Science.gov

Sample records for aerodynamic flow variables

  1. User's manual for an aerodynamic optimization scheeme that updates flow variables and design parameters simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    This user's manual is presented for an aerodynamic optimization program that updates flow variables and design parameters simultaneously. The program was developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The program was tested by applying it to the problem of optimizing propeller designs. Some reference to this particular application is therefore made in the manual. However, the optimization scheme is suitable for application to general aerodynamic design problems. A description of the approach used in the optimization scheme is first presented, followed by a description of the use of the program.

  2. Rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith

    1992-01-01

    Means for relatively simple and quick procedures are examined for estimating aerodynamic coefficients of lifting reentry vehicles. The methods developed allow aerospace designers not only to evaluate the aerodynamics of specific shapes but also to optimize shapes under given constraints. The analysis was also studied of the effect of thermomolecular flow on pressures measured by an orifice near the nose of a Space Shuttle Orbiter at altitudes above 75 km. It was shown that pressures corrected for thermomolecular flow effect are in good agreement with values predicted by independent theoretical methods. An incidental product was the insight gained about the free molecular thermal accommodation coefficient applicable under 'real' conditions of high speed flow in the Earth's atmosphere. The results are presented as abstracts of referenced papers. One reference paper is presented in its entirety.

  3. Aerodynamic optimization by simultaneously updating flow variables and design parameters with application to advanced propeller designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    A scheme is developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The scheme updates the design parameter iterative solutions and the flow variable iterative solutions simultaneously. It is applied to an advanced propeller design problem with the Euler equations used as the flow governing equations. The scheme's accuracy, efficiency and sensitivity to the computational parameters are tested.

  4. Vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H. B.; Campbell, J. F.; Young, A. D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The principal emphasis of the meeting was to be on the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads. This report shows that a substantial amount of the papers covering this area were received from a wide range of countries, together with an attendance that was even more diverse. In itself, this testifies to the current interest in the subject and to the appropriateness of the Panel's choice of topic and approach. An attempt is made to summarize each paper delivered, and to relate the contributions made in the papers and in the discussions to some of the important aspects of vortex flow aerodynamics. This reveals significant progress and important clarifications, but also brings out remaining weaknesses in predictive capability and gaps in understanding. Where possible, conclusions are drawn and areas of continuing concern are identified.

  5. Nebulization of active pharmaceutical ingredients with the eFlow(®) rapid: impact of formulation variables on aerodynamic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Prüfer, Nadine; Oesterheld, Nina; Seeger, Werner; Schmehl, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Nebulization of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) solutions is a well-established means to achieve pulmonary drug deposition. The current study identified the impact of formulation variables on the aerosolization performance of the eFlow(®) rapid with special respect to optimized lung application. API formulations (including excipient-supplemented samples) were investigated for physicochemical properties, then nebulized using vibrating-mesh technology. The generated aerosol clouds were analyzed by laser diffraction. Aerosol deposition characteristics in the human respiratory tract were estimated using an algebraic model. Remarkable effects on aerosolization performance [i.e., mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD)] of API solutions were obtained when the sample conductivity (by API concentration and type, sodium chloride addition) and dynamic viscosity (by application of sucrose and poly(ethylene glycol) 200) were elevated. A similar influence was observed for a decline in surface tension (by ethanol addition). Thus, a defined adjustment of formulation parameters allowed for a decrease of the MMAD from ∼ 8.0 μm to values as small as ∼ 3.5 μm. Consequently, the pattern and efficiency of aerosol deposition in the human respiratory tract were improved. In conclusion, identification of physicochemical variables and their way of influencing vibrating-mesh nebulization has been provided to deliver a platform for tailoring aerosol characteristics and thus, advancing pulmonary therapy.

  6. Aerodynamic heating on AFE due to nonequilibrium flow with variable entropy at boundary layer edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, P. C.; Rochelle, W. C.; Bouslog, S. A.; Tam, L. T.; Scott, C. D.; Curry, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A method of predicting the aerobrake aerothermodynamic environment on the NASA Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle is described. Results of a three dimensional inviscid nonequilibrium solution are used as input to an axisymmetric nonequilibrium boundary layer program to predict AFE convective heating rates. Inviscid flow field properties are obtained from the Euler option of the Viscous Reacting Flow (VRFLO) code at the boundary layer edge. Heating rates on the AFE surface are generated with the Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure (BLIMP) code for a partially catalytic surface composed of Reusable Surface Insulation (RSI) times. The 1864 kg AFE will fly an aerobraking trajectory, simulating return from geosynchronous Earth orbit, with a 75 km perigee and a 10 km/sec entry velocity. Results of this analysis will provide principal investigators and thermal analysts with aeroheating environments to perform experiment and thermal protection system design.

  7. Aerodynamic Design of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, R. O. (Editor); Johnsen, I. A.

    1965-01-01

    An overview of 'Aerodynamic systems design of axial flow compressors' is presented. Numerous chapters cover topics such as compressor design, ptotential and viscous flow in two dimensional cascades, compressor stall and blade vibration, and compressor flow theory. Theoretical aspects of flow are also covered.

  8. Preliminary aerodynamic design considerations for advanced laminar flow aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph L., Jr.; Yip, Long P.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Modern composite manufacturing methods have provided the opportunity for smooth surfaces that can sustain large regions of natural laminar flow (NLF) boundary layer behavior and have stimulated interest in developing advanced NLF airfoils and improved aircraft designs. Some of the preliminary results obtained in exploratory research investigations on advanced aircraft configurations at the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed. Results of the initial studies have shown that the aerodynamic effects of configuration variables such as canard/wing arrangements, airfoils, and pusher-type and tractor-type propeller installations can be particularly significant at high angles of attack. Flow field interactions between aircraft components were shown to produce undesirable aerodynamic effects on a wing behind a heavily loaded canard, and the use of properly designed wing leading-edge modifications, such as a leading-edge droop, offset the undesirable aerodynamic effects by delaying wing stall and providing increased stall/spin resistance with minimum degradation of laminar flow behavior.

  9. Rarefield-Flow Shuttle Aerodynamics Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moats, Christina D.

    1994-01-01

    A model of the Shuttle Orbiter rarefied-flow aerodynamic force coefficients has been derived from the ratio of flight acceleration measurements. The in-situ, low-frequency (less than 1Hz), low-level (approximately 1 x 10(exp -6) g) acceleration measurements are made during atmospheric re-entry. The experiment equipment designed and used for this task is the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), one of the sensor packages in the Orbiter Experiments Program. To date, 12 HiRAP re-entry mission data sets spanning a period of about 10 years have been processed. The HiRAP-derived aerodynamics model is described in detail. The model includes normal and axial hypersonic continuum coefficient equations as function of angle of attack, body-flap deflection, and elevon deflection. Normal and axial free molecule flow coefficient equations as a function of angle of attack are also presented, along with flight-derived rarefied-flow transition bridging formulae. Comparisons are made between the aerodynamics model, data from the latest Orbiter Operational Aerodynamic Design Data Book, applicable computer simulations, and wind-tunnel data.

  10. Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. Subba

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic space vehicles is an important factor to be considered in their design. Therefore the designers of such vehicles need reliable heat transfer data in this respect for a successful design. Such data is usually produced by testing the models of hypersonic surfaces in wind tunnels. Most of the hypersonic test facilities at present are conventional blow-down tunnels whose run times are of the order of several seconds. The surface temperatures on such models are obtained using standard techniques such as thin-film resistance gages, thin-skin transient calorimeter gages and coaxial thermocouple or video acquisition systems such as phosphor thermography and infrared thermography. The data are usually reduced assuming that the model behaves like a semi-infinite solid (SIS) with constant properties and that heat transfer is by one-dimensional conduction only. This simplifying assumption may be valid in cases where models are thick, run-times short, and thermal diffusivities small. In many instances, however, when these conditions are not met, the assumption may lead to significant errors in the heat transfer results. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this aspect. Specifically, the objectives are as follows: (1) to determine the limiting conditions under which a model can be considered a semi-infinite body; (2) to estimate the extent of errors involved in the reduction of the data if the models violate the assumption; and (3) to come up with correlation factors which when multiplied by the results obtained under the SIS assumption will provide the results under the actual conditions.

  11. Vortex Flow Aerodynamics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F. (Editor); Osborn, R. F. (Editor); Foughner, J. T., Jr. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Vortex modeling techniques and experimental studies of research configurations utilizing vortex flows are discussed. Also discussed are vortex flap investigations using generic and airplane research models and vortex flap theoretical analysis and design studies.

  12. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  13. Air flow testing on aerodynamic truck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This photograph illustrates a standard passenger van modified at the Dryden Flight Research Center to investigate the aerodynamics of trucks. The resulting vehicle--re-fashioned with sheet metal--resembled a motor home, with rounded vertical corners on the vehicle's front and rear sections. For subsequent tests, researchers installed a 'boat tail' structure, shown in the photograph. During a decade spanning the 1970s and 1980s, Dryden researchers conducted tests to determine the extent to which adjustments in the shape of trucks reduced aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the tests, the vehicle's sides were fitted with tufts, or strings, that showed air flow. The investigators concluded that rounding the vertical corners front and rear reduced drag by 40 percent, yet decreased the vehicle's internal volume by only 1.3 percent. Rounding both the vertical and horizontal corners cut drag by 54 percent, resulting in a three percent loss of internal volume. A second group of tests added a faired underbody and a boat tail, the latter feature resulting in drag reduction of about 15 percent.

  14. Aerodynamic Flow Control of a Maneuvering Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.; Culp, John; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments on a maneuvering, free-moving airfoil are varied in wind tunnel experiments by controlling vorticity generation/accumulation near the surface using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic characteristics of the airfoil that is mounted on a 2-DOF traverse are controlled using position and attitude feedback loops that are actuated by servo motors. Bi-directional changes in the pitching moment are induced using controllable trapped vorticity concentrations on the suction and pressure surfaces near the trailing edge. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and velocity measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The time scales associated with the actuation process is determined from PIV measurements of vorticity flux downstream of the trailing edge. Circulation time history shows that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within about 1.5 TCONV, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is only limited by the inertia of the platform. Supported by AFSOR.

  15. A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics of a blunt lifting body is being developed by NASA. This experiment, called the Rarefied-Flow Aerodynamic Measurement Experiment (RAME), is part of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) mission, which is a Pathfinder design tool for aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles. The RAME will use flight measurements from accelerometers, rate gyros, and pressure transducers, combined with knowledge of AFE in-flight mass properties and trajectory, to infer aerodynamic forces and moments in the rarefied-flow environment, including transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Preflight estimates of the aerodynamic measurements are based upon environment models, existing computer simulations, and ground test results. Planned maneuvers at several altitudes will provide a first-time opportunity to examine gas-surface accommondation effects on aerodynamic coefficients in an environment of changing atmospheric composition. A description is given of the RAME equipment design.

  16. Transient platoon aerodynamics and bluff body flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuei, Lun

    There are two components of this experimental work: transient vehicle platoon aerodynamics and bluff-body flows. The transient aerodynamic effects in a four-vehicle platoon during passing maneuvers and in-line oscillations are investigated. A vehicle model is moved longitudinally parallel to a four-car platoon to simulate passing maneuvers. The drag and side forces experienced by each platoon member are measured using strain gauge balances. The resulting data are presented as dimensionless coefficients. It is shown that each car in the platoon experiences a repulsive side force when the passing vehicle is in the neighborhood of its rear half. The side force reverses its direction and becomes an attractive force when the passing vehicle moves to the neighborhood of its front half. The drag force experienced by each platoon member is increased when the passing vehicle is in its proximity. The effects of the lateral spacing and relative velocity between the platoon and the passing vehicle, as well as the shape of the passing vehicle, are also investigated. Similar trends are observed in simulations of both a vehicle passing a platoon and a platoon overtaking a vehicle. During the in-line oscillation experiments, one of the four platoon members is forced to undergo longitudinal periodic motions. The drag force experienced by each platoon member is determined simultaneously during the oscillations. The effects of the location of the oscillating vehicle, the shape of the vehicles and the displacement and velocity amplitudes of the oscillation are examined. The results from the transient conditions are compared to those from the steady tests in the same setup. In the case of a four-car platoon, the drag variations experienced by the vehicles adjacent to the oscillating vehicle are discussed using a cavity model. It is found that when the oscillating car moves forward and approaches its upstream neighbor, itself and its downstream neighbor experiences an increased drag

  17. Air flow testing on aerodynamic truck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    After leasing a cab-over tractor-trailer from a Southern California firm, Dryden researchers added sheet metal modifications like those shown here. They rounded the front corners and edges, and placed a smooth fairing on the cab's roofs and sides extending back to the trailer. During the investigation of truck aerodynamics, the techniques honed in flight research proved highly applicable. By closing the gap between the cab and the trailer, for example, researchers discovered a significant reduction in aerodynamic drag, one resulting in 20 to 25 percent less fuel consumption than the standard design. Many truck manufacturers subsequently incorporated similar modifications on their products.

  18. Passive flow control by membrane wings for aerodynamic benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timpe, Amory; Zhang, Zheng; Hubner, James; Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    The coupling of passive structural response of flexible membranes with the flow over them can significantly alter the aerodynamic characteristic of simple flat-plate wings. The use of flexible wings is common throughout biological flying systems inspiring many engineers to incorporate them into small engineering flying systems. In many of these systems, the motion of the membrane serves to passively alter the flow over the wing potentially resulting in an aerodynamic benefit. In this study, the aerodynamic loads and the flow field for a rigid flat-plate wing are compared to free trailing-edge membrane wings with two different pre-tensions at a chord-based Reynolds number of approximately 50,000. The membrane was silicon rubber with a scalloped free trailing edge. The analysis presented includes load measurements from a sting balance along with velocity fields and membrane deflections from synchronized, time-resolved particle image velocimetry and digital image correlation. The load measurements demonstrate increased aerodynamic efficiency and lift, while the synchronized flow and membrane measurements show how the membrane motion serves to force the flow. This passive flow control introduced by the membranes motion alters the flows development over the wing and into the wake region demonstrating how, at least for lower angles of attack, the membranes motion drives the flow as opposed to the flow driving the membrane motion.

  19. AERODYNAMIC AND BLADING DESIGN OF MULTISTAGE AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSORS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The axial-flow compressor is used for aircraft engines because it has distinct configuration and performance advantages over other compressor types. However, good potential performance is not easily obtained. The designer must be able to model the actual flows well enough to adequately predict aerodynamic performance. This computer program has been developed for computing the aerodynamic design of a multistage axial-flow compressor and, if desired, the associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis. The aerodynamic solution gives velocity diagrams on selected streamlines of revolution at the blade row edges. The program yields aerodynamic and blading design results that can be directly used by flow and mechanical analysis codes. Two such codes are TSONIC, a blade-to-blade channel flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-10977), and MERIDL, a more detailed hub-to-shroud flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-12966). The aerodynamic and blading design program can reduce the time and effort required to obtain acceptable multistage axial-flow compressor configurations by generating good initial solutions and by being compatible with available analysis codes. The aerodynamic solution assumes steady, axisymmetric flow so that the problem is reduced to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. The streamline curvature method is used for the iterative aerodynamic solution at stations outside of the blade rows. If a blade design is desired, the blade elements are defined and stacked within the aerodynamic solution iteration. The blade element inlet and outlet angles are established by empirical incidence and deviation angles to the relative flow angles of the velocity diagrams. The blade element centerline is composed of two segments tangentially joined at a transition point. The local blade angle variation of each element can be specified as a fourth-degree polynomial function of path distance. Blade element thickness can also be specified

  20. Cross Flow Parameter Calculation for Aerodynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, David, Jr. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system and method for determining a cross flow angle for a feature on a structure. A processor unit receives location information identifying a location of the feature on the structure, determines an angle of the feature, identifies flow information for the location, determines a flow angle using the flow information, and determines the cross flow angle for the feature using the flow angle and the angle of the feature. The flow information describes a flow of fluid across the structure. The flow angle comprises an angle of the flow of fluid across the structure for the location of the feature.

  1. The Effects of Surfaces on the Aerodynamics and Acoustics of Jet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew J.; Miller, Steven A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft noise mitigation is an ongoing challenge for the aeronautics research community. In response to this challenge, low-noise aircraft concepts have been developed that exhibit situations where the jet exhaust interacts with an airframe surface. Jet flows interacting with nearby surfaces manifest a complex behavior in which acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics are altered. In this paper, the variation of the aerodynamics, acoustic source, and far-field acoustic intensity are examined as a large at plate is positioned relative to the nozzle exit. Steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solutions are examined to study the aerodynamic changes in the field-variables and turbulence statistics. The mixing noise model of Tam and Auriault is used to predict the noise produced by the jet. To validate both the aerodynamic and the noise prediction models, results are compared with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and free-field acoustic data respectively. The variation of the aerodynamic quantities and noise source are examined by comparing predictions from various jet and at plate configurations with an isolated jet. To quantify the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic installation effects on the aerodynamic noise source, a non-dimensional number is formed that contains the flow-conditions and airframe installation parameters.

  2. Variable volume combustor with aerodynamic fuel flanges for nozzle mounting

    DOEpatents

    McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Keener, Christopher Paul; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2016-09-20

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles and a fuel injection system for providing a flow of fuel to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles. The fuel injection system may include a number of support struts supporting the fuel nozzles and for providing the flow of fuel therethrough. The fuel injection system also may include a number of aerodynamic fuel flanges connecting the micro-mixer fuel nozzles and the support struts.

  3. Development of an aerodynamic measurement system for hypersonic rarefied flows.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, T; Fujita, K; Suzuki, T

    2015-01-01

    A hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel (HRWT) has lately been developed at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency in order to improve the prediction of rarefied aerodynamics. Flow characteristics of hypersonic rarefied flows have been investigated experimentally and numerically. By conducting dynamic pressure measurements with pendulous models and pitot pressure measurements, we have probed flow characteristics in the test section. We have also improved understandings of hypersonic rarefied flows by integrating a numerical approach with the HRWT measurement. The development of the integration scheme between HRWT and numerical approach enables us to estimate the hypersonic rarefied flow characteristics as well as the direct measurement of rarefied aerodynamics. Consequently, this wind tunnel is capable of generating 25 mm-core flows with the free stream Mach number greater than 10 and Knudsen number greater than 0.1.

  4. Joint influences of aerodynamic flow field and aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of airborne optical systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Haosu; Zuo, Baojun; Tian, Yi; Zhang, Wang; Hao, Chenglong; Liu, Chaofeng; Li, Qi; Li, Fan; Zhang, Li; Fan, Zhigang

    2012-12-20

    We investigated the joint influences exerted by the nonuniform aerodynamic flow field surrounding the optical dome and the aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of an airborne optical system. The Spalart-Allmaras model provided by FLUENT was used for flow computations. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm based ray tracing program was used to simulate optical transmission through the aerodynamic flow field and the dome. Four kinds of imaging quality evaluation parameters were presented: wave aberration of the exit pupil, point spread function, encircled energy, and modulation transfer function. The results show that the aero-optical disturbance of the aerodynamic flow field and the aerodynamic heating of the dome significantly affect the imaging quality of an airborne optical system.

  5. Unsteady aerodynamics and flow control for flapping wing flyers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Steven; Nassef, Hany; Pornsinsirirak, Nick; Tai, Yu-Chong; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2003-11-01

    The creation of micro air vehicles (MAVs) of the same general sizes and weight as natural fliers has spawned renewed interest in flapping wing flight. With a wingspan of approximately 15 cm and a flight speed of a few meters per second, MAVs experience the same low Reynolds number (10 4-10 5) flight conditions as their biological counterparts. In this flow regime, rigid fixed wings drop dramatically in aerodynamic performance while flexible flapping wings gain efficacy and are the preferred propulsion method for small natural fliers. Researchers have long realized that steady-state aerodynamics does not properly capture the physical phenomena or forces present in flapping flight at this scale. Hence, unsteady flow mechanisms must dominate this regime. Furthermore, due to the low flight speeds, any disturbance such as gusts or wind will dramatically change the aerodynamic conditions around the MAV. In response, a suitable feedback control system and actuation technology must be developed so that the wing can maintain its aerodynamic efficiency in this extremely dynamic situation; one where the unsteady separated flow field and wing structure are tightly coupled and interact nonlinearly. For instance, birds and bats control their flexible wings with muscle tissue to successfully deal with rapid changes in the flow environment. Drawing from their example, perhaps MAVs can use lightweight actuators in conjunction with adaptive feedback control to shape the wing and achieve active flow control. This article first reviews the scaling laws and unsteady flow regime constraining both biological and man-made fliers. Then a summary of vortex dominated unsteady aerodynamics follows. Next, aeroelastic coupling and its effect on lift and thrust are discussed. Afterwards, flow control strategies found in nature and devised by man to deal with separated flows are examined. Recent work is also presented in using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuators and angular speed

  6. Use of advanced computers for aerodynamic flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. R.; Ballhaus, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    The current and projected use of advanced computers for large-scale aerodynamic flow simulation applied to engineering design and research is discussed. The design use of mature codes run on conventional, serial computers is compared with the fluid research use of new codes run on parallel and vector computers. The role of flow simulations in design is illustrated by the application of a three dimensional, inviscid, transonic code to the Sabreliner 60 wing redesign. Research computations that include a more complete description of the fluid physics by use of Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation formulations are also presented. Results of studies for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility are used to project the feasibility of design applications employing these more advanced three dimensional viscous flow simulations.

  7. Multi-colored layers for visualizing aerodynamic flow effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Ronald N. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for visualizing aerodynamic flow effects on a test surface. First, discrete quantities of a sublimating chemical such as naphthalene are distinctively colored via appropriate dyes or paints. Next, a uniform layer of the sublimating chemical having a particular color is applied to the test surface. This layer is covered with a second uniform layer of a different colored sublimating chemical, and so on until a composite of multi-colored layers is formed having a discrete thickness. Friction caused by an airflow results in the distinctly colored layers being removed in proportion to such aerodynamic flow characteristics as velocity and temperature, resulting in a multi-colored portrait which approximates the air flow on the underlying test surface.

  8. Unsteady aerodynamics of vortical flows: Early and recent developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, H. M.

    1994-01-01

    The development of aerodynamic theories of streaming motions around bodies with unsteady vortical and entropic disturbances is reviewed. The basic concepts associated with such motions, their interaction with solid boundaries and their noise generating mechanisms are described. The theory was first developed in the approximation wherein the unsteady flow is linearized about a uniform mean lfow. This approach has been extensively developed and used in aeroelastic and aeroacoustic calculations. The theory was recently extended to account for the effect of distortion of the incident disturbances by the nonuniform mean flow around the body. This effect is found to have a significant influence on the unsteady aerodynamic force along the body surface and the sound radiated in the far field. Finally, the nonlinear characteristics of unsteady transonic flows are reviewed and recent results of linear and nonlinear computations are presented.

  9. Unsteady Aerodynamic Flow Control of a Suspended Axisymmetric Moving Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Thomas; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2011-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces on an axisymmetric wind tunnel model are altered by fluidic interaction of an azimuthal array of integrated synthetic jet actuators with the cross flow. Four-quadrant actuators are integrated into a Coanda surface on the aft section of the body, and the jets emanate from narrow, azimuthally segmented slots equally distributed around the model's perimeter. The model is suspended in the tunnel using eight wires each comprising miniature in-line force sensors and shape-memory-alloy (SMA) strands that are used to control the instantaneous forces and moments on the model and its orientation. The interaction of the actuation jets with the flow over the moving model is investigated using PIV and time-resolved force measurements to assess the transitory aerodynamic loading effected by coupling between the induced motion of the aerodynamic surface and the fluid dynamics that is driven by the actuation. It is shown that these interactions can lead to effective control of the aerodynamic forces and moments, and thereby of the model's motion. Supported by ARO.

  10. Flow variability of an aerial variable-rate nozzle at constant pressures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable-rate ground application systems have been in use for the past 15 years, but due to high application speeds, flow requirements, and aerodynamic considerations, variable-rate aerial nozzles have not been available until now. In 2006, Spray Target, Inc. released the VeriRate™ variable-rate aer...

  11. Modeling of turbulent separated flows for aerodynamic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Steady, high speed, compressible separated flows modeled through numerical simulations resulting from solutions of the mass-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on benchmark flows that represent simplified (but realistic) aerodynamic phenomena. These include impinging shock waves, compression corners, glancing shock waves, trailing edge regions, and supersonic high angle of attack flows. A critical assessment of modeling capabilities is provided by comparing the numerical simulations with experiment. The importance of combining experiment, numerical algorithm, grid, and turbulence model to effectively develop this potentially powerful simulation technique is stressed.

  12. Transonic aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of a variable sweep wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, P. M.; Guruswamy, G. P.; Ide, H.; Miller, G.

    1985-01-01

    The flow over the B-1 wing is studied computationally, including the aeroelastic response of the wing. Computed results are compared with results from wind tunnel and flight tests for both low-sweep and high-sweep cases, at 25.0 and 67.5 deg., respectively, for selected transonic Mach numbers. The aerodynamic and aeroelastic computations are made by using the transonic unsteady code ATRAN3S. Steady aerodynamic computations compare well with wind tunnel results for the 25.0 deg sweep case and also for small angles of attack at the 67.5 deg sweep case. The aeroelastic response results show that the wing is stable at the low sweep angle for the calculation at the Mach number at which there is a shock wave. In the higher sweep case, for the higher angle of attack at which oscillations were observed in the flight and wind tunnel tests, the calculations do not show any shock waves. Their absence lends support to the hypothesis that the observed oscillations are due to the presence of leading edge separation vortices and are not due to shock wave motion as was previously proposed.

  13. Transonic aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of a variable sweep wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, P. M.; Guruswamy, G. P.; Ide, H.; Miller, G.

    1985-01-01

    The flow over the B-1 wing is studied computationally, including the aeroelastic response of the wing. Computed results are compared with results from wind tunnel and flight tests for both low-sweep and high-sweep cases, at 25.0 deg. and 67.5 deg., respectively, for selected transonic Mach numbers. The aerodynamic and aeroelastic computations are made by using the transonic unsteady code ATRAN3S. Steady aerodynamic computations compare well with wind tunnel results for the 25.0 deg. sweep case and also for small angles of attack at the 67.5 deg. sweep case. The aeroelastic response results show that the wing is stable at the low sweep angle for the calculation at the Mach number at which there is a shock wave. In the higher sweep case, for the higher angle of attack at which oscillations were observed in the flight and wind tunnel tests, the calculations do not show any shock waves. Their absence lends support to the hypothesis that the observed oscillations are due to the presence of leading edge separation vortices and are not due to shock wave motion as was previously proposed.

  14. Aerodynamic Flow Field Measurements for Automotive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepner, Timothy E.

    1999-01-01

    The design of a modern automotive air handling system is a complex task. The system is required to bring the interior of the vehicle to a comfortable level in as short a time as possible. A goal of the automotive industry is to predict the interior climate of an automobile using advanced computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods. The development of these advanced prediction tools will enable better selection of engine and accessory components. The goal of this investigation was to predict methods used by the automotive industry. To accomplish this task three separate experiments were performed. The first was a laboratory setup where laser velocimeter (LV) flow field measurements were made in the heating and air conditioning unit of a Ford Windstar. The second involved flow field measurements in the engine compartment of a Ford Explorer, with the engine running idle. The third mapped the flow field exiting the center dashboard panel vent inside the Explorer, while the circulating fan operated at 14 volts. All three experiments utilized full-coincidence three-component LV systems. This enabled the mean and fluctuating velocities to be measured along with the Reynolds stress terms.

  15. Aerodynamic Analysis of Multistage Turbomachinery Flows in Support of Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the state of 3D CFD based models of the time average flow field within axial flow multistage turbomachines. Emphasis is placed on models which are compatible with the industrial design environment and those models which offer the potential of providing credible results at both design and off-design operating conditions. The need to develop models which are free of aerodynamic input from semi-empirical design systems is stressed. The accuracy of such models is shown to be dependent upon their ability to account for the unsteady flow environment in multistage turbomachinery. The relevant flow physics associated with some of the unsteady flow processes present in axial flow multistage machinery are presented along with procedures which can be used to account for them in 3D CFD simulations. Sample results are presented for both axial flow compressors and axial flow turbines which help to illustrate the enhanced predictive capabilities afforded by including these procedures in 3D CFD simulations. Finally, suggestions are given for future work on the development of time average flow models.

  16. Closed-Loop Aerodynamic Flow Control of a Maneuvering Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.; Culp, John R.; Glezer, Ari

    2011-11-01

    The unsteady interaction between trailing edge aerodynamic flow control and airfoil motion in pitch and plunge is investigated in wind tunnel experiments using a 2-DOF traverse which enables application of time-dependent external torque and forces by servo motors. The global aerodynamic forces and moments are regulated by controlling vorticity generation and accumulation near the surface using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and velocity measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The effect of the unsteady motion on the model-embedded flow control is assessed in unsteady several maneuvers. Circulation time history that is estimated from a PIV wake survey shows that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within about 1.5 TCONV, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales that are commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is primarily limited by the inertia of the platform.

  17. Computers vs. wind tunnels for aerodynamic flow simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, D. R.; Mark, H.; Pirtle, M. W.

    1975-01-01

    It is pointed out that in other fields of computational physics, such as ballistics, celestial mechanics, and neutronics, computations have already displaced experiments as the principal means of obtaining dynamic simulations. In the case of aerodynamic investigations, the complexity of the computational work involved in solving the Navier-Stokes equations is the reason that such investigations rely currently mainly on wind-tunnel testing. However, because of inherent limitations of the wind-tunnel approach and economic considerations, it appears that at some time in the future aerodynamic studies will chiefly rely on computational flow data provided by the computer. Taking into account projected development trends, it is estimated that computers with the required capabilities for a solution of the complete viscous, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations will be available in the mid-1980s.

  18. Control of flow separation and mixing by aerodynamic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J.; Abbott, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The recent research in the control of shear flows using unsteady aerodynamic excitation conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center is reviewed. The program is of a fundamental nature, concentrating on the physics of the unsteady aerodynamic processes. This field of research is a fairly new development with great promise in the areas of enhanced mixing and flow separation control. Enhanced mixing research includes influence of core turbulence, forced pairing of coherent structures, and saturation of mixing enhancement. Separation flow control studies included are for a two-dimensional diffuser, conical diffusers, and single airfoils. Ultimate applications include aircraft engine inlet flow control at high angle of attack, wide angle diffusers, highly loaded airfoils as in turbomachinery, and ejector/suppressor nozzles for the supersonic transport. An argument involving the Coanda Effect is made that all of the above mentioned application areas really only involve forms of shear layer mixing enhancement. The program also includes the development of practical excitation devices which might be used in aircraft applications.

  19. Control of flow separation and mixing by aerodynamic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J.; Abbott, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The recent research progress in the control of shear flows using unsteady aerodynamic excitation conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center is reviewed. The program is of fundamental nature concentrating on the physics of the unsteady aerodynamic processes. This field of research is a fairly new development with great promise in the areas of enhanced mixing and flow separation control. Enhanced mixing research reported in this paper include influence of core turbulence, forced pairing of coherent structures, and saturation of mixing enhancement. Separation flow control studies included are for a two-dimensional diffuser, conical diffusers, and single airfoils. Ultimate applications of this research include aircraft engine inlet flow control at high angle of attack, wide angle diffusers, highly loaded airfoils as in turbomachinery, and ejector/suppressor nozzles for the supersonic transport. An argument involving the Coanda Effect is made here that all of the above mentioned application areas really only involve forms of shear layer mixing enhancement. The program also includes the development of practical excitation devices which might be used in aircraft applications.

  20. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE). Aerodynamic and aeromechanical performance of a 50.8 cm (20 inch) diameter 1.34 PR variable pitch fan with core flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, R. G.; Mcfalls, R. A.; Beacher, B. F.

    1977-01-01

    The fan aerodynamic and aeromechanical performance tests of the quiet clean short haul experimental engine under the wing fan and inlet with a simulated core flow are described. Overall forward mode fan performance is presented at each rotor pitch angle setting with conventional flow pressure ratio efficiency fan maps, distinguishing the performance characteristics of the fan bypass and fan core regions. Effects of off design bypass ratio, hybrid inlet geometry, and tip radial inlet distortion on fan performance are determined. The nonaxisymmetric bypass OGV and pylon configuration is assessed relative to both total pressure loss and induced circumferential flow distortion. Reverse mode performance, obtained by resetting the rotor blades through both the stall pitch and flat pitch directions, is discussed in terms of the conventional flow pressure ratio relationship and its implications upon achievable reverse thrust. Core performance in reverse mode operation is presented in terms of overall recovery levels and radial profiles existing at the simulated core inlet plane. Observations of the starting phenomena associated with the initiation of stable rotor flow during acceleration in the reverse mode are briefly discussed. Aeromechanical response characteristics of the fan blades are presented as a separate appendix, along with a description of the vehicle instrumentation and method of data reduction.

  1. Blunt Body Aerodynamics for Hypersonic Low Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Glass, Christopher E.; Greene, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed for the Apollo capsule from the hypersonic rarefied to the continuum regimes. The focus is on flow conditions similar to those experienced by the Apollo 6 Command Module during the high altitude portion of its reentry. The present focus is to highlight some of the current activities that serve as a precursor for computational tool assessments that will be used to support the development of aerodynamic data bases for future capsule flight environments, particularly those for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Results for aerodynamic forces and moments are presented that demonstrate their sensitivity to rarefaction; that is, free molecular to continuum conditions. Also, aerodynamic data are presented that shows their sensitivity to a range of reentry velocities, encompassing conditions that include reentry from low Earth orbit, lunar return, and Mars return velocities (7.7 to 15 km/s). The rarefied results obtained with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) codes are anchored in the continuum regime with data from Navier-Stokes simulations.

  2. Low-speed aerodynamic test of an axisymmetric supersonic inlet with variable cowl slot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, A. G.; Welge, H. R.; Trefny, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of an axisymmetric mixed-compression supersonic inlet with variable cowl slot are described. The model consisted of the NASA P-inlet centerbody and redesigned cowl with variable cowl slot powered by the JT8D single-stage fan simulator and driven by an air turbine. The model was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center 9- by 15-foot low-speed tunnel at Mach numbers of 0, 0.1, and 0.2 over a range of flows, cowl slot openings, centerbody positions, and angles of attack. The variable cowl slot was effective in minimizing lip separation at high velocity ratios, showed good steady-state and dynamic distortion characteristics, and had good angle-of-attack tolerance.

  3. Influence of Flow Rotation Within a Cooling Tower on the Aerodynamic Interaction with Crosswind Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, M. M. Hemmasian; Dobrego, K. V.

    2014-03-01

    Environmental crosswind changes the aerodynamic pattern inside a cooling tower, destroys uniform and axisymmetric distribution of flow at its inlet and outlet, and may degrade fill zone performance. In this paper, the effect of flow rotation in the over-shower zone of a natural draft cooling tower (NDCT) on the aerodynamic interaction with crosswind is studied numerically. The 3D geometry of an actual NDCT and three models of induced rotation velocity fields are utilized for simulation. It is demonstrated that flow rotation results in homogenization of the aerodynamic field in the over-shower zone. The inhomogeneity of the velocity field in the outlet cross section decreases linearly with rotation intensification. The effect of main stream switching under strong wind conditions is found. It is shown that even moderate flow rotation eliminates this effect.

  4. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular plug nozzles. [variable cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, P. R.; Blozy, J. T.; Staid, P. S.

    1981-01-01

    The results of model scale parametric static and wind tunnel aerodynamic performance tests on unsuppressed coannular plug nozzle configurations with inverted velocity profile are discussed. The nozzle configurations are high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles applicable to dual-stream exhaust systems typical of a variable cycle engine for Advanced Supersonic Transport application. In all, seven acoustic models and eight aerodynamic performance models were tested. The nozzle geometric variables included outer stream radius ratio, inner stream to outer stream ratio, and inner stream plug shape. When compared to a conical nozzle at the same specific thrust, the results of the static acoustic tests with the coannular nozzles showed noise reductions of up to 7 PNdB. Extensive data analysis showed that the overall acoustic results can be well correlated using the mixed stream velocity and the mixed stream density. Results also showed that suppression levels are geometry and flow regulation dependent with the outer stream radius ratio, inner stream-to-outer stream velocity ratio and inner stream velocity ratio and inner stream plug shape, as the primary suppression parameters. In addition, high-radius ratio coannular plug nozzles were found to yield shock associated noise level reductions relative to a conical nozzle. The wind tunnel aerodynamic tests showed that static and simulated flight thrust coefficient at typical takeoff conditions are quite good - up to 0.98 at static conditions and 0.974 at a takeoff Mach number of 0.36. At low inner stream flow conditions significant thrust loss was observed. Using an inner stream conical plug resulted in 1% to 2% higher performance levels than nozzle geometries using a bent inner plug.

  5. Variable orifice flow regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christianson, Rollin C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A flow regulator for high-pressure fluids at elevated temperatures includes a body having a flow passage extending between inlet and outlet openings. First and second orifice members are arranged in the flow passage so at least one of the orifice members can be moved transversely in relation to the flow passage between one operating position where the two orifice openings are aligned for establishing a maximum flow rate of fluids flowing through the flow passage and at least one other operating position in which the two openings are moderately misaligned with one another for establishing a predetermined reduced flow rate of fluids flowing through the flow passage.

  6. Vacuum chamber with a supersonic-flow aerodynamic window

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, C.L.

    1980-10-14

    A supersonic flow aerodynamic window is disclosed whereby a steam ejector situated in a primary chamber at vacuum exhausts superheated steam toward an orifice to a region of higher pressure, creating a barrier to the gas in the region of higher pressure which attempts to enter through the orifice. In a mixing chamber outside and in fluid communication with the primary chamber, superheated steam and gas are combined into a mixture which then enters the primary chamber through the orifice. At the point of impact of the ejector/superheated steam and the incoming gas/superheated steam mixture, a barrier is created to the gas attempting to enter the ejector chamber. This barrier, coupled with suitable vacuum pumping means and cooling means, serves to keep the steam ejector and primary chamber at a negative pressure, even though the primary chamber has an orifice to a region of higher pressure.

  7. Vacuum chamber with a supersonic flow aerodynamic window

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Clark L.

    1982-01-01

    A supersonic flow aerodynamic window, whereby a steam ejector situated in a primary chamber at vacuum exhausts superheated steam toward an orifice to a region of higher pressure, creating a barrier to the gas in the region of higher pressure which attempts to enter through the orifice. In a mixing chamber outside and in fluid communication with the primary chamber, superheated steam and gas are combined into a mixture which then enters the primary chamber through the orifice. At the point of impact of the ejector/superheated steam and the incoming gas/superheated steam mixture, a barrier is created to the gas attempting to enter the ejector chamber. This barrier, coupled with suitable vacuum pumping means and cooling means, serves to keep the steam ejector and primary chamber at a negative pressure, even though the primary chamber has an orifice to a region of higher pressure.

  8. Analysis of the Hessian for Aerodynamic Optimization: Inviscid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal; Ta'asan, Shlomo

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we analyze inviscid aerodynamic shape optimization problems governed by the full potential and the Euler equations in two and three dimensions. The analysis indicates that minimization of pressure dependent cost functions results in Hessians whose eigenvalue distributions are identical for the full potential and the Euler equations. However the optimization problems in two and three dimensions are inherently different. While the two dimensional optimization problems are well-posed the three dimensional ones are ill-posed. Oscillations in the shape up to the smallest scale allowed by the design space can develop in the direction perpendicular to the flow, implying that a regularization is required. A natural choice of such a regularization is derived. The analysis also gives an estimate of the Hessian's condition number which implies that the problems at hand are ill-conditioned. Infinite dimensional approximations for the Hessians are constructed and preconditioners for gradient based methods are derived from these approximate Hessians.

  9. Lightweight, variable solidity knitted parachute fabric. [for aerodynamic decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, F. R., Jr.; White, E. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A parachute fabric for aerodynamic decelerator applications is described. The fabric will permit deployment of the decelerator at high altitudes and low density conditions. The fabric consists of lightweight, highly open, circular knitted parachute fabric with ribbon-like yarns to assist in air deflection.

  10. Correlation-based Transition Modeling for External Aerodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medida, Shivaji

    Conventional turbulence models calibrated for fully turbulent boundary layers often over-predict drag and heat transfer on aerodynamic surfaces with partially laminar boundary layers. A robust correlation-based model is developed for use in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations to predict laminar-to-turbulent transition onset of boundary layers on external aerodynamic surfaces. The new model is derived from an existing transition model for the two-equation k-omega Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model, and is coupled with the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model. The transition model solves two transport equations for intermittency and transition momentum thickness Reynolds number. Experimental correlations and local mean flow quantities are used in the model to account for effects of freestream turbulence level and pressure gradients on transition onset location. Transition onset is triggered by activating intermittency production using a vorticity Reynolds number criterion. In the new model, production and destruction terms of the intermittency equation are modified to improve consistency in the fully turbulent boundary layer post-transition onset, as well as ensure insensitivity to freestream eddy viscosity value specified in the SA model. In the original model, intermittency was used to control production and destruction of turbulent kinetic energy. Whereas, in the new model, only the production of eddy viscosity in SA model is controlled, and the destruction term is not altered. Unlike the original model, the new model does not use an additional correction to intermittency for separation-induced transition. Accuracy of drag predictions are improved significantly with the use of the transition model for several two-dimensional single- and multi-element airfoil cases over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The new model is able to predict the formation of stable and long laminar separation bubbles on low-Reynolds number airfoils that

  11. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar-Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation related to the paper of the same name describing Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of low speed stall aerodynamics of a swept wing with a laminar flow wing glove.

  12. A collection of flow visualization techniques used in the Aerodynamic Research Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental research on unsteady aerodynamic flows is discussed. Complex flow fields that involve separations, vortex interactions, and transonic flow effects were investigated. Flow visualization techniques are used to obtain a global picture of the flow phenomena before detailed quantitative studies are undertaken. A wide variety of methods are used to visualize fluid flow and a sampling of these methods is presented. It is emphasized that the visualization technique is a thorough quantitative analysis and subsequent physical understanding of these flow fields.

  13. Complementary Aerodynamic Performance Datasets for Variable Speed Power Turbine Blade Section from Two Independent Transonic Turbine Cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.; Welch, Gerard E.; Giel, Paul W.; Ames, Forrest E.; Long, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Two independent experimental studies were conducted in linear cascades on a scaled, two-dimensional mid-span section of a representative Variable Speed Power Turbine (VSPT) blade. The purpose of these studies was to assess the aerodynamic performance of the VSPT blade over large Reynolds number and incidence angle ranges. The influence of inlet turbulence intensity was also investigated. The tests were carried out in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility and at the University of North Dakota (UND) High Speed Compressible Flow Wind Tunnel Facility. A large database was developed by acquiring total pressure and exit angle surveys and blade loading data for ten incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. Data were acquired over six flow conditions with exit isentropic Reynolds number ranging from 0.05×106 to 2.12×106 and at exit Mach numbers of 0.72 (design) and 0.35. Flow conditions were examined within the respective facility constraints. The survey data were integrated to determine average exit total-pressure and flow angle. UND also acquired blade surface heat transfer data at two flow conditions across the entire incidence angle range aimed at quantifying transitional flow behavior on the blade. Comparisons of the aerodynamic datasets were made for three "match point" conditions. The blade loading data at the match point conditions show good agreement between the facilities. This report shows comparisons of other data and highlights the unique contributions of the two facilities. The datasets are being used to advance understanding of the aerodynamic challenges associated with maintaining efficient power turbine operation over a wide shaft-speed range.

  14. Real-Time Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation without Air Flow Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for estimating aerodynamic parameters in real time from flight data without air flow angle measurements is described and demonstrated. The method is applied to simulated F-16 data, and to flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Modeling results obtained with the new approach using flight data without air flow angle measurements were compared to modeling results computed conventionally using flight data that included air flow angle measurements. Comparisons demonstrated that the new technique can provide accurate aerodynamic modeling results without air flow angle measurements, which are often difficult and expensive to obtain. Implications for efficient flight testing and flight safety are discussed.

  15. Grid sensitivity for aerodynamic optimization and flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadrehaghighi, I.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    After reviewing relevant literature, it is apparent that one aspect of aerodynamic sensitivity analysis, namely grid sensitivity, has not been investigated extensively. The grid sensitivity algorithms in most of these studies are based on structural design models. Such models, although sufficient for preliminary or conceptional design, are not acceptable for detailed design analysis. Careless grid sensitivity evaluations, would introduce gradient errors within the sensitivity module, therefore, infecting the overall optimization process. Development of an efficient and reliable grid sensitivity module with special emphasis on aerodynamic applications appear essential. The organization of this study is as follows. The physical and geometric representations of a typical model are derived in chapter 2. The grid generation algorithm and boundary grid distribution are developed in chapter 3. Chapter 4 discusses the theoretical formulation and aerodynamic sensitivity equation. The method of solution is provided in chapter 5. The results are presented and discussed in chapter 6. Finally, some concluding remarks are provided in chapter 7.

  16. Computer program for aerodynamic and blading design of multistage axial-flow compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.; Gorrell, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    A code for computing the aerodynamic design of a multistage axial-flow compressor and, if desired, the associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis codes is presented. Compressible flow, which is assumed to be steady and axisymmetric, is the basis for a two-dimensional solution in the meridional plane with viscous effects modeled by pressure loss coefficients and boundary layer blockage. The radial equation of motion and the continuity equation are solved with the streamline curvature method on calculation stations outside the blade rows. The annulus profile, mass flow, pressure ratio, and rotative speed are input. A number of other input parameters specify and control the blade row aerodynamics and geometry. In particular, blade element centerlines and thicknesses can be specified with fourth degree polynomials for two segments. The output includes a detailed aerodynamic solution and, if desired, blading coordinates that can be used for internal flow analysis codes.

  17. Variable Camber Continuous Aerodynamic Control Surfaces and Methods for Active Wing Shaping Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamic control apparatus for an air vehicle improves various aerodynamic performance metrics by employing multiple spanwise flap segments that jointly form a continuous or a piecewise continuous trailing edge to minimize drag induced by lift or vortices. At least one of the multiple spanwise flap segments includes a variable camber flap subsystem having multiple chordwise flap segments that may be independently actuated. Some embodiments also employ a continuous leading edge slat system that includes multiple spanwise slat segments, each of which has one or more chordwise slat segment. A method and an apparatus for implementing active control of a wing shape are also described and include the determination of desired lift distribution to determine the improved aerodynamic deflection of the wings. Flap deflections are determined and control signals are generated to actively control the wing shape to approximate the desired deflection.

  18. Experimental aerodynamic and acoustic model testing of the Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) testbed coannular exhaust nozzle system: Comprehensive data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.; Morris, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    The component detail design drawings of the one sixth scale model of the variable cycle engine testbed demonstrator exhaust syatem tested are presented. Also provided are the basic acoustic and aerodynamic data acquired during the experimental model tests. The model drawings, an index to the acoustic data, an index to the aerodynamic data, tabulated and graphical acoustic data, and the tabulated aerodynamic data and graphs are discussed.

  19. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 3: Unsteady aerodynamics of bodies with concave nose geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the unsteady aerodynamics of bodies with concave nose geometries was performed. The results show that the experimentally observed pulsating flow on spiked bodies and in forward facing cavities can be described by the developed simple mathematical model of the phenomenon. Static experimental data is used as a basis for determination of the oscillatory frequency of spike-induced flow pulsations. The agreement between predicted and measured reduced frequencies is generally very good. The spiked-body mathematical model is extended to describe the pulsations observed in forward facing cavities and it is shown that not only the frequency but also the pressure time history can be described with the accuracy needed to predict the experimentally observed time average effects. This implies that it should be possible to determine analytically the impact of the flow pulsation on the structural integrity of the nozzles for the jettisoned empty SRM-shells.

  20. Characteristics of aerodynamic sound sources generated by coiled wires in a uniform air-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Nishida, K.; Saitoh, K.

    2003-11-01

    This study deals experimentally with aerodynamic sounds generated by coiled wires in a uniform air-flow. The coiled wire is a model of the hair dryer's heater. In the experiment, the effects of the coil diameter D, wire diameter d and coil spacing s of the coiled wire on the aerodynamic sound have been clarified. The results of frequency analyses of the aerodynamic sounds show that an Aeolian sound is generated by the coiled wire, when s/d is larger than 1. Also the peak frequencies of Aeolian sounds generated by the coiled wires are higher than the ones generated by a straight cylinder having the same diameter d. To clarify the characteristics of the aerodynamic sound sources, the directivity of the aerodynamic sound generated by the coiled wire has been examined, and the coherent function between the velocity fluctuation around the coiled wire and the aerodynamic sound has been calculated. Moreover, the band overall value of coherent output power between the sound and the velocity fluctuations has been calculated. This method has clarified the sound source region of the Aeolian sound generated by the coiled wire. These results show that the Aeolian sound is generated by the arc part of the coiled wire, which is located in the upstream side of the air-flow.

  1. On-orbit free molecular flow aerodynamic characteristics of a proposal space operations center configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romere, P. O.

    1982-01-01

    A proposed configuration for a Space Operations Center is presented in its eight stages of buildup. The on orbit aerodynamic force and moment characteristics were calculated for each stage based upon free molecular flow theory. Calculation of the aerodynamic characteristics was accomplished through the use of an orbital aerodynamic computer program, and the computation method is described with respect to the free molecular theory used. The aerodynamic characteristics are presented in tabulated form for each buildup stage at angles of attack from 0 to 360 degrees and roll angles from -60 to +60 degrees. The reference altitude is 490 kilometers, however, the data should be applicable for altitudes below 490 kilometers down to approximately 185 kilometers.

  2. Assessment of Aerodynamic Challenges of a Variable-Speed Power Turbine for Large Civil Tilt-Rotor Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerand E.

    2010-01-01

    The main rotors of the NASA Large Civil Tilt-Rotor notional vehicle operate over a wide speed-range (100% at take-off to 54% at cruise). The variable-speed power turbine, when coupled to a fixed-gear-ratio transmission, offers one approach to accomplish this speed variation. The key aero-challenges of the variable-speed power turbine are related to high work factors at cruise, where the power turbine operates at 54% of take-off speed, wide incidence variations into the vane, blade, and exit-guide-vane rows associated with the power-turbine speed change, and the impact of low aft-stage Reynolds number (transitional flow) at 28 kft cruise. Meanline and 2-D Reynolds-Averaged Navier- Stokes analyses are used to characterize the variable-speed power-turbine aerodynamic challenges and to outline a conceptual design approach that accounts for multi-point operation. Identified technical challenges associated with the aerodynamics of high work factor, incidence-tolerant blading, and low Reynolds numbers pose research needs outlined in the paper

  3. An experimental study of plasma aerodynamic actuation on a round jet in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Sheng-ji; Xiao, Yang; He, Li-ming; Jin, Tao; Zhang, Qian; Hou, Peng-hui; Zhao, Zi-chen

    2015-03-01

    The present paper is performed on the effect of plasma aerodynamic actuation on a round jet in cross flow field with a low Reynolds number by using smoke visualization. The actuator is constituted by an electrode pair separated by a dielectric Al2O3 sheet. Several AC supply conditions are utilized. The experimental result shows a closing-in tendency of the jet flow toward the wall after being induced by plasma aerodynamic actuation, and such tendency is increasingly intensified as the actuation voltage increases. Numerical simulation is also performed. The simulation results show that an induced vortex pair is generated by plasma aerodynamic actuation near the wall flow field. The rotation direction of the induced vortex pair reverses against the counter-rotating vortex pair generated by a round jet in a cross flow without plasma aerodynamic actuation. Then the strength and structural size of the counter-rotating vortex pair are significantly reduced, resulting in the intensified near-wall effect of the jet flow. Three electrode-typed actuators (straight, 150°-elliptic arc and 180°-elliptic arc with the same streamwise extent) are placed at the exit of round jet to research the influence of electrode structure on jet in cross flow. The result shows that the longer the arc electrode surrounding the hole, the stronger the induced jet that flow near the wall is.

  4. Comparative study on aerodynamic heating under perfect and nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiu; Li, JinPing; Zhao, Wei; Jiang, ZongLin

    2016-02-01

    In this study, comparative heat flux measurements for a sharp cone model were conducted by utilizing a high enthalpy shock tunnel JF-10 and a large-scale shock tunnel JF-12, responsible for providing nonequilibrium and perfect gas flows, respectively. Experiments were performed at the Key Laboratory of High Temperature Gas Dynamics (LHD), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Corresponding numerical simulations were also conducted in effort to better understand the phenomena accompanying in these experiments. By assessing the consistency and accuracy of all the data gathered during this study, a detailed comparison of sharp cone heat transfer under a totally different kind of freestream conditions was build and analyzed. One specific parameter, defined as the product of the Stanton number and the square root of the Reynold number, was found to be more characteristic for the aerodynamic heating phenomena encountered in hypersonic flight. Adequate use of said parameter practically eliminates the variability caused by the deferent flow conditions, regardless of whether the flow is in dissociation or the boundary condition is catalytic. Essentially, the parameter identified in this study reduces the amount of ground experimental data necessary and eases data extrapolation to flight.

  5. Dynamic control of aerodynamic forces on a moving platform using active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.

    The unsteady interaction between trailing edge aerodynamic flow control and airfoil motion in pitch and plunge is investigated in wind tunnel experiments using a two degree-of-freedom traverse which enables application of time-dependent external torque and forces by servo motors. The global aerodynamic forces and moments are regulated by controlling vorticity generation and accumulation near the trailing edge of the airfoil using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The effect of the unsteady motion on the model-embedded flow control is assessed in both trajectory tracking and disturbance rejection maneuvers. The time-varying aerodynamic lift and pitching moment are estimated from a PIV wake survey using a reduced order model based on classical unsteady aerodynamic theory. These measurements suggest that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within 2--3 convective time scales, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales that are commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is primarily limited by the inertia of the platform.

  6. Simulation of vortex-dominated aerodynamic flows by a point-vortex method

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Z.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical study was made to simulate vortex-dominated aerodynamic flows by the point-vortex method. Attention was divided into three different aspects: a nascent vortex-shedding algorithm, numerical demonstration of the point-vortex method, and the calculation of some example of aerodynamic interesting flows, which include two major categories: unsteady flow about a flat plate at a fixed angle of attack with and without a leading edge flap, and the transient, vortical cross flow produced by a slender delta wing. Evolution of the vortex traces, streamlines, surface pressure, and forces are studied. Flow features based on data obtained by different point-vortex shedding rates and different integration time steps and schemes are found to be consistent with each other on length and time scales comparable to as well as considerably smaller than those of the global flow.

  7. The effect of time trial cycling position on physiological and aerodynamic variables.

    PubMed

    Fintelman, D M; Sterling, M; Hemida, H; Li, F-X

    2015-01-01

    To reduce aerodynamic resistance cyclists lower their torso angle, concurrently reducing Peak Power Output (PPO). However, realistic torso angle changes in the range used by time trial cyclists have not yet been examined. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of torso angle on physiological parameters and frontal area in different commonly used time trial positions. Nineteen well-trained male cyclists performed incremental tests on a cycle ergometer at five different torso angles: their preferred torso angle and at 0, 8, 16 and 24°. Oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide expiration, minute ventilation, gross efficiency, PPO, heart rate, cadence and frontal area were recorded. The frontal area provides an estimate of the aerodynamic drag. Overall, results showed that lower torso angles attenuated performance. Maximal values of all variables, attained in the incremental test, decreased with lower torso angles (P < 0.001). The 0° torso angle position significantly affected the metabolic and physiological variables compared to all other investigated positions. At constant submaximal intensities of 60, 70 and 80% PPO, all variables significantly increased with increasing intensity (P < 0.0001) and decreasing torso angle (P < 0.005). This study shows that for trained cyclists there should be a trade-off between the aerodynamic drag and physiological functioning.

  8. Aerodynamic forces induced by controlled transitory flow on a body of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, Christopher S.

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on an axisymmetric body of revolution are controlled in a low-speed wind tunnel by induced local flow attachment. Control is effected by an array of aft-facing synthetic jets emanating from narrow, azimuthally segmented slots embedded within an axisymmetric backward facing step. The actuation results in a localized, segmented vectoring of the separated base flow along a rear Coanda surface and induced asymmetric aerodynamic forces and moments. The observed effects are investigated in both quasi-steady and transient states, with emphasis on parametric dependence. It is shown that the magnitude of the effected forces can be substantially increased by slight variations of the Coanda surface geometry. Force and velocity measurements are used to elucidate the mechanisms by which the synthetic jets produce asymmetric aerodynamic forces and moments, demonstrating a novel method to steer axisymmetric bodies during flight.

  9. Unsteady aerodynamics of reverse flow dynamic stall on an oscillating blade section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew H.; Jones, Anya R.

    2016-07-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were performed on a sinusoidally oscillating NACA 0012 blade section in reverse flow. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry and unsteady surface pressure measurements were used to characterize the evolution of reverse flow dynamic stall and its sensitivity to pitch and flow parameters. The effects of a sharp aerodynamic leading edge on the fundamental flow physics of reverse flow dynamic stall are explored in depth. Reynolds number was varied up to Re = 5 × 105, reduced frequency was varied up to k = 0.511, mean pitch angle was varied up to 15∘, and two pitch amplitudes of 5∘ and 10∘ were studied. It was found that reverse flow dynamic stall of the NACA 0012 airfoil is weakly sensitive to the Reynolds numbers tested due to flow separation at the sharp aerodynamic leading edge. Reduced frequency strongly affects the onset and persistence of dynamic stall vortices. The type of dynamic stall observed (i.e., number of vortex structures) increases with a decrease in reduced frequency and increase in maximum pitch angle. The characterization and parameter sensitivity of reverse flow dynamic stall given in the present work will enable the development of a physics-based analytical model of this unsteady aerodynamic phenomenon.

  10. Effects of Leading Edge Defect on the Aerodynamic and Flow Characteristics of an S809 Airfoil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiaojing; Hu, Ruifeng; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Unexpected performance degradation occurs in wind turbine blades due to leading edge defect when suffering from continuous impacts with rain drops, hails, insects, or solid particles during its operation life. To assess this issue, this paper numerically investigates the steady and dynamic stall characteristics of an S809 airfoil with various leading edge defects. More leading edge defect sizes and much closer to practical parameters are investigated in the paper. Methodology Numerical computation is conducted using the SST k-ω turbulence model, and the method has been validated by comparison with existed published data. In order to ensure the calculation convergence, the residuals for the continuity equation are set to be less than 10−7 and 10−6 in steady state and dynamic stall cases. The simulations are conducted with the software ANSYS Fluent 13.0. Results It is found that the characteristics of aerodynamic coefficients and flow fields are sensitive to leading edge defect both in steady and dynamic conditions. For airfoils with the defect thickness of 6%tc, leading edge defect has a relative small influence on the aerodynamics of S809 airfoil. For other investigated defect thicknesses, leading edge defect has much greater influence on the flow field structures, pressure coefficients and aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil at relative small defect lengths. For example, the lift coefficients decrease and drag coefficients increase sharply after the appearance of leading edge defect. However, the aerodynamic characteristics could reach a constant value when the defect length is large enough. The flow field, pressure coefficient distribution and aerodynamic coefficients do not change a lot when the defect lengths reach to 0.5%c,1%c, 2%c and 3%c with defect thicknesses of 6%tc, 12%tc,18%tc and 25%tc, respectively. In addition, the results also show that the critical defect length/thickness ratio is 0.5, beyond which the aerodynamic characteristics

  11. Magnetic cataclysmic variable accretion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, A. J.; Butters, O. W.; Parker, T. L.; Wynn, G. A.

    2007-08-01

    We have used a magnetic accretion model to investigate the accretion flows of magnetic cataclysmic variables (mCVs) throughout a range of parameter space. The results of our numerical simulations demonstrate that broadly four types of flow are possible: discs, streams, rings and propellers. We show that the equilibrium spin periods in asynchronous mCVs, for a given orbital period and magnetic moment, occur where the flow changes from a type characterised by spin-up (i.e. disc or stream) to one characterised by spin-down (i.e. propeller or ring). `Triple points' occur in the plane of spin-to-orbital period ratio versus magnetic moment, at which stream-disc-propeller flows or stream-ring-propeller flows can co-exist. The first of these is identified as corresponding to when the corotation radius is equal to the circularisation radius, and the second as where the corotation radius is equal to the distance from white dwarf to the L1 point. If mCVs are accreting at their equilibrium spin rates, then for a mass ratio of 0.5, those with Pspin/Porb <~ 0.10 will be disc-like, those with 0.10 <~ Pspin/Porb <~ 0.55 will be stream-like, and those with Pspin/Porb ~ 0.55 will be ring-like. In each case, some material is also lost from the binary in order to maintain angular momentum balance. The spin to orbital period ratio at which the systems transition between these flow types decreases as the mass ratio of the stellar components increases, and vice versa.

  12. Bedform response to flow variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, J.M.; Logan, B.L.; Kinzel, P.J.; Shimizu, Y.; Giri, S.; Shreve, R.L.; McLean, S.R.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory observations and computational results for the response of bedform fields to rapid variations in discharge are compared and discussed. The simple case considered here begins with a relatively low discharge over a flat bed on which bedforms are initiated, followed by a short high-flow period with double the original discharge, during which the morphology of the bedforms adjusts, followed in turn by a relatively long period of the original low discharge. For the grain size and hydraulic conditions selected, the Froude number remains subcritical during the experiment, and sediment moves predominantly as bedload. Observations show rapid development of quasi-two-dimensional bedforms during the initial period of low flow with increasing wavelength and height over the initial low-flow period. When the flow increases, the bedforms rapidly increase in wavelength and height, as expected from other empirical results. When the flow decreases back to the original discharge, the height of the bedforms quickly decreases in response, but the wavelength decreases much more slowly. Computational results using an unsteady two-dimensional flow model coupled to a disequilibrium bedload transport model for the same conditions simulate the formation and initial growth of the bedforms fairly accurately and also predict an increase in dimensions during the high-flow period. However, the computational model predicts a much slower rate of wavelength increase, and also performs less accurately during the final low-flow period, where the wavelength remains essentially constant, rather than decreasing. In addition, the numerical results show less variability in bedform wavelength and height than the measured values; the bedform shape is also somewhat different. Based on observations, these discrepancies may result from the simplified model for sediment particle step lengths used in the computational approach. Experiments show that the particle step length varies spatially and

  13. Variable-complexity aerodynamic-structural design of a high-speed civil transport wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchison, M. G.; Huang, X.; Mason, W. H.; Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.

    1992-01-01

    A variable-complexity strategy of combining simple and detailed analysis methods is presented for the design optimization of a high-speed civil transport (HSCT) wing. Two sets of results are shown: the aerodynamic design of the wing using algebraic weight equations for structural considerations, and optimization results of the internal wing structure for a fixed wing configuration. We show example results indicating that using simple analysis methods alone for the calculation of a critical constraint can allow an optimizer to exploit weaknesses in the analysis. The structural optimization results provide a valuable check for the weight equations used in the aerodynamic design. In addition, these results confirm the need for using simple, algebraic models in conjunction with more detailed analysis methods. A strategy of interlaced aerodynanic-structural design is proposed.

  14. Flow-Visualization Techniques Used at High Speed by Configuration Aerodynamics Wind-Tunnel-Test Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes a variety of optically based flow-visualization techniques used for high-speed research by the Configuration Aerodynamics Wind-Tunnel Test Team of the High-Speed Research Program during its tenure. The work of other national experts is included for completeness. Details of each technique with applications and status in various national wind tunnels are given.

  15. Vortical flow management for improved configuration aerodynamics: Recent experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Recent progress in vortex-control applications for alleviating the adverse consequences of three dimensional separation and vortical interactions on slender body/swept wing configurations is reported. Examples include helical separation trip to alleviate the side force due to forebody vortex asymmetry; hinged strakes to avoid vortex breakdown effects; compartmentation of swept leading edge separation to delay the pitch-up instability; under wing vortex trip and vortex trip and vortex flaps for drag reduction at high lift; and an apex-flap trimmer to fully utilize the lift capability of trailing-edge flaps for take off and landing of delta wings. Experimental results on generic wind-tunnel models are presented to illustrate the vortex-management concepts involved and to indicate their potential for enhancing the subsonic aerodynamics of supersonic-cruise type vehicles.

  16. Encyclopedia of fluid mechanics. Volume 8 - Aerodynamics and compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisinoff, Nicholas P.

    Advanced analytical methods for compressible flows and their application to specific engineering problems are discussed in chapters by leading experts. Topics addressed include fluid viscosity, laminar flow past semiinfinite bodies, the structure of turbulent boundary layers, homogeneous turbulence, turbulent shear flows and jets, vortex patterns on slender bodies, wake interference and vortex shedding, turbulent rough-wall skin friction and heat transfer, FEM iterative solutions of compressible flows, transient natural-convection flows, and direct-contact transfer processes with moving liquid droplets. Consideration is given to artificially thickening turbulent boundary layers, subsonic transitory stalled flows in diffusers, impeller-blade design for centrifugal and axial blowers, transonic cascade flows, high-speed turboprop noise, turbine-blade vibrations, compressible flow in valves, the performance of cryogenic pumps, the structure of turbulent dense-spray jets, and the dynamics of wind machines.

  17. Experimental static aerodynamics of a regular hexagonal prism in a low density hypervelocity flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, R. W.; Mueller, J. N.; Lee, L. P.

    1972-01-01

    A regular hexagonal prism, having a fineness ratio of 1.67, has been tested in a wind tunnel to determine its static aerodynamic characteristics in a low-density hypervelocity flow. The prism tested was a 1/4-scale model of the graphite heat shield which houses the radioactive fuel for the Viking spacecraft auxiliary power supply. The basic hexagonal prism was also modified to simulate a prism on which ablation of one of the six side flats had occurred. This modified hexagonal prism was tested to determine the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of a shape change caused by ablation during a possible side-on stable reentry.

  18. Aerodynamic Modeling of Oscillating Wing in Hypersonic Flow: a Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Hou, Ying-Yu; Ji, Chen; Liu, Zi-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Various approximations to unsteady aerodynamics are examined for the unsteady aerodynamic force of a pitching thin double wedge airfoil in hypersonic flow. Results of piston theory, Van Dyke’s second-order theory, Newtonian impact theory, and CFD method are compared in the same motion and Mach number effects. The results indicate that, for this thin double wedge airfoil, Newtonian impact theory is not suitable for these Mach number, while piston theory and Van Dyke’s second-order theory are in good agreement with CFD method for Ma<7.

  19. Current Trends in Modeling Research for Turbulent Aerodynamic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, Thomas B.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Manceau, Remi

    2007-01-01

    The engineering tools of choice for the computation of practical engineering flows have begun to migrate from those based on the traditional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach to methodologies capable, in theory if not in practice, of accurately predicting some instantaneous scales of motion in the flow. The migration has largely been driven by both the success of Reynolds-averaged methods over a wide variety of flows as well as the inherent limitations of the method itself. Practitioners, emboldened by their ability to predict a wide-variety of statistically steady, equilibrium turbulent flows, have now turned their attention to flow control and non-equilibrium flows, that is, separation control. This review gives some current priorities in traditional Reynolds-averaged modeling research as well as some methodologies being applied to a new class of turbulent flow control problems.

  20. Effects of flow curvature on the aerodynamics of Darrieus wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P. G.; Wolfe, W. P.

    1980-07-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation was conducted which clearly showed the effects of flow curvature to be significant determinants of Darrieus turbine blade aerodynamics; qualitatively, these results apply equally to straight or curved bladed machines. Unusually large boundary layer radial pressure gradients and virtually altered camber and incidence are the phenomena of primary importance. Conformal mapping techniques were developed which transform the geometric turbine airfoils in curved flow to their virtual equivalents in rectilinear flow, thereby permitting the more accurate selection of airfoil aerodynamic coefficients from published sectional data. It is demonstrated that once the flow idiosyncracies are fully understood, they may be used to advantage to improve the wind energy extraction efficiency of these machines.

  1. The Fifth Symposium on Numerical and Physical Aspects of Aerodynamic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at the Fifth Symposium on Numerical and Physical Aspects of Aerodynamic Flows, held at the California State University, Long Beach, from 13 to 15 January 1992. The symposium, like its immediate predecessors, considers the calculation of flows of relevance to aircraft, ships, and missiles with emphasis on the solution of two-dimensional unsteady and three-dimensional equations.

  2. Aircraft aerodynamic prediction method for V/STOL transition including flow separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmer, B. R.; Miner, G. A.; Bristow, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed for the aerodynamic force and moment analysis of V/STOL aircraft operating in the transition regime between hover and conventional forward flight. The trajectories, cross sectional area variations, and mass entrainment rates of the jets are calculated by the Adler-Baron Jet-in-Crossflow Program. The inviscid effects of the interaction between the jets and airframe on the aerodynamic properties are determined by use of the MCAIR 3-D Subsonic properties are determined by use of the MCAIR 3-D Subsonic Potential Flow Program, a surface panel method. In addition, the MCAIR 3-D Geometry influence Coefficient Program is used to calculate a matrix of partial derivatives that represent the rate of change of the inviscid aerodynamic properties with respect to arbitrary changes in the effective wing shape.

  3. Aerodynamic analysis of the aerospaceplane HyPlane in supersonic rarefied flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuppardi, Gennaro; Savino, Raffaele; Russo, Gennaro; Spano'Cuomo, Luca; Petrosino, Eliano

    2016-06-01

    HyPlane is the Italian aerospaceplane proposal targeting, at the same time, both the space tourism and point-to-point intercontinental hypersonic flights. Unlike other aerospaceplane projects, relying on boosters or mother airplanes that bring the vehicle to high altitude, HyPlane will take off and land horizontally from common runways. According to the current project, HyPlane will fly sub-orbital trajectories under high-supersonic/low-hypersonic continuum flow regimes. It can go beyond the von Karman line at 100 km altitude for a short time, then starting the descending leg of the trajectory. Its aerodynamic behavior up to 70 km have already been studied and the results published in previous works. In the present paper some aspects of the aerodynamic behavior of HyPlane have been analyzed at 80, 90 and 100 km. Computer tests, calculating the aerodynamic parameters, have been carried out by a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code. The effects of the Knudsen, Mach and Reynolds numbers have been evaluated in clean configuration. The effects of the aerodynamic surfaces on the rolling, pitching and yawing moments, and therefore on the capability to control attitude, have been analyzed at 100 km altitude. The aerodynamic behavior has been compared also with that of another aerospaceplane at 100 km both in clean and flapped configuration.

  4. Experimental aerodynamic and acoustic model testing of the Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) testbed coannular exhaust nozzle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.; Morris, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance and jet noise characteristics of a one sixth scale model of the variable cycle engine testbed exhaust system were obtained in a series of static tests over a range of simulated engine operating conditions. Model acoustic data were acquired. Data were compared to predictions of coannular model nozzle performance. The model, tested with an without a hardwall ejector, had a total flow area equivalent to a 0.127 meter (5 inch) diameter conical nozzle with a 0.65 fan to primary nozzle area ratio and a 0.82 fan nozzle radius ratio. Fan stream temperatures and velocities were varied from 422 K to 1089 K (760 R to 1960 R) and 434 to 755 meters per second (1423 to 2477 feet per second). Primary stream properties were varied from 589 to 1089 K (1060 R to 1960 R) and 353 to 600 meters per second (1158 to 1968 feet per second). Exhaust plume velocity surveys were conducted at one operating condition with and without the ejector installed. Thirty aerodynamic performance data points were obtained with an unheated air supply. Fan nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.8 to 3.2 at a constant primary pressure ratio of 1.6; primary pressure ratio was varied from 1.4 to 2.4 while holding fan pressure ratio constant at 2.4. Operation with the ejector increased nozzle thrust coefficient 0.2 to 0.4 percent.

  5. Flow Physics and Control for Internal and External Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, I.

    2010-01-01

    Exploiting instabilities rather than forcing the flow is advantageous. Simple 2D concepts may not always work. Nonlinear effects may result in first order effect. Interaction between spanwise and streamwise vortices may have a paramount effect on the mean flow, but this interaction may not always be beneficial.

  6. Interferometric reconstruction of three-dimensional high-speed aerodynamic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, Soyoung Stephen

    1992-01-01

    Holographic interferometry can be a very useful diagnostic tool in high-speed aerodynamic testing. During this summer research period, various possible approaches for accurately reconstructing three-dimensional flows from limited data were examined. The approach based on the combination of the following three techniques appears to be promising: (1) Continuous Local Basis Function Method - this computational tomographic method has a power to accurately reconstruct continuous regions and is appropriate from well-conditioned to moderately limited data; (2) Variable Basis Method - this computational tomographic method provides accuracy near discontinuities, i.e., shock regions, and is appropriate from moderately-limited to severely-limited data; and (3) Complementary Field Method - this is a general iterative reconstructor that can be coupled with any computational tomographic techniques. Mathematically, it can be shown that this method can provide better accuracy than the direct reconstruction as in a conventional approach. Our numerical simulation of experiments demonstrated improved reconstruction results even when these techniques were individually tested.

  7. Vortical flow aerodynamics - Physical aspects and numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsome, Richard W.; Kandil, Osama A.

    1987-01-01

    Progress in the numerical simulation of vortical flow due to three-dimensional flow separation about flight vehicles at high angles of attack and quasi-steady flight conditions is surveyed. Primary emphasis is placed on Euler and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes methods where the vortices are 'captured' as a solution to the governing equations. A discussion of the relevant flow physics provides a perspective from which to assess numerical solutions. Current numerical prediction capabilities and their evolutionary development are surveyed. Future trends and challenges are identified and discussed.

  8. The Transient Aerodynamic Forces Effected by Trailing Edge Active Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, Dan; Culp, John; Glezer, Ari

    2012-11-01

    The transient aerodynamic forces effected by trailing edge flow control are investigated in wind tunnel experiments using a 2-DOF traverse which enables application of time-dependent external torque and forces by servo motors. The global aerodynamic forces and moments are regulated by controlling vorticity generation and accumulation near the surface using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The time-histories of surface pressure and aerodynamic lift and pitching moment immediately following the application of flow control are measured using simultaneous pressure, force and velocity measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. Circulation time history that is estimated from a PIV wake survey shows that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within about 1 . 5TCONV , which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales that are commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is primarily limited by the inertia of the platform.

  9. Role of jet asymmetry in glottal flow aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, Joel; Krane, Michael; Medvitz, Richard

    2008-11-01

    Finite element computations of flow through a constriction are used to illuminate the role of the Coanda effect in glottal flow and voice production. Steady-state computations were performed for a series of constriction openings. One set of simulations enforced transverse flow symmetry, while the other allowed the flow to develop naturally. Comparisons of measures relevant to vocal fold vibration and sound production are presented. These comparisons show that the Coanda effect primarily affects the differential transverse force on the vocal fold walls, while the axial force differs little from the symmetric case. These results suggest strongly that the primary role of the Coanda effect in speech is to drive asymmetric vocal fold vibration patterns, and that glottal jet instability contributes to voice perturbations and fluctuations.

  10. Building Integrated Active Flow Control: Improving the Aerodynamic Performance of Tall Buildings Using Fluid-Based Aerodynamic Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menicovich, David

    material and energy consumption profiles of tall building. To date, the increasing use of light-weight and high-strength materials in tall buildings, with greater flexibility and reduced damping, has increased susceptibility to dynamic wind load effects that limit the gains afforded by incorporating these new materials. Wind, particularly fluctuating wind and its interaction with buildings induces two main responses; alongwind - in the direction of the flow and crosswind - perpendicular to the flow. The main risk associated with this vulnerability is resonant oscillations induced by von-Karman-like vortex shedding at or near the natural frequency of the structure caused by flow separation. Dynamic wind loading effects often increase with a power of wind speed greater than 3, thus increasingly, tall buildings pay a significant price in material to increase the natural frequency and/or the damping to overcome this response. In particular, crosswind response often governs serviceability (human habitability) design criteria of slender buildings. Currently, reducing crosswind response relies on a Solid-based Aerodynamic Modification (SAM), either by changing structural or geometric characteristics such as the tower shape or through the addition of damping systems. While this approach has merit it has two major drawbacks: firstly, the loss of valuable rentable areas and high construction costs due to increased structural requirements for mass and stiffness, further contributing towards the high consumption of non-renewable resources by the commercial building sector. For example, in order to insure human comfort within an acceptable range of crosswind response induced accelerations at the top of a building, an aerodynamically efficient plan shape comes at the expense of floor area. To compensate for the loss of valuable area compensatory stories are required, resulting in an increase in wind loads and construction costs. Secondly, a limited, if at all, ability to adaptively

  11. [The influence of nasal flow aerodynamics on the nasal physiology].

    PubMed

    Betlejewski, Stanisław; Betlejewski, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The ability of the human nose to warm and humidify the respiratory air is important to maintaining the internal environment of the lungs, since ambient air is conditioned to nearly alveolar conditions (body temperature and fully saturated with water vapour) upon reaching the nasopharynx. Because of very short time of the inspiratory phase duration, as well as expiratory phase, only the rich vascularization of the nasal mucosa and specific organization of the submucosal vessels are not able to assure such effective physiological activity. Therefore the type of airflow during the respiration is essential to understanding the functional possibilities of the nasal mucosa. Most studies have investigated the airflow only in steady-flow conditions, where the laminar flow was observed. Anatomically accurate physical models of real nasal cavities and particle image velocimetry allow evaluation of the entire flow field in the nasal cavity. In these investigations a partially turbulent flow was observed even at low air velocities in most part of the nasal cavity. From a physiological perspective, a turbulent flow would seem sensible, since it enhances contact between air and the mucosal layer. By doing so, the nasal physiological functions - humidification, cleaning and warming are optimized.

  12. Aerodynamic performance of a 1.35-pressure-ratio axial-flow fan stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, W. M.; Moore, R. D.; Steinke, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The overall blade element performances and the aerodynamic design parameters are presented for a 1.35-pressure-ratio fan stage. The fan stage was designed for a weight flow of 32.7 kilograms per second and a tip speed of 302.8 meters per second. At design speed the stage peak efficiency of 0.879 occurred at a pressure ratio of 1.329 and design flow. Stage stall margin was approximately 14 percent. At design flow rotor efficiency was 0.94 and the pressure ratio was 1.360.

  13. Flow visualization using the laser light sheet method in vehicle aerodynamics and combustion chamber engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Werner

    Laser light sheet flow visualization is applied in the automobile industry with a view to the reduction of air resistance. Using high power lasers a plane is cut out of the 3-D flow field and the course of flow in the plane is analyzed. In vehicle aerodynamics the flow phenomena are mainly visualized with smoke in the tail region of automobiles and in the wake, in planes parallel as well as perpendicular to the flow direction. For the investigation of flow phenomena in the combustion chamber of Otto and Diesel engines, the laser light sheet method is used on a series motor with optical access, the so-called flow motor. Typical results and requirements for future automated evaluation methods are discussed.

  14. Aerodynamic forces acting on a rough rotating cylinder in a cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, N. M.; Kovalenko, V. M.

    1981-06-01

    The forces are investigated experimentally for two values of the degree of turbulence. The experiments are carried out in a low-turbulence, subsonic wind tunnel; the Reynolds number varies between 100,000 and 600,000, and the rotation parameter, between 0 and 1 radian. The apparatus permits the registration of instantaneous forces with relatively high precision. The desired roughness is produced by covering the surface of the cylinder with emery paper. The magnitude and type of changes in the aerodynamic forces for the case of a rough cylinder are found to differ in a fundamental way from that of a smooth cylinder, a difference related to features of the flow near the wall and to the position of the separation points of the boundary layer. Increasing the degree of turbulence of the flow does not noticeably affect the aerodynamic forces of a rough cylinder in the supercritical region of Reynolds numbers.

  15. Aerodynamic Design of Axial-flow Compressors. Volume III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Irving A; Bullock, Robert O; Graham, Robert W; Costilow, Eleanor L; Huppert, Merle C; Benser, William A; Herzig, Howard Z; Hansen, Arthur G; Jackson, Robert J; Yohner, Peggy L; Dugan, Ames F , Jr

    1956-01-01

    Chapters XI to XIII concern the unsteady compressor operation arising when compressor blade elements stall. The fields of compressor stall and surge are reviewed in Chapters XI and XII, respectively. The part-speed operating problem in high-pressure-ratio multistage axial-flow compressors is analyzed in Chapter XIII. Chapter XIV summarizes design methods and theories that extend beyond the simplified two-dimensional approach used previously in the report. Chapter XV extends this three-dimensional treatment by summarizing the literature on secondary flows and boundary layer effects. Charts for determining the effects of errors in design parameters and experimental measurements on compressor performance are given in Chapters XVI. Chapter XVII reviews existing literature on compressor and turbine matching techniques.

  16. RCS jet-flow field interaction effects on the aerodynamics of the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, J. R.; Roberge, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the external effects caused by operation of the reaction control system during entry of the space shuttle orbiter. The effects of jet plume-external flow interactions were emphasized. Force data were obtained for the basic airframe characteristics plus induced effects when the reaction control system is operating. Resulting control amplification and/or coupling were derived and their effects on the aerodynamic stability and control of the orbiter and the reaction control system thrust were determined.

  17. Aerodynamic potpourri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic developments for vertical axis and horizontal axis wind turbines are given that relate to the performance and aerodynamic loading of these machines. Included are: (1) a fixed wake aerodynamic model of the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine; (2) experimental results that suggest the existence of a laminar flow Darrieus vertical axis turbine; (3) a simple aerodynamic model for the turbulent windmill/vortex ring state of horizontal axis rotors; and (4) a yawing moment of a rigid hub horizontal axis wind turbine that is related to blade coning.

  18. Aerodynamic potpourri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1981-05-01

    Aerodynamic developments for vertical axis and horizontal axis wind turbines are given that relate to the performance and aerodynamic loading of these machines. Included are: (1) a fixed wake aerodynamic model of the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine; (2) experimental results that suggest the existence of a laminar flow Darrieus vertical axis turbine; (3) a simple aerodynamic model for the turbulent windmill/vortex ring state of horizontal axis rotors; and (4) a yawing moment of a rigid hub horizontal axis wind turbine that is related to blade coning.

  19. Effect of Fuselage Cross Sections on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Reusable Launch Vehicles in Subsonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadakuma, Kenji; Morita, Wataru; Aso, Shigeru; Tani, Yasuhiro

    An experimental study on aerodynamic effect of RLVs (Reusable Launch Vehicles) due to fuselage cross sections has been conducted in subsonic flow. Three fuselage models and two wing-body models have been considered. Fuselage models have a circular, a square and a triangular cross section. Wing-body models have a square and a triangular cross section with wings. Experiments have been conducted under test conditions of free-stream Mach number M∞=0.3 and Reynolds number Re=3.2×106. Aerodynamic forces are measured and flow fields are visualized by smoke-wire technique and oil-flow technique. Results show that fuselage cross sections have much effect on whole aerodynamic characteristics, the fuselage model with a triangular cross section has higher lift coefficient in high angle of attack region than that of the other fuselage models and the wing-body model with a triangular fuselage cross section does not stall till high angle of attack region compared with the “Square” fuselage wing-body model.

  20. Effects of a Rotating Aerodynamic Probe on the Flow Field of a Compressor Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2008-01-01

    An investigation of distortions of the rotor exit flow field caused by an aerodynamic probe mounted in the rotor is described in this paper. A rotor total pressure Kiel probe, mounted on the rotor hub and extending up to the mid-span radius of a rotor blade channel, generates a wake that forms additional flow blockage. Three types of high-response aerodynamic probes were used to investigate the distorted flow field behind the rotor. These probes were: a split-fiber thermo-anemometric probe to measure velocity and flow direction, a total pressure probe, and a disk probe for in-flow static pressure measurement. The signals acquired from these high-response probes were reduced using an ensemble averaging method based on a once per rotor revolution signal. The rotor ensemble averages were combined to construct contour plots for each rotor channel of the rotor tested. In order to quantify the rotor probe effects, the contour plots for each individual rotor blade passage were averaged into a single value. The distribution of these average values along the rotor circumference is a measure of changes in the rotor exit flow field due to the presence of a probe in the rotor. These distributions were generated for axial flow velocity and for static pressure.

  1. Aerodynamic sound generation induced by flow over small, cylindrical cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted on the production of high intensity tones by small cylindrical cavities in a flat surface. The application of such a mechanism is to the acoustic coding of moving objects containing drilled holes. The sound intensity and frequency have been determined as functions of flow velocity, diameter and depth of the cavities. As a practical matter, it is possible to produce a whistle producing 106 dB at 30.5 cm distance from a cylindrical hole of 0.5 cm diameter and 1.2 cm deep with an airflow of 60 m/s past the hole.

  2. Application of the laser Doppler velocimeter in aerodynamic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanta, W. J.; Ausherman, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Applications of the laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) are discussed. Measurements were made of the flowfield around a tangent-ogive model in a low turbulent, incompressible flow at an incidence of 45 deg. The free-stream velocity was 80 ft per second. The flowfield velocities in several cross-flow planes were measured with a 2-D, two-color LDC operated in a backscatter mode. Measurements were concentrated in the secondary separation region. A typical survey is given. The survey was taken at a model location where the maximum side force occurs. The overall character of the leeward flowfield with the influence of the two body vorticles are shown. Measurements of the velocity and density flowfields in the shock-layer region of a reentry-vehicle indented nose configuration were carried out at Mach 5. The velocity flowfield was measured with a 2-color, 2-D, forward-scatter LDV system. Because of the need to minimize particle lag in the shock-layer region, polystyrene particles with a mean diameter of 0.312 microns were used for the scattering particles. The model diameter was 6 inches.

  3. Investigations on the Aerodynamic Characteristics and Blade Excitations of the Radial Turbine with Pulsating Inlet Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixiong; Yang, Ce; Yang, Dengfeng; Zhang, Rui

    2016-04-01

    The aerodynamic performance, detailed unsteady flow and time-based excitations acting on blade surfaces of a radial flow turbine have been investigated with pulsation flow condition. The results show that the turbine instantaneous performance under pulsation flow condition deviates from the quasi-steady value significantly and forms obvious hysteretic loops around the quasi-steady conditions. The detailed analysis of unsteady flow shows that the characteristic of pulsation flow field in radial turbine is highly influenced by the pulsation inlet condition. The blade torque, power and loading fluctuate with the inlet pulsation wave in a pulse period. For the blade excitations, the maximum and the minimum blade excitations conform to the wave crest and wave trough of the inlet pulsation, respectively, in time-based scale. And toward blade chord direction, the maximum loading distributes along the blade leading edge until 20% chord position and decreases from the leading to trailing edge.

  4. Unsteady Analysis of Separated Aerodynamic Flows Using an Unstructured Multigrid Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelaez, Juan; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Kandil, Osama

    2001-01-01

    An implicit method for the computation of unsteady flows on unstructured grids is presented. The resulting nonlinear system of equations is solved at each time step using an agglomeration multigrid procedure. The method allows for arbitrarily large time steps and is efficient in terms of computational effort and storage. Validation of the code using a one-equation turbulence model is performed for the well-known case of flow over a cylinder. A Detached Eddy Simulation model is also implemented and its performance compared to the one equation Spalart-Allmaras Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence model. Validation cases using DES and RANS include flow over a sphere and flow over a NACA 0012 wing including massive stall regimes. The project was driven by the ultimate goal of computing separated flows of aerodynamic interest, such as massive stall or flows over complex non-streamlined geometries.

  5. An Engineering Aerodynamic Heating Method for Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; DeJarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  6. An engineering aerodynamic heating method for hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; Dejarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  7. Mathematical model and numerical algorithm for aerodynamical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaydurov, V.; Shchepanovskaya, G.; Yakubovich, M.

    2016-10-01

    In the paper, a mathematical model and a numerical algorithm are proposed for modeling an air flow. The proposed model is based on the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations for viscous heat-conducting gas. The energy equation and the state equations are modified to account for two kinds of `internal' energy. The first one is the usual translational and rotational energy of molecules which defines the thermodynamical temperature and the pressure. The second one is the subgrid energy of small turbulent eddies. A numerical algorithm is proposed for solving the formulated initial-boundary value problem as a combination of the semi-Lagrangian approximation for Lagrange transport derivatives and the conforming finite element method for other terms. A numerical example illustrates these approaches.

  8. Aerodynamic Measurements of a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade Section in a Transonic Turbine Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to document the impact of incidence angle and Reynolds number variations on the three-dimensional flow field and midspan loss and turning of a two-dimensional section of a variable-speed power-turbine (VSPT) rotor blade. Aerodynamic measurements were obtained in a transonic linear cascade at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Steady-state data were obtained for 10 incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. At each angle, data were acquired at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number (based on axial chord) varying over an order-of-magnitude from 2.12×105 to 2.12×106. Data were obtained at the design exit Mach number of 0.72 and at a reduced exit Mach number of 0.35 as required to achieve the lowest Reynolds number. Midspan tota lpressure and exit flow angle data were acquired using a five-hole pitch/yaw probe surveyed on a plane located 7.0 percent axial-chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane. The survey spanned three blade passages. Additionally, three-dimensional half-span flow fields were examined with additional probe survey data acquired at 26 span locations for two key incidence angles of +5.8deg and -36.7deg. Survey data near the endwall were acquired with a three-hole boundary-layer probe. The data were integrated to determine average exit total-pressure and flow angle as functions of incidence and flow conditions. The data set also includes blade static pressures measured on four spanwise planes and endwall static pressures.

  9. Flow Quality Measurements in an Aerodynamic Model of NASA Lewis' Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canacci, Victor A.; Gonsalez, Jose C.

    1999-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to improve the aerodynamic flow characteristics of the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT), a modular scale model of the facility was fabricated. This 1/10th-scale model was used to gain further understanding of the flow characteristics in the IRT. The model was outfitted with instrumentation and data acquisition systems to determine pressures, velocities, and flow angles in the settling chamber and test section. Parametric flow quality studies involving the insertion and removal of a model of the IRT's distinctive heat exchanger (cooler) and/or of a honeycomb in the settling chamber were performed. These experiments illustrate the resulting improvement or degradation in flow quality.

  10. Design and aerodynamic performance evaluation of a high-work mixed flow turbine stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neri, Remo N.; Elliott, Thomas J.; Marsh, David N.; Civinskas, Kestutis C.

    1994-01-01

    As axial and radial turbine designs have been pushed to their aerothermodynamic and mechanical limits, the mixed-flow turbine (MFT) concept has been projected to offer performance and durability improvements, especially when ceramic materials are considered. The objective of this NASA/U.S. Army sponsored mixed-flow turbine (AMFT) program was to determine the level of performance attainable with MFT technology within the mechanical constraints of 1997 projected ceramic material properties. The MFT geometry is similar to a radial turbine, exhibiting a large radius change from inlet to exit, but differing in that the inlet flowpath is not purely radial, nor axial, but mixed; it is the inlet geometry that gives rise to the name 'mixed-flow'. The 'mixed' orientation of the turbine inlet offers several advantages over radial designs by allowing a nonzero inlet blade angle yet maintaining radial-element blades. The oblique inlet not only improves the particle-impact survivability of the design, but improves the aerodynamic performance by reducing the incidence at the blade inlet. The difficulty, however, of using mixed-flow geometry lies in the scarcity of detailed data and documented design experience. This paper reports the design of a MFT stage designed with the intent to maximize aerodynamic performance by optimizing design parameters such as stage reaction, rotor incidence, flowpath shape, blade shape, vane geometry, and airfoil counts using 2-D, 3-D inviscid, and 3-D viscous computational fluid dynamics code. The aerodynamic optimization was accomplished while maintaining mechanical integrity with respect to vibration and stress levels in the rotor. A full-scale cold-flow rig test was performed with metallic hardware fabricated to the specifications of the hot ceramic geometry to evaluate the stage performance.

  11. Effect of Trailing Edge Shape on the Unsteady Aerodynamics of Reverse Flow Dynamic Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2015-11-01

    This work considers dynamic stall in reverse flow, where flow travels over an oscillating airfoil from the geometric trailing edge towards the leading edge. An airfoil with a sharp geometric trailing edge causes early formation of a primary dynamic stall vortex since the sharp edge acts as the aerodynamic leading edge in reverse flow. The present work experimentally examines the potential merits of using an airfoil with a blunt geometric trailing edge to delay flow separation and dynamic stall vortex formation while undergoing oscillations in reverse flow. Time-resolved and phase-averaged flow fields and pressure distributions are compared for airfoils with different trailing edge shapes. Specifically, the evolution of unsteady flow features such as primary, secondary, and trailing edge vortices is examined. The influence of these flow features on the unsteady pressure distributions and integrated unsteady airloads provide insight on the torsional loading of rotor blades as they oscillate in reverse flow. The airfoil with a blunt trailing edge delays reverse flow dynamic stall, but this leads to greater downward-acting lift and pitching moment. These results are fundamental to alleviating vibrations of high-speed helicopters, where much of the rotor operates in reverse flow.

  12. Aerodynamic study on supersonic flows in high-velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katanoda, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Kuroda, Seiji; Kawakita, Jin; Fukanuma, Hirotaka; Matsuo, Kazuyasu

    2005-06-01

    To clarify the characteristics of gas flow in high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun, aerodynamic research is performed using a special gun. The gun has rectangular cross-sectional area and sidewalls of optical glass to visualize the internal flow. The gun consists of a supersonic nozzle with the design Mach number of 2.0 followed by a straight passage called barrel. Compressed dry air up to 0.78 MPa is used as a process gas instead of combustion gas which is used in a commercial HVOF gun. The high-speed gas flows with shock waves in the gun and jets are visualized by schlieren technique. Complicated internal and external flow-fields containing various types of shock wave as well as expansion wave are visualized.

  13. Aerodynamic pressure and flow-visualization measurement from a rotating wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C P

    1988-11-01

    Aerodynamic, load, flow-visualization, and inflow measurements have been made on a 10-m, three-bladed, downwind, horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). A video camera mounted on the rotor was used to record nighttime and daytime video images of tufts attached to the low-pressure side of a constant-chord, zero-twist blade. Load measurements were made using strain gages mounted at every 10% of the blade's span. Pressure measurements were made at 80% of the blade's span. Pressure taps were located at 32 chordwise positions, revealing pressure distributions comparable with wind tunnel data. Inflow was measured using a vertical-plane array of eight propvane and five triaxial (U-V-W) prop-type anemometers located 10 m upwind in the predominant wind direction. One objective of this comprehensive research program was to study the effects of blade rotation on aerodynamic behavior below, near, and beyond stall. To this end, flow patterns are presented here that reveal the dynamic and steady behavior of flow conditions on the blade. Pressure distributions are compared to flow patterns and two-dimensional wind tunnel data. Separation boundary locations are shown that change as a function of spanwise location, pitch angle, and wind speed. 6 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Orbiter Aerodynamic Acceleration Flight Measurements in the Rarefied-Flow Transition Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; LeBeau, Gerald J.

    1996-01-01

    Acceleration data taken from the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) during reentry on STS-62 have been analyzed using calibration factors taken on orbit. This is the first Orbiter mission which collected OARE data during the Orbiter reentry phase. The data examined include the flight regime from orbital altitudes down to about 90 km which covers the free-molecule-flow regime and the upper altitude fringes of the rarefied-flow transition into the hypersonic continuum. Ancillary flight data on Orbiter position, orientation, velocity, and rotation rates have been used in models to transform the measured accelerations to the Orbiter center-of-gravity, from which aerodynamic accelerations along the Orbiter body axes have been calculated. Residual offsets introduced in the measurements by unmodeled Orbiter forces are identified and discussed. Direct comparisons are made between the OARE flight data and an independent micro-gravity accelerometer experiment, the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), which also obtained flight data on reentry during the mission down to about 95 km. The resulting OARE aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's body axis, aid the normal to axial acceleration ratio in the free-molecule-flow and transition-flow regimes are presented and compared with numerical simulations from three direct simulation Monte Carlo codes.

  15. Modeling and Simulation of Radiative Compressible Flows in Aerodynamic Heating Arc-Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensassi, Khalil; Laguna, Alejandro A.; Lani, Andrea; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations of an arc heated flow inside NASA's 20 [MW] Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF) are performed in order to investigate the three-dimensional swirling flow and the current distribution inside the wind tunnel. The plasma is considered in Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium(LTE) and is composed of Air-Argon gas mixture. The governing equations are the Navier-Stokes equations that include source terms corresponding to Joule heating and radiative cooling. The former is obtained by solving an electric potential equation, while the latter is calculated using an innovative massively parallel ray-tracing algorithm. The fully coupled system is closed by the thermodynamics relations and transport properties which are obtained from Chapman-Enskog method. A novel strategy was developed in order to enable the flow solver and the radiation calculation to be preformed independently and simultaneously using a different number of processors. Drastic reduction in the computational cost was achieved using this strategy. Details on the numerical methods used for space discretization, time integration and ray-tracing algorithm will be presented. The effect of the radiative cooling on the dynamics of the flow will be investigated. The complete set of equations were implemented within the COOLFluiD Framework. Fig. 1 shows the geometry of the Anode and part of the constrictor of the Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF). Fig. 2 shows the velocity field distribution along (x-y) plane and the streamline in (z-y) plane.

  16. Aircraft Aerodynamic Parameter Detection Using Micro Hot-Film Flow Sensor Array and BP Neural Network Identification

    PubMed Central

    Que, Ruiyi; Zhu, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Air speed, angle of sideslip and angle of attack are fundamental aerodynamic parameters for controlling most aircraft. For small aircraft for which conventional detecting devices are too bulky and heavy to be utilized, a novel and practical methodology by which the aerodynamic parameters are inferred using a micro hot-film flow sensor array mounted on the surface of the wing is proposed. A back-propagation neural network is used to model the coupling relationship between readings of the sensor array and aerodynamic parameters. Two different sensor arrangements are tested in wind tunnel experiments and dependence of the system performance on the sensor arrangement is analyzed. PMID:23112638

  17. Effect of Trailing Edge Flow Injection on Fan Noise and Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian; Woodward, Richard P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental investigation using trailing edge blowing for reducing fan rotor/guide vane wake interaction noise was completed in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Data were acquired to measure noise, aerodynamic performance, and flow features for a 22" tip diameter fan representative of modern turbofan technology. The fan was designed to use trailing edge blowing to reduce the fan blade wake momentum deficit. The test objective was to quantify noise reductions, measure impacts on fan aerodynamic performance, and document the flow field using hot-film anemometry. Measurements concentrated on approach, cutback, and takeoff rotational speeds as those are the primary conditions of acoustic interest. Data are presented for a 2% (relative to overall fan flow) trailing edge injection rate and show a 2 dB reduction in Overall Sound Power Level (OAPWL) at all fan test speeds. The reduction in broadband noise is nearly constant and is approximately 1.5 dB up to 20 kHz at all fan speeds. Measurements of tone noise show significant variation, as evidenced by reductions of up to 6 dB in the 2 BPF tone at 6700 rpm.: and increases of nearly 2 dB for the 4 BPF tone at approach speed. Aerodynamic performance measurements show the fan with 2 % injection has an overall efficiency that is comparable to the baseline fan and operates, as intended, with nearly the same pressure ratio and mass flow parameters. Hot-film measurements obtained at the approach operating condition indicate that mean blade wake filling in the tip region was not as significant as expected. This suggests that additional acoustic benefits could be realized if the trailing edge blowing could be modified to provide better filling of the wake momentum deficit. Nevertheless, the hot-film measurements indicate that the trailing edge blowing provided significant reductions in blade wake turbulence. Overall, these results indicate that further work may be required to fully understand the proper

  18. Hydrodynamic and Aerodynamic Tests of Models of Flying-boat Hulls Designed Flow Aerodynamic Drag - NACA Models 74, 74-A, and 75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truscott, Starr; Parkinson, J B; Ebert, John W , Jr; Valentine, E Floyd

    1938-01-01

    The present tests illustrate how the aerodynamic drag of a flying boat hull may be reduced by following closely the form of a low drag aerodynamic body and the manner in which the extent of the aerodynamic refinement is limited by poorer hydrodynamic performance. This limit is not sharply defined but is first evidenced by an abnormal flow of water over certain parts of the form accompanied by a sharp increase in resistance. In the case of models 74-A and 75, the resistance (sticking) occurs only at certain combinations of speed, load, and trim and can be avoided by proper control of the trim at high water speeds. Model 75 has higher water resistance at very high speeds than does model 74-A. With constant speed propellers and high takeoff speeds, it appears that the form of model 75 would give slightly better takeoff performance. Model 74-A, however, has lower aerodynamic drag than does model 75 for the same volume of hull.

  19. Minnowbrook VI: 2009 Workshop on Flow Physics and Control for Internal and External Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John E.; Povinelli, Louis A.; Gostelow, J. Paul; Glauser, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Topics covered include: Flow Physics and control for Internal and External Aerodynamics (not in TOC...starts on pg13); Breaking CFD Bottlenecks in Gas-Turbine Flow-Path Design; Streamwise Vortices on the Convex Surfaces of Circular Cylinders and Turbomachinery Blading; DNS and Embedded DNS as Tools for Investigating Unsteady Heat Transfer Phenomena in Turbines; Cavitation, Flow Structure and Turbulence in the Tip Region of a Rotor Blade; Development and Application of Plasma Actuators for Active Control of High-Speed and High Reynolds Number Flows; Active Flow Control of Lifting Surface With Flap-Current Activities and Future Directions; Closed-Loop Control of Vortex Formation in Separated Flows; Global Instability on Laminar Separation Bubbles-Revisited; Very Large-Scale Motions in Smooth and Rough Wall Boundary Layers; Instability of a Supersonic Boundary-Layer With Localized Roughness; Active Control of Open Cavities; Amplitude Scaling of Active Separation Control; U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory's Need for Flow Physics and Control With Applications Involving Aero-Optics and Weapon Bay Cavities; Some Issues Related to Integrating Active Flow Control With Flight Control; Active Flow Control Strategies Using Surface Pressure Measurements; Reduction of Unsteady Forcing in a Vaned, Contra-Rotating Transonic Turbine Configuration; Active Flow Control Stator With Coanda Surface; Controlling Separation in Turbomachines; Flow Control on Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoils Using Vortex Generator Jets; Reduced Order Modeling Incompressible Flows; Study and Control of Flow Past Disk, and Circular and Rectangular Cylinders Aligned in the Flow; Periodic Forcing of a Turbulent Axisymmetric Wake; Control of Vortex Breakdown in Critical Swirl Regime Using Azimuthal Forcing; External and Turbomachinery Flow Control Working Group; Boundary Layers, Transitions and Separation; Efficiency Considerations in Low Pressure Turbines; Summary of Conference; and Final Plenary Session

  20. Recent advances in applying Free Vortex Sheet theory to the estimation of vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Schoonover, W. E., Jr.; Frink, N. T.

    1982-01-01

    Free Vortex Sheet theory has been applied to a variety of configurations for the estimation of three-dimensional pressure distributions for wings developing separation-induced leading-edge vortex flows. Correlations with experiment show reasonable estimates for the effects of compressibility, side-slip, side edges, swept-wing blast-induced loads, and leading-edge vortex flaps. Theoretical studies expand upon these correlations to show general aerodynamic trends. Consideration is also given to simple, yet effective techniques which expedite convergence and therefore reduce computational expense.

  1. A fast and accurate method to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2014-12-01

    A quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic flows. This method is suitable for offshore wind turbine design software as it is a very accurate and computationally reasonably cheap method. This study shows the results for a NACA 0012 airfoil. The two applied solvers converge to the experimental values when the grid is refined. We also show that in separation the eigenvalues remain positive thus avoiding the Goldstein singularity at separation. In 3D we show a flow over a dent in which separation occurs. A rotating flat plat is used to show the applicability of the method for rotating flows. The shown capabilities of the method indicate that the quasi-simultaneous interaction method is suitable for design methods for offshore wind turbine blades.

  2. High Reynolds Number Hybrid Laminar Flow Control (HLFC) Flight Experiment. Report 2; Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the aerodynamic design of an experimental hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) wing panel intended for use on a Boeing 757 airplane to provide a facility for flight research on high Reynolds number HLFC and to demonstrate practical HLFC operation on a full-scale commercial transport airplane. The design consists of revised wing leading edge contour designed to produce a pressure distribution favorable to laminar flow, definition of suction flow requirements to laminarize the boundary layer, provisions at the inboard end of the test panel to prevent attachment-line boundary layer transition, and a Krueger leading edge flap that serves both as a high lift device and as a shield to prevent insect accretion on the leading edge when the airplane is taking off or landing.

  3. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar-Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong

    2013-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft s swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First AIAA CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  4. Analysis of Low Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2014-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft's swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  5. The use of linearized-aerodynamics and vortex-flow methods in aircraft design /invited paper/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with selected linearized-aerodynamic and vortex-flow methods as applied to aircraft design problems at high subsonic speeds. In particular, the NASA Vortex Lattice and Modified Multhopp methods are the linearized techniques employed, and the suction analogy is used to provide estimates associated with vortex-flow aerodynamics. Many examples are given as to how researchers at Langley have used these methods to design the high subsonic, wing-mean-camber shapes for various configurations such as a supersonic transport, high-aspect-ratio transport, trapezoidal fighter wing, strake wing, tandem wing, joined wing, delta wing, and slender cranked wing. Many of these have been built, tested, and have had their data compared with theory. In addition, a technique for defining efficiently performing strake planforms for use in strake-wing combinations is discussed, and further improvements in wing design are outlined. The latter may be obtained by using higher-ordered linear panel methods as well as nonlinear-transonic methods.

  6. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar-Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2014-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft's swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  7. Numerical simulations of aerodynamic contribution of flows about a space-plane-type configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsushima, Kisa; Takanashi, Susume; Fujii, Kozo; Obayashi, Shigeru

    1987-01-01

    The slightly supersonic viscous flow about the space-plane under development at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) in Japan was simulated numerically using the LU-ADI algorithm. The wind-tunnel testing for the same plane also was conducted with the computations in parallel. The main purpose of the simulation is to capture the phenomena which have a great deal of influence to the aerodynamic force and efficiency but is difficult to capture by experiments. It includes more accurate representation of vortical flows with high angles of attack of an aircraft. The space-plane shape geometry simulated is the simplified model of the real space-plane, which is a combination of a flat and slender body and a double-delta type wing. The comparison between experimental results and numerical ones will be done in the near future. It could be said that numerical results show the qualitatively reliable phenomena.

  8. Aerodynamic and thermal analysis of an engine cylinder head using numerical flow simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Taghavi, R.; Dupont, A.; Dupont, J.F. )

    1990-07-01

    This paper reports on a computational fluid dynamics code used as a guide during the development stage of a passenger car spark ignition engine. The focus is on the flow proiperties of the inlet port as well as the heat transfer characteristics of the proposed cylinder head design. In the first part of this study, the aerodynamic characteristics of two slightly different inlet ports are considered and their effect on the development of in-cylinder flow is examined. The collected information is used to estimate geometric sensitivity and assess the effects of drifts between design and actual production specifications of inlet ports. In the second part, the same computational code is used to simulate in-cylinder combustion and determine the resulting temperature and heat flux distribution on the cylinder head walls. A comparison is thn carried out between numerical results and experimental measurements and good agreement is obtained.

  9. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 2: Launch vehicle aeroelastic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    An exploratory analysis has been made of the aeroelastic stability of the Space Shuttle Launch Configuration, with the objective of defining critical flow phenomena with adverse aeroelastic effects and developing simple analytic means of describing the time-dependent flow-interference effects so that they can be incorporated into a computer program to predict the aeroelastic stability of all free-free modes of the shuttle launch configuration. Three critical flow phenomana have been identified: (1) discontinuous jump of orbiter wing shock, (2) inlet flow between orbiter and booster, and (3) H.O. tank base flow. All involve highly nonlinear and often discontinuous aerodynamics which cause limit cycle oscillations of certain critical modes. Given the appropriate static data, the dynamic effects of the wing shock jump and the HO tank bulbous base effect can be analyzed using the developed quasi-steady techniques. However, further analytic and experimental efforts are required before the dynamic effects of the inlet flow phenomenon can be predicted for the shuttle launch configuration.

  10. Acoustic and aerodynamic testing of a scale model variable pitch fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutras, R. R.; Kazin, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    A fully reversible pitch scale model fan with variable pitch rotor blades was tested to determine its aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics. The single-stage fan has a design tip speed of 1160 ft/sec (353.568 m/sec) at a bypass pressure ratio of 1.5. Three operating lines were investigated. Test results show that the blade pitch for minimum noise also resulted in the highest efficiency for all three operating lines at all thrust levels. The minimum perceived noise on a 200-ft (60.96 m) sideline was obtained with the nominal nozzle. At 44% of takeoff thrust, the PNL reduction between blade pitch and minimum noise blade pitch is 1.8 PNdB for the nominal nozzle and decreases with increasing thrust. The small nozzle (6% undersized) has the highest efficiency at all part thrust conditions for the minimum noise blade pitch setting; although, the noise is about 1.0 PNdB higher for the small nozzle at the minimum noise blade pitch position.

  11. A preferential flow model based on flow variability in macropores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, M.

    2004-12-01

    Simulating infiltration in soils containing macropores still provides unsatisfactory results, as existing models seem not to capture all relevant processes. Recent studies of macropore flow initiation in natural soils containing earthworm channels revealed a distinct flow rate variability in the macropores depending on the initiation process (Weiler & Naef, 2003, J of Hydrology, 273: 139-154). When macropore flow was initiated at the soil surface, most of the macropores received very little water while a few macropores received a large proportion of the total inflow. In contrast, when macropore flow was initiated from a saturated or nearly saturated soil layer, macropore flow rate variation was much lower. The objective of this study was to develop and test a model, which combines the macropore flow variability with several established approaches to model dual permeability soils. We then evaluate the INfiltration-INitiation-INteraction Model (IN3M) as a tool to explore the influence of macropore flow variability on infiltration behavior by performing a sensitivity analysis and applying IN3M to sprinkling and dye tracer experiments at various field sites with different macropore and soil matrix properties. The sensitivity analysis showed that the flow variability in macropores reduces interaction between the macropores and the surrounding soil matrix and thus increases bypass flow, especially for surface initiation of macropore flow and at higher rainfall intensities. The model application shows reasonable agreement between IN3M simulations and field data in terms of water balance, water content change, and dye patterns. The influence of macropore flow variability on the hydrological response of the soil was considerable and especially pronounced for soils where initiation occurs at the soil surface.

  12. Classical Aerodynamic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A collection of papers on modern theoretical aerodynamics is presented. Included are theories of incompressible potential flow and research on the aerodynamic forces on wing and wing sections of aircraft and on airship hulls.

  13. Aerodynamic Measurements of a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade Section in a Transonic Turbine Cascade at Low Inlet Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel-McVetta, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic measurements obtained in a transonic linear cascade were used to assess the impact of large incidence angle and Reynolds number variations on the 3-D flow field and midspan loss and turning of a 2-D section of a variable-speed power-turbine (VSPT) rotor blade. Steady-state data were obtained for ten incidence angles ranging from +15.8 deg to -51.0 deg. At each angle, data were acquired at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number (based on axial chord) varying over an order-of-magnitude from 2.12×10(exp 5) to 2.12×10(exp 6). Data were obtained at the design exit Mach number of 0.72 and at a reduced exit Mach number of 0.35 as required to achieve the lowest Reynolds number. Midspan total-pressure and exit flow angle data were acquired using a five-hole pitch/yaw probe surveyed on a plane located 7.0 percent axial chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane. The survey spanned three blade passages. Additionally, three-dimensional half-span flow fields were examined with additional probe survey data acquired at 26 span locations for two key incidence angles of +5.8 deg and -36.7 deg. Survey data near the endwall were acquired with a three-hole boundary-layer probe. The data were integrated to determine average exit total-pressure and flow angle as functions of incidence and flow conditions. The data set also includes blade static pressures measured on four spanwise planes and endwall static pressures. Tests were conducted in the NASA Glenn Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The measurements reflect strong secondary flows associated with the high aerodynamic loading levels at large positive incidence angles and an increase in loss levels with decreasing Reynolds number. The secondary flows decrease with negative incidence as the blade becomes unloaded. Transitional flow is admitted in this low inlet turbulence dataset, making it a challenging CFD test case. The dataset will be used to advance understanding of the aerodynamic

  14. Unsteady transonic aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, D.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on unsteady transonic aerodynamics are presented. The topics addressed include: physical phenomena associated with unsteady transonic flows, basic equations for unsteady transonic flow, practical problems concerning aircraft, basic numerical methods, computational methods for unsteady transonic flows, application of transonic flow analysis to helicopter rotor problems, unsteady aerodynamics for turbomachinery aeroelastic applications, alternative methods for modeling unsteady transonic flows.

  15. Ultra high bypass Nacelle aerodynamics inlet flow-through high angle of attack distortion test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Michael J.; Schweiger, Paul S.

    1992-01-01

    A flow-through inlet test program was conducted to evaluate inlet test methods and determine the impact of the fan on inlet separation when operating at large angles of attack. A total of 16 model configurations of approximately 1/6 scale were tested. A comparison of these flow-through results with powered data indicates the presence of the fan increased separation operation 3 degrees to 4 degrees over the flow through inlet. Rods and screens located at the fan face station, that redistribute the flow, achieved simulation of the powered-fan results for separation angle of attack. Concepts to reduce inlet distortion and increase angle of attack capability were also evaluated. Vortex generators located on the inlet surface increased inlet angle of attack capability up to 2 degrees and reduced inlet distortion in the separated region. Finally, a method of simulating the fan/inlet aerodynamic interaction using blockage sizing method has been defined. With this method, a static blockage device used with a flow-through model will approximate the same inlet onset of separation angle of attack and distortion pattern that would be obtained with an inlet model containing a powered fan.

  16. Newton-Krylov-Schwarz methods for aerodynamics problems : compressible and incompressible flows on unstructured grids.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaushik, D. K.; Keyes, D. E.; Smith, B. F.

    1999-02-24

    We review and extend to the compressible regime an earlier parallelization of an implicit incompressible unstructured Euler code [9], and solve for flow over an M6 wing in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic regimes. While the parallelization philosophy of the compressible case is identical to the incompressible, we focus here on the nonlinear and linear convergence rates, which vary in different physical regimes, and on comparing the performance of currently important computational platforms. Multiple-scale problems should be marched out at desired accuracy limits, and not held hostage to often more stringent explicit stability limits. In the context of inviscid aerodynamics, this means evolving transient computations on the scale of the convective transit time, rather than the acoustic transit time, or solving steady-state problems with local CFL numbers approaching infinity. Whether time-accurate or steady, we employ Newton's method on each (pseudo-) timestep. The coupling of analysis with design in aerodynamic practice is another motivation for implicitness. Design processes that make use of sensitivity derivatives and the Hessian matrix require operations with the Jacobian matrix of the state constraints (i.e., of the governing PDE system); if the Jacobian is available for design, it may be employed with advantage in a nonlinearly implicit analysis, as well.

  17. Effects of Shrouded Stator Cavity Flows on Multistage Axial Compressor Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellborn, Steven R.; Okiishi, Theodore H.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were performed on a low-speed multistage axial-flow compressor to assess the effects of shrouded stator cavity flows on aerodynamic performance. Five configurations, which involved changes in seal-tooth leakage rates and/or elimination of the shrouded stator cavities, were tested. Data collected enabled differences in overall individual stage and the third stage blade element performance parameters to be compared. The results show conclusively that seal-tooth leakage ran have a large impact on compressor aerodynamic performance while the presence of the shrouded stator cavities alone seemed to have little influence. Overall performance data revealed that for every 1% increase in the seal-tooth clearance to blade-height ratio the pressure rise dropped up to 3% while efficiency was reduced by 1 to 1.5 points. These observed efficiency penalty slopes are comparable to those commonly reported for rotor and cantilevered stator tip clearance variations. Therefore, it appears that in order to correctly predict overall performance it is equally important to account for the effects of seal-tooth leakage as it is to include the influence of tip clearance flows. Third stage blade element performance data suggested that the performance degradation observed when leakage was increased was brought about in two distinct ways. First, increasing seal-tooth leakage directly spoiled the near hub performance of the stator row in which leakage occurred. Second, the altered stator exit now conditions caused by increased leakage impaired the performance of the next downstream stage by decreasing the work input of the downstream rotor and increasing total pressure loss of the downstream stator. These trends caused downstream stages to progressively perform worse. Other measurements were acquired to determine spatial and temporal flow field variations within the up-and-downstream shrouded stator cavities. Flow within the cavities involved low momentum fluid traveling primarily

  18. New directions in fluid dynamics: non-equilibrium aerodynamic and microsystem flows.

    PubMed

    Reese, Jason M; Gallis, Michael A; Lockerby, Duncan A

    2003-12-15

    Fluid flows that do not have local equilibrium are characteristic of some of the new frontiers in engineering and technology, for example, high-speed high-altitude aerodynamics and the development of micrometre-sized fluid pumps, turbines and other devices. However, this area of fluid dynamics is poorly understood from both the experimental and simulation perspectives, which hampers the progress of these technologies. This paper reviews some of the recent developments in experimental techniques and modelling methods for non-equilibrium gas flows, examining their advantages and drawbacks. We also present new results from our computational investigations into both hypersonic and microsystem flows using two distinct numerical methodologies: the direct simulation Monte Carlo method and extended hydrodynamics. While the direct simulation approach produces excellent results and is used widely, extended hydrodynamics is not as well developed but is a promising candidate for future more complex simulations. Finally, we discuss some of the other situations where these simulation methods could be usefully applied, and look to the future of numerical tools for non-equilibrium flows.

  19. Method for obtaining aerodynamic data on hypersonic configurations with scramjet exhaust flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartill, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    A hypersonic wind tunnel test method for obtaining credible aerodynamic data on a complete hypersonic vehicle (generic X-24c) with scramjet exhaust flow simulation is described. The general problems of simulating the scramjet exhaust as well as accounting for scramjet inlet flow and vehicle forces are analyzed, and candidate test methods are described and compared. The method selected as most useful makes use of a thrust-minus-drag flow-through balance with a completely metric model. Inlet flow is diverted by a fairing. The incremental effect of the fairing is determined in the testing of two reference models. The net thrust of the scramjet module is an input to be determined in large-scale module tests with scramjet combustion. Force accounting is described, and examples of force component levels are predicted. Compatibility of the test method with candidate wind tunnel facilities is described, and a preliminary model mechanical arrangement drawing is presented. The balance design and performance requirements are described in a detailed specification. Calibration procedures, model instrumentation, and a test plan for the model are outlined.

  20. Reduction of aerodynamic load fluctuation on wind turbine blades through active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, John-Michael; Coleman, Thomas; Magstadt, Andrew; Aggarwal, Somil; Glauser, Mark

    2015-11-01

    The current set of experiments deals with implementing active flow control on a Bergey Excel 1, 1kW turbine. The previous work in our group demonstrated successfully that implementation of a simple closed-loop controller could reduce unsteady aerodynamic load fluctuation by 18% on a vertically mounted wing. Here we describe a similar flow control method adapted to work in the rotating frame of a 2.5m diameter wind turbine. Strain gages at the base of each blade measure the unsteady fluctuation in the blades and pressure taps distributed along the span of the blades feed information to the closed-loop control scheme. A realistic, unsteady flow field has been generated by placing a cylinder upstream of the turbine to induce shedding vortices at frequencies in the bandwidth of the first structural bending mode of the turbine blades. The goal of these experiments is to demonstrate closed-loop flow control as a means to reduce the unsteady fluctuation in the blades and increase the overall lifespan of the wind turbine.

  1. Rotorcraft Downwash Flow Field Study to Understand the Aerodynamics of Helicopter Brownout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadcock, Alan J.; Ewing, Lindsay A.; Solis, Eduardo; Potsdam, Mark; Rajagopalan, Ganesh

    2008-01-01

    Rotorcraft brownout is caused by the entrainment of dust and sand particles in helicopter downwash, resulting in reduced pilot visibility during low, slow flight and landing. Recently, brownout has become a high-priority problem for military operations because of the risk to both pilot and equipment. Mitigation of this problem has focused on flight controls and landing maneuvers, but current knowledge and experimental data describing the aerodynamic contribution to brownout are limited. This paper focuses on downwash characteristics of a UH-60 Blackhawk as they pertain to particle entrainment and brownout. Results of a full-scale tuft test are presented and used to validate a high-fidelity Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation. CFD analysis for an EH-101 Merlin helicopter is also presented, and its flow field characteristics are compared with those of the UH-60.

  2. Shock Structure Analysis and Aerodynamics in a Weakly Ionized Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saeks, R.; Popovic, S.; Chow, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is analyzed using an electrofluid dynamics model composed of classical conservation laws and Gauss Law. A viscosity model is included to correctly model the spatial scale of the shock structure, and quasi-neutrality is not assumed. A detailed analysis of the structure of a shock wave propagating in a weakly ionized gas is presented, together with a discussion of the physics underlying the key features of the shock structure. A model for the flow behind a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is developed and used to analyze the effect of the ionization on the aerodynamics and performance of a two-dimensional hypersonic lifting body.

  3. Aerodynamic analysis of natural flapping flight using a lift model based on spanwise flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Lionel D., Jr.

    This study successfully described the mechanics of flapping hovering flight within the framework of conventional aerodynamics. Additionally, the theory proposed and supported by this research provides an entirely new way of looking at animal flapping flight. The mechanisms of biological flight are not well understood, and researchers have not been able to describe them using conventional aerodynamic forces. This study proposed that natural flapping flight can be broken down into a simplest model, that this model can then be used to develop a mathematical representation of flapping hovering flight, and finally, that the model can be successfully refined and compared to biological flapping data. This paper proposed a unique theory that the lift of a flapping animal is primarily the result of velocity across the cambered span of the wing. A force analysis was developed using centripetal acceleration to define an acceleration profile that would lead to a spanwise velocity profile. The force produced by the spanwise velocity profile was determined using a computational fluid dynamics analysis of flow on the simplified wing model. The overall forces on the model were found to produce more than twice the lift required for hovering flight. In addition, spanwise lift was shown to generate induced drag on the wing. Induced drag increased both the model wing's lift and drag. The model allowed the development of a mathematical representation that could be refined to account for insect hovering characteristics and that could predict expected physical attributes of the fluid flow. This computational representation resulted in a profile of lift and drag production that corresponds to known force profiles for insect flight. The model of flapping flight was shown to produce results similar to biological observation and experiment, and these results can potentially be applied to the study of other flapping animals. This work provides a foundation on which to base further exploration

  4. Complex conservative difference schemes for computing supersonic flows past simple aerodynamic forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarova, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    Complex conservative modifications of two-dimensional difference schemes on a minimum stencil are presented for the Euler equations. The schemes are conservative with respect to the basic divergent variables and the divergent variables for spatial derivatives. Approximations of boundary conditions for computing flows around variously shaped bodies (plates, cylinders, wedges, cones, bodies with cavities, and compound bodies) are constructed without violating the conservation properties in the computational domain. Test problems for computing flows with shock waves and contact discontinuities and supersonic flows with external energy sources are described.

  5. The Effect of Break Edge Configuration on the Aerodynamics of Anti-Ice Jet Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, V.; Yildizay, H.; Aras, H.

    2015-05-01

    One of the components of a turboprop gas turbine engine is the Front Bearing Structure (FBS) which leads air into the compressor. FBS directly encounters with ambient air, as a consequence ice accretion may occur on its static vanes. There are several aerodynamic parameters which should be considered in the design of anti-icing system of FBS, such as diameter, position, exit angle of discharge holes, etc. This research focuses on the effects of break edge configuration over anti-ice jet flow. Break edge operation is a process which is applied to the hole in order to avoid sharp edges which cause high stress concentration. Numerical analyses and flow visualization test have been conducted. Four different break edge configurations were used for this investigation; without break edge, 0.35xD, 74xD, 0.87xD. Three mainstream flow conditions at the inlet of the channel are defined; 10m/s, 20 m/s and 40 m/s. Shear stresses are extracted from numerical analyses near the trailing edge of pressure surface where ice may occur under icing conditions. A specific flow visualization method was used for the experimental study. Vane surface near the trailing edge was dyed and thinner was injected into anti-ice jet flow in order to remove dye from the vane surface. Hence, film effect on the surface could be computed for each testing condition. Thickness of the dye removal area of each case was examined. The results show noticeable effects of break edge operation on jet flow, and the air film effectiveness decreases when mainstream inlet velocity decreases.

  6. Elasto-Aerodynamics-Driven Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Scavenging Air-Flow Energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhua; Mu, Xiaojing; Wang, Xue; Gu, Alex Yuandong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2015-10-27

    Efficient scavenging the kinetic energy from air-flow represents a promising approach for obtaining clean, sustainable electricity. Here, we report an elasto-aerodynamics-driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on contact electrification. The reported TENG consists of a Kapton film with two Cu electrodes at each side, fixed on two ends in an acrylic fluid channel. The relationship between the TENG output power density and its fluid channel dimensions is systematically studied. TENG with a fluid channel size of 125 × 10 × 1.6 mm(3) delivers the maximum output power density of about 9 kW/m(3) under a loading resistance of 2.3 MΩ. Aero-elastic flutter effect explains the air-flow induced vibration of Kapton film well. The output power scales nearly linearly with parallel wiring of multiple TENGs. Connecting 10 TENGs in parallel gives an output power of 25 mW, which allows direct powering of a globe light. The TENG is also utilized to scavenge human breath induced air-flow energy to sustainably power a human body temperature sensor. PMID:26343789

  7. Flow Visualization and Unsteady Aerodynamics in the Flight of the Hawkmoth, Manduca sexta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmott, Alexander P.; Ellington, Charles P.; Thomas, Adrian L. R.

    1997-03-01

    The aerodynamic mechanisms employed during the flight of the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, have been investigated through smoke visualization studies with tethered moths. Details of the flow around the wings and of the overall wake structure were recorded as stereophotographs and high-speed video sequences. The changes in flow which accompanied increases in flight speed from 0.4 to 5.7 m s-1 were analysed. The wake consists of an alternating series of horizontal and vertical vortex rings which are generated by successive down- and upstrokes, respectively. The downstroke produces significantly more lift than the upstroke due to a leading-edge vortex which is stabilized by a radial flow moving out towards the wingtip. The leading-edge vortex grew in size with increasing forward flight velocity. Such a phenomenon is proposed as a likely mechanism for lift enhancement in many insect groups. During supination, vorticity is shed from the leading edge as postulated in the 'flex' mechanism. This vorticity would enhance upstroke lift if it was recaptured during subsequent translation, but it is not. Instead the vorticity is left behind and the upstroke circulation builds up slowly. A small jet provides additional thrust as the trailing edges approach at the end of the upstroke. The stereophotographs also suggest that the bound circulation may not be reversed between half strokes at the fastest flight speeds.

  8. Investigation of aerodynamic characteristics of wings having vortex flow using different numerical codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. S.; Goglia, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of highly sweptback wings having separation-induced vortex flow were investigated by employing different numerical codes with a view to determining some of the capabilities and limitations of these codes. Flat wings of various configurations-strake wing models, cropped, diamond, arrow and double delta wings, were studied. Cambered and cranked planforms have also been tested. The theoretical results predicted by the codes were compared with the experimental data, wherever possible, and found to agree favorably for most of the configurations investigated. However, large cambered wings could not be successfully modeled by the codes. It appears that the final solution in the free vortex sheet method is affected by the selection of the initial solution. Accumulated span loadings estimated for delta and diamond wings were found to be unusual in comparison with attached flow results in that the slopes of these load curves near the leading edge do not tend to infinity as they do in the case of attached flow.

  9. Flow visualization and unsteady aerodynamics in the flight of the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta

    PubMed Central

    Willmott, A. P.; Ellington, C. P.; Thomas, A. L. R.

    1997-01-01

    The aerodynamic mechanisms employed durng the flight of the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, have been investigated through smoke visualization studies with tethered moths. Details of the flow around the wings and of the overall wake structure were recorded as stereophotographs and high-speed video sequences. The changes in flow which accompanied increases in flight speed from 0.4 to 5.7 m s-1 were analysed. The wake consists of an alternating series of horizontal and vertical vortex rings which are generated by successive down- and upstrokes, respectively. The downstroke produces significantly more lift than the upstroke due to a leading-edge vortex which is stabilized by a radia flow moving out towards the wingtip. The leading-edge vortex grew in size with increasing forward flight velocity. Such a phenomenon is proposed as a likely mechanism for lift enhancement in many insect groups. During supination, vorticity is shed from the leading edge as postulated in the 'flex' mechanism. This vorticity would enhance upstroke lift if it was recaptured diring subsequent translation, but it is not. Instead, the vorticity is left behind and the upstroke circulation builds up slowly. A small jet provides additional thrust as the trailing edges approach at the end of the upstroke. The stereophotographs also suggest that the bound circulation may not be reversed between half strokes at the fastest flight speeds.

  10. Subsonic Aerodynamic Assessment of Vortex Flow Management Devices on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Applin, Zachary T.; Kemmerly, Guy T.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of leading-edge vortex management devices on the subsonic performance of a high-speed civil transport (HSCT) configuration was conducted in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.14 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 3.08 x 10 (sup 6) to 5.47 x 10 (sup 6). The test model was designed for a cruise Mach number of 2.7. During the subsonic high-lift phase of flight, vortical flow dominates the upper surface flow structure, and during vortex breakdown, this flow causes adverse pitch-up and a reduction of usable lift. The experimental results showed that the beneficial effects of small leading-edge vortex management devices located near the model reference center were insufficient to substantially affect the resulting aerodynamic forces and moments. However, devices located at or near the wiring apex region demonstrated potential for pitch control with little effect on overall lift.

  11. Elasto-Aerodynamics-Driven Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Scavenging Air-Flow Energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhua; Mu, Xiaojing; Wang, Xue; Gu, Alex Yuandong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2015-10-27

    Efficient scavenging the kinetic energy from air-flow represents a promising approach for obtaining clean, sustainable electricity. Here, we report an elasto-aerodynamics-driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on contact electrification. The reported TENG consists of a Kapton film with two Cu electrodes at each side, fixed on two ends in an acrylic fluid channel. The relationship between the TENG output power density and its fluid channel dimensions is systematically studied. TENG with a fluid channel size of 125 × 10 × 1.6 mm(3) delivers the maximum output power density of about 9 kW/m(3) under a loading resistance of 2.3 MΩ. Aero-elastic flutter effect explains the air-flow induced vibration of Kapton film well. The output power scales nearly linearly with parallel wiring of multiple TENGs. Connecting 10 TENGs in parallel gives an output power of 25 mW, which allows direct powering of a globe light. The TENG is also utilized to scavenge human breath induced air-flow energy to sustainably power a human body temperature sensor.

  12. The effect of variable stator on performance of a highly loaded tandem axial flow compressor stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshraghi, Hamzeh; Boroomand, Masoud; Tousi, Abolghasem M.; Fallah, Mohammad Toude; Mohammadi, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Increasing the aerodynamic load on compressor blades helps to obtain a higher pressure ratio in lower rotational speeds. Considering the high aerodynamic load effects and structural concerns in the design process, it is possible to obtain higher pressure ratios compared to conventional compressors. However, it must be noted that imposing higher aerodynamic loads results in higher loss coefficients and deteriorates the overall performance. To avoid the loss increase, the boundary layer quality must be studied carefully over the blade suction surface. Employment of advanced shaped airfoils (like CDAs), slotted blades or other boundary layer control methods has helped the designers to use higher aerodynamic loads on compressor blades. Tandem cascade is a passive boundary layer control method, which is based on using the flow momentum to control the boundary layer on the suction surface and also to avoid the probable separation caused by higher aerodynamic loads. In fact, the front pressure side flow momentum helps to compensate the positive pressure gradient over the aft blade's suction side. Also, in comparison to the single blade stators, tandem variable stators have more degrees of freedom, and this issue increases the possibility of finding enhanced conditions in the compressor off-design performance. In the current study, a 3D design procedure for an axial flow tandem compressor stage has been applied to design a highly loaded stage. Following, this design is numerically investigated using a CFD code and the stage characteristic map is reported. Also, the effect of various stator stagger angles on the compressor performance and especially on the compressor surge margin has been discussed. To validate the CFD method, another known compressor stage is presented and its performance is numerically investigated and the results are compared with available experimental results.

  13. The influence of incidence angle on the aerodynamics of condensing flow around a rotor tip section of steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti Amiri, H.; Salmaniyeh, F.; Izadi, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of incidence angle on the aerodynamics of the steam flow field around a rotor tip section is investigated. An Eulerian-Eulerian method, based on a non-equilibrium thermodynamics model for simulating the wet flow is employed. In this study, the effects of incidence angle on different design parameters such as: outflow Mach number, outflow gas phase mass fraction, loss coefficient and deviation angle are studied.

  14. The influence of incidence angle on the aerodynamics of condensing flow around a rotor tip section of steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti Amiri, H.; Salmaniyeh, F.; Izadi, A.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the influence of incidence angle on the aerodynamics of the steam flow field around a rotor tip section is investigated. An Eulerian-Eulerian method, based on a non-equilibrium thermodynamics model for simulating the wet flow is employed. In this study, the effects of incidence angle on different design parameters such as: outflow Mach number, outflow gas phase mass fraction, loss coefficient and deviation angle are studied.

  15. On the similarity of variable viscosity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voivenel, L.; Danaila, L.; Varea, E.; Renou, B.; Cazalens, M.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent mixing is ubiquitous in both nature and industrial applications. Most of them concern different fluids, therefore with variable physical properties (density and/or viscosity). The focus here is on variable viscosity flows and mixing, involving density-matched fluids. The issue is whether or not these flows may be self-similar, or self-preserving. The importance of this question stands on the predictability of these flows; self-similar dynamical systems are easier tractable from an analytical viewpoint. More specifically, self-similar analysis is applied to the scale-by-scale energy transport equations, which represent the transport of energy at each scale and each point of the flow. Scale-by-scale energy budget equations are developed for inhomogeneous and anisotropic flows, in which the viscosity varies as a result of heterogeneous mixture or temperature variations. Additional terms are highlighted, accounting for the viscosity gradients, or fluctuations. These terms are present at both small and large scales, thus rectifying the common belief that viscosity is a small-scale quantity. Scale-by-scale energy budget equations are then adapted for the particular case of a round jet evolving in a more viscous host fluid. It is further shown that the condition of self-preservation is not necessarily satisfied in variable-viscosity jets. Indeed, the jet momentum conservation, as well as the constancy of the Reynolds number in the central region of the jet, cannot be satisfied simultaneously. This points to the necessity of considering less stringent conditions (with respect to classical, single-fluid jets) when analytically tackling these flows and reinforces the idea that viscosity variations must be accounted for when modelling these flows.

  16. Off-design computer code for calculating the aerodynamic performance of axial-flow fans and compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, James F.

    1995-01-01

    An off-design axial-flow compressor code is presented and is available from COSMIC for predicting the aerodynamic performance maps of fans and compressors. Steady axisymmetric flow is assumed and the aerodynamic solution reduces to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. A streamline curvature method is used for calculating this flow-field outside the blade rows. This code allows for bleed flows and the first five stators can be reset for each rotational speed, capabilities which are necessary for large multistage compressors. The accuracy of the off-design performance predictions depend upon the validity of the flow loss and deviation correlation models. These empirical correlations for the flow loss and deviation are used to model the real flow effects and the off-design code will compute through small reverse flow regions. The input to this off-design code is fully described and a user's example case for a two-stage fan is included with complete input and output data sets. Also, a comparison of the off-design code predictions with experimental data is included which generally shows good agreement.

  17. Nonstationary flow about a wing-aileron-tab combination including aerodynamic balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodorsen, Theodore; Garrick, I E

    1942-01-01

    This paper presents a continuation of the work published in Technical Report no. 496. The results of that paper have been extended to include the effect of aerodynamic balance and the effect of a tab added to the aileron. The aerodynamic coefficients are presented in a form convenient for application to the flutter problem.

  18. Advanced Small Perturbation Potential Flow Theory for Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced small perturbation (ASP) potential flow theory has been developed to improve upon the classical transonic small perturbation (TSP) theories that have been used in various computer codes. These computer codes are typically used for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses in the nonlinear transonic flight regime. The codes exploit the simplicity of stationary Cartesian meshes with the movement or deformation of the configuration under consideration incorporated into the solution algorithm through a planar surface boundary condition. The new ASP theory was developed methodically by first determining the essential elements required to produce full-potential-like solutions with a small perturbation approach on the requisite Cartesian grid. This level of accuracy required a higher-order streamwise mass flux and a mass conserving surface boundary condition. The ASP theory was further developed by determining the essential elements required to produce results that agreed well with Euler solutions. This level of accuracy required mass conserving entropy and vorticity effects, and second-order terms in the trailing wake boundary condition. Finally, an integral boundary layer procedure, applicable to both attached and shock-induced separated flows, was incorporated for viscous effects. The resulting ASP potential flow theory, including entropy, vorticity, and viscous effects, is shown to be mathematically more appropriate and computationally more accurate than the classical TSP theories. The formulaic details of the ASP theory are described fully and the improvements are demonstrated through careful comparisons with accepted alternative results and experimental data. The new theory has been used as the basis for a new computer code called ASP3D (Advanced Small Perturbation - 3D), which also is briefly described with representative results.

  19. Wind tunnel experiments on flow separation control of an Unmanned Air Vehicle by nanosecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Chen; Hua, Liang

    2016-02-01

    Plasma flow control (PFC) is a new kind of active flow control technology, which can improve the aerodynamic performances of aircrafts remarkably. The flow separation control of an unmanned air vehicle (UAV) by nanosecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation (NDPAA) is investigated experimentally in this paper. Experimental results show that the applied voltages for both the nanosecond discharge and the millisecond discharge are nearly the same, but the current for nanosecond discharge (30 A) is much bigger than that for millisecond discharge (0.1 A). The flow field induced by the NDPAA is similar to a shock wave upward, and has a maximal velocity of less than 0.5 m/s. Fast heating effect for nanosecond discharge induces shock waves in the quiescent air. The lasting time of the shock waves is about 80 μs and its spread velocity is nearly 380 m/s. By using the NDPAA, the flow separation on the suction side of the UAV can be totally suppressed and the critical stall angle of attack increases from 20° to 27° with a maximal lift coefficient increment of 11.24%. The flow separation can be suppressed when the discharge voltage is larger than the threshold value, and the optimum operation frequency for the NDPAA is the one which makes the Strouhal number equal one. The NDPAA is more effective than the millisecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation (MDPAA) in boundary layer flow control. The main mechanism for nanosecond discharge is shock effect. Shock effect is more effective in flow control than momentum effect in high speed flow control. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61503302, 51207169, and 51276197), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M562446), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2015JM1001).

  20. The aerodynamic performance of several flow control devices for internal flow systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, W. T.; Wettlaufer, B. M.; Mort, K. W.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental reseach and development program was undertaken to develop and document new flow-control devices for use in the major modifications to the 40 by 80 Foot wind tunnel at Ames Research Center. These devices, which are applicable to other facilities as well, included grid-type and quasi-two-dimensional flow straighteners, louver panels for valving, and turning-vane cascades with net turning angles from 0 deg to 90 deg. The tests were conducted at model scale over a Reynolds number range from 2 x 100,000 to 17 x 100,000, based on chord. The results showed quantitatively the performance benefits of faired, low-blockage, smooth-surface straightener systems, and the advantages of curved turning-vanes with hinge-line gaps sealed and a preferred chord-to-gap ratio between 2.5 and 3.0 for 45 deg or 90 deg turns.

  1. Combined Numerical/Analytical Perturbation Solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations for Aerodynamic (Ejector Nozzle) Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeChant, Lawrence J.

    1997-01-01

    In spite of the rapid advances in both scalar and parallel computational tools, the large number and breadth of variables involved in aerodynamic systems make the use of parabolized or even boundary layer fluid flow models impractical for both preliminary design and inverse design problems. Given this restriction, we have concluded that reduced or approximate models are an important family of tools for design purposes. This study of a combined perturbation/numerical modeling methodology with an application to ejector-mixer nozzles (shown schematically in the following figure) is nearing completion. The work is being funded by a grant from the NASA Lewis Research Center to Texas A&M University. These ejector-mixer nozzle models are designed to be of use to the High Speed Civil Transport Program and may be adopted by both NASA and industry. A computer code incorporating the ejector-mixer models is under development. This code, the Differential Reduced Ejector/Mixer Analysis (DREA), can be run fast enough to be used as a subroutine or to be called by a design optimization routine. Simplified conservation equations--x-momentum, energy, and mass conservation--are used to define the model. Unlike other preliminary design models, DREA requires minimal empirical input and includes vortical mixing and a fully compressible formulation among other features. DREA is being validated by comparing it with results obtained from open literature and proprietary industry data. Preliminary results for a subsonic ejector and a supersonic ejector are shown. In addition, dedicated experiments have been performed at Texas A&M. These experiments use a hydraulic/gas flow analog to provide information about the inviscid mixing interface structure. Final validation and documentation of this work is expected by May of 1997. However, preliminary versions of DREA can be expected in early 1997. In summary, DREA provides a sufficiently detailed and realistic ejector-mixer nozzle model at a

  2. Variable Frequency Diverter Actuation for Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.

    2006-01-01

    The design and development of an actively controlled fluidic actuator for flow control applications is explored. The basic device, with one input and two output channels, takes advantage of the Coanda effect to force a fluid jet to adhere to one of two axi-symmetric surfaces. The resultant flow is bi-stable, producing a constant flow from one output channel, until a disturbance force applied at the control point causes the flow to switch to the alternate output channel. By properly applying active control the output flows can be manipulated to provide a high degree of modulation over a wide and variable range of frequency and duty cycle. In this study the momentary operative force is applied by small, high speed isolation valves of which several different types are examined. The active fluidic diverter actuator is shown to work in several configurations including that in which the operator valves are referenced to atmosphere as well as to a source common with the power stream.

  3. Local and overall aerodynamic coefficients for bodies in hypersonic, rarefied flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith; Peterson, Steven W.

    1991-01-01

    A computational method is given for the prediction of local pressure and viscous shear stress on windward surfaces of bluff, convex, axisymmetric or quasi-axisymmetric, hypersonic bodies in the transitional, rarefied flow regime. Overall aerodynamic forces and moments are computed by integration of the local quantities. The method is based upon a correlation of local pressure and shear stress computed by the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) numerical technique for cold wall, real gas conditions and some supplemental data from low-density, hypersonic wind tunnels. The relative simplicity of the method makes it feasible to do the necessary calculations with a personal computer. Two-dimensional shapes and leeward surfaces are not included in the scope of the method as it is presented here. Results are compared with DSMC computations for both local and overall coefficients. The latter includes sphere and blunt cone drag as well as lift and pitching moment coefficients for the NASA AFE vehicle at various angles of attack. Very satisfactory agreement is shown.

  4. Sunspots and the physics of magnetic flux tubes. IV - Aerodynamic lift on a thin cylinder in convective flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsinganos, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic lift exerted on a long circular cylinder immersed in a convective flow pattern in an ideal fluid is calculated to establish the equilibrium position of the cylinder. The calculations establish the surprising result that the cylinder is pushed out the upwellings and the downdrafts of the convective cell, into a location midway between them. The implications for the intense magnetic flux tubes in the convection beneath the surface of the sun are considered.

  5. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Tabulated aerodynamic data book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Tabulated aerodynamic data from coannular nozzle performance tests are given for test runs 26 through 37. The data include nozzle thrust coefficient parameters, nozzle discharge coefficients, and static pressure tap measurements.

  6. Parallel CFD Algorithms for Aerodynamical Flow Solvers on Unstructured Meshes. Parts 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD) has requested my participation in the lecture series entitled Parallel Computing in Computational Fluid Dynamics to be held at the von Karman Institute in Brussels, Belgium on May 15-19, 1995. In addition, a request has been made from the US Coordinator for AGARD at the Pentagon for NASA Ames to hold a repetition of the lecture series on October 16-20, 1995. I have been asked to be a local coordinator for the Ames event. All AGARD lecture series events have attendance limited to NATO allied countries. A brief of the lecture series is provided in the attached enclosure. Specifically, I have been asked to give two lectures of approximately 75 minutes each on the subject of parallel solution techniques for the fluid flow equations on unstructured meshes. The title of my lectures is "Parallel CFD Algorithms for Aerodynamical Flow Solvers on Unstructured Meshes" (Parts I-II). The contents of these lectures will be largely review in nature and will draw upon previously published work in this area. Topics of my lectures will include: (1) Mesh partitioning algorithms. Recursive techniques based on coordinate bisection, Cuthill-McKee level structures, and spectral bisection. (2) Newton's method for large scale CFD problems. Size and complexity estimates for Newton's method, modifications for insuring global convergence. (3) Techniques for constructing the Jacobian matrix. Analytic and numerical techniques for Jacobian matrix-vector products, constructing the transposed matrix, extensions to optimization and homotopy theories. (4) Iterative solution algorithms. Practical experience with GIVIRES and BICG-STAB matrix solvers. (5) Parallel matrix preconditioning. Incomplete Lower-Upper (ILU) factorization, domain-decomposed ILU, approximate Schur complement strategies.

  7. Aerodynamic design applying automatic differentiation and using robust variable fidelity optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemiya, Tetsushi

    , and that (2) the AMF terminates optimization erroneously when the optimization problems have constraints. The first problem is due to inaccuracy in computing derivatives in the AMF, and the second problem is due to erroneous treatment of the trust region ratio, which sets the size of the domain for an optimization in the AMF. In order to solve the first problem of the AMF, automatic differentiation (AD) technique, which reads the codes of analysis models and automatically generates new derivative codes based on some mathematical rules, is applied. If derivatives are computed with the generated derivative code, they are analytical, and the required computational time is independent of the number of design variables, which is very advantageous for realistic aerospace engineering problems. However, if analysis models implement iterative computations such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD), which solves system partial differential equations iteratively, computing derivatives through the AD requires a massive memory size. The author solved this deficiency by modifying the AD approach and developing a more efficient implementation with CFD, and successfully applied the AD to general CFD software. In order to solve the second problem of the AMF, the governing equation of the trust region ratio, which is very strict against the violation of constraints, is modified so that it can accept the violation of constraints within some tolerance. By accepting violations of constraints during the optimization process, the AMF can continue optimization without terminating immaturely and eventually find the true optimum design point. With these modifications, the AMF is referred to as "Robust AMF," and it is applied to airfoil and wing aerodynamic design problems using Euler CFD software. The former problem has 21 design variables, and the latter 64. In both problems, derivatives computed with the proposed AD method are first compared with those computed with the finite

  8. Flow aerodynamics modeling of an MHD swirl combustor - Calculations and experimental verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A. K.; Beer, J. M.; Louis, J. F.; Busnaina, A. A.; Lilley, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    The paper describes a computer code for calculating the flow dynamics of a constant-density flow in the second-stage trumpet shaped nozzle section of a two-stage MHD swirl combustor for application to a disk generator. The primitive pressure-velocity variable, finite-difference computer code has been developed for the computation of inert nonreacting turbulent swirling flows in an axisymmetric MHD model swirl combustor. The method and program involve a staggered grid system for axial and radial velocities, and a line relaxation technique for the efficient solution of the equations. The code produces as output the flow field map of the nondimensional stream function, axial and swirl velocity. It was found that the best location for seed injection to obtain a uniform distribution at the combustor exit is in the central location for seed injected at the entrance to the second stage combustor.

  9. The aerodynamic effects of wheelspace coolant injection into the mainstream flow of a high pressure gas turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Christopher Elliot

    Modern gas turbine engines operate with mainstream gas temperatures exceeding 1450°C in the high-pressure turbine stage. Unlike turbine blades, rotor disks and other internal components are not designed to withstand the extreme temperatures found in mainstream flow. In modern gas turbines, cooling air is pumped into the wheelspace cavities to prevent mainstream gas ingestion and then exits through a seal between the rotor and the nozzle guide vane (NGV) thereby mixing with the mainstream flow. The primary purpose for the wheelspace cooling air is the cooling of the turbine wheelspace. However, secondary effects arise from the mixing of the spent cooling air with the mainstream flow. The exiting cooling air is mixed with the hot mainstream flow effecting the aerodynamic and performance characteristics of the turbine stage. The physics underlying this mixing process and its effects on stage performance are not yet fully understood. The relative aerodynamic and performance effects associated with rotor - NGV gap coolant injections were investigated in the Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) of the Center for Gas Turbines and Power of The Pennsylvania State University. This study quantifies the secondary effects of the coolant injection on the aerodynamic and performance character of the turbines main stream flow for root injection, radial cooling, and impingement cooling. Measurement and analysis of the cooling effects were performed in both stationary and rotational frames of reference. The AFTRF is unique in its ability to perform long duration cooling measurements in the stationary and rotating frames. The effects of wheelspace coolant mixing with the mainstream flow on total-to-total efficiency, energy transport, three dimensional velocity field, and loading coefficient were investigated. Overall, it was found that a small quantity (1%) of cooling air can have significant effects on the performance character and exit conditions of the high pressure stage

  10. Aerodynamic forces and flow structures of the leading edge vortex on a flapping wing considering ground effect.

    PubMed

    Van Truong, Tien; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Min Jun; Yoon, Kwang Joon; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide an insight into the aerodynamic performance of the beetle during takeoff, which has been estimated in previous investigations. We employed a scaled-up electromechanical model flapping wing to measure the aerodynamic forces and the three-dimensional flow structures on the flapping wing. The ground effect on the unsteady forces and flow structures were also characterized. The dynamically scaled wing model could replicate the general stroke pattern of the beetle's hind wing kinematics during takeoff flight. Two wing kinematic models have been studied to examine the influences of wing kinematics on unsteady aerodynamic forces. In the first model, the angle of attack is asymmetric and varies during the translational motion, which is the flapping motion of the beetle's hind wing. In the second model, the angle of attack is constant during the translational motion. The instantaneous aerodynamic forces were measured for four strokes during the beetle's takeoff by the force sensor attached at the wing base. Flow visualization provided a general picture of the evolution of the three-dimensional leading edge vortex (LEV) on the beetle hind wing model. The LEV is stable during each stroke, and increases radically from the root to the tip, forming a leading-edge spiral vortex. The force measurement results show that the vertical force generated by the hind wing is large enough to lift the beetle. For the beetle hind wing kinematics, the total vertical force production increases 18.4% and 8.6% for the first and second strokes, respectively, due to the ground effect. However, for the model with a constant angle of attack during translation, the vertical force is reduced during the first stroke. During the third and fourth strokes, the ground effect is negligible for both wing kinematic patterns. This finding suggests that the beetle's flapping mechanism induces a ground effect that can efficiently lift its body from the ground during takeoff

  11. Aerodynamic forces and flow structures of the leading edge vortex on a flapping wing considering ground effect.

    PubMed

    Van Truong, Tien; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Min Jun; Yoon, Kwang Joon; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide an insight into the aerodynamic performance of the beetle during takeoff, which has been estimated in previous investigations. We employed a scaled-up electromechanical model flapping wing to measure the aerodynamic forces and the three-dimensional flow structures on the flapping wing. The ground effect on the unsteady forces and flow structures were also characterized. The dynamically scaled wing model could replicate the general stroke pattern of the beetle's hind wing kinematics during takeoff flight. Two wing kinematic models have been studied to examine the influences of wing kinematics on unsteady aerodynamic forces. In the first model, the angle of attack is asymmetric and varies during the translational motion, which is the flapping motion of the beetle's hind wing. In the second model, the angle of attack is constant during the translational motion. The instantaneous aerodynamic forces were measured for four strokes during the beetle's takeoff by the force sensor attached at the wing base. Flow visualization provided a general picture of the evolution of the three-dimensional leading edge vortex (LEV) on the beetle hind wing model. The LEV is stable during each stroke, and increases radically from the root to the tip, forming a leading-edge spiral vortex. The force measurement results show that the vertical force generated by the hind wing is large enough to lift the beetle. For the beetle hind wing kinematics, the total vertical force production increases 18.4% and 8.6% for the first and second strokes, respectively, due to the ground effect. However, for the model with a constant angle of attack during translation, the vertical force is reduced during the first stroke. During the third and fourth strokes, the ground effect is negligible for both wing kinematic patterns. This finding suggests that the beetle's flapping mechanism induces a ground effect that can efficiently lift its body from the ground during takeoff.

  12. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2010-03-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re approximately 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small

  13. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re ≈ 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small robotic

  14. Dose emission and aerodynamic characterization of the terbutaline sulphate dose emitted from a Turbuhaler at low inhalation flow.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahim, M E; Assi, K H; Chrystyn, H

    2013-01-01

    Previously, dose emission below 30 L min(-1) through DPI has not been routinely determined. However, during routine use some patients do not achieve 30 L min(-1) inhalation flows. Hence, the aim of the present study was to determine dose emission characteristics for low inhalation flows from terbutaline sulphate Turbuhaler. Total emitted dose (TED), fine particle dose (FPD) and mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of terbutaline sulphate Turbuhaler were determined using inhalation flows of 10-60 L min(-1) and inhaled volume of 4 L. TED and FPD increase significantly with the increase of inhalation flows (p <0.05). Flows had more pronounced effect on FPD than TED, thus, faster inhalation increases respirable amount more than it increases emitted dose. MMAD increases with decrease of inhalation flow until flow of 20L min(-1) then it decreases. In vitro flow dependent dose emission has been demonstrated previously for Turbuhaler for flow rates above 30 L min(-1) but is more pronounced below this flow. Minimal FPD below 30 L min(-1) suggests that during routine use at this flow rate most of emitted dose will impact in mouth. Flow dependent dose emission results suggest that Pharmacopoeias should consider the use variety of inhalation flows rather than one that is equivalent to pressure drop of 4 KPa. PMID:21981637

  15. The effect of prewhirl on the internal aerodynamics and performance of a mixed flow research centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, William B.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1987-01-01

    The internal three-dimensional steady and time-varying flow through the diffusing elements of a centrifugal impeller were investigated using a moderate scale, subsonic, mixed flow research compressor facility. The characteristics of the test facility which permit the measurement of internal flow conditions throughout the entire research compressor and radial diffuser for various operating conditions are described. Results are presented in the form of graphs and charts to cover a range of mass flow rates with inlet guide vane settings varying from minus 15 degrees to plus 45 degrees. The static pressure distributions in the compressor inlet section and on the impeller and exit diffuser vanes, as well as the overall pressure and temperature rise and mass flow rate, were measured and analyzed at each operating point to determine the overall performance as well as the detailed aerodynamics throughout the compressor.

  16. Transonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of Two Wedge Airfoil Sections Including Unsteady Flow Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick J.

    1959-01-01

    A two-dimensional wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted on a 20-percent-thick single-wedge airfoil section. Steady-state forces and moments were determined from pressure measurements at Mach numbers from 0.70 to about 1.25. Additional information on the flows about the single wedge is provided by means of instantaneous pressure measurements at Mach numbers up to unity. Pressure distributions were also obtained on a symmetrical double-wedge or diamond-shaped profile which had the same leading-edge included angle as the single-wedge airfoil. A comparison of the data on the two profiles to provide information on the effects of the afterbody showed that with the exception of drag, the single-wedge profile proved to be aerodynamically superior to the diamond profile in all respects. The lift effectiveness of the single-wedge airfoil section far exceeded that of conventional thin airfoil sections over the speed range of the investigation. Pitching-moment irregularities, caused by negative loadings near the trailing edge, generally associated with conventional airfoils of equivalent thicknesses were not exhibited by the single-wedge profile. Moderately high pulsating pressures existing over the base of the single-wedge airfoil section were significantly reduced as the Mach number was increased beyond 0.92 and the boundaries of the dead airspace at the base of the model converged to eliminate the vortex street in the wake. Increasing the leading-edge radius from 0 to 1 percent of the chord had a minor effect on the steady-state forces and generally raised the level of pressure pulsations over the forward part of the single-wedge profile.

  17. Preserving Flow Variability in Watershed Model Calibrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods Although watershed modeling flow calibration techniques often emphasize a specific flow mode, ecological conditions that depend on flow-ecology relationships often emphasize a range of flow conditions. We used informal likelihood methods to investig...

  18. Investigation of aerodynamic characteristics of a hypersonic flow around bodies of revolution with a permeable tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidnyaev, N. I.

    2007-03-01

    Results of experimental investigations of aerodynamic characteristics of models of high-velocity flying vehicles consisting of a combination of a blunt cone, a cylinder, and a conical tail fin are presented. The model forebody is cooled by porous blowing. The choice of such a configuration is determined by the necessity of optimizing the arrangement of high-velocity flying vehicles on the launcher and their aerodynamic characteristics under conditions of intense surface mass transfer (decrease in drag and heat transfer and increase in static and dynamic stability).

  19. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. [Lewis 8 by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of a coannular exhaust nozzle for a proposed variable stream control supersonic propulsion system. Tests were conducted with two simulated configurations differing primarily in the fan duct flowpaths: a short flap mechanism for fan stream control with an isentropic contoured flow splitter, and an iris fan nozzle with a conical flow splitter. Both designs feature a translating primary plug and an auxiliary inlet ejector. Tests were conducted at takeoff and simulated cruise conditions. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. At simulated supersonic cruise, both configurations demonstrated good performance, comparable to levels assumed in earlier advanced supersonic propulsion studies. However, at subsonic cruise, both configurations exhibited performance that was 6 to 7.5 percent less than the study assumptions. At take off conditions, the iris configuration performance approached the assumed levels, while the short flap design was 4 to 6 percent less.

  20. NASP aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the critical aerodynamic technologies needed to support the development of a class of aircraft represented by the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The air-breathing, single-stage-to-orbit mission presents a severe challenge to all of the aeronautical disciplines and demands an extension of the state-of-the-art in each technology area. While the largest risk areas are probably advanced materials and the development of the scramjet engine, there remains a host of design issues and technology problems in aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and propulsion integration. The paper presents an overview of the most significant propulsion integration problems, and defines the most critical fluid flow phenomena that must be evaluated, defined, and predicted for the class of aircraft represented by the Aero-Space Plane.

  1. Numerical Investigation of Aerodynamics of Canard-Controlled Missile Using Planar and Grid Tail Fins. Part 1. Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSpirito, James; Vaughn, Milton E., Jr.; Washington, W. D.

    2002-09-01

    Viscous computational fluid dynamic simulations were used to predict the aerodynamic coefficients and flowfield around a generic canard-controlled missile configuration in supersonic flow. Computations were performed for Mach 1.5 and 3.0, at six angles of attack between 0 and 10, with 0 and 10 canard deflection, and with planar and grid tail fins, for a total of 48 cases. Validation of the computed results was demonstrated by the very good agreement between the computed aerodynamic coefficients and those obtained from wind tunnel measurements. Visualizations of the flowfield showed that the canard trailing vortices and downwash produced a low-pressure region on the starboard side of the missile that in turn produced an adverse side force. The pressure differential on the leeward fin produced by the interaction with the canard trailing vortices is primarily responsible for the adverse roll effect observed when planar fins are used. Grid tail fins improved the roll effectiveness of the canards at low supersonic speed. No adverse rolling moment was observed with no canard deflection, or at the higher supersonic speed for either tail fin type due to the lower intensity of the canard trailing vortices in these cases. Flow visualizations from the simulations performed in this study help in the understanding of the flow physics and can lead to improved canard and tail fin designs for missiles and rockets.

  2. Radiation mechanism for the aerodynamic sound of gears - An explanation for the radiation process by air flow observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houjoh, Haruo

    1992-12-01

    One specific feature of the aerodynamic sound produced at the face end region is that the radiation becomes equally weak by filling root spaces as by shortening the center distance. However, one can easily expect that such actions make the air flow faster, and consequently make the sound louder. This paper attempts to reveal the reason for such a feature. First, air flow induced by the pumping action of the gear pair was analyzed regarding a series of root spaces as volume varying cavities which have channels to adjacent cavities as well as the exit/inlet at the face ends. The numerical analysis was verified by the hot wire anemometer measurement. Next, from the obtained flow response, the sound source was estimated to be a combination of symmetrically distributed simple sources. Taking the effect of either the center distance or root filling into consideration, it is shown that the simplified model can explain such a feature rationally.

  3. A laser-sheet flow visualization technique for the large wind tunnels of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinath, M. S.; Ross, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    A flow visualization technique for the large wind tunnels of the National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) is described. The technique uses a laser sheet generated by the NFAC Long Range Laser Velocimeter (LRLV) to illuminate a smoke-like tracer in the flow. The LRLV optical system is modified slightly, and a scanned mirror is added to generate the sheet. These modifications are described, in addition to the results of an initial performance test conducted in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. During this test, flow visualization was performed in the wake region behind a truck as part of a vehicle drag reduction study. The problems encountered during the test are discussed, in addition to the recommended improvements needed to enhance the performance of the technique for future applications.

  4. A laser-sheet flow visualization technique for the large wind tunnels of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinath, M. S.; Ross, J. C.

    1990-09-01

    A flow visualization technique for the large wind tunnels of the National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) is described. The technique uses a laser sheet generated by the NFAC Long Range Laser Velocimeter (LRLV) to illuminate a smoke-like tracer in the flow. The LRLV optical system is modified slightly, and a scanned mirror is added to generate the sheet. These modifications are described, in addition to the results of an initial performance test conducted in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. During this test, flow visualization was performed in the wake region behind a truck as part of a vehicle drag reduction study. The problems encountered during the test are discussed, in addition to the recommended improvements needed to enhance the performance of the technique for future applications.

  5. Modeling of pulverized coal combustion processes in a vortex furnace of improved design. Part 1: Flow aerodynamics in a vortex furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasinsky, D. V.; Salomatov, V. V.; Anufriev, I. S.; Sharypov, O. V.; Shadrin, E. Yu.; Anikin, Yu. A.

    2015-02-01

    Some results of the complex experimental and numerical study of aerodynamics and transfer processes in a vortex furnace, whose design was improved via the distributed tangential injection of fuel-air flows through the upper and lower burners, were presented. The experimental study of the aerodynamic characteristics of a spatial turbulent flow was performed on the isothermal laboratory model (at a scale of 1 : 20) of an improved vortex furnace using a laser Doppler measurement system. The comparison of experimental data with the results of the numerical modeling of an isothermal flow for the same laboratory furnace model demonstrated their agreement to be acceptable for engineering practice.

  6. Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Jungil; Park, Hyungmin

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the aerodynamics of heavy vehicles, such as tractor-trailers, high-speed trains, and buses. We introduce three-dimensional flow structures around simplified model vehicles and heavy vehicles and discuss the flow-control devices used for drag reduction. Finally, we suggest important unsteady flow structures to investigate for the enhancement of aerodynamic performance and future directions for experimental and numerical approaches.

  7. Shrouded probe performance: Variable flow operation and effect of free stream turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; McFarland, A.R.

    1997-02-01

    Performance of a shrouded aerosol sampling probe, operated in accordance with the variable flow protocol of EPA Methods 5 and 17, was compared with its performance in a fixed flow rate mode. The effect of free stream turbulence intensity on the transmission ratio of the shrouded probe was also evaluated. This study shows that the sampling flow rate through a shrouded probe can be varied in proportion to the stack velocity, and representative samples can be obtained. This variable sampling flow rate protocol is appropriate to nonnuclear stacks and to nuclear stacks that have the potential to emit significant quantities of radioactive aerosol particles. A shrouded probe, designed for nominal conditions of 57 L/min at a stack velocity of 12 m/s was tested in a wind tunnel over a range of free stream velocities of 6-24 m/s. When the flow rate through the shrouded probe was varied proportionally with the free stream velocity, the transmission ratio (ratio of aerosol concentration at the probe exit plane to the aerosol concentration in the free stream of the stack or duct) of 10-{mu}m aerodynamic diameter (AD) particles varied between 0.97 and 1.04. In comparison, sampling at a fixed flow rate over the same range of free stream velocities resulted in transmission ratios of 0.88-1.32. 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Progress on a Taylor weak statement finite element algorithm for high-speed aerodynamic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Freels, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    A new finite element numerical Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) algorithm has matured to the point of efficiently solving two-dimensional high speed real-gas compressible flow problems in generalized coordinates on modern vector computer systems. The algorithm employs a Taylor Weak Statement classical Galerkin formulation, a variably implicit Newton iteration, and a tensor matrix product factorization of the linear algebra Jacobian under a generalized coordinate transformation. Allowing for a general two-dimensional conservation law system, the algorithm has been exercised on the Euler and laminar forms of the Navier-Stokes equations. Real-gas fluid properties are admitted, and numerical results verify solution accuracy, efficiency, and stability over a range of test problem parameters.

  9. Effect of coolant flow ejection on aerodynamic performance of low-aspect-ratio vanes. 2: Performance with coolant flow ejection at temperature ratios up to 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, J. E.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a 0.5 aspect ratio turbine vane configuration with coolant flow ejection was experimentally determined in a full annular cascade. The vanes were tested at a nominal mean section ideal critical velocity ratio of 0.890 over a range of primary to coolant total temperature ratio from 1.0 to 2.08 and a range of coolant to primary total pressure ratio from 1.0 to 1.4 which corresponded to coolant flows from 3.0 to 10.7 percent of the primary flow. The variations in primary and thermodynamic efficiency and exit flow conditions with circumferential and radial position were obtained.

  10. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a variable-pitch 1.83-meter-(6-ft) diameter 1.20-pressure-ratio fan stage (QF-9)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, F. W.; Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Far field noise data and related aerodynamic performance are presented for a variable pitch fan stage having characteristics suitable for low noise, STOL engine application. However, no acoustic suppression material was used in the flow passages. The fan was externally driven by an electric motor. Tests were made at several forward thrust rotor blade pitch angles and one for reverse thrust. Fan speed was varied from 60 to 120 percent of takeoff (design) speed, and exhaust nozzles having areas 92 to 105 percent of design were tested. The fan noise level was at a minimum at the design rotor blade pitch angles of 64 deg for takeoff thrust and at 57 deg for approach (50 percent takeoff thrust). Perceived noise along a 152.4-m sideline reached 100.1 PNdb for the takeoff (design) configuration for a stage pressure ratio of 1.17 and thrust of 57,600 N. For reverse thrust the PNL values were 4 to 5 PNdb above the takeoff values at comparable fan speeds.

  11. Reduction of aerodynamic sound generated in a flow past an oscillating and a fixed cylinder in tandem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    The aerodynamic sound generated in a two-dimensional flow past an oscillating and a fixed circular cylinder in tandem is studied. This flow can be regarded as a simplified model of the sound generation due to the interaction of rotating wings and a strut. The sound pressure is captured by direct numerical simulation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations using the volume penalization method modified by the author. It is shown that synchronization plays a crucial role in sound reduction. When the frequency of the oscillating cylinder is smaller than that of vortex shedding of the fixed cylinder, the sound is significantly reduced due to synchronization as the frequency of vortex shedding is decreased. Sound reduction also depends on the distance between the cylinders. There are distances at which the forces exerted on the cylinders are in anti-phase so that the total force and thereby the resulting sound are significantly reduced.

  12. Low-speed wind-tunnel investigation of the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a translating grid choked flow inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, J. M.; Miller, B. A.; Golladay, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a translating grid choked-flow inlet was determined in a low-speed wind tunnel at free-stream velocities of 24, 32, and 45 m/sec and incidence angles of 0, 10, 20, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50 deg. The inlet was sized to fit a 13.97- centimeter-diameter fan with a design weight flow of 2.49 kg/sec. Measurements were made to determine inlet total pressure recovery, flow distortion, and sound pressure level for both choked and unchoked geometries over a range of inlet weight flows. For the unchoked geometry, inlet total pressure recovery ranged from 0.983 to 0.989 at incidence angles less than 40 deg. At 40 deg incidence angle, inlet cowl separation was encountered which resulted in lower values of pressure recovery and higher levels of fan broadband noise. For the choked geometry, increasing total pressure losses occurred with increasing inlet weight flow that prevented the inlet from reaching full choked conditions with the particular fan used. These losses were attributed to the high Mach number drag rise characteristics of airfoil grid. At maximum attainable inlet weight flow, the total pressure recovery at static conditions was 0.935. The fan blade passing frequency and other fan generated pure tones were eliminated from the noise spectrum, but the broadband level was increased.

  13. Aerodynamic Effects of High Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade With Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of high inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. These results are compared to previous measurements made in a low turbulence environment. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The current study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Assessing the effects of turbulence at these large incidence and Reynolds number variations complements the existing database. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for 10 incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12×10(exp 5) to 2.12×10(exp 6) and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 8 to 15 percent for the current study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitch/yaw probe located in a survey plane 7 percent axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At

  14. Aerodynamic Effects of High Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade with Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of high inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. These results are compared to previous measurements made in a low turbulence environment. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The current study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Assessing the effects of turbulence at these large incidence and Reynolds number variations complements the existing database. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for 10 incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12×10(exp 5) to 2.12×10(exp 6) and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 8 to 15 percent for the current study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitch/yaw probe located in a survey plane 7 percent axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At

  15. Aerodynamic Effects of Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade with Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie Brynn; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The high turbulence study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for ten incidence angles ranging from +15.8 to 51.0. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12105 to 2.12106 and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 0.25 - 0.4 for the low Tu tests and 8- 15 for the high Tu study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitchyaw probe located in a survey plane 7 axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At the extreme positive and negative incidence angles, the data show substantial differences in the exit flow field. These differences are attributable to both the higher inlet Tu directly and to the thinner inlet endwall

  16. A comparative numerical analysis of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic sound generation by vortex disturbances in homentropic constant shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, Jan-Niklas Oberlack, Martin; Chagelishvili, George; Khujadze, George; Tevzadze, Alexander

    2015-12-15

    Aerodynamic sound generation in shear flows is investigated in the light of the breakthrough in hydrodynamics stability theory in the 1990s, where generic phenomena of non-normal shear flow systems were understood. By applying the thereby emerged short-time/non-modal approach, the sole linear mechanism of wave generation by vortices in shear flows was captured [G. D. Chagelishvili, A. Tevzadze, G. Bodo, and S. S. Moiseev, “Linear mechanism of wave emergence from vortices in smooth shear flows,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3178-3181 (1997); B. F. Farrell and P. J. Ioannou, “Transient and asymptotic growth of two-dimensional perturbations in viscous compressible shear flow,” Phys. Fluids 12, 3021-3028 (2000); N. A. Bakas, “Mechanism underlying transient growth of planar perturbations in unbounded compressible shear flow,” J. Fluid Mech. 639, 479-507 (2009); and G. Favraud and V. Pagneux, “Superadiabatic evolution of acoustic and vorticity perturbations in Couette flow,” Phys. Rev. E 89, 033012 (2014)]. Its source is the non-normality induced linear mode-coupling, which becomes efficient at moderate Mach numbers that is defined for each perturbation harmonic as the ratio of the shear rate to its characteristic frequency. Based on the results by the non-modal approach, we investigate a two-dimensional homentropic constant shear flow and focus on the dynamical characteristics in the wavenumber plane. This allows to separate from each other the participants of the dynamical processes — vortex and wave modes — and to estimate the efficacy of the process of linear wave-generation. This process is analyzed and visualized on the example of a packet of vortex modes, localized in both, spectral and physical, planes. Further, by employing direct numerical simulations, the wave generation by chaotically distributed vortex modes is analyzed and the involved linear and nonlinear processes are identified. The generated acoustic field is anisotropic in the wavenumber

  17. A comparative numerical analysis of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic sound generation by vortex disturbances in homentropic constant shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hau, Jan-Niklas; Chagelishvili, George; Khujadze, George; Oberlack, Martin; Tevzadze, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Aerodynamic sound generation in shear flows is investigated in the light of the breakthrough in hydrodynamics stability theory in the 1990s, where generic phenomena of non-normal shear flow systems were understood. By applying the thereby emerged short-time/non-modal approach, the sole linear mechanism of wave generation by vortices in shear flows was captured [G. D. Chagelishvili, A. Tevzadze, G. Bodo, and S. S. Moiseev, "Linear mechanism of wave emergence from vortices in smooth shear flows," Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3178-3181 (1997); B. F. Farrell and P. J. Ioannou, "Transient and asymptotic growth of two-dimensional perturbations in viscous compressible shear flow," Phys. Fluids 12, 3021-3028 (2000); N. A. Bakas, "Mechanism underlying transient growth of planar perturbations in unbounded compressible shear flow," J. Fluid Mech. 639, 479-507 (2009); and G. Favraud and V. Pagneux, "Superadiabatic evolution of acoustic and vorticity perturbations in Couette flow," Phys. Rev. E 89, 033012 (2014)]. Its source is the non-normality induced linear mode-coupling, which becomes efficient at moderate Mach numbers that is defined for each perturbation harmonic as the ratio of the shear rate to its characteristic frequency. Based on the results by the non-modal approach, we investigate a two-dimensional homentropic constant shear flow and focus on the dynamical characteristics in the wavenumber plane. This allows to separate from each other the participants of the dynamical processes — vortex and wave modes — and to estimate the efficacy of the process of linear wave-generation. This process is analyzed and visualized on the example of a packet of vortex modes, localized in both, spectral and physical, planes. Further, by employing direct numerical simulations, the wave generation by chaotically distributed vortex modes is analyzed and the involved linear and nonlinear processes are identified. The generated acoustic field is anisotropic in the wavenumber plane, which

  18. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  19. Predicting aerodynamic characteristics of vortical flows on three-dimensional configurations using a surface-singularity panel method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskew, B.

    1983-01-01

    A general low-order surface-singularity panel method is used to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of a problem where a wing-tip vortex from one wing closely interacts with an aft mounted wing in a low Reynolds Number flow; i.e., 125,000. Nonlinear effects due to wake roll-up and the influence of the wings on the vortex path are included in the calculation by using a coupled iterative wake relaxation scheme. The interaction also affects the wing pressures and boundary layer characteristics: these effects are also considered using coupled integral boundary layer codes and preliminary calculations using free vortex sheet separation modelling are included. Calculated results are compared with water tunnel experimental data with generally remarkably good agreement.

  20. Unsteady aerodynamics of an oscillating cascade in a compressible flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, Daniel H.; Boldman, Donald R.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1987-01-01

    Fundamental experiments were performed in the NASA Lewis Transonic Oscillating Cascade Facility to investigate and quantify the unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade of biconvex airfoils executing torsion-mode oscillations at realistic reduced frequencies. Flush-mounted, high-response miniature pressure transducers were used to measure the unsteady airfoil surface pressures. The pressures were measured for three interblade phase angles at two inlet Mach numbers, 0.65 and 0.80, and two incidence angles, 0 and 7 deg. The time-variant pressures were analyzed by means of discrete Fourier transform techniques, and these unique data were then compared with predictions from a linearized unsteady cascade model. The experimental results indicate that the interblade phase angle had a major effect on the chordwise distributions of the airfoil surface unsteady pressure, and that reduced frequency, incidence angle, and Mach number had a somewhat less significant effect.

  1. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Suei; Lan, C. Edward

    1990-01-01

    Due to the requirement of increased performance and maneuverability, the flight envelope of a modern fighter is frequently extended to the high angle-of-attack regime. Vehicles maneuvering in this regime are subjected to nonlinear aerodynamic loads. The nonlinearities are due mainly to three-dimensional separated flow and concentrated vortex flow that occur at large angles of attack. Accurate prediction of these nonlinear airloads is of great importance in the analysis of a vehicle's flight motion and in the design of its flight control system. A satisfactory evaluation of the performance envelope of the aircraft may require a large number of coupled computations, one for each change in initial conditions. To avoid the disadvantage of solving the coupled flow-field equations and aircraft's motion equations, an alternate approach is to use a mathematical modeling to describe the steady and unsteady aerodynamics for the aircraft equations of motion. Aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a rapidly maneuvering aircraft are, in general, nonlinear functions of motion variables, their time rate of change, and the history of maneuvering. A numerical method was developed to analyze the nonlinear and time-dependent aerodynamic response to establish the generalized indicial function in terms of motion variables and their time rates of change.

  2. A simple automatic variable flow controller

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, I.; Carpenter, R.L.

    1982-07-01

    A simple system is reported on for flow control, using standard components, that operates in the 20 to 70 ACFM flow rate range (0.4 to 1.4 m/sup 3//min).The method is suitable for use in laboratory and field environments or for sampling exhaust gases from coal combustors. In source sampling tests, this system has successfully operated high volume filters at 26.9 ACFM (0.55 m/sup 3//min) and a high volume cascade impactor at 21 ACFM (0.43 m/sup 3//min). (JMT)

  3. Evaluation of the Lattice-Boltzmann Equation Solver PowerFLOW for Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Luo, Li-Shi; Singer, Bart A.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A careful comparison of the performance of a commercially available Lattice-Boltzmann Equation solver (Power-FLOW) was made with a conventional, block-structured computational fluid-dynamics code (CFL3D) for the flow over a two-dimensional NACA-0012 airfoil. The results suggest that the version of PowerFLOW used in the investigation produced solutions with large errors in the computed flow field; these errors are attributed to inadequate resolution of the boundary layer for reasons related to grid resolution and primitive turbulence modeling. The requirement of square grid cells in the PowerFLOW calculations limited the number of points that could be used to span the boundary layer on the wing and still keep the computation size small enough to fit on the available computers. Although not discussed in detail, disappointing results were also obtained with PowerFLOW for a cavity flow and for the flow around a generic helicopter configuration.

  4. General theory of conical flows and its application to supersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, Paul

    1955-01-01

    Points treated in this report are: homogeneous flows, the general study of conical flows with infinitesimal cone angles, the numerical or analogous methods for the study of flows flattened in one direction, and a certain number of results. A thorough consideration of the applications on conical flows and demonstration of how one may solve within the scope of linear theory, by combinations of conical flows, the general problems of the supersonic wing, taking into account dihedral and sweepback, and also fuselage and control surface effects.

  5. Computational wing design in support of an NLF variable sweep transition flight experiment. [Natural Laminar Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waggoner, E. G.; Campbell, R. L.; Phillips, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    A natural laminar flow outer panel wing glove has been designed for a variable sweep fighter aircraft using state-of-the-art computational techniques. Testing of the design will yield wing pressure and boundary-layer data under actual flight conditions and environment. These data will be used to enhance the understanding of the interaction between crossflow and Tollmien-Schlichting disturbances on boundary-layer transition. The outer wing panel was contoured such that a wide range of favorable pressure gradients could be obtained on the wing upper surface. Extensive computations were performed to support the design effort which relied on two- and three-dimensional transonic design and analysis techniques. A detailed description of the design procedure that evolved during this study is presented. Results on intermediate designs at various stages in the design process demonstrate how the various physical and aerodynamic constraints were integrated into the design. Final results of the glove design analyzed as part of the complete aircraft configuration with a full-potential wing/body analysis code indicate that the aerodynamic design objectives were met.

  6. Bumblebee program, aerodynamic data. Part 2: Flow fields at Mach number 2.0. [supersonic missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, G. A.; Cronvich, L. L.

    1979-01-01

    Available flow field data which can be used in validating theoretical procedures for computing flow fields around supersonic missiles are presented. Tabulated test data are given which define the flow field around a conical-nosed cylindrical body in a crossflow plane corresponding to a likely tail location. The data were obtained at a Mach number of 2.0 for an angle of attack of 0 to 23 degrees. The data define the flow field for cases both with and without a forward wing present.

  7. Aerodynamic database development of the ESA intermediate experimental vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzella, Giuseppe; Marino, Giuliano; Rufolo, Giuseppe C.

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the aerodynamic database development of the Intermediate Experiment Vehicle. The aerodynamic analysis, carried out for the whole flight scenario, relies on computational fluid dynamics, wind tunnel test, and engineering-based design data generated during the project phases, from rarefied flow conditions, to hypersonic continuum flow up to reach subsonic speeds regime. Therefore, the vehicle aerodynamic database covers the range of Mach number, angle of attack, sideslip and control surface deflections foreseen for the vehicle nominal re-entry. In particular, the databasing activities are developed in the light of build-up approach. This means that all aerodynamic force and moment coefficients are provided by means of a linear summation over certain number of incremental contributions such as, for example, effect of sideslip angle, aerodynamic control surface effectiveness, etc. Each force and moment coefficient is treated separately and appropriate equation is provided, in which all the pertinent contributions for obtaining the total coefficient for any selected flight conditions appear. To this aim, all the available numerical and experimental aerodynamic data are gathered in order to explicit the functional dependencies from each aerodynamic model addend through polynomial expressions obtained with the least squares method. These polynomials are function of the primary variable that drives the phenomenon whereas secondary dependencies are introduced directly into its unknown coefficients which are determined by means of best-fitting algorithms.

  8. The Current Status of Unsteady CFD Approaches for Aerodynamic Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Singer, Bart A.; Yamaleev, Nail; Vatsa, Veer N.; Viken, Sally A.; Atkins, Harold L.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the current status of time dependent algorithms is presented. Special attention is given to algorithms used to predict fluid actuator flows, as well as other active and passive flow control devices. Capabilities for the next decade are predicted, and principal impediments to the progress of time-dependent algorithms are identified.

  9. An unstructured mesh arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian unsteady incompressible flow solver and its application to insect flight aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiaohui; Cao, Yuanwei; Zhao, Yong

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an unstructured mesh Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) incompressible flow solver is developed to investigate the aerodynamics of insect hovering flight. The proposed finite-volume ALE Navier-Stokes solver is based on the artificial compressibility method (ACM) with a high-resolution method of characteristics-based scheme on unstructured grids. The present ALE model is validated and assessed through flow passing over an oscillating cylinder. Good agreements with experimental results and other numerical solutions are obtained, which demonstrates the accuracy and the capability of the present model. The lift generation mechanisms of 2D wing in hovering motion, including wake capture, delayed stall, rapid pitch, as well as clap and fling are then studied and illustrated using the current ALE model. Moreover, the optimized angular amplitude in symmetry model, 45°, is firstly reported in details using averaged lift and the energy power method. Besides, the lift generation of complete cyclic clap and fling motion, which is simulated by few researchers using the ALE method due to large deformation, is studied and clarified for the first time. The present ALE model is found to be a useful tool to investigate lift force generation mechanism for insect wing flight.

  10. Development of a model of entrained flow coal gasification and study of aerodynamic mechanisms of action on gasifier operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaimov, N. A.; Ryzhkov, A. F.

    2015-11-01

    Problems requiring solution in development of modern highly efficient gasification reactor of a promising high power integrated gasification combined-cycle plant are formulated. The task of creating and testing a numerical model of an entrained-flow reactor for thermochemical conversion of pulverized coal is solved. The basic method of investigation is computational fluid dynamics. The submodel of thermochemical processes, including a single-stage scheme of volatile substances outlet and three heterogeneous reactions of carbon residue conversion (complete carbon oxidation, Boudouard reaction and hydrogasification), is given. The mass loss rate is determined according to the basic assumptions of the diffusion-kinetic theory. The equations applied for calculation of the process of outlet of volatile substances and three stages of fuel gasifi-cation (diffusion of reagent gas toward the surface of the coal particle, heterogeneous reactions of gas with carbon on its surface, and homogeneous reactions beyond the particle surface) are presented. The universal combined submodel Eddy Dissipation/Finite Rate Chemistry with standard (built-in) constants is used for numerical estimates. Aerodynamic mechanisms of action on thermochemical processes of solid fuel gasification are studied, as exemplified by the design upgrade of a cyclone reactor of preliminary thermal fuel preparation. Volume concentrations of combustible gases and products of complete combustion in the syngas before and after primary air and pulverized coal flows' redistribution are given. Volume concentrations of CO in syngas at different positions of tangential secondary air inlet nozzle are compared.

  11. Computational study of the aerodynamics and control by blowing of asymmetric vortical flows over delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Ken

    1991-01-01

    Some of the work is described which was done in a study of the flow field produced by tangential leading edge blowing on a 60 deg. delta wing. The flow is studied computationally by solving the Thin Layer Navier-Stokes equations. Steady state flow fields are calculated for various angles of attack and yaw, with and without the presence of tangential leading edge blowing. The effectiveness of blowing as a rolling moment control mechanism to extend the envelope of controllability is illustrated at pre- and post-stall angles of attack. The numerical grid is generated using algebraic grid generation and various interpolation and blending techniques. The jet emanates from a slot with linearly varying thickness and is introduced into the flow field using the concept of an actuator plane, thereby not requiring resolution of the jet slot geometry. The Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model is used to provide turbulent closure. The computational results are compared with those of experiments.

  12. Calculation of Compressible Flows past Aerodynamic Shapes by Use of the Streamline Curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perl, W

    1947-01-01

    A simple approximate method is given for the calculation of isentropic irrotational flows past symmetrical airfoils, including mixed subsonic-supersonic flows. The method is based on the choice of suitable values for the streamline curvature in the flow field and the subsequent integration of the equations of motion. The method yields limiting solutions for potential flow. The effect of circulation is considered. A comparison of derived velocity distributions with existing results that are based on calculation to the third order in the thickness ratio indicated satisfactory agreement. The results are also presented in the form of a set of compressibility correction rules that lie between the Prandtl-Glauert rule and the von Karman-Tsien rule (approximately). The different rules correspond to different values of the local shape parameter square root sign YC sub a, in which Y is the ordinate and C sub a is the curvature at a point on an airfoil. Bodies of revolution, completely supersonic flows, and the significance of the limiting solutions for potential flow are also briefly discussed.

  13. Effect of process variables on morphology and aerodynamic properties of voriconazole formulations produced by thin film freezing.

    PubMed

    Beinborn, Nicole A; Lirola, Hélène L; Williams, Robert O

    2012-06-15

    The particle engineering process, thin film freezing (TFF), was used to produce particulate voriconazole (VRC) formulations with enhanced properties. The effect of various processing parameters on the solid state properties and aerodynamic performance of the TFF-processed powders was investigated in order to evaluate the suitability of these formulations for dry powder inhalation and to optimize the aerodynamic properties. Thin film freezing of VRC solution without stabilizing excipients resulted in microstructured, crystalline low density aggregate particles with specific surface areas of approximately 10m(2)/g. Thin film freezing of VRC-PVP solutions produced nanostructured, amorphous low density aggregate particles with specific surface areas ranging from 15 to 180m(2)/g, depending on the solvent system composition, polymer grade, and drug to polymer ratio utilized. VRC formulations manufactured with 1,4-dioxane, with and without PVP K12, resulted in the lowest specific surface areas but displayed the best aerodynamic properties. Using a Handihaler(®) dry powder inhaler (DPI), microstructured crystalline TFF-VRC and nanostructured amorphous TFF-VRC-PVP K12 (1:2) displayed total emitted fractions of 80.6% and 96.5%, fine particle fractions of 43.1% and 42.4%, and mass median aerodynamic diameters of 3.5 and 4.5μm, respectively.

  14. Aerodynamic shape optimization using control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James

    1996-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape design has long persisted as a difficult scientific challenge due its highly nonlinear flow physics and daunting geometric complexity. However, with the emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it has become possible to make accurate predictions of flows which are not dominated by viscous effects. It is thus worthwhile to explore the extension of CFD methods for flow analysis to the treatment of aerodynamic shape design. Two new aerodynamic shape design methods are developed which combine existing CFD technology, optimal control theory, and numerical optimization techniques. Flow analysis methods for the potential flow equation and the Euler equations form the basis of the two respective design methods. In each case, optimal control theory is used to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which provides the necessary gradient information to a numerical optimization method much more efficiently then by conventional finite differencing. Each technique uses a quasi-Newton numerical optimization algorithm to drive an aerodynamic objective function toward a minimum. An analytic grid perturbation method is developed to modify body fitted meshes to accommodate shape changes during the design process. Both Hicks-Henne perturbation functions and B-spline control points are explored as suitable design variables. The new methods prove to be computationally efficient and robust, and can be used for practical airfoil design including geometric and aerodynamic constraints. Objective functions are chosen to allow both inverse design to a target pressure distribution and wave drag minimization. Several design cases are presented for each method illustrating its practicality and efficiency. These include non-lifting and lifting airfoils operating at both subsonic and transonic conditions.

  15. Aerodynamic study of a small wind turbine with emphasis on laminar and transition flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niculescu, M. L.; Cojocaru, M. G.; Crunteanu, D. E.

    2016-06-01

    The wind energy is huge but unfortunately, wind turbines capture only a little part of this enormous green energy. Furthermore, it is impossible to put multi megawatt wind turbines in the cities because they generate a lot of noise and discomfort. Instead, it is possible to install small Darrieus and horizontal-axis wind turbines with low tip speed ratios in order to mitigate the noise as much as possible. Unfortunately, the flow around this wind turbine is quite complex because the run at low Reynolds numbers. Therefore, this flow is usually a mixture of laminar, transition and laminar regimes with bubble laminar separation that is very difficult to simulate from the numerical point of view. Usually, transition and laminar regimes with bubble laminar separation are ignored. For this reason, this paper deals with laminar and transition flows in order to provide some brightness in this field.

  16. Aerodynamics of knuckle ball: Flow-structure interaction problem on a pitched baseball without spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Kiura, Toshiro

    2012-07-01

    In the game of baseball, the knuckleball—so-called because the baseball is gripped with the knuckles in a certain position—is pitched in a way that introduces nearly no rotation, resulting in erratic flight paths which confuse batters. The “knuckleball” effect is believed to be caused by asymmetric flow separation over the baseball, but little is known about its flow physics. In the experiment described in this paper, the flow near the seams of the baseball is visualized thoroughly and the velocity vector fields near the surface and in the wake are obtained with Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. Depending on its position, the seam is found to trigger the boundary layer transition thus delaying the separation, or to cause separation itself. Three-dimensional wake patterns associated with specific ball orientations are identified and related to the force variations on the ball.

  17. MISDRAG- AERODYNAMIC DRAG ON WING-BODY COMBINATIONS AT SMALL ANGLES OF ATTACK IN SUPERSONIC FLOW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, W. C.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been written to obtain the wave and friction drag of configurations with bodies of revolution and fins. These inviscid flow fields are superimposed and the wave drag of the configuration is obtained by integration of the surface pressures. The friction drag is obtained from the viscous flow field of the body and a flat-plate friction analysis of the fins. The numerical solution of these flow fields, superposition, and integration to obtain total drag have been programmed for high-speed digital computation. A large portion of the input required by the program is involved with the description of the configuration geometry and the specific surface positions where pressures are to be evaluated. In addition to drag forces, an output is available whereby the pressure distributions on the body and fins can be obtained.

  18. Sensitivity of aerodynamic forces in laminar and turbulent flow past a square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliga, Philippe; Boujo, Edouard; Pujals, Gregory; Gallaire, François

    2014-10-01

    We use adjoint-based gradients to analyze the sensitivity of the drag force on a square cylinder. At Re = 40, the flow settles down to a steady state. The quantity of interest in the adjoint formulation is the steady asymptotic value of drag reached after the initial transient, whose sensitivity is computed solving a steady adjoint problem from knowledge of the stable base solution. At Re = 100, the flow develops to the time-periodic, vortex-shedding state. The quantity of interest is rather the time-averaged mean drag, whose sensitivity is computed integrating backwards in time an unsteady adjoint problem from knowledge of the entire history of the vortex-shedding solution. Such theoretical frameworks allow us to identify the sensitive regions without computing the actually controlled states, and provide a relevant and systematic guideline on where in the flow to insert a secondary control cylinder in the attempt to reduce drag, as established from comparisons with dedicated numerical simulations of the two-cylinder system. For the unsteady case at Re = 100, we also compute an approximation to the mean drag sensitivity solving a steady adjoint problem from knowledge of only the mean flow solution, and show the approach to carry valuable information in view of guiding relevant control strategy, besides reducing tremendously the related numerical effort. An extension of this simplified framework to turbulent flow regime is examined revisiting the widely benchmarked flow at Reynolds number Re = 22 000, the theoretical predictions obtained in the frame of unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes modeling being consistent with experimental data from the literature. Application of the various sensitivity frameworks to alternative control objectives such as increasing the lift and reducing the fluctuating drag and lift is also discussed and illustrated with a few selected examples.

  19. The impact of unilateral vibrations on aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils in transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamuraev, V.; Kalinina, A.

    2016-06-01

    The work is devoted to the mathematical modeling of the influence of forced vibrations of a surface element on one side of the airfoil on the shock-wave structure of transonic flow around. The influence of parameters of oscillations on the airfoil wave drag and the lift force were qualitatively and quantitatively investigated for constant maximum velocity amplitude, which is close in magnitude to the sound velocity in the incoming flow, and for a wide range of frequencies. The arising of additional lift force is shown.

  20. Influence of unilateral oscillation on the aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils at transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    The work is devoted to the mathematical modelling of the influence of forced vibrations of a surface element on one side of the airfoil on the shock-wave structure of transonic flow around. The influence of parameters of oscillations on the airfoil wave drag and the lift force were qualitatively and quantitatively investigated for constant maximum velocity amplitude, which is close in magnitude to the sound velocity in the oncoming flow, and for a wide range of frequencies. The additional lift force arising is shown.

  1. Investigation of Active Flow Control to Improve Aerodynamic Performance of Oscillating Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narducci, Robert P.; Bowersox, Rodney; Bussom, Richard; McVeigh, Michael; Raghu, Surya; White, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to design a promising active flow control concept on an oscillating airfoil for on-blade alleviation of dynamic stall. The concept must be designed for a range of representative Mach numbers (0.2 to 0.5) and representative reduced frequency characteristics of a full-scale rotorcraft. Specifications for a sweeping-jet actuator to mitigate the detrimental effects of retreating blade stall experienced by edgewise rotors in forward flight has been performed. Wind tunnel modifications have been designed to accommodate a 5x6 test section in the Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel at Texas A&M University that will allow the tunnel to achieve Mach 0.5. The flow control design is for a two-dimensional oscillating VR-7 blade section with a 15- inch chord at rotor-relevant flow conditions covering the range of reduced frequencies from 0.0 to 0.15 and Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.5. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to influence the placement of the flow control devices for optimal effectiveness.

  2. Computational Study of the Impact of Unsteadiness on the Aerodynamic Performance of a Variable- Speed Power Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    2012-01-01

    The design-point and off-design performance of an embedded 1.5-stage portion of a variable-speed power turbine (VSPT) was assessed using Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) analyses with mixing-planes and sector-periodic, unsteady RANS analyses. The VSPT provides one means by which to effect the nearly 50 percent main-rotor speed change required for the NASA Large Civil Tilt-Rotor (LCTR) application. The change in VSPT shaft-speed during the LCTR mission results in blade-row incidence angle changes of as high as 55 . Negative incidence levels of this magnitude at takeoff operation give rise to a vortical flow structure in the pressure-side cove of a high-turn rotor that transports low-momentum flow toward the casing endwall. The intent of the effort was to assess the impact of unsteadiness of blade-row interaction on the time-mean flow and, specifically, to identify potential departure from the predicted trend of efficiency with shaft-speed change of meanline and 3-D RANS/mixing-plane analyses used for design.

  3. Experimental and Computational Studies of Low-Speed Aerodynamic Performance and Flow Characteristics around a Supersonic Biplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuratani, Naoshi; Ozaki, Shuichi; Obayashi, Shigeru; Ogawa, Toshihiro; Matsuno, Takashi; Kawazoe, Hiromitsu

    One of the most critical technical issues with regard to supersonic commercial transportation is the sonic boom that occurs during supersonic cruising flight, which causes impulsive noise on the ground. The “supersonic biplane theory” has been proposed to reduce the sonic boom. Shock wave interaction and cancellation between the wings of a supersonic biplane can be realized at a specific design Mach number, but does not work at off-design values. Here, the low-speed aerodynamic performance, as off-design performance, of a baseline supersonic biplane was investigated and discussed using experimental and computational fluid dynamics approaches. The thin airfoil stall characteristics of a supersonic biplane were shown to be caused by the stall of both upper and lower wings at an angle of attack of 20°. Although there was leading flow separation of the upper wing at lower angles of attack, the stall of the lower wing was suppressed by interference with the upper wing. The lift of the lower wing was almost dominant to produce the lift of the supersonic biplane in the low-speed range. However, the lower wing caused greater drag than the upper wing at higher angles of attack.

  4. Real-Time Aerodynamic Flow and Data Visualization in an Interactive Virtual Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Richard J.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2005-01-01

    Significant advances have been made to non-intrusive flow field diagnostics in the past decade. Camera based techniques are now capable of determining physical qualities such as surface deformation, surface pressure and temperature, flow velocities, and molecular species concentration. In each case, extracting the pertinent information from the large volume of acquired data requires powerful and efficient data visualization tools. The additional requirement for real time visualization is fueled by an increased emphasis on minimizing test time in expensive facilities. This paper will address a capability titled LiveView3D, which is the first step in the development phase of an in depth, real time data visualization and analysis tool for use in aerospace testing facilities.

  5. Numerical Study on the Flow Mechanism of Base Aerodynamic Force Acting on the Vertical Landing Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimatsu, Nobuyoshi; Suzuki, Kojiro

    The base flow field of a vertical landing rocket in ground effect is numerically studied to clarify the mechanism of downward force acting on the body. Two characteristic patterns in the pressure distribution on the base surface are successfully captured as observed in the experiments. When the distance between the base and the ground surface is small, vorticies generated in the shear layer of the jet boundary interact with both the ground and base surfaces. The base pressure near the axis of the base is significantly reduced and large downward force appears due to vortical structure in the base region. When the distance is large, the vorticies are convected along the ground surface and the base pressure near the edge of the vehicle base is reduced due to suction of the ambient air. The numerical results indicate that unsteady motion of such vortices plays an important role in formation of the flow patterns described above.

  6. Aerodynamics of the Large-Volume, Flow-Through Detector System. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, H.; Saric, W.; Laananen, D.; Martinez, C.; Carrillo, R.; Myers, J.; Clevenger, D.

    1996-03-01

    The Large-Volume Flow-Through Detector System (LVFTDS) was designed to monitor alpha radiation from Pu, U, and Am in mixed-waste incinerator offgases; however, it can be adapted to other important monitoring uses that span a number of potential markets, including site remediation, indoor air quality, radon testing, and mine shaft monitoring. Goal of this effort was to provide mechanical design information for installation of LVFTDS in an incinerator, with emphasis on ability to withstand the high temperatures and high flow rates expected. The work was successfully carried out in three stages: calculation of pressure drop through the system, materials testing to determine surrogate materials for wind-tunnel testing, and wind-tunnel testing of an actual configuration.

  7. Flow visualization of mast-mounted-sight/main rotor aerodynamic interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghee, Terence A.; Kelley, Henry L.

    1993-01-01

    Flow visualization tests were conducted on a 27 percent-scale AH-64 attack helicopter model fitted with various mast-mounted-sight configurations in an attempt to identify the cause of adverse vibration encountered during full-scale flight tests of an Apache/Longbow configuration. The tests were conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. A symmetric and an asymmetric mast-mounted-sight oriented at several skew angles were tested at forward and rearward flight speeds of 30 and 45 knots. A laser light sheet seeded with vaporized propylene glycol was used to visualize the wake of the sight in planes parallel and perpendicular to the freestream flow. Analysis of the flow visualization data identified the frequency of the wake shed from the sight, the angle-of-attack at the sight, and the location where the sight wake crossed the rotor plane. Differences in wake structure were observed between the various sight configurations and slew angles. Postulations into the cause of the adverse vibration found in flight test are given along with considerations for future tests.

  8. Inflow/Outflow Conditions for Unsteady Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics in Nonuniform Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, Oliver V.; Grady, Joseph E. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The effect of a nonuniform mean flow on the normal modes; the inflow/outflow nonreflecting boundary conditions; and the sound power are studied. The normal modes in an annular duct are computed using a spectral method in combination with a shooting method. The swirl causes force imbalance which couples the acoustic and vortical modes. The acoustic modes are distinguished from the vortical modes by their large pressure and small vorticity content. The mean swirl also produces a Doppler shift in frequency. This results in more counter-spinning modes cut-on at a given frequency than modes spinning with the swirl. Nonreflecting boundary conditions are formulated using the normal mode solutions. The inflow/outflow boundary conditions are implemented in a linearized Euler scheme and validated by computing the propagation of acoustic and vortical waves in a duct for a variety of swirling mean flows. Numerical results show that the evolution of the vortical disturbances is sensitive to the inflow conditions and the details of the wake excitations. All three components of the wake velocity must be considered to correctly compute the wake evolution and the blade upwash. For high frequencies, the acoustic-vortical mode coupling is weak and a conservation equation for the acoustic energy can be derived. Sound power calculations show significant mean flow swirl effects, but mode interference effects are small.

  9. Aerodynamic design of turbomachinery blading in three-dimensional flow - An application to radial inflow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Y. L.; Tan, C. S.; Hawthorne, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    A computational method, based on a theory for turbomachinery blading design in three-dimensional inviscid flow, is applied to a parametric design study of a radial inflow turbine wheel. As the method requires the specification of swirl distribution, a technique for its smooth generation within the blade region is proposed. Excellent agreements have been obtained between the computed results from this design method and those from direct Euler computations, demonstrating the correspondence and consistency between the two. The computed results indicate the sensitivity of the pressure distribution to a lean in the stacking axis and a minor alteration in the hub/shroud profiles. Analysis based on Navier-Stokes solver shows no breakdown of flow within the designed blade passage and agreement with that from design calculation; thus the flow in the designed turbine rotor closely approximates that of an inviscid one. These calculations illustrate the use of a design method coupled to an analysis tool for establishing guidelines and criteria for designing turbomachinery blading.

  10. Aerodynamic Performance and Flow-Field Characteristics of Two Waverider-Derived Hypersonic Cruise Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; Finley, Dennis B.

    1995-01-01

    The component integration of a class of hypersonic high-lift configurations known as waveriders into hypersonic cruise vehicles was evaluated. A wind-tunnel model was developed which integrates realistic vehicle components with two waverider shapes, referred to as the straight-wing and cranked-wing shapes. Both shapes were conical-flow-derived waveriders for a design Mach number of 4.0. Experimental data and limited computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions were obtained over a Mach number range of 1.6 to 4.63 at a Reynolds number of 2.0 x 10(exp 6) per foot. The CFD predictions and flow visualization data confirmed the shock attachment characteristics of the baseline waverider shapes and illustrated the waverider flow-field properties. Experimental data showed that no significant performance degradations, in terms of maximum lift-to-drag ratios, occur at off-design Mach numbers for the waverider shapes and the integrated configurations. A comparison of the fully-integrated waverider vehicles to the baseline shapes showed that the performance was significantly degraded when all of the components were added to the waveriders, with the most significant degradation resulting from aftbody closure and the addition of control surfaces. Both fully-integrated configurations were longitudinally unstable over the Mach number range studied with the selected center of gravity location and for unpowered conditions. The cranked-wing configuration provided better lateral-directional stability characteristics than the straight-wing configuration.

  11. Formulation for Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, G. W.; Taylor, A. C., III; Mani, S. V.; Newman, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient approach for simultaneous aerodynamic analysis and design optimization is presented. This approach does not require the performance of many flow analyses at each design optimization step, which can be an expensive procedure. Thus, this approach brings us one step closer to meeting the challenge of incorporating computational fluid dynamic codes into gradient-based optimization techniques for aerodynamic design. An adjoint-variable method is introduced to nullify the effect of the increased number of design variables in the problem formulation. The method has been successfully tested on one-dimensional nozzle flow problems, including a sample problem with a normal shock. Implementations of the above algorithm are also presented that incorporate Newton iterations to secure a high-quality flow solution at the end of the design process. Implementations with iterative flow solvers are possible and will be required for large, multidimensional flow problems.

  12. Variable flow -- the quest for system energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Eppelheimer, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Varying condenser water flow has long been used as a method of controlling head pressure in water-cooled refrigeration systems. This method of head pressure control has been applied successfully on systems with scroll, reciprocating, heli-rotor, and centrifugal compressors. Condenser water flow is altered either by bypassing the condenser via a three-way valve or by throttling flow with a two-way valve. Today, the affordability and potential energy savings of adjustable speed drives makes this the preferred method of varying flow. In the quest for greater energy savings, many designers propose to vary the flow of water through the evaporators of chillers also. This feat is not as easily accomplished as the first. There are system designs that allow variable flow of chilled water at the system level while maintaining constant flow through the chiller evaporator. Yet in spite of the risk and the presence of other variable options, some still wish to vary the flow of chilled water through the evaporator by large proportions. Can it be done? Of course! However, there are a few engineering problems that must be tackled to accomplish this feat. This paper delineates those problems.

  13. Global characteristics of stream flow seasonality and variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dettinger, M.D.; Diaz, Henry F.

    2000-01-01

    Monthly stream flow series from 1345 sites around the world are used to characterize geographic differences in the seasonality and year-to-year variability of stream flow. Stream flow seasonality varies regionally, depending on the timing of maximum precipitation, evapotranspiration, and contributions from snow and ice. Lags between peaks of precipitation and stream flow vary smoothly from long delays in high-latitude and mountainous regions to short delays in the warmest sectors. Stream flow is most variable from year to year in dry regions of the southwest United States and Mexico, the Sahel, and southern continents, and it varies more (relatively) than precipitation in the same regions. Tropical rivers have the steadiest flows. El Nin??o variations are correlated with stream flow in many parts of the Americas, Europe, and Australia. Many stream flow series from North America, Europe, and the Tropics reflect North Pacific climate, whereas series from the eastern United States, Europe, and tropical South America and Africa reflect North Atlantic climate variations.

  14. Optimization of gas path aerodynamics for PK-39 boiler of power generating unit No. 4 of Troitskaya SDPP using numerical simulation of gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, V. B.; Grigorev, I. V.; Fomenko, M. V.; Kaverin, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Power generating unit no. 4 of Troitskaya State District Power Plant (SDPP) is incapable of operating with a nominal load of 278 MW because of high aerodynamic drag of the gas path. At present, the maximum load of the two-boiler single-turbine unit is 210 MW practically without a possibility of adjustment. The results of numerical simulation of the gas flow for the existing gas path from the electrostatic precipitator (EP) to the smoke exhausts (SEs) and two flue designs proposed for renovation of this section are presented. The results of simulation show that the existing flue section has high aerodynamic drag, which is explained by poor, as regards aerodynamics, design. The local loss coefficient, in terms of the dynamic pressure in the sucker pocket of the smoke exhaust is equal to 4.57. The local aerodynamic loss coefficient after renovation at the considered section according to the first version would make 1.48, and according to the second version 1.325, which would reduce losses at this section by more than a factor of three, and ensure the power unit operation with the rated load.

  15. Fast linear solvers for variable density turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouransari, Hadi; Mani, Ali; Darve, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Variable density flows are ubiquitous in variety of natural and industrial systems. Two-phase and multi-phase flows in natural and industrial processes, astrophysical flows, and flows involved in combustion processes are such examples. For an ideal gas subject to low-Mach approximation, variations in temperature can lead to a non-uniform density field. In this work, we consider radiatively heated particle-laden turbulent flows as an example application in which density variability is resulted from inhomogeneities in the heat absorption by an inhomogeneous particle field. Under such conditions, the divergence constraint of the fluid is enforced through a variable coefficient Poisson equation. Inversion of the discretized variable coefficient Poisson operator is difficult using the conventional linear solvers as the size of the problem grows. We apply a novel hierarchical linear solve algorithm based on low-rank approximations. The proposed linear solver could be applied to variety of linear systems arising from discretized partial differential equations. It can be used as a standalone direct-solver with tunable accuracy and linear complexity, or as a high-accuracy pre-conditioner in conjunction with other iterative methods.

  16. An overview of the fundamental aerodynamics branch's research activities in wing leading-edge vortex flows at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. S.; Wood, R. M.; Covell, P. F.

    1986-01-01

    For the past 3 years, a research program pertaining to the study of wing leading edge vortices at supersonic speeds has been conducted in the Fundamental Aerodynamics Branch of the High-Speed Aerodynamics Division at the Langley Research Center. The purpose of the research is to provide an understanding of the factors governing the formation and the control of wing leading-edge vortices and to evaluate the use of these vortices for improving supersonic aerodynamic performance. The studies include both experimental and theoretical investigations and focus primarily on planform, thickness and camber effects for delta wings. An overview of this research activity is presented.

  17. Aerodynamic flow control of a high lift system with dual synthetic jet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alstrom, Robert Bruce

    Implementing flow control systems will mitigate the vibration and aeroacoustic issues associated with weapons bays; enhance the performance of the latest generation aircraft by reducing their fuel consumption and improving their high angle-of-attack handling qualities; facilitate steep climb out profiles for military transport aircraft. Experimental research is performed on a NACA 0015 airfoil with a simple flap at angle of attack of 16o in both clean and high lift configurations. The results of the active control phase of the project will be discussed. Three different experiments were conducted; they are Amplitude Modulated Dual Location Open Loop Control, Adaptive Control with Amplitude Modulation using Direct Sensor Feedback and Adaptive Control with Amplitude Modulation using Extremum Seeking Control. All the closed loop experiments are dual location. The analysis presented uses the spatial variation of the root mean square pressure fluctuations, power spectral density estimates, Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs), and time frequency analysis which consists of the application of the Morlet and Mexican Hat wavelets. Additionally, during the course of high speed testing in the wind tunnel, some aeroacoustic phenomena were uncovered; those results will also be presented. A cross section of the results shows that the shape of the RMS pressure distributions is sensitive to forcing frequency. The application of broadband excitation in the case adaptive control causes the flow to select a frequency to lock in to. Additionally, open loop control results in global synchronization via switching between two stable states and closed loop control inhibits the switching phenomena, but rather synchronizes the flow about multiple stable shedding frequencies.

  18. Flow Induced Vibration and Glottal Aerodynamics in a Three-Dimensional Laryngeal Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian; Mittal, Rajat; Bielamowicz, Steven

    2009-11-01

    Three-dimensional effects associated with phonation remain unclear due to the lack of capability of simulating 3D fluid-tissue interaction in the past. To advance the state-of-the-art in this arena, an immersed-boundary method based flow solver coupled with a finite-element solid dynamics solver is employed to conduct high-fidelity direct-numerical simulations of phonation in a 3D model of the human larynx. Three-dimensional vibration patterns are captured along with turbulence effects and three-dimensional vortex structures in the glottal jet. Results from these simulations are presented.

  19. 2D VARIABLY SATURATED FLOWS: PHYSICAL SCALING AND BAYESIAN ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel dimensionless formulation for water flow in two-dimensional variably saturated media is presented. It shows that scaling physical systems requires conservation of the ratio between capillary forces and gravity forces. A direct result of this finding is that for two phys...

  20. Variability modes in core flows inverted from geomagnetic field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, M. A.; Morozova, A. L.; Schaeffer, N.

    2014-01-01

    The flow of liquid metal inside the Earth's core produces the geomagnetic field and its time variations. Understanding the variability of those deep currents is crucial to improve the forecast of geomagnetic field variations and may provide relevant information on the core dynamics. The main goal of this study is to extract and characterize the leading variability modes of core flows over centennial periods, and to assess their statistical robustness. To this end, we use flows that we invert from two geomagnetic field models (`gufm1' and `COV-OBS'), and apply principal component analysis and singular value decomposition of coupled fields. The quasi-geostrophic (QG) flows inverted from both geomagnetic field models show similar features. However, `COV-OBS' flows have a less energetic mean and larger time variability. The statistical significance of flow components is tested from analyses performed on subareas of the whole domain. Bootstrapping methods are also used to extract significant flow features required by both `gufm1' and `COV-OBS'. Three main empirical circulation modes emerge, simultaneously constrained by both geomagnetic field models and expected to be robust against the particular a priori used to build them (large-scale QG dynamics). Mode 1 exhibits three large vortices at medium/high latitudes, with opposite circulation under the Atlantic and the Pacific hemispheres. Mode 2 interestingly accounts for most of the variations of the Earth's core angular momentum. In this mode, the regions close to the tangent cylinder and to the equator are correlated, and oscillate with a period between 80 and 90 yr. Each of these two modes is energetic enough to alter the mean flow, sometimes reinforcing the eccentric gyre, and other times breaking it up into smaller circulations. The three main circulation modes added to the mean flow account for about 70 per cent of the flows variability, 90 per cent of the rms total velocities, and 95 per cent of the secular

  1. Zonal Two Equation Kappa-Omega Turbulence Models for Aerodynamic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menter, Florian R.

    1993-01-01

    Two new versions of the kappa-omega two-equation turbulence model will be presented. The new Baseline (BSL) model is designed to give results similar to those of the original kappa-omega model of Wilcox, but without its strong dependency on arbitrary freestream values. The BSL model is identical to the Wilcox model in the inner 50% of the boundary-layer but changes gradually to the standard kappa-epsilon model (in a kappa- omega formulation) towards the boundary-layer edge. The free shear layers. The second version of the model is called Shear-Stress Transport (SST) model. It is a variation of the BSL model with the additional ability to account for the transport of the principal turbulent shear stress in adverse pressure gradient boundary-layers. The model is based on Bradshaw's assumption that the principal shear-stress is proportional to the turbulent kinetic energy, which is introduced into the definition of the eddy-viscosity. Both models are tested for a large number of different flowfields. The results of the BSL model are similar to those of the original kappa-omega model, but without the undesirable freestream dependency. The predictions of the SST model are also independent of the freestream values but show better agreement with experimental data for adverse pressure gradient boundary-layer flows.

  2. Improved two-equation k-omega turbulence models for aerodynamic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menter, Florian R.

    1992-01-01

    Two new versions of the k-omega two-equation turbulence model will be presented. The new Baseline (BSL) model is designed to give results similar to those of the original k-omega model of Wilcox, but without its strong dependency on arbitrary freestream values. The BSL model is identical to the Wilcox model in the inner 50 percent of the boundary-layer but changes gradually to the high Reynolds number Jones-Launder k-epsilon model (in a k-omega formulation) towards the boundary-layer edge. The new model is also virtually identical to the Jones-Lauder model for free shear layers. The second version of the model is called Shear-Stress Transport (SST) model. It is based on the BSL model, but has the additional ability to account for the transport of the principal shear stress in adverse pressure gradient boundary-layers. The model is based on Bradshaw's assumption that the principal shear stress is proportional to the turbulent kinetic energy, which is introduced into the definition of the eddy-viscosity. Both models are tested for a large number of different flowfields. The results of the BSL model are similar to those of the original k-omega model, but without the undesirable freestream dependency. The predictions of the SST model are also independent of the freestream values and show excellent agreement with experimental data for adverse pressure gradient boundary-layer flows.

  3. Effect of nacelles on aerodynamic characteristics of an executive-jet model with simulated, partial-chord, laminar-flow-control wing glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley High-Speed 7- by 10-Foot Tunnel using a 1/10-scale model of an executive jet to examine the effects of the nacelles on the wing pressures and model longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics. For the present investigation, each wing panel was modified with a simulated, partial-chord, laminar-flow-control glove. Horizontal-tail effects were also briefly examined. The tests covered a range of Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.82 and lift coefficients from 0.20 to 0.55. Oil-flow photographs of the wing at selected conditions are included.

  4. Langley Symposium on Aerodynamics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, Sharon H. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to present current work and results of the Langley Aeronautics Directorate covering the areas of computational fluid dynamics, viscous flows, airfoil aerodynamics, propulsion integration, test techniques, and low-speed, high-speed, and transonic aerodynamics. The following sessions are included in this volume: theoretical aerodynamics, test techniques, fluid physics, and viscous drag reduction.

  5. Asthma-like peak flow variability in various lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Virendra; Meena, Pradeep; Sharma, Bharat Bhushan

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Bronchodilator reversibility and diurnal peak flow variability are considered characteristic of asthma patients. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) show poor reversibility. But reversibility and variability in other pulmonary diseases manifesting with airflow obstruction in not known. Therefore, we assessed reversibility and peak flow variability in patients with various lung diseases to recognize the pattern. Materials and Methods: Seventy consecutive patients with a diagnosis of lung diseases manifesting with airflow obstruction were recruited in the study. These included 23 patients with asthma, 11 patients with bronchiectasis, 16 patients with post-tubercular lung disease (PTLD), and 20 patients with COPD. Ten healthy matched control subjects were also selected to pair with asthmatic patients. Bronchodilator reversibility test was done initially and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was measured for a duration of 1 week by patients themselves on a chart that was given to them. The mean amplitude percentage of these records were analyzed. Results: The mean values of peak flow variability were 14.73% ± 6.1% in asthmatic patients, 11.98% ± 7.5% in patients with bronchiectasis, and 10.54% ± 5.3% in PTLD. The difference in the mean values of peak flow variability between asthma and bronchiectasis, that is, 14.73 (6.1) vs 11.98 (7.5) was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Forced expiratory volume one second (FEV1) reversibility values were 14.77% ± 26.93%, 11.24% ± 20.43%, 10.85% ± 13.02%, 16.83% ± 22.84%, and 5.47% ± 4.99% in asthma, COPD, PTLD, bronchiectasis, and healthy subjects, respectively. Conclusion: Both reversibility and diurnal peak flow variability were higher in patients with various lung diseases compared with normal healthy subjects. Although these are characteristic of asthma, some cases of bronchiectasis and PTLD patients may also manifest asthma-like PEFR variability and reversibility

  6. The influence of wing, fuselage and tail design on rotational flow aerodynamics data obtained beyond maximum lift with general aviation configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihrle, W., Jr.; Bowman, J. S., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has initiated a broad general aviation stall/spin research program. A rotary balance system was developed to support this effort. Located in the Langley spin tunnel, this system makes it possible to identify an airplane's aerodynamic characteristics in a rotational flow environment, and thereby permits prediction of spins. This paper presents a brief description of the experimental set-up, testing technique, five model programs conducted to date, and an overview of the rotary balance results and their correlation with spin tunnel free-spinning model results. It is shown, for example, that there is a large, nonlinear dependency of the aerodynamic moments on rotational rate and that these moments are pronouncedly configuration-dependent. Fuselage shape, horizontal tail and, in some instances, wing location are shown to appreciably influence the yawing moment characteristics above an angle of attack of 45 deg.

  7. Unsteady aerodynamics of blade rows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.

    1989-01-01

    The requirements placed on an unsteady aerodynamic theory intended for turbomachinery aeroelastic or aeroacoustic applications are discussed along with a brief description of the various theoretical models that are available to address these requirements. The major emphasis is placed on the description of a linearized inviscid theory which fully accounts for the affects of a nonuniform mean or steady flow on unsteady aerodynamic response. Although this linearization was developed primarily for blade flutter prediction, more general equations are presented which account for unsteady excitations due to incident external aerodynamic disturbances as well as those due to prescribed blade motions. The motivation for this linearized unsteady aerodynamic theory is focused on, its physical and mathematical formulation is outlined and examples are presented to illustrate the status of numerical solution procedures and several effects of mean flow nonuniformity on unsteady aerodynamic response.

  8. Sensitivity and variability redux in hot-Jupiter flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J. Y.-K.; Polichtchouk, I.; Thrastarson, H. Th.

    2015-12-01

    We revisit the issues of sensitivity to initial flow and intrinsic variability in hot-Jupiter atmospheric flow simulations, issues originally investigated by Cho et al. and Thrastarson & Cho. The flow in the lower region (˜1 to 20 MPa) `dragged' to immobility and uniform temperature on a very short time-scale, as in Liu & Showman, leads to effectively a complete cessation of variability as well as sensitivity in three-dimensional (3D) simulations with traditional primitive equations. Such momentum (Rayleigh) and thermal (Newtonian) drags are, however, ad hoc for 3D giant planet simulations. For 3D hot-Jupiter simulations, which typically already employ a strong Newtonian drag in the upper region, sensitivity is not quenched if only the Newtonian drag is applied in the lower region, without the strong Rayleigh drag: in general, both sensitivity and variability persist if the two drags are not applied concurrently in the lower region. However, even when the drags are applied concurrently, vertically propagating planetary waves give rise to significant variability in the ˜0.05-0.5 MPa region, if the vertical resolution of the lower region is increased (e.g. here with 1000 layers for the entire domain). New observations on the effects of the physical setup and model convergence in `deep' atmosphere simulations are also presented.

  9. Variable flow control for a nuclear reactor control rod

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, Richard D.; Bhattacharyya, Ajay

    1978-01-01

    A variable flow control for a control rod assembly of a nuclear reactor that depends on turbulent friction though an annulus. The annulus is formed by a piston attached to the control rod drive shaft and a housing or sleeve fitted to the enclosure housing the control rod. As the nuclear fuel is burned up and the need exists for increased reactivity, the control rods are withdrawn, which increases the length of the annulus and decreases the rate of coolant flow through the control rod assembly.

  10. System Identification and POD Method Applied to Unsteady Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Deman; Kholodar, Denis; Juang, Jer-Nan; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The representation of unsteady aerodynamic flow fields in terms of global aerodynamic modes has proven to be a useful method for reducing the size of the aerodynamic model over those representations that use local variables at discrete grid points in the flow field. Eigenmodes and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) modes have been used for this purpose with good effect. This suggests that system identification models may also be used to represent the aerodynamic flow field. Implicit in the use of a systems identification technique is the notion that a relative small state space model can be useful in describing a dynamical system. The POD model is first used to show that indeed a reduced order model can be obtained from a much larger numerical aerodynamical model (the vortex lattice method is used for illustrative purposes) and the results from the POD and the system identification methods are then compared. For the example considered, the two methods are shown to give comparable results in terms of accuracy and reduced model size. The advantages and limitations of each approach are briefly discussed. Both appear promising and complementary in their characteristics.

  11. Symposium on numerical and physical aspects of aerodynamic flows, 3rd, California State University, Long Beach, CA, January 21-24, 1985, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are hydrodynamic stability and turbulent transition, separated flow simulations employing finite difference methods, a quasi-simultaneous finite difference approach for strongly interacting flow, the Newton solution of coupled Euler and boundary layer equations, multielement airfoil aerodynamics, vorticity dynamics, the significance of the thin layer Navier-Stokes approximation, a comparison of interactive and Navier-Stokes calculations of separating boundary layer flows, and a Navier-Stokes analysis for the mechanism of shock wave/boundary layer interactions. Also discussed are transonic interactions of unsteady vortical flows, boundary layers on oscillating airfoils, a laser-interferometer skin friction meter, flow over surface-mounted semibluff bodies, computations for spinning and spin-stabilized supersonic projectiles, transition calculations in three-dimensional flows, the effect of projectile boattailing in transonic flow, flow characteristics of a body of revolution at incidence, the influence of the boundary layer on the leading edge flow of a swept wing, and an interactive scheme for three-dimensional transonic flows.

  12. A new numerical benchmark for variably saturated variable-density flow and transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Carlos; Graf, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In subsurface hydrological systems, spatial and temporal variations in solute concentration and/or temperature may affect fluid density and viscosity. These variations could lead to potentially unstable situations, in which a dense fluid overlies a less dense fluid. These situations could produce instabilities that appear as dense plume fingers migrating downwards counteracted by vertical upwards flow of freshwater (Simmons et al., Transp. Porous Medium, 2002). As a result of unstable variable-density flow, solute transport rates are increased over large distances and times as compared to constant-density flow. The numerical simulation of variable-density flow in saturated and unsaturated media requires corresponding benchmark problems against which a computer model is validated (Diersch and Kolditz, Adv. Water Resour, 2002). Recorded data from a laboratory-scale experiment of variable-density flow and solute transport in saturated and unsaturated porous media (Simmons et al., Transp. Porous Medium, 2002) is used to define a new numerical benchmark. The HydroGeoSphere code (Therrien et al., 2004) coupled with PEST (www.pesthomepage.org) are used to obtain an optimized parameter set capable of adequately representing the data set by Simmons et al., (2002). Fingering in the numerical model is triggered using random hydraulic conductivity fields. Due to the inherent randomness, a large number of simulations were conducted in this study. The optimized benchmark model adequately predicts the plume behavior and the fate of solutes. This benchmark is useful for model verification of variable-density flow problems in saturated and/or unsaturated media.

  13. Applied computational aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The present volume discusses the original development of the panel method, the mapping solutions and singularity distributions of linear potential schemes, the capabilities of full-potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes schemes, the use of the grid-generation methodology in applied aerodynamics, subsonic airfoil design, inverse airfoil design for transonic applications, the divergent trailing-edge airfoil innovation in CFD, Euler and potential computational results for selected aerodynamic configurations, and the application of CFD to wing high-lift systems. Also discussed are high-lift wing modifications for an advanced-capability EA-6B aircraft, Navier-Stokes methods for internal and integrated propulsion system flow predictions, the use of zonal techniques for analysis of rotor-stator interaction, CFD applications to complex configurations, CFD applications in component aerodynamic design of the V-22, Navier-Stokes computations of a complete F-16, CFD at supersonic/hypersonic speeds, and future CFD developments.

  14. Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented which deal with results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include: viscous flows, boundary layer equations, turbulence modeling and Navier-Stokes equations, and internal flows.

  15. Increased peak flow variability in children with asymptomatic hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Gibson, P G; Mattoli, S; Sears, M R; Dolovich, J; Hargreave, F E

    1995-10-01

    The relevance of increased methacholine airway responsiveness detected in children with no current or past symptoms of asthma is not known. We wished to determine whether the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness in asymptomatic children is also associated with abnormal variability of peak expiratory flow (PEF). In 12 asymptomatic children with methacholine hyperresponsiveness, we examined the diurnal variation of peak expiratory flow (PEF) and response to inhaled bronchodilator. Twelve asthmatic children with a comparable range of methacholine hyperresponsiveness, and 12 normal children without methacholine responsiveness, were used as positive and negative controls. The children were aged 11 (range 9-14) yrs. The mean diurnal variation of PEF in those children with asymptomatic hyperresponsiveness was increased at 9.3%, to a degree comparable to the symptomatic asthmatic children (10.7%), and greater than the normal children (5.7%). Methacholine stimulated airway constriction was associated with symptoms in subjects from each group, indicating that the children were capable of perceiving airway constriction. We conclude that asymptomatic children with methacholine airway hyperresponsiveness have other evidence of mild variable airflow obstruction with increased diurnal PEF variability, and can perceive airflow limitation. The lack of symptoms in the children with airway hyperresponsiveness could be due to an insufficient stimulus to cause symptomatic obstruction, or the absence of eosinophilic airway inflammation, which may be a requirement for the development of symptomatic airway hyperresponsiveness.

  16. Aerodynamics of Race Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, suspension, road, aerodynamics, and of course the driver. In recent years, however, vehicle aerodynamics gained increased attention, mainly due to the utilization of the negative lift (downforce) principle, yielding several important performance improvements. This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic downforce and how it improves race car performance. After this short introduction various methods to generate downforce such as inverted wings, diffusers, and vortex generators are discussed. Due to the complex geometry of these vehicles, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flows and lifting surface shapes unlike traditional airplane wings. Typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development, are discussed as well. In spite of the tremendous progress of these design tools (due to better instrumentation, communication, and computational power), the fluid dynamic phenomenon is still highly nonlinear, and predicting the effect of a particular modification is not always trouble free. Several examples covering a wide range of vehicle shapes (e.g., from stock cars to open-wheel race cars) are presented to demonstrate this nonlinear nature of the flow field.

  17. Magneto-polar fluid flow through a porous medium of variable permeability in slip flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, P. K.; Jha, A. K.; Sharma, R.

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical study is carried out to obtain an analytical solution of free convective heat transfer for the flow of a polar fluid through a porous medium with variable permeability bounded by a semi-infinite vertical plate in a slip flow regime. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicular to the porous surface. The free stream velocity follows an exponentially decreasing small perturbation law. Using the approximate method the expressions for the velocity, microrotation, and temperature are obtained. Further, the results of the skin friction coefficient, the couple stress coefficient and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are presented with various values of fluid properties and flow conditions.

  18. Aerodynamic research on tipvane windturbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbussel, G. J. W.; Vanholten, T.; Vankuik, G. A. M.

    1982-09-01

    Tipvanes are small auxiliary wings mounted at the tips of windturbine blades in such a way that a diffuser effect is generated, resulting in a mass flow augmentation through the turbine disc. For predicting aerodynamic loads on the tipvane wind turbine, the acceleration potential is used and an expansion method is applied. In its simplest form, this method can essentially be classified as a lifting line approach, however, with a proper choice of the basis load distributions of the lifting line, the numerical integration of the pressurefield becomes one dimensional. the integration of the other variable can be performed analytically. The complete analytical expression for the pressure field consists of two series of basic pressure fields. One series is related to the basic load distributions over the turbineblade, and the other series to the basic load distribution over the tipvane.

  19. Evaluating environmental flows under climate variability and change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, R.

    2012-04-01

    How much river flow is needed to ensure healthy freshwater ecosystems? This is a question that has exercised environmental managers for decades and one that is being made even harder by the prospect of anthropogenic climate change. The response requires balancing the long-term water demands of society with the needs of the environment in a sustainable and least cost way. Meeting these challenges will require more flexible water management systems and processes that recognise changing environmental limits, incentivise more environmentally-sensitive behaviours by water users and abstractors during times of water scarcity, and a move away from capital intensive, supply-side solutions. This talk evaluates the sensitivity of river flows to decadal variations in rainfall, abstraction amounts, licensing regime, and climate change. The overall objective is to determine how achievable abstraction volumes vary with different e-flow standards and water licensing regimes, under climate variability and change. The River Itchen in southern England has historically experienced unsustainable levels of water abstraction and is used as a test basin. The talk will consider the extent to which a 'smarter' approach to abstraction licensing could ensure that e-flow standards are met despite large uncertainty in the future climate, whilst having a minimal impact on security of water supplies.

  20. A title-gap flow model for use in aerodynamic loads assessment of space shuttle thermal protection system: Parallel gap faces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, D. L.; Newman, P. A.; Thames, F. C.; Melson, N. D.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of predicting aerodynamic loads on the insulating tiles of the space shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) is discussed and seen to require a method for predicting pressure and mass flux in the gaps between tiles. A mathematical model of the tile-gap flow is developed, based upon a slow viscous (Stokes) flow analysis, and is verified against experimental data. The tile-gap pressure field is derived from a solution of the two-dimensional Laplace equation; the mass-flux vector is then calculated from the pressure gradient. The means for incorporating this model into a lumped-parameter network analogy for porous-media flow is given. The means for incorporating this model into a lumped-parameter network analogy for porous-media flow is given. The flow model shows tile-gap mass flux to be very sensitive to the gap width indicating a need for coupling the TPS flow and tile displacement calculation. Analytical and experimental work to improve TPS flow predictions and a possible shuttle TPS hardware modification are recommended.

  1. Intra- and interboar variability in flow cytometric sperm sex sorting.

    PubMed

    Alkmin, Diego V; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Tarantini, Tatiana; Parlapan, Laura; Del Olmo, David; Vazquez, Juan M; Martinez, Emilio A; Roca, Jordi

    2014-08-01

    To improve the efficiency of porcine sperm sex sorting using flow cytometry, the aims of the present study were to determine the relevance of inter- and intraboar variability in sperm sortability and to evaluate the significance of ejaculate semen characteristics in such variability. In addition, the variability among boars in the ability of sex-sorted spermatozoa to survive liquid storage at 15 °C to 17 °C was also evaluated. In total, 132 ejaculates collected from 67 boars of different breeds that were housed at an artificial insemination center were used in three experiments. X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm were simultaneously separated according to the Beltsville sperm-sorting technology using a high-speed flow cytometer. In the first experiment, interboar variability in the ability of the ejaculated spermatozoa to undergo the flow-based sex-sorting procedure was observed; the ejaculates of nearly 15% of the boars (n = 67) did not exhibit well-defined X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa peaks in the histogram, and the ejaculate sperm concentration demonstrated good predictive value for explaining this variation, as indicated by the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (0.88, P < 0.001). In the second experiment, a certain degree of intraboar variability was observed only in the boars that showed poor sperm sortability (measured according to the presence or not a well-defined split together with sperm sortability parameters) in the first ejaculate (n = 3). In contrast, boars classified as having good sperm sortability in the first ejaculate (n = 5) maintained this condition in five ejaculates collected over the subsequent 5 months. In the third experiment, sex-sorted spermatozoa from boars with good sperm sortability (n = 5) remained viable and motile (above 70% in all boars) after 48 hours of storage at 15 °C to 17 °C, which may facilitate the commercial application of sex-sorted spermatozoa in swine artificial insemination programs

  2. Atmospheric testing of wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.S.; Migliore, P.G.; Quandt, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    An experimental investigation was conducted using an instrumented horizontal-axis wind turbine that incorporated variable span trailing-edge aerodynamic brakes. A primary goal was to directly compare study results with (infinite-span) wind tunnel data and to provide information on how to account for device span effects during turbine design or analysis. Comprehensive measurements were utilized to define effective changes in the aerodynamic coefficients, as a function of angle of attack and control deflection, for three device spans and configurations. Differences in the lift and drag behavior are most pronounced near stall and for device spans of less than 15%. Drag performance is affected only minimally (<70%) for 15% or larger span devices. Interestingly, aerodynamic controls with characteristic vents or openings appear most affected by span reductions and three-dimensional flow.

  3. Unsteady aerodynamics modeling for flight dynamics application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; He, Kai-Feng; Qian, Wei-Qi; Zhang, Tian-Jiao; Cheng, Yan-Qing; Wu, Kai-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    In view of engineering application, it is practicable to decompose the aerodynamics into three components: the static aerodynamics, the aerodynamic increment due to steady rotations, and the aerodynamic increment due to unsteady separated and vortical flow. The first and the second components can be presented in conventional forms, while the third is described using a one-order differential equation and a radial-basis-function (RBF) network. For an aircraft configuration, the mathematical models of 6-component aerodynamic coefficients are set up from the wind tunnel test data of pitch, yaw, roll, and coupled yawroll large-amplitude oscillations. The flight dynamics of an aircraft is studied by the bifurcation analysis technique in the case of quasi-steady aerodynamics and unsteady aerodynamics, respectively. The results show that: (1) unsteady aerodynamics has no effect upon the existence of trim points, but affects their stability; (2) unsteady aerodynamics has great effects upon the existence, stability, and amplitudes of periodic solutions; and (3) unsteady aerodynamics changes the stable regions of trim points obviously. Furthermore, the dynamic responses of the aircraft to elevator deflections are inspected. It is shown that the unsteady aerodynamics is beneficial to dynamic stability for the present aircraft. Finally, the effects of unsteady aerodynamics on the post-stall maneuverability are analyzed by numerical simulation.

  4. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Tabulated aeroynamic data book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Tabulated data from wind tunnel tests conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of an advanced coannular exhaust nozzle for a future supersonic propulsion system are presented. Tests were conducted with two test configurations: (1) a short flap mechanism for fan stream control with an isentropic contoured flow splitter, and (2) an iris fan nozzle with a conical flow splitter. Both designs feature a translating primary plug and an auxiliary inlet ejector. Tests were conducted at takeoff and simulated cruise conditions. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. At simulated supersonic cruise, both configurations demonstrated good performance, comparable to levels assumed in earlier advanced supersonic propulsion studies. However, at subsonic cruise, both configurations exhibited performance that was 6 to 7.5 percent less than the study assumptions. At takeoff conditions, the iris configuration performance approached the assumed levels, while the short flap design was 4 to 6 percent less. Data are provided through test run 25.

  5. Use of a generalized Stokes number to determine the aerodynamic capture efficiency of non-Stokesian particles from a compressible gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, R.; Rosner, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    The aerodynamic capture efficiency of small but nondiffusing particles suspended in a high-speed stream flowing past a target is known to be influenced by parameters governing small particle inertia, departures from the Stokes drag law, and carrier fluid compressibility. By defining an effective Stokes number in terms of the actual (prevailing) particle stopping distance, local fluid viscosity, and inviscid fluid velocity gradient at the target nose, it is shown that these effects are well correlated in terms of a 'standard' (cylindrical collector, Stokes drag, incompressible flow, sq rt Re much greater than 1) capture efficiency curve. Thus, a correlation follows that simplifies aerosol capture calculations in the parameter range already included in previous numerical solutions, allows rational engineering predictions of deposition in situations not previously specifically calculated, and should facilitate the presentation of performance data for gas cleaning equipment and aerosol instruments.

  6. Aerodynamic characteristics of a Sparrow 3 missile model in the flow field of a generalized parent body at Mach 2.86

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, R. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a Sparrow 3 wing control missile model were measured through a range of separation distances relative to a flat plate surface that represented the parent-body configuration. Measurements were obtained with and without two dimensional circular arc protuberances attached to the flat plate surface. The tests were conducted at a Mach number of 2.86 and a Reynolds number per meter of 6.56 million. The behavior of these longitudinal characteristics with varying separation distance in the flow field created by the flat plate and protuberance was generally as would be expected on the basis of flow field boundaries determined from the second order approximation of Friedrich. In general, varying roll angle from 0 deg to 45 deg caused no significant effect on the store separation characteristics.

  7. Aerodynamic design trends for commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbig, R.; Koerner, H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent research on advanced-configuration commercial aircraft at DFVLR is surveyed, with a focus on aerodynamic approaches to improved performance. Topics examined include transonic wings with variable camber or shock/boundary-layer control, wings with reduced friction drag or laminarized flow, prop-fan propulsion, and unusual configurations or wing profiles. Drawings, diagrams, and graphs of predicted performance are provided, and the need for extensive development efforts using powerful computer facilities, high-speed and low-speed wind tunnels, and flight tests of models (mounted on specially designed carrier aircraft) is indicated.

  8. Fiber-optic-based laser vapor screen flow visualization system for aerodynamic research in larger scale subsonic and transonic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Inenaga, Andrew S.

    1994-01-01

    Laser vapor screen (LVS) flow visualization systems that are fiber-optic based were developed and installed for aerodynamic research in the Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel and the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel. Fiber optics are used to deliver the laser beam through the plenum shell that surrounds the test section of each facility and to the light-sheet-generating optics positioned in the ceiling window of the test section. Water is injected into the wind tunnel diffuser section to increase the relative humidity and promote condensation of the water vapor in the flow field about the model. The condensed water vapor is then illuminated with an intense sheet of laser light to reveal features of the flow field. The plenum shells are optically sealed; therefore, video-based systems are used to observe and document the flow field. Operational experience shows that the fiber-optic-based systems provide safe, reliable, and high-quality off-surface flow visualization in smaller and larger scale subsonic and transonic wind tunnels. The design, the installation, and the application of the Langley Research Center (LaRC) LVS flow visualization systems in larger scale wind tunnels are highlighted. The efficiency of the fiber optic LVS systems and their insensitivity to wind tunnel vibration, the tunnel operating temperature and pressure variations, and the airborne contaminants are discussed.

  9. Aerodynamic noise sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munin, A. G.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Leontev, E. A.

    A general theory is developed for aerodynamic sound generation and its propagation in an inhomogeneous medium. Results of theoretical and experimental studies of the acoustic characteristics of jets are discussed, and a solution is presented to the problem concerning the noise from a section, free rotor, and a rotor located inside a channel. Sound propagation in a channel with flow and selection of soundproofing liners for the channel walls are also discussed.

  10. FLASH: A finite element computer code for variably saturated flow

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, R.G.; Magnuson, S.O.

    1992-05-01

    A numerical model was developed for use in performance assessment studies at the INEL. The numerical model, referred to as the FLASH computer code, is designed to simulate two-dimensional fluid flow in fractured-porous media. The code is specifically designed to model variably saturated flow in an arid site vadose zone and saturated flow in an unconfined aquifer. In addition, the code also has the capability to simulate heat conduction in the vadose zone. This report presents the following: description of the conceptual frame-work and mathematical theory; derivations of the finite element techniques and algorithms; computational examples that illustrate the capability of the code; and input instructions for the general use of the code. The FLASH computer code is aimed at providing environmental scientists at the INEL with a predictive tool for the subsurface water pathway. This numerical model is expected to be widely used in performance assessments for: (1) the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process and (2) compliance studies required by the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A.

  11. Combined Numerical/Analytical Perturbation Solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations for Aerodynamic Ejector/Mixer Nozzle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeChant, Lawrence Justin

    1998-01-01

    In spite of rapid advances in both scalar and parallel computational tools, the large number of variables involved in both design and inverse problems make the use of sophisticated fluid flow models impractical, With this restriction, it is concluded that an important family of methods for mathematical/computational development are reduced or approximate fluid flow models. In this study a combined perturbation/numerical modeling methodology is developed which provides a rigorously derived family of solutions. The mathematical model is computationally more efficient than classical boundary layer but provides important two-dimensional information not available using quasi-1-d approaches. An additional strength of the current methodology is its ability to locally predict static pressure fields in a manner analogous to more sophisticated parabolized Navier Stokes (PNS) formulations. To resolve singular behavior, the model utilizes classical analytical solution techniques. Hence, analytical methods have been combined with efficient numerical methods to yield an efficient hybrid fluid flow model. In particular, the main objective of this research has been to develop a system of analytical and numerical ejector/mixer nozzle models, which require minimal empirical input. A computer code, DREA Differential Reduced Ejector/mixer Analysis has been developed with the ability to run sufficiently fast so that it may be used either as a subroutine or called by an design optimization routine. Models are of direct use to the High Speed Civil Transport Program (a joint government/industry project seeking to develop an economically.viable U.S. commercial supersonic transport vehicle) and are currently being adopted by both NASA and industry. Experimental validation of these models is provided by comparison to results obtained from open literature and Limited Exclusive Right Distribution (LERD) sources, as well as dedicated experiments performed at Texas A&M. These experiments have

  12. Aerodynamic Forces on a Vibrating Unstaggered Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soehngen, H.

    1957-01-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic forces, [based on two-dimensional incompressible flow considerations], are determined for an unstaggered cascade, the blades of which are vibrating in phase in an approach flow parallel to the blades.

  13. Low-speed wind tunnel investigation of the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a translating-centerbody choked-flow inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. A.; Abbott, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Low-speed wind-tunnel tests were conducted to determine the effects of free-stream velocity and incidence angle on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a translating centerbody choked-flow inlet. The inlet was sized to fit a 13.97 cm diameter fan with a design weight flow of 2.49 kg/sec. Performance was determined at free-stream velocities to 45 meters per second and incidence angles of 0 deg to 50 deg. The inlet was operated in both the choked and unchoked modes over a range of weight flows. Measurements were made of inlet total pressure recovery, flow distortion, surface static pressure distribution, and fan noise suppression. In the choked mode, increasing incidence angle tended to reduce the amount of inlet noise suppression for a given amount of inlet suction. This tendency was overcome by applying sufficient inlet suction to increase the flow Mach number. At 45 meters per second free-stream velocity, at least 22 decibels of suppression were measured at 35 deg incidence angle with a total pressure recovery of 0.985.

  14. The Aeroacoustics and Aerodynamics of High-Speed Coanda Devices, Part 2: Effects of Modifications for Flow Control and Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, P. W.; Smith, C.

    1997-12-01

    The paper describes two studies of the effects of flow control devices on the aerodynamics and aeroacoustics of a high-speed Coanda flow that is formed when a supersonic jet issues from a radial nozzle and adheres to a tulip-shaped body of revolution. Shadowgraphy and other flow-visualization techniques are used to reveal the various features of the complex flow fields. The acoustic characteristics are obtained from far- and near-field measurements with an array of microphones in an anechoic chamber. First the effects of incorporating a step between the annular exit slot and the Coanda surface are investigated. The step is incorporated to ensure that the breakaway pressure is raised to a level well above the maximum operating pressure. It substantially increases the complexity of the flow field and acoustic characteristics. In particular, it promotes the generation of two groups of discrete tones. A theoretical model based on a self-generated feedback loop is proposed to explain how these tones are generated. The second study investigates the effects of replacing the annular exit slot with a saw-toothed one with the aim of eliminating the discrete tones and thereby substantially reducing the level of noise generated.

  15. Pool and flow boiling in variable and microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    As is well known, boiling is an effective mode of heat transfer in that high heat flux levels are possible with relatively small temperature differences. Its optimal application requires that the process be adequately understood. A measure of the understanding of any physical event lies in the ability to predict its behavior in terms of the relevant parameters. Despite many years of research the predictability of boiling is currently possible only for quite specialized circumstances, e.g., the critical heat flux and film boiling for the pool boiling case, and then only with special geometries. Variable gravity down to microgravity provides the opportunity to test this understanding, but possibly more important, by changing the dimensional and time scales involved permits more detailed observations of elements involved in the boiling process, and perhaps discloses phenomena heretofore unknown. The focus here is on nucleate boiling although, as will be demonstrated below, under but certain circumstances in microgravity it can take place concurrently with the dryout process. In the presence of earth gravity or forced convection effects, the latter process is usually referred to as film boiling. However, no vapor film as such forms with pool boiling in microgravity, only dryout. Initial results are presented here for pool boiling in microgravity, and were made possible at such an early date by the availability of the Get-Away-Specials (GAS). Also presented here are some results of ground testing of a flow loop for the study of low velocity boiling, eventually to take place also in microgravity. In the interim, variable buoyancy normal to the heater surface is achieved by rotation of the entire loop relative to earth gravity. Of course, this is at the expense of varying the buoyancy parallel to the heater surface. Two questions which must be resolved early in the study of flow boiling in microgravity are (1) the lower limits of liquid flow velocity where buoyancy

  16. The effects of age and gender on laryngeal aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Goozée, J V; Murdoch, B E; Theodoros, D G; Thompson, E C

    1998-01-01

    A computerized airflow/air pressure analysis system, the Aerophone II Model 6800 (Kay Elemetrics Corp.), was used to assess the effects of age and gender on laryngeal aerodynamics. A sample of 56 male and 53 female normal speaking subjects was divided into six age groups (20-30; 31-40; 41-50; 51-60; 61-70 and 71-80 years). The laryngeal aerodynamic parameters measured included phonatory (mean) flow rate, estimated subglottal pressure, laryngeal airway resistance, phonatory sound pressure level, phonatory power, and phonatory efficiency. Most comfortable phonation, vocal efficiency, and running speech tasks were used to collect the aerodynamic data. Comfortable pitch and loudness levels were used for each of these tasks. Age and gender effects were found for a number of the phonatory (mean) flow rate and phonatory sound pressure level values. Results failed, however, to indicate age or gender effects for the estimated subglottal pressure, laryngeal airway resistance, phonatory power and phonatory efficiency parameters. High intersubject variability was found for the phonatory flow rate, laryngeal airway resistance, phonatory power and phonatory efficiency values. Estimated subglottal pressure values, however, appeared to vary the least among subjects. The results are discussed with respect to factors that might influence laryngeal aerodynamics, such as underlying laryngeal anatomical and physiological age-related changes and gender-related differences. The clinical implications of the findings for the assessment and treatment of individuals with voice disorders using the Aerophone II are also discussed.

  17. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. V - Radiative flows with variable ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montesinos, Benjamin; Thomas, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Steady siphon flows in arched isolated magnetic flux tubes in the solar atmosphere are calculated here including radiative transfer between the flux tube and its surrounding and variable ionization of the flowing gas. It is shown that the behavior of a siphon flow is strongly determined by the degree of radiative coupling between the flux tube and its surroundings in the superadiabatic layer just below the solar surface. Critical siphon flows with adiabatic tube shocks in the downstream leg are calculated, illustrating the radiative relaxation of the temperature jump downstream of the shock. For flows in arched flux tubes reaching up to the temperature minimum, where the opacity is low, the gas inside the flux tube is much cooler than the surrounding atmosphere at the top of the arch. It is suggested that gas cooled by siphon flows contribute to the cool component of the solar atmosphere at the height of the temperature minimum implied by observations of the infrared CO bands at 4.6 and 2.3 microns.

  18. Flow variability in the Scandinavian ice sheet: modelling the coupling between ice sheet flow and hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Neil; Sharp, Martin

    2002-02-01

    There is increasing geologic evidence for periodic flow variability within large ice sheets, manifested as spatially and temporally variable areas of fast ice flow, and resulting in the very complex patterns of lineations observed in formerly glaciated areas. However, many ice sheet models do not replicate this behaviour. A possible reason for this is that such models do not include a detailed treatment of basal hydrology. Changes in the character of sub-glacial drainage systems are believed to cause surges in valley glaciers. Recent ice sheet models, which have included basal hydrology or at least a link between basal velocity and the presence of water at the bed, often show flow variability. However, these models have typically assumed a deformable bed, or have made no assumptions about the nature of the bed. Whilst these assumptions seem applicable to areas close to the former margins of Quaternary ice sheets, they are less applicable to interior areas. These areas typically show thin or scanty till cover over eroded bedrock, and the presence of eskers, which are indicative of drainage in sub-glacial tunnels. We have developed a two-dimensional time-dependent ice sheet model that includes hard-bed basal hydrology. This allows calculation of sub-glacial water pressures and the use of a water pressure dependent sliding law to calculate ice sheet velocities. When used to simulate the Weichselian Scandinavian ice sheet, with late Quaternary climate and sea level as forcing functions, this model develops localised areas of fast-flowing ice, which vary in extent and in distance of penetration into the interior of the ice sheet both spatially and temporally. The behaviour of these lobes depends crucially on the influence of the evolving ice sheet topography on the routing of subglacial water flow, due to the resulting variations in the subglacial hydraulic potential which drive the water flow. Bedrock topography also has some influence, but fast flow areas are not

  19. Choice of velocity variables for complex flow computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyy, W.; Chang, G. C.

    1991-01-01

    The issue of adopting the velocity components as dependent velocity variables for the Navier-Stokes flow computations is investigated. The viewpoint advocated is that a numerical algorithm should preferably honor both the physical conservation law in differential form and the geometric conservation law in discrete form. With the use of Cartesian velocity vector, the momentum equations in curvilinear coordinates can retain the full conservation-law form and satisfy the physical conservation laws. With the curvilinear velocity components, source terms appear in differential equations and hence the full conservation law form can not be retained. In discrete expressions, algorithms based on the Cartesian components can satisfy the geometric conservation-law form for convection terms but not for viscous terms; those based on the curvilinear components, on the other hand, cannot satisfy the geometric conservation-law form for either convection or viscous terms. Several flow solutions for domain with 90 and 360 degree turnings are presented to illustrate the issues of using the Cartesian velocity components and the staggered grid arrangement.

  20. Aerodynamic characteristics of an F-8 aircraft configuration with a variable camber wing at Mach numbers from 0.70 to 1.15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boltz, F. W.; Pena, D. F.

    1977-01-01

    A 0.1-scale model of an F-8 aircraft was tested in the Ames 14-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.7 to 1.15. Angle of attack was varied from -2 deg. to 22 deg. at sideslip angles of 0 deg and -5 deg. Reynolds number, dictated by the atmospheric stagnation pressure, varied with Mach number from 3.4 to 4.0 million based on mean aerodynamic chord. The model was configured with a wing designed to simulate the downward deflection of the leading and trailing edges of an advanced-technology-conformal-variable camber wing. This wing was also equipped with conventional (simple hinge) flaps. In addition, the model was tested with the basic F-8 wing to provide a reference for extrapolating to flight data. In general, at all Mach numbers the use of conformal flap deflections at both the leading edge and trailing edge resulted in slightly higher maximum lift coefficients and lower drag coefficients than with the use of simple hinge flaps. There were also found to be small improvements in the pitching-moment characteristics with the use of conformal flaps.

  1. Nonlinear problems in flight dynamics involving aerodynamic bifurcations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, M.; Chapman, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    Aerodynamic bifurcation is defined as the replacement of an unstable equilibrium flow by a new stable equilibrium flow at a critical value of a parameter. A mathematical model of the aerodynamic contribution to the aircraft's equations of motion is amended to accommodate aerodynamic bifurcations. Important bifurcations such as, the onset of large-scale vortex-shedding are defined. The amended mathematical model is capable of incorporating various forms of aerodynamic responses, including those associated with dynamic stall of airfoils.

  2. Computational Assessment of the Aerodynamic Performance of a Variable-Speed Power Turbine for Large Civil Tilt-Rotor Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    2011-01-01

    The main rotors of the NASA Large Civil Tilt-Rotor notional vehicle operate over a wide speed-range, from 100% at take-off to 54% at cruise. The variable-speed power turbine offers one approach by which to effect this speed variation. Key aero-challenges include high work factors at cruise and wide (40 to 60 deg.) incidence variations in blade and vane rows over the speed range. The turbine design approach must optimize cruise efficiency and minimize off-design penalties at take-off. The accuracy of the off-design incidence loss model is therefore critical to the turbine design. In this effort, 3-D computational analyses are used to assess the variation of turbine efficiency with speed change. The conceptual design of a 4-stage variable-speed power turbine for the Large Civil Tilt-Rotor application is first established at the meanline level. The design of 2-D airfoil sections and resulting 3-D blade and vane rows is documented. Three-dimensional Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes computations are used to assess the design and off-design performance of an embedded 1.5-stage portion-Rotor 1, Stator 2, and Rotor 2-of the turbine. The 3-D computational results yield the same efficiency versus speed trends predicted by meanline analyses, supporting the design choice to execute the turbine design at the cruise operating speed.

  3. Effect of Flow Rate on In Vitro Aerodynamic Performance of NEXThaler® in Comparison with Diskus® and Turbohaler® Dry Powder Inhalers

    PubMed Central

    Buttini, Francesca; Brambilla, Gaetano; Copelli, Diego; Sisti, Viviana; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Bettini, Ruggero; Pasquali, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: European and United States Pharmacopoeia compendial procedures for assessing the in vitro emitted dose and aerodynamic size distribution of a dry powder inhaler require that 4.0 L of air at a pressure drop of 4 kPa be drawn through the inhaler. However, the product performance should be investigated using conditions more representative of what is achievable by the patient population. This work compares the delivered dose and the drug deposition profile at different flow rates (30, 40, 60, and 90 L/min) of Foster NEXThaler® (beclomethasone dipropionate/formoterol fumarate), Seretide® Diskus® (fluticasone propionate/salmeterol xinafoate), and Symbicort® Turbohaler® (budesonide/formoterol fumarate). Methods: The delivered dose uniformity was tested using a dose unit sampling apparatus (DUSA) at inhalation volumes either 2.0 or 4.0 L and flow rates 30, 40, 60, or 90 L/min. The aerodynamic assessment was carried out using a Next Generation Impactor by discharging each inhaler at 30, 40, 60, or 90 L/min for a time sufficient to obtain an air volume of 4 L. Results: Foster® NEXThaler® and Seretide® Diskus® showed a consistent dose delivery for both the drugs included in the formulation, independently of the applied flow rate. Contrary, Symbicort® Turbohaler® showed a high decrease of the emitted dose for both budesonide and formoterol fumarate when the device was operated at airflow rate lower that 60 L/min. The aerosolizing performance of NEXThaler® and Diskus® was unaffected by the flow rate applied. Turbohaler® proved to be the inhaler most sensitive to changes in flow rate in terms of fine particle fraction (FPF) for both components. Among the combinations tested, Foster NEXThaler® was the only one capable to deliver around 50% of extra-fine particles relative to delivered dose. Conclusions: NEXThaler® and Diskus® were substantially unaffected by flow rate through the inhaler in terms of both delivered dose and

  4. Numerical investigation on the flow characteristics and aerodynamic force of the upper airway of patient with obstructive sleep apnea using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soo-Jin; Kim, Woo-Seung; Sung, Sang-Jin

    2007-07-01

    Developing a mathematical model to predict the abnormal flow characteristics that are produced by obstructive sleep apnea is an important step in learning the pathophysiology of the obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) disease. The present study provides detailed calculations of flow in the pharyngeal airway of a patient with obstructive sleep apnea. To achieve this goal, a computational fluid dynamics model was constructed using raw data from three-dimensional computed tomogram (CT) images of an OSA patient. To reproduce the important transition from laminar to turbulent flow in the pharyngeal airway, the low Reynolds number k-epsilon model was adopted and successfully validated using previous open literature. The results show that the flow in the pharyngeal airway of patients with OSA comprises a turbulent jet formed by area restriction at the velopharynx. This turbulent jet causes higher shear and pressure forces in the vicinity of the velopharynx. From the results, It may be deduced that the most collapsible area in the pharyngeal airway of OSA patients is the velopharynx where minimum intraluminal pressure and maximum aerodynamic force lie.

  5. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  6. Comparison of theoretical and flight-measured local flow aerodynamics for a low-aspect-ratio fin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. Blair; Sandlin, Doral R.

    1986-01-01

    Flight test and theoretical aerodynamic data were obtained for a flight test fixture mounted on the underside of an F-104G aircraft. The theoretical data were generated using two codes: a two-dimensional transonic code called code H, and a three-dimensional subsonic and supersonic code called wing-body. Pressure distributions generated by the codes for the flight test fixture, as well as compared with the flight-measured data. The two-dimensional code pressure distributions compared well except at the minimum pressure point and the trailing edge. Shock locations compared well except at high transonic speeds. However, the two-dimensional code did not adequately predict the displacement thickness of the flight test fixture. The three-dimensional code pressure distributions compared well except at the trailing edge of the flight test fixture.

  7. Solution of plane cascade flow using improved surface singularity methods. [application of panel method to internal aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    A solution method was developed for calculating compressible inviscid flow through a linear cascade of arbitrary blade shapes. The method uses advanced surface singularity formulations which were adapted from those in current external flow analyses. The resulting solution technique provides a fast flexible calculation for flows through turbomachinery blade rows. The solution method and some examples of the method's capabilities are presented.

  8. Computational aerodynamics and supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the progress in computational aerodynamics over the last decade is reviewed. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program objectives, computational goals, and implementation plans are described.

  9. Aeroassist flight experiment aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Edwin B.

    1989-01-01

    The problem is to determine the transitional flow aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics, including the base flow characteristics, of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE). The justification for the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) Application stems from MSFC's system integration responsibility for the AFE. To insure that the AFE objectives are met, MSFC must understand the limitations and uncertainties of the design data. Perhaps the only method capable of handling the complex physics of the rarefied high energy AFE trajectory is Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. The 3-D code used in this analysis is applicable only to the AFE geometry. It uses the Variable Hard Sphere (VHS) collision model and five specie chemistry model available from Langley Research Center. The code is benchmarked against the AFE flight data and used as an Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV) design tool. The code is being used to understand the AFE flow field and verify or modify existing design data. Continued application to lower altitudes is testing the capability of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) to handle 3-D DSMC and its practicality as an ASTV/AFE design tool.

  10. A new technique for aerodynamic noise calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Pope, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method for the numerical analysis of aerodynamic noise generation is presented. The method involves first solving for the time-dependent incompressible flow for the given geometry. This fully nonlinear method that is tailored to extract the relevant acoustic fluctuations seems to be an efficient approach to the numerical analysis of aerodynamic noise generation.

  11. Numerical experiments of variable property turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ashish; Peeters, Jurriaan; Boersma, Bendiks; Pecnik, Rene

    2014-11-01

    We perform numerical experiments of turbulent channel flows with varying density and viscosity to investigate the validity of semi-local scaling as proposed by Huang, Coleman and Bradshaw (1995, J. Fluid Mech). Direct numerical simulations of the low Mach number approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations are used, whereby the fluid is internally heated and the temperature at the walls is set to constant. A pseudo-spectral discretization in the periodic directions and a 6th order compact finite difference in wall normal direction is used. The friction Reynolds number based on half channel height and wall friction velocity is Reτ = 395 . Different relations for density and viscosity as a function of temperature are studied. A variable property case has been identified with turbulent statistics that are quasi-similar to constant property turbulence. This case corresponds to the condition when the semi-local scaling is equal to the classical scaling. For cases wherein the semi-local scaling differs from classical scaling in the channel core, we show that the near-wall turbulence deviates towards a state of increased/decreased anisotropy as compared to constant property turbulence. The above results show not only the validity but also the usefulness of the semi-local scaling.

  12. A Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump Computer Model in EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect

    Raustad, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the variable refrigerant flow heat pump computer model included with the Department of Energy's EnergyPlusTM whole-building energy simulation software. The mathematical model for a variable refrigerant flow heat pump operating in cooling or heating mode, and a detailed model for the variable refrigerant flow direct-expansion (DX) cooling coil are described in detail.

  13. Recent advances in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh K.; Desse, Jerry E.

    1991-04-01

    The current state of the art in computational aerodynamics is described. Recent advances in the discretization of surface geometry, grid generation, and flow simulation algorithms have led to flowfield predictions for increasingly complex and realistic configurations. As a result, computational aerodynamics is emerging as a crucial enabling technology for the development and design of flight vehicles. Examples illustrating the current capability for the prediction of aircraft, launch vehicle and helicopter flowfields are presented. Unfortunately, accurate modeling of turbulence remains a major difficulty in the analysis of viscosity-dominated flows. In the future inverse design methods, multidisciplinary design optimization methods, artificial intelligence technology and massively parallel computer technology will be incorporated into computational aerodynamics, opening up greater opportunities for improved product design at substantially reduced costs.

  14. Prediction of modeled velopharyngeal orifice areas during steady flow conditions and during aerodynamic simulation of voiceless stop consonants.

    PubMed

    Smith, B E; Weinberg, B

    1982-07-01

    Results of a small number of studies (Warren and DuBois, 1964; Lubker, 1969; Smith and Weinberg, 1980; Horii and Lang, 1981) have led to expression of divergent views concerning the accuracy of modeled velopharyngeal orifice area estimates obtained on the basis of hydrokinetic principles. In this work, the hydrokinetic equation (Warren and DuBois, 1964) was subjected to experimentation: (1) in which flow rates through a vocal tract model were not varied and (2) in which flow rates were varied to simulate pressure/flow events found during voiceless, stop consonant production. With consideration given to instrumental and procedural factors, results indicated that accurate estimates of modeled velopharyngeal orifice areas can be obtained during steady flow conditions and during alternating flow conditions when measurements are made at airflow peaks. Results were interpreted to provide strong support for clinical and research use of the hydrokinetic equation to predict velopharyngeal orifice areas during stop consonant production.

  15. Prediction of modeled velopharyngeal orifice areas during steady flow conditions and during aerodynamic simulation of voiceless stop consonants.

    PubMed

    Smith, B E; Weinberg, B

    1982-07-01

    Results of a small number of studies (Warren and DuBois, 1964; Lubker, 1969; Smith and Weinberg, 1980; Horii and Lang, 1981) have led to expression of divergent views concerning the accuracy of modeled velopharyngeal orifice area estimates obtained on the basis of hydrokinetic principles. In this work, the hydrokinetic equation (Warren and DuBois, 1964) was subjected to experimentation: (1) in which flow rates through a vocal tract model were not varied and (2) in which flow rates were varied to simulate pressure/flow events found during voiceless, stop consonant production. With consideration given to instrumental and procedural factors, results indicated that accurate estimates of modeled velopharyngeal orifice areas can be obtained during steady flow conditions and during alternating flow conditions when measurements are made at airflow peaks. Results were interpreted to provide strong support for clinical and research use of the hydrokinetic equation to predict velopharyngeal orifice areas during stop consonant production. PMID:6956460

  16. Application of Jetstream to a Suite of Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telidetzki, Karla

    The impact of dimensionality on three aerodynamic optimization cases is studied to determine the effect of the number of geometric design variables. The cases investigated are: (1) drag minimization of an airfoil in transonic inviscid flow, (2) drag minimization through optimizing the twist distribution of a rectangular wing in subsonic inviscid flow, and (3) drag minimization through optimizing the twist distribution and section shapes of a wing in transonic turbulent flow. The optimization algorithm achieves significant drag reductions in all three cases. Valuable insight into the impact of dimensionality is gained, showing that increasing the number of design variables can provide greater flexibility. This flexibility can come at a cost to the convergence of the optimization algorithm, whether that be due to an inability to reduce the optimality significantly, the increased geometric flexibility challenging the mesh movement algorithm, or the unique aerodynamic shapes being unable to achieve converged flow solutions.

  17. Sensitivity Analysis and Optimization of Aerodynamic Configurations with Blend Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, A. M.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1997-01-01

    A novel (geometrical) parametrization procedure using solutions to a suitably chosen fourth order partial differential equation is used to define a class of airplane configurations. Inclusive in this definition are surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, vertical tail and horizontal tail. The design variables are incorporated into the boundary conditions, and the solution is expressed as a Fourier series. The fuselage has circular cross section, and the radius is an algebraic function of four design parameters and an independent computational variable. Volume grids are obtained through an application of the Control Point Form method. A graphic interface software is developed which dynamically changes the surface of the airplane configuration with the change in input design variable. The software is made user friendly and is targeted towards the initial conceptual development of any aerodynamic configurations. Grid sensitivity with respect to surface design parameters and aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients based on potential flow is obtained using an Automatic Differentiation precompiler software tool ADIFOR. Aerodynamic shape optimization of the complete aircraft with twenty four design variables is performed. Unstructured and structured volume grids and Euler solutions are obtained with standard software to demonstrate the feasibility of the new surface definition.

  18. Nonstationary Gas Flow in Thin Pipes of Variable Cross Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guderley, G.

    1948-01-01

    Characteristic methods for nonstationary flows have been published only for the special case of the isentropic flow up until the present, althought they are applicable in various places to more difficult questions too. This report derives the characteristic method for the flows which depend only on the position coordinates and time. At the same time the treatment of compression shocks is shown.

  19. A numerical simulation of the NFAC (National Full-scale Aerodynamics Complex) open-return wind tunnel inlet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, U. K.; Ross, J. C.; Jacocks, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The flow into an open return wind tunnel inlet was simulated using Euler equations. An explicit predictor-corrector method was employed to solve the system. The calculation is time-accurate and was performed to achieve a steady-state solution. The predictions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. Wall pressures are accurately predicted except in a region of recirculating flow. Flow-field surveys agree qualitatively with laser velocimeter measurements. The method can be used in the design process for open return wind tunnels.

  20. Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers given at the conference present the results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include two-dimensional configurations, three-dimensional configurations, transonic aircraft, and the space shuttle.

  1. Performance and test section flow characteristics of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.

    1993-01-01

    Results from the performance and test section flow calibration of the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented. Measurements indicating the 80- by 120-ft test section flow quality were obtained throughout the tunnel operational envelope and for atmospheric wind speeds up to approximately 20 knots. Tunnel performance characteristics and a dynamic pressure system calibration were also documented during the process of mapping the test section flow field. Experimental results indicate that the test section flow quality is relatively insensitive to dynamic pressure and the level of atmospheric winds experienced during the calibration. The dynamic pressure variation in the test section is within +/-75 percent of the average. The axial turbulence intensity is less than 0.5 percent up to the maximum test section speed of 100 knots, and the vertical and lateral flow angle variations are within +/-5 deg and +/-7 deg, respectively. Atmospheric winds were found to affect the pressure distribution in the test section only at high ratios of wind speed to test section speed.

  2. Aerodynamics Research Revolutionizes Truck Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center conducted numerous tests to refine the shape of trucks to reduce aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the 1980s and 1990s, a team based at Langley Research Center explored controlling drag and the flow of air around a moving body. Aeroserve Technologies Ltd., of Ottawa, Canada, with its subsidiary, Airtab LLC, in Loveland, Colorado, applied the research from Dryden and Langley to the development of the Airtab vortex generator. Airtabs create two counter-rotating vortices to reduce wind resistance and aerodynamic drag of trucks, trailers, recreational vehicles, and many other vehicles.

  3. Computer Simulation of Aircraft Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inouye, Mamoru

    1989-01-01

    The role of Ames Research Center in conducting basic aerodynamics research through computer simulations is described. The computer facilities, including supercomputers and peripheral equipment that represent the state of the art, are described. The methodology of computational fluid dynamics is explained briefly. Fundamental studies of turbulence and transition are being pursued to understand these phenomena and to develop models that can be used in the solution of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Four applications of computer simulations for aerodynamics problems are described: subsonic flow around a fuselage at high angle of attack, subsonic flow through a turbine stator-rotor stage, transonic flow around a flexible swept wing, and transonic flow around a wing-body configuration that includes an inlet and a tail.

  4. Workshop on Aircraft Surface Representation for Aerodynamic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J. (Editor); Ashbaugh, J. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Papers and discussions on surface representation and its integration with aerodynamics, computers, graphics, wind tunnel model fabrication, and flow field grid generation are presented. Surface definition is emphasized.

  5. Spatial Variability of the Flow and Turbulence Within a Model Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Ian N.; Böhm, Margi; Finnigan, John J.; Hughes, Dale

    2016-09-01

    The spatial variability of the mean flow and turbulence in and above a model canopy is investigated using three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimetry. The mean flow and turbulence are shown to be highly variable in space within the canopy but rapidly converge above the canopy. The coherent variations in the mean flow generate dispersive fluxes contributing almost a fifth to the total flux of momentum, and a greater contribution to the divergence of the flux, within the canopy. The higher-order turbulent statistics are more variable than the mean flow and often strongly correlated in space to variations in the mean flow. The implications of this microscale spatial variability for both field experiments and other laboratory experiments into canopy flow are discussed.

  6. Distributed Aerodynamic Sensing and Processing Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin; Jutte, Christine; Mangalam, Arun

    2011-01-01

    A Distributed Aerodynamic Sensing and Processing (DASP) toolbox was designed and fabricated for flight test applications with an Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) mounted under the fuselage of an F-15B on the Flight Test Fixture (FTF). DASP monitors and processes the aerodynamics with the structural dynamics using nonintrusive, surface-mounted, hot-film sensing. This aerodynamic measurement tool benefits programs devoted to static/dynamic load alleviation, body freedom flutter suppression, buffet control, improvement of aerodynamic efficiency through cruise control, supersonic wave drag reduction through shock control, etc. This DASP toolbox measures local and global unsteady aerodynamic load distribution with distributed sensing. It determines correlation between aerodynamic observables (aero forces) and structural dynamics, and allows control authority increase through aeroelastic shaping and active flow control. It offers improvements in flutter suppression and, in particular, body freedom flutter suppression, as well as aerodynamic performance of wings for increased range/endurance of manned/ unmanned flight vehicles. Other improvements include inlet performance with closed-loop active flow control, and development and validation of advanced analytical and computational tools for unsteady aerodynamics.

  7. Turbulent combustion flow through variable cross section channel

    SciTech Connect

    Rogov, B.V.; Sokolova, I.A.

    1999-07-01

    The object of this study is to develop a new evolutionary numerical method for solving direct task of Laval nozzle, which provides non-iterative calculations of chemical reacting turbulent flows with detailed kinetic chemistry. The numerical scheme of fourth order along the normal coordinate and second order along the streamwise one is derived for calculation of difference-differential equations of the second order and the first order. Marching method provides the possibility of computing field flow in subsonic section of nozzle and near an expansion. Critical mass consumption is calculated with controlled accuracy. After critical cross section of nozzle a combined marching method with global iterations over axial pressure (only) makes it possible to overcome ill posedness of mixed supersonic flow and calculate the whole flow field near and after critical cross section. Numerical results are demonstrated on turbulent burning hydrogen-oxygen flow through Laval nozzle with curvature of wall K{sub w} = 0.5.

  8. Aerodynamic drag on intermodal railcars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinghorn, Philip; Maynes, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The aerodynamic drag associated with transport of commodities by rail is becoming increasingly important as the cost of diesel fuel increases. This study aims to increase the efficiency of intermodal cargo trains by reducing the aerodynamic drag on the load carrying cars. For intermodal railcars a significant amount of aerodynamic drag is a result of the large distance between loads that often occurs and the resulting pressure drag resulting from the separated flow. In the present study aerodynamic drag data have been obtained through wind tunnel testing on 1/29 scale models to understand the savings that may be realized by judicious modification to the size of the intermodal containers. The experiments were performed in the BYU low speed wind tunnel and the test track utilizes two leading locomotives followed by a set of five articulated well cars with double stacked containers. The drag on a representative mid-train car is measured using an isolated load cell balance and the wind tunnel speed is varied from 20 to 100 mph. We characterize the effect that the gap distance between the containers and the container size has on the aerodynamic drag of this representative rail car and investigate methods to reduce the gap distance.

  9. Development of digital flow control system for multi-channel variable-rate sprayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision modulation of nozzle flow rates is a critical step for variable-rate spray applications in orchards and ornamental nurseries. An automatic flow rate control system activated with microprocessors and pulse width modulation (PWM) controlled solenoid valves was developed to control flow rates...

  10. Aerodynamics of Small Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas J.

    In this review we describe the aerodynamic problems that must be addressed in order to design a successful small aerial vehicle. The effects of Reynolds number and aspect ratio (AR) on the design and performance of fixed-wing vehicles are described. The boundary-layer behavior on airfoils is especially important in the design of vehicles in this flight regime. The results of a number of experimental boundary-layer studies, including the influence of laminar separation bubbles, are discussed. Several examples of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in this regime are described. Also, a brief survey of analytical models for oscillating and flapping-wing propulsion is presented. These range from the earliest examples where quasi-steady, attached flow is assumed, to those that account for the unsteady shed vortex wake as well as flow separation and aeroelastic behavior of a flapping wing. Experiments that complemented the analysis and led to the design of a successful ornithopter are also described.

  11. Reciprocity relations in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaslet, Max A; Spreiter, John R

    1953-01-01

    Reverse flow theorems in aerodynamics are shown to be based on the same general concepts involved in many reciprocity theorems in the physical sciences. Reciprocal theorems for both steady and unsteady motion are found as a logical consequence of this approach. No restrictions on wing plan form or flight Mach number are made beyond those required in linearized compressible-flow analysis. A number of examples are listed, including general integral theorems for lifting, rolling, and pitching wings and for wings in nonuniform downwash fields. Correspondence is also established between the buildup of circulation with time of a wing starting impulsively from rest and the buildup of lift of the same wing moving in the reverse direction into a sharp-edged gust.

  12. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  13. [Aerodynamics study on pressure changes inside pressure-type whole-body plethysmograph produced by flowing air].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2010-02-25

    When using pressure-type plethysmography to test lung function of rodents, calculation of lung volume is always based on Boyle's law. The precondition of Boyle's law is that perfect air is static. However, air in the chamber is flowing continuously when a rodent breathes inside the chamber. Therefore, Boyle's law, a principle of air statics, may not be appropriate for measuring pressure changes of flowing air. In this study, we deduced equations for pressure changes inside pressure-type plethysmograph and then designed three experiments to testify the theoretic deduction. The results of theoretic deduction indicated that increased pressure was generated from two sources: one was based on Boyle's law, and the other was based on the law of conservation of momentum. In the first experiment, after injecting 0.1 mL, 0.2 mL, 0.4 mL of air into the plethysmograph, the pressure inside the chamber increased sharply to a peak value, then promptly decreased to horizontal pressure. Peak values were significantly higher than the horizontal values (P<0.001). This observation revealed that flowing air made an extra effect on air pressure in the plethysmograph. In the second experiment, the same volume of air was injected into the plethysmograph at different frequencies (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 Hz) and pressure changes inside were measured. The results showed that, with increasing frequencies, the pressure changes in the chamber became significantly higher (P<0.001). In the third experiment, small animal ventilator and pipette were used to make two types of airflow with different functions of time. The pressure changes produced by the ventilator were significantly greater than those produced by the pipette (P<0.001). Based on the data obtained, we draw the conclusion that, the flow of air plays a role in pressure changes inside the plethysmograph, and the faster the airflow is, the higher the pressure changes reach. Furthermore, the type of airflow also influences the pressure changes

  14. [Aerodynamics study on pressure changes inside pressure-type whole-body plethysmograph produced by flowing air].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2010-02-25

    When using pressure-type plethysmography to test lung function of rodents, calculation of lung volume is always based on Boyle's law. The precondition of Boyle's law is that perfect air is static. However, air in the chamber is flowing continuously when a rodent breathes inside the chamber. Therefore, Boyle's law, a principle of air statics, may not be appropriate for measuring pressure changes of flowing air. In this study, we deduced equations for pressure changes inside pressure-type plethysmograph and then designed three experiments to testify the theoretic deduction. The results of theoretic deduction indicated that increased pressure was generated from two sources: one was based on Boyle's law, and the other was based on the law of conservation of momentum. In the first experiment, after injecting 0.1 mL, 0.2 mL, 0.4 mL of air into the plethysmograph, the pressure inside the chamber increased sharply to a peak value, then promptly decreased to horizontal pressure. Peak values were significantly higher than the horizontal values (P<0.001). This observation revealed that flowing air made an extra effect on air pressure in the plethysmograph. In the second experiment, the same volume of air was injected into the plethysmograph at different frequencies (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 Hz) and pressure changes inside were measured. The results showed that, with increasing frequencies, the pressure changes in the chamber became significantly higher (P<0.001). In the third experiment, small animal ventilator and pipette were used to make two types of airflow with different functions of time. The pressure changes produced by the ventilator were significantly greater than those produced by the pipette (P<0.001). Based on the data obtained, we draw the conclusion that, the flow of air plays a role in pressure changes inside the plethysmograph, and the faster the airflow is, the higher the pressure changes reach. Furthermore, the type of airflow also influences the pressure changes.

  15. Stochastic variability of oceanic flows above topography anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venaille, A.; Le Sommer, J.; Molines, J.-M.; Barnier, B.

    2011-08-01

    We describe a stochastic variability mechanism which is genuinely internal to the ocean, i.e., not due to fluctuations in atmospheric forcing. The key ingredient is the existence of closed contours of bottom topography surrounded by a stirring region of enhanced eddy activity. This configuration leads to the formation of a robust but highly variable vortex above the topography anomaly. The vortex dynamics integrates the white noise forcing of oceanic eddies into a red noise signal for the large scale volume transport of the vortex. The strong interannual fluctuations of the transport of the Zapiola anticyclone (˜100 Sv) in the Argentine basin are argued to be partly due to such eddy-driven stochastic variability, on the basis of a 310 years long simulation of a comprehensive global ocean model run driven by a repeated-year forcing.

  16. Introduction. Computational aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Paul G

    2007-10-15

    The wide range of uses of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aircraft design is discussed along with its role in dealing with the environmental impact of flight. Enabling technologies, such as grid generation and turbulence models, are also considered along with flow/turbulence control. The large eddy simulation, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and hybrid turbulence modelling approaches are contrasted. The CFD prediction of numerous jet configurations occurring in aerospace are discussed along with aeroelasticity for aeroengine and external aerodynamics, design optimization, unsteady flow modelling and aeroengine internal and external flows. It is concluded that there is a lack of detailed measurements (for both canonical and complex geometry flows) to provide validation and even, in some cases, basic understanding of flow physics. Not surprisingly, turbulence modelling is still the weak link along with, as ever, a pressing need for improved (in terms of robustness, speed and accuracy) solver technology, grid generation and geometry handling. Hence, CFD, as a truly predictive and creative design tool, seems a long way off. Meanwhile, extreme practitioner expertise is still required and the triad of computation, measurement and analytic solution must be judiciously used.

  17. Method for the determination of the three-dimensional aerodynamic field of a rotor-stator combination to compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandra, Sridhar M.; Bober, Lawrence J.; Khandelwal, Suresh

    1987-01-01

    Using the lifting surface theory and the acceleration potential method for the flow field of an axial turbocompressor stage, a recursive and a direct method are presented that make use of the eigenfunction solutions of the isolated rotor and stator to solve for the rotor-stator interaction problem. The net pressure distribution on the rotor and stator blades is represented by modified Birnbaum series, whose coefficients are determined using a matrix procedure and satisfying the boundary conditions on the surface of the blades. The relation between the matrix operators of the recursive and the direct methods is also shown. Expressions have been given for the blade circulation, the axial and tangential forces on the blade, the rotor power required, and the induced upwash velocity of the stage.

  18. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  19. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  20. Effects of ice accretions on aircraft aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Frank T.; Khodadoust, Abdollah

    2001-11-01

    This article is a systematic and comprehensive review, correlation, and assessment of test results available in the public domain which address the aerodynamic performance and control degradations caused by various types of ice accretions on the lifting surfaces of fixed wing aircraft. To help put the various test results in perspective, overviews are provided first of the important factors and limitations involved in computational and experimental icing simulation techniques, as well as key aerodynamic testing simulation variables and governing flow physics issues. Following these are the actual reviews, assessments, and correlations of a large number of experimental measurements of various forms of mostly simulated in-flight and ground ice accretions, augmented where appropriate by similar measurements for other analogous forms of surface contamination and/or disruptions. In-flight icing categories reviewed include the initial and inter-cycle ice accretions inherent in the use of de-icing systems which are of particular concern because of widespread misconceptions about the thickness of such accretions which can be allowed before any serious consequences occur, and the runback/ridge ice accretions typically associated with larger-than-normal water droplet encounters which are of major concern because of the possible potential for catastrophic reductions in aerodynamic effectiveness. The other in-flight ice accretion category considered includes the more familiar large rime and glaze ice accretions, including ice shapes with rather grotesque features, where the concern is that, in spite of all the research conducted to date, the upper limit of penalties possible has probably not been defined. Lastly, the effects of various possible ground frost/ice accretions are considered. The concern with some of these is that for some types of configurations, all of the normally available operating margins to stall at takeoff may be erased if these accretions are not

  1. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-04-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  2. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J.; Hessenius, Kristin A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Hicks, Gary; Richardson, Pamela F.; Unger, George; Neumann, Benjamin; Moss, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The annual accomplishments is reviewed for the Aerodynamics Division during FY 1991. The program includes both fundamental and applied research directed at the full spectrum of aerospace vehicles, from rotorcraft to planetary entry probes. A comprehensive review is presented of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications; CFD validation; transition and turbulence physics; numerical aerodynamic simulation; test techniques and instrumentation; configuration aerodynamics; aeroacoustics; aerothermodynamics; hypersonics; subsonics; fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  3. Unsteady Flow in a Supersonic Turbine with Variable Specific Heats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Huber, Frank; Sondak, Douglas L.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modern high-work turbines can be compact, transonic, supersonic, counter-rotating, or use a dense drive gas. The vast majority of modern rocket turbine designs fall into these Categories. These turbines usually have large temperature variations across a given stage, and are characterized by large amounts of flow unsteadiness. The flow unsteadiness can have a major impact on the turbine performance and durability. For example, the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) fuel turbine, a high work, transonic design, was found to have an unsteady inter-row shock which reduced efficiency by 2 points and increased dynamic loading by 24 percent. The Revolutionary Reusable Technology Turbopump (RRTT), which uses full flow oxygen for its drive gas, was found to shed vortices with such energy as to raise serious blade durability concerns. In both cases, the sources of the problems were uncovered (before turbopump testing) with the application of validated, unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the designs. In the case of the RRTT and the Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) turbines, the unsteady CFD codes have been used not just to identify problems, but to guide designs which mitigate problems due to unsteadiness. Using unsteady flow analyses as a part of the design process has led to turbine designs with higher performance (which affects temperature and mass flow rate) and fewer dynamics problems. One of the many assumptions made during the design and analysis of supersonic turbine stages is that the values of the specific heats are constant. In some analyses the value is based on an average of the expected upstream and downstream temperatures. In stages where the temperature can vary by 300 to 500 K, however, the assumption of constant fluid properties may lead to erroneous performance and durability predictions. In this study the suitability of assuming constant specific heats has been investigated by performing three-dimensional unsteady Navier

  4. Unstructured mesh algorithms for aerodynamic calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The use of unstructured mesh techniques for solving complex aerodynamic flows is discussed. The principle advantages of unstructured mesh strategies, as they relate to complex geometries, adaptive meshing capabilities, and parallel processing are emphasized. The various aspects required for the efficient and accurate solution of aerodynamic flows are addressed. These include mesh generation, mesh adaptivity, solution algorithms, convergence acceleration, and turbulence modeling. Computations of viscous turbulent two-dimensional flows and inviscid three-dimensional flows about complex configurations are demonstrated. Remaining obstacles and directions for future research are also outlined.

  5. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Schairer, Edward; Hicks, Gary; Wander, Stephen; Blankson, Isiaiah; Rose, Raymond; Olson, Lawrence; Unger, George

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a comprehensive review of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation, transition and turbulence physics, numerical aerodynamic simulation, drag reduction, test techniques and instrumentation, configuration aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, aerothermodynamics, hypersonics, subsonic transport/commuter aviation, fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  6. Explaining and Forecasting Interannual Variability in the Flow of the Nile River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltahir, E. A.; Siam, M.

    2013-12-01

    The natural interannual variability in the flow of Nile River had a significant impact on the ancient civilizations and cultures that flourished on the banks of the river. Here, we analyze extensive data sets collected during the 20th century and define four modes of natural variability in the flow of Nile River, identifying a new significant potential for improving predictability of floods and droughts. Previous studies have identified a significant teleconnection between the Nile flow and the Eastern Pacific Ocean. El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) explains about 25% of the interannual variability in the Nile flow. Here, we identify, for the first time, a region in the southern Indian Ocean with similarly strong teleconnection to the Nile flow. Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in the region (60oE-90oE and 25oS-35oS) explains 28% of the interannual variability in the Nile flow. During those years with anomalous SST conditions in both Oceans, we estimate that indices of the SSTs in the Pacific and Indian Oceans can collectively explain up to 84% of the interannual variability in the flow of Nile. Building on these findings, we use classical Bayesian theorem to develop a new hybrid forecasting algorithm that predicts the Nile flow based on indices of the SST in the Eastern Pacific and Southern Indian Oceans.

  7. Explaining and forecasting interannual variability in the flow of the Nile River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siam, M. S.; Eltahir, E. A. B.

    2014-05-01

    The natural interannual variability in the flow of Nile River had a significant impact on the ancient civilizations and cultures that flourished on the banks of the river. This is evident from stories in the Bible and Koran, and from the numerous Nilometers discovered near ancient temples. Here, we analyze extensive data sets collected during the 20th century and define four modes of natural variability in the flow of Nile River, identifying a new significant potential for improving predictability of floods and droughts. Previous studies have identified a significant teleconnection between the Nile flow and the Eastern Pacific Ocean. El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) explains about 25% of the interannual variability in the Nile flow. Here, we identify, for the first time, a region in the southern Indian Ocean with similarly strong teleconnection to the Nile flow. Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in the region (50-80° E and 25-35° S) explains 28% of the interannual variability in the Nile flow. During those years with anomalous SST conditions in both Oceans, we estimate that indices of the SSTs in the Pacific and Indian Oceans can collectively explain up to 84% of the interannual variability in the flow of Nile. Building on these findings, we use classical Bayesian theorem to develop a new hybrid forecasting algorithm that predicts the Nile flow based on global models predictions of indices of the SST in the Eastern Pacific and Southern Indian Oceans.

  8. Effect of flow rate on environmental variables and phytoplankton dynamics: results from field enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiping; Chen, Ruihong; Li, Feipeng; Chen, Ling

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effects of flow rate on phytoplankton dynamics and related environment variables, a set of enclosure experiments with different flow rates were conducted in an artificial lake. We monitored nutrients, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity, turbidity, chlorophyll- a and phytoplankton levels. The lower biomass in all flowing enclosures showed that flow rate significantly inhibited the growth of phytoplankton. A critical flow rate occurred near 0.06 m/s, which was the lowest relative inhibitory rate. Changes in flow conditions affected algal competition for light, resulting in a dramatic shift in phytoplankton composition, from blue-green algae in still waters to green algae in flowing conditions. These findings indicate that critical flow rate can be useful in developing methods to reduce algal bloom occurrence. However, flow rate significantly enhanced the inter-relationships among environmental variables, in particular by inducing higher water turbidity and vegetative reproduction of periphyton ( Spirogyra). These changes were accompanied by a decrease in underwater light intensity, which consequently inhibited the photosynthetic intensity of phytoplankton. These results warn that a universal critical flow rate might not exist, because the effect of flow rate on phytoplankton is interlinked with many other environmental variables.

  9. Effects of reaction control system jet flow field interactions on the aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.010-scale space shuttle orbiter model in the Langley Research Center 31 inch CFHT (OA85)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daileda, J. J.; Marroquin, J.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to obtain detailed effects on supersonic vehicle hypersonic aerodynamic and stability and control characteristics of reaction control system jet flow field interactions with the local vehicle flow field. A 0.010-scale model was used. Six-component force data and wing, elevon, and body flap surface pressure data were obtained through an angle-of-attack range of -10 to +35 degrees with 0 deg angle of sideslip. The test was conducted with yaw, pitch and roll jet simulation at a free-stream Mach number of 10.3 and reaction control system plume simulation of flight dynamic pressures of 5, 10 and 20 PSF.

  10. Equations of motion for the variable mass flow-variable exhaust velocity rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempelman, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    An equation of motion for a one dimensional rocket is derived as a function of the mass flow rate into the acceleration chamber and the velocity distribution along the chamber, thereby including the transient flow changes in the chamber. The derivation of the mass density requires the introduction of the special time coordinate. The equation of motion is derived from both classical force and momentum approaches and is shown to be consistent with the standard equation expressed in terms of flow parameters at the exit to the acceleration chamber.

  11. Self-Calibrating, Variable-Flow Pumping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, Joe T.

    1994-01-01

    Pumping system provides accurate, controlled flows of two chemical liquids mixed in spray head and react to form rigid or flexible polyurethane or polyisocyanurate foam. Compatible with currently used polyurethane-based coating materials and gas-bubble-forming agents (called "blowing agents" in industry) and expected to be compatible with materials that used in near future. Handles environmentally acceptable substitutes for chlorofluorocarbon foaming agents.

  12. Improved Prediction of Disturbed Flow via Hemodynamically-Inspired Geometric Variables

    PubMed Central

    Bijari, Payam B.; Antiga, Luca; Gallo, Diego; Wasserman, Bruce A.; Steinman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Arterial geometry has long been considered a pragmatic alternative for inferring arterial flow disturbances and their impact on the natural history and treatment of vascular diseases. Traditionally, definition of geometric variables is based on convenient shape descriptors, with only superficial consideration of their influence on flow and wall shear stress patterns. In the present study we demonstrate that a more studied consideration of the actual (c.f., nominal) local hemodynamics can lead to substantial improvements in the prediction of disturbed flow by geometry. Starting from a well-characterized computational fluid dynamics (CFD) dataset of 50 normal carotid bifurcations, we observed that disturbed flow tended to be confined proximal to the flow divider, whereas geometric variables previously shown to be significant predictors of disturbed flow included features distal to the flow divider in their definitions. Flaring of the bifurcation leading to flow separation was redefined as the maximum relative expansion of the common carotid artery (CCA), proximal to the flow divider. The beneficial effect of primary curvature on flow inertia, via suppression of flow separation, was characterized by the in-plane tortuosity of CCA as it enters the flare region. Multiple linear regressions of these redefined geometric variables against various metrics of disturbed flow revealed R2 values approaching 0.6, better than the roughly 0.3 achieved using the conventional shape-based variables, while maintaining their demonstrated real-world reproducibility. Such a hemodynamically-inspired approach to the definition of geometric variables may reap benefits for other applications where geometry is used as a surrogate marker of local hemodynamics. PMID:22552156

  13. Bifurcations in unsteady aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, M.; Unal, A.

    1986-01-01

    Nonlinear algebraic functional expansions are used to create a form for the unsteady aerodynamic response that is consistent with solutions of the time dependent Navier-Stokes equations. An enumeration of means of invalidating Frechet differentiability of the aerodynamic response, one of which is aerodynamic bifurcation, is proposed as a way of classifying steady and unsteady aerodynamic phenomena that are important in flight dynamics applications. Accomodating bifurcation phenomena involving time dependent equilibrium states within a mathematical model of the aerodynamic response raises an issue of memory effects that becomes more important with each successive bifurcation.

  14. Cutaneous microvascular flow in the foot during simulated variable gravities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D. S.; Breit, G. A.; Styf, J. R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    Our objective was to understand how weight bearing with varying gravitational fields affects blood perfusion in the sole of the foot. Human subjects underwent whole body tilting at four angles: upright [1 gravitational vector from head to foot (Gz)], 22 degrees (0.38 Gz), 10 degrees (0.17 Gz), and supine (0 Gz), simulating the gravitational fields of Earth, Mars, Moon, and microgravity, respectively. Cutaneous capillary blood flow was monitored on the plantar surface of the heel by laser Doppler flowmetry while weight-bearing load was measured. At each tilt angle, subjects increased weight bearing on one foot in graded load increments of 1 kg beginning with zero. The weight bearing at which null flow first occurred was determined as the closing load. Subsequently, the weight bearing was reduced in reverse steps until blood flow returned (opening load). Mean closing loads for simulated Earth gravity, Mars gravity, Moon gravity, and microgravity were 9.1, 4.6, 4.4, and 3.6 kg, respectively. Mean opening loads were 7.9, 4.1, 3.5, and 3.1 kg, respectively. Mean arterial pressures in the foot (MAP(foot)) calculated for each simulated gravitational field were 192, 127, 106, and 87 mmHg, respectively. Closing load and opening load were significantly correlated with MAP(foot) (r =0.70, 0.72, respectively) and were significantly different (P < 0.001) from each other. The data suggest that decreased local arterial pressure in the foot lowers tolerance to external compression. Consequently, the human foot sole may be more prone to cutaneous ischemia during load bearing in microgravity than on Earth.

  15. Cutaneous Microvascular Flow In the Foot During Simulated Variable Gravities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, David S.; Breit, Greg A.; Styf, Jorma R.; Hargens, Alan R.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Our objective was to elucidate how varying gravitational fields affect blood perfusion in the sole of the foot. Human subjects underwent whole-body tilting at four angles: upright (1 G(sub z), 22 deg (.38 G(sub z)), 10 deg (.17 G(sub z)), and supine (0 G(sub z)), simulating the gravitational fields of Earth, Mars, Moon, and microgravity, respectively. Cutaneous capillary blood flow was monitored on the plantar surface of the heel by laser Doppler flowmetry while weight bearing load was measured beneath the same foot with a calibrated scale. Foot mean arterial pressures (MAP) were calculated by adding estimated hydrostatic pressures to continuously recorded heart-level blood pressures for each subject. At each tilt angle, subjects increased weight bearing on one foot in graded load increments of one kilogram beginning with zero. The weight bearing at which null flow first occurred was determined as the closing load (CL). Subsequently, the weight bearing was reduced in reverse steps until blood flow returned (opening load, OL). CL and OL were normalized to each subject's body weight and expressed as percent of body weight. Mean CLs (SD in parentheses) for simulated Earth, Mars, Moon, and micro-gravities were 14 (5), 8 (2), 6 (2), and 5 (2) percent of body weight, respectively. OLs were 12 (3), 6 (1), 5 (2), and 4 (1), respectively. Calculated foot MAPs for each simulated gravitational field were 192 (19), 127 (12), 106 (10), and 87 (9) mm Hg, respectively. CL and OL were significantly correlated with foot MAP (r = 0.70, 0.72, respectively). Overall, CL and OL were significantly different (p is less than 0.001). The data suggest that decreased local arterial pressure in the foot lowers tolerance to external compression. Consequently, the human foot sole may be more prone to cutaneous ischernia during loading in microgravity than on Earth.

  16. Modeling Scramjet Flows with Variable Turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiao, X.; Hassan, H. A.; Baurle, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    A complete turbulence model, where the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers are calculated as part of the solution and where averages involving chemical source terms are modeled, is presented. The ability of avoiding the use of assumed or evolution Probability Distribution Functions (PDF's) results in a highly efficient algorithm for reacting flows. The predictions of the model are compared with two sets of experiments involving supersonic mixing and one involving supersonic combustion. The results demonstrate the need for consideration of turbulence/chemistry interactions in supersonic combustion. In general, good agreement with experiment is indicated.

  17. Parental smoking, bronchial reactivity and peak flow variability in children

    PubMed Central

    Cook, D.; Strachan, D.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—A systematic quantitative review was conducted of the evidence relating environmental tobacco smoke to bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) during childhood.
METHODS—Twenty nine relevant studies were identified after consideration of 1593 articles selected by electronic search of the Embase and Medline databases using keywords relevant to passive smoking in children. The search was completed in April 1997.
RESULTS—Of 19 studies using challenge tests in children of school age, 10 (5759 children) could be summarised as the odds ratio of being bronchial hyperreactive in children exposed to environmental tobacco smoke compared with those not exposed. The pooled odds ratio for maternal smoking was 1.29 (95% confidence limits 1.10to 1.50) with no evidence of heterogeneity between studies. However, in five further studies of 3531 children providing some evidence, but not odds ratios, none were statistically significant. A further four studies on 5233 children have collected data but are not published. In contrast, all four studies of circadian variation in peak expiratory flow found increased variation in children exposed to environmental tobacco smoke.
CONCLUSIONS—A clear effect of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke on BHR in the general population has not been established. While the meta-analysis suggests a small but real increase in BHR in school aged children, it seems likely that this estimate is biased upwards due to publication bias. In contrast, limited evidence suggests greater variation in peak expiratory flow in children of smoking parents.

 PMID:9741375

  18. DENSITY-DEPENDENT FLOW IN ONE-DIMENSIONAL VARIABLY-SATURATED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A one-dimensional finite element is developed to simulate density-dependent flow of saltwater in variably saturated media. The flow and solute equations were solved in a coupled mode (iterative), in a partially coupled mode (non-iterative), and in a completely decoupled mode. P...

  19. An electronic flow control system for a variable-rate tree sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precise modulation of nozzle flow rates is a critical measure to achieve variable-rate spray applications. An electronic flow rate control system accommodating with microprocessors and pulse width modulation (PWM) controlled solenoid valves was designed to manipulate the output of spray nozzles inde...

  20. Application of control valves and balancing valves in a variable-flow hydronic system

    SciTech Connect

    Hegberg, R.A.

    1998-10-01

    In a hydronic system design for an HVAC system with load terminals for providing heating or cooling to a building, it is desirable to provide a variable water flow under command of the space temperature/humidity control at each load terminal. This paper discusses the design of a variable-speed pumping system with proportional control.

  1. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 3: Graphical data book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    A graphical presentation of the aerodynamic data acquired during coannular nozzle performance wind tunnel tests is given. The graphical data consist of plots of nozzle gross thrust coefficient, fan nozzle discharge coefficient, and primary nozzle discharge coefficient. Normalized model component static pressure distributions are presented as a function of primary total pressure, fan total pressure, and ambient static pressure for selected operating conditions. In addition, the supersonic cruise configuration data include plots of nozzle efficiency and secondary-to-fan total pressure pumping characteristics. Supersonic and subsonic cruise data are given.

  2. New technology in turbine aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    A cursory review is presented of some of the recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research at NASA-Lewis Research Center. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. An extensive bibliography is included. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Turbines currently being investigated make use of advanced blading concepts designed to maintain high efficiency under conditions of high aerodynamic loading. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flow fields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

  3. VARIABLE FIRING RATE OIL BURNER USING PULSE FUEL FLOW CONTROL.

    SciTech Connect

    KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KAMATH,B.R.

    2004-10-01

    problem is to develop a burner, which can operate at two firing rates, with the lower rate being significantly lower than 0.5 gallons per hour. This paper describes the initial results of adopting this approach through a pulsed flow nozzle. It has been shown that the concept of flow modulation with a small solenoid valve is feasible. Especially in the second configuration tested, where the Lee valve was integrated with the nozzle, reasonable modulation in flow of the order of 1.7 could be achieved. For this first prototype, the combustion performance is still not quite satisfactory. Improvements in operation, for example by providing a sharp and positive shut-off so that there is no flow under low pressures with consequent poor atomization could lead to better combustion performance. This could be achieved by using nozzles that have shut off or check valves for example. It is recommended that more work in cooperation with the valve manufacturer could produce a technically viable system. Marketability is of course a far more complex problem to be addressed once a technically viable product is available.

  4. Heat flow in variable polarity plasma arc welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1992-01-01

    The space shuttle external tank and the space station Freedom are fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding. Heat sink effects (taper) are observed when there are irregularities in the work-piece configuration especially if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, and in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of the previous, present, and consecutive research studies is to investigate the effect of irregularities in the work-piece configuration and fixture differences on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate automatically for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld.

  5. Variability in isotopic composition of base flow in two headwater streams of the southern Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nitin K.; Emanuel, Ryan E.; McGlynn, Brian L.

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the influence of hillslope scale topographic characteristics and the relative position of hillslopes along streams (i.e., internal catchment structure) on the isotopic composition of base flow in first-order, forested headwater streams at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory. The study focused on two adjacent forested catchments with different topographic characteristics. We used stable isotopes (18O and 2H) of water together with stream gauging and geospatial analysis to evaluate relationships between internal catchment structure and the spatiotemporal variability of base flow δ18O. Base flow δ18O was variable in space and time along streams, and the temporal variability of base flow δ18O declined with increasing drainage area. Base flow became enriched in 18O moving along streams from channel heads to catchment outlets but the frequency of enrichment varied between catchments. The spatiotemporal variability in base flow δ18O was high adjacent to large hillslopes with short flow paths, and it was positively correlated with the relative arrangement of hillslopes within the catchment. These results point to influence of unique arrangement of hillslopes on the patterns of downstream enrichment. Spatial variability in base flow δ18O within the streams was relatively low during dry and wet conditions, but it was higher during the transition period between dry and wet conditions. These results suggest that the strength of topographic control on the isotopic composition of base flow can vary with catchment wetness. This study highlights that topographic control on base flow generation and isotopic composition is important even at fine spatial scales.

  6. Flowing layer kinematics for constant dimension flowing layers with variable erosion velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitulnik, Adam; Pohlman, Nicholas

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of granular flow assume a consistent flowing layer profile observed in circular tumblers that were half full. While the constant shear rate model predicts mixing kinematics adequately, the model has not been empirically tested in systems where the erosion from the solid body has velocity components along the dynamic angle of repose. This research reports on experiments where the relationship between tumbler fill fraction and the kinematics of the erosion boundary transition into the flowing layer is analyzed. Tumblers greater than 50% full have inertial velocity along the angle of repose; fill conditions less than 50% enter with velocity opposite the free surface angle. Results show that varying the fill level while maintaining constant flowing layer length does not change the advection pattern within the flowing layer. The conclusion is that the 50% model is independent of fill level due to the kinetic energy of the flowing layer exceeding the potential energy at the erosion boundary.

  7. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in area of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodyamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  8. A Generalized Subsurface Flow Parameterization Considering Subgrid Spatial Variability of Recharge and Topography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Maoyi; Liang, Xu; Leung, Lai R.

    2008-12-05

    Subsurface flow is an important hydrologic process and a key component of the water budget, especially in humid regions. In this study, a new subsurface flow formulation is developed that incorporates spatial variability of both topography and recharge. It is shown through theoretical derivation and case studies that the power law and exponential subsurface flow parameterizations and the parameterization proposed by Woods et al.[1997] are all special cases of the new formulation. The subsurface flows calculated using the new formulation compare well with values derived from observations at the Tulpehocken Creek and Walnut Creek watersheds. Sensitivity studies show that when the spatial variability of topography or recharge, or both is increased, the subsurface flows increase at the two aforementioned sites and the Maimai hillslope. This is likely due to enhancement of interactions between the groundwater table and the land surface that reduce the flow path. An important conclusion of this study is that the spatial variability of recharge alone, and/or in combination with the spatial variability of topography can substantially alter the behaviors of subsurface flows. This suggests that in macroscale hydrologic models or land surface models, subgrid variations of recharge and topography can make significant contributions to the grid mean subsurface flow and must be accounted for in regions with large surface heterogeneity. This is particularly true for regions with humid climate and relatively shallow groundwater table where the combined impacts of spatial variability of recharge and topography are shown to be more important. For regions with arid climate and relatively deep groundwater table, simpler formulations, especially the power law, for subsurface flow can work well, and the impacts of subgrid variations of recharge and topography may be ignored.

  9. Structure and Mixing Characterization of Variable Density Transverse Jet Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorkyan, Levon

    (CVP) and the generation of strong upstream shear layer instability. In contrast, weak, convectively unstable upstream shear layers corresponded with asymmetries in the jet cross-sectional shape and/or lack of a CVP structure. While momentum flux ratio J and density ratio S most significantly determined the strength of the instabilities and CVP structures, an additional dependence on jet Reynolds number for CVP formation was found, with significant increases in jet Reynolds number resulting in enhanced symmetry and CVP generation. The mixing characteristics of Rej = 1900 jets of various J, S, and injector type were explored in detail in the present studies using jet centerplane and cross-sectional PLIF measurements. Various mixing metrics such as the jet fluid centerline concentration decay, Unmixedness, and Probability Density Function (PDF) were applied systematically using a novel method for comparing jets with different mass flux characteristics. It was found that when comparing mixing metrics along the jet trajectory, strengthening the upstream shear layer instability by reducing J, and achieving absolutely unstable conditions, enhanced overall mixing. Reducing density ratio S for larger J values, which under equidensity (S = 1.00) conditions would create a convectively unstable shear layer, was also observed to enhance mixing. On the other hand, reducing S for low J conditions, which are known to produce absolutely unstable upstream shear layers even for equidensity cases, was actually observed to reduce mixing, a result attributed to a reduction in crossfiow fluid entrainment into shear layer vortex cores as jet density was reduced. Comparing injectors, the flush-mounted pipe was generally the best mixer, whereas the worst mixer was the nozzle that was elevated above the crossfiow boundary layer due to upstream shear layer co-flow generated by the elevated nozzle contour; this co-flow was observed here and in prior studies to stabilize the shear layer. The

  10. Cold-air performance of a 15.41-cm-tip-diameter axial-flow power turbine with variable-area stator designed for a 75-kW automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclallin, K. L.; Kofskey, M. G.; Wong, R. Y.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of the aerodynamic performance of the axial flow, variable area stator power turbine stage for the Department of Energy upgraded automotive gas turbine engine was conducted in cold air. The interstage transition duct, the variable area stator, the rotor, and the exit diffuser were included in the evaluation of the turbine stage. The measured total blading efficiency was 0.096 less than the design value of 0.85. Large radial gradients in flow conditions were found at the exit of the interstage duct that adversely affected power turbine performance. Although power turbine efficiency was less than design, the turbine operating line corresponding to the steady state road load power curve was within 0.02 of the maximum available stage efficiency at any given speed.

  11. Effects of dynamically variable saturation and matrix-conduit coupling of flow in karst aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimann, T.; Geyer, T.; Shoemaker, W.B.; Liedl, R.; Sauter, M.

    2011-01-01

    Well-developed karst aquifers consist of highly conductive conduits and a relatively low permeability fractured and/or porous rock matrix and therefore behave as a dual-hydraulic system. Groundwater flow within highly permeable strata is rapid and transient and depends on local flow conditions, i.e., pressurized or nonpressurized flow. The characterization of karst aquifers is a necessary and challenging task because information about hydraulic and spatial conduit properties is poorly defined or unknown. To investigate karst aquifers, hydraulic stresses such as large recharge events can be simulated with hybrid (coupled discrete continuum) models. Since existing hybrid models are simplifications of the system dynamics, a new karst model (ModBraC) is presented that accounts for unsteady and nonuniform discrete flow in variably saturated conduits employing the Saint-Venant equations. Model performance tests indicate that ModBraC is able to simulate (1) unsteady and nonuniform flow in variably filled conduits, (2) draining and refilling of conduits with stable transition between free-surface and pressurized flow and correct storage representation, (3) water exchange between matrix and variably filled conduits, and (4) discharge routing through branched and intermeshed conduit networks. Subsequently, ModBraC is applied to an idealized catchment to investigate the significance of free-surface flow representation. A parameter study is conducted with two different initial conditions: (1) pressurized flow and (2) free-surface flow. If free-surface flow prevails, the systems is characterized by (1) a time lag for signal transmission, (2) a typical spring discharge pattern representing the transition from pressurized to free-surface flow, and (3) a reduced conduit-matrix interaction during free-surface flow. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Acoustic transmission matrix of a variable area duct or nozzle carrying a compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    The differential equations governing the propagation of sound in a variable area duct or nozzle carrying a one dimensional subsonic compressible fluid flow are derived and put in state variable form using acoustic pressure and particle velocity as the state variables. The duct or nozzle is divided into a number of regions. The region size is selected so that in each region the Mach number can be assumed constant and the area variation can be approximated by an exponential area variation. Consequently, the state variable equation in each region has constant coefficients. The transmission matrix for each region is obtained by solving the constant coefficient acoustic state variable differential equation. The transmission matrix for the duct or nozzle is the product of the individual transmission matrices of each region. Solutions are presented for several geometries with and without mean flow.

  13. A study of gas flow pattern, undercutting and torch modification in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, John C.; Hou, Haihui Ron

    1994-01-01

    A study on the plasma and shield gas flow patterns in variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding was undertaken by shadowgraph techniques. Visualization of gas flow under different welding conditions was obtained. Undercutting is often present with aluminum welds. The effects of torch alignment, shield gas flow rate and gas contamination on undercutting were investigated and suggestions made to minimize the defect. A modified shield cup for the welding torch was fabricated which consumes much less shield gas while maintaining the weld quality. The current torch was modified with a trailer flow for Al-Li welding, in which hot cracking is a critical problem. The modification shows improved weldablility on these alloys.

  14. Aerodynamic Characterization of a Modern Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.; Holland, Scott D.; Blevins, John A.

    2011-01-01

    A modern launch vehicle is by necessity an extremely integrated design. The accurate characterization of its aerodynamic characteristics is essential to determine design loads, to design flight control laws, and to establish performance. The NASA Ares Aerodynamics Panel has been responsible for technical planning, execution, and vetting of the aerodynamic characterization of the Ares I vehicle. An aerodynamics team supporting the Panel consists of wind tunnel engineers, computational engineers, database engineers, and other analysts that address topics such as uncertainty quantification. The team resides at three NASA centers: Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Ames Research Center. The Panel has developed strategies to synergistically combine both the wind tunnel efforts and the computational efforts with the goal of validating the computations. Selected examples highlight key flow physics and, where possible, the fidelity of the comparisons between wind tunnel results and the computations. Lessons learned summarize what has been gleaned during the project and can be useful for other vehicle development projects.

  15. Aerodynamic Performance of Hand Launch Glider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Masaru; Ishii, Mitsuru

    In recent years Micro Air Vehicles (MAV) for disaster aerial video are developed vigorously. In order to improve aerodynamic performance of MAV wing performance in low Reynolds numbers (Re) need to be improved, but research on the theme are very rare. In category of Hand Launch Glider, a kind of model aircraft, glide performance are competed, as a result high performance airfoils in Re is around 20,000 are developed. Therefore for MAV's aerodynamic performance improvement airfoils of Hand Launch Gliders should be referred and aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils desired to be studied. So in this research, aerodynamic characteristics of the gliders are measured in wind tunnel. And also consistency between wind tunnel test and glide test in calm air is examined to confirm reliability of wind tunnel test. Comparison of different airfoils and flow visualization are also performed.

  16. Switchable and Tunable Aerodynamic Drag on Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttag, Mark; Lopéz Jiménez, Francisco; Upadhyaya, Priyank; Kumar, Shanmugam; Reis, Pedro

    We report results on the performance of Smart Morphable Surfaces (Smporhs) that can be mounted onto cylindrical structures to actively reduce their aerodynamic drag. Our system comprises of an elastomeric thin shell with a series of carefully designed subsurface cavities that, once depressurized, lead to a dramatic deformation of the surface topography, on demand. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the giant cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) which possesses an array of axial grooves, thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. We perform systematic wind tunnel tests on cylinders covered with our Smorphs and characterize their aerodynamic performance. The switchable and tunable nature of our system offers substantial advantages for aerodynamic performance when compared to static topographies, due to their operation over a wider range of flow conditions.

  17. Switchable and Tunable Aerodynamic Drag on Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttag, Mark; Lopez Jimenez, Francisco; Reis, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    We report results on the performance of Smart Morphable Surfaces (Smporhs) that can be mounted onto cylindrical structures to actively reduce their aerodynamic drag. Our system comprises of an elastomeric thin shell with a series of carefully designed subsurface cavities that, once depressurized, lead to a dramatic deformation of the surface topography, on demand. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the giant cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) which possesses an array of axial grooves, which are thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. We perform systematic wind tunnel tests on cylinders covered with our Smorphs and characterize their aerodynamic performance. The switchable and tunable nature of our system offers substantial advantages for aerodynamic performance when compared to static topographies, due to their operation over a wider range of flow conditions.

  18. System Identification of a Vortex Lattice Aerodynamic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Kholodar, Denis; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The state-space presentation of an aerodynamic vortex model is considered from a classical and system identification perspective. Using an aerodynamic vortex model as a numerical simulator of a wing tunnel experiment, both full state and limited state data or measurements are considered. Two possible approaches for system identification are presented and modal controllability and observability are also considered. The theory then is applied to the system identification of a flow over an aerodynamic delta wing and typical results are presented.

  19. Aerodynamics of high-speed railway train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Raghu S.; Kim, H.-D.; Setoguchi, T.

    2002-10-01

    Railway train aerodynamic problems are closely associated with the flows occurring around train. Much effort to speed up the train system has to date been paid on the improvement of electric motor power rather than understanding the flow around the train. This has led to larger energy losses and performance deterioration of the train system, since the flows around train are more disturbed due to turbulence of the increased speed of the train, and consequently the flow energies are converted to aerodynamic drag, noise and vibrations. With the speed-up of train, many engineering problems which have been neglected at low train speeds, are being raised with regard to aerodynamic noise and vibrations, impulse forces occurring as two trains intersect each other, impulse wave at the exit of tunnel, ear discomfort of passengers inside train, etc. These are of major limitation factors to the speed-up of train system. The present review addresses the state of the art on the aerodynamic and aeroacoustic problems of high-speed railway train and highlights proper control strategies to alleviate undesirable aerodynamic problems of high-speed railway train system.

  20. Computational and experimental studies of light twin aerodynamic interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, W. G.; Wentz, W. H., Jr.; Ostowari, C.

    1982-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental study of aerodynamic interference effects for a light twin aircraft are presented. Both the influence of a body (either fuselage or nacelle) on a wing and the influence of a wing on a body are studied. The wing studied uses a new natural laminar flow airfoil with variable camber movable trailing edge. A three-dimensional panel method program utilizing surface source and surface doublet singularities was used to design wing-nacelle and wing-fuselage fairings. Experiments were conducted using a 1/6 scale reflection plane model. Forces, pressures, and surface flow visualization results are presented. Results indicate that potential flow analysis is useful to guide the design of intersection fairings, but experimental tuning is still required. While the study specifically addressed a light twin aircraft, the methods are applicable to a wide variety of aircraft.

  1. Associations of decadal to multidecadal sea-surface temperature variability with Upper Colorado River flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Betancourt, J.L.; Hidalgo, H.G.

    2007-01-01

    The relations of decadal to multidecadal (D2M) variability in global sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) with D2M variability in the flow of the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) are examined for the years 1906-2003. Results indicate that D2M variability of SSTs in the North Atlantic, North Pacific, tropical Pacific, and Indian Oceans is associated with D2M variability of the UCRB. A principal components analysis (with varimax rotation) of detrended and 11-year smoothed global SSTs indicates that the two leading rotated principal components (RPCs) explain 56% of the variability in the transformed SST data. The first RPC (RPC1) strongly reflects variability associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation and the second RPC (RPC2) represents variability of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, the tropical Pacific Ocean, and Indian Ocean SSTs. Results indicate that SSTs in the North Atlantic Ocean (RPC1) explain as much of the D2M variability in global SSTs as does the combination of Indian and Pacific Ocean variability (RPC2). These results suggest that SSTs in all of the oceans have some relation with flow of the UCRB, but the North Atlantic may have the strongest and most consistent association on D2M time scales. Hydroclimatic persistence on these time scales introduces significant nonstationarity in mean annual streamflow, with critical implications for UCRB water resource management. ?? 2007 American Water Resources Association.

  2. Atmospheric tests of trailing-edge aerodynamic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L S; Huang, S; Quandt, G A

    1998-01-01

    An experiment was conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s (NREL`s) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) using an instrumented horizontal-axis wind turbine that incorporated variable-span, trailing-edge aerodynamic brakes. The goal of the investigation was to directly compare results with (infinite-span) wind tunnel data and to provide information on how to account for device span effects during turbine design or analysis. Comprehensive measurements were used to define effective changes in the aerodynamic and hinge-moment coefficients, as a function of angle of attack and control deflection, for three device spans (7.5%, 15%, and 22.5%) and configurations (Spoiler-Flap, vented sileron, and unvented aileron). Differences in the lift and drag behavior are most pronounced near stall and for device spans of less than 15%. Drag performance is affected only minimally (about a 30% reduction from infinite-span) for 15% or larger span devices. Interestingly, aerodynamic controls with vents or openings appear most affected by span reductions and three-dimensional flow.

  3. Aerodynamic investigation by infrared imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. Sidney, Jr.; Mcree, Griffith J.; Gartenberg, Ehud

    1988-01-01

    Infrared imaging systems can be used to measure temperatures of actively heated bodies immersed in an airstream. This monitoring of the convective heat transfer process, provides also information about the interaction between the body and the flow. The concept appeals to Nusselt/Reynolds numbers relations in order to produce data of interest from surface temperatures. Two test cases are presented and reference is made to analytical results: the mapping of a laminar jet and the temperature distribution along a constant power heated flat plate in laminar boundary layer regime. Although this research is currently focused on low speed aerodynamics, the extension to high speed aerodynamics, where the body undergoes frictional heating is of interest in this context, too.

  4. Aerodynamics of badminton shuttlecocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Aekaansh; Desai, Ajinkya; Mittal, Sanjay

    2013-08-01

    A computational study is carried out to understand the aerodynamics of shuttlecocks used in the sport of badminton. The speed of the shuttlecock considered is in the range of 25-50 m/s. The relative contribution of various parts of the shuttlecock to the overall drag is studied. It is found that the feathers, and the net in the case of a synthetic shuttlecock, contribute the maximum. The gaps, in the lower section of the skirt, play a major role in entraining the surrounding fluid and causing a difference between the pressure inside and outside the skirt. This pressure difference leads to drag. This is confirmed via computations for a shuttlecock with no gaps. The synthetic shuttle experiences more drag than the feather model. Unlike the synthetic model, the feather shuttlecock is associated with a swirling flow towards the end of the skirt. The effect of the twist angle of the feathers on the drag as well as the flow has also been studied.

  5. Unsteady aerodynamics of insect flight.

    PubMed

    Ellington, C P

    1995-01-01

    Over the past decade, the importance of unsteady aerodynamic mechanisms for flapping insect flight has become widely recognised. Even at the fastest flight speeds, the old quasi-steady aerodynamic interpretation seems inadequate to explain the extra lift produced by the wings. Recent experiments on rigid model wings have confirmed the effectiveness of several postulated high-lift mechanisms. Delayed stall can produce extra lift for several chords of travel during the translational phases of the wingbeat. Lift can also be enhanced by circulation created during pronation and supination by rotational mechanisms: the fling/peel, the near fling/peel and isolated rotation. These studies have revealed large leading-edge vortices which contribute to the circulation around the wing, augmenting the lift. The mechanisms show distinctive patterns of vortex shedding from leading and trailing edges. The results of flow visualization experiments on tethered insects are reviewed in an attempt to identify the high-lift mechanisms actually employed. The fling/peel mechanism is clearly used by some insects. The near fling/peel is the wing motion most commonly observed, but evidence for the production of high lift remains indirect. For many insects, lift on the upstroke probably results from delayed stall instead of the flex mechanism of isolated rotation. The large leading-edge vortices from experiments on rigid model wings are greatly reduced or missing around the real insect wings, often making the identification of aerodynamic mechanisms inconclusive. A substantial spanwise flow component has been detected over the aerodynamic upper wing surface, which should transport leading-edge vorticity towards the wingtip before it has much time to roll up. This spanwise transport, arising from centrifugal acceleration, is probably a general phenomenon for flapping insect flight. It should reduce and stabilise any leading-edge vortices that are present, which is essential for preventing

  6. Sphincter of Oddi regulates flow by acting as a variable resistor to flow.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y F; Saccone, G T; Thune, A; Baker, R A; Harvey, J R; Toouli, J

    1992-11-01

    Two models of transsphincteric flow and a model evaluating pumping activity were established in the anesthetized Australian brush-tailed possum to determine whether the sphincter of Oddi (SO) acts as a resistor or as a pump. A simple model of transsphincteric flow (inflow only) demonstrated that at physiological common bile duct (CBD) pressure, 9.5 +/- 0.3 cmH2O (n = 7), transsphincteric flow occurred between SO pressure waves (n = 10). A second more complex transsphincteric flow model was established that permitted simultaneous measurements of inflow, outflow, CBD pressure, SO basal pressure, SO contraction frequency, and amplitude. At physiological CBD pressure, inflow always equaled outflow (157.0 +/- 11.2 and 156.4 +/- 11.4 microliters/min, respectively; n = 7). The SO displayed regular contractions superimposed on a basal pressure of 1.1 +/- 0.4 mmHg. Contraction amplitude was 12.6 +/- 3.0 mmHg and the frequency was 3.6 +/- 0.4 contractions/min (n = 7). Pressure waves recorded in the CBD corresponded to the SO contractions and reflected SO activity. Transsphincteric flow occurred between SO contractions and was obstructed by these contractions. Stimulation of SO activity (basal pressure and contraction frequency) with intra-arterial injections of motilin (200 ng/kg) or erythromycin (200 micrograms/kg) abolished transsphincteric flow. Reduction in SO contraction frequency to 72.7 +/- 7.2% (P < 0.01, paired t test) after administration of Cisapride (2 mg/kg iv) increased transsphincteric flow to 147.6 +/- 12.3% (n = 7, P < 0.05, paired t test). In six possums, possible SO pumping action was evaluated. A manometer was connected to the CBD, and a second manometer was connected to the duodenum surrounding the papilla.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1443142

  7. Aerodynamic Design of a Dual-Flow Mach 7 Hypersonic Inlet System for a Turbine-Based Combined-Cycle Hypersonic Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Bobby W.; Weir, Lois J.

    2008-01-01

    A new hypersonic inlet for a turbine-based combined-cycle (TBCC) engine has been designed. This split-flow inlet is designed to provide flow to an over-under propulsion system with turbofan and dual-mode scramjet engines for flight from takeoff to Mach 7. It utilizes a variable-geometry ramp, high-speed cowl lip rotation, and a rotating low-speed cowl that serves as a splitter to divide the flow between the low-speed turbofan and the high-speed scramjet and to isolate the turbofan at high Mach numbers. The low-speed inlet was designed for Mach 4, the maximum mode transition Mach number. Integration of the Mach 4 inlet into the Mach 7 inlet imposed significant constraints on the low-speed inlet design, including a large amount of internal compression. The inlet design was used to develop mechanical designs for two inlet mode transition test models: small-scale (IMX) and large-scale (LIMX) research models. The large-scale model is designed to facilitate multi-phase testing including inlet mode transition and inlet performance assessment, controls development, and integrated systems testing with turbofan and scramjet engines.

  8. Method of reducing drag in aerodynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrach, Frank J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    In the present method, boundary layer thickening is combined with laminar flow control to reduce drag. An aerodynamic body is accelerated enabling a ram turbine on the body to receive air at velocity V sub 0. The discharge air is directed over an aft portion of the aerodynamic body producing boundary layer thickening. The ram turbine also drives a compressor by applying torque to a shaft connected between the ram turbine and the compressor. The compressor sucks in lower boundary layer air through inlets in the shell of the aircraft producing laminar flow control and reducing drag. The discharge from the compressor is expanded in a nozzle to produce thrust.

  9. Uncertainty in Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Hemsch, M. J.; Morrison, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    An approach is presented to treat computational aerodynamics as a process, subject to the fundamental quality assurance principles of process control and process improvement. We consider several aspects affecting uncertainty for the computational aerodynamic process and present a set of stages to determine the level of management required to meet risk assumptions desired by the customer of the predictions.

  10. Aerodynamic heating to the gaps and surfaces of simulated reusable-surface-insulation tile arrays in turbulent flow at Mach 6.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, I.; Avery, D. E.; Chapman, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made on a simulated reusable-surface-insulation tile array in a turbulent boundary layer to determine aerodynamic-heating distributions representative of those expected on the surface of the shuttle orbiter during earth entry due to the presence of longitudinal and transverse surface gaps. The tests were conducted in an 8-foot high-temperature structures tunnel in a test medium of methane-air combustion products at a nominal Mach number of 6.6 and over a free-stream Reynolds number range from 2,000,000 to 4,900,000 per meter (600,000 to 1,500,000 per foot). The results were used to assess the aerodynamic heating effects produced by parameters that include gap width, boundary-layer displacement thickness, in-line and staggered tile arrangement, and tile protrusion.

  11. Design Exploration of Aerodynamic Wing Shape for RLV Flyback Booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Kazuhisa; Obayashi, Shigeru; Nakahashi, Kazuhiro

    The wing shape of flyback booster for a Two-Stage-To-Orbit reusable launch vehicle has been optimized considering four objectives. The objectives are to minimize the shift of aerodynamic center between supersonic and transonic conditions, transonic pitching moment and transonic drag coefficient, as well as to maximize subsonic lift coefficient. The three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computation using the modified Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model is used in aerodynamic evaluation accounting for possible flow separations. Adaptive range multi-objective genetic algorithm is used for the present study because tradeoff can be obtained using a smaller number of individuals than conventional multi-objective genetic algorithms. Consequently, four-objective optimization has produced 102 non-dominated solutions, which represent tradeoff information among four objective functions. Moreover, Self-Organizing Maps have been used to analyze the present non-dominated solutions and to visualize tradeoffs and influence of design variables to the four objectives. Self-Organizing Maps contoured by the four objective functions and design variables are found to visualize tradeoffs and effects of each design variable.

  12. Introduction to the aerodynamics of flight. [including aircraft stability, and hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talay, T. A.

    1975-01-01

    General concepts of the aerodynamics of flight are discussed. Topics considered include: the atmosphere; fluid flow; subsonic flow effects; transonic flow; supersonic flow; aircraft performance; and stability and control.

  13. Reliability and Applicability of Aerodynamic Measures in Dysphonia Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yiu, Edwin M.-L.; Yuen, Yuet-Ming; Whitehill, Tara; Winkworth, Alison

    2004-01-01

    Aerodynamic measures are frequently used to analyse and document pathological voices. Some normative data are available for speakers from the English-speaking population. However, no data are available yet for Chinese speakers despite the fact that they are one of the largest populations in the world. The high variability of aerodynamic measures…

  14. Influence of spatial and temporal flow variability on solute transport in catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selroos, Jan-Olof; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-04-01

    The present study quantifies the separate and combined effects of spatial and temporal variability of waterborne solute transport through catchments. The questions addressed are whether, when and why different types of variability may dominate catchment-scale transport. We utilize a versatile numerical solute transport code with a particle-based Monte Carlo time domain random walk method to simulate waterborne transport through a generic catchment. The methodology is exemplified by performing simulations using data on spatiotemporal flow and transport variability from direct stream discharge observations and independently calculated advective solute travel time distributions for catchments within the water management district Northern Baltic Proper (NBP) in Mid-Eastern Sweden. A main conclusion of the study is that projections of catchment mass loading based on spatial variability alone are robust estimates of long-term average solute transport development. This is especially true when annually aggregated mass load rather than finer temporal resolution of mass flux is considered. Temporal variability yields short-term fluctuations around the long-term average solute breakthrough development, and earlier or later arrival than the latter, depending on the timing and duration of solute input relative to the temporal flow variability. The exact temporal characteristics of future solute breakthroughs are thus fundamentally uncertain but their statistical expectation may be well quantified by only spatial variability account.

  15. Simultaneous Aerodynamic and Structural Design Optimization (SASDO) for a 3-D Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumbert, Clyde R.; Hou, Gene J.-W.; Newman, Perry A.

    2001-01-01

    The formulation and implementation of an optimization method called Simultaneous Aerodynamic and Structural Design Optimization (SASDO) is shown as an extension of the Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) method. It is extended by the inclusion of structure element sizing parameters as design variables and Finite Element Method (FEM) analysis responses as constraints. The method aims to reduce the computational expense. incurred in performing shape and sizing optimization using state-of-the-art Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow analysis, FEM structural analysis and sensitivity analysis tools. SASDO is applied to a simple. isolated, 3-D wing in inviscid flow. Results show that the method finds the saine local optimum as a conventional optimization method with some reduction in the computational cost and without significant modifications; to the analysis tools.

  16. Improving Flow Response of a Variable-rate Aerial Application System by Interactive Refinement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate response of a variable-rate aerial application controller to changing flow rates and to improve its response at correspondingly varying system pressures. System improvements have been made by refinement of the control algorithms over time in collaboration with ...

  17. Comparison of aerodynamic characteristics of pentagonal and hexagonal shaped bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Md. Naimul; Katsuchi, Hiroshi; Yamada, Hitoshi; Nishio, Mayuko

    2016-07-01

    Aerodynamics of the long-span bridge deck should be well understood for an efficient design of the bridge system. For practical bridges various deck shapes are being recommended and adopted, yet not all of their aerodynamic behaviors are well interpreted. In the present study, a numerical investigation was carried out to explore the aerodynamic characteristics of pentagonal and hexagonal shaped bridge decks. A relative comparison of steady state aerodynamic responses was made and the flow field was critically analyzed for better understanding the aerodynamic responses. It was found that the hexagonal shaped bridge deck has better aerodynamic characteristics as compared to the pentagonal shaped bridge deck.

  18. Aerodynamic tests of Darrieus wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P.G.; Walters, R.E.; Wolfe, W.P.

    1983-03-01

    An indoor facility for the aerodynamic testing of Darrieus turbine blades was developed. Lift, drag, and moment coefficients were measured for two blades whose angle of attack and chord-to-radius ratio were varied. The first blade used an NACA 0015 airfoil section; the second used a 15% elliptical cross section with a modified circular arc trailing edge. Blade aerodynamic coefficients were corrected to section coefficients for comparison to published rectilinear flow data. Although the airfoil sections were symmetrical, moment coefficients were not zero and the lift and drag curves were asymmetrical about zero lift coefficient and angle of attack. These features verified the predicted virtual camber and incidence phenomena. Boundary-layer centrifugal effects were manifested by discontinuous lift curves and large differences in the angle of zero lift between th NACA 0015 and elliptical airfoils. It was concluded that rectilinear flow aerodynamic data are not applicable to Darrieus turbine blades, even for small chord-to-radius ratios.

  19. High-lift aerodynamics: Prospects and plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Lawrence E.

    1992-01-01

    The emergence of high-lift aerodynamics is reviewed as one of the key technologies to the development of future subsonic transport aircraft. Airport congestion, community noise, economic competitiveness, and safety - the drivers that make high-lift an important technology - are discussed. Attention is given to the potentially synergistic integration of high-lift aerodynamics with two other advanced technologies: ultra-high bypass ratio turbofan engines and hybrid laminar flow control. A brief review of the ongoing high-lift research program at Ames Research Center is presented. Suggestions for future research directions are made with particular emphasis on the development and validation of computational codes and design methods. It is concluded that the technology of high-lift aerodynamics analysis and design should move boldly into the realm of high Reynolds number, three-dimensional flows.

  20. Calculated Low-Speed Steady and Time-Dependent Aerodynamic Derivatives for Some Airfoils Using a Discrete Vortex Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a collection of some results of four individual studies presenting calculated numerical values for airfoil aerodynamic stability derivatives in unseparated inviscid incompressible flow due separately to angle-of-attack, pitch rate, flap deflection, and airfoil camber using a discrete vortex method. Both steady conditions and oscillatory motion were considered. Variables include the number of vortices representing the airfoil, the pitch axis / moment center chordwise location, flap chord to airfoil chord ratio, and circular or parabolic arc camber. Comparisons with some experimental and other theoretical information are included. The calculated aerodynamic numerical results obtained using a limited number of vortices provided in each study compared favorably with thin airfoil theory predictions. Of particular interest are those aerodynamic results calculated herein (such as induced drag) that are not readily available elsewhere.

  1. Aerodynamics of bird flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Unlike airplanes birds must have either flapping or oscillating wings (the hummingbird). Only such wings can produce both lift and thrust - two sine qua non attributes of flying.The bird wings have several possibilities how to obtain the same functions as airplane wings. All are realized by the system of flight feathers. Birds have also the capabilities of adjusting the shape of the wing according to what the immediate flight situation demands, as well as of responding almost immediately to conditions the flow environment dictates, such as wind gusts, object avoidance, target tracking, etc. In bird aerodynamics also the tail plays an important role. To fly, wings impart downward momentum to the surrounding air and obtain lift by reaction. How this is achieved under various flight situations (cruise flight, hovering, landing, etc.), and what the role is of the wing-generated vortices in producing lift and thrust is discussed.The issue of studying bird flight experimentally from in vivo or in vitro experiments is also briefly discussed.

  2. Aerodynamics of Laminar Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Chung K.

    2000-11-01

    The presentation will review recent advances in the understanding of the structure, dynamics, and geometry of stretched, nonequidiffusive, laminar premixed flames, as exemplified by the unsteady propagation of wrinkled flames in nonuniform flow fields. It is first shown that by considering the effects of aerodynamic stretch on the flame structure, and by allowing for mixture nonequidiffusion, the flame responses, especially the flame propagation speed, can be quantitatively as well as qualitatively modified from the idealized planar limit. Subsequently, by treating the flame as a level surface propagating with the stretch-affected flame speed, problems of increasing complexity are presented to illustrate various features of flame propagation. The illustration first treats the flame as a structureless surface propagating into a constant-density combustible with a constant velocity * the laminar flame speed, and demonstrates the phenomena of cusp formation and volumetric burning rate augmentation through flame wrinkling. By using the stretch-affected flame speed, we then describe the phenomena of cusp broadening as well as tip opening of the Bunsen flame. Finally, by allowing for the density jump across the flame surface, a unified dispersion relation is derived for the intrinsic hydrodynamic, body-force, and nonequidiffusive modes of flame

  3. Aerodynamic Design Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan; Madavan, Nateri K.

    2003-01-01

    The design of aerodynamic components of aircraft, such as wings or engines, involves a process of obtaining the most optimal component shape that can deliver the desired level of component performance, subject to various constraints, e.g., total weight or cost, that the component must satisfy. Aerodynamic design can thus be formulated as an optimization problem that involves the minimization of an objective function subject to constraints. A new aerodynamic design optimization procedure based on neural networks and response surface methodology (RSM) incorporates the advantages of both traditional RSM and neural networks. The procedure uses a strategy, denoted parameter-based partitioning of the design space, to construct a sequence of response surfaces based on both neural networks and polynomial fits to traverse the design space in search of the optimal solution. Some desirable characteristics of the new design optimization procedure include the ability to handle a variety of design objectives, easily impose constraints, and incorporate design guidelines and rules of thumb. It provides an infrastructure for variable fidelity analysis and reduces the cost of computation by using less-expensive, lower fidelity simulations in the early stages of the design evolution. The initial or starting design can be far from optimal. The procedure is easy and economical to use in large-dimensional design space and can be used to perform design tradeoff studies rapidly. Designs involving multiple disciplines can also be optimized. Some practical applications of the design procedure that have demonstrated some of its capabilities include the inverse design of an optimal turbine airfoil starting from a generic shape and the redesign of transonic turbines to improve their unsteady aerodynamic characteristics.

  4. Simulating Water Flow in Variably Saturated Soils - Exploring the Advantage of Three-dimensional Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, L.; Ivanov, V. Y.

    2010-12-01

    There is still a debate in rainfall-runoff modeling over the advantage of using three-dimensional models based on partial differential equations describing variably saturated flow vs. models with simpler infiltration and flow routing algorithms. Fully explicit 3D models are computationally demanding but allow the representation of spatially complex domains, heterogeneous soils, conditions of ponded infiltration, and solute transport, among others. Models with simpler infiltration and flow routing algorithms provide faster run times and are likely to be more versatile in the treatment of extreme conditions such as soil drying but suffer from underlying assumptions and ad-hoc parameterizations. In this numerical study, we explore the question of whether these two model strategies are competing approaches or if they complement each other. As a 3D physics-based model we use HYDRUS-3D, a finite element model that numerically solves the Richards equation for variably-saturated water flow. As an example of a simpler model, we use tRIBS+VEGGIE that solves the 1D Richards equation for vertical flow and applies Dupuit-Forchheimer approximation for saturated lateral exchange and gravity-driven flow for unsaturated lateral exchange. The flow can be routed using either the D-8 (steepest descent) or D-infinity flow routing algorithms. We study lateral subsurface stormflow and moisture dynamics at the hillslope-scale, using a zero-order basin topography, as a function of storm size, antecedent moisture conditions and slope angle. The domain and soil characteristics are representative of a forested hillslope with conductive soils in a humid environment, where the major runoff generating process is lateral subsurface stormflow. We compare spatially integrated lateral subsurface flow at the downslope boundary as well as spatial patterns of soil moisture. We illustrate situations where both model approaches perform equally well and identify conditions under which the application of a

  5. Variability in venom volume, flow rate and duration in defensive stings of five scorpion species.

    PubMed

    van der Meijden, Arie; Coelho, Pedro; Rasko, Mykola

    2015-06-15

    Scorpions have been shown to control their venom usage in defensive encounters, depending on the perceived threat. Potentially, the venom amount that is injected could be controlled by reducing the flow speed, the flow duration, or both. We here investigated these variables by allowing scorpions to sting into an oil-filled chamber, and recording the accreting venom droplets with high-speed video. The size of the spherical droplets on the video can then be used to calculate their volume. We recorded defensive stings of 20 specimens representing 5 species. Significant differences in the flow rate and total expelled volume were found between species. These differences are likely due to differences in overall size between the species. Large variation in both venom flow speed and duration are described between stinging events of single individuals. Both venom flow rate and flow duration correlate highly with the total expelled volume, indicating that scorpions may control both variables in order to achieve a desired end volume of venom during a sting.

  6. Variability in venom volume, flow rate and duration in defensive stings of five scorpion species.

    PubMed

    van der Meijden, Arie; Coelho, Pedro; Rasko, Mykola

    2015-06-15

    Scorpions have been shown to control their venom usage in defensive encounters, depending on the perceived threat. Potentially, the venom amount that is injected could be controlled by reducing the flow speed, the flow duration, or both. We here investigated these variables by allowing scorpions to sting into an oil-filled chamber, and recording the accreting venom droplets with high-speed video. The size of the spherical droplets on the video can then be used to calculate their volume. We recorded defensive stings of 20 specimens representing 5 species. Significant differences in the flow rate and total expelled volume were found between species. These differences are likely due to differences in overall size between the species. Large variation in both venom flow speed and duration are described between stinging events of single individuals. Both venom flow rate and flow duration correlate highly with the total expelled volume, indicating that scorpions may control both variables in order to achieve a desired end volume of venom during a sting. PMID:25911958

  7. Performance of Thermal Mass Flow Meters in a Variable Gravitational Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, John E.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    The performance of five thermal mass flow meters, MKS Instruments 179A and 258C, Unit Instruments UFM-8100, Sierra Instruments 830L, and Hastings Instruments HFM-200, were tested on the KC-135 Reduced Gravity Aircraft in orthogonal, coparallel, and counterparallel orientations relative to gravity. Data was taken throughout the parabolic trajectory where the g-level varied from 0.01 to 1.8 times normal gravity. Each meter was calibrated in normal gravity in the orthogonal position prior to flight followed by ground testing at seven different flow conditions to establish a baseline operation. During the tests, the actual flow rate was measured independently using choked-flow orifices. Gravitational acceleration and attitude had a unique effect on the performance of each meter. All meters operated within acceptable limits at all gravity levels in the calibrated orthogonal position. However, when operated in other orientations, the deviations from the reference flow became substantial for several of the flow meters. Data analysis indicated that the greatest source of error was the effect of orientation, followed by the gravity level. This work emphasized that when operating thermal flow meters in a variable gravity environment, it is critical to orient the meter in the same direction relative to gravity in which it was calibrated. Unfortunately, there was no test in normal gravity that could predict the performance of a meter in reduced gravity. When operating in reduced gravity, all meters indicated within 5 percent of the full scale reading at all flow conditions and orientations.

  8. Aerodynamics. [numerical simulation using supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Randolph A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A projection is made of likely improvements in the economics of commercial aircraft operation due to developments in aerodynamics in the next half-century. Notable among these improvements are active laminar flow control techniques' application to third-generation SSTs, in order to achieve an L/D value of about 20; this is comparable to current subsonic transports, and has the further consequence of reducing cabin noise. Wave-cancellation systems may also be used to eliminate sonic boom overpressures, and rapid-combustion systems may be able to eliminate all pollutants from jet exhausts other than CO2.

  9. Aerodynamics. [Numerical simulation using supercomputers

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, R.A. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A projection is made of likely improvements in the economics of commercial aircraft operation due to developments in aerodynamics in the next half-century. Notable among these improvements are active laminar flow control techniques' application to third-generation SSTs, in order to achieve an L/D value of about 20; this is comparable to current subsonic transports, and has the further consequence of reducing cabin noise. Wave-cancellation systems may also be used to eliminate sonic boom overpressures, and rapid-combustion systems may be able to eliminate all pollutants from jet exhausts other than CO/sub 2/.

  10. Stage-by-Stage and Parallel Flow Path Compressor Modeling for a Variable Cycle Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Cheng, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of stage-by-stage and parallel flow path compressor modeling approaches for a Variable Cycle Engine. The stage-by-stage compressor modeling approach is an extension of a technique for lumped volume dynamics and performance characteristic modeling. It was developed to improve the accuracy of axial compressor dynamics over lumped volume dynamics modeling. The stage-by-stage compressor model presented here is formulated into a parallel flow path model that includes both axial and rotational dynamics. This is done to enable the study of compressor and propulsion system dynamic performance under flow distortion conditions. The approaches utilized here are generic and should be applicable for the modeling of any axial flow compressor design.

  11. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficient using Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network for Sparse Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Wind tunnels use scale models to characterize aerodynamic coefficients, Wind tunnel testing can be slow and costly due to high personnel overhead and intensive power utilization. Although manual curve fitting can be done, it is highly efficient to use a neural network to define the complex relationship between variables. Numerical simulation of complex vehicles on the wide range of conditions required for flight simulation requires static and dynamic data. Static data at low Mach numbers and angles of attack may be obtained with simpler Euler codes. Static data of stalled vehicles where zones of flow separation are usually present at higher angles of attack require Navier-Stokes simulations which are costly due to the large processing time required to attain convergence. Preliminary dynamic data may be obtained with simpler methods based on correlations and vortex methods; however, accurate prediction of the dynamic coefficients requires complex and costly numerical simulations. A reliable and fast method of predicting complex aerodynamic coefficients for flight simulation I'S presented using a neural network. The training data for the neural network are derived from numerical simulations and wind-tunnel experiments. The aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of the flow characteristics and the control surfaces of the vehicle. The basic coefficients of lift, drag and pitching moment are expressed as functions of angles of attack and Mach number. The modeled and training aerodynamic coefficients show good agreement. This method shows excellent potential for rapid development of aerodynamic models for flight simulation. Genetic Algorithms (GA) are used to optimize a previously built Artificial Neural Network (ANN) that reliably predicts aerodynamic coefficients. Results indicate that the GA provided an efficient method of optimizing the ANN model to predict aerodynamic coefficients. The reliability of the ANN using the GA includes prediction of aerodynamic

  12. Wing aerodynamic loading caused by jet-induced lift associated with STOL-OTW configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U.; Groesbeck, D.

    1979-01-01

    Surface pressure distributions were obtained with model-scale STOL-OTW configurations using various nozzles designed to promote flow attachment to the wing/flap surface. The nozzle configurations included slot-types and both circular and slot nozzles with external flow deflectors. The wing aerodynamic loading caused by the jet-induced lift is presented in conventional terms of delta p/q as a function of chordwise surface distance in the nozzle centerline plane as well as outboard of the nozzle centerline. Nozzle roof/deflector angle, chordwise location of the nozzle, wing size, and flap deflection angle are included in the geometric variables affecting the wing loading.

  13. Wing aerodynamic loading caused by jet-induced lift associated with STOL-OTW configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Glahn, U.; Groesbeck, D.

    1979-01-01

    Surface pressure distributions were obtained with model-scale STOL-OTW configurations using various nozzles designed to promote flow attachment to the wing-flap surface. The nozzle configurations included slot-types and both circular and slot nozzles with external flow deflectors. The wing aerodynamic loading caused by the jet-induced lift is presented in conventional terms of delta p/q as a function of chordwise surface distance in the nozzle centerline plane as well as outboard of the nozzle centerline. Included in the geometric variables affecting the wing loading are nozzle roof/deflector angle, chordwise location of the nozzle, wing size, and flap deflection angle.

  14. Benchmarking variable-density flow in saturated and unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Morel, Carlos Roberto; Cremer, Clemens; Graf, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In natural environments, fluid density and viscosity can be affected by spatial and temporal variations of solute concentration and/or temperature. These variations can occur, for example, due to salt water intrusion in coastal aquifers, leachate infiltration from waste disposal sites and upconing of saline water from deep aquifers. As a consequence, potentially unstable situations may exist in which a dense fluid overlies a less dense fluid. This situation can produce instabilities that manifest as dense plume fingers that move vertically downwards counterbalanced by vertical upwards flow of the less dense fluid. Resulting free convection increases solute transport rates over large distances and times relative to constant-density flow. Therefore, the understanding of free convection is relevant for the protection of freshwater aquifer systems. The results from a laboratory experiment of saturated and unsaturated variable-density flow and solute transport (Simmons et al., Transp. Porous Medium, 2002) are used as the physical basis to define a mathematical benchmark. The HydroGeoSphere code coupled with PEST are used to estimate the optimal parameter set capable of reproducing the physical model. A grid convergency analysis (in space and time) is also undertaken in order to obtain the adequate spatial and temporal discretizations. The new mathematical benchmark is useful for model comparison and testing of variable-density variably saturated flow in porous media.

  15. Flow variability and ongoing margin shifts on Bindschadler and MacAyeal Ice Streams, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulbe, C. L.; Scambos, T. A.; Klinger, M.; Fahnestock, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Ice streams on the Ross Sea side of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet are known to experience flow variability on hourly, annual, and multicentury time scales. We report here on observations of flow variability at the decade scale on the Bindschadler and MacAyeal Ice Streams (BIS and MacIS). Our analysis makes use of archived ice velocity data and new mappings from composited Landsat 7 and Landsat 8 imagery that together span the interval from 1985 to 2014. Both ice streams speedup and slowdown in a range of about ±5 m a-2 over our various comparison intervals. The rates of change are variable in both time and space, and there is no evidence of external forcing at work across the two streams. Widespread changes are most likely linked to instability in the subglacial till and/or subglacial water flow. Sticky spots near the confluence of the two ice streams are loci for speed changes. These relatively young and slow-flowing features appear to be forcing shifts in margin position near the outlets of both streams. The margin jumps reduce the effective outlet widths of the streams by 20% and 30% on BIS and MacIS, respectively. Those magnitudes are similar to the outlet narrowing experienced by Kamb Ice Stream prior to its stagnation.

  16. Modeling of aircraft unsteady aerodynamic characteristics. Part 1: Postulated models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Noderer, Keith D.

    1994-01-01

    A short theoretical study of aircraft aerodynamic model equations with unsteady effects is presented. The aerodynamic forces and moments are expressed in terms of indicial functions or internal state variables. The first representation leads to aircraft integro-differential equations of motion; the second preserves the state-space form of the model equations. The formulations of unsteady aerodynamics is applied in two examples. The first example deals with a one-degree-of-freedom harmonic motion about one of the aircraft body axes. In the second example, the equations for longitudinal short-period motion are developed. In these examples, only linear aerodynamic terms are considered. The indicial functions are postulated as simple exponentials and the internal state variables are governed by linear, time-invariant, first-order differential equations. It is shown that both approaches to the modeling of unsteady aerodynamics lead to identical models.

  17. Study of aerodynamic technology for single-cruise-engine V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, J. R.; Bear, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A viable, single engine, supersonic V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft concept was defined. This vectored thrust, canard wing configuration utilizes an advanced technology separated flow engine with fan stream burning. The aerodynamic characteristics of this configuration were estimated and performance evaluated. Significant aerodynamic and aerodynamic propulsion interaction uncertainties requiring additional investigation were identified. A wind tunnel model concept and test program to resolve these uncertainties and validate the aerodynamic prediction methods were defined.

  18. Temporal variability of colloidal material in agricultural storm runoff from managed grassland using flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Gimbert, Laura J; Worsfold, Paul J

    2009-12-25

    This paper reports the use of flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) to determine the temporal variability of colloidal (<1mum) particle size distributions in agricultural runoff waters in a small managed catchment in SW England during storm events. Three storm events of varying intensity were captured and the colloidal material in the runoff analysed by FlFFF. The technique had sufficient sensitivity to determine directly the changing colloidal profile over the 0.08-1.0mum size range in the runoff waters during these storm events. Rainfall, total phosphorus and suspended solids in the bulk runoff samples were also determined throughout one storm and showed significant correlation (P<0.01) with the amount of colloidal material. Whilst there are some uncertainties in the resolution and absolute calibration of the FlFFF profiles, the technique has considerable potential for the quantification of colloidal material in storm runoff waters. PMID:19577239

  19. Advanced turboprop installation aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The expected aerodynamic effects of a propfan installed on a thick supercritical wing are summarized qualitatively. Nacelle/wing and jet interactions, slipstream incremental velocity, nonuniform inflow, and swirl loss recovery are discussed.

  20. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  1. DSMC-LBM hybrid scheme for flows with variable rarefaction conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Staso, Gianluca; Succi, Sauro; Toschi, Federico; Clercx, Herman

    2015-11-01

    The kinetic description of gases, based on the Boltzmann equation, allows to cover flow regimes ranging from the rarefied to the continuum limit. The two limits are traditionally studied by numerically approximating the Boltzmann equation via Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method or the Lattice Boltzmann Equation method (LBM). While DSMC is suitable for rarefied flows, its computational cost makes it unpractical to study hydrodynamic flows. The LBM has instead proved itself to be an efficient and accurate method in the hydrodynamic limit even though simulation of rarefied flows requires additional modeling. Here, results on the development of a hybrid scheme capable of coupling the LBM and the DSMC methods and able to efficiently simulate flows with variable rarefaction conditions are presented. The coupling scheme is based on Grad's moment method approach and the local single particle distribution function at a given order of truncation is built by using the Hermite polynomials expansion approach and Gauss-Hermite quadratures. The capabilities of the hybrid approach for simulating flows in the transition regime are illustrated in the case of planar Couette and Poiseuille flows.

  2. Active flow control integrated diffuser (afcid) for increased energy efficiency in variable air volume systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Schijff, Hermanus P.

    Variable air volume (VAV) air terminals are designed to save energy by reducing airflow into a given space based on occupancy and required load. Systems are typically designed to operate at peak load, however as load is reduced, performance is compromised due to inadequate throw. As a result, fans are installed to adjust for the losses, negating many of the energy savings. Additionally flow is vectored by the use of vanes, a basic passive type of flow control. An experimental investigation was performed to study the application of flow control on that of a HVAC diffuser using synthetic jets distributed evenly along the diffuser edge parallel to the flow field. The study was conducted on a 1:3 scale typical office space (150 ft2), which included a simulated scale HVAC system supplied by compressed air. Two different jet blowing ratios were investigated for system loads of 60% and 90%. The flow field was established using hot wire anemometry and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of synthetic jet based active flow control at controlling airflow, showing ability to affect throw parameters for changing flow rates within the test chamber. Vectoring of up to 20% and improvement in jet spread of 200% was demonstrated. The use of such devices has the potential to improve air quality and air distribution in building while simultaneously lowering energy demands of HVAC systems.

  3. Cyclic variability measurements of in-cylinder engine flows using high-speed particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towers, D. P.; Towers, C. E.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we present full-field flow measurements for cyclic variability analysis within in-cylinder flows. A high-speed particle image velocimetry system has been developed with a framing rate of 13.5 kHz to allow single pulse multiple frame cross-correlation processing. This framing rate produced velocity vector maps at approximately 1° crank angle temporal resolution for engine speeds up to 2000 rpm. A novel processing scheme employing the temporal product of correlation functions is shown to increase vector validation rates enabling a statistical flow analysis. Velocity data have been obtained over 15 engine cycles for two engine conditions to demonstrate the operation of the instrumentation and processing algorithms. The data obtained show that changing the axial swirl level via the inlet port geometry has a significant effect on the cyclic variability of the flow in the latter half of the compression stroke. The technique allows the acquisition and processing of the flow data within a single working day representing orders of magnitude time and cost savings compared to using single point optical velocimeters.

  4. The Impact of Flow on Spatial Variability of Streamwater Chemistry in a Boreal Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffam, I.; Laudon, H.; Bishop, K.; Temnerud, J.; Mörth, M.

    2004-12-01

    Spatial variability in water chemistry is one defining characteristic of stream ecosystems. An infrequently studied aspect of this variability is the impact of flow regime: for instance, does the variation in water chemistry within a watershed differ between times of baseflow and flood? We examined this issue in Krycklan, a largely forested till-underlain boreal catchment in Northern Sweden, with an emphasis on changes occurring during the annual spring flood. Utilizing 15 stream sites ranging in catchment size from 0.07-68 km2 and in catchment wetland coverage from 0-40%, the between-site variance in several water parameters was compared between times of stable, relatively low flow and times of dramatically changing, high flow during spring flood. Distinctly different patterns were observed for different solutes. While dissolved organic carbon (DOC) varied widely between streams at baseflow (5-40 mg/l) and was positively correlated with catchment % wetland area, these differences were subdued during peak flood (DOC range 15-25 mg/l), and as such variability was lower. Conversely, differences in inorganic cation concentrations (electrical conductivity ranged from 15-30 μ S/cm) were amplified during the spring flood, resulting in increased spatial variability. Much of the change in variability hinged on the contrasting behavior of streams draining catchments with high % wetland compared to forested catchments: wetland streams had lower concentrations of cations at baseflow, and were also diluted more dramatically than forest streams during the flood. Hydrological flowpaths were explored using isotopic and chemical signatures of streamwater and catchment source waters. Much of the observed patterns in spatial variability could be explained by divergent flowpaths within wetland and forest catchments during spring flood, and by differing source areas for DOC vs. cations.

  5. Supersonic Parachute Aerodynamic Testing and Fluid Structure Interaction Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingard, J. S.; Underwood, J. C.; Darley, M. G.; Marraffa, L.; Ferracina, L.

    2014-06-01

    The ESA Supersonic Parachute program expands the knowledge of parachute inflation and flying characteristics in supersonic flows using wind tunnel testing and fluid structure interaction to develop new inflation algorithms and aerodynamic databases.

  6. Effect of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity on high-speed slip flow between concentric cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T C; Street, R E

    1954-01-01

    Schamberg was the first to solve the differential equations of slip flow, including the Burnett terms, for concentric circular cylinders assuming constant coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity. The problem is solved for variable coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity in this paper by applying a transformation which leads to an iteration method. Starting with the solution for constant coefficients, this method enables one to approximate the solution for variable coefficients very closely after one or two steps. Satisfactory results are shown to follow from Schamberg's solution by using his values of constant coefficients multiplied by a constant factor, leading to what are denoted as the effective coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity.

  7. Effect of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity on high-speed slip flow between concentric cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T C; Street, R E

    1953-01-01

    The differential equations of slip flow, including the Burnett terms, were first solved by Schamberg assuming that the coefficients of viscosity and heat conduction of the gas were constants. The problem is solved herein for variable coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity by applying a transformation leading to an iteration method. The method, starting with the solution for constant coefficients, enables one to approximate the solution for variable coefficients very closely after one or two steps. Satisfactory results are shown to follow from Schamberg's solution by using his values of the constant coefficients multiplied by a constant factor 'N', leading to what are denoted as the effective coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity.

  8. An initial investigation into methods of computing transonic aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1994-01-01

    The primary accomplishments of the project are as follows: (1) Using the transonic small perturbation equation as a flowfield model, the project demonstrated that the quasi-analytical method could be used to obtain aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients for airfoils at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic conditions for design variables such as Mach number, airfoil thickness, maximum camber, angle of attack, and location of maximum camber. It was established that the quasi-analytical approach was an accurate method for obtaining aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives for airfoils at transonic conditions and usually more efficient than the finite difference approach. (2) The usage of symbolic manipulation software to determine the appropriate expressions and computer coding associated with the quasi-analytical method for sensitivity derivatives was investigated. Using the three dimensional fully conservative full potential flowfield model, it was determined that symbolic manipulation along with a chain rule approach was extremely useful in developing a combined flowfield and quasi-analytical sensitivity derivative code capable of considering a large number of realistic design variables. (3) Using the three dimensional fully conservative full potential flowfield model, the quasi-analytical method was applied to swept wings (i.e. three dimensional) at transonic flow conditions. (4) The incremental iterative technique has been applied to the three dimensional transonic nonlinear small perturbation flowfield formulation, an equivalent plate deflection model, and the associated aerodynamic and structural discipline sensitivity equations; and coupled aeroelastic results for an aspect ratio three wing in transonic flow have been obtained.

  9. Reference values and improvement of aerodynamic drag in professional cyclists.

    PubMed

    García-López, Juan; Rodríguez-Marroyo, José Antonio; Juneau, Carl-Etienne; Peleteiro, José; Martínez, Alfredo Córdova; Villa, José Gerardo

    2008-02-01

    The aims of this study were to measure the aerodynamic drag in professional cyclists, to obtain aerodynamic drag reference values in static and effort positions, to improve the cyclists' aerodynamic drag by modifying their position and cycle equipment, and to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these modifications. The study was performed in a wind tunnel with five professional cyclists. Four positions were assessed with a time-trial bike and one position with a standard racing bike. In all positions, aerodynamic drag and kinematic variables were recorded. The drag area for the time-trial bike was 31% higher in the effort than static position, and lower than for the standard racing bike. Changes in the cyclists' position decreased the aerodynamic drag by 14%. The aero-helmet was not favourable for all cyclists. The reliability of aerodynamic drag measures in the wind tunnel was high (r > 0.96, coefficient of variation < 2%). In conclusion, we measured and improved the aerodynamic drag in professional cyclists. Our results were better than those of other researchers who did not assess aerodynamic drag during effort at race pace and who employed different wheels. The efficiency of the aero-helmet, and the validity, reliability, and sensitivity of the wind tunnel and aerodynamic field testing were addressed.

  10. A numerical investigation of the finite element method in compressible primitive variable Navier-Stokes flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive numerical investigation of the basic capabilities of the finite element method (FEM) for numerical solution of compressible flow problems governed by the two-dimensional and axis-symmetric Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables are presented. The strong and weak points of the method as a tool for computational fluid dynamics are considered. The relation of the linear element finite element method to finite difference methods (FDM) is explored. The calculation of free shear layer and separated flows over aircraft boattail afterbodies with plume simulators indicate the strongest assets of the method are its capabilities for reliable and accurate calculation employing variable grids which readily approximate complex geometry and capably adapt to the presence of diverse regions of large solution gradients without the necessity of domain transformation.

  11. Leveraging Understanding of Flow of Variable Complex Fluid to Design Better Absorbent Hygiene Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautkramer, C.; Rend, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Menstrual flow, which is a result of shedding of uterus endometrium, occurs periodically in sync with a women's hormonal cycle. Management of this flow while allowing women to pursue their normal daily lives is the purpose of many commercial products. Some of these products, e.g. feminine hygiene pads and tampons, utilize porous materials in achieving their goal. In this paper we will demonstrate different phenomena that have been observed in flow of menstrual fluid through these porous materials, share some of the advances made in experimental and analytical study of these phenomena, and also present some of the unsolved challenges and difficulties encountered while studying this kind of flow. Menstrual fluid is generally composed of four main components: blood plasma, blood cells, cervical mucus, and tissue debris. This non-homogeneous, multiphase fluid displays very complex rheological behavior, e. g., yield stress, thixotropy, and visco-elasticity, that varies throughout and between menstrual cycles and among women due to various factors. Flow rates are also highly variable during menstruation and across the population and the rheological properties of the fluid change during the flow into and through the product. In addition to these phenomena, changes to the structure of the porous medium within the product can also be seen due to fouling and/or swelling of the material. This paper will, also, share how the fluid components impact the flow and the consequences for computer simulation, the creation of a simulant fluid and testing methods, and for designing products that best meet consumer needs. We hope to bring to light the challenges of managing this complex flow to meet a basic need of women all over the world. An opportunity exists to apply learnings from research in other disciplines to improve the scientific knowledge related to the flow of this complex fluid through the porous medium that is a sanitary product.

  12. Investigating in-stream nitrogen removal at variable flow conditions using new optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Michael; Knoeller, Kay; Kiwel, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Most experimental studies on in-stream nitrogen removal concentrate on low flow conditions. Considerable knowledge gaps exist on nitrogen removal during high flow stages, especially for mid- sized streams. The objective of the study is quantify nitrogen removal during low and high flow conditions in the 4th order Bode river, which is part of the TERENO Hydrological Observatory of UFZ, Germany. To measure nitrogen removal at variable flow conditions we used new optical and conventional water quality multi-parameter sensors for continues measurements (10-15 min frequency) on electric conductivity, temperature, pH-value, nitrate-N, soluble oxygen, turbidity, chlorophyll a and SAC 254 (specific absorption coefficient) at two river stations. Additional automatic samplers were installed to conduct four low flow campaigns and to measure four high flow events at a 30km river reach from 2010 to 2012. Several nitrogen and phosphorus compounds as well as δ18O and δ15N isotopes at nitrate have been analyzed using a two hour sampling interval. The study river reach is an ideal system to investigate the impact of flow conditions on nitrogen removal by mass balances and natural abundance of nitrogen isotopes because upstream inflow is equal with downstream outflow with less the 3% deviation on a yearly basis. Continues sensor measurements show that nitrate removal is occurring throughout the year depending on primary production, temperature and nitrate concentrations. During low flow conditions in the vegetation period a clear diurnal variation of nitrate concentrations is observable. Nitrate-N concentrations, which range between 2 and 8 mgN l-1, can vary by 10% between day and night time during periods with high algae concentration. The nitrogen balance calculations for the four low flow sampling campaigns suggest a loss of nitrogen between 10 and 20 % in the 30km reach. Losses were highest in August 2011 and lowest in October 2010. Surprisingly also during high flow events

  13. Investigating in-stream nitrogen removal at variable flow conditions using new optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, M.; Knoeller, K.; Kiwel, U.

    2012-12-01

    Most experimental studies on in-stream nitrogen removal concentrate on low flow conditions. Considerable knowledge gaps exist on nitrogen removal during high flow stages, especially for mid- sized streams. The objective of the study is quantify nitrogen removal during low and high flow conditions in the 4th order Bode river, which is part of the TERENO Hydrological Observatory of UFZ, Germany. To measure nitrogen removal at variable flow conditions we used new optical and conventional water quality multi-parameter sensors for continues measurements (10-15 min frequency) on electric conductivity, temperature, pH-value, nitrate-N, soluble oxygen, turbidity, chlorophyll a and SAC 254 (specific absorption coefficient) at two river stations. Additional automatic samplers were installed to conduct four low flow campaigns and to measure four high flow events at a 30km river reach from 2010 to 2012. Several nitrogen and phosphorus compounds as well as δ18O and δ15N isotopes at nitrate have been analysed using a two hour sampling interval. The study river reach is an ideal system to investigate the impact of flow conditions on nitrogen removal by mass balances and natural abundance of nitrogen isotops because upstream inflow is equal with downstream outflow with less the 3% deviation on a yearly basis. Continues sensor measurements show that nitrate removal if occurring throughout the year depending on primary production, temperature and nitrate concentrations. During low flow conditions in the vegetation period a clear diurnal variation of nitrate concentrations is observable. Nitrate-N concentrations, which range between 2 and 8 mgN l-1, can vary by 10% between day and night time during periods with high algae concentration. The nitrogen balance calculations for the four low flow sampling campaigns suggest a loss of nitrogen between 10 and 20 % in the 30km reach. Losses were highest in August 2011 and lowest in October 2010. Surprisingly also during high flow events

  14. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shit, G. C.; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-01

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank-Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance.

  15. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  16. Aerodynamic optimization studies on advanced architecture computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chawla, Kalpana

    1995-01-01

    The approach to carrying out multi-discipline aerospace design studies in the future, especially in massively parallel computing environments, comprises of choosing (1) suitable solvers to compute solutions to equations characterizing a discipline, and (2) efficient optimization methods. In addition, for aerodynamic optimization problems, (3) smart methodologies must be selected to modify the surface shape. In this research effort, a 'direct' optimization method is implemented on the Cray C-90 to improve aerodynamic design. It is coupled with an existing implicit Navier-Stokes solver, OVERFLOW, to compute flow solutions. The optimization method is chosen such that it can accomodate multi-discipline optimization in future computations. In the work , however, only single discipline aerodynamic optimization will be included.

  17. Aerodynamic analysis of a tumbling American football

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, Daniel Edmundson

    In this study, the aerodynamic effects on an American football are characterized, especially in a tumbling, or end-over-end, motion as seen in a typical kickoff or field goal attempt. The objective of this study is to establish aerodynamic coefficients for the dynamic motion of a tumbling American football. A subsonic wind tunnel was used to recreate a range of air velocities that, when coupled with rotation rates and differing laces orientations, would provide a test bed for aerodynamic drag, side, and lift coefficient analysis. Test results quantify effect of back-spin and top-spin on lift force. Results show that the presence of laces imposes a side force in the opposite direction of the laces orientation. A secondary system was installed to visualize air flow around the tumbling ball and record high-speed video of wake patterns, as a qualitative check of measured force directions.

  18. Nonlinear aerodynamic modeling using multivariate orthogonal functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1993-01-01

    A technique was developed for global modeling of nonlinear aerodynamic coefficients using multivariate orthogonal functions based on the data. Each orthogonal function retained in the model was decomposed into an expansion of ordinary polynomials in the independent variables, so that the final model could be interpreted as selectively retained terms from a multivariable power series expansion. A predicted squared-error metric was used to determine the orthogonal functions to be retained in the model; analytical derivatives were easily computed. The approach was demonstrated on the Z-body axis aerodynamic force coefficient (Cz) wind tunnel data for an F-18 research vehicle which came from a tabular wind tunnel and covered the entire subsonic flight envelope. For a realistic case, the analytical model predicted experimental values of Cz very well. The modeling technique is shown to be capable of generating a compact, global analytical representation of nonlinear aerodynamics. The polynomial model has good predictive capability, global validity, and analytical differentiability.

  19. User's guide to the Variably Saturated Flow (VSF) process to MODFLOW

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thoms, R. Brad; Johnson, Richard L.; Healy, Richard W.

    2006-01-01

    A new process for simulating three-dimensional (3-D) variably saturated flow (VSF) using Richards' equation has been added to the 3-D modular finite-difference ground-water model MODFLOW. Five new packages are presented here as part of the VSF Process--the Richards' Equation Flow (REF1) Package, the Seepage Face (SPF1) Package, the Surface Ponding (PND1) Package, the Surface Evaporation (SEV1) Package, and the Root Zone Evapotranspiration (RZE1) Package. Additionally, a new Adaptive Time-Stepping (ATS1) Package is presented for use by both the Ground-Water Flow (GWF) Process and VSF. The VSF Process allows simulation of flow in unsaturated media above the ground-water zone and facilitates modeling of ground-water/surface-water interactions. Model performance is evaluated by comparison to an analytical solution for one-dimensional (1-D) constant-head infiltration (Dirichlet boundary condition), field experimental data for a 1-D constant-head infiltration, laboratory experimental data for two-dimensional (2-D) constant-flux infiltration (Neumann boundary condition), laboratory experimental data for 2-D transient drainage through a seepage face, and numerical model results (VS2DT) of a 2-D flow-path simulation using realistic surface boundary conditions. A hypothetical 3-D example case also is presented to demonstrate the new capability using periodic boundary conditions (for example, daily precipitation) and varied surface topography over a larger spatial scale (0.133 square kilometer). The new model capabilities retain the modular structure of the MODFLOW code and preserve MODFLOW's existing capabilities as well as compatibility with commercial pre-/post-processors. The overall success of the VSF Process in simulating mixed boundary conditions and variable soil types demonstrates its utility for future hydrologic investigations. This report presents a new flow package implementing the governing equations for variably saturated ground-water flow, four new boundary

  20. Non-invasive energy meter for fixed and variable flow systems

    DOEpatents

    Menicucci, David F.; Black, Billy D.

    2005-11-01

    An energy metering method and apparatus for liquid flow systems comprising first and second segments of one or more conduits through which a liquid flows, comprising: attaching a first temperature sensor for connection to an outside of the first conduit segment; attaching a second temperature sensor for connection to an outside of the second conduit segment; via a programmable control unit, receiving data from the sensors and calculating energy data therefrom; and communicating energy data from the meter; whereby the method and apparatus operate without need to temporarily disconnect or alter the first or second conduit segments. The invention operates with both variable and fixed flow systems, and is especially useful for both active and passive solar energy systems.

  1. Whispering--a single-subject study of glottal configuration and aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Johan; Scherer, Ronald; Hess, Markus; Müller, Frank

    2010-09-01

    Whisper productions were produced by a single adult male subject over a wide range of subglottal pressures, glottal areas, and glottal flows. Dimensional measurements were made of these three variables, including glottal perimeter. Subglottal pressure was directly obtained by a pressure transducer in a tracheal catheter, and wide-band flow with a pneumotach mask. Four types of whispers were used-hyperfunctional, hypofunctional, neutral, and postphonation-in addition to three levels of loudness (soft, medium, loud). Sequences of the /pae/ syllable were used. Video recordings of the larynx were made. The glottis was outlined by hand with extrapolation for unseen parts, and area and perimeter were obtained through image analysis software. The whisper tokens resulted in the following wide ranges: subglottal pressure: 1.3-17 cm H2O; glottal flow: 0.9-1.71 L/s; glottal area: 0.065-1.76 m2; and glottal perimeter: 1.09-6.55 cm. Hyperfunctional whisper tended to have higher subglottal pressures and lower areas and flows than hypofunctional whisper, with neutral and postphonation whisper values in between. An important finding is that glottal flow changed more for small changes of area when the area was already small, and did not create much flow change when area was changed for already larger areas; that is, whisper is "more sensitive" to airflow changes for smaller glottal areas. A general equation for whisper aerodynamics was obtained, namely, P (subglottal pressure [cm H2O])=C X F (glottal flow [cm(3)/s]), where C = 0.052 x A(4) - 0.1913 x A(3) + 0.2577 x A(2) - 0.1523 x A+0.0388, where A is the glottal area (cm(2)). Another general equation for nondimensional terms (pressure coefficient vs Reynolds number) also is offered. Implications for whisper flow resistance and aerodynamic power are given. These results give insight into whisper aerodynamics and offer equations relevant to speech synthesis.

  2. Oceanographic Controls on Diffuse Flow Temperature Variability at Main Endeavour Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaly, S. F.; Matabos, M.; Butterfield, D. A.; Lee, R.; Lilley, M. D.; Sarradin, P. M.; Sarrazin, J.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature observations from the Main Endeavour vent Field (MEF) on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge reveal large spatial variability over centimeter length scales. Five thermistor chains with ten sensors each are draped over a faunal assemblage on the the north side of the Grotto mound in the northern part of MEF. Spacing is on the order of 10 cm and the areal coverage is about a square meter. Shimmering fluids are evident in the ROV video during the deployment and recovery of the thermistors indicating that the area is a diffuse venting zone. The temperature variability can be a result of heterogeneity in the degree of diffuse venting and/or variability in the degree of mixing with the cool ambient waters. Concurrent observations from the NEPTUNE cabled observatory are: temperature from a nearby hot fluid (330 deg) vent orifice that is weakly modulated by the surface tide (pressure), temperature from a diffuse flow area artificially sheltered from the ambient currents and measurements of currents from a bottom-mounted ADCP. We use these measurements to argue that the temperature variability is the result of interaction of the buoyant flow with the oceanic currents in the boundary layer at the level of the faunal assemblage.

  3. Discriminative variable subsets in Bayesian classification with mixture models, with application in flow cytometry studies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Chan, Cliburn; West, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the evaluation of subsets of variables for the discriminative evidence they provide in multivariate mixture modeling for classification. The novel development of Bayesian classification analysis presented is partly motivated by problems of design and selection of variables in biomolecular studies, particularly involving widely used assays of large-scale single-cell data generated using flow cytometry technology. For such studies and for mixture modeling generally, we define discriminative analysis that overlays fitted mixture models using a natural measure of concordance between mixture component densities, and define an effective and computationally feasible method for assessing and prioritizing subsets of variables according to their roles in discrimination of one or more mixture components. We relate the new discriminative information measures to Bayesian classification probabilities and error rates, and exemplify their use in Bayesian analysis of Dirichlet process mixture models fitted via Markov chain Monte Carlo methods as well as using a novel Bayesian expectation-maximization algorithm. We present a series of theoretical and simulated data examples to fix concepts and exhibit the utility of the approach, and compare with prior approaches. We demonstrate application in the context of automatic classification and discriminative variable selection in high-throughput systems biology using large flow cytometry datasets.

  4. Discriminative variable subsets in Bayesian classification with mixture models, with application in flow cytometry studies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Chan, Cliburn; West, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the evaluation of subsets of variables for the discriminative evidence they provide in multivariate mixture modeling for classification. The novel development of Bayesian classification analysis presented is partly motivated by problems of design and selection of variables in biomolecular studies, particularly involving widely used assays of large-scale single-cell data generated using flow cytometry technology. For such studies and for mixture modeling generally, we define discriminative analysis that overlays fitted mixture models using a natural measure of concordance between mixture component densities, and define an effective and computationally feasible method for assessing and prioritizing subsets of variables according to their roles in discrimination of one or more mixture components. We relate the new discriminative information measures to Bayesian classification probabilities and error rates, and exemplify their use in Bayesian analysis of Dirichlet process mixture models fitted via Markov chain Monte Carlo methods as well as using a novel Bayesian expectation-maximization algorithm. We present a series of theoretical and simulated data examples to fix concepts and exhibit the utility of the approach, and compare with prior approaches. We demonstrate application in the context of automatic classification and discriminative variable selection in high-throughput systems biology using large flow cytometry datasets. PMID:26040910

  5. Sampling variability in estimates of flow characteristics in coarse-bed channels: Effects of sample size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cienciala, Piotr; Hassan, Marwan A.

    2016-03-01

    Adequate description of hydraulic variables based on a sample of field measurements is challenging in coarse-bed streams, a consequence of high spatial heterogeneity in flow properties that arises due to the complexity of channel boundary. By applying a resampling procedure based on bootstrapping to an extensive field data set, we have estimated sampling variability and its relationship with sample size in relation to two common methods of representing flow characteristics, spatially averaged velocity profiles and fitted probability distributions. The coefficient of variation in bed shear stress and roughness length estimated from spatially averaged velocity profiles and in shape and scale parameters of gamma distribution fitted to local values of bed shear stress, velocity, and depth was high, reaching 15-20% of the parameter value even at the sample size of 100 (sampling density 1 m-2). We illustrated implications of these findings with two examples. First, sensitivity analysis of a 2-D hydrodynamic model to changes in roughness length parameter showed that the sampling variability range observed in our resampling procedure resulted in substantially different frequency distributions and spatial patterns of modeled hydraulic variables. Second, using a bedload formula, we showed that propagation of uncertainty in the parameters of a gamma distribution used to model bed shear stress led to the coefficient of variation in predicted transport rates exceeding 50%. Overall, our findings underscore the importance of reporting the precision of estimated hydraulic parameters. When such estimates serve as input into models, uncertainty propagation should be explicitly accounted for by running ensemble simulations.

  6. Flow Forecasting via Artificial Neural Networks - A Study for Input Variables conditioned on atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagoulia, D.; Trichakis, I.; Tsekouras, G. J.

    2012-04-01

    The paper compares the performance of different structures of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for flow forecasting of the next day in the Mesochora catchment in Northwestern Greece with respect to different input variables. The input variables are historical data of previous days, such as: (a) flows, (b) temperatures conditioned on atmospheric circulation, and (c) rainfalls conditioned on atmospheric circulation too. The training algorithm is the stochastic training back-propagation process with decreasing functions of learning rate and momentum term, for which a calibration process is conducted regarding the crucial parameters values, such as the number of neurons, the kind of activation functions, the initial values and time parameters of learning rate and momentum term etc. The performance of each structure has been evaluated by different criterions, such as (i) the root mean square error (RMSE), (ii) the correlation index (R), (iii) the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), (iv) the mean percentage error (MPE), (v) the mean percentage error (ME), (vi) the percentage volume in errors (VE), (vii) the percentage error in peak (MF), (viii) the normalized mean bias error (NMBE), (ix) the normalized root mean bias error (NRMSE), (x) the Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (E), (xi) the modified Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (E1), (xii) the threshold statistics (TSp%) for a level of absolute relative error of p% (=1%, 2%, 5%, 25%, 50% and 100%). Here, the calibration process has been based on the voting analysis of the (i) to (xi) criterions. The time period of long-term falling flow (1972-77) is divided in two sets: one for ANN training with the 80% of data and the other for ANN parameters' calibration with the 20% data. The test set for the final verification of behaviour of ANN structures encompasses the following long-term time period with falling flow (1987-92). From the aforementioned analysis the nonlinear behaviour between forecasted

  7. Rarefaction Effects in Hypersonic Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    2011-05-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) technique is used for numerical analysis of rarefied-gas hypersonic flows near a blunt plate, wedge, two side-by-side plates, disk, torus, and rotating cylinder. The role of various similarity parameters (Knudsen and Mach numbers, geometrical and temperature factors, specific heat ratios, and others) in aerodynamics of the probes is studied. Important kinetic effects that are specific for the transition flow regime have been found: non-monotonic lift and drag of plates, strong repulsive force between side-by-side plates and cylinders, dependence of drag on torus radii ratio, and the reverse Magnus effect on the lift of a rotating cylinder. The numerical results are in a good agreement with experimental data, which were obtained in a vacuum chamber at low and moderate Knudsen numbers from 0.01 to 10.

  8. Spatial and seasonal variability of base flow in the Verde Valley, central Arizona, 2007 and 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garner, Bradley D.; Bills, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Synoptic base-flow surveys were conducted on streams in the Verde Valley, central Arizona, in June 2007 and February 2011 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Verde River Basin Partnership, the Town of Clarkdale, and Yavapai County. These surveys, also known as seepage runs, measured streamflow under base-flow conditions at many locations over a short period of time. Surveys were conducted on a segment of the Verde River that flows through the Verde Valley, between USGS streamflow-gaging stations 09504000 and 09506000, a distance of 51 river miles. Data from the surveys were used to investigate the dominant controls on Verde River base flow, spatial variability in gaining and losing reaches, and the effects that human alterations have on base flow in the surface-water system. The most prominent human alterations in the Verde Valley are dozens of surface-water diversions from streams, including gravity-fed ditch diversions along the Verde River.Base flow that entered the Verde River from the tributary streams of Oak Creek, Beaver Creek, and West Clear Creek was found to be a major source of base flow in the Verde River. Groundwater discharge directly into the Verde River near these three confluences also was an important contributor of base flow to the Verde River, particularly near the confluence with Beaver Creek. An examination of individual reaches of the Verde River in the Verde Valley found three reaches (largely unaffected by ditch diversions) exhibiting a similar pattern: a small net groundwater discharge in February 2011 (12 cubic feet per second or less) and a small net streamflow loss in June 2007 (11 cubic feet per second or less). Two reaches heavily affected by ditch diversions were difficult to interpret because of the large number of confounding human factors. Possible lower and upper bounds of net groundwater flux were calculated for all reaches, including those heavily affected by ditches.

  9. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-03-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing.

  10. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds

    PubMed Central

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F.; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-01-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier–Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing. PMID:25589565

  11. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-03-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing. PMID:25589565

  12. Improved Algorithms and Methods for Solving Strongly Variable-Viscosity 3D Stokes flow and Strongly Variable Permeability 3D D’Arcy flow on a Parallel Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. P.; Hasenclever, J.; Shi, C.

    2009-12-01

    Computational studies of mantle convection face large challenges to obtain fast and accurate solutions for variable viscosity 3d flow. Recently we have been using parallel (MPI-based) MATLAB to more thoroughly explore possible pitfalls and algorithmic improvements to current ‘best-practice’ variable viscosity Stokes and D’Arcy flow solvers. Here we focus on study of finite-element solvers based on a decomposition of the equations for incompressible Stokes flow: Ku + Gp = f and G’u = 0 (K-velocity stiffness matrix, G-discretized gradient operator, G’=transpose(G)-discretized divergence operator) into a single equation for pressure Sp==G’K^-1Gp =G’K^-1f, in which the velocity is also updated as part of each pressure iteration. The outer pressure iteration is solved with preconditioned conjugate gradients (CG) (Maday and Patera, 1989), with a multigrid-preconditioned CG solver for the z=K^-1 (Gq) step of each pressure iteration. One fairly well-known pitfall (Fortin, 1985) is that constant-pressure elements can generate a spurious non-zero flow under a constant body force within non-rectangular geometries. We found a new pitfall when using an iterative method to solve the Kz=y operation in evaluating each G’K^-1Gq product -- even if the residual of the outer pressure equation converges to zero, the discrete divergence of this equation does not correspondingly converge; the error in the incompressibility depends on roughly the square of the tolerance used to solve each Kz=y velocity-like subproblem. Our current best recipe is: (1) Use flexible CG (cf. Notay, 2001) to solve the outer pressure problem. This is analogous to GMRES for a symmetric positive definite problem. It allows use of numerically unsymmetric and/or inexact preconditioners with CG. (2) In this outer-iteration, use an ‘alpha-bar’ technique to find the appropriate magnitude alpha to change the solution in each search direction. This improvement allows a similar iterative tolerance of

  13. High-angle-of-attack aerodynamics - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the military and civil technical communities have undertaken numerous studies of the high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of advanced airplane and missile configurations. The method of approach and the design methodology employed have necessarily been experimental and exploratory in nature, due to the complex nature of separated flows. However, despite the relatively poor definition of many of the key aerodynamic phenomena involved for high-alpha conditions, some generic guidelines for design consideration have been identified. The present paper summarizes some of the more important lessons learned in the area of high angle-of-attack aerodynamics with examples of a number of key concepts and with particular emphasis on high-alpha stability and control characteristics of high performance aircraft. Topics covered in the discussion include the impact of design evolution, forebody flows, control of separated flows, configuration effects, aerodynamic controls, wind-tunnel flight correlation, and recent NASA research activities.

  14. Active Flow Control Integrated Diffuser for increased Energy Efficiency in Variable Air Volume Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schijff, Hermanus; Menicovich, David; Vollen, Jason; Amitay, Michael

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the application of flow control on an HVAC diffuser using synthetic jets distributed evenly along the diffuser edges. The study was conducted on 1:3 scale typical office space (150 ft2) , which included a simulated scale HVAC system supplied by compressed air. Two different jet momentum coefficients were investigated for two inlet flow rates of 40 and 60 CFM. The flow field was measured using hot wire anemometry and Particle Image Velocimetry. Current Variable Air Volume HVAC systems vary the incoming airflow to adjust to changing temperature conditions in the conditioned space. However, when the air flow rate drops below ideal, air distribution becomes inefficient. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of synthetic jets at controlling the incoming airflow and the distribution in the room, showing ability to affect throw coefficient parameters for different flow rates within the test chamber. The use of such devices has the potential to improve air quality and air distribution in building while simultaneously lowering energy demands of HVAC systems.

  15. Development and validation of a turbulent-mix model for variable-density and compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arindam; Gore, Robert A.; Andrews, Malcolm J.

    2010-10-01

    The modeling of buoyancy driven turbulent flows is considered in conjunction with an advanced statistical turbulence model referred to as the BHR (Besnard-Harlow-Rauenzahn) k-S-a model. The BHR k-S-a model is focused on variable-density and compressible flows such as Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) driven mixing. The BHR k-S-a turbulence mix model has been implemented in the RAGE hydro-code, and model constants are evaluated based on analytical self-similar solutions of the model equations. The results are then compared with a large test database available from experiments and direct numerical simulations (DNS) of RT, RM, and KH driven mixing. Furthermore, we describe research to understand how the BHR k-S-a turbulence model operates over a range of moderate to high Reynolds number buoyancy driven flows, with a goal of placing the modeling of buoyancy driven turbulent flows at the same level of development as that of single phase shear flows.

  16. Free-flow variability on the Jess and Souza Ranches, Altamont Pass

    SciTech Connect

    Nierenberg, R.

    1989-03-01

    This report is one of a series of such documents that present the findings of field tests conducted under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Cooperative Field Test Program with the US wind industry. The report provides the results of a study to collect data at two windfarms. The two wind turbine arrays, located in the Altamont Pass east of San Francisco, were instrumented with anemometers and a central monitoring computer. To obtain a high spatial density of wind-speed measurements, every other turbine in both arrays was instrumented. Wind-speed data were collected over a period of four days during the summer high-wind season with all turbines shut down. The resultant data set was analyzed to determine the spatial variability of the wind resource in the two arrays. Because no turbine wakes were present, variation in the flow was caused by the interaction of the flow with the terrain and was not a function of turbine wake interaction. The free-flow data sets can be used by other researchers to refine numerical free-flow computer models. The data sets will be used to fine tune and validate these computer models. In addition, the free-flow data will be compared to results of a wake energy deficit study also under way on these turbine arrays. 56 figs., 14 tabs.

  17. Identifying variably saturated water-flow patterns in a steep hillslope under intermittent heavy rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    El-Kadi, A. I.; Torikai, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify water-flow patterns in part of an active landslide, through the use of numerical simulations and data obtained during a field study. The approaches adopted include measuring rainfall events and pore-pressure responses in both saturated and unsaturated soils at the site. To account for soil variability, the Richards equation is solved within deterministic and stochastic frameworks. The deterministic simulations considered average water-retention data, adjusted retention data to account for stones or cobbles, retention functions for a heterogeneous pore structure, and continuous retention functions for preferential flow. The stochastic simulations applied the Monte Carlo approach which considers statistical distribution and autocorrelation of the saturated conductivity and its cross correlation with the retention function. Although none of the models is capable of accurately predicting field measurements, appreciable improvement in accuracy was attained using stochastic, preferential flow, and heterogeneous pore-structure models. For the current study, continuum-flow models provide reasonable accuracy for practical purposes, although they are expected to be less accurate than multi-domain preferential flow models.

  18. Aerodynamic sensitivities from subsonic, sonic and supersonic unsteady, nonplanar lifting-surface theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. Carson, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The technique of implicit differentiation has been used in combination with linearized lifting-surface theory to derive analytical expressions for aerodynamic sensitivities (i.e., rates of change of lifting pressures with respect to general changes in aircraft geometry, including planform variations) for steady or oscillating planar or nonplanar lifting surfaces in subsonic, sonic, or supersonic flow. The geometric perturbation is defined in terms of a single variable, and the user need only provide simple expressions or similar means for defining the continuous or discontinuous global or local perturbation of interest. Example expressions are given for perturbations of the sweep, taper, and aspect ratio of a wing with trapezoidal semispan planform. In addition to direct computational use, the analytical method presented here should provide benchmark criteria for assessing the accuracy of aerodynamic sensitivities obtained by approximate methods such as finite geometry perturbation and differencing. The present process appears to be readily adaptable to more general surface-panel methods.

  19. Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) for a 3-D Flexible Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumbert, Clyde R.; Hou, Gene J.-W.; Newman, Perry A.

    2001-01-01

    The formulation and implementation of an optimization method called Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) are extended from single discipline analysis (aerodynamics only) to multidisciplinary analysis - in this case, static aero-structural analysis and applied to a simple 3-D wing problem. The method aims to reduce the computational expense incurred in performing shape optimization using state-of-the-art Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow analysis, Finite Element Method (FEM) structural analysis and sensitivity analysis tools. Results for this small problem show that the method reaches the same local optimum as conventional optimization. However, unlike its application to the rigid wing (single discipline analysis), the method, as implemented here, may not show significant reduction in the computational cost. Similar reductions were seen in the two-design-variable (DV) problem results but not in the 8-DV results given here.

  20. Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) for a 3-D Flexible Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumbert, Clyde R.; Hou, Gene J.-W.

    2001-01-01

    The formulation and implementation of an optimization method called Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) are extended from single discipline analysis (aerodynamics only) to multidisciplinary analysis - in this case, static aero-structural analysis - and applied to a simple 3-D wing problem. The method aims to reduce the computational expense incurred in performing shape optimization using state-of-the-art Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow analysis, Finite Element Method (FEM) structural analysis and sensitivity analysis tools. Results for this small problem show that the method reaches the same local optimum as conventional optimization. However, unlike its application to the win,, (single discipline analysis), the method. as I implemented here, may not show significant reduction in the computational cost. Similar reductions were seen in the two-design-variable (DV) problem results but not in the 8-DV results given here.

  1. Aerodynamic shape optimization of a HSCT type configuration with improved surface definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Almuttil M.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1994-01-01

    Two distinct parametrization procedures of generating free-form surfaces to represent aerospace vehicles are presented. The first procedure is the representation using spline functions such as nonuniform rational b-splines (NURBS) and the second is a novel (geometrical) parametrization using solutions to a suitably chosen partial differential equation. The main idea is to develop a surface which is more versatile and can be used in an optimization process. Unstructured volume grid is generated by an advancing front algorithm and solutions obtained using an Euler solver. Grid sensitivity with respect to surface design parameters and aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients based on potential flow is obtained using an automatic differentiator precompiler software tool. Aerodynamic shape optimization of a complete aircraft with twenty four design variables is performed. High speed civil transport aircraft (HSCT) configurations are targeted to demonstrate the process.

  2. Variable pump flow-based Doppler ultrasound method: a novel approach to the measurement of access flow in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ching; Chang, Chao-Fu; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Sun, Ying-Chou; Chiang, Shou-Shan; Lin, Ming-Wei; Lee, Pui-Ching; Yang, Wu-Chang

    2005-01-01

    Decreasing vascular access flow (Qa) is an important predictor of future access thrombosis and malfunction for hemodialysis (HD) patients. Among all of the methods for determining Qa, the variable pump flow (VPF) Doppler method measures Qa according to the change in Doppler signal between the arterial and the venous needles under different pump flow. After this technique was combined with spectral analysis of Duplex Doppler imaging, the variable pump flow-based Doppler ultrasound method (VPFDUM) for Qa measurement was developed. This study compared the reproducibility and correlation of Qa measurements for three different methods-VPFDUM, ultrasound dilution method (UDM), and conventional Doppler ultrasound method (CDUM)-in 55 HD patients. The mean value of Qa by VPFDUM (870.8 +/- 412.0 ml/min) was close to that by UDM (868.6 +/- 417.9 ml/min) but higher than that by CDUM (either of the above values versus 685.1 +/- 303.6 ml/min; P < 0.005). The mean values of coefficient of variation were similar by VPFDUM (1.6%) and UDM (1.4%) but lower than that by CDUM (either of the above values versus 6.8%; P < 0.01). The correlation coefficient and intraclass correlation coefficient of the repeated Qa measurements by VPFDUM (0.985 and 0.993; P < 0.001) were also similar to those by UDM (0.992 and 0.995; P < 0.001) but slightly higher than those by CDUM (0.917 and 0.948; P < 0.005). Either the reproducibility of VPFDUM (r=0.98, P < 0.0001) or the correlation between VPFDUM and UDM (r=0.99, P < 0.0001) in Qa measurements is good. The unassisted patency of vascular access at 6 mo was significantly poorer in patients with Qa <500 ml/min than those with Qa >500 ml/min (13.6% versus 92.2%; P < 0.0001). In conclusion, VPFDUM is a noninvasive, accurate, and reliable procedure for Qa measurement and prediction of the prognosis of vascular access in HD patients.

  3. Launch vehicle aerodynamic data base development comparison with flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, J. T.; Wallace, R. O.; Dill, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The aerodynamic development plan for the Space Shuttle integrated vehicle had three major objectives. The first objective was to support the evolution of the basic configuration by establishing aerodynamic impacts to various candidate configurations. The second objective was to provide continuing evaluation of the basic aerodynamic characteristics in order to bring about a mature data base. The third task was development of the element and component aerodynamic characteristics and distributed air loads data to support structural loads analyses. The complexity of the configurations rendered conventional analytic methods of little use and therefore required extensive wind tunnel testing of detailed complex models. However, the ground testing and analyses did not predict the aerodynamic characteristics that were extracted from the Space Shuttle flight test program. Future programs that involve the use of vehicles similar to the Space Shuttle should be concerned with the complex flow fields characteristics of these types of complex configurations.

  4. Frost Growth and Densification on a Flat Surface in Laminar Flow with Variable Humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, M.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments are performed concerning frost growth and densification in laminar flow over a flat surface under conditions of constant and variable humidity. The flat plate test specimen is made of aluminum-6031, and has dimensions of 0.3 mx0.3 mx6.35 mm. Results for the first variable humidity case are obtained for a plate temperature of 255.4 K, air velocity of 1.77 m/s, air temperature of 295.1 K, and a relative humidity continuously ranging from 81 to 54%. The second variable humidity test case corresponds to plate temperature of 255.4 K, air velocity of 2.44 m/s, air temperature of 291.8 K, and a relative humidity ranging from 66 to 59%. Results for the constant humidity case are obtained for a plate temperature of 263.7 K, air velocity of 1.7 m/s, air temperature of 295 K, and a relative humidity of 71.6 %. Comparisons of the data with the author's frost model extended to accommodate variable humidity suggest satisfactory agreement between the theory and the data for both constant and variable humidity.

  5. Mimicking the humpback whale: An aerodynamic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftab, S. M. A.; Razak, N. A.; Mohd Rafie, A. S.; Ahmad, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    This comprehensive review aims to provide a critical overview of the work on tubercles in the past decade. The humpback whale is of interest to aerodynamic/hydrodynamic researchers, as it performs manoeuvres that baffle the imagination. Researchers have attributed these capabilities to the presence of lumps, known as tubercles, on the leading edge of the flipper. Tubercles generate a unique flow control mechanism, offering the humpback exceptional manoeuverability. Experimental and numerical studies have shown that the flow pattern over the tubercle wing is quite different from conventional wings. Research on the Tubercle Leading Edge (TLE) concept has helped to clarify aerodynamic issues such as flow separation, tonal noise and dynamic stall. TLE shows increased lift by delaying and restricting spanwise separation. A summary of studies on different airfoils and reported improvement in performance is outlined. The major contributions and limitations of previous work are also reported.

  6. An Interactive Educational Tool for Compressible Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    A workstation-based interactive educational tool was developed to aid in the teaching of undergraduate compressible aerodynamics. The tool solves for the supersonic flow past a wedge using the equations found in NACA 1135. The student varies the geometry or flow conditions through a graphical user interface and the new conditions are calculated immediately. Various graphical formats present the variation of flow results to the student. One such format leads the student to the generation of some of the graphs found in NACA-1135. The tool includes interactive questions and answers to aid in both the use of the tool and to develop an understanding of some of the complexities of compressible aerodynamics. A series of help screens make the simulator easy to learn and use. This paper will detail the numerical methods used in the tool and describe how it can be used and modified.

  7. Novel Applications of Magnetic Fields for Fluid Flow Control and for Simulating Variable Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    Static and dynamic magnetic fields have been used to control convection in many materials processing applications. In most of the applications, convection control (damping or enhancement) is achieved through the Lorentz force that can be tailored to counteract/assist dominant system flows. This technique has been successfully applied to liquids that are electrically conducting, such as high temperature melts of semiconductors, metals and alloys, etc. In liquids with low electrical conductivity such as ionic solutions of salts in water, the Lorentz force is weak and hence not very effective and alternate ways of flow control are necessary. If the salt in solution is paramagnetic then the variation of magnetic susceptibility with temperature and/or concentration can be used for flow control. For thermal buoyancy driven flows this can be accomplished in a temperature range below the Curie point of the salt. The magnetic force is proportional to the magnetic susceptibility and the product of the magnetic field and its gradient. By suitably positioning the experiment cell in the magnet, system flows can be assisted or countered, as desired. A similar approach can be extended to diamagnetic substances and fluids but the required magnetic force is considerably larger than that required for paramagnetic substances. The presentation will provide an overview of work to date on a NASA fluid physics sponsored project that aims to test the hypothesis of convective flow control using strong magnetic fields in protein crystal growth. The objective is to understand the nature of the various forces that come into play, delineate causative factors for fluid flow and to quantify them through experiments, analysis, and numerical modeling. The seminar will report specifically on the experimental results using paramagnetic salts and solutions in magnetic fields and compare them to analytical predictions. Applications of the concept to protein crystallization studies will be discussed

  8. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  9. Effects of selected design variables on three ramp, external compression inlet performance. [boundary layer control bypasses, and mass flow rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamman, J. H.; Hall, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    Two inlet performance tests and one inlet/airframe drag test were conducted in 1969 at the NASA-Ames Research Center. The basic inlet system was two-dimensional, three ramp (overhead), external compression, with variable capture area. The data from these tests were analyzed to show the effects of selected design variables on the performance of this type of inlet system. The inlet design variables investigated include inlet bleed, bypass, operating mass flow ratio, inlet geometry, and variable capture area.

  10. Decadal variability in core surface flows deduced from geomagnetic observatory monthly means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaler, K. A.; Olsen, N.; Finlay, C. C.

    2016-10-01

    Monthly means of the magnetic field measurements at ground observatories are a key data source for studying temporal changes of the core magnetic field. However, when they are calculated in the usual way, contributions of external (magnetospheric and ionospheric) origin may remain, which make them less favourable for studying the field generated by dynamo action in the core. We remove external field predictions, including a new way of characterizing the magnetospheric ring current, from the data and then calculate revised monthly means using robust methods. The geomagnetic secular variation (SV) is calculated as the first annual differences of these monthly means, which also removes the static crustal field. SV time-series based on revised monthly means are much less scattered than those calculated from ordinary monthly means, and their variances and correlations between components are smaller. On the annual to decadal timescale, the SV is generated primarily by advection in the fluid outer core. We demonstrate the utility of the revised monthly means by calculating models of the core surface advective flow between 1997 and 2013 directly from the SV data. One set of models assumes flow that is constant over three months; such models exhibit large and rapid temporal variations. For models of this type, less complex flows achieve the same fit to the SV derived from revised monthly means than those from ordinary monthly means. However, those obtained from ordinary monthly means are able to follow excursions in SV that are likely to be external field contamination rather than core signals. Having established that we can find models that fit the data adequately, we then assess how much temporal variability is required. Previous studies have suggested that the flow is consistent with torsional oscillations (TO), solid body-like oscillations of fluid on concentric cylinders with axes aligned along the Earth's rotation axis. TO have been proposed to explain decadal

  11. Decadal variability in core surface flows deduced from geomagnetic observatory monthly means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaler, K. A.; Olsen, N.; Finlay, C. C.

    2016-07-01

    Monthly means of the magnetic field measurements at ground observatories are a key data source for studying temporal changes of the core magnetic field. However, when they are calculated in the usual way, contributions of external (magnetospheric and ionospheric) origin may remain, which make them less favourable for studying the field generated by dynamo action in the core. We remove external field predictions, including a new way of characterising the magnetospheric ring current, from the data and then calculate revised monthly means using robust methods. The geomagnetic secular variation (SV) is calculated as the first annual differences of these monthly means, which also removes the static crustal field. SV time series based on revised monthly means are much less scattered than those calculated from ordinary monthly means, and their variances and correlations between components are smaller. On the annual to decadal timescale, the SV is generated primarily by advection in the fluid outer core. We demonstrate the utility of the revised monthly means by calculating models of the core surface advective flow between 1997 and 2013 directly from the SV data. One set of models assumes flow that is constant over three months; such models exhibit large and rapid temporal variations. For models of this type, less complex flows achieve the same fit to the SV derived from revised monthly means than those from ordinary monthly means. However, those obtained from ordinary monthly means are able to follow excursions in SV that are likely to be external field contamination rather than core signals. Having established that we can find models that fit the data adequately, we then assess how much temporal variability is required. Previous studies have suggested that the flow is consistent with torsional oscillations (TO), solid body-like oscillations of fluid on concentric cylinders with axes aligned along the Earth's rotation axis. TO have been proposed to explain decadal

  12. Three-dimensional study of turbulent flow characteristics of an offset plane jet with variable density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assoudi, Ali; Habli, Sabra; Mahjoub Saïd, Nejla; Bournot, Hervé; Le Palec, Georges

    2016-11-01

    An experimental and numerical investigation of the flow field of variable density turbulent offset jet is presented. The velocity measurements are performed using a Velocimetry Laser Doppler technique for an offset height h. Three cases of variable-density turbulent plane jets discharging from a rectangular nozzle into a quiescent medium are studied. The variation density jets considered were revealed at different Reynolds numbers. In the second step of this work, a numerical three-dimensional model of the problem is simulated through the resolution of the Navier-Stokes equations by means of the finite volume method and the Reynolds stress model second-order turbulent closure model. A non-uniform mesh system tightened close to the emitting nozzle and both the vertical and horizontal walls is also adopted. A good level of agreement was achieved, between the experiments and the calculations. Once the model validated, our model allowed the evaluation of the influence of the variation density on the characterizing features of the resulting flow filed. It is found that the centerline velocity and concentration of the heavier jet decays much faster than in the two other jets, and a similar behavior for the vertical profiles in the three variable-density jets is well reproduced in the simulation.

  13. Three-dimensional study of turbulent flow characteristics of an offset plane jet with variable density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assoudi, Ali; Habli, Sabra; Mahjoub Saïd, Nejla; Bournot, Hervé; Le Palec, Georges

    2015-12-01

    An experimental and numerical investigation of the flow field of variable density turbulent offset jet is presented. The velocity measurements are performed using a Velocimetry Laser Doppler technique for an offset height h. Three cases of variable-density turbulent plane jets discharging from a rectangular nozzle into a quiescent medium are studied. The variation density jets considered were revealed at different Reynolds numbers. In the second step of this work, a numerical three-dimensional model of the problem is simulated through the resolution of the Navier-Stokes equations by means of the finite volume method and the Reynolds stress model second-order turbulent closure model. A non-uniform mesh system tightened close to the emitting nozzle and both the vertical and horizontal walls is also adopted. A good level of agreement was achieved, between the experiments and the calculations. Once the model validated, our model allowed the evaluation of the influence of the variation density on the characterizing features of the resulting flow filed. It is found that the centerline velocity and concentration of the heavier jet decays much faster than in the two other jets, and a similar behavior for the vertical profiles in the three variable-density jets is well reproduced in the simulation.

  14. Nozzle Aerodynamic Stability During a Throat Shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawecki, Edwin J.; Ribeiro, Gregg L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on the internal aerodynamic stability of a family of two-dimensional (2-D) High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) nozzle concepts. These nozzles function during takeoff as mixer-ejectors to meet acoustic requirements, and then convert to conventional high-performance convergent-divergent (CD) nozzles at cruise. The transition between takeoff mode and cruise mode results in the aerodynamic throat and the minimum cross-sectional area that controls the engine backpressure shifting location within the nozzle. The stability and steadiness of the nozzle aerodynamics during this so called throat shift process can directly affect the engine aerodynamic stability, and the mechanical design of the nozzle. The objective of the study was to determine if pressure spikes or other perturbations occurred during the throat shift process and, if so, identify the caused mechanisms for the perturbations. The two nozzle concepts modeled in the test program were the fixed chute (FC) and downstream mixer (DSM). These 2-D nozzles differ principally in that the FC has a large over-area between the forward throat and aft throat locations, while the DSM has an over-area of only about 10 percent. The conclusions were that engine mass flow and backpressure can be held constant simultaneously during nozzle throat shifts on this class of nozzles, and mode shifts can be accomplished at a constant mass flow and engine backpressure without upstream pressure perturbations.

  15. Variable parameter McCarthy-Muskingum routing method considering lateral flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Basant; Perumal, Muthiah; Bardossy, Andras

    2015-04-01

    The fully mass conservative variable parameter McCarthy-Muskingum (VPMM) method recently proposed by Perumal and Price (2013) for routing floods in channels and rivers without considering lateral flow is extended herein for accounting uniformly distributed lateral flow contribution along the reach. The proposed procedure is applied for studying flood wave movement in a 24.2 km river stretch between Rottweil and Oberndorf gauging stations of Neckar River in Germany wherein significant lateral flow contribution by intermediate catchment rainfall prevails during flood wave movement. The geometrical elements of the cross-sectional information of the considered routing river stretch without considering lateral flow are estimated using the Robust Parameter Estimation (ROPE) algorithm that allows for arriving at the best performing set of bed width and side slope of a trapezoidal section. The performance of the VPMM method is evaluated using the Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency criterion as the objective function to be maximized using the ROPE algorithm. The twenty-seven flood events in the calibration set are considered to identify the relationship between 'total rainfall' and 'total losses' as well as to optimize the geometric characteristics of the prismatic channel (width and slope of the trapezoidal section). Based on this analysis, a relationship between total rainfall and total loss of the intermediate catchment is obtained and then used to estimate the lateral flow in the reach. Assuming the lateral flow hydrograph is of the form of inflow hydrograph and using the total intervening catchment runoff estimated from the relationship, the uniformly distributed lateral flow rate qL at any instant of time is estimated for its use in the VPMM routing method. All the 27 flood events are simulated using this routing approach considering lateral flow along the reach. Many of these simulations are able to simulate the observed hydrographs very closely. The proposed approach

  16. Nonlinear aerodynamic wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, Ellwood

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of new nonlinear theoretical techniques is demonstrated for supersonic wing design. The new technology was utilized to define outboard panels for an existing advanced tactical fighter model. Mach 1.6 maneuver point design and multi-operating point compromise surfaces were developed and tested. High aerodynamic efficiency was achieved at the design conditions. A corollary result was that only modest supersonic penalties were incurred to meet multiple aerodynamic requirements. The nonlinear potential analysis of a practical configuration arrangement correlated well with experimental data.

  17. Computational aerodynamics and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The role of computational aerodynamics in design is reviewed with attention given to the design process; the proper role of computations; the importance of calibration, interpretation, and verification; the usefulness of a given computational capability; and the marketing of new codes. Examples of computational aerodynamics in design are given with particular emphasis on the Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology. Finally, future prospects are noted, with consideration given to the role of advanced computers, advances in numerical solution techniques, turbulence models, complex geometries, and computational design procedures. Previously announced in STAR as N82-33348

  18. Dynamic stall and aerodynamic damping

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, F.; Petersen, J.T.; Madsen, H.A.

    1999-08-01

    A dynamic stall model is used to analyze and reproduce open air blade section measurements as well as wind tunnel measurements. The dynamic stall model takes variations in both angle of attack and flow velocity into account. The paper gives a brief description of the dynamic stall model and presents results from analyses of dynamic stall measurements for a variety of experiments with different airfoils in wind tunnel and on operating rotors. The wind tunnel experiments comprises pitching as well as plunging motion of the airfoils. The dynamic stall model is applied for derivation of aerodynamic damping characteristics for cyclic motion of the airfoils in flapwise and edgewise direction combined with pitching. The investigation reveals that the airfoil dynamic stall characteristics depend on the airfoil shape, and the type of motion (pitch, plunge). The aerodynamic damping characteristics, and thus the sensitivity to stall induced vibrations, depend highly on the relative motion of the airfoil in flapwise and edgewise direction, and on a possibly coupled pitch variation, which is determined by the structural characteristics of the blade.

  19. A laser velocimeter system for large-scale aerodynamic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinath, M. S.; Orloff, K. L.; Snyder, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    A unique laser velocimeter was developed that is capable of sensing two orthogonal velocity components from a variable remote distance of 2.6 to 10 m for use in the 40- by 80-Foot and 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnels and the Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility at Ames Research Center. The system hardware, positioning instrumentation, and data acquisition equipment are described in detail; system capabilities and limitations are discussed; and expressions for systematic and statistical accuracy are developed. Direct and coupled laboratory measurements taken with the system are compared with measurements taken with a laser velocimeter of higher spatial resolution, and sample data taken in the open circuit exhaust flow of a 1/50-scale model of the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented.

  20. Low Flows over the Eastern United States: Variability, Trends, and Attributions (1962-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, J.; Sheffield, J.

    2014-12-01

    Low flows are a seasonal hydrologic response generally during a drying period. Extreme low flows are a result of prolonged antecedent precipitation deficit and/or high evaporative demand, and can indicate hydrological droughts (water availability deficit) and ecological droughts (water quality degradation). Human impacts (e.g. dams, reservoirs, and power plants) also play a role in exacerbating the severity of low flow droughts. For drought mitigation, it is critical to better understand how low flows vary over time and their generating mechanisms. The goals of this study are to examine trends in low flows over the eastern U.S. and to assess their attributions and teleconnections in the context of climate change and variability. We selected 149 out of 4878 USGS stations over the eastern U.S., taking into account data availability and minimal human impacts. We analyzed annual 7-day low flows (Q7) from the series of daily streamflow records for 1962-2011. We also computed an antecedent precipitation (AP) over the corresponding basin for each station. We found a north-south (increasing-decreasing) dipole pattern in Q7 trends and a monopole (increasing) pattern in AP trends, which indicates a gap between the trends of Q7 and AP over the southern part of the study region (Virginia, North and South Carolina). We found that these regions show significant increasing trends in potential evapotranspiration (PET) as driven by increasing temperatures and vapor pressure deficit. We also examined teleconnections between detrended Q7 and nine atmospheric and oceanic climate indices. We found that the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Pacific North America (PNA) pattern show prediction skill for Q7 at one and two month lead time, respectively. Our findings suggest that the worst scenario for future droughts over the eastern U.S. is a combination of a response to an increasing trend in temperature driving PET with strong negative NAO and positve PNA during summer.

  1. Two-phase dusty fluid flow along a cone with variable properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqa, Sadia; Begum, Naheed; Hossain, Md. Anwar; Mustafa, Naeem; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy

    2016-09-01

    In this paper numerical solutions of a two-phase natural convection dusty fluid flow are presented. The two-phase particulate suspension is investigated along a vertical cone by keeping variable viscosity and thermal conductivity of the carrier phase. Comprehensive flow formations of the gas and particle phases are given with the aim to predict the behavior of heat transport across the heated cone. The influence of (1) air with particles, (2) water with particles and (3) oil with particles are shown on shear stress coefficient and heat transfer coefficient. It is recorded that sufficient increment in heat transport rate can be achieved by loading the dust particles in the air. Further, distribution of velocity and temperature of both the carrier phase and the particle phase are shown graphically for the pure fluid (air, water) as well as for the fluid with particles (air-metal and water-metal particle mixture).

  2. Mesoscale density variability in the mesosphere and thermosphere: Effects of vertical flow accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revelle, D. O.

    1987-01-01

    A mechanistic one dimensional numerical (iteration) model was developed which can be used to simulate specific types of mesoscale atmospheric density (and pressure) variability in the mesosphere and the thermosphere, namely those due to waves and those due to vertical flow accelerations. The model was developed with the idea that it could be used as a supplement to the TGCMs (thermospheric general circulation models) since such models have a very limited ability to model phenomena on small spatial scales. The simplest case to consider was the integration upward through a time averaged, height independent, horizontally divergent flow field. Vertical winds were initialized at the lower boundary using the Ekman pumping theory over flat terrain. The results of the computations are summarized.

  3. Flow and Containment Transport Code for Modeling Variably Saturated Porous Media

    1998-05-14

    FACT is a finite element based code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport. It was designed to perform transient three-dimensional calculations that simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media. The code is designed specifically to handle complex multi-layer and/or heterogenous aquifer systems in an efficient manner and accommodates a wide range of boundary conditions. Additionally 1-D and 2-D (in Cartesian coordinates) problemsmore » are handled in FACT by simply limiting the number of elements in a particular direction(s) to one. The governing equations in FACT are formulated only in Cartesian coordinates. FACT writes out both ascii and graphical binary files that are TECPLOT-ready. Special features are also available within FACT for handling the typical groundwater modeling needs for remediation efforts at the Savannah River Site.« less

  4. Aeroacoustics. [analysis of properties of sound generated by aerodynamic forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M., E.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis was conducted to determine the properties of sound generated by aerodynamic forces or motions originating in a flow, such as the unsteady aerodynamic forces on propellers or by turbulent flows around an aircraft. The acoustics of moving media are reviewed and mathematical models are developed. Lighthill's acoustic analogy and the application to turbulent flows are analyzed. The effects of solid boundaries are calculated. Theories based on the solution of linearized vorticity and acoustic field equations are explained. The effects of nonuniform mean flow on the generation of sound are reported.

  5. Improved flux calculations for viscous incompressible flow by the variable penalty method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheshgi, H.; Luskin, M.

    The Navier-Stokes system for viscous, incompressible flow is considered, taking into account a replacement of the continuity equation by the perturbed continuity equation. The introduction of the approximation allows the pressure variable to be eliminated to obtain the system of equations for the approximate velocity. The penalty approximation is often applied to numerical discretizations since it provides a reduction in the size and band-width of the system of equations. Attention is given to error estimates, and to two numerical experiments which illustrate the error estimates considered. It is found that the variable penalty method provides an accurate solution for a much wider range of epsilon than the classical penalty method.

  6. Effect of Surface Energy Pulses on Supersonic Flow in a Channel of Variable Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of a surface pulse-periodic supply of energy on the formation of shock-wave structures in a plane channel of variable cross section has been studied. Energy is supplied to the constant cross-section units of the channel with the flow Mach number M = 2. The time-average supplied power corresponds to the combustion of hydrogen with the excess-air coefficient from 1 to 10. The problem is solved within the framework of the Euler equations. A dimensionless approach is used to analyze the effect of sources. The applicability of the analytical relations obtained is confirmed by numerical solution of two-dimensional Euler equations.

  7. Aerodynamic improvement of the assembly through which gas conduits are taken into a smoke stack by simulating gas flow on a computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, V. B.; Fomenko, M. V.; Grigor'ev, I. V.

    2012-06-01

    Results from computer simulation of gas flow motion for gas conduits taken on one and two sides into the gas-removal shaft of a smoke stack with a constant cross section carried out using the SolidWorks and FlowVision application software packages are presented.

  8. Numerical and physical aspects of aerodynamic flows III; Proceedings of the Third Symposium, California State University, Long Beach, CA, January 21-24, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present symposium considers hydrodynamic stability and turbulent transition, transition calculations in three-dimensional flows, a quasi-simultaneous finite difference approach for strongly interacting flows, the significance of the thin layer Navier-Stokes approximation, unsteady airfoil boundary layers, predictions and experiments on airfoils at low Reynolds numbers, and a comparison of interactive boundary layer and thin layer Navier-Stokes procedures. Also discussed are a viscous-inviscid interaction method for computing unsteady transonic separation, massive separation and dynamic stall on a cusped trailing edge airfoil, the computation of turbulent separated flows over wings, an iterative scheme for three-dimensional transonic flows, and the computation of three-dimensional flows with shock wave/boundary layer interaction. Many of the papers in this symposium were abstracted previously (cf., A85-42951).

  9. Comparing aerodynamic efficiency in birds and bats suggests better flight performance in birds.

    PubMed

    Muijres, Florian T; Johansson, L Christoffer; Bowlin, Melissa S; Winter, York; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Flight is one of the energetically most costly activities in the animal kingdom, suggesting that natural selection should work to optimize flight performance. The similar size and flight speed of birds and bats may therefore suggest convergent aerodynamic performance; alternatively, flight performance could be restricted by phylogenetic constraints. We test which of these scenarios fit to two measures of aerodynamic flight efficiency in two passerine bird species and two New World leaf-nosed bat species. Using time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the wake of the animals flying in a wind tunnel, we derived the span efficiency, a metric for the efficiency of generating lift, and the lift-to-drag ratio, a metric for mechanical energetic flight efficiency. We show that the birds significantly outperform the bats in both metrics, which we ascribe to variation in aerodynamic function of body and wing upstroke: Bird bodies generated relatively more lift than bat bodies, resulting in a more uniform spanwise lift distribution and higher span efficiency. A likely explanation would be that the bat ears and nose leaf, associated with echolocation, disturb the flow over the body. During the upstroke, the birds retract their wings to make them aerodynamically inactive, while the membranous bat wings generate thrust and negative lift. Despite the differences in performance, the wake morphology of both birds and bats resemble the optimal wake for their respective lift-to-drag ratio regimes. This suggests that evolution has optimized performance relative to the respective conditions of birds and bats, but that maximum performance is possibly limited by phylogenetic constraints. Although ecological differences between birds and bats are subjected to many conspiring variables, the different aerodynamic flight efficiency for the bird and bat species studied here may help explain why birds typically fly faster, migrate more frequently and migrate longer distances

  10. Comparing aerodynamic efficiency in birds and bats suggests better flight performance in birds.

    PubMed

    Muijres, Florian T; Johansson, L Christoffer; Bowlin, Melissa S; Winter, York; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Flight is one of the energetically most costly activities in the animal kingdom, suggesting that natural selection should work to optimize flight performance. The similar size and flight speed of birds and bats may therefore suggest convergent aerodynamic performance; alternatively, flight performance could be restricted by phylogenetic constraints. We test which of these scenarios fit to two measures of aerodynamic flight efficiency in two passerine bird species and two New World leaf-nosed bat species. Using time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the wake of the animals flying in a wind tunnel, we derived the span efficiency, a metric for the efficiency of generating lift, and the lift-to-drag ratio, a metric for mechanical energetic flight efficiency. We show that the birds significantly outperform the bats in both metrics, which we ascribe to variation in aerodynamic function of body and wing upstroke: Bird bodies generated relatively more lift than bat bodies, resulting in a more uniform spanwise lift distribution and higher span efficiency. A likely explanation would be that the bat ears and nose leaf, associated with echolocation, disturb the flow over the body. During the upstroke, the birds retract their wings to make them aerodynamically inactive, while the membranous bat wings generate thrust and negative lift. Despite the differences in performance, the wake morphology of both birds and bats resemble the optimal wake for their respective lift-to-drag ratio regimes. This suggests that evolution has optimized performance relative to the respective conditions of birds and bats, but that maximum performance is possibly limited by phylogenetic constraints. Although ecological differences between birds and bats are subjected to many conspiring variables, the different aerodynamic flight efficiency for the bird and bat species studied here may help explain why birds typically fly faster, migrate more frequently and migrate longer distances

  11. Future requirements and roles of computers in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    While faster computers will be needed to make solution of the Navier-Stokes equations practical and useful, most all of the other aerodynamic solution techniques can benefit from faster computers. There is a wide variety of computational and measurement techniques, the prospect of more powerful computers permits extension and an enhancement across all aerodynamic methods, including wind-tunnel measurement. It is expected that, as in the past, a blend of methods will be used to predict aircraft aerodynamics in the future. These will include methods based on solution of the Navier-Stokes equations and the potential flow equations as well as those based on empirical and measured results. The primary flows of interest in aircraft aerodynamics are identified, the predictive methods currently in use and/or under development are reviewed and two of these methods are analyzed in terms of the computational resources needed to improve their usefulness and practicality.

  12. Results of tests of advanced flexible insulation vortex and flow environments in the North American Aerodynamics Laboratory lowspeed wind tunnel using 0.0405-scale Space Shuttle Orbiter model 16-0 (test OA-309)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, B. A.; Nichols, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation (Test OA-309) was conducted using 0.0405-scale Space Shuttle Orbiter Model 16-0 in the North American Aerodynamics Laboratory 7.75 x 11.00-foot Lowspeed Wind Tunnel. The primary purpose was to locate and study any flow conditions or vortices that might have caused damage to the Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation (AFRSI) during the Space Transportation System STS-6 mission. A secondary objective was to evaluate vortex generators to be used for Wind Tunnel Test OS-314. Flowfield visualization was obtained by means of smoke, tufts, and oil flow. The test was conducted at Mach numbers between 0.07 and 0.23 and at dynamic pressures between 7 and 35 pounds per square foot. The angle-of-attack range of the model was -5 degrees through 35 degrees at 0 or 2 degrees of sideslip, while roll angle was held constant at zero degrees. The vortex generators were studied at angles of 0, 5, 10, and 15 degrees.

  13. Unsteady Aerodynamics of Insect Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. Jane

    2000-03-01

    The myth `bumble-bees can not fly according to conventional aerodynamics' simply reflects our poor understanding of unsteady viscous fluid dynamics. In particular, we lack a theory of vorticity shedding due to dynamic boundaries at the intermediate Reynolds numbers relevant to insect flight, typically between 10^2 and 10^4, where both viscous and inertial effects are important. In our study, we compute unsteady viscous flows, governed by the Navier-Stokes equation, about a two dimensional flapping wing which mimics the motion of an insect wing. I will present two main results: the existence of a prefered frequency in forward flight and its physical origin, and 2) the vortex dynamics and forces in hovering dragonfly flight.

  14. Intercomparison of 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS 3321): uncertainties in particle sizing and number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Sascha; Müller, Thomas; Weinhold, Kay; Zikova, Nadezda; Martins dos Santos, Sebastiao; Marinoni, Angela; Bischof, Oliver F.; Kykal, Carsten; Ries, Ludwig; Meinhardt, Frank; Aalto, Pasi; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic particle size spectrometers are a well-established method to measure number size distributions of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere. Quality assurance is essential for atmospheric observational aerosol networks to obtain comparable results with known uncertainties. In a laboratory study within the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network), 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS model 3321, TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) were compared with a focus on flow rates, particle sizing, and the unit-to-unit variability of the particle number size distribution. Flow rate deviations were relatively small (within a few percent), while the sizing accuracy was found to be within 10 % compared to polystyrene latex (PSL) reference particles. The unit-to-unit variability in terms of the particle number size distribution during this study was within 10 % to 20 % for particles in the range of 0.9 up to 3 µm, which is acceptable for atmospheric measurements. For particles smaller than that, the variability increased up to 60 %, probably caused by differences in the counting efficiencies of individual units. Number size distribution data for particles smaller than 0.9 µm in aerodynamic diameter should only be used with caution. For particles larger than 3 µm, the unit-to-unit variability increased as well. A possible reason is an insufficient sizing accuracy in combination with a steeply sloping particle number size distribution and the increasing uncertainty due to decreasing counting. Particularly this uncertainty of the particle number size distribution must be considered if higher moments of the size distribution such as the particle volume or mass are calculated, which require the conversion of the aerodynamic diameter measured to a volume equivalent diameter. In order to perform a quantitative quality assurance, a traceable reference method for the particle number concentration in the size range 0.5-3 µm

  15. Three-dimensional model for multi-component reactive transport with variable density groundwater flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mao, X.; Prommer, H.; Barry, D.A.; Langevin, C.D.; Panteleit, B.; Li, L.

    2006-01-01

    PHWAT is a new model that couples a geochemical reaction model (PHREEQC-2) with a density-dependent groundwater flow and solute transport model (SEAWAT) using the split-operator approach. PHWAT was developed to simulate multi-component reactive transport in variable density groundwater flow. Fluid density in PHWAT depends not on only the concentration of a single species as in SEAWAT, but also the concentrations of other dissolved chemicals that can be subject to reactive processes. Simulation results of PHWAT and PHREEQC-2 were compared in their predictions of effluent concentration from a column experiment. Both models produced identical results, showing that PHWAT has correctly coupled the sub-packages. PHWAT was then applied to the simulation of a tank experiment in which seawater intrusion was accompanied by cation exchange. The density dependence of the intrusion and the snow-plough effect in the breakthrough curves were reflected in the model simulations, which were in good agreement with the measured breakthrough data. Comparison simulations that, in turn, excluded density effects and reactions allowed us to quantify the marked effect of ignoring these processes. Next, we explored numerical issues involved in the practical application of PHWAT using the example of a dense plume flowing into a tank containing fresh water. It was shown that PHWAT could model physically unstable flow and that numerical instabilities were suppressed. Physical instability developed in the model in accordance with the increase of the modified Rayleigh number for density-dependent flow, in agreement with previous research. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Relation between respiratory symptoms, pulmonary function and peak flow variability in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Boezen, H. M.; Schouten, J. P.; Postma, D. S.; Rijcken, B.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--A study was carried out to determine whether subjects with respiratory symptoms are more likely to have impaired lung function or increased airway lability, and to quantify these relationships in a population of adults. METHODS--Data were collected from 511 participants (aged 20-70 years) from the Dutch part of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS). The symptoms analysed were: wheeze, dyspnoea > or = grade 3, nocturnal dyspnoea, cough and phlegm, and history of allergy. Lung function was measured by peak expiratory flow (PEF) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). PEF variability was used as an index for bronchial lability. RESULTS--Both FEV1 and PEF were decreased with increasing numbers of symptoms. Subjects with one symptom had an increased risk of having an FEV1 value of < 70% (OR = 4.2) and this risk increased with an increasing number of symptoms. Subjects with three or more symptoms had an increased risk of having a PEF value of < 70%, a diurnal variation in PEF of > 10% (both OR = 4.4), and an increased risk of high between day variation (OR = 6.6). CONCLUSIONS--Subject-reported symptoms are related to impaired lung function and to increased variability of peak flow. PMID:7701448

  17. Energy Simulation of Integrated Multiple-Zone Variable Refrigerant Flow System

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Rice, C Keith; Baxter, Van D

    2013-01-01

    We developed a detailed steady-state system model, to simulate the performance of an integrated five-zone variable refrigerant flow (VRF)heat pump system. The system is multi-functional, capable of space cooling, space heating, combined space cooling and water heating, and dedicated water heating. Methods were developed to map the VRF performance in each mode, based on the abundant data produced by the equipment system model. The performance maps were used in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. Using TRNSYS, we have successfully setup and run cases for a multiple-split, VRF heat pump and dehumidifier combination in 5-zone houses in 5 climates that control indoor dry-bulb temperature and relative humidity. We compared the calculated energy consumptions for the VRF heat pump against that of a baseline central air source heat pump, coupled with electric water heating and the standalone dehumidifiers. In addition, we investigated multiple control scenarios for the VRF heat pump, i.e. on/off control, variable indoor air flow rate, and using different zone temperature setting schedules, etc. The energy savings for the multiple scenarios were assessed.

  18. Transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doig, G.

    2014-08-01

    A review of recent and historical work in the field of transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics has been conducted, focussing on applied research on wings and aircraft, present and future ground transportation, projectiles, rocket sleds and other related bodies which travel in close ground proximity in the compressible regime. Methods for ground testing are described and evaluated, noting that wind tunnel testing is best performed with a symmetry model in the absence of a moving ground; sled or rail testing is ultimately preferable, though considerably more expensive. Findings are reported on shock-related ground influence on aerodynamic forces and moments in and accelerating through the transonic regime - where force reversals and the early onset of local supersonic flow is prevalent - as well as more predictable behaviours in fully supersonic to hypersonic ground effect flows.

  19. CFD research, parallel computation and aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1995-01-01

    Over five years of research in Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications are covered in this report. Using CFD as an established tool, aerodynamic optimization on parallel architectures is explored. The objective of this work is to provide better tools to vehicle designers. Submarine design requires accurate force and moment calculations in flow with thick boundary layers and large separated vortices. Low noise production is critical, so flow into the propulsor region must be predicted accurately. The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) has been the subject of recent work. This vehicle is to be a passenger vehicle with the capability of cutting overseas flight times by more than half. A successful design must surpass the performance of comparable planes. Fuel economy, other operational costs, environmental impact, and range must all be improved substantially. For all these reasons, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer and other disciplines.

  20. Bifurcations in unsteady aerodynamics-implications for testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Gary T.; Tobak, Murray

    1988-01-01

    The various forms of bifurcations that can occur between steady and unsteady aerodynamic flows are reviewed. Examples are provided to illustrate the various ways in which bifurcations may intervene to influence the outcome of dynamics tests involving unsteady aerodynamics. The presence of bifurcation phenomena in such tests must be taken into consideration to ensure the proper interpretation of results, and some recommendations are made to that end.

  1. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling for arbitrary motions. [for active control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Results indicating that unsteady aerodynamic loads derived under the assumption of simple harmonic motions executed by airfoil or wing can be extended to arbitrary motions are summarized. The generalized Theodorsen (1953) function referable to loads due to simple harmonic oscillations of a wing section in incompressible flow, the Laplace inversion integral for unsteady aerodynamic loads, calculations of root loci of aeroelastic loads, and analysis of generalized compressible transient airloads are discussed.

  2. Critical review of the trailing edge condition in steady and unsteady flow. Blade flutter in compressors and fans: Numerical simulation of the aerodynamic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radwan, S. F.; Rockwell, D. O.; Johnson, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Existing interpretations of the trailing edge condition, addressing both theoretical and experimental works in steady, as well as unsteady flows are critically reviewed. The work of Kutta and Joukowski on the trailing edge condition in steady flow is reviewed. It is shown that for most practical airfoils and blades (as in the case of most turbomachine blades), this condition is violated due to rounded trailing edges and high frequency effects, the flow dynamics in the trailing edge region being dominated by viscous forces; therefore, any meaningful modelling must include viscous effects. The question of to what extent the trailing edge condition affects acoustic radiation from the edge is raised; it is found that violation of the trailing edge condition leads to significant sound diffraction at the tailing edge, which is related to the problem of noise generation. Finally, various trailing edge conditions in unsteady flow are discussed, with emphasis on high reduced frequencies.

  3. Detailed Mechanistic Investigation of Preferential Flow and Transport in Variably- Saturated Fractured Clayey Till

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbom, A. E.; Refsgaard, J.; Jensen, K. H.; Fluehler, H.; Ernstsen, V.; Klint, K. S.; Therrien, R.

    2008-12-01

    By applying fluorescence imaging with high spatial resolution (1mm2) to tracer distribution in variably saturated fractured clayey till, a mechanistic study of preferential flow and transport were performed. Tracer experiments with two fluorescent tracers, Acid Yellow (AY7) and Sulforhodamine (SB), were conducted for three different rain events under dry and wet conditions, respectively. Two-dimensional vertical apparent concentration distribution profiles of both tracers to depths of 2.8 m were delineated simultaneously using an imaging device. The profiles showed that: i) biopores formed the primarily migration paths in the upper 1.4 meters, ii) only fractures connected to hydraulically active biopores contributed to tracer migration, (iii) dead- end biopores were not active under wet conditions, (iv) under dry conditions, AY7 was displaced piston-flow like down to 20 cm below irrigation level, which was not observed for SB, (v) the highest apparent tracer pixel concentrations (per pixel) are often found in macropores particularly under dry conditions, and (vi) the maximum migration depths observed for SB and AY7 were 1.7 and 3 m below surface, respectively. To achieve a better mechanistic understanding of the different tracer migration pathways for various initial water content, rain intensities, tracer characteristics, geometry of the structural discontinuity setting, and domain properties, a detailed numerical analysis of the tracer experiments using the three-dimensional discrete fracture model HydroGeoSphere was performed. Detailed data on the geometry and hydraulic properties of the different domains of the till (two matrix units, fractures, and biopores), and tracer characteristics were incorporated in the model. Overall, the analysis showed that discontinuities control tracer migration even at high matrix suction values. Hence, the study revealed that, for any risk assessment analysis of these complex media, it is necessary to account for fast flow

  4. Surface Time-Variable Gravity Signals and Possible Sources Including Core Mass Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Over two decades of geodetic satellite-laser-ranging (SLR) data show that the variation of the Earth's oblateness parameter J2 has a clear seasonal signal of amplitude of about 3e-10 and a secular decrease of about -2.8e-11/year, superimposed on some interesting interannual fluctuations. Physically, any change in mass distribution or/inside the Earth will be reflected in the time-variable gravity signal obtained outside the Earth, according to Newton s gravitational law. Therefore, such signal contains contributions from all geophysical sources that redistribute mass, on all temporal and spatial scales, including those from the core. Besides Earth rotation and geomagnetic field variations, the time-variable gravity also contains information linking Earth surface observations with internal core dynamical processes. The time scales of the gravity signal are critical in helping differentiate different contributions. The atmosphere and hydrosphere are responsible for the seasonal and much of the interannual and intraseasoanl fluctuations, while the secular trend is due mainly to the post-glacial rebound but possibly core mass flow. To estimate the latter effect, we use our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent, Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to forward simulate the core flow, and density variation due to the core convection. Our results suggest that, when upward continued to the surface, the J2 component of the core mass redistribution can reach an overall amplitude of e-11/year, approaching the SLR detectability and significant in geophysical terms. We also find a general westward drift of the mass flow, with a speed comparable to that of the geomagnetic westward drift.

  5. Aerodynamic design lowers truck fuel consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steers, L.

    1978-01-01

    Energy-saving concepts in truck design are emerging from developing new shapes with improved aerodynamic flow properties that can reduce air-drag coefficient of conventional tractor-trailers without requiring severe design changes or compromising load-carrying capability. Improvements are expected to decrease somewhat with increased wind velocities and would be affected by factors such as terrain, driving techniques, and mechanical condition.

  6. Semi-local scaling and turbulence modulation in variable property turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ashish; Peeters, Jurriaan W. R.; Boersma, Bendiks J.; Pecnik, Rene

    2015-09-01

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the effect of temperature dependent density and viscosity on turbulence in channel flows. First, a mathematical framework is developed to support the validity of the semi-local scaling as proposed based on heuristic arguments by Huang, Coleman, and Bradshaw ["Compressible turbulent channel flows: DNS results and modelling," J. Fluid Mech. 305, 185-218 (1995)]. Second, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent channel flows with different constitutive relations for density and viscosity are performed to assess and validate the semi-local scaling for turbulent statistics. The DNS database is obtained by solving the low-Mach number approximation of the Navier-Stokes equation. Finally, we quantify the modulation of turbulence due to changes in fluid properties. In the simulations, the fluid is internally heated and the temperature at both channel walls is fixed, such that the friction Reynolds number based on wall quantities is Reτ = 395 for all cases investigated. We show that for a case with variable density ρ and viscosity μ, but constant semi-local Reynolds number R eτ ∗ ≡ √{ ( ρ ¯ / ρ w ) } / ( μ ¯ / μ w ) R e τ (where bar and subscript w, denote Reynolds averaging and averaged wall quantity, respectively), across the whole channel height, the turbulent statistics exhibit quasi-similarity with constant property turbulent flows. For cases where R eτ ∗ ≠ R e τ across the channel, we found that quasi-similarity is maintained for cases with similar R eτ ∗ distributions, even if their individual mean density and viscosity profiles substantially differ. With a decrease of R eτ ∗ towards the channel center ( R eτ ∗ < R e τ ), we show that the anisotropy increases and the pre-multiplied stream-wise spectra reveal that this increase is associated with strengthening of the large scale streaks in the buffer layer. The opposite effect is observed when R eτ ∗ increases towards the channel

  7. Modeling the Variability of Blue and Green Water Flows in the Congo Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloysius, N. R.; Saiers, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    The Congo River and its tributaries flow through the second largest rainforest in the world, second only to the Amazon, and are regulated by several natural lakes and wetlands. The river basin that spans on both sides of the equator in Central Africa, possesses significant natural resources, but lacks economic growth due to the continuous political crisis. Published studies describe deforestation as a result of industrial logging and expansion of subsistence agriculture and increasing trends in temperature and precipitation as causes of environmental change in the region. These changes are expected to continue into the future and are likely to alter the spatiotemporal variability of the basin’s blue water (rivers, lakes, wetlands and groundwater storage) and green water (evapotranspiration) flows. Rapid population growth will further exert pressure on available water resources. These changes endanger the health and resilience of ecosystems and their services within the Congo basin. In order to explore the effects of climate and land use on the water resources of the basin and to identify strategies to manage the basin’s water resources for their long-term sustainability, we are conducting an assessment of the basin hydrology. A semi-distributed hydrological modeling framework is being used to simulate the hydrology of the basin. The information on the region’s climate, soil properties and land use and land cover are used in the model. The first phase of the modeling involves simulating the historical hydrology of the basin for the period 1948-2006. The headwater streams drain semi-humid catchments with distinct dry and wet rainy seasons on both sides of the equator. The central part of the basin encompasses dense tropical forest which receives over 2000 mm of rainfall per year. A well-connected lake-wetland system modulates the stream flows in the southern part of the basin. As a result the discharge regime of the main Congo river does not show much

  8. Requirements for Large Eddy Simulation Computations of Variable-Speed Power Turbine Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    Variable-speed power turbines (VSPTs) operate at low Reynolds numbers and with a wide range of incidence angles. Transition, separation, and the relevant physics leading to them are important to VSPT flow. Higher fidelity tools such as large eddy simulation (LES) may be needed to resolve the flow features necessary for accurate predictive capability and design of such turbines. A survey conducted for this report explores the requirements for such computations. The survey is limited to the simulation of two-dimensional flow cases and endwalls are not included. It suggests that a grid resolution necessary for this type of simulation to accurately represent the physics may be of the order of Delta(x)+=45, Delta(x)+ =2 and Delta(z)+=17. Various subgrid-scale (SGS) models have been used and except for the Smagorinsky model, all seem to perform well and in some instances the simulations worked well without SGS modeling. A method of specifying the inlet conditions such as synthetic eddy modeling (SEM) is necessary to correctly represent the inlet conditions.

  9. Analysis of an anisotropic coastal aquifer system using variable-density flow and solute transport simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Souza, W.R.; Voss, C.I.

    1987-01-01

    The groundwater system in southern Oahu, Hawaii consists of a thick, areally extensive freshwater lens overlying a zone of transition to a thick saltwater body. This system is analyzed in cross section with a variable-density groundwater flow and solute transport model on a regional scale. The simulation is difficult, because the coastal aquifer system has a saltwater transition zone that is broadly dispersed near the discharge area, but is very sharply defined inland. Steady-state simulation analysis of the transition zone in the layered basalt aquifer of southern Oahu indicates that a small transverse dispersivity is characteristic of horizontal regional flow. Further, in this system flow is generally parallel to isochlors and steady-state behavior is insensitive to the longitudinal dispersivity. Parameter analysis identifies that only six parameters control the complex hydraulics of the system: horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity of the basalt aquifer; hydraulic conductivity of the confining "caprock" layer; leakance below the caprock; specific yield; and aquifer matrix compressibility. The best-fitting models indicate the horizontal hydraulic conductivity is significantly greater than the vertical hydraulic conductivity. These models give values for specific yield and aquifer compressibility which imply a considerable degree of compressive storage in the water table aquifer. ?? 1987.

  10. Highly Variable Cycle Nozzle Concept: Validation of Flow and Noise Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Results from experimental and numerical studies of highly Variable Cycle (HVC) exhaust model were presented. The model was designed and fabricated under a Supersonics NRA awarded to Rolls-Royce. The model had a lobed mixer for the core stream nozzle, and elliptic fan stream nozzle, and an ejector. Experiments included far-field acoustic array, phased array, and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Numerical studies included flow simulations using the WIND-US code and far-field acoustic solutions using an acoustic analogy developed by Goldstein (2003) and Leib and Goldstein (2011). Far-field acoustic measurements showed increased noise levels over the round baseline nozzle when using non-static forward flight conditions. Phased array measurements showed noise sources near the ejector doors when tones were produced for small ejector door positions. Ejector door separation identified in the experiments was reproduced in the numerical flow simulations. Acoustic solutions were unable to match levels measured in the peak jet noise direction indicating additional development work is needed to predict noise from highly three-dimensional flows.

  11. Multiple-Zone Variable Refrigerant Flow System Modeling and Equipment Performance Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Rice, C Keith

    2012-01-01

    We developed a variable refrigerant flow (VRF) vapor compression system model, which has five indoor units, one outdoor unit and one water heater. The VRF system can run simultaneous space conditioning (cooling or heating) and water heating. The indoor units and outdoor unit use fin-&-tube coil heat exchangers, and the water heater uses a tube-in-tube heat exchanger. The fin-&-tube coil heat exchangers are modeled using a segment-by-segment approach and the tube-in-tube water heater is modeled using a phase-by-phase approach. The compressor used is a variable-speed rotary design. We calibrated our model against a manufacturer s product literature. Based on the vapor compression system model, we investigated the methodology for generating VRF equipment performance maps, which can be used for energy simulations in TRNSYS and EnergyPlus, etc. In the study, the major independent variables for mapping are identified and the deviations between the simplified performance map and the actual equipment system simulation are quantified.

  12. Aerodynamic analysis of an isolated vehicle wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leśniewicz, P.; Kulak, M.; Karczewski, M.

    2014-08-01

    Increasing fuel prices force the manufacturers to look into all aspects of car aerodynamics including wheels, tyres and rims in order to minimize their drag. By diminishing the aerodynamic drag of vehicle the fuel consumption will decrease, while driving safety and comfort will improve. In order to properly illustrate the impact of a rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body, precise analysis of an isolated wheel should be performed beforehand. In order to represent wheel rotation in contact with the ground, presented CFD simulations included Moving Wall boundary as well as Multiple Reference Frame should be performed. Sliding mesh approach is favoured but too costly at the moment. Global and local flow quantities obtained during simulations were compared to an experiment in order to assess the validity of the numerical model. Results of investigation illustrates dependency between type of simulation and coefficients (drag and lift). MRF approach proved to be a better solution giving result closer to experiment. Investigation of the model with contact area between the wheel and the ground helps to illustrate the impact of rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body.

  13. A Generic Nonlinear Aerodynamic Model for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    A generic model of the aerodynamic coefficients was developed using wind tunnel databases for eight different aircraft and multivariate orthogonal functions. For each database and each coefficient, models were determined using polynomials expanded about the state and control variables, and an othgonalization procedure. A predicted squared-error criterion was used to automatically select the model terms. Modeling terms picked in at least half of the analyses, which totalled 45 terms, were retained to form the generic nonlinear aerodynamic (GNA) model. Least squares was then used to estimate the model parameters and associated uncertainty that best fit the GNA model to each database. Nonlinear flight simulations were used to demonstrate that the GNA model produces accurate trim solutions, local behavior (modal frequencies and damping ratios), and global dynamic behavior (91% accurate state histories and 80% accurate aerodynamic coefficient histories) under large-amplitude excitation. This compact aerodynamics model can be used to decrease on-board memory storage requirements, quickly change conceptual aircraft models, provide smooth analytical functions for control and optimization applications, and facilitate real-time parametric system identification.

  14. Future Challenges and Opportunities in Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Hefner, Jerry N.

    2000-01-01

    Investments in aeronautics research and technology have declined substantially over the last decade, in part due to the perception that technologies required in aircraft design are fairly mature and readily available. This perception is being driven by the fact that aircraft configurations, particularly the transport aircraft, have evolved only incrementally, over last several decades. If however, one considers that the growth in air travel is expected to triple in the next 20 years, it becomes quickly obvious that the evolutionary development of technologies is not going to meet the increased demands for safety, environmental compatibility, capacity, and economic viability. Instead, breakthrough technologies will he required both in traditional disciplines of aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, materials, controls, and avionics as well as in the multidisciplinary integration of these technologies into the design of future aerospace vehicles concepts. The paper discusses challenges and opportunities in the field of aerodynamics over the next decade. Future technology advancements in aerodynamics will hinge on our ability, to understand, model, and control complex, three-dimensional, unsteady viscous flow across the speed range. This understanding is critical for developing innovative flow and noise control technologies and advanced design tools that will revolutionize future aerospace vehicle systems and concepts. Specifically, the paper focuses on advanced vehicle concepts, flow and noise control technologies, and advanced design and analysis tools.

  15. Aerodynamic Design Opportunities for Future Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.

    2002-01-01

    A discussion of a diverse set of aerodynamic opportunities to improve the aerodynamic performance of future supersonic aircraft has been presented and discussed. These ideas are offered to the community in a hope that future supersonic vehicle development activities will not be hindered by past efforts. A number of nonlinear flow based drag reduction technologies are presented and discussed. The subject technologies are related to the areas of interference flows, vehicle concepts, vortex flows, wing design, advanced control effectors, and planform design. The authors also discussed the importance of improving the aerodynamic design environment to allow creativity and knowledge greater influence. A review of all of the data presented show that pressure drag reductions on the order of 50 to 60 counts are achievable, compared to a conventional supersonic cruise vehicle, with the application of several of the discussed technologies. These drag reductions would correlate to a 30 to 40% increase in cruise L/D (lift-to-drag ratio) for a commercial supersonic transport.

  16. Development of a Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Time-Resolved Gas Flow Velocity, Temperature, and Density Measurements in Aerodynamic Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2007-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultiplier tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. An acoustically driven nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements, and an asymmetric oscillating counterflow with unequal enthalpies is studied to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations. Velocity fluctuations are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements and temperature fluctuations are compared with constant current anemometry measurements at the same locations. Time-series and power spectra of the temperature and velocity measurements are presented. A numerical simulation of the light scattering and detection process was developed and compared with experimental data for future use as an experiment design tool.

  17. Effect of reaction control system jet-flow field interactions on a 0.015 scale model space shuttle orbiter aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monta, W. J.; Rausch, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of the reaction control system (RCS) jet-flow field interactions on the space shuttle orbiter system during entry are discussed. The primary objective of the test program was to obtain data for the shuttle orbiter configuration to determine control amplification factors resulting from jet interaction between the RCS plumes and the external flow over the vehicle. A secondary objective was to provide data for comparison and improvement of analytic jet interaction prediction techniques. The test program was divided into two phases; (1) force and moment measurements were made with and without RCS blowing, investigating environment parameters (R sub e, Alpha, Beta), RCS plume parameters (Jet pressure ratio, momentum ratio and thrust level), and geometry parameters (RCS pod locations) on the orbiter model, (2) oil flow visualization tests were conducted on a dummy balance at the end of the test.

  18. Computational methods for aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeters, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Five methods to increase the computational efficiency of aerodynamic design using numerical optimization, by reducing the computer time required to perform gradient calculations, are examined. The most promising method consists of drastically reducing the size of the computational domain on which aerodynamic calculations are made during gradient calculations. Since a gradient calculation requires the solution of the flow about an airfoil whose geometry was slightly perturbed from a base airfoil, the flow about the base airfoil is used to determine boundary conditions on the reduced computational domain. This method worked well in subcritical flow.

  19. Wind Tunnel Investigation of the Effects of Surface Porosity and Vertical Tail Placement on Slender Wing Vortex Flow Aerodynamics at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the effects of passive surface porosity and vertical tail placement on vortex flow development and interactions about a general research fighter configuration at supersonic speeds. Optical flow measurement and flow visualization techniques were used that featured pressure sensitive paint (PSP), laser vapor screen (LVS), and schlieren, These techniques were combined with conventional electronically-scanned pressure (ESP) and six-component force and moment measurements to quantify and to visualize the effects of flow-through porosity applied to a wing leading edge extension (LEX) and the placement of centerline and twin vertical tails on the vortex-dominated flow field of a 65 cropped delta wing model. Test results were obtained at free-stream Mach numbers of 1.6, 1.8, and 2.1 and a Reynolds number per foot of 2.0 million. LEX porosity promoted a wing vortex-dominated flow field as a result of a diffusion and weakening of the LEX vortex. The redistribution of the vortex-induced suction pressures contributed to large nose-down pitching moment increments but did not significantly affect the vortex-induced lift. The trends associated with LEX porosity were unaffected by vertical tail placement. The centerline tail configuration generally provided more stable rolling moments and yawing moments compared to the twin wing-mounted vertical tails. The strength of a complex system of shock waves between the twin tails was reduced by LEX porosity.

  20. Variably saturated flow and multicomponent biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a uranium bioremediation field experiment.

    PubMed

    Yabusaki, Steven B; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H; Murray, Christopher J; Ward, Andy L; Dayvault, Richard D; Waichler, Scott R; Newcomer, Darrell R; Spane, Frank A; Long, Philip E

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional, coupled variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport and biogeochemical reactions controlling uranium behavior under pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. While the simulation of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado was generally consistent with behaviors identified in previous field experiments at the Rifle IFRC site, the additional process and property detail provided several new insights. A principal conclusion from this work is that uranium bioreduction is most effective when acetate, in excess of the sulfate-reducing bacteria demand, is available to the metal-reducing bacteria. The inclusion of an initially small population of slow growing sulfate-reducing bacteria identified in proteomic analyses led to an additional source of Fe(II) from the dissolution of Fe(III) minerals promoted by biogenic sulfide. The falling water table during the experiment significantly reduced the saturated thickness of the aquifer and resulted in reactants and products, as well as unmitigated uranium, in the newly unsaturated vadose zone. High permeability sandy gravel structures resulted in locally high flow rates in the vicinity of injection wells that increased acetate dilution. In downgradient locations, these structures created preferential flow paths for acetate delivery that enhanced local zones of TEAP reactivity and subsidiary reactions. Conversely, smaller transport rates associated with the lower permeability lithofacies (e.g., fine) and vadose zone were shown to limit acetate access and reaction. Once accessed by acetate, however, these same zones limited subsequent acetate dilution and provided longer residence times that resulted