind turbine airfoils using CFD

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.P.; Ochs, S.S.

    1997-09-01

    An investigation was conducted into the capabilities and accuracy of a representative computational fluid dynamics code to predict the flow field and aerodynamic characteristics of typical wind-turbine airfoils. Comparisons of the computed pressure and aerodynamic coefficients were made with wind tunnel data. This work highlights two areas in CFD that require further investigation and development in order to enable accurate numerical simulations of flow about current generation wind-turbine airfoils: transition prediction and turbulence modeling. The results show that the laminar-to turbulent transition point must be modeled correctly to get accurate simulations for attached flow. Calculations also show that the standard turbulence model used in most commercial CFD codes, the k-e model, is not appropriate at angles of attack with flow separation. 14 refs., 28 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Wind-tunnel investigation of aerodynamic characteristics and wing pressure distributions of an airplane with variable-sweep wings modified for laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallissy, James B.; Phillips, Pamela S.

    1989-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and wing pressure distributions of a variable wing sweep aircraft having wing panels that are modified to promote laminar flow. The modified wing section shapes were incorporated over most of the exposed outer wing panel span and were obtained by extending the leading edge and adding thickness to the existing wing upper surface forward of 60 percent chord. Two different wing configurations, one each for Mach numbers 0.7 and 0.8, were tested on the model simultaneously, with one wing configuration on the left side and the other on the right. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers 0.20 to 0.90 for wing sweep angles of 20, 25, 30, and 35 degrees. Longitudinal, lateral and directional aerodynamic characteristics of the modified and baseline configurations, and selected pressure distributions for the modified configurations, are presented in graphical form without analysis. A tabulation of the pressure data for the modified configuration is available as microfiche.

  20. Numerical Investigation of Two-Phase Flows With Charged Droplets in Electrostatic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1996-01-01

    A numerical method to solve two-phase turbulent flows with charged droplets in an electrostatic field is presented. The ensemble-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the electrostatic potential equation are solved using a finite volume method. The transitional turbulence field is described using multiple-time-scale turbulence equations. The equations of motion of droplets are solved using a Lagrangian particle tracking scheme, and the inter-phase momentum exchange is described by the Particle-In-Cell scheme. The electrostatic force caused by an applied electrical potential is calculated using the electrostatic field obtained by solving a Laplacian equation and the force exerted by charged droplets is calculated using the Coulombic force equation. The method is applied to solve electro-hydrodynamic sprays. The calculated droplet velocity distributions for droplet dispersions occurring in a stagnant surrounding are in good agreement with the measured data. For droplet dispersions occurring in a two-phase flow, the droplet trajectories are influenced by aerodynamic forces, the Coulombic force, and the applied electrostatic potential field.

  1. Combined Numerical/Analytical Perturbation Solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations for Aerodynamic Ejector/Mixer Nozzle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeChant, Lawrence Justin

    1998-01-01

    In spite of rapid advances in both scalar and parallel computational tools, the large number of variables involved in both design and inverse problems make the use of sophisticated fluid flow models impractical, With this restriction, it is concluded that an important family of methods for mathematical/computational development are reduced or approximate fluid flow models. In this study a combined perturbation/numerical modeling methodology is developed which provides a rigorously derived family of solutions. The mathematical model is computationally more efficient than classical boundary layer but provides important two-dimensional information not available using quasi-1-d approaches. An additional strength of the current methodology is its ability to locally predict static pressure fields in a manner analogous to more sophisticated parabolized Navier Stokes (PNS) formulations. To resolve singular behavior, the model utilizes classical analytical solution techniques. Hence, analytical methods have been combined with efficient numerical methods to yield an efficient hybrid fluid flow model. In particular, the main objective of this research has been to develop a system of analytical and numerical ejector/mixer nozzle models, which require minimal empirical input. A computer code, DREA Differential Reduced Ejector/mixer Analysis has been developed with the ability to run sufficiently fast so that it may be used either as a subroutine or called by an design optimization routine. Models are of direct use to the High Speed Civil Transport Program (a joint government/industry project seeking to develop an economically.viable U.S. commercial supersonic transport vehicle) and are currently being adopted by both NASA and industry. Experimental validation of these models is provided by comparison to results obtained from open literature and Limited Exclusive Right Distribution (LERD) sources, as well as dedicated experiments performed at Texas A&M. These experiments have

  2. Chaff Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    further improve the contrast all of the interior surfaces of the test chamber are painted flat black and the bac!-,ground walls in view of the cameras...to be adequate to eliminate wall effects on the chaff aerodynamics. Secondly, the chamber air mass had to be sufficiently small that it would damp out...independently- supported special rotating-shutter system to "strobe" the dipole images. The integral shutter in each lens assembly is also retained for

  3. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry measurements of the three-dimensional flow field of a descending autorotating mahogany seed (Swietenia macrophylla).

    PubMed

    Salcedo, E; Treviño, C; Vargas, R O; Martínez-Suástegui, L

    2013-06-01

    An experimental investigation of near field aerodynamics of wind dispersed rotary seeds has been performed using stereoscopic digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). The detailed three-dimensional flow structure of the leading-edge vortex (LEV) of autorotating mahogany seeds (Swietenia macrophylla) in a low-speed vertical wind tunnel is revealed for the first time. The results confirm that the presence of strong spanwise flow and strain produced by centrifugal forces through a spiral vortex are responsible for the attachment and stability of the LEV, with its core forming a cone pattern with a gradual increase in vortex size. The LEV appears at 25% of the wingspan, increases in size and strength outboard along the wing, and reaches its maximum stability and spanwise velocity at 75% of the wingspan. At a region between 90 and 100% of the wingspan, the strength and stability of the vortex core decreases and the LEV re-orientation/inflection with the tip vortex takes place. In this study, the instantaneous flow structure and the instantaneous velocity and vorticity fields measured in planes parallel to the free stream direction are presented as contour plots using an inertial and a non-inertial frame of reference. Results for the mean aerodynamic thrust coefficients as a function of the Reynolds number are presented to supplement the DPIV data.

  4. Reconstruction of velocity fields in electromagnetic flow tomography.

    PubMed

    Lehtikangas, Ossi; Karhunen, Kimmo; Vauhkonen, Marko

    2016-06-28

    Electromagnetic flow meters (EMFMs) are the gold standard in measuring flow velocity in process industry. The flow meters can measure the mean flow velocity of conductive liquids and slurries. A drawback of this approach is that the velocity field cannot be determined. Asymmetric axial flows, often encountered in multiphase flows, pipe elbows and T-junctions, are problematic and can lead to serious systematic errors. Recently, electromagnetic flow tomography (EMFT) has been proposed for measuring velocity fields using several coils and a set of electrodes attached to the surface of the pipe. In this work, a velocity field reconstruction method for EMFT is proposed. The method uses a previously developed finite-element-based computational forward model for computing boundary voltages and a Bayesian framework for inverse problems. In the approach, the vz-component of the velocity field along the longitudinal axis of the pipe is estimated on the pipe cross section. Different asymmetric velocity fields encountered near pipe elbows, solids-in-water flows in inclined pipes and in stratified or multiphase flows are tested. The results suggest that the proposed reconstruction method could be used to estimate velocity fields in complicated pipe flows in which the conventional EMFMs have limited accuracy. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'.

  5. Effect of Flow Rate on In Vitro Aerodynamic Performance of NEXThaler® in Comparison with Diskus® and Turbohaler® Dry Powder Inhalers

    PubMed Central

    Buttini, Francesca; Brambilla, Gaetano; Copelli, Diego; Sisti, Viviana; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Bettini, Ruggero; Pasquali, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: European and United States Pharmacopoeia compendial procedures for assessing the in vitro emitted dose and aerodynamic size distribution of a dry powder inhaler require that 4.0 L of air at a pressure drop of 4 kPa be drawn through the inhaler. However, the product performance should be investigated using conditions more representative of what is achievable by the patient population. This work compares the delivered dose and the drug deposition profile at different flow rates (30, 40, 60, and 90 L/min) of Foster NEXThaler® (beclomethasone dipropionate/formoterol fumarate), Seretide® Diskus® (fluticasone propionate/salmeterol xinafoate), and Symbicort® Turbohaler® (budesonide/formoterol fumarate). Methods: The delivered dose uniformity was tested using a dose unit sampling apparatus (DUSA) at inhalation volumes either 2.0 or 4.0 L and flow rates 30, 40, 60, or 90 L/min. The aerodynamic assessment was carried out using a Next Generation Impactor by discharging each inhaler at 30, 40, 60, or 90 L/min for a time sufficient to obtain an air volume of 4 L. Results: Foster® NEXThaler® and Seretide® Diskus® showed a consistent dose delivery for both the drugs included in the formulation, independently of the applied flow rate. Contrary, Symbicort® Turbohaler® showed a high decrease of the emitted dose for both budesonide and formoterol fumarate when the device was operated at airflow rate lower that 60 L/min. The aerosolizing performance of NEXThaler® and Diskus® was unaffected by the flow rate applied. Turbohaler® proved to be the inhaler most sensitive to changes in flow rate in terms of fine particle fraction (FPF) for both components. Among the combinations tested, Foster NEXThaler® was the only one capable to deliver around 50% of extra-fine particles relative to delivered dose. Conclusions: NEXThaler® and Diskus® were substantially unaffected by flow rate through the inhaler in terms of both delivered dose and

  6. Experimental results for a hypersonic nozzle/afterbody flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaid, Frank W.; Keener, Earl R.; Hui, Frank C. L.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to experimentally characterize the flow field created by the interaction of a single-expansion ramp-nozzle (SERN) flow with a hypersonic external stream. Data were obtained from a generic nozzle/afterbody model in the 3.5 Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center, in a cooperative experimental program involving Ames and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The model design and test planning were performed in close cooperation with members of the Ames computational fluid dynamics (CFD) team for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program. This paper presents experimental results consisting of oil-flow and shadow graph flow-visualization photographs, afterbody surface-pressure distributions, rake boundary-layer measurements, Preston-tube skin-friction measurements, and flow field surveys with five-hole and thermocouple probes. The probe data consist of impact pressure, flow direction, and total temperature profiles in the interaction flow field.

  7. Use of computer graphics for visualization of flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val; Buning, Pieter; Choi, Diana; Bancroft, Gordon; Merritt, Fergus; Rogers, Stuart

    1987-01-01

    A high-performance graphics workstation has been combined with software developed for flow-field visualization to yield a highly effective tool for analysis of fluid-flow dynamics. After the flow fields are obtained from experimental measurements or computer simulations, the workstation permits one to interactively view the dynamics of the flow fields; e.g., the viewer can zoom into a region or rotate his viewing position about the region to study it in more detail. Several techniques for visualization of flow fields with this workstation are described in this paper and illustrated with a videotape available from the authors. The computer hardware and software required to create effective flow visualization displays are discussed. Additional software and hardware required to create videotapes or 16mm movies are also described. Limitations imposed by current workstation performance is addressed and future workstation performance is forecast.

  8. Flow field design development using the segmented cell approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, G.; Ramsey, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    We report on fuel cell flow-field development employing two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (2-D CFD). Simulation of the flow distribution of a parallel channel flow-field, with a simple one-channel manifold, predicted inhomogeneous performance distribution within the cell. Further modeling, focusing on modification of the inlet and outlet flow fields, was used to predict a more homogeneous flow distribution in the flow-field. Attempts were made to verify the theoretical predictions experimentally by application of the segmented cell system. Measurements of the current distribution and CO transient response supported the 2-D CFD predictions. However, the margin of error between predicted and experimental results was considered insufficient to be of practical use. Future work will involve the evaluation of 3-D CFD to achieve the appropriate level of accuracy.

  9. Controlling flow direction in nanochannels by electric field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Zhao, Tianshou; Li, Zhigang

    2015-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to study the flow behavior of CsF solutions in nanochannels under external electric fields E . It is found that the channel surface energy greatly affects the flow behavior. In channels of high surface energy, water molecules, on average, move in the same direction as that of the electric field regardless of the strength of E . In low surface energy channels, however, water transports in the opposite direction to the electric field at weak E and the flow direction is changed when E becomes sufficiently large. The direction change of water flow is attributed to the coupled effects of different water-ion interactions, inhomogeneous water viscosity, and ion distribution changes caused by the electric field. The flow direction change observed in this work may be employed for flow control in complex micro- or nanofluidic systems.

  10. The CMC:3DPNS computer program for prediction of three-dimensional, subsonic, turbulent aerodynamic juncture region flow. Volume 1: Theoretical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    An order-of-magnitude analysis of the subsonic three dimensional steady time averaged Navier-Stokes equations, for semibounded aerodynamic juncture geometries, yields the parabolic Navier-Stokes simplification. The numerical solution of the resultant pressure Poisson equation is cast into complementary and particular parts, yielding an iterative interaction algorithm with an exterior three dimensional potential flow solution. A parabolic transverse momentum equation set is constructed, wherein robust enforcement of first order continuity effects is accomplished using a penalty differential constraint concept within a finite element solution algorithm. A Reynolds stress constitutive equation, with low turbulence Reynolds number wall functions, is employed for closure, using parabolic forms of the two-equation turbulent kinetic energy-dissipation equation system. Numerical results document accuracy, convergence, and utility of the developed finite element algorithm, and the CMC:3DPNS computer code applied to an idealized wing-body juncture region. Additional results document accuracy aspects of the algorithm turbulence closure model.

  11. Transonic Flow Field Analysis for Wing-Fuselage Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boppe, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    A computational method for simulating the aerodynamics of wing-fuselage configurations at transonic speeds is developed. The finite difference scheme is characterized by a multiple embedded mesh system coupled with a modified or extended small disturbance flow equation. This approach permits a high degree of computational resolution in addition to coordinate system flexibility for treating complex realistic aircraft shapes. To augment the analysis method and permit applications to a wide range of practical engineering design problems, an arbitrary fuselage geometry modeling system is incorporated as well as methodology for computing wing viscous effects. Configuration drag is broken down into its friction, wave, and lift induced components. Typical computed results for isolated bodies, isolated wings, and wing-body combinations are presented. The results are correlated with experimental data. A computer code which employs this methodology is described.

  12. Numerical study of turbulent flow over complex aeolian dune fields: the White Sands National Monument.

    PubMed

    Anderson, William; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of fully developed turbulent flows responding to aeolian dune fields are studied using large-eddy simulation with an immersed boundary method. An aspect of particular importance in these flows is the downwind migration of coherent motions associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities that originate at the dune crests. These instabilities are responsible for enhanced downward transport of high-momentum fluid via the so-called turbulent sweep mechanism. However, the presence of such structures and their role in determining the bulk characteristics of fully developed dune field sublayer aerodynamics have received relatively limited attention. Moreover, many existing studies address mostly symmetric or mildly asymmetric dune forms. The White Sands National Monument is a field of aeolian gypsum sand dunes located in the Tularosa Basin in southern New Mexico. Aeolian processes at the site result in a complex, anisotropic dune field. In the dune field sublayer, the flow statistics resemble a mixing layer: At approximately the dune crest height, vertical profiles of streamwise velocity exhibit an inflection and turbulent Reynolds stresses are maximum; below this, the streamwise and vertical velocity fluctuations are positively and negatively skewed, respectively. We evaluate the spatial structure of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities present in the dune field sublayer (shear length L(s) and vortex spacing Λ(x)) and show that Λ(x)=m(dune)L(s), where m(dune)≈7.2 in the different sections considered (for turbulent mixing layers, 7

  13. A novel potential/viscous flow coupling technique for computing helicopter flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summa, J. Michael; Strash, Daniel J.; Yoo, Sungyul

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of a new potential/viscous flow coupling procedure for reducing computational effort while maintaining solution accuracy. This closed-loop, overlapped velocity-coupling concept has been developed in a new two-dimensional code, ZAP2D (Zonal Aerodynamics Program - 2D), a three-dimensional code for wing analysis, ZAP3D (Zonal Aerodynamics Program - 3D), and a three-dimensional code for isolated helicopter rotors in hover, ZAPR3D (Zonal Aerodynamics Program for Rotors - 3D). Comparisons with large domain ARC3D solutions and with experimental data for a NACA 0012 airfoil have shown that the required domain size can be reduced to a few tenths of a percent chord for the low Mach and low angle of attack cases and to less than 2-5 chords for the high Mach and high angle of attack cases while maintaining solution accuracies to within a few percent. This represents CPU time reductions by a factor of 2-4 compared with ARC2D. The current ZAP3D calculation for a rectangular plan-form wing of aspect ratio 5 with an outer domain radius of about 1.2 chords represents a speed-up in CPU time over the ARC3D large domain calculation by about a factor of 2.5 while maintaining solution accuracies to within a few percent. A ZAPR3D simulation for a two-bladed rotor in hover with a reduced grid domain of about two chord lengths was able to capture the wake effects and compared accurately with the experimental pressure data. Further development is required in order to substantiate the promise of computational improvements due to the ZAPR3D coupling concept.

  14. Numerical Analysis of the Acoustic Field of Tip-Clearance Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi Moghadam, S. M.; M. Meinke Team; W. Schröder Team

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations of the acoustic field generated by a shrouded axial fan are studied by a hybrid fluid-dynamics-acoustics method. In a first step, large-eddy simulations are performed to investigate the dynamics of tip clearance flow for various tip gap sizes and to determine the acoustic sources. The simulations are performed for a single blade out of five blades with periodic boundary conditions in the circumferential direction on a multi-block structured mesh with 1.4 ×108 grid points. The turbulent flow is simulated at a Reynolds number of 9.36 ×105 at undisturbed inflow condition and the results are compared with experimental data. The diameter and strength of the tip vortex increase with the tip gap size, while simultaneously the efficiency of the fan decreases. In a second step, the acoustic field on the near field is determined by solving the acoustic perturbation equations (APE) on a mesh for a single blade consisting of approx. 9.8 ×108 grid points. The overall agreement of the pressure spectrum and its directivity with measurements confirm the correct identification of the sound sources and accurate prediction of the acoustic duct propagation. The results show that the longer the tip gap size the higher the broadband noise level. Senior Scientist, Institute of Aerodynamics, RWTH Aachen University.

  15. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  16. Field methods for measuring concentrated flow erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, C.; Pérez, R.; James, M. R.; Quinton, J. N.; Taguas, E. V.; Gómez, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    techniques (3D) for measuring erosion from concentrated flow (pole, laser profilemeter, photo-reconstruction and terrestrial LiDAR) The comparison between two- and three-dimensional methods has showed the superiority of the 3D techniques for obtaining accurate cross sectional data. The results from commonly-used 2D methods can be subject to systematic errors in areal cross section that exceed magnitudes of 10 % on average. In particular, the pole simplified method has showed a clear tendency to understimate areas. Laser profilemeter results show that further research on calibrating optical devices for a variety of soil conditions must be carried out to improve its performance. For volume estimations, photo-reconstruction results provided an excellent approximation to terrestrial laser data and demonstrate that this new remote sensing technique has a promising application field in soil erosion studies. 2D approaches involved important errors even over short measurement distances. However, as well as accuracy, the cost and time requirements of a technique must be considered.

  17. Background field method in the gradient flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    In perturbative consideration of the Yang-Mills gradient flow, it is useful to introduce a gauge non-covariant term (“gauge-fixing term”) to the flow equation that gives rise to a Gaussian damping factor also for gauge degrees of freedom. In the present paper, we consider a modified form of the gauge-fixing term that manifestly preserves covariance under the background gauge transformation. It is shown that our gauge-fixing term does not affect gauge-invariant quantities as does the conventional gauge-fixing term. The formulation thus allows a background gauge covariant perturbative expansion of the flow equation that provides, in particular, a very efficient computational method of expansion coefficients in the small flow time expansion. The formulation can be generalized to systems containing fermions.

  18. Field Detection of Chemical Assimilation in A Basaltic Lava Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, K. E.; Bleacher, J. E.; Needham, D. H.; Evans, C. A.; Whelley, P. L.; Scheidt, S. P.; Williams, D. A.; Rogers, A. D.; Glotch, T.

    2017-01-01

    Lava channels are features seen throughout the inner Solar System, including on Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Flow emplacement is therefore a crucial process in the shaping of planetary surfaces. Many studies, including some completed by members of this team at the December 1974 lava flow, have investigated the dynamics of lava flow emplacement, both on Earth and on the Moon and how pre-flow terrain can impact final channel morphology, but far fewer have focused on how the compositional characteristics of the substrate over which a flow was em-placed influenced its final flow morphology. Within the length of one flow, it is common for flows to change in morphology, a quality linked to rheology (a function of multiple factors including viscosi-ty, temperature, composition, etc.). The relationship between rheology and temperature has been well-studied but less is known about the relationship between an older flow's chemistry and how the interaction between this flow and the new flow might affect lava rheology and therefore emplacement dynamics. Lava erosion. Through visual observations of active terrestrial flows, mechanical erosion by flowing lava has been well-documented. Lava erosion by which flow composition is altered as the active lava melts and assimilates the pre-flow terrain over which it moves is also hypothesized to affect channel formation. However, there is only one previous field study that geochemically documents the process in recent basaltic flow systems.

  19. Aerodynamic Size Classification of Glass Fibers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laosmaa, Pekka J. J.

    The objective of this research was to examine a technique by which fibers may be aerodynamically classified by diameter and/or length. In this study a system for fiber preparation and generation as well as an in situ fiber classifier were constructed and evaluated. A recently developed technique, the size classification of particles by opposing jets, was modified. The research set-up consisted of (1) a vibrating bed fiber generator, which also functioned as a preselector, (2) an opposing-jet classifier equipped with electrodes and high voltage power supplies to create fiber-aligning electric fields inside the classifier and (3) an optoelectric fiber sensor to measure the concentration and length of fibers. The classified fibers were also collected on filters for the counting and dimensional analysis of the fibers. Some flow instability problems were found during the initial tests of the classifier. They were attributed to random flow fluctuations in the nozzles caused by very small perturbations upstream of the nozzles. Within a critical range of flow Reynolds numbers the flow becomes "intermittent", i.e. it alternates in time between being laminar and turbulent in a random sequence. Small disturbances upstream of the point of consideration can "trigger" the changes from laminar to turbulent flow and the initial disturbance may be "amplified", sending a turbulent flash through the flow system. The classifier performed well with test aerosols after the nozzle flowrate had been decreased to correspond to a lower and less critical Reynolds number and after some modifications had been made to smooth the flow inside the classifier inlet chambers. The cut-off of test aerosols was sharp, but the loss of particles greater than 2.5 (mu)m in aerodynamic diameter was unsatisfactorily high. The classifier was able to classify fibers by aerodynamic diameter, but not as predicted through calculations. The results were difficult to interpret because of the high loss of fibers

  20. Steady incompressible variable thickness shear layer aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    A shear flow aerodynamic theory for steady incompressible flows is presented for both the lifting and non lifting problems. The slow variation of the boundary layer thickness is considered. The slowly varying behavior is treated by using multitime scales. The analysis begins with the elementary wavy wall problem and, through Fourier superpositions over the wave number space, the shear flow equivalents to the aerodynamic transfer functions of classical potential flow are obtained. The aerodynamic transfer functions provide integral equations which relate the wall pressure and the upwash. Computational results are presented for the pressure distribution, the lift coefficient, and the center of pressure travel along a two dimensional flat plate in a shear flow. The aerodynamic load is decreased by the shear layer, compared to the potential flow. The variable thickness shear layer decreases it less than the uniform thickness shear layer based upon equal maximum shear layer thicknesses.

  1. Modal forced vibration analysis of aerodynamically excited turbosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of a new capability to determine the vibratory response of turbosystems subjected to aerodynamic excitation are presented. Turbosystems such as advanced turbopropellers with highly swept blades, and axial-flow compressors and turbines can be analyzed using this capability. The capability has been developed and implemented in the April 1984 release of the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN. The dynamic response problem is addressed in terms of the normal modal coordinates of these tuned rotating cyclic structures. Both rigid and flexible hubs/disks are considered. Coriolis and centripetal accelerations, as well as differential stiffness effects are included. Generally non-uniform steady inflow fields and uniform flow fields arbitrarily inclined at small angles with respect to the axis of rotation of the turbosystem are considered sources of aerodynamic excitation. The spatial non-uniformities are considered to be small deviations from a principally uniform inflow. Subsonic and supersonic relative inflows are addressed, with provision for linearly interpolating transonic airloads.

  2. A tomographic technique for aerodynamics at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G.

    1985-01-01

    Computer aided tomography (CAT) provides a means of noninvasively measuring the air density distribution around an aerodynamic model. This technique is global in that a large portion of the flow field can be measured. A test of the applicability of CAT to transonic velocities was studied. A hemispherical-nose cylinder afterbody model was tested at a Mach number of 0.8 with a new laser holographic interferometer at the 2- by 2-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. Holograms of the flow field were taken and were reconstructed into interferograms. The fringe distribution (a measure of the local densities) was digitized for subsequent data reduction. A computer program based on the Fourier-transform technique was developed to convert the fringe distribution into three-dimensional densities around the model. Theoretical aerodynamic densities were calculated for evaluating and assessing the accuracy of the data obtained from the tomographic method.

  3. Experimental Facilities and Modelling for Rarefied Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    aerodynamic forces and moments that act on an object moving in the gas . The aerodynamics of rarefied gases also investigates the flow of gases in...Originally, theoretical models for rarefied gas flows were developed in the frame of the molecular kinetic theory. Thus the first self-consistent descriptions...method [7-11]. 3.0 EXPERIMENTAL FACILITIES FOR RAREFIED FLOWS 3.1 Overview Rarefied - gas (vacuum) wind tunnel is a wind tunnel operating at low pressures

  4. Flow Field Measurement of Mixing Driven by Buoyancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batur, C.; Zhong, H.

    2003-01-01

    Mixing driven by buoyancy-induced flows inside a cavity consists of stretching and folding of an interface. Measurement of the flow field using particle imaging velocimetry shows that during stretching the flow field has a single elliptic point, thus dominated by a single vortex. However, global bifurcation that results in folding introduces a hyperbolic point whereby the flow field degenerates to multiple vortex interactions. The short-lived coherent structure observed during mixing which results in the Rayleigh- Taylor morphology is attributed to vortex interactions. The mixing characteristics of non-homogeneous fluids driven by buoyancy are important towards understanding transport phenomenon in a microgravity environment. Mixing consists of stretching and folding of an interface due to a flow field whose intensity depends on the body force. For miscible liquids, the characteristic of the flow field determines whether mass transport is governed by diffusion or bulk stirring which induces mixing. For technologically important processes, transport of mass is governed by the coupling of the body force to scalar gradients such as concentration and or temperature' 2 3 . In order to lend insight into these classes of problems we consider a model experimental system to study mixing driven by buoyancy-induced flows. The characteristics of mixing is addressed from detail measurements of the flow field using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV), and its corresponding interface dynamics using image processing techniques.

  5. A new technique for aerodynamic noise calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Pope, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method for the numerical analysis of aerodynamic noise generation is presented. The method involves first solving for the time-dependent incompressible flow for the given geometry. This fully nonlinear method that is tailored to extract the relevant acoustic fluctuations seems to be an efficient approach to the numerical analysis of aerodynamic noise generation.

  6. Flow damping due to stochastization of the magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tsuchiya, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Suzuki, C.; Yokoyama, M.; Shimizu, A.; Nagaoka, K.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, K.; Akiyama, T.; Emoto, M.; Evans, T.; Dinklage, A.; Du, X.; Fujii, K.; Goto, M.; Goto, T.; Hasuo, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Ichiguchi, K.; Ishizawa, A.; Jakubowski, M.; Kamiya, K.; Kasahara, H.; Kawamura, G.; Kato, D.; Kobayashi, M.; Morita, S.; Mukai, K.; Murakami, I.; Murakami, S.; Narushima, Y.; Nunami, M.; Ohdach, S.; Ohno, N.; Osakabe, M.; Pablant, N.; Sakakibara, S.; Seki, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Shoji, M.; Sudo, S.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Todo, Y.; Wang, H.; Yamada, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Mutoh, T.; Imagawa, S.; Mito, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Ashikawa, N.; Chikaraishi, H.; Ejiri, A.; Furukawa, M.; Fujita, T.; Hamaguchi, S.; Igami, H.; Isobe, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Morisaki, T.; Motojima, G.; Nagasaki, K.; Nakano, H.; Oya, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Sakamoto, R.; Sakamoto, M.; Sanpei, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tokitani, M.; Ueda, Y.; Yoshimura, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Nishimura, K.; Sugama, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Idei, H.; Isayama, A.; Kitajima, S.; Masamune, S.; Shinohara, K.; Bawankar, P. S.; Bernard, E.; von Berkel, M.; Funaba, H.; Huang, X. L.; Ii, T.; Ido, T.; Ikeda, K.; Kamio, S.; Kumazawa, R.; Moon, C.; Muto, S.; Miyazawa, J.; Ming, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishimura, S.; Ogawa, K.; Ozaki, T.; Oishi, T.; Ohno, M.; Pandya, S.; Seki, R.; Sano, R.; Saito, K.; Sakaue, H.; Takemura, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, H.; Toi, K.; Wieland, B.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Zhang, H.; Kaneko, O.; Komori, A.

    2015-01-01

    The driving and damping mechanism of plasma flow is an important issue because flow shear has a significant impact on turbulence in a plasma, which determines the transport in the magnetized plasma. Here we report clear evidence of the flow damping due to stochastization of the magnetic field. Abrupt damping of the toroidal flow associated with a transition from a nested magnetic flux surface to a stochastic magnetic field is observed when the magnetic shear at the rational surface decreases to 0.5 in the large helical device. This flow damping and resulting profile flattening are much stronger than expected from the Rechester–Rosenbluth model. The toroidal flow shear shows a linear decay, while the ion temperature gradient shows an exponential decay. This observation suggests that the flow damping is due to the change in the non-diffusive term of momentum transport. PMID:25569268

  7. Research on inverse, hybrid and optimization problems in engineering sciences with emphasis on turbomachine aerodynamics: Review of Chinese advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Gao-Lian

    1991-01-01

    Advances in inverse design and optimization theory in engineering fields in China are presented. Two original approaches, the image-space approach and the variational approach, are discussed in terms of turbomachine aerodynamic inverse design. Other areas of research in turbomachine aerodynamic inverse design include the improved mean-streamline (stream surface) method and optimization theory based on optimal control. Among the additional engineering fields discussed are the following: the inverse problem of heat conduction, free-surface flow, variational cogeneration of optimal grid and flow field, and optimal meshing theory of gears.

  8. Active Control of Aerodynamic Noise Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise sources become important when propulsion noise is relatively low, as during aircraft landing. Under these conditions, aerodynamic noise from high-lift systems can be significant. The research program and accomplishments described here are directed toward reduction of this aerodynamic noise. Progress toward this objective include correction of flow quality in the Low Turbulence Water Channel flow facility, development of a test model and traversing mechanism, and improvement of the data acquisition and flow visualization capabilities in the Aero. & Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. These developments are described in this report.

  9. Mach 10 computational study of a three-dimensional scramjet inlet flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.

    1995-01-01

    The present work documents the computational results for a combined computational and experimental parametric study of the internal aerodynamics of a generic three-dimensional sidewall-compression scramjet inlet configuration at Mach 10. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code SCRAMIN was chosen for the computational portion of the study because it uses a well-known and well-proven numerical scheme and has shown favorable comparison with experiment at Mach numbers between 2 and 6. One advantage of CFD was that it provided flow field data for a detailed examination of the internal flow characteristics in addition to the surface properties. The experimental test matrix at mach 10 included three geometric contraction ratios (3, 5, and 9), three Reynolds numbers (0.55 x 10(exp 6) per foot, 1.14 x 10(exp 6) per foot, and 2.15 x 10(exp 6) per foot), and three cowl positions (at the throat and two forward positions). Computational data for two of these configurations (the contraction ratio of 3, Re = 2.15 x 10 (exp 6) per foot, at two cowl positions) are presented along with a detailed analysis of the flow interactions in successive computational planes.

  10. Mach 10 computational study of a three-dimensional scramjet inlet flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.

    1995-01-01

    The present work documents the computational results for a combined computational and experimental parametric study of the internal aerodynamics of a generic three-dimensional sidewall-compression scramjet inlet configuration at Mach 10. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code SCRAMIN was chosen for the computational portion of the study because it uses a well-known and well-proven numerical scheme and has shown favorable comparison with experiment at Mach numbers between 2 and 6. One advantage of CFD was that it provided flow field data for a detailed examination of the internal flow characteristics in addition to the surface properties. The experimental test matrix at Mach 10 included three geometric contraction ratios (3, 5, and 9), three Reynolds numbers (0.55 x 10(exp 6) per foot, 1.14 x 10(exp 6) per foot, and 2.15 x 10(exp 6) per foot), and three cowl positions (at the throat and two forward positions). Computational data for two of these configurations (the contraction ratio of 3, Re = 2.15 x 10(exp 6) per foot, at two cowl positions) are presented along with a detailed analysis of the flow interactions in successive computational planes.

  11. Gradient isolator for flow field of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, William D.

    1999-01-01

    Isolator(s) include isolating material and optionally gasketing material strategically positioned within a fuel cell assembly. The isolating material is disposed between a solid electrolyte and a metal flow field plate. Reactant fluid carried by flow field plate channel(s) forms a generally transverse electrochemical gradient. The isolator(s) serve to isolate electrochemically a portion of the flow field plate, for example, transversely outward from the channel(s), from the electrochemical gradient. Further, the isolator(s) serve to protect a portion of the solid electrolyte from metallic ions.

  12. Gradient isolator for flow field of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, W.D.

    1999-06-15

    Isolator(s) include isolating material and optionally gasketing material strategically positioned within a fuel cell assembly. The isolating material is disposed between a solid electrolyte and a metal flow field plate. Reactant fluid carried by flow field plate channel(s) forms a generally transverse electrochemical gradient. The isolator(s) serve to isolate electrochemically a portion of the flow field plate, for example, transversely outward from the channel(s), from the electrochemical gradient. Further, the isolator(s) serve to protect a portion of the solid electrolyte from metallic ions. 4 figs.

  13. Temporal analysis of transonic flow field characteristics associated with limit cycle oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasiliao, Crystal Lynn

    Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO) is a sustained, non-divergent, periodic motion experienced by aircraft with certain external store configurations. Flutter, an instability caused by the aerodynamic forces coupling with the structural dynamics, and LCO are related as evidenced by the accuracy with which linear flutter models predict LCO frequencies and modal mechanisms. However, since the characteristics of LCO motion are a result of nonlinear effects, flutter models do not accurately predict LCO onset speed and amplitude. Current engineering knowledge and theories are not sufficient to provide an analytical means for direct prediction of LCO; instead engineers rely heavily on historical experience and interpretation of traditional flutter analyses and flight tests as they may correlate to the expected LCO characteristics for the configuration of concern. There exists a significant need for a detailed understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in LCO that can lead to a unified theory and analysis methodology. This dissertation aims for a more thorough comprehension of the nature of the nonlinear aerodynamic effects for transonic LCO mechanisms, providing a significant building block in the understanding of the overall aeroelastic effects in the LCO mechanism. Examination of a true fluid-structure interaction (FSI) LCO case (flexible structure coupled with CFD) is considered quasi-incrementally since this capability does not yet exist in the flutter community. The first step in this process is to perform fluid-structure reaction (FSR) simulations, examining the flow-field during rigid body pitch and roll oscillations, simulating the torsional and bending nature of an LCO mechanism. More complicated configurations and motions will be examined as the state of technology progresses. Through this build-up FSR approach, valuable insight is gained into the characteristics of the flow-field during transonic LCO conditions in order to assess any possible influences on

  14. Aerodynamic Effects in Weakly Ionized Gas: Phenomenology and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Svetozar

    2006-10-01

    Successful application of gas discharges in aerodynamics requires their efficient generation, sustaining and control at supersonic or hypersonic flow conditions. Wall-free plasma formations that meet the requirements may then act as time-controlled and space-localized actuators to modify the flow. Potential candidates for this challenging task are plasmas contained in open or linear-cavity microwave field structures. We present and discuss direct observations of aerodynamic effects activated or modified by wall-free discharges. Further, we compare two generic types of wall-free discharges. First group, applicable for inlet-type structures, consists of a periodic series of microwave-induced plasmoids generated in a linear cavity, using the outgoing wave from a microwave antenna and the reflected wave from a nearby on-axis concave reflector. The plasmoids are spaced at half-wavelength separations according to the standing-wave pattern. The plasmoids are enhanced by an ``effective focusing'' in the near field of the antenna (Fresnel region) as a result of diffraction effects and mode structure. Second group, applicable to supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers, are the surface microwave discharges enhanced by a structure of Hertz dipoles. Standard microwave discharge phenomenology, such as microwave breakdown, mode structure and plasma parameters, is revisited to present a quantitative interpretation of the observed effects. Special attention is given to complex phenomena specific to flow-plasma interaction (double electric layers, ionization waves, instabilities), which provide the physical basis for localized heating in the aerodynamic flow.

  15. Influence of Local Flow Field on Flow Accelerated Corrosion Downstream from an Orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utanohara, Yoichi; Nagaya, Yukinori; Nakamura, Akira; Murase, Michio

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) rate downstream from an orifice was measured in a high-temperature water test loop to evaluate the effects of flow field on FAC. Orifice flow was also measured using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) and simulated by steady RANS simulation and large eddy simulation (LES). The LDV measurements indicated the flow structure did not depend on the flow velocity in the range of Re = 2.3×104 to 1.2×105. Flow fields predicted by RANS and LES agreed well with LDV data. Measured FAC rate was higher downstream than upstream from the orifice and the maximum appeared at 2D (D: pipe diameter) downstream. The shape of the profile of the root mean square (RMS) wall shear stress predicted by LES had relatively good agreement with the shape of the profile of FAC rate. This result indicates that the effects of flow field on FAC can be evaluated using the calculated wall shear stress.

  16. Viscous and Interacting Flow Field Effects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    and Experimental Pressure Distributions on a Circular Cylinder; Re =8.4 x 106. 21 S., -10 Co EXPERIMENT - CALCULATIONS, TRANMAX -5 0 10 Figure 18...theoretical and experimental study of the flow over a prolate spheroid is being investigated at t l- DFVLR. The first experiments were aimed at the...PRESSURE TAP regime in which experimental data are very scarce. 1I. Description of the Experiments 1.4500 0 0 Facility 0 The tests were conducted in the

  17. Low-perigee aerodynamic heating during orbital flight of an atmosphere Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, P. S., Jr.; Naegeli, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    An extensive, low-perigee orbital aerodynamic heating study was undertaken in support of the Atmosphere Explorer-C Temperature Alarm. State of the art of low-density, high-speed flows, some models of the earth's atmosphere, external flow-field definition, thermodynamic and transport properties of atmospheric gases, the accommodation coefficient orbital thermal environment, and correlation of theory and measurements are discussed. Aerodynamic heating rates are determined for eight selected orbits by means of a reduced, analytical model verified by both ground test and flight data. These heating rates are compared with classical free-molecule and first-order collision regime values.

  18. Aerodynamic Simulation of Runback Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Whalen, Edward A.; Busch, Greg T.; Bragg, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of recent investigations into the aerodynamics of simulated runback ice accretion on airfoils. Aerodynamic tests were performed on a full-scale model using a high-fidelity, ice-casting simulation at near-flight Reynolds (Re) number. The ice-casting simulation was attached to the leading edge of a 72-in. (1828.8-mm ) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model. Aerodynamic performance tests were conducted at the ONERA F1 pressurized wind tunnel over a Reynolds number range of 4.7?10(exp 6) to 16.0?10(exp 6) and a Mach (M) number ran ge of 0.10 to 0.28. For Re = 16.0?10(exp 6) and M = 0.20, the simulated runback ice accretion on the airfoil decreased the maximum lift coe fficient from 1.82 to 1.51 and decreased the stalling angle of attack from 18.1deg to 15.0deg. The pitching-moment slope was also increased and the drag coefficient was increased by more than a factor of two. In general, the performance effects were insensitive to Reynolds numb er and Mach number changes over the range tested. Follow-on, subscale aerodynamic tests were conducted on a quarter-scale NACA 23012 model (18-in. (457.2-mm) chord) at Re = 1.8?10(exp 6) and M = 0.18, using low-fidelity, geometrically scaled simulations of the full-scale castin g. It was found that simple, two-dimensional simulations of the upper- and lower-surface runback ridges provided the best representation of the full-scale, high Reynolds number iced-airfoil aerodynamics, whereas higher-fidelity simulations resulted in larger performance degrada tions. The experimental results were used to define a new subclassification of spanwise ridge ice that distinguishes between short and tall ridges. This subclassification is based upon the flow field and resulting aerodynamic characteristics, regardless of the physical size of the ridge and the ice-accretion mechanism.

  19. Characterizing the flow field around ballutes of various geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panko, Jeffrey; Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel

    2016-11-01

    A ballute combines the performance of large parachutes with the rigidity and design flexibility of aeroshells. Such designs, when optimized, could drastically increase the allowable payload for interplanetary missions associated with high reentry velocities, for which, the current capabilities of thermal protection systems are being reached. Using commercially available software, a CFD investigation into the flow phenomena and performance characteristics of various such designs was conducted in order to determine features which may prove conducive for use in aerocapture missions, a primary application of such technology. Concerns around current ballute designs stem from the aerodynamic heating loads and flow instabilities at reentry velocities and as such, the study revolved around geometries which would provide favorable performance under such environments. Design parameters included: blunt versus sharp bodies, boundary layer control, and turbulence model. Results were monitored for changes in lift to drag ratios (L/D), separation point, vortex shedding, and control authority. Funding for this work, in part, provided by the CT Space Grant Consortium.

  20. Synthetic Jet Flow Field Database for CFD Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Chung-Sheng; Chen, Fang Jenq; Neuhart, Dan; Harris, Jerome

    2004-01-01

    An oscillatory zero net mass flow jet was generated by a cavity-pumping device, namely a synthetic jet actuator. This basic oscillating jet flow field was selected as the first of the three test cases for the Langley workshop on CFD Validation of Synthetic Jets and Turbulent Separation Control. The purpose of this workshop was to assess the current CFD capabilities to predict unsteady flow fields of synthetic jets and separation control. This paper describes the characteristics and flow field database of a synthetic jet in a quiescent fluid. In this experiment, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV), and hot-wire anemometry were used to measure the jet velocity field. In addition, the actuator operating parameters including diaphragm displacement, internal cavity pressure, and internal cavity temperature were also documented to provide boundary conditions for CFD modeling.

  1. Unsteady fluid dynamic model for propeller induced flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Ashby, Dale L.; Yon, Steven

    1991-01-01

    A potential flow based three-dimensional panel method was modified to treat time dependent flow conditions in which the body's geometry may vary with time. The main objective of this effort was the study of a flow field due to a propeller rotating relative to a nonrotating body which is otherwise moving at a constant forward speed. Calculated surface pressure, thrust and torque coefficient data for a four-bladed marine propeller/body compared favorably with previously published experimental results.

  2. Phase-stepping interferometric system for capturing instantaneous flow field under harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Yu, Enxi; Cha, Soyoung S.

    2003-04-01

    Interferometric reconstruction of a flow field usually consists of three steps. The first is to record interferograms, the second is to extract phase information from interferograms and the final is for numerical inversion of the phase data. In interferometric flow recording, test section enclosures and opaque models are frequently present, blocking a portion of the probing rays or restricting the view angle of the field to produce a partial data set especially for interferometric tomography. It also involves very harsh environments with external vibrations and disturbances of the ambient air. The ill-posed problem is susceptible to experimental noise and can produce serious distortions in reconstruction. Interferometric reconstruction of flow fields thus needs accurate phase information extraction. The major problem encountered in interferometry is that it is extremely sensitive to external disturbances including the vibration of the optical setup. This is true especially for aerodynamic wind tunnel testing. For successful application of interferometry to experimental fluid mechancis and heat/mass transfer, efficient mechanisms for accurate flow-field recording and information extraction are thus very necessary. In interferometric recording, use of the phase stepping techniques is desirable whenever possible, since they provide the most accuracy. However, they are not applicable under disturbing conditions; that is, under harsh environments. In an effort to provide accurate interferometric data, we device interferogram recording and reduction techniques. They are based on a phase-stepping method: however, applicable to harsh environments including wind tunnel testing. Here we present the governing concepts, investigation results, and application demonstration of our approaches for practical flow measurements. The developed approaches are tested through phoase extraction and 3D reconstruction of an experimental flow field, which is designed for future wind tunnel

  3. Biofilm responses to smooth flow fields and chemical gradients in novel microfluidic flow cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jisun L.; Au, Kelly H.; Huynh, Kimberly T.

    2013-01-01

    We present two novel microfluidic flow cells developed to provide reliable control of flow distributions and chemical gradients in biofilm studies. We developed a single-inlet microfluidic flow cell to support biofilm growth under a uniform velocity field, and a double-inlet flow cell to provide a very smooth transverse concentration gradient. Both flow cells consist of a layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bonded to glass cover slips and were fabricated using the replica molding technique. We demonstrate the capabilities of the flow cells by quantifying flow patterns before and after growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms through particle imaging velocimetry, and by evaluating concentration gradients within the double-inlet microfluidic flow cell. Biofilm growth substantially increased flow complexity by diverting flow around biomass, creating high- and low-velocity regions and surface friction. Under a glucose gradient in the double-inlet flow cell, P. aeruginosa biofilms grew in proportion to the local glucose concentration, producing distinct spatial patterns in biofilm biomass relative to the imposed glucose gradient. When biofilms were subjected to a ciprofloxacin gradient, spatial patterns of fractions of dead cells were also in proportion to the local antibiotic concentration. These results demonstrate that the microfluidic flow cells are suitable for quantifying flow complexities resulting from flow-biofilm interactions and investigating spatial patterns of biofilm growth under chemical gradients. These novel microfluidic flow cells will facilitate biofilm research that requires flow control and in situ imaging, particularly investigations of biofilm-environment interactions. PMID:24038055

  4. Flow field studies using holographic interferometry at Langley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.; Helms, V. T.; Gooderum, P. B.

    1982-09-01

    Some of the uses of holographic interferometry at Langley Research Center both for flow visualization and for density field determinations are described and tests in cryogenic flows at the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel are discussed. Experimental and theoretical fringe shift data are compared.

  5. Filtered Rayleigh Scattering Measurements in a Buoyant Flow Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    John William Strutt , the third Baron of Rayleigh , or more commonly known as Lord Rayleigh , was the first to offer a correct explanation of the...FILTERED RAYLEIGH SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS IN A BUOYANT FLOW FIELD         THESIS       Steven Michael Meents, Captain, USAF...AFIT/GAE/ENY/08-M22 FILTERED RAYLEIGH SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS IN A BUOYANT FLOW FIELD THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics

  6. Particle and flow field holography: A critical survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.

    1987-01-01

    A brief background is provided for the fields of particle and flow visualization holography. A summary of methods currently in use is given, followed by a discussion of more recent and unique applications. The problem of data reduction is discussed. A state of the art summary is then provided with a prognosis of the future of the field. Particle and flow visualization holography are characterized as powerful tools currently in wide use and with significant untapped potential.

  7. USE OF THE AERODYNAMIC PARTICLE SIZER TO MEASURE PM-COARSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aerodynamic particle sizer (APS 3321, TSI, Inc.) measures particle size distributions from 0.5 µm to 20 µm by determining the time-of-flight of individual particles in an accelerating flow field. A complete particle size distribution may be determined in a matter of s...

  8. USE OF THE AERODYNAMIC PARTICLE SIZER TO MEASURE PM-COARSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aerodynamic particle sizer (APS 3321, TSI, Inc.) measures particle size distributions from 0.5 µm to 20 µm by determining the time-of-flight of individual particles in an accelerating flow field. A complete particle size distribution may be determined in a matter of ...

  9. The electromagnetic force field, fluid flow field and temperature profiles in levitated metal droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Kaddah, N.; Szekely, J.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical representation was developed for the electromagnetic force field, the flow field, the temperature field (and for transport controlled kinetics), in a levitation melted metal droplet. The technique of mutual inductances was employed for the calculation of the electromagnetic force field, while the turbulent Navier - Stokes equations and the turbulent convective transport equations were used to represent the fluid flow field, the temperature field and the concentration field. The governing differential equations, written in spherical coordinates, were solved numerically. The computed results were in good agreement with measurements, regarding the lifting force, and the average temperature of the specimen and carburization rates, which were transport controlled.

  10. Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers given at the conference present the results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include two-dimensional configurations, three-dimensional configurations, transonic aircraft, and the space shuttle.

  11. On the flow field around a Savonius rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeles, G.; Athanassiadis, N.

    A model of a two-bucket Savonius rotor windmill was constructed and tested in a wind tunnel. The flow field around the rotor was examined visually and also quantitatively with the use of a hot wire. The flow visualization revealed an upstream influence on the flow field up to 3 rotor diameters away and a strong downwash downstream. Hot wire measurements showed a large velocity deficit behind the rotor and a quick velocity recovery downstream due to strong mixing; the latter was associated with high levels of turbulence. Energy spectra revealed that all turbulence was concentrated in a single harmonic corresponding to twice the rotational speed of the rotor.

  12. Laser Anemometer Measurements of the Three-Dimensional Rotor Flow Field in the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Chriss, Randall M.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Wood, Jerry R.

    1995-01-01

    A laser anemometer system was used to provide detailed surveys of the three-dimensional velocity field within the NASA low-speed centrifugal impeller operating with a vaneless diffuser. Both laser anemometer and aerodynamic performance data were acquired at the design flow rate and at a lower flow rate. Floor path coordinates, detailed blade geometry, and pneumatic probe survey results are presented in tabular form. The laser anemometer data are presented in the form of pitchwise distributions of axial, radial, and relative tangential velocity on blade-to-blade stream surfaces at 5-percent-of-span increments, starting at 95-percent-of-span from the hub. The laser anemometer data are also presented as contour and wire-frame plots of throughflow velocity and vector plots of secondary velocities at all measurement stations through the impeller.

  13. Numerical Simulations of Canted Nozzle and Scarfed Nozzle Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Afroz; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2016-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques are used for the analysis of issues concerning non-conventional (canted and scarfed) nozzle flow fields. Numerical simulations are carried out for the quality of flow in terms of axisymmetric nature at the inlet of canted nozzles of a rocket motor. Two different nozzle geometries are examined. The analysis of these simulation results shows that the flow field at the entry of the nozzles is non axisymmetric at the start of the motor. With time this asymmetry diminishes, also the flow becomes symmetric before the nozzle throat, indicating no misalignment of thrust vector with the nozzle axis. The qualitative flow fields at the inlet of the nozzles are used in selecting the geometry with lesser flow asymmetry. Further CFD methodology is used to analyse flow field of a scarfed nozzle for the evaluation of thrust developed and its direction. This work demonstrates the capability of the CFD based methods for the nozzle analysis problems which were earlier solved only approximately by making simplifying assumptions and semi empirical methods.

  14. The structure of the vorticity field in homogeneous turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Michael M.; Moin, Parviz

    1987-01-01

    The structures of the vorticity fields in several homogeneous irrotational straining flows and a homogeneous turbulent shear flow were examined using a database generated by direct numerical simulation of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. In all cases, strong evidence was found for the presence of coherent vortical structures. The initially isotropic vorticity fields were rapidly affected by imposed mean strain and the rotational component of mean shear and developed accordingly. In the homogeneous turbulent shear-flow cases, the roll-up of mean vorticity into characteristic hairpin vortices was clearly observed, supporting the view that hairpin vortices are an important vortical structure in all turbulent shear flows; the absence of mean shear in the homogeneous irrotational straining flows precludes the presence of hairpin-like vortices.

  15. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  16. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or.crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  17. Aerodynamics Research Revolutionizes Truck Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center conducted numerous tests to refine the shape of trucks to reduce aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the 1980s and 1990s, a team based at Langley Research Center explored controlling drag and the flow of air around a moving body. Aeroserve Technologies Ltd., of Ottawa, Canada, with its subsidiary, Airtab LLC, in Loveland, Colorado, applied the research from Dryden and Langley to the development of the Airtab vortex generator. Airtabs create two counter-rotating vortices to reduce wind resistance and aerodynamic drag of trucks, trailers, recreational vehicles, and many other vehicles.

  18. Vortex Particle-Mesh simulations of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine flows: from the blade aerodynamics to the very far wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelain, P.; Duponcheel, M.; Caprace, D.-G.; Marichal, Y.; Winckelmans, G.

    2016-09-01

    A Vortex Particle-Mesh (VPM) method with immersed lifting lines has been developed and validated. Based on the vorticity-velocity formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations, it combines the advantages of a particle method and of a mesh-based approach. The immersed lifting lines handle the creation of vorticity from the blade elements and its early development. LES of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) flows are performed. The complex wake development is captured in details and over very long distances: from the blades to the near wake coherent vortices, then through the transitional ones to the fully developed turbulent far wake (beyond 10 rotor diameters). The statistics and topology of the mean flow are studied. The computational sizes also allow insights into the detailed unsteady vortex dynamics, including some unexpected topological flow features.

  19. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B.

    1995-10-01

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. This requires experiments in appropriate research facilities in which complete flow field data, not only point measurements, are obtained and analyzed. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows.

  20. Report of the Panel on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Richard G.; Bushnell, Dennis

    1984-01-01

    Progress in aerodynamics over the past 50 years has been evidenced by the development of increasingly sophisticated and efficient flight vehicles throughout the flight spectrum. Advances have generally arisen in an evolutionary manner from experience gained in wind tunnel testing, flight testing, and improvements in analytical and computational capabilities. As a result of this evolutionary development, both military and commercial vehicles operate at a relatively high efficiency level. This observation plus the fact that airplanes have not changed appreciably in outward appearance over recent years has led some skeptics to conclude incorrectly that aerodynamics is a mature technology, with little to be gained from further developments in the field. It is of interest to note that progress in aerodynamics has occurred without a thorough understanding of the fundamental physics of flow, turbulence, vortex dynamics, and separated flow, for example. The present understanding of transition, turbulence, and boundary layer separation is actually very limited. However, these fundamental flow phenomena provide the key to reducing the viscous drag of aircraft. Drag reduction provides the greatest potential for increased flight efficiency from the standpoint of both saving energy and maximizing performance. Recent advances have led to innovative concepts for reducing turbulent friction drag by modifying the turbulent structure within the boundary layer. Further advances in this basic area should lead to methods for reducing skin friction drag significantly. The current challenges for military aircraft open entirely new fields of investigation for the aerodynamicist. The ability through very high speed information processing technology to totally integrate the flight and propulsion controls can permit an aircraft to fly with "complete abandon," avoiding departure, buffet, and other undesirable characteristics. To utilize these new control concepts, complex aerodynamic

  1. Numerical simulation of the tip aerodynamics and acoustics test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejero E, F.; Doerffer, P.; Szulc, O.; Cross, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    The application of an efficient flow control system on helicopter rotor blades may lead to improved aerodynamic performance. Recently, our invention of Rod Vortex Generators (RVGs) has been analyzed for helicopter rotor blades in hover with success. As a step forward, the study has been extended to forward flight conditions. For this reason, a validation of the numerical modelling for a reference helicopter rotor (without flow control) is needed. The article presents a study of the flow-field of the AH-1G helicopter rotor in low-, medium- and high-speed forward flight. The CFD code FLOWer from DLR has proven to be a suitable tool for the aerodynamic analysis of the two-bladed rotor without any artificial wake modelling. It solves the URANS equations with LEA (Linear Explicit Algebraic stress) k-ω model using the chimera overlapping grids technique. Validation of the numerical model uses comparison with the detailed flight test data gathered by Cross J. L. and Watts M. E. during the Tip Aerodynamics and Acoustics Test (TAAT) conducted at NASA in 1981. Satisfactory agreements for all speed regimes and a presence of significant flow separation in high-speed forward flight suggest a possible benefit from the future implementation of RVGs. The numerical results based on the URANS approach are presented not only for a popular, low-speed case commonly used in rotorcraft community for CFD codes validation but preferably for medium- and high-speed test conditions that have not been published to date.

  2. Convective Flow Induced by Localized Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An axisymmetric traveling magnetic field induces a meridional base flow in a cylindrical zone of an electrically conducting liquid. This remotely induced flow can be conveniently controlled, in magnitude and direction, and can have benefits for crystal growth applications. In particular, it can be used to offset natural convection. For long vertical cylinders, non-uniform and localized in the propagating direction, magnetic fields are required for this purpose. Here we investigate a particular form of this field, namely that induced by a set of a few electric current coils. An order of magnitude reduction of buoyancy convection is theoretically demonstrated for a vertical Bridgman crystal growth configuration.

  3. Turbine disk cavity aerodynamics and heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Daniels, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to define the nature of the aerodynamics and heat transfer for the flow within the disk cavities and blade attachments of a large-scale model, simulating the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump drive turbines. These experiments of the aerodynamic driving mechanisms explored the following: (1) flow between the main gas path and the disk cavities; (2) coolant flow injected into the disk cavities; (3) coolant density; (4) leakage flows through the seal between blades; and (5) the role that each of these various flows has in determining the adiabatic recovery temperature at all of the critical locations within the cavities. The model and the test apparatus provide close geometrical and aerodynamic simulation of all the two-stage cavity flow regions for the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump and the ability to simulate the sources and sinks for each cavity flow.

  4. Paper-based flow fractionation system for preconcentration and field-flow fractionation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokbin; Kwak, Rhokyun; Kim, Wonjung

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel paper-based flow fractionation system for preconcentration and field-flow fractionation. The paper fluidic system consisting of a straight channel connected with expansion regions can generate a fluid flow with a constant flow rate for 10 min without any external pumping devices. The flow bifurcates with a fraction ratio of up to 30 depending on the control parameters of the channel geometry. Utilizing this simple paper-based bifurcation system, we developed a continuous-flow preconcentrator and a field-flow fractionator on a paper platform. Our experimental results show that the continuous-flow preconcentrator can produce a 33-fold enrichment of the ion concentration and that the flow fractionation system successfully separates the charged dyes. Our study suggests simple, cheap ways to construct preconcentration and field-flow fractionation systems for paper-based microfluidic diagnostic devices. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) grant funded by the Korea government(MSIP) (NRF-2015R1A2A2A04006181).

  5. Flow Driven by an Archimedean Helical Permanent Magnetic Field. Part I: Flow Patterns and Their Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Xiaodong; Etay, Jacqueline; Na, Xianzhao; Zhang, Xinde; Fautrelle, Yves

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an Archimedean helical permanent magnetic field was constructed and its driving effects on liquid metal were examined. A magnetic stirrer was constructed using a series of arc-like magnets. The helical distribution of its magnetic field, which was confirmed via Gauss probe measurements and numerical simulations, can be considered a combination of rotating and traveling magnetic fields. The characteristics of the flow patterns, particularly the transitions between the meridian secondary flow (two vortices) and the global axial flow (one vortex), driven by this magnetic field were quantitatively measured using ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry. The transient and modulated flow behaviors will be presented in a companion article. The D/ H dimension ratio was used to characterize the transitions of these two flow patterns. The results demonstrated that the flow patterns depend on not only the intrinsic structure of the magnetic field, e.g., the helix lead angle, but also the performance parameters, e.g., the dimensional ratio of the liquid bulk. The notable opposing roles of these two flow patterns in the improvement of macrosegregations when imposing such magnetic fields near the solidifying front were qualitatively addressed.

  6. Analysis of a solar collector field water flow network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohde, J. E.; Knoll, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    A number of methods are presented for minimizing the water flow variation in the solar collector field for the Solar Building Test Facility at the Langley Research Center. The solar collector field investigated consisted of collector panels connected in parallel between inlet and exit collector manifolds to form 12 rows. The rows were in turn connected in parallel between the main inlet and exit field manifolds to complete the field. The various solutions considered included various size manifolds, manifold area change, different locations for the inlets and exits to the manifolds, and orifices or flow control valves. Calculations showed that flow variations of less than 5 percent were obtainable both inside a row between solar collector panels and between various rows.

  7. Transpiration effects in perforated plate aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwaba, R.; Ochrymiuk, T.

    2016-10-01

    Perforated walls find a wide use as a method of flow control and effusive cooling. Experimental investigations of the gas flow past perforated plate with microholes (110μm) were carried out. The wide range of pressure at the inlet were investigated. Two distinguishable flow regimes were obtained: laminar and turbulent regime.The results are in good agreement with theory, simulations and experiments on large scale perforated plates and compressible flows in microtubules. Formulation of the transpiration law was associated with the porous plate aerodynamics properties. Using a model of transpiration flow the “aerodynamic porosity” could be determined for microholes.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Flow Field Within Parallel Plate Plastometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    2002-01-01

    Parallel Plate Plastometer (PPP) is a device commonly used for measuring the viscosity of high polymers at low rates of shear in the range 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 9) poises. This device is being validated for use in measuring the viscosity of liquid glasses at high temperatures having similar ranges for the viscosity values. PPP instrument consists of two similar parallel plates, both in the range of 1 inch in diameter with the upper plate being movable while the lower one is kept stationary. Load is applied to the upper plate by means of a beam connected to shaft attached to the upper plate. The viscosity of the fluid is deduced from measuring the variation of the plate separation, h, as a function of time when a specified fixed load is applied on the beam. Operating plate speeds measured with the PPP is usually in the range of 10.3 cm/s or lower. The flow field within the PPP can be simulated using the equations of motion of fluid flow for this configuration. With flow speeds in the range quoted above the flow field between the two plates is certainly incompressible and laminar. Such flows can be easily simulated using numerical modeling with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. We present below the mathematical model used to simulate this flow field and also the solutions obtained for the flow using a commercially available finite element CFD code.

  9. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, T. P.; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.; Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.

    2014-04-01

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow vi, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow ve can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J ×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×ve×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δBz. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  10. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, T. P. Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.

    2014-04-15

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow v{sub i}, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow v{sub e} can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×v{sub e}×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δB{sub z}. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  11. Selecting MODFLOW cell sizes for accurate flow fields.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, H; Kelson, V; de Lange, W

    2001-01-01

    Contaminant transport models often use a velocity field derived from a MODFLOW flow field. Consequently, the accuracy of MODFLOW in representing a ground water flow field determines in part the accuracy of the transport predictions, particularly when advective transport is dominant. We compared MODFLOW ground water flow rates and MODPATH particle traces (advective transport) for a variety of conceptual models and different grid spacings to exact or approximate analytic solutions. All of our numerical experiments concerned flow in a single confined or semiconfined aquifer. While MODFLOW appeared robust in terms of both local and global water balance, we found that ground water flow rates, particle traces, and associated ground water travel times are accurate only when sufficiently small cells are used. For instance, a minimum of four or five cells are required to accurately model total ground water inflow in tributaries or other narrow surface water bodies that end inside the model domain. Also, about 50 cells are needed to represent zones of differing transmissivities or an incorrect flow field and (locally) inaccurate ground water travel times may result. Finally, to adequately represent leakage through aquitards or through the bottom of surface water bodies it was found that the maximum allowable cell dimensions should not exceed a characteristic leakage length lambda, which is defined as the square root of the aquifer transmissivity times the resistance of the aquitard or stream bottom. In some cases a cell size of one-tenth of lambda is necessary to obtain accurate results.

  12. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Zawodzinski, Christine

    1998-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field therebetween for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells.

  13. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Zawodzinski, Christine

    2001-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field therebetween for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells.

  14. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.

    1998-08-25

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field there between for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells. 11 figs.

  15. Aerodynamic drag on intermodal railcars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinghorn, Philip; Maynes, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The aerodynamic drag associated with transport of commodities by rail is becoming increasingly important as the cost of diesel fuel increases. This study aims to increase the efficiency of intermodal cargo trains by reducing the aerodynamic drag on the load carrying cars. For intermodal railcars a significant amount of aerodynamic drag is a result of the large distance between loads that often occurs and the resulting pressure drag resulting from the separated flow. In the present study aerodynamic drag data have been obtained through wind tunnel testing on 1/29 scale models to understand the savings that may be realized by judicious modification to the size of the intermodal containers. The experiments were performed in the BYU low speed wind tunnel and the test track utilizes two leading locomotives followed by a set of five articulated well cars with double stacked containers. The drag on a representative mid-train car is measured using an isolated load cell balance and the wind tunnel speed is varied from 20 to 100 mph. We characterize the effect that the gap distance between the containers and the container size has on the aerodynamic drag of this representative rail car and investigate methods to reduce the gap distance.

  16. Aircraft Noise Prediction Program theoretical manual: Propeller aerodynamics and noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, W. E. (Editor); Weir, D. S. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The prediction sequence used in the aircraft noise prediction program (ANOPP) is described. The elements of the sequence are called program modules. The first group of modules analyzes the propeller geometry, the aerodynamics, including both potential and boundary-layer flow, the propeller performance, and the surface loading distribution. This group of modules is based entirely on aerodynamic strip theory. The next group of modules deals with the first group. Predictions of periodic thickness and loading noise are determined with time-domain methods. Broadband noise is predicted by a semiempirical method. Near-field predictions of fuselage surface pressrues include the effects of boundary layer refraction and scattering. Far-field predictions include atmospheric and ground effects.

  17. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  18. Numerical simulation of inducing characteristics of high energy electron beam plasma for aerodynamics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongfeng, DENG; Jian, JIANG; Xianwei, HAN; Chang, TAN; Jianguo, WEI

    2017-04-01

    The problem of flow active control by low temperature plasma is considered to be one of the most flourishing fields of aerodynamics due to its practical advantages. Compared with other means, the electron beam plasma is a potential flow control method for large scale flow. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics model coupled with a multi-fluid plasma model is established to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics induced by electron beam plasma. The results demonstrate that the electron beam strongly influences the flow properties, not only in the boundary layers, but also in the main flow. A weak shockwave is induced at the electron beam injection position and develops to the other side of the wind tunnel behind the beam. It brings additional energy into air, and the inducing characteristics are closely related to the beam power and increase nonlinearly with it. The injection angles also influence the flow properties to some extent. Based on this research, we demonstrate that the high energy electron beam air plasma has three attractive advantages in aerodynamic applications, i.e. the high energy density, wide action range and excellent action effect. Due to the rapid development of near space hypersonic vehicles and atmospheric fighters, by optimizing the parameters, the electron beam can be used as an alternative means in aerodynamic steering in these applications.

  19. Flow Driven by an Archimedean Helical Permanent Magnetic Field. Part II: Transient and Modulated Flow Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Xiaodong; Fautrelle, Yves; Etay, Jacqueline; Na, Xianzhao; Baltaretu, Florin

    2016-12-01

    The present study considers the transient and modulated flow behaviors of liquid metal driven by a helical permanent magnetic field. The transient process, in which the fluid at rest experiences an increase in the angular velocity, is observed both in secondary and global axial flow with duration time less than 1 second. The flow fields are measured quantitatively to reveal the evolution of the transient flow, and the transient process is due to the variation of the electromagnetic force. Besides, the modulated flow behaviors of global axial flow, which is significantly different from that of secondary flow, is expected to avoid flow-induced macrosegregation in solidification process if the modulated time is suitable because its direction reversed periodically with the modulated helical stirrer. In addition, an optimal modulation frequency, under which the magnetic field could efficiently stir the solute at the solidification front, exists both in secondary and global axial flow (0.1 Hz and 0.625 Hz, respectively). Future investigations will focus on additional metallic alloy solidification experiments.

  20. Investigation of flow fields within large scale hypersonic inlet models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnos, A. V.; Watson, E. C.; Seebaugh, W. R.; Sanator, R. J.; Decarlo, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations were conducted to determine the internal flow characteristics in model passages representative of hypersonic inlets for use at Mach numbers to about 12. The passages were large enough to permit measurements to be made in both the core flow and boundary layers. The analytical techniques for designing the internal contours and predicting the internal flow-field development accounted for coupling between the boundary layers and inviscid flow fields by means of a displacement-thickness correction. Three large-scale inlet models, each having a different internal compression ratio, were designed to provide high internal performance with an approximately uniform static-pressure distribution at the throat station. The models were tested in the Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at a nominal free-stream Mach number of 7.4 and a unit free-stream Reynolds number of 8.86 X one million per meter.

  1. Field-effect Flow Control in Polymer Microchannel Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sniadecki, Nathan; Lee, Cheng S.; Beamesderfer, Mike; DeVoe, Don L.

    2003-01-01

    A new Bio-MEMS electroosmotic flow (EOF) modulator for plastic microchannel networks has been developed. The EOF modulator uses field-effect flow control (FEFC) to adjust the zeta potential at the Parylene C microchannel wall. By setting a differential EOF pumping rate in two of the three microchannels at a T-intersection with EOF modulators, the induced pressure at the intersection generated pumping in the third, field-free microchannel. The EOF modulators are able to change the magnitude and direction of the pressure pumping by inducing either a negative or positive pressure at the intersection. The flow velocity is tracked by neutralized fluorescent microbeads in the microchannels. The proof-of-concept of the EOF modulator described here may be applied to complex plastic ,microchannel networks where individual microchannel flow rates are addressable by localized induced-pressure pumping.

  2. The mantle flow field beneath western North America.

    PubMed

    Silver, P G; Holt, W E

    2002-02-08

    Although motions at the surface of tectonic plates are well determined, the accompanying horizontal mantle flow is not. We have combined observations of surface deformation and upper mantle seismic anisotropy to estimate this flow field for western North America. We find that the mantle velocity is 5.5 +/- 1.5 centimeters per year due east in a hot spot reference frame, nearly opposite to the direction of North American plate motion (west-southwest). The flow is only weakly coupled to the motion of the surface plate, producing a small drag force. This flow field is probably due to heterogeneity in mantle density associated with the former Farallon oceanic plate beneath North America.

  3. Patterns in the sky: Natural visualization of aircraft flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James F.; Chambers, Joseph R.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the current publication is to present the collection of flight photographs to illustrate the types of flow patterns that were visualized and to present qualitative correlations with computational and wind tunnel results. Initially in section 2, the condensation process is discussed, including a review of relative humidity, vapor pressure, and factors which determine the presence of visible condensate. Next, outputs from computer code calculations are postprocessed by using water-vapor relationships to determine if computed values of relative humidity in the local flow field correlate with the qualitative features of the in-flight condensation patterns. The photographs are then presented in section 3 by flow type and subsequently in section 4 by aircraft type to demonstrate the variety of condensed flow fields that was visualized for a wide range of aircraft and flight maneuvers.

  4. Flow-Field Investigation of Gear-Flap Interaction on a Gulfstream Aircraft Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Chung-Sheng; Jenkins, Luther N.; Bartram, Scott M.; Harris, Jerome; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Mace, W. Derry

    2014-01-01

    Off-surface flow measurements of a high-fidelity 18% scale Gulfstream aircraft model in landing configuration with the main landing gear deployed are presented. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Velocimetry (LV) were used to measure instantaneous velocities in the immediate vicinity of the main landing gear and its wake and near the inboard tip of the flap. These measurements were made during the third entry of a series of tests conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel (14 x 22) to obtain a comprehensive set of aeroacoustic measurements consisting of both aerodynamic and acoustic data. The majority of the off-body measurements were obtained at a freestream Mach number of 0.2, angle of attack of 3 degrees, and flap deflection angle of 39 degrees with the landing gear on. A limited amount of data was acquired with the landing gear off. LV was used to measure the velocity field in two planes upstream of the landing gear and to measure two velocity profiles in the landing gear wake. Stereo and 2-D PIV were used to measure the velocity field over a region extending from upstream of the landing gear to downstream of the flap trailing edge. Using a special traverse system installed under the tunnel floor, the velocity field was measured at 92 locations to obtain a comprehensive picture of the pertinent flow features and characteristics. The results clearly show distinct structures in the wake that can be associated with specific components on the landing gear and give insight into how the wake is entrained by the vortex at the inboard tip of the flap.

  5. Aerodynamic Design of a Locomotive Fairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucki, Chad; Maynes, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Rising fuel cost has motivated increased fuel efficiency of freight trains. At cruising speed, the largest contributing factor to the fuel consumption is the aerodynamic drag. As a result of air stagnation at the front of the train and substantial flow separation behind, the leading locomotive and trailing railcar experience greater drag than intermediate cars. This work introduces the design of streamlined nose fairings to be attached to freight locomotives as a means of reducing the leading locomotive drag. The aerodynamic performance of each fairing design is modeled using a commercial CFD software package. The K-epsilon turbulence model is used, and fluid properties are equivalent to atmospheric air at standard conditions. A selection of isolated screening studies are performed, and a multidimensional regression is used to predict optimal-performing fairing designs. Between screening studies, careful examination of the flow field is performed to inspire subsequent fairing designs. Results are presented for 250 different nose fairings. The best performing fairing geometry predicts a nominal drag reduction of 17% on the lead locomotive in a train set. This drag reduction is expected to result in nearly 1% fuel savings for the entire train.

  6. Propulsion efficiency and imposed flow fields of a copepod jump.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Houshuo; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Pelagic copepods jump to relocate, to attack prey and to escape predators. However, there is a price to be paid for these jumps in terms of their energy costs and the hydrodynamic signals they generate to rheotactic predators. Using observed kinematics of various types of jumps, we computed the imposed flow fields and associated energetics of jumps by means of computational fluid dynamics simulations by modeling the copepod as a self-propelled body. The computational fluid dynamics simulation was validated by particle image velocimetry data. The flow field generated by a repositioning jump quickly evolves into two counter-rotating viscous vortex rings that are near mirror image of one another, one in the wake and one around the body of the copepod; this near symmetrical flow may provide hydrodynamic camouflage because it contains no information about the position of the copepod prey within the flow structure. The flow field associated with an escape jump sequence also includes two dominant vortex structures: one leading wake vortex generated as a result of the first jump and one around the body, but between these two vortex structures is an elongated, long-lasting flow trail with flow velocity vectors pointing towards the copepod; such a flow field may inform the predator of the whereabouts of the escaping copepod prey. High Froude propulsion efficiency (0.94-0.98) was obtained for individual power stroke durations of all simulated jumps. This is unusual for small aquatic organisms but is caused by the rapidity and impulsiveness of the jump that allows only a low-cost viscous wake vortex to travel backwards.

  7. Heat-flow mapping at the Geysers Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.P.

    1986-10-31

    Pertinent data were compiled for 187 temperature-gradient holes in the vicinity of The Geysers Geothermal field. Terrain-correction techniques were applied to most of the temperature-gradient data, and a temperature-gradient map was constructed. Cutting samples from 16, deep, production wells were analyzed for thermal conductivity. From these samples, the mean thermal conductivities were determined for serpentinized ultramafic rock, greenstone, and graywacke. Then, a heat flow map was made. The temperature-gradient and heat-flow maps show that The Geysers Geothermal field is part of a very large, northwesterly-trending, thermal anomaly; the commercially productive portion of the field may be 100 km/sup 2/ in area. The rate that heat energy flows through the surface by thermal conduction is estimated at 1.79 x 10/sup 9/MJ per year. The net heat energy loss from commercial production for 1983 is estimated at 180.14 x 10/sup 9/MJ.

  8. Magnetic field generation from shear flow in flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, T. P.; Sears, J.; Gao, K.; Klarenbeek, J.; Yoo, C.

    2012-10-01

    In the Reconnection Scaling Experiment (RSX) we have measured out of plane quadrupole magnetic field structure in situations where magnetic reconnection was minimal. This quadrupole out of plane magnetic signature has historically been presumed to be the smoking gun harbinger of reconnection. On the other hand, we showed that when flux ropes bounced instead of merging and reconnecting, this signature could evolve. This can follow from sheared fluid flows in the context of a generalized Ohms Law. We reconstruct a shear flow model from experimental data for flux ropes that have been experimentally well characterized in RSX as screw pinch equilibria, including plasma ion and electron flow, with self consistent profiles for magnetic field, pressure, and current density. The data can account for the quadrupole field structure.

  9. The role of wind tunnels in predicting sounding rocket aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of sounding rockets, in some cases, may be adequately determined by various estimating procedures, however, there are cases where these procedures fail and wind tunnel studies become necessary. The present paper deals with configurations of the latter type, for which the problems of concern include mismatched diameters between stages, mutual fin interference effects, fin alignment and orientation, body deflections between stages, boundary layer growth, and stability changes that occur as stages are dropped. Some characteristics related to separated flow, interference flow fields, and Reynolds number are examined.

  10. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit.

    PubMed

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-10-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  11. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  12. [Aerodynamics study on pressure changes inside pressure-type whole-body plethysmograph produced by flowing air].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2010-02-25

    When using pressure-type plethysmography to test lung function of rodents, calculation of lung volume is always based on Boyle's law. The precondition of Boyle's law is that perfect air is static. However, air in the chamber is flowing continuously when a rodent breathes inside the chamber. Therefore, Boyle's law, a principle of air statics, may not be appropriate for measuring pressure changes of flowing air. In this study, we deduced equations for pressure changes inside pressure-type plethysmograph and then designed three experiments to testify the theoretic deduction. The results of theoretic deduction indicated that increased pressure was generated from two sources: one was based on Boyle's law, and the other was based on the law of conservation of momentum. In the first experiment, after injecting 0.1 mL, 0.2 mL, 0.4 mL of air into the plethysmograph, the pressure inside the chamber increased sharply to a peak value, then promptly decreased to horizontal pressure. Peak values were significantly higher than the horizontal values (P<0.001). This observation revealed that flowing air made an extra effect on air pressure in the plethysmograph. In the second experiment, the same volume of air was injected into the plethysmograph at different frequencies (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 Hz) and pressure changes inside were measured. The results showed that, with increasing frequencies, the pressure changes in the chamber became significantly higher (P<0.001). In the third experiment, small animal ventilator and pipette were used to make two types of airflow with different functions of time. The pressure changes produced by the ventilator were significantly greater than those produced by the pipette (P<0.001). Based on the data obtained, we draw the conclusion that, the flow of air plays a role in pressure changes inside the plethysmograph, and the faster the airflow is, the higher the pressure changes reach. Furthermore, the type of airflow also influences the pressure changes.

  13. Wall jet analysis for circulation control aerodynamics. Part 2: Zonal modeling concepts for wall jet/potential flow coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, Frank A.; Dash, Sanford M.

    1987-01-01

    Work currently in progress to update an existing transonic circulation control airfoil analysis method is described. Existing methods suffer from two dificiencies: the inability to predict the shock structure of the underexpanded supersonic jets; and the insensitivity of the calculation to small changes in the Coanda surface geometry. A method developed for the analysis of jet exhaust plumes in supersonic flow is being modified for the case of the underexpanded wall jet. In the subsonic case, the same wall jet model was modified to include the calculation of the normal pressure gradient. This model is currently being coupled with the transonic circulation control airfoil analysis.

  14. Turbulence, flow and transport: hints from reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2006-04-01

    The interplay between sheared E × B flows and turbulence has been experimentally investigated in the edge region of the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment. Electrostatic fluctuations are found to rule the momentum balance equation representing the main driving term for sheared flows which counterbalances anomalous viscous damping. The driving role of electrostatic fluctuations is proved by the spatial structure of the Reynolds stress and by the time behaviour of the mean energy production term which supports the existence of an energy exchange from the small scales of turbulence to the larger scales of the mean flow.

  15. Analysis of supersonic combustion flow fields with embedded subsonic regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S.; Delguidice, P.

    1972-01-01

    The viscous characteristic analysis for supersonic chemically reacting flows was extended to include provisions for analyzing embedded subsonic regions. The numerical method developed to analyze this mixed subsonic-supersonic flow fields is described. The boundary conditions are discussed related to the supersonic-subsonic and subsonic-supersonic transition, as well as a heuristic description of several other numerical schemes for analyzing this problem. An analysis of shock waves generated either by pressure mismatch between the injected fluid and surrounding flow or by chemical heat release is also described.

  16. Turbulence in Flowing Soap Films: Velocity, Vorticity, and Thickness Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, M.; Vorobieff, P.; Ecke, R.E.

    1998-08-01

    We report experimental measurements of the velocity, vorticity, and thickness fields of turbulent flowing soap films using a modified particle-image velocimetry technique. These data yield the turbulent energy and enstrophy of the two-dimensional flows with microscale Reynolds numbers of about 100 and demonstrate the effects of compressibility arising from variations in film thickness. Despite the compressibility of the flow, real-space correlations of velocity, vorticity, and enstrophy flux are consistent with theoretical predictions for two-dimensional turbulence. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  17. The CMC/3DPNS computer program for prediction of three-dimension, subsonic, turbulent aerodynamic juncture region flow. Volume 2: Users' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manhardt, P. D.

    1982-01-01

    The CMC fluid mechanics program system was developed to transmit the theoretical solution of finite element numerical solution methodology, applied to nonlinear field problems into a versatile computer code for comprehensive flow field analysis. Data procedures for the CMC 3 dimensional Parabolic Navier-Stokes (PNS) algorithm are presented. General data procedures a juncture corner flow standard test case data deck is described. A listing of the data deck and an explanation of grid generation methodology are presented. Tabulations of all commands and variables available to the user are described. These are in alphabetical order with cross reference numbers which refer to storage addresses.

  18. High-throughput flowing upstream sperm sorting in a retarding flow field for human semen analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jen-Kuei; Chen, Peng-Chun; Lin, Yu-Nan; Wang, Chia-Woei; Pan, Li-Chern; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2017-03-13

    In this paper, we propose a microfluidic device capable of generating a retarding flow field for the sorting and separation of human motile sperm in a high-throughput manner. The proposed sorting/separation process begins with a rapid flow field in a straight-flow zone to carry sperm into a sorting zone to maintain the sperm's mobility. The sorting zone consists of a diffuser-type sperm sorter to differentiate sperm with different motilities based on the flowing upstream nature of human sperm in a retarding flow field. The dead sperm will then be separated from the live ones by passing through a dumbbell flow field to the outlet for disposal. The proposed flowing upstream sperm sorter (FUSS) is designed to imitate the selection mechanism found in the female body when sperm swim into the uterus. The experimental results demonstrate the utility of this device with regard to throughput (approximately 200 000 sperm per minute and a maximum of 200 million cells per mL), efficiency (90% of selected sperm are mobile), and the ability to select sperm with high motility (∼20% of sperm with a velocity exceeding 120 μm s(-1)). The proposed device is suitable for intrauterine insemination as well as in vitro fertilization thanks to the highly efficient sorting process not interfering with the natural function and energy resource of human sperm.

  19. Laboratory Observation Of Magnetic Field Growth Driven By Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Dorf, L.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Lapenta, G.

    2012-12-01

    We have measured in the laboratory profiles of magnetic flux ropes, that include ion flow, magnetic field, current density, and plasma pressure. These data allow a complete screw pinch equilibrium with guide magnetic field to be reconstructed, and the electron flows to be inferred. We use this information to evaluate the Hall JxB term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohms Law. The difference between ion and electron flows allows us to show experimentally and theoretically that the sheared electron flows can account for the generation of magnetic field. For example we show a measured quadrupole out of plane magnetic field B_z structure that occurs even in the absence of magnetic reconnection. This out of plane quadrupole pattern has historically been used as a signature of magnetic reconnection, especially with small to vanishing guide field. Recent theoretical analyses have pointed out that this presumption need not be true. *Supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under LANS contract DE-AC52-06NA25369, NASA Geospace NNHIOA044I, Basic

  20. A novel approach to improve operation and performance in flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Johann, Christoph; Elsenberg, Stephan; Roesch, Ulrich; Rambaldi, Diana C; Zattoni, Andrea; Reschiglian, Pierluigi

    2011-07-08

    A new system design and setup are proposed for the combined use of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) within the same instrumentation. To this purpose, three innovations are presented: (a) a new flow control scheme where focusing flow rates are measured in real time allowing to adjust the flow rate ratio as desired; (b) a new HF5 channel design consisting of two sets of ferrule, gasket and cap nut used to mount the fiber inside a tube. This design provides a mechanism for effective and straightforward sealing of the fiber; (c) a new AF4 channel design with only two fluid connections on the upper plate. Only one pump is needed to deliver the necessary flow rates. In the focusing/relaxation step the two parts of the focusing flow and a bypass flow flushing the detectors are created with two splits of the flow from the pump. In the elution mode the cross-flow is measured and controlled with a flow controller device. This leads to reduced pressure pulsations in the channel and improves signal to noise ratio in the detectors. Experimental results of the separation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and of a mix of four proteins demonstrate a significant improvement in the HF5 separation performance, in terms of efficiency, resolution, and run-to-run reproducibility compared to what has been reported in the literature. Separation performance in HF5 mode is shown to be comparable to the performance in AF4 mode using a channel with two connections in the upper plate.

  1. Aeroacoustic and aerodynamic applications of the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. Clifton; Smith, Charles A.; Karamcheti, Krishnamurty

    1991-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of nonequilibrium thermodynamics associated with viscous flows are examined and related to developments to the understanding of specific phenomena in aerodynamics and aeroacoustics. A key element of the nonequilibrium theory is the principle of minimum entropy production rate for steady dissipative processes near equilibrium, and variational calculus is used to apply this principle to several examples of viscous flow. A review of nonequilibrium thermodynamics and its role in fluid motion are presented. Several formulations are presented of the local entropy production rate and the local energy dissipation rate, two quantities that are of central importance to the theory. These expressions and the principle of minimum entropy production rate for steady viscous flows are used to identify parallel-wall channel flow and irrotational flow as having minimally dissipative velocity distributions. Features of irrotational, steady, viscous flow near an airfoil, such as the effect of trailing-edge radius on circulation, are also found to be compatible with the minimum principle. Finally, the minimum principle is used to interpret the stability of infinitesimal and finite amplitude disturbances in an initially laminar, parallel shear flow, with results that are consistent with experiment and linearized hydrodynamic stability theory. These results suggest that a thermodynamic approach may be useful in unifying the understanding of many diverse phenomena in aerodynamics and aeroacoustics.

  2. Introduction. Computational aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Paul G

    2007-10-15

    The wide range of uses of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aircraft design is discussed along with its role in dealing with the environmental impact of flight. Enabling technologies, such as grid generation and turbulence models, are also considered along with flow/turbulence control. The large eddy simulation, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and hybrid turbulence modelling approaches are contrasted. The CFD prediction of numerous jet configurations occurring in aerospace are discussed along with aeroelasticity for aeroengine and external aerodynamics, design optimization, unsteady flow modelling and aeroengine internal and external flows. It is concluded that there is a lack of detailed measurements (for both canonical and complex geometry flows) to provide validation and even, in some cases, basic understanding of flow physics. Not surprisingly, turbulence modelling is still the weak link along with, as ever, a pressing need for improved (in terms of robustness, speed and accuracy) solver technology, grid generation and geometry handling. Hence, CFD, as a truly predictive and creative design tool, seems a long way off. Meanwhile, extreme practitioner expertise is still required and the triad of computation, measurement and analytic solution must be judiciously used.

  3. Unstructured mesh algorithms for aerodynamic calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The use of unstructured mesh techniques for solving complex aerodynamic flows is discussed. The principle advantages of unstructured mesh strategies, as they relate to complex geometries, adaptive meshing capabilities, and parallel processing are emphasized. The various aspects required for the efficient and accurate solution of aerodynamic flows are addressed. These include mesh generation, mesh adaptivity, solution algorithms, convergence acceleration, and turbulence modeling. Computations of viscous turbulent two-dimensional flows and inviscid three-dimensional flows about complex configurations are demonstrated. Remaining obstacles and directions for future research are also outlined.

  4. Penn State axial flow turbine facility: Performance and nozzle flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Zaccaria, M.; Itoh, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to gain a thorough understanding of the flow field in a turbine stage including three-dimensional inviscid and viscid effects, unsteady flow field, rotor-stator interaction effects, unsteady blade pressures, shear stress, and velocity field in rotor passages. The performance of the turbine facility at the design condition is measured and compared with the design distribution. The data on the nozzle vane static pressure and wake characteristics are presented and interpreted. The wakes are found to be highly three-dimensional, with substantial radial inward velocity at most spanwise locations.

  5. Aerodynamics at NASA JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicker, Darby

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing aerodynamics at NASA Johnson Space Center is shown. The topics include: 1) Personal Background; 2) Aerodynamic Tools; 3) The Overset Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Process; and 4) Recent Applicatoins.

  6. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  7. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  8. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J.; Hessenius, Kristin A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Hicks, Gary; Richardson, Pamela F.; Unger, George; Neumann, Benjamin; Moss, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The annual accomplishments is reviewed for the Aerodynamics Division during FY 1991. The program includes both fundamental and applied research directed at the full spectrum of aerospace vehicles, from rotorcraft to planetary entry probes. A comprehensive review is presented of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications; CFD validation; transition and turbulence physics; numerical aerodynamic simulation; test techniques and instrumentation; configuration aerodynamics; aeroacoustics; aerothermodynamics; hypersonics; subsonics; fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  9. Investigation of an Axial Fan—Blade Stress and Vibration Due to Aerodynamic Pressure Field and Centrifugal Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Cheng; Amano, Ryoichi Samuel; Lee, Eng Kwong

    A 1.829m (6ft) diameter industrial large flow-rate axial fan operated at 1770rpm was studied experimentally in laboratory conditions. The flow characteristics on the fan blade surfaces were investigated by measuring the pressure distributions on the blade suction and pressure surfaces and the results were discussed by comparing with analytical formulations and CFD. Flow visualizations were also performed to validate the flow characteristics near the blade surface and it was demonstrated that the flow characteristics near the fan blade surface were dominated by the centrifugal force of the fan rotation which resulted in strong three-dimensional flows. The time-dependent pressure measurement showed that the pressure oscillations on the fan blade were significantly dominated by vortex shedding from the fan blades. It was further demonstrated that the pressure distributions during the fan start-up were highly unsteady, and the main frequency variation of the static pressure was much smaller than the fan rotational frequency. The time-dependent pressure measurement when the fan operated at a constant speed showed that the magnitude of the blade pressure variation with time and the main variation frequency was much smaller than the fan rotational frequency. The pressure variations that were related to the vortex shedding were slightly smaller than the fan rotational frequency. The strain gages were used to measure the blade stress and the results were compared with FEA results.

  10. Computational Analysis of Flow Field Inside Coral Colony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md Monir; Staples, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Development of the flow field inside coral colonies is a key issue for understanding coral natural uptake, photosynthesis and wave dissipation capabilities. But most of the computations and experiments conducted earlier, measured the flow outside the coral reef canopies. Experimental studies are also constrained due to the limitation of measurement techniques and limited environmental conditions. Numerical simulations can be an answer to overcome these shortcomings. In this work, a detailed, three-dimensional simulation of flow around a single coral colony was developed to examine the interaction between coral geometry and hydrodynamics. To simplify grid generation and minimize computational cost, Immersed Boundary method (IBM) was implemented. The computation of IBM involves identification of the interface between the solid body and the fluid, establishment of the grid/interface relation and identification of the forcing points on the grid and distribution of the forcing function on the corresponding points. LES was chosen as the framework to capture the turbulent flow field without requiring extensive modeling. The results presented will give insight into internal coral colony flow fields and the interaction between coral and surrounding ocean hydrodynamics.

  11. Rapid Numerical Simulation of Viscous Axisymmetric Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.; Chima, Rodrick V.

    1995-01-01

    A two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been developed for rapid numerical simulation of axisymmetric flow fields, including flow fields with an azimuthal velocity component. The azimuthal-invariant Navier-Stokes equations in a cylindrical coordinate system are mapped to a general body-fitted coordinate system, with the streamwise viscous terms then neglected by applying the thin-layer approximation. Turbulence effects are modeled using an algebraic model, typically the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, although a modified Cebeci-Smith model can also be used. The equations are discretized using central finite differences and solved using a multistage Runge-Kutta algorithm with a spatially varying time step and implicit residual smoothing. Results are presented for calculations of supersonic flow over a waisted body-of-revolution, transonic flow through a normal shock wave in a straight circular duct of constant cross sectional area, swirling supersonic (inviscid) flow through a strong shock in a straight radial duct, and swirling subsonic flow in an annular-to-circular diffuser duct. Comparisons between computed and experimental results are in fair to good agreement, demonstrating that the viscous code can be a useful tool for practical engineering design and analysis work.

  12. Application of CFD techniques toward the validation of nonlinear aerodynamic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, L. B.; Katz, J.

    1985-01-01

    Applications of Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to determine the regimes of applicability of nonlinear models describing the unsteady aerodynamic responses to aircraft flight motions are described. The potential advantages of computational methods over experimental methods are discussed and the concepts underlying mathematical modeling are reviewed. The economic and conceptual advantages of the modeling procedure over coupled, simultaneous solutions of the gasdynamic equations and the vehicle's kinematic equations of motion are discussed. The modeling approach, when valid, eliminates the need for costly repetitive computation of flow field solutions. For the test cases considered, the aerodynamic modeling approach is shown to be valid.

  13. Analytical solutions for flow fields near continuous wall reactive barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klammler, Harald; Hatfield, Kirk

    2008-05-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are widely applied for in-situ remediation of contaminant plumes transported by groundwater. Besides the goal of a sufficient contaminant remediation inside the reactive cell (residence time) the width of plume intercepted by a PRB is of critical concern. A 2-dimensional analytical approach is applied to determine the flow fields towards rectangular PRBs of the continuous wall (CW) configuration with and without impermeable side walls (but yet no funnel). The approach is based on the conformal mapping technique and assumes a homogeneous aquifer with a uniform ambient flow field. The hydraulic conductivity of the reactive material is furthermore assumed to exceed the conductivity of the aquifer by at least one order of magnitude as to neglect the hydraulic gradient across the reactor. The flow fields are analyzed regarding the widths and shapes of the respective capture zones as functions of the dimensions (aspect ratio) of the reactive cell and the ambient groundwater flow direction. Presented are an improved characterization of the advantages of impermeable side walls, a convenient approach to improved hydraulic design (including basic cost-optimization) and new concepts for monitoring CW PRBs. Water level data from a CW PRB at the Seneca Army Depot site, NY, are used for field demonstration.

  14. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Schairer, Edward; Hicks, Gary; Wander, Stephen; Blankson, Isiaiah; Rose, Raymond; Olson, Lawrence; Unger, George

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a comprehensive review of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation, transition and turbulence physics, numerical aerodynamic simulation, drag reduction, test techniques and instrumentation, configuration aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, aerothermodynamics, hypersonics, subsonic transport/commuter aviation, fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  15. Turbulent transport modeling of shear flows around an aerodynamic wing. Development of turbulent near-wall model and its application to recirculating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amano, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in implementing and refining two near-wall turbulence models in which the near-wall region is divided into either two or three zones is outlined. These models were successfully applied to the computation of recirculating flows. The research was further extended to obtaining experimental results of two different recirculating flow conditions in order to check the validity of the present models. Two different experimental apparatuses were set up: axisymmetric turbulent impinging jets on a flat plate, and turbulent flows in a circular pipe with a abrupt pipe expansion. It is shown that generally better results are obtained by using the present near-wall models, and among the models the three-zone model is superior to the two-zone model.

  16. Fast and accurate prediction for aerodynamic forces and moments acting on satellites flying in Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xuhon; Huang, Fei; Hu, Pengju; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2016-11-01

    A fundamental prerequisite for satellites operating in a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is the availability of fast and accurate prediction of non-gravitational aerodynamic forces, which is characterised by the free molecular flow regime. However, conventional computational methods like the analytical integral method and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique are found failing to deal with flow shadowing and multiple reflections or computationally expensive. This work develops a general computer program for the accurate calculation of aerodynamic forces in the free molecular flow regime using the test particle Monte Carlo (TPMC) method, and non-gravitational aerodynamic forces actiong on the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite is calculated for different freestream conditions and gas-surface interaction models by the computer program.

  17. On the flow field about an electrophoretic particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsini, Gabriele; Tricoli, Vincenzo

    2012-10-01

    The flow field about an electrophoretic body is theoretically investigated by analytical methods. An effective boundary condition for the electric potential at particle surface is derived. This condition, which generalizes the one obtained by Levich [Physicochemical Hydrodynamics (Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, 1962), Chap. 9, p. 475], captures the effect of (convective and electromigratory) surface current in the Debye layer and is valid as far as it is legitimate to neglect ion-concentration gradient in the bulk liquid. Conditions for negligible concentration gradients are also presented and discussed. The effect of surface current determines a deviation from Morrison's "classical" theory, which predicts irrotational flow-field for any particle shape with electrophoretic velocity given by the well-known Smoluchowski formula and always directed along the applied electric field. It is shown here that in the presence of the above effect the irrotationality of the flow field is not preserved if the particle surface has non-uniform curvature. However, irrotational flow-field still subsists for a sphere and a cylinder and is analytically determined in terms of a new non-dimensional parameter, referred to as the electrophoretic number. The case of spheroidal objects is also examined in detail. In this case the flow field, though not strictly irrotational, is shown to be nearly approximated by an irrotational flow-field, which is also determined over wide ranges of electrophoretic number and spheroid aspect ratio. The quality of this approximation is expressed as a relative error on the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski condition and numerically evaluated both in longitudinal and transverse configuration. The limiting cases of spheroid degenerating into a needle and a disk are also addressed. In all above cases the respective mobilities deviate from Smoluchowski's formula and depend on the electrophoretic number. An important effect of surface ion-transport in the double layer is

  18. Mean-field dynamo action in renovating shearing flows.

    PubMed

    Kolekar, Sanved; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Sridhar, S

    2012-08-01

    We study mean-field dynamo action in renovating flows with finite and nonzero correlation time (τ) in the presence of shear. Previous results obtained when shear was absent are generalized to the case with shear. The question of whether the mean magnetic field can grow in the presence of shear and nonhelical turbulence, as seen in numerical simulations, is examined. We show in a general manner that, if the motions are strictly nonhelical, then such mean-field dynamo action is not possible. This result is not limited to low (fluid or magnetic) Reynolds numbers nor does it use any closure approximation; it only assumes that the flow renovates itself after each time interval τ. Specifying to a particular form of the renovating flow with helicity, we recover the standard dispersion relation of the α(2)Ω dynamo, in the small τ or large wavelength limit. Thus mean fields grow even in the presence of rapidly growing fluctuations, surprisingly, in a manner predicted by the standard quasilinear closure, even though such a closure is not strictly justified. Our work also suggests the possibility of obtaining mean-field dynamo growth in the presence of helicity fluctuations, although having a coherent helicity will be more efficient.

  19. Drop Breakup in Fixed Bed Flows as Model Stochastic Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.; Mosler, Alisa B.; Patel, Prateek

    1999-01-01

    We examine drop breakup in a class of stochastic flow fields as a model for the flow through fixed fiber beds and to elucidate the general mechanisms whereby drops breakup in disordered, Lagrangian unsteady flows. Our study consists of two parallel streams of investigation. First, large scale numerical simulations of drop breakup in a class of anisotropic Gaussian fields will be presented. These fields are generated spectrally and have been shown in a previous publication to be exact representations of the flow in a dilute disordered bed of fibers if close interactions between the fibers and the drops are dynamically unimportant. In these simulations the drop shape is represented by second and third order small deformation theories which have been shown to be excellent for the prediction of drop breakup in steady strong flows. We show via these simulations that the mechanisms of drop breakup in these flows are quite different than in steady flows. The predominant mechanism of breakup appears to be very short lived twist breakups. Moreover, the occurrence of breakup events is poorly predicted by either the strength of the local flow in which the drop finds itself at breakup, or the degree of deformation that the drop achieves prior to breakup. It is suggested that a correlation function of both is necessary to be predictive of breakup events. In the second part of our research experiments are presented where the drop deformation and breakup in PDMS/polyisobutylene emulsions is considered. We consider very dilute emulsions such that coalescence is unimportant. The flows considered are simple shear and the flow through fixed fiber beds. Turbidity, small angle light scattering, dichroism and microscopy are used to interrogate the drop deformation process in both flows. It is demonstrated that breakup at very low capillary numbers occurs in both flows but larger drop deformation occurs in the fixed bed flow. Moreover, it is witnessed that breakup in the bed occurs

  20. Aerodynamic-structural analysis of dual bladed helicopter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selberg, B. P.; Cronin, D. L.; Rokhsaz, K.; Dykman, J. R.; Yager, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    The aerodynamic and structural feasibility of the birotor blade concept is assessed. The inviscid flow field about the dual bladed rotor was investigated to determine the aerodynamic characteristics for various dual rotor blade placement combinations with respect to blade stagger, gap, and angle of attack between the two blades. The boundary layer separation on the rotors was studied and three dimensional induced drag calculations for the dual rotor system are presented. The thrust and power requirements of the rotor system were predicted. NASTRAN, employed as the primary modeling tool, was used to obtain a model for predicting in plane bending, out of plane bending, and the torsional behavior of the birotors. Local hub loads, blade loads, and the natural frequencies for the birotor configuration are discussed.

  1. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2010-03-06

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re approximately 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small

  2. Mantle flow field in the southern Ryukyu subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S.; Kuo, B.

    2012-12-01

    The Okinawa trough in the Ryukyu subduction system is the only active back arc basin formed within a continental lithosphere. Recent shear-wave splitting measurements show variable fast directions along the trough suggesting complex three-dimensional flow field in the mantle wedge. In this study we use numerical subduction models to explore the effects of plate thickness variations caused by non-uniform lithospheric stretching on the dynamics in the southern Ryukyu subduction system. We calculate orientations of infinite strain axes as a proxy for olivine lattice preferred orientations and orientations of seismic anisotropy. Our models demonstrate that flow patterns may vary significantly with depth near the plate edge as a result of the along-arc variations in lithospheric thickness. The model results show that the toroidal circulation around the lateral slab edge predominates at greater depths. The thick neighboring lithosphere acts as an effective barrier of the lateral mass exchanges in the shallow portion of the mantle wedge. The wedge material is drawn in horizontally toward the plate edge from the central region of the subduction zone induced by pressure gradients, opposite to the inwards lateral flow at greater depths. Model predictions for the lattice preferred orientations of olivine aggregates agree reasonably well with the observed shear-wave splitting patterns. The results suggest that the depth-varying flow field near the subduction zone edge and the westward flow components in the shallow portion of the mantle wedge may contribute to complex patterns of seismic anisotropy and arc isotopic systematics.

  3. Navier-Stokes Flow Field Analysis of Compressible Flow in a Pressure Relief Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Wang, Ten-See; Shih, Ming-Hsin; Soni, Bharat K.

    1993-01-01

    The present study was motivated to analyze the complex flow field involving gaseous oxygen (GOX) flow in a relief valve (RV). The 9391 RV, pictured in Figure 1, was combined with the pilot valve to regulate the actuation pressure of the main valve system. During a high-pressure flow test at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) the valve system developed a resonance chatter, which destroyed most of the valve body. Figures 2-4 show the valve body before and after accident. It was understood that the subject RV has never been operated at 5500 psia. In order to fully understand the flow behavior in the RV, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is carried out to investigate the side load across the piston sleeve and the erosion patterns resulting from flow distribution around piston/nozzle interface.

  4. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation of white wine chromophoric colloidal matter.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Christian; Parot, Jérémie; Gonsior, Michael; Nikolantonaki, Maria; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parlanti, Edith; Gougeon, Régis D

    2017-04-01

    Two analytical separation methods-size-exclusion chromatography and asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation-were implemented to evaluate the integrity of the colloidal composition of Chardonnay white wine and the impact of pressing and fermentations on the final macromolecular composition. Wine chromophoric colloidal matter, representing UV-visible-absorbing wine macromolecules, was evaluated by optical and structural measurements combined with the description of elution profiles obtained by both separative techniques. The objective of this study was to apply these two types of fractionation on a typical Chardonnay white wine produced in Burgundy and to evaluate how each of them impacted the determination of the macromolecular chromophoric content of wine. UV-visible and fluorescence measurements of collected fractions were successfully applied. An additional proteomic study revealed that grape and microorganism proteins largely impacted the composition of chromophoric colloidal matter of Chardonnay wines. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation appeared to be more reliable and less invasive with respect to the native chemical environment of chromophoric wine macromolecules, and hence is recommended as a tool to fractionate chromophoric colloidal matter in white wines. Graphical Abstract An innovative macromolecular separation method based on Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation was developed to better control colloidal dynamics across Chardonnay white winemaking.

  5. Path planning in uncertain flow fields using ensemble method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Le Maître, Olivier P.; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Knio, Omar M.

    2016-10-01

    An ensemble-based approach is developed to conduct optimal path planning in unsteady ocean currents under uncertainty. We focus our attention on two-dimensional steady and unsteady uncertain flows, and adopt a sampling methodology that is well suited to operational forecasts, where an ensemble of deterministic predictions is used to model and quantify uncertainty. In an operational setting, much about dynamics, topography, and forcing of the ocean environment is uncertain. To address this uncertainty, the flow field is parametrized using a finite number of independent canonical random variables with known densities, and the ensemble is generated by sampling these variables. For each of the resulting realizations of the uncertain current field, we predict the path that minimizes the travel time by solving a boundary value problem (BVP), based on the Pontryagin maximum principle. A family of backward-in-time trajectories starting at the end position is used to generate suitable initial values for the BVP solver. This allows us to examine and analyze the performance of the sampling strategy and to develop insight into extensions dealing with general circulation ocean models. In particular, the ensemble method enables us to perform a statistical analysis of travel times and consequently develop a path planning approach that accounts for these statistics. The proposed methodology is tested for a number of scenarios. We first validate our algorithms by reproducing simple canonical solutions, and then demonstrate our approach in more complex flow fields, including idealized, steady and unsteady double-gyre flows.

  6. Time-to-Passage Judgments in Nonconstant Optical Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Hecht, Heiko

    1995-01-01

    The time until an approaching object will pass an observer (time to passage, or TTP) is optically specified by a global flow field even in the absence of local expansion or size cues. Kaiser and Mowafy have demonstrated that observers are in fact sensitive to this global flow information. The present studies investigate two factors that are usually ignored in work related to TTP: (1) non-constant motion functions and (2) concomitant eye rotation. Non-constant velocities violate an assumption of some TTP derivations, and eye rotations may complicate heading extraction. Such factors have practical significance, for example, in the case of a pilot accelerating an aircraft or executing a roll. In our studies, a flow field of constant-sized stars was presented monocularly on a large screen. TIP judgments had to be made on the basis of one target star. The flow field varied in its acceleration pattern and its roll component. Observers did not appear to utilize acceleration information. In particular, TTP with decelerating motion were consistently underestimated. TTP judgments were fairly robust with respect to roll, even when roll axis and track vector were decoupled. However, substantial decoupling between heading and track vector led to a decrement in performance, in both the presence and the absence of roll.

  7. Laboratory Observation of Magnetic Field Growth Driven by Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, Thomas; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Feng, Y.

    2013-04-01

    We have measured in the laboratory profiles of magnetic flux ropes, that include ion flow, magnetic field, current density, and plasma pressure. The electron flows v_e can therefore be inferred, and we use this information to evaluate the Hall J × B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm’s Law. Mutually attracted and compressed flux ropes break the cylindrical symmetry. This simple and coherent example of shear flow supports magnetic field growth corresponding to non vanishing curl × v_e × B. In the absence of magnetic reconnection we measure and predict a quadrupole out of plane magnetic field δBz, even though this has historically been invoked to be the signature of Hall magnetic reconnection. This provides a natural and general mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence. *Supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under LANS contract DE-AC52-06NA25369, NASA Geospace NNHIOA044I, Basic

  8. Simulating Magneto-Aerodynamic Actuator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-20

    2005. 19. Boeuf, J.P., Lagmich, Y., Callegari, Th., and Pitchford , L.C., Electro- hydrodynamic Force and Acceleration in Surface Discharge, AIAA 2006...Plasmadynamics and Laser Award, 2004 AFRL Point of Contact Dr. Donald B. Paul , AFRL/VA WPAFB, OH 937-255-7329, met weekly. Dr. Alan Garscadden, AFRL/PR...validating database for numerical simulation of magneto-aerodynamic actuator for hypersonic flow control. Points of contact at the AFRL/VA are Dr. D. Paul

  9. Aerodynamics of Supersonic Lifting Bodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    verso of front cover. 19 Y WOROS (Continue on rt.’,;erso side i recessary and identily by block number) Theoretical Aerodynamics Lifting Bodies Wind ...waverider solution, developed from the supersonic wedge flow solution, is then i Fused to fashion vertLcal stabilizer-likh control surfaces. Wind ...served as Project Engineers ror thE wind tunnel work. Important contributions were also made bv: Mr. iis±ung Miin; Lee, -M. Beom-Soo Kim, Mtr. Martin Weeks

  10. Performance enhancement of iron-chromium redox flow batteries by employing interdigitated flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y. K.; Zhou, X. L.; Zeng, L.; Yan, X. H.; Zhao, T. S.

    2016-09-01

    The catalyst for the negative electrode of iron-chromium redox flow batteries (ICRFBs) is commonly prepared by adding a small amount of Bi3+ ions in the electrolyte and synchronously electrodepositing metallic particles onto the electrode surface at the beginning of charge process. Achieving a uniform catalyst distribution in the porous electrode, which is closely related to the flow field design, is critically important to improve the ICRFB performance. In this work, the effects of flow field designs on catalyst electrodeposition and battery performance are investigated. It is found that compared to the serpentine flow field (SFF) design, the interdigitated flow field (IFF) forces the electrolyte through the porous electrode between the neighboring channels and enhances species transport during the processes of both the catalyst electrodeposition and iron/chromium redox reactions, thus enabling a more uniform catalyst distribution and higher mass transport limitation. It is further demonstrated that the energy efficiency of the ICRFB with the IFF reaches 80.7% at a high current density (320 mA cm-2), which is 8.2% higher than that of the ICRFB with the SFF. With such a high performance and intrinsically low-cost active materials, the ICRFB with the IFF offers a great promise for large-scale energy storage.

  11. Recent advances in transonic axial compressor aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biollo, Roberto; Benini, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Transonic axial flow compressors are fundamental components in aircraft engines as they make it possible to maximize pressure ratios per stage unit. This is achieved through a careful combination of both tangential flow deflections and, above all, by taking advantage of shock wave formation around the rotor blades. The resulting flow field is really complex as it features highly three-dimensional inviscid/viscous structures, strong shock-boundary layer interaction and intense tip clearance effects which negatively influence compressor efficiency. Complications are augmented at part load operation, where stall-related phenomena occur. Therefore, considerable research efforts are being spent, both numerically and experimentally, to improve efficiency and stall margin at peak efficiency and near stall operation. The present work aims at giving a complete review of the most recent advances in the field of aerodynamic design and operation of such machines. A great emphasis has been given to highlight the most relevant contribution in this field and to suggest the prospects for future developments.

  12. Rotor redesign for a highly loaded 1800 ft/sec tip speed fan. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, J. M.; Tari, U.; Weber, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    A quasi three dimensional design system and multiple-circular-arc airfoil sections were used to design a fan rotor. An axisymmetric intrablade flow field calculation modeled the shroud of an isolated splitter and radial distribution. The structural analysis indicates that the design is satisfactory for evaluation of aerodynamic performance of the fan stage in a test facility.

  13. Flow field around a sphere colliding against a wall.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, R.; Hunt, M. L.

    1998-11-01

    This study investigates the flow field and the fluid agitation generated by particle collisions. The motion of a particle towards a wall, or towards another particle, will result in a collision if the Reynolds number of the flow is large. As the particle approaches the wall, the fluid in the gap between the particle and the wall will be displaced. When the particle touches the wall and rebounds, the direction of the flow will reverse. This process produces a considerable agitation in the fluid phase. To study this process an immersed pendulum experiment was built to produce controlled collisions of particles. A fine string is attached to a particle, which is positioned at rest from some initial angle. Once released, the particle accelerates towards a wall, or to another suspended particle, resulting in a collision. The fluid is seeded with neutrally buoyant micro-spheres, which illuminated by a laser sheet serve as flow tracers. The motion of the particles and tracers is recorded using a high speed digital camera. The images are digitally processed to calculate displacements and velocities for different times before and after the collision. Flow fields are obtained for different impact velocities, particle diameters and solid-fluid density ratios, as well as for particle-wall and particle-particle collisions. Preliminary results show that for the flow conditions tested, the rebound of the particle is dependent on the shape of the wake behind the particle at the moment of collision, and not only on the flow in the gap between the particle and the wall. The amount of collision-generated agitation appears to increase with impact velocity and density ratio.

  14. Missile Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-02-01

    desired properties. To this end, we shall make use of ex- perimental evidence, as obtained in wind or water tunnels by various flow visualization...based on the results of number of tests carried out in a water and various wind tunnels, as reported by H. Werl6 in Ref. 3. Vortex breakdown is found...of a triangular wing Rogachev, G.V. moving close to the earth ’ s surface. AD 785154, FTD-HC-23-1802-74. 25 Fox, C.H. Prediction of lift and drag for

  15. Development and performance of a large-scale, transonic turbine blade cascade facility for aerodynamic studies of merging coolant-mainstream flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sayeh, Amjad Isaaf

    1998-11-01

    A new, large scale, linear cascade facility of turbine blades has been developed for the experimental exploration of the aerodynamic aspects of film cooling technology. Primary interest is in the mixing of the ejected coolant with the mainstream, at both subsonic and supersonic mainstream Mach numbers at the cascade exit. In order to achieve a spatial resolution adequate for the exploration of details on the scale of the coolant ejection holes, the cascade dimensions were maximized, within the limitations of the air supply system. The cascade contains four blades (three passages) with 14.05 cm axial chord, 17.56 cm span and a design total turning angle of 130.6 degrees. Exit Mach numbers range from 0.6 to 1.5 and Reynolds numbers from 0.5 to 1.5 million. The air supply system capacity allows run times up to five minutes at maximum flow rates. A coolant supply system has been built to deliver mixtures of SFsb6 and air to simulate coolant/mainstream density ratios up to 2. The cascade contains several novel features. A full-perimeter bleed slot upstream of the blades is used to remove the approach boundary layer from all four walls, to improve the degree of two-dimensionality. The exit flow is bounded by two adjustable tailboards that are hinged at the trailing edges and actuated to set the exit flow direction according to the imposed pressure ratio. The boards are perforated and subjected to mass removal near the blades, to minimize the undesirable reflection of shocks and expansion waves. A probe actuator is incorporated that allows continuous positioning of probes in the exhaust stream, in both the streamwise and pitchwise directions. Diagnostic methods include extensive surface pressure taps on the approach and exhaust ducts and on the blade surfaces. The large size permitted as many as 19 taps on the trailing edge itself. Shadowgraph and schlieren are available. A three-prong wake probe has been constructed to simultaneously measure total and static pressures

  16. Flow Web: a graph based user interface for 3D flow field exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lijie; Shen, Han-Wei

    2010-01-01

    While there have been intensive efforts in developing better 3D flow visualization techniques, little attention has been paid to the design of better user interfaces and more effective data exploration work flow. In this paper, we propose a novel graph-based user interface called Flow Web to enable more systematic explorations of 3D flow data. The Flow Web is a node-link graph that is constructed to highlight the essential flow structures where a node represents a region in the field and a link connects two nodes if there exist particles traveling between the regions. The direction of an edge implies the flow path, and the weight of an edge indicates the number of particles traveling through the connected nodes. Hierarchical flow webs are created by splitting or merging nodes and edges to allow for easy understanding of the underlying flow structures. To draw the Flow Web, we adopt force based graph drawing algorithms to minimize edge crossings, and use a hierarchical layout to facilitate the study of flow patterns step by step. The Flow Web also supports user queries to the properties of nodes and links. Examples of the queries for node properties include the degrees, complexity, and some associated physical attributes such as velocity magnitude. Queries for edges include weights, flow path lengths, existence of circles and so on. It is also possible to combine multiple queries using operators such as and , or, not. The FlowWeb supports several types of user interactions. For instance, the user can select nodes from the subgraph returned by a query and inspect the nodes with more details at different levels of detail. There are multiple advantages of using the graph-based user interface. One is that the user can identify regions of interest much more easily since, unlike inspecting 3D regions, there is very little occlusion. It is also much more convenient for the user to query statistical information about the nodes and links at different levels of detail. With

  17. Laser velocimetry in turbulent flow fields - Particle response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, W. D.; Rudoff, R.; Houser, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the particle response in a decelerating flow and a highly turbulent two-phase flow were obtained. Simultaneous measurements of the particle size and velocity served to quantify the particle response to the prevailing flow field. In the case of a flow incident upon a cylinder, the particle lag for a range of size classes was recorded. Results were also obtained in the flow generated by an atomizer operating on the leeward side of a flat disk bluff body in a coflowing air stream. Measurements of the mean axial, mean radial, and rms velocities and angles of trajectories were obtained for representative particle size classes. The air velocity and turbulence intensity were inferred from the seed particles on the order of one micrometer in diameter. Particles 9 micrometers and larger showed significant differences with respect to the gas phase mean velocity and turbulence intensity even at low velocities. In two-phase flows, reliable measurements of the continuous phase velocity and turbulence parameters requires the simultaneous measurement of particle size as a means for rejecting readings from large particles from the velocity pdf's.

  18. Some useful hybrid approaches for predicting aerodynamic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailly, Christophe; Bogey, Christophe; Gloerfelt, Xavier

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, several numerical studies have shown the feasibility of Direct Noise Computation (DNC) where the turbulent flow and the radiated acoustic field are obtained simultaneously by solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The acoustic radiation obtained by DNC can be used as reference solution to investigate hybrid methods in which the sound field is usually calculated as a by-product of the flow field obtained by a more conventional Navier-Stokes solver. A hybrid approach is indeed of practical interest when only the non-acoustic part of the aerodynamic field is available. In this review, some acoustic analogies or hybrid approaches are revisited in the light of CAA. To cite this article: C. Bailly et al., C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  19. Field measurement of basal forces generated by erosive debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, S.W.; Tucker, G.E.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that debris flows cut bedrock valleys in steeplands worldwide, but field measurements needed to constrain mechanistic models of this process remain sparse due to the difficulty of instrumenting natural flows. Here we present and analyze measurements made using an automated sensor network, erosion bolts, and a 15.24 cm by 15.24 cm force plate installed in the bedrock channel floor of a steep catchment. These measurements allow us to quantify the distribution of basal forces from natural debris‒flow events that incised bedrock. Over the 4 year monitoring period, 11 debris‒flow events scoured the bedrock channel floor. No clear water flows were observed. Measurements of erosion bolts at the beginning and end of the study indicated that the bedrock channel floor was lowered by 36 to 64 mm. The basal force during these erosive debris‒flow events had a large‒magnitude (up to 21 kN, which was approximately 50 times larger than the concurrent time‒averaged mean force), high‒frequency (greater than 1 Hz) fluctuating component. We interpret these fluctuations as flow particles impacting the bed. The resulting variability in force magnitude increased linearly with the time‒averaged mean basal force. Probability density functions of basal normal forces were consistent with a generalized Pareto distribution, rather than the exponential distribution that is commonly found in experimental and simulated monodispersed granular flows and which has a lower probability of large forces. When the bed sediment thickness covering the force plate was greater than ~ 20 times the median bed sediment grain size, no significant fluctuations about the time‒averaged mean force were measured, indicating that a thin layer of sediment (~ 5 cm in the monitored cases) can effectively shield the subjacent bed from erosive impacts. Coarse‒grained granular surges and water‒rich, intersurge flow had very similar basal force distributions despite

  20. NAS (Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program) technical summaries, March 1989 - February 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Given here are selected scientific results from the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program's third year of operation. During this year, the scientific community was given access to a Cray-2 and a Cray Y-MP supercomputer. Topics covered include flow field analysis of fighter wing configurations, large-scale ocean modeling, the Space Shuttle flow field, advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes for rotary-wing airloads and performance prediction, turbulence modeling of separated flows, airloads and acoustics of rotorcraft, vortex-induced nonlinearities on submarines, and standing oblique detonation waves.

  1. Flow-Field Surveys for Rectangular Nozzles. Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2012-01-01

    Flow field survey results for three rectangular nozzles are presented for a low subsonic condition obtained primarily by hot-wire anemometry. The three nozzles have aspect ratios of 2:1, 4:1 and 8:1. A fourth case included has 2:1 aspect ratio with chevrons added to the long edges. Data on mean velocity, turbulent normal and shear stresses as well as streamwise vorticity are presented covering a streamwise distance up to sixteen equivalent diameters from the nozzle exit. These detailed flow properties, including initial boundary layer characteristics, are usually difficult to measure in high speed flows and the primary objective of the study is to aid ongoing and future computational and noise modeling efforts. This supplement contains data files, charts and source code.

  2. Numerical computation of space shuttle orbiter flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A new parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code has been developed to compute the hypersonic, viscous chemically reacting flow fields around 3-D bodies. The flow medium is assumed to be a multicomponent mixture of thermally perfect but calorically imperfect gases. The new PNS code solves the gas dynamic and species conservation equations in a coupled manner using a noniterative, implicit, approximately factored, finite difference algorithm. The space-marching method is made well-posed by special treatment of the streamwise pressure gradient term. The code has been used to compute hypersonic laminar flow of chemically reacting air over cones at angle of attack. The results of the computations are compared with the results of reacting boundary-layer computations and show excellent agreement.

  3. Elevator mode convection in flows with strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li; Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-04-15

    Instability modes in the form of axially uniform vertical jets, also called “elevator modes,” are known to be the solutions of thermal convection problems for vertically unbounded systems. Typically, their relevance to the actual flow state is limited by three-dimensional breakdown caused by rapid growth of secondary instabilities. We consider a flow of a liquid metal in a vertical duct with a heated wall and strong transverse magnetic field and find elevator modes that are stable and, thus, not just relevant, but a dominant feature of the flow. We then explore the hypothesis suggested by recent experimental data that an analogous instability to modes of slow axial variation develops in finite-length ducts, where it causes large-amplitude fluctuations of temperature. The implications for liquid metal blankets for tokamak fusion reactors that potentially invalidate some of the currently pursued design concepts are discussed.

  4. Elevator mode convection in flows with strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    Instability modes in the form of axially uniform vertical jets, also called "elevator modes," are known to be the solutions of thermal convection problems for vertically unbounded systems. Typically, their relevance to the actual flow state is limited by three-dimensional breakdown caused by rapid growth of secondary instabilities. We consider a flow of a liquid metal in a vertical duct with a heated wall and strong transverse magnetic field and find elevator modes that are stable and, thus, not just relevant, but a dominant feature of the flow. We then explore the hypothesis suggested by recent experimental data that an analogous instability to modes of slow axial variation develops in finite-length ducts, where it causes large-amplitude fluctuations of temperature. The implications for liquid metal blankets for tokamak fusion reactors that potentially invalidate some of the currently pursued design concepts are discussed.

  5. Unsteady aerodynamics of membrane wings with adaptive compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, Jillian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    Membrane wings are known to provide superior aerodynamic performance at low Reynolds numbers (Re =104 -105), primarily due to passive shape adaptation to flow conditions. In addition to this passive deformation, active control of the fluid-structure interaction and resultant aerodynamic properties can be achieved through the use of dielectric elastomer actuators as the wing membrane material. When actuated, membrane pretension is decreased and wing camber increases. Additionally, actuation at resonance frequencies allows additional control over wing camber. We present results using synchronized (i) time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) to resolve the flow field, (ii) 3D direct linear transformation (DLT) to recover membrane shape, (iii) lift/drag/torque measurements and (iv) near-wake hot wire anemometry measurements to characterize the fluid-structure interactions. Particular attention is paid to cases in which the vortex shedding frequency, the membrane resonance, and the actuation frequency coincide. In quantitatively examining both flow field and membrane shape at a range of actuation frequencies and vortex shedding frequencies, this work seeks to find actuation parameters that allow for active control of boundary layer separation over a range of flow conditions. Also at Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport.

  6. Aerodynamic distortion propagation calculation in application of high-speed target detection by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yonghui; Sun, Huayan; Zhao, Yanzhong; Chen, Jianbiao

    2015-10-01

    Active laser detection technique has a broad application prospect in antimissile and air defense, however the aerodynamic flow field around the planes and missiles cause serious distortion effect on the detecting laser beams. There are many computational fluid dynamics(CFD) codes that can predict the air density distribution and also the density fluctuations of the flow field, it's necessary for physical optics to be used to predict the distortion properties after propagation through the complex process. Aiming at the physical process of laser propagation in "Cat-eye" lenses and aerodynamic flow field for twice, distortion propagation calculation method is researched in this paper. In the minds of dividing the whole process into two parts, and tread the aero-optical optical path difference as a phase distortion, the incidence and reflection process are calculated using Collins formula and angular spectrum diffraction theory respectively. In addition, turbulent performance of the aerodynamic flow field is estimated according to the electromagnetic propagation theory through a random medium, the rms optical path difference and Strehl ratio of the turbulent optical distortion are obtained. Finally, Computational fluid mechanics and aero-optical distortion properties of the detecting laser beams are calculated with the hemisphere-on-cylinder turret as an example, calculation results are showed and analysed.

  7. Longitudinal Dispersivity in a Radial Diverging Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, J. C.; Wilson, M.; Bertsch, P. M.; Aburime, S. A.

    2005-12-01

    Hydrodynamic dispersion is an important factor controlling contaminant migration in the subsurface environment. However, few comprehensive data sets exist for evaluating the impact of travel distance and site heterogeneity on solute dispersion under non-uniform flow conditions. In addition, anionic tracers are often used to estimate physical transport parameters based on an erroneous assumption of conservative (i.e., non-reactive) behavior. Therefore, a series of field experiments using tritiated water and several other commonly used hydrologic tracers (Br, Cl, FBAs) were conducted in the water-table aquifer on the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (Aiken, SC) to evaluate solute transport processes in a diverging radial flow field. For each experiment, tracer-free groundwater was injected for approximately 24 hours at a fixed rate of 56.7 L/min (15 gpm) to establish a forced radial gradient prior to the introduction of a tracer pulse. After the tracer pulse, the forced gradient was maintained throughout the experiment using non-labeled groundwater. Tracer migration was monitored using a set of six sampling wells radially spaced at approximate distances of 1.5, 3, and 4.5 meters from a central injection well. Each sampling well was further divided into three discrete sampling depths that were monitored continuously throughout the course of the tracer experiment. At various time intervals, discrete groundwater samples were collected from all 18 sampling ports for tritium analysis. Longitudinal dispersivity for tritium breakthrough at each sampling location was estimated using analytical approximations of the convection dispersion equation (CDE) for radial flow assuming an instantaneous Dirac pulse and a pulse of known duration. The results were also compared to dispersivity values derived from fitting the tracer data to analytical solutions derived from assuming uniform flow conditions. Tremendous variation in dispersivity values and tracer arrival

  8. Faster Aerodynamic Simulation With Cart3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A NASA-developed aerodynamic simulation tool is ensuring the safety of future space operations while providing designers and engineers with an automated, highly accurate computer simulation suite. Cart3D, co-winner of NASA's 2002 Software of the Year award, is the result of over 10 years of research and software development conducted by Michael Aftosmis and Dr. John Melton of Ames Research Center and Professor Marsha Berger of the Courant Institute at New York University. Cart3D offers a revolutionary approach to computational fluid dynamics (CFD), the computer simulation of how fluids and gases flow around an object of a particular design. By fusing technological advancements in diverse fields such as mineralogy, computer graphics, computational geometry, and fluid dynamics, the software provides a new industrial geometry processing and fluid analysis capability with unsurpassed automation and efficiency.

  9. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in area of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodyamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  10. The CMC/3DPNS computer program for prediction of three-dimensional, subsonic, turbulent aerodynamic juncture region flow. Volume 3: Programmers' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orzechowski, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The CMC fluid mechanics program system was developed to transmit the theoretical evolution of finite element numerical solution methodology, applied to nonlinear field problems into a versatile computer code for comprehensive flow field analysis. A detailed view of the code from the standpoint of a computer programmer's use is presented. A system macroflow chart and detailed flow charts of several routines necessary to interact with a theoretican/user to modify the operation of this program are presented. All subroutines and details of usage, primarily for input and output routines are described. Integer and real scalars and a cross reference list denoting subroutine usage for these scalars are outlined. Entry points in dynamic storage vector IZ; the lengths of each vector accompanying the scalar definitions are described. A listing of the routines peculiar to the standard test case and a listing of the input deck and printout for this case are included.

  11. Unsteady Simulation of a Landing-Gear Flow Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents results of an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulation of a landing-gear flow field. The geometry of the four-wheel landing gear assembly consists of several of the fine details including the oleo-strut, two diagonal struts, a door, yokes/pin and a flat-plate simulating the wing surface. The computational results, obtained by using 13.3 million grid points, are presented with an emphasis on the characteristics of the unsteadiness ensuing from different parts of the landing-gear assembly, including vortex shedding patterns and frequencies of dominant oscillations. The results show that the presence of the diagonal struts and the door significantly influence the flow field. Owing to the induced asymmetry, vortices are shed only from one of the rear wheels and not the other. Present computations also capture streamwise vortices originating from the upstream corners of the door.

  12. Fuel cell with interdigitated porous flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1997-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is formed with an improved system for distributing gaseous reactants to the membrane surface. A PEM fuel cell has an ionic transport membrane with opposed catalytic surfaces formed thereon and separates gaseous reactants that undergo reactions at the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The fuel cell may also include a thin gas diffusion layer having first and second sides with a first side contacting at least one of the catalytic surfaces. A macroporous flow-field with interdigitated inlet and outlet reactant channels contacts the second side of the thin gas diffusion layer for distributing one of the gaseous reactants over the thin gas diffusion layer for transport to an adjacent one of the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The porous flow field may be formed from a hydrophilic material and provides uniform support across the backside of the electrode assembly to facilitate the use of thin backing layers.

  13. Fuel cell with interdigitated porous flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.S.

    1997-06-24

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is formed with an improved system for distributing gaseous reactants to the membrane surface. A PEM fuel cell has an ionic transport membrane with opposed catalytic surfaces formed thereon and separates gaseous reactants that undergo reactions at the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The fuel cell may also include a thin gas diffusion layer having first and second sides with a first side contacting at least one of the catalytic surfaces. A macroporous flow-field with interdigitated inlet and outlet reactant channels contacts the second side of the thin gas diffusion layer for distributing one of the gaseous reactants over the thin gas diffusion layer for transport to an adjacent one of the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The porous flow field may be formed from a hydrophilic material and provides uniform support across the backside of the electrode assembly to facilitate the use of thin backing layers. 9 figs.

  14. Potential field cellular automata model for pedestrian flow.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Jian, Xiao-Xia; Wong, S C; Choi, Keechoo

    2012-02-01

    This paper proposes a cellular automata model of pedestrian flow that defines a cost potential field, which takes into account the costs of travel time and discomfort, for a pedestrian to move to an empty neighboring cell. The formulation is based on a reconstruction of the density distribution and the underlying physics, including the rule for resolving conflicts, which is comparable to that in the floor field cellular automaton model. However, we assume that each pedestrian is familiar with the surroundings, thereby minimizing his or her instantaneous cost. This, in turn, helps reduce the randomness in selecting a target cell, which improves the existing cellular automata modelings, together with the computational efficiency. In the presence of two pedestrian groups, which are distinguished by their destinations, the cost distribution for each group is magnified due to the strong interaction between the two groups. As a typical phenomenon, the formation of lanes in the counter flow is reproduced.

  15. Earth's field NMR flow meter: preliminary quantitative measurements.

    PubMed

    Fridjonsson, Einar O; Stanwix, Paul L; Johns, Michael L

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of Earth's field NMR (EF NMR) combined with a pre-polarising permanent magnet for measuring fast fluid velocities. This time of flight measurement protocol has a considerable history in the literature; here we demonstrate that it is quantitative when employing the Earth's magnetic field for signal detection. NMR signal intensities are measured as a function of flow rate (0-1m/s) and separation distance between the permanent magnet and the EF NMR signal detection. These data are quantitatively described by a flow model, ultimately featuring no free parameters, that accounts for NMR signal modulation due to residence time inside the pre-polarising magnet, between the pre-polarising magnet and the detection RF coil and inside the detection coil respectively. The methodology is subsequently demonstrated with a metallic pipe in the pre-polarising region.

  16. Mixing, chemical reaction and flow field development in ducted rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Vanka, S.P.; Craig, R.R.; Stull, F.D.

    1984-09-01

    Calculations have been made of the three-dimensional mixing, chemical reaction, and flow field development in a typical ducted rocket configuration. The governing partial differential equations are numerically solved by an iterative finite-difference solution procedure. The physical models include the k approx. epsilon turbulence model, one-step reaction, and mixing controlled chemical reaction rate. Radiation is neglected. The mean flow structure, fuel dispersal patterns, and temperature field are presented in detail for a base configuration with 0.058 m (2 in.) dome height, 45/sup 0/ side arm inclination, and with gaseous ethylene injected from the dome plate at an eccentric location. In addition, the influences of the geometrical parameters such as dome height, inclination of the side arms, and location of the fuel injector are studied.

  17. A high-performance flow-field structured iron-chromium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y. K.; Zhou, X. L.; An, L.; Wei, L.; Zhao, T. S.

    2016-08-01

    Unlike conventional iron-chromium redox flow batteries (ICRFBs) with a flow-through cell structure, in this work a high-performance ICRFB featuring a flow-field cell structure is developed. It is found that the present flow-field structured ICRFB reaches an energy efficiency of 76.3% with a current density of 120 mA cm-2 at 25 °C. The energy efficiency can be as high as 79.6% with an elevated current density of 200 mA cm-2 at 65 °C, a record performance of the ICRFB in the existing literature. In addition, it is demonstrated that the energy efficiency of the battery is stable during the cycle test, and that the capacity decay rate of the battery is 0.6% per cycle. More excitingly, the high performance of the flow-field structured battery significantly lowers the capital cost at 137.6 kWh-1, which is 28.2% lower than that of the conventional ICRFB for 8-h energy storage.

  18. Wind Tunnel Investigation of the Effects of Surface Porosity and Vertical Tail Placement on Slender Wing Vortex Flow Aerodynamics at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the effects of passive surface porosity and vertical tail placement on vortex flow development and interactions about a general research fighter configuration at supersonic speeds. Optical flow measurement and flow visualization techniques were used that featured pressure sensitive paint (PSP), laser vapor screen (LVS), and schlieren, These techniques were combined with conventional electronically-scanned pressure (ESP) and six-component force and moment measurements to quantify and to visualize the effects of flow-through porosity applied to a wing leading edge extension (LEX) and the placement of centerline and twin vertical tails on the vortex-dominated flow field of a 65 cropped delta wing model. Test results were obtained at free-stream Mach numbers of 1.6, 1.8, and 2.1 and a Reynolds number per foot of 2.0 million. LEX porosity promoted a wing vortex-dominated flow field as a result of a diffusion and weakening of the LEX vortex. The redistribution of the vortex-induced suction pressures contributed to large nose-down pitching moment increments but did not significantly affect the vortex-induced lift. The trends associated with LEX porosity were unaffected by vertical tail placement. The centerline tail configuration generally provided more stable rolling moments and yawing moments compared to the twin wing-mounted vertical tails. The strength of a complex system of shock waves between the twin tails was reduced by LEX porosity.

  19. Flow field and near and far sound field of a subsonic jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1986-01-01

    Flow and sound field data are presented for a 2.54 cm diameter air jet at a Mach number of 0.50 and a Reynolds number of 300,000. Distributions of mean velocity, turbulence intensities, Reynolds stress, spectral components of turbulence as well as of the near field pressure, together with essential characteristics of the far field sound are reported. This detailed set of data for one particular flow, erstwhile unavailable in the literature, is expected to help promoote and calibrate subsonic jet noise theories. 'Source locations' in terms of the turbulence maxima, coupling between the entrainment dynamics and the near pressure field, the sound radiation paths, and the balance in mass, momentum and sound energy fluxes are discussed. The results suggest that the large scale coherent structures of the jet govern the 'source locations' by controlling the turbulence and also strongly influence the near field pressure fluctuations.

  20. Laser Velocimetry Measurements of Oscillating Airfoil Dynamic Stall Flow Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Velocimetry Measurements of Oscillating Airfoil Dynamic Stall Flow Field By M.S.Chandrasekharal Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics and Fluid Mechanics ...tunnel of the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory(FML) angle information. The other could be used for the at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). It is one of...were on throat is always kept choked so that no disturbances a different traverse mechanism , but this was driven as can propagate upstream into the