Science.gov

Sample records for aerodynamic heating tests

  1. Shuttle reentry aerodynamic heating test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, J. E.; Mccormick, P. O.; Smith, S. D.

    1971-01-01

    The research for determining the space shuttle aerothermal environment is reported. Brief summaries of the low Reynolds number windward side heating test, and the base and leeward heating and high Reynolds number heating test are included. Also discussed are streamline divergence and the resulting effect on aerodynamic heating, and a thermal analyzer program that is used in the Thermal Environment Optimization Program.

  2. Viking entry aerodynamics and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polutchko, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the Mars entry including the mission sequence of events and associated spacecraft weights are described along with the Viking spacecraft. Test data are presented for the aerodynamic characteristics of the entry vehicle showing trimmed alpha, drag coefficient, and trimmed lift to drag ratio versus Mach number; the damping characteristics of the entry configuration; the angle of attack time history of Viking entries; stagnation heating and pressure time histories; and the aeroshell heating distribution as obtained in tests run in a shock tunnel for various gases. Flight tests which demonstrate the aerodynamic separation of the full-scale aeroshell and the flying qualities of the entry configuration in an uncontrolled mode are documented. Design values selected for the heat protection system based on the test data and analysis performed are presented.

  3. Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. Subba

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic space vehicles is an important factor to be considered in their design. Therefore the designers of such vehicles need reliable heat transfer data in this respect for a successful design. Such data is usually produced by testing the models of hypersonic surfaces in wind tunnels. Most of the hypersonic test facilities at present are conventional blow-down tunnels whose run times are of the order of several seconds. The surface temperatures on such models are obtained using standard techniques such as thin-film resistance gages, thin-skin transient calorimeter gages and coaxial thermocouple or video acquisition systems such as phosphor thermography and infrared thermography. The data are usually reduced assuming that the model behaves like a semi-infinite solid (SIS) with constant properties and that heat transfer is by one-dimensional conduction only. This simplifying assumption may be valid in cases where models are thick, run-times short, and thermal diffusivities small. In many instances, however, when these conditions are not met, the assumption may lead to significant errors in the heat transfer results. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this aspect. Specifically, the objectives are as follows: (1) to determine the limiting conditions under which a model can be considered a semi-infinite body; (2) to estimate the extent of errors involved in the reduction of the data if the models violate the assumption; and (3) to come up with correlation factors which when multiplied by the results obtained under the SIS assumption will provide the results under the actual conditions.

  4. Orion Crew Module Aerodynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Bibb, Karen L.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Owens, Bruce; Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Bell, James H.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    The Apollo-derived Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), part of NASA s now-cancelled Constellation Program, has become the reference design for the new Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). The MPCV will serve as the exploration vehicle for all near-term human space missions. A strategic wind-tunnel test program has been executed at numerous facilities throughout the country to support several phases of aerodynamic database development for the Orion spacecraft. This paper presents a summary of the experimental static aerodynamic data collected to-date for the Orion Crew Module (CM) capsule. The test program described herein involved personnel and resources from NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Johnson Space Flight Center, Arnold Engineering and Development Center, Lockheed Martin Space Sciences, and Orbital Sciences. Data has been compiled from eight different wind tunnel tests in the CEV Aerosciences Program. Comparisons are made as appropriate to highlight effects of angle of attack, Mach number, Reynolds number, and model support system effects.

  5. Summary of NASA aerodynamic and heat transfer studies in turbine vanes and blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, T. P.; Stepka, F. S.; Rohlik, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    Aerodynamic effects of trailing edge geometry, hole size, angle, spacing, and shape were studied in two- and three-dimensional cascades and in a warm turbine test series. Heat transfer studies were carried out in various two- and three-dimensional test facilities in order to provide corresponding heat transfer data. Results are shown in terms of cooling effectiveness and aerodynamic efficiency for various coolant fractions, coolant-primary temperature ratios, and cooling configurations.

  6. Aerodynamic tests of Darrieus wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P.G.; Walters, R.E.; Wolfe, W.P.

    1983-03-01

    An indoor facility for the aerodynamic testing of Darrieus turbine blades was developed. Lift, drag, and moment coefficients were measured for two blades whose angle of attack and chord-to-radius ratio were varied. The first blade used an NACA 0015 airfoil section; the second used a 15% elliptical cross section with a modified circular arc trailing edge. Blade aerodynamic coefficients were corrected to section coefficients for comparison to published rectilinear flow data. Although the airfoil sections were symmetrical, moment coefficients were not zero and the lift and drag curves were asymmetrical about zero lift coefficient and angle of attack. These features verified the predicted virtual camber and incidence phenomena. Boundary-layer centrifugal effects were manifested by discontinuous lift curves and large differences in the angle of zero lift between th NACA 0015 and elliptical airfoils. It was concluded that rectilinear flow aerodynamic data are not applicable to Darrieus turbine blades, even for small chord-to-radius ratios.

  7. Low-perigee aerodynamic heating during orbital flight of an atmosphere Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, P. S., Jr.; Naegeli, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    An extensive, low-perigee orbital aerodynamic heating study was undertaken in support of the Atmosphere Explorer-C Temperature Alarm. State of the art of low-density, high-speed flows, some models of the earth's atmosphere, external flow-field definition, thermodynamic and transport properties of atmospheric gases, the accommodation coefficient orbital thermal environment, and correlation of theory and measurements are discussed. Aerodynamic heating rates are determined for eight selected orbits by means of a reduced, analytical model verified by both ground test and flight data. These heating rates are compared with classical free-molecule and first-order collision regime values.

  8. Air flow testing on aerodynamic truck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This photograph illustrates a standard passenger van modified at the Dryden Flight Research Center to investigate the aerodynamics of trucks. The resulting vehicle--re-fashioned with sheet metal--resembled a motor home, with rounded vertical corners on the vehicle's front and rear sections. For subsequent tests, researchers installed a 'boat tail' structure, shown in the photograph. During a decade spanning the 1970s and 1980s, Dryden researchers conducted tests to determine the extent to which adjustments in the shape of trucks reduced aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the tests, the vehicle's sides were fitted with tufts, or strings, that showed air flow. The investigators concluded that rounding the vertical corners front and rear reduced drag by 40 percent, yet decreased the vehicle's internal volume by only 1.3 percent. Rounding both the vertical and horizontal corners cut drag by 54 percent, resulting in a three percent loss of internal volume. A second group of tests added a faired underbody and a boat tail, the latter feature resulting in drag reduction of about 15 percent.

  9. Aerodynamics of heat exchangers for high-altitude aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drela, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Reduction of convective beat transfer with altitude dictates unusually large beat exchangers for piston- engined high-altitude aircraft The relatively large aircraft drag fraction associated with cooling at high altitudes makes the efficient design of the entire heat exchanger installation an essential part of the aircraft's aerodynamic design. The parameters that directly influence cooling drag are developed in the context of high-altitude flight Candidate wing airfoils that incorporate heat exchangers are examined. Such integrated wing-airfoil/heat-exchanger installations appear to be attractive alternatives to isolated heat.exchanger installations. Examples are drawn from integrated installations on existing or planned high-altitude aircraft.

  10. Aerodynamic Simulation of the MARINTEK Braceless Semisubmersible Wave Tank Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Gordon; Muskulus, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Model scale experiments of floating offshore wind turbines are important for both platform design for the industry as well as numerical model validation for the research community. An important consideration in the wave tank testing of offshore wind turbines are scaling effects, especially the tension between accurate scaling of both hydrodynamic and aerodynamic forces. The recent MARINTEK braceless semisubmersible wave tank experiment utilizes a novel aerodynamic force actuator to decouple the scaling of the aerodynamic forces. This actuator consists of an array of motors that pull on cables to provide aerodynamic forces that are calculated by a blade-element momentum code in real time as the experiment is conducted. This type of system has the advantage of supplying realistically scaled aerodynamic forces that include dynamic forces from platform motion, but does not provide the insights into the accuracy of the aerodynamic models that an actual model-scale rotor could provide. The modeling of this system presents an interesting challenge, as there are two ways to simulate the aerodynamics; either by using the turbulent wind fields as inputs to the aerodynamic model of the design code, or by surpassing the aerodynamic model and using the forces applied to the experimental turbine as direct inputs to the simulation. This paper investigates the best practices of modeling this type of novel aerodynamic actuator using a modified wind turbine simulation tool, and demonstrates that bypassing the dynamic aerodynamics solver of design codes can lead to erroneous results.

  11. A Visual Technique for Determining Qualitative Aerodynamic Heating Rates on Complex Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. Calvin

    1960-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted at a test-section Mach number of 4.95 and a stagnation temperature of 400 F to evaluate a visual technique for obtaining qualitative aerodynamic heat-transfer data on complex configurations.This technique utilized a temperature-sensetive paint indicated that this technique was satisfactory for determining qualitative heat-transfer rates on various bodies, some of which exhibited complex flow patterns. The results obtained have been found useful to guide the instrumentation of quantitative heat-transfer models, to supplement quantitative heat-transfer measurements, and to make preliminary heat-transfer studies for new configurations.

  12. Fluid-thermal-structural study of aerodynamically heated leading edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deuchamphai, Pramote; Thornton, Earl A.; Wieting, Allan R.

    1988-01-01

    A finite element approach for integrated fluid-thermal-structural analysis of aerodynamically heated leading edges is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations for high speed compressible flow, the energy equation, and the quasi-static equilibrium equations for the leading edge are solved using a single finite element approach in one integrated, vectorized computer program called LIFTS. The fluid-thermal-structural coupling is studied for Mach 6.47 flow over a 3-in diam cylinder for which the flow behavior and the aerothermal loads are calibrated by experimental data. Issues of the thermal-structural response are studied for hydrogen-cooled, super thermal conducting leading edges subjected to intense aerodynamic heating.

  13. Joint influences of aerodynamic flow field and aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of airborne optical systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Haosu; Zuo, Baojun; Tian, Yi; Zhang, Wang; Hao, Chenglong; Liu, Chaofeng; Li, Qi; Li, Fan; Zhang, Li; Fan, Zhigang

    2012-12-20

    We investigated the joint influences exerted by the nonuniform aerodynamic flow field surrounding the optical dome and the aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of an airborne optical system. The Spalart-Allmaras model provided by FLUENT was used for flow computations. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm based ray tracing program was used to simulate optical transmission through the aerodynamic flow field and the dome. Four kinds of imaging quality evaluation parameters were presented: wave aberration of the exit pupil, point spread function, encircled energy, and modulation transfer function. The results show that the aero-optical disturbance of the aerodynamic flow field and the aerodynamic heating of the dome significantly affect the imaging quality of an airborne optical system.

  14. Test section configuration for aerodynamic testing in shock tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study of the test section configuration required to minimize or alleviate interference effects on model flow produced by the presence of test section walls in the aerodynamic testing of two dimensional transonic airfoils in a shock tube. Tests at a nominal Mach number of 0.85 and a chord Reynolds number of 2,000,000 were carried out by means of schlieren photography and pressure measurements for several symmetric airfoil profiles using shock tube test sections with unmodified straight walls, contoured walls, and slotted walls with adjacent chambers. Results were compared with corresponding results from conventional wind tunnel tests of the airfoils. Results for the straight wall tests show major airfoil flow distortions. Results from contoured wall tests and those performed using a slotted wall test section developed in this study exhibit essential agreement with wind tunnel results. The collective results show that test sections for aerodynamic testing can be designed for shock tubes that will alleviate wall interference effects.

  15. Air flow testing on aerodynamic truck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    After leasing a cab-over tractor-trailer from a Southern California firm, Dryden researchers added sheet metal modifications like those shown here. They rounded the front corners and edges, and placed a smooth fairing on the cab's roofs and sides extending back to the trailer. During the investigation of truck aerodynamics, the techniques honed in flight research proved highly applicable. By closing the gap between the cab and the trailer, for example, researchers discovered a significant reduction in aerodynamic drag, one resulting in 20 to 25 percent less fuel consumption than the standard design. Many truck manufacturers subsequently incorporated similar modifications on their products.

  16. Supersonic Parachute Aerodynamic Testing and Fluid Structure Interaction Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingard, J. S.; Underwood, J. C.; Darley, M. G.; Marraffa, L.; Ferracina, L.

    2014-06-01

    The ESA Supersonic Parachute program expands the knowledge of parachute inflation and flying characteristics in supersonic flows using wind tunnel testing and fluid structure interaction to develop new inflation algorithms and aerodynamic databases.

  17. Ares I Aerodynamic Testing at the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Niskey, Charles J.; Hanke, Jeremy L.; Tomek, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout three full design analysis cycles, the Ares I project within the Constellation program has consistently relied on the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel (PSWT) for aerodynamic testing of the subsonic, transonic and supersonic portions of the atmospheric flight envelope (Mach=0.5 to 4.5). Each design cycle required the development of aerodynamic databases for the 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) forces and moments, as well as distributed line-loads databases covering the full range of Mach number, total angle-of-attack, and aerodynamic roll angle. The high fidelity data collected in this facility has been consistent with the data collected in NASA Langley s Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at the overlapping condition ofMach=1.6. Much insight into the aerodynamic behavior of the launch vehicle during all phases of flight was gained through wind tunnel testing. Important knowledge pertaining to slender launch vehicle aerodynamics in particular was accumulated. In conducting these wind tunnel tests and developing experimental aerodynamic databases, some challenges were encountered and are reported as lessons learned in this paper for the benefit of future crew launch vehicle aerodynamic developments.

  18. Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test: Trajectory, Atmosphere, and Aerodynamics Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutty, Prasad; Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Blood, Eric M.; O'Farrell, Clara; Ginn, Jason M.; Shoenenberger, Mark; Dutta, Soumyo

    2015-01-01

    The Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test is a full-scale flight test of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator, which is part of the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator technology development project. The purpose of the project is to develop and mature aerodynamic decelerator technologies for landing large mass payloads on the surface of Mars. The technologies include a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator and Supersonic Parachutes. The first Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test occurred on June 28th, 2014 at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. This test was used to validate the test architecture for future missions. The flight was a success and, in addition, was able to acquire data on the aerodynamic performance of the supersonic inflatable decelerator. This paper describes the instrumentation, analysis techniques, and acquired flight test data utilized to reconstruct the vehicle trajectory, atmosphere, and aerodynamics. The results of the reconstruction show significantly higher lofting of the trajectory, which can partially be explained by off-nominal booster motor performance. The reconstructed vehicle force and moment coefficients fall well within pre-flight predictions. A parameter identification analysis indicates that the vehicle displayed greater aerodynamic static stability than seen in pre-flight computational predictions and ballistic range tests.

  19. Bifurcations in unsteady aerodynamics-implications for testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Gary T.; Tobak, Murray

    1988-01-01

    The various forms of bifurcations that can occur between steady and unsteady aerodynamic flows are reviewed. Examples are provided to illustrate the various ways in which bifurcations may intervene to influence the outcome of dynamics tests involving unsteady aerodynamics. The presence of bifurcation phenomena in such tests must be taken into consideration to ensure the proper interpretation of results, and some recommendations are made to that end.

  20. Aerodynamic Reconstruction Applied to Parachute Test Vehicle Flight Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassady, Leonard D.; Ray, Eric S.; Truong, Tuan H.

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamics, both static and dynamic, of a test vehicle are critical to determining the performance of the parachute cluster in a drop test and for conducting a successful test. The Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is conducting tests of NASA's Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) parachutes at the Army Yuma Proving Ground utilizing the Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV). The PTV shape is based on the MPCV, but the height has been reduced in order to fit within the C-17 aircraft for extraction. Therefore, the aerodynamics of the PTV are similar, but not the same as, the MPCV. A small series of wind tunnel tests and computational fluid dynamics cases were run to modify the MPCV aerodynamic database for the PTV, but aerodynamic reconstruction of the flights has proven an effective source for further improvements to the database. The acceleration and rotational rates measured during free flight, before parachute inflation but during deployment, were used to con rm vehicle static aerodynamics. A multibody simulation is utilized to reconstruct the parachute portions of the flight. Aerodynamic or parachute parameters are adjusted in the simulation until the prediction reasonably matches the flight trajectory. Knowledge of the static aerodynamics is critical in the CPAS project because the parachute riser load measurements are scaled based on forebody drag. PTV dynamic damping is critical because the vehicle has no reaction control system to maintain attitude - the vehicle dynamics must be understood and modeled correctly before flight. It will be shown here that aerodynamic reconstruction has successfully contributed to the CPAS project.

  1. Experimental investigation of turbine disk cavity aerodynamics and heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, W. A.; Johnson, B. V.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation of turbine disk cavity aerodynamics and heat transfer was conducted to provide an experimental data base that can guide the aerodynamic and thermal design of turbine disks and blade attachments for flow conditions and geometries simulating those of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) turbopump drive turbines. Experiments were conducted to define the nature of the aerodynamics and heat transfer of the flow within the disk cavities and blade attachments of a large scale model simulating the SSME turbopump drive turbines. These experiments include flow between the main gas path and the disk cavities, flow within the disk cavities, and leakage flows through the blade attachments and labyrinth seals. Air was used to simulate the combustion products in the gas path. Air and carbon dioxide were used to simulate the coolants injected at three locations in the disk cavities. Trace amounts of carbon dioxide were used to determine the source of the gas at selected locations on the rotors, the cavity walls, and the interstage seal. The measurements on the rotor and stationary walls in the forward and aft cavities showed that the coolant effectiveness was 90 percent or greater when the coolant flow rate was greater than the local free disk entrainment flow rate and when room temperature air was used as both coolant and gas path fluid. When a coolant-to-gas-path density ratio of 1.51 was used in the aft cavity, the coolant effectiveness on the rotor was also 90 percent or greater at the aforementioned condition. However, the coolant concentration on the stationary wall was 60 to 80 percent at the aforementioned condition indicating a more rapid mixing of the coolant and flow through the rotor shank passages. This increased mixing rate was attributed to the destabilizing effects of the adverse density gradients.

  2. Wind turbine blade aerodynamics: The analysis of field test data

    SciTech Connect

    Luttges, M.W.; Miller, M.S.; Robinson, M.C.; Shipley, D.E.; Young, T.S.

    1994-08-01

    Data obtained from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory site test of a wind turbine (The Combined Experiment) was analyzed specifically to capture information regarding the aerodynamic loading experienced by the machine rotor blades. The inflow conditions were shown to be extremely variable. These inflows yielded three different operational regimes about the blades. Each regime produced very different aerodynamic loading conditions. Two of these regimes could not have been readily predicted from wind tunnel data. These conditions are being subjected to further analyses to provide new guidelines for both designers and operators. The roles of unsteady aerodynamics effects are highlighted since periods of dynamic stall were shown to be associated with brief episodes of high aerodynamic forces.

  3. Tabulation of data from the tip aerodynamics and acoustics test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Jeffrey L.; Tu, Wilson

    1990-01-01

    In a continuing effort to understand helicopter rotor tip aerodynamics and acoustics, researchers at Ames Research Center conducted a flight test. The test was performed using the NASA White Cobra and a set of highly instrumented blades. Tabular and graphic summaries of two data subsets from the Tip Aerodynamics and Acoustics Test are given. The data presented are for airloads, blade structural loads, blade vibrations, with summary tables of the aircraft states for each test point. The tabular data consist of the first 15 harmonics only, whereas the plots contain the entire measured frequency content.

  4. Aerodynamic Heat-Power Engine Operating on a Closed Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J.; Keller, D. C.

    1942-01-01

    Hot-air engines with dynamic compressors and turbines offer new prospects of success through utilization of units of high efficiencies and through the employment of modern materials of great strength at high temperature. Particular consideration is given to an aerodynamic prime mover operating on a closed circuit and heated externally. Increase of the pressure level of the circulating air permits a great increase of limit load of the unit. This also affords a possibility of regulation for which the internal efficiency of the unit changes but slightly. The effect of pressure and temperature losses is investigated. A general discussion is given of the experimental installation operating at the Escher Wyss plant in Zurich for a considerable time at high temperatures.

  5. Aerodynamic and Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing of the Orion Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C.

    2011-01-01

    The Orion aerodynamic testing team has completed more than 40 tests as part of developing the aerodynamic and loads databases for the vehicle. These databases are key to achieving good mechanical design for the vehicle and to ensure controllable flight during all potential atmospheric phases of a mission, including launch aborts. A wide variety of wind tunnels have been used by the team to document not only the aerodynamics but the aeroacoustic environment that the Orion might experience both during nominal ascents and launch aborts. During potential abort scenarios the effects of the various rocket motor plumes on the vehicle must be accurately understood. The Abort Motor (AM) is a high-thrust, short duration motor that rapidly separates Orion from its launch vehicle. The Attitude Control Motor (ACM), located in the nose of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle, is used for control during a potential abort. The 8 plumes from the ACM interact in a nonlinear manner with the four AM plumes which required a carefully controlled test to define the interactions and their effect on the control authority provided by the ACM. Techniques for measuring dynamic stability and for simulating rocket plume aerodynamics and acoustics were improved or developed in the course of building the aerodynamic and loads databases for Orion.

  6. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Ground Test Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Corso, Jospeh A.; Hughes, Stephen; Cheatwood, Neil; Johnson, Keith; Calomino, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology readiness levels have been incrementally matured by NASA over the last thirteen years, with most recent support from NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). Recently STMD GCDP has authorized funding and support through fiscal year 2015 (FY15) for continued HIAD ground developments which support a Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) study. The Mars study will assess the viability of various EDL architectures to enable a Mars human architecture pathfinder mission planned for mid-2020. At its conclusion in November 2014, NASA's first HIAD ground development effort had demonstrated success with fabricating a 50 W/cm2 modular thermal protection system, a 400 C capable inflatable structure, a 10-meter scale aeroshell manufacturing capability, together with calibrated thermal and structural models. Despite the unquestionable success of the first HIAD ground development effort, it was recognized that additional investment was needed in order to realize the full potential of the HIAD technology capability to enable future flight opportunities. The second HIAD ground development effort will focus on extending performance capability in key technology areas that include thermal protection system, lifting-body structures, inflation systems, flight control, stage transitions, and 15-meter aeroshell scalability. This paper presents an overview of the accomplishments under the baseline HIAD development effort and current plans for a follow-on development effort focused on extending those critical technologies needed to enable a Mars Pathfinder mission.

  7. Ferroelectric Liquid Crystals In Aerodynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S.; Holmes, Harlan K.

    1994-01-01

    The process of simultaneous optical visualization and quantitative measurement of aerodynamic boundary layer parameters requires new concepts, materials and utilization methods. Measurement of shear stress in terms of the transmitted or the reflected light intensity from an aligned ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) thin (approx. 1 micron) film deposited on a glass substrate has been the first step in this direction. In this paper, recent progress in utilization of FLC thin films for skin friction measurement and for studying the state of the boundary layer in a wind tunnel environment is reviewed. The switching characteristics of FLCs have been used to measure pressure from the newly devised system of partially exposed polymer dispersed ferroelectric liquid crystals (PEPDFLCs). In this configuration, a PEPDFLC thin film (approx. 10-25 microns) is sandwiched between two transparent conducting electrodes, one a rigid surface and the other a flexible sheet such as polyvinylidene fluoride or mylar. The switching characteristics of the film are a function of the pressure applied to the flexible transparent electrode and a predetermined bias voltage across the two electrodes. The results, considering the dielectrics of composite media, are discussed.

  8. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B.

    1995-12-31

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows. Again, to verify and or direct the development of these advanced codes, complete three-dimensional unsteady flow field data are needed.

  9. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B.

    1995-10-01

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. This requires experiments in appropriate research facilities in which complete flow field data, not only point measurements, are obtained and analyzed. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows.

  10. Evaluation of thermographic phosphor technology for aerodynamic model testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cates, M.R.; Tobin, K.W.; Smith, D.B.

    1990-08-01

    The goal for this project was to perform technology evaluations applicable to the development of higher-precision, higher-temperature aerodynamic model testing at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) in Tullahmoa, Tennessee. With the advent of new programs for design of aerospace craft that fly at higher speeds and altitudes, requirements for detailed understanding of high-temperature materials become very important. Model testing is a natural and critical part of the development of these new initiatives. The well-established thermographic phosphor techniques of the Applied Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are highly desirable for diagnostic evaluation of materials and aerodynamic shapes as studied in model tests. Combining this state-of-the-art thermographic technique with modern, higher-temperature models will greatly improve the practicability of tests for the advanced aerospace vehicles and will provide higher precision diagnostic information for quantitative evaluation of these tests. The wavelength ratio method for measuring surface temperatures of aerodynamic models was demonstrated in measurements made for this project. In particular, it was shown that the appropriate phosphors could be selected for the temperature range up to {approximately}700 {degree}F or higher and emission line ratios of sufficient sensitivity to measure temperature with 1% precision or better. Further, it was demonstrated that two-dimensional image- processing methods, using standard hardware, can be successfully applied to surface thermography of aerodynamic models for AEDC applications.

  11. The critical role of aerodynamic heating effects in the design of hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, Allan R.

    1989-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles operate in a hostile aerothermal environment, which has a significant impact on their aerothermostructural performance. Significant coupling occurs between the aerodynamic flow field, structural heat transfer, and structural response, creating a multidisciplinary interaction. The critical role of aerodynamic heating effects in the design of hypersonic vehicles is identified with an example of high localized heating on an engine-cowl leading edge. Recent advances is integrated fluid-thermal-structural finite-element analyses are presented.

  12. Space Shuttle hypersonic aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic flight research and the comparison to ground test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Shafer, Mary F.

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic comparisons between flight and ground test for the Space Shuttle at hypersonic speeds are discussed. All of the comparisons are taken from papers published by researchers active in the Space Shuttle program. The aerodynamic comparisons include stability and control derivatives, center-of-pressure location, and reaction control jet interaction. Comparisons are also discussed for various forms of heating, including catalytic, boundary layer, top centerline, side fuselage, OMS pod, wing leading edge, and shock interaction. The jet interaction and center-of-pressure location flight values exceeded not only the predictions but also the uncertainties of the predictions. Predictions were significantly exceeded for the heating caused by the vortex impingement on the OMS pods and for heating caused by the wing leading-edge shock interaction.

  13. Aerodynamic levitation of laser-heated solids in gas jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, P. C.; Atkins, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The aerodynamic levitation technique is developed for studies of high-temperature material properties and gas/condensed-phase reaction kinetics. Stable levitation is demonstrated in a supersonic jet from a 0.081 cm nozzle with 0.03-0.20 g 0.24-0.47 cm diameter solid spheres at a height between 0.7-2.0 cm above the nozzle and ambient pressures between 1.1-18 Torr. A model of supersonic jet levitation is developed which accurately predicts the values of height vs pressure over the full range of conditions investigated. It is found that the efficiency with which jet momentum is converted into levitation force decreases with the jet/specimen diameter ratio and the jet Reynolds number, and the rate of jet spreading with distance from the nozzle is found to agree with that measured by pitot tube traverses of the jet. In addition, laser heating is shown to reduce the jet momentum required for levitation at a given height and to increase levitation stability. Measurements of sphere levitation in subsonic gas jets show that the required jet momentum flow rate exceeds the specimen weight by about 2/the specimen drag coefficient at its terminal free-fall speed under ambient conditions.

  14. Tip aerodynamics and acoustics test: A report and data survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Jeffrey L.; Watts, Michael E.

    1988-01-01

    In a continuing effort to understand helicopter rotor tip aerodynamics and acoustics, a flight test was conducted by NASA Ames Research Center. The test was performed using the NASA White Cobra and a set of highly instrumented blades. All aspects of the flight test instrumentation and test procedures are explained. Additionally, complete data sets for selected test points are presented and analyzed. Because of the high volume of data acquired, only selected data points are presented. However, access to the entire data set is available to the researcher on request.

  15. Elevated-Temperature Tests Under Static and Aerodynamic Conditions on Honeycomb-Core Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Joseph M.; Johnson, Aldie E., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    Stainless-steel honeycomb-core sandwich panels which differed primarily in skin thicknesses were tested at elevated temperatures under static and aerodynamic conditions. The results of these tests were evaluated to determine the insulating effectiveness and structural integrity of the panels. The static radiant-heating tests were performed in front of a quartz-tube radiant heater at panel skin temperatures up to 1,5000 F. The aerodynamic tests were made in a Mach 1.4 heated blowdown wind tunnel. The tunnel temperature was augmented by additional heat supplied by a radiant heater which raised the panel surface temperature above 8000 F during air flow. Static radiant-heating tests of 2 minutes duration showed that all the panels protected the load-carrying structure about equally well. Thin-skin panels showed an advantage for this short-time test over thick-skin panels from a standpoint of weight against insulation. Permanent inelastic strains in the form of local buckles over each cell of the honeycomb core caused an increase in surface roughness. During the aero- dynamic tests all of the panels survived with little or no damage, and panel flutter did not occur.

  16. An Engineering Aerodynamic Heating Method for Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; DeJarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  17. An engineering aerodynamic heating method for hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; Dejarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  18. Numerical simulation of the tip aerodynamics and acoustics test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejero E, F.; Doerffer, P.; Szulc, O.; Cross, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    The application of an efficient flow control system on helicopter rotor blades may lead to improved aerodynamic performance. Recently, our invention of Rod Vortex Generators (RVGs) has been analyzed for helicopter rotor blades in hover with success. As a step forward, the study has been extended to forward flight conditions. For this reason, a validation of the numerical modelling for a reference helicopter rotor (without flow control) is needed. The article presents a study of the flow-field of the AH-1G helicopter rotor in low-, medium- and high-speed forward flight. The CFD code FLOWer from DLR has proven to be a suitable tool for the aerodynamic analysis of the two-bladed rotor without any artificial wake modelling. It solves the URANS equations with LEA (Linear Explicit Algebraic stress) k-ω model using the chimera overlapping grids technique. Validation of the numerical model uses comparison with the detailed flight test data gathered by Cross J. L. and Watts M. E. during the Tip Aerodynamics and Acoustics Test (TAAT) conducted at NASA in 1981. Satisfactory agreements for all speed regimes and a presence of significant flow separation in high-speed forward flight suggest a possible benefit from the future implementation of RVGs. The numerical results based on the URANS approach are presented not only for a popular, low-speed case commonly used in rotorcraft community for CFD codes validation but preferably for medium- and high-speed test conditions that have not been published to date.

  19. Aerodynamic Tests of the Space Launch System for Database Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Victor E.; Mayle, Melody N.; Blevins, John A.; Crosby, William A.; Purinton, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The Aerosciences Branch (EV33) at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been responsible for a series of wind tunnel tests on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Launch System (SLS) vehicles. The primary purpose of these tests was to obtain aerodynamic data during the ascent phase and establish databases that can be used by the Guidance, Navigation, and Mission Analysis Branch (EV42) for trajectory simulations. The paper describes the test particulars regarding models and measurements and the facilities used, as well as database preparations.

  20. Wind Tunnel Tests on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Advanced Solid Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Keiichi; Fujimoto, Keiichiro; Nonaka, Satoshi; Irikado, Tomoko; Fukuzoe, Moriyasu; Shima, Eiji

    The Advanced Solid Rocket is being developed by JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). Since its configuration has been changed very recently, its aerodynamic characteristics are of great interest of the JAXA Advanced Solid Rocket Team. In this study, we carried out wind tunnel tests on the aerodynamic characteristics of the present configuration for Mach 1.5. Six test cases were conducted with different body configurations, attack angles, and roll angles. A six component balance, oilflow visualization, Schlieren images were used throughout the experiments. It was found that, at zero angle-of-attack, the flow around the body were perturbed and its drag (axial force) characteristics were significantly influenced by protruding body components such as flanges, cable ducts, and attitude control units of SMSJ (Solid Motor Side Jet), while the nozzle had a minor role. With angle-of-attack of five degree, normal force of CNα = 3.50±0.03 was measured along with complex flow features observed in the full-component model; whereas no crossflow separations were induced around the no-protuberance model with CNα = 2.58±0.10. These values were almost constant with respect to the angle-of-attack in both of the cases. Furthermore, presence of roll angle made the flow more complicated, involving interactions of separation vortices. These data provide us with fundamental and important aerodynamic insights of the Advanced Solid Rocket, and they will be utilized as reference data for the corresponding numerical analysis.

  1. Light Vehicle-Trailer Systems' Aerodynamics Testing and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Henry; Sigurdson, Lorenz; Lange, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    A wide range of trailers with very poor aerodynamics are hauled long distances across a vast North American highway system. Our goal was to use preliminary smoke-wire flow visualizations to learn: the characteristic flow patterns over models representing modern Vehicle-Trailer Systems (VTS); what improvements need to be made in the experimental set-up; and if there is an opportunity for reduction in aerodynamic drag. Visualization tests were done in an open circuit wind tunnel, with a cross-sectional area of 0.3 m2. Detailed models of light duty trucks and trailers were used at a Reynolds number of 13,700. Images of the streaklines indicated two characteristic features. One was the presence of a stagnation point on the leading face of the trailer followed by a separation bubble on its top. The other feature was an unexpected separation bubble on the hood of the towing vehicle. We determined that it did not have a significant effect on the downstream flow pattern. By adding a small wedge deflector on the cab of the vehicle it was concluded that there is an opportunity for significant improvement of the VTS aerodynamics. Computational simulation of the flow is underway. Support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Discovery Grant Number 41747 is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Estimating monthly averaged air-sea transfers of heat and momentum using the bulk aerodynamic method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esbensen, S. K.; Reynolds, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Air-sea transfers of sensible heat, latent heat and momentum are computed from 25 years of middle-latitude and subtropical ocean weather ship data in the North Atlantic and North Pacific using the bulk aerodynamic method. The results show that monthly averaged wind speeds, temperatures and humidities can be used to estimate the monthly averaged sensible and latent heat fluxes from the bulk aerodynamic equations to within a relative error of approximately 10%. The estimates of monthly averaged wind stress under the assumption of neutral stability are shown to be within approximately 5% of the monthly averaged nonneutral values.

  3. Rocket Sled Propelled Testing of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meacham, Michael B.; Kennett, Andrew; Townsend, Derik J.; Marti, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Decelerators (IADs) have traditionally been tested in wind tunnels. As the limitations of these test facilities are reached, other avenues must be pursued. The IAD being tested is a Supersonic IAD (SIAD), which attaches just aft of the heatshield around the perimeter of an entry body. This 'attached torus' SIAD is meant to improve the accuracy of landing for robotic class missions to Mars and allow for potentially increased payloads. The SIAD Design Verification (SDV) test aims to qualify the SIAD by applying a targeted aerodynamic load to the vehicle. While many test architectures were researched, a rocket sled track was ultimately chosen to be the most cost effective way to achieve the desired dynamic pressures. The Supersonic Naval Ordnance Research Track (SNORT) at the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD) China Lake is a four mile test track, traditionally used for warhead and ejection seat testing. Prior to SDV, inflatable drag bodies have been tested on this particular track. Teams at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NAWCWD collaborate together to design and fabricate one of the largest sleds ever built. The SDV sled is comprised of three individual sleds: a Pusher Sled which holds the solid booster rockets, an Item Sled which supports the test vehicle, and a Camera Sled that is pushed in front for in-situ footage and measurements. The JPL-designed Test Vehicle has a full-scale heatshield shape and contains all instrumentation and inflation systems necessary to inflate and test a SIAD. The first campaign that is run at SNORT tested all hardware and instrumentation before the SIAD was ready to be tested. For each of the three tests in this campaign, the number of rockets and top speed was increased and the data analyzed to ensure the hardware is safe at the necessary accelerations and aerodynamic loads.

  4. Global Aerodynamic Modeling for Stall/Upset Recovery Training Using Efficient Piloted Flight Test Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Cunningham, Kevin; Hill, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Flight test and modeling techniques were developed for efficiently identifying global aerodynamic models that can be used to accurately simulate stall, upset, and recovery on large transport airplanes. The techniques were developed and validated in a high-fidelity fixed-base flight simulator using a wind-tunnel aerodynamic database, realistic sensor characteristics, and a realistic flight deck representative of a large transport aircraft. Results demonstrated that aerodynamic models for stall, upset, and recovery can be identified rapidly and accurately using relatively simple piloted flight test maneuvers. Stall maneuver predictions and comparisons of identified aerodynamic models with data from the underlying simulation aerodynamic database were used to validate the techniques.

  5. Effects of aerodynamic heating and TPS thermal performance uncertainties on the Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, W. D.; Derry, S. M.; Maraia, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for estimating uncertainties in the aerodynamic-heating and thermal protection system (TPS) thermal-performance methodologies developed for the Shuttle Orbiter is presented. This procedure is used in predicting uncertainty bands around expected or nominal TPS thermal responses for the Orbiter during entry. Individual flowfield and TPS parameters that make major contributions to these uncertainty bands are identified and, by statistical considerations, combined in a manner suitable for making engineering estimates of the TPS thermal confidence intervals and temperature margins relative to design limits. Thus, for a fixed TPS design, entry trajectories for future Orbiter missions can be shaped subject to both the thermal-margin and confidence-interval requirements. This procedure is illustrated by assessing the thermal margins offered by selected areas of the existing Orbiter TPS design for an entry trajectory typifying early flight test missions.

  6. Exploratory Environmental Tests of Several Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, George P.; Betts, John, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    Exploratory tests have been conducted with several conceptual radiative heat shields of composite construction. Measured transient temperature distributions were obtained for a graphite heat shield without insulation and with three types of insulating materials, and for a metal multipost heat shield, at surface temperatures of approximately 2,000 F and 1,450 F, respectively, by use of a radiant-heat facility. The graphite configurations suffered loss of surface material under repeated irradiation. Temperature distribution calculated for the metal heat shield by a numerical procedure was in good agreement with measured data. Environmental survival tests of the graphite heat shield without insulation, an insulated multipost heat shield, and a stainless-steel-tile heat shield were made at temperatures of 2,000 F and dynamic pressures of approximately 6,000 lb/sq ft, provided by an ethylene-heated jet operating at a Mach number of 2.0 and sea-level conditions. The graphite heat shield survived the simulated aerodynamic heating and pressure loading. A problem area exists in the design and materials for heat-resistant fasteners between the graphite shield and the base structure. The insulated multipost heat shield was found to be superior to the stainless-steel-tile heat shield in retarding heat flow. Over-lapped face-plate joints and surface smoothness of the insulated multi- post heat shield were not adversely affected by the test environment. The graphite heat shield without insulation survived tests made in the acoustic environment of a large air jet. This acoustic environment is random in frequency and has an overall noise level of 160 decibels.

  7. Enhancement of the CAVE computer code. [aerodynamic heating package for nose cones and scramjet engine sidewalls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathjen, K. A.; Burk, H. O.

    1983-01-01

    The computer code CAVE (Conduction Analysis via Eigenvalues) is a convenient and efficient computer code for predicting two dimensional temperature histories within thermal protection systems for hypersonic vehicles. The capabilities of CAVE were enhanced by incorporation of the following features into the code: real gas effects in the aerodynamic heating predictions, geometry and aerodynamic heating package for analyses of cone shaped bodies, input option to change from laminar to turbulent heating predictions on leading edges, modification to account for reduction in adiabatic wall temperature with increase in leading sweep, geometry package for two dimensional scramjet engine sidewall, with an option for heat transfer to external and internal surfaces, print out modification to provide tables of select temperatures for plotting and storage, and modifications to the radiation calculation procedure to eliminate temperature oscillations induced by high heating rates. These new features are described.

  8. Results of test MA22 in the NASA/LaRC 31-inch CFHT on an 0.010-scale model (32-0) of the space shuttle configuration 3 to determine RCS jet flow field interaction, volume 1. [wind tunnel tests for interactions of aerodynamic heating on jet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanipe, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted in the Langley Research Center 31-inch Continuous Flow Hypersonic Wind Tunnel from May 6, 1975 through June 3, 1975. The primary objectives of this test were the following: (1) to study the ability of the wind tunnel to repeat, on a run-to-run basis, data taken for identical configurations to determine if errors in repeatability could have a significant effect on jet interaction data, (2) to determine the effect of aerodynamic heating of the scale model on jet interaction, (3) to investigate the effects of elevon and body flap deflections on jet interaction, (4) to determine if the effects from jets fired separately along different axes can be added to equal the effects of the jets fired simultaneously (super position effects), (5) to study multiple jet effects, and (6) to investigate area ratio effects, i.e., the effect on jet interaction measurements of using wind tunnel nozzles with different area ratios in the same location. The model used in the test was a .010-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Configuration 3. The test was conducted at Mach 10.3 and a dynamic pressure of 150 psf. RCS chamber pressure was varied to simulate free flight dynamic pressures of 5, 7.5, 10, and 20 psf.

  9. Aerodynamic Flight-Test Results for the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Smith, Mark S.; Ali, Aliyah N.; Bui, Trong T.; Ellsworth, Joel C.; Garcia, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    The aerodynamic effects of compliant flaps installed onto a modified Gulfstream III airplane were investigated. Analyses were performed prior to flight to predict the aerodynamic effects of the flap installation. Flight tests were conducted to gather both structural and aerodynamic data. The airplane was instrumented to collect vehicle aerodynamic data and wing pressure data. A leading-edge stagnation detection system was also installed. The data from these flights were analyzed and compared with predictions. The predictive tools compared well with flight data for small flap deflections, but differences between predictions and flight estimates were greater at larger deflections. This paper describes the methods used to examine the aerodynamics data from the flight tests and provides a discussion of the flight-test results in the areas of vehicle aerodynamics, wing sectional pressure coefficient profiles, and air data.

  10. Aerodynamic heating environment definition/thermal protection system selection for the HL-20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurster, K. E.; Stone, H. W.

    1993-01-01

    Definition of the aerothermal environment is critical to any vehicle such as the HL-20 Personnel Launch System that operates within the hypersonic flight regime. Selection of an appropriate thermal protection system design is highly dependent on the accuracy of the heating-environment prediction. It is demonstrated that the entry environment determines the thermal protection system design for this vehicle. The methods used to predict the thermal environment for the HL-20 Personnel Launch System vehicle are described. Comparisons of the engineering solutions with computational fluid dynamic predictions, as well as wind-tunnel test results, show good agreement. The aeroheating predictions over several critical regions of the vehicle, including the stagnation areas of the nose and leading edges, windward centerline and wing surfaces, and leeward surfaces, are discussed. Results of predictions based on the engineering methods found within the MINIVER aerodynamic heating code are used in conjunction with the results of the extensive wind-tunnel tests on this configuration to define a flight thermal environment. Finally, the selection of the thermal protection system based on these predictions and current technology is described.

  11. Aerodynamic testing of a rotating wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C.P.; Nelsen, E.N.

    1990-01-01

    Aerodynamic, load, flow-visualization, and inflow measurements were taken on a downwind horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). A video camera mounted on the rotor recorded video images of tufts attached to the low-pressure side of the blade. Strain gages, mounted every 10% of the blade's span, provided load and pressure measurements. Pressure taps at 32 chordwise positions recorded pressure distributions. Wind inflow was measured via a vertical-plane array of anemometers located 10 m upwind. The objectives of the test were to address whether airfoil pressure distributions measured on a rotating blade differed from those measured in the wind tunnel, if radial flow near or in the boundary layer of the airfoil affected pressure distributions, if dynamic stall could result in increased dynamic loads, and if the location of the separation boundary measured on the rotating blade agreed with that measured in two-dimensional flow in the wind tunnel. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  12. High altitude aerodynamic platform concept evaluation and prototype engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    A design concept has been developed for maintaining a 150-pound payload at 60,000 feet altitude for about 50 hours. A 600-pound liftoff weight aerodynamic vehicle is used which operates at sufficient speeds to withstand prevailing winds. It is powered by a turbocharged four-stoke cycle gasoline fueled engine. Endurance time of 100 hours or more appears to be feasible with hydrogen fuel and a lighter payload. A prototype engine has been tested to 40,000 feet simulated altitude. Mismatch of the engine and the turbocharger system flow and problems with fuel/air mixture ratio control characteristics prohibited operation beyond 40,000 feet. But there seems to be no reason why the concept cannot be developed to function as analytically predicted.

  13. Modal Test of Six-Meter Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nijo; Buehrle, Ralph; Templeton, Justin; Lindell, Mike; Hancock, Sean M.

    2014-01-01

    A modal test was performed on the six-meter Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) test article to gain a firm understanding of the dynamic characteristics of the unloaded structure within the low frequency range. The tests involved various configurations of the HIAD to understand the influence of the tri-torus, the varying pressure within the toroids and the influence of straps. The primary test was conducted utilizing an eletrodynamic shaker and the results were verified using a step relaxation technique. The analysis results show an increase in the structure's stiffness with respect to increasing pressure. The results also show the rise of coupled modes with the tri-torus configurations. During the testing activity, the attached straps exhibited a behavior that is similar to that described as fuzzy structures in the literature. Therefore extensive tests were also performed by utilizing foam to mitigate these effects as well as understand the modal parameters of these fuzzy sub structures. Results are being utilized to update the finite element model of the six-meter HIAD and to gain a better understanding of the modeling of complex inflatable structures.

  14. Results of an investigation of the space shuttle integrated vehicle aerodynamic heating characteristics obtained using the 0.0175-scale model 60-OTS in AEDC tunnel A during tests IH41 and IH41A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, J. W.; Dye, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    A thin skin thermocouple test was conducted to obtain heat-transfer data on the space shuttle integrated vehicle during the ascent phase of the flight profile. The test model was the 0.0175-scale thin skin thermocouple model (60-OTS) of the Rockwell International vehicle 5 configuration. The test was conducted at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, and 5.5, and a free stream unit Reynolds number of 5 million per ft. Heat transfer data were obtained for angles of attack of 0, + or - 5, and 10 deg and yaw angles of 0, 3, and 6 deg. The integrated vehicle model was tested with the external tank configured with both a smooth ogive nose and an ogive nose with a spherical nose tip (nipple nose). The remainder of the test was conducted with the external tank installed alone in the tunnel.

  15. Drones for aerodynamic and structural testing /DAST/ - A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, H. N.; Eckstrom, C. V.

    1978-01-01

    A program for providing research data on aerodynamic loads and active control systems on wings with supercritical airfoils in the transonic speed range is described. Analytical development, wind tunnel tests, and flight tests are included. A Firebee II target drone vehicle has been modified for use as a flight test facility. The program currently includes flight experiments on two aeroelastic research wings. The primary purpose of the first flight experiment is to demonstrate an active control system for flutter suppression on a transport-type wing. Design and fabrication of the wing are complete and after installing research instrumentation and the flutter suppression system, flight testing is expected to begin in early 1979. The experiment on the second research wing - a fuel-conservative transport type - is to demonstrate multiple active control systems including flutter suppression, maneuver load alleviation, gust load alleviation, and reduce static stability. Of special importance for this second experiment is the development and validation of integrated design methods which include the benefits of active controls in the structural design.

  16. The application of vision measurement in aerodynamic testing combined with speckle correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ding; Zhang, Jin-guo; Zhang, Ye-hua; Wang, Wei; Ma, Hong-qiang; Zhang, Shang-bin; Feng, Jia-bo

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a combination of visual measurement technique of speckle correlation method in aerodynamic test application. Modal analysis of aerodynamic testing and deformation measurement is often very important but very difficult to achieve, fortunately, the development of modern optical measurement techniques made it possible. First, we conduct the modal analysis on an airfoil model and its deformation analysis under certain conditions. Then, the above technique was used to verify it. The results of the aerodynamic test and finite element analysis agree well, The novel of the new method is combining the speckle correlation and the model deformation in the aerodynamic testing. This method using the speckle correlation to process the data, combining sub-pixel correlation can make the results achieve very high precision and realized the real planar measuring. This non-contact full-field optical metrology shows a lot of abstracting potentials in aerodynamic test applications.

  17. Aerodynamic and base heating studies on space shuttle configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Heating rate and pressure measurements were obtained on a 25-O space shuttle model in a vacuum chamber. Correlation data on windward laminar and turbulent boundary layers and leeside surfaces of the space shuttle orbiter are included.

  18. SRB ascent aerodynamic heating design criteria reduction study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, W. K.; Frost, C. L.; Engel, C. D.

    1989-01-01

    Data are presented for the wind tunnel interference heating factor data base, the timewise tabulated ascent design environments, and the timewise plotted environments comparing the REMTECH results to the Rockwell RI-IVBC-3 results.

  19. Advanced turbine cooling, heat transfer, and aerodynamic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Je-Chin Han; Schobeiri, M.T.

    1995-10-01

    The contractual work is in three parts: Part I - Effect of rotation on enhanced cooling passage heat transfer, Part II - Effect on Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) spallation on surface heat transfer, and Part III - Effect of surface roughness and trailing edge ejection on turbine efficiency under unsteady flow conditions. Each section of this paper has been divided into three parts to individually accommodate each part. Part III is further divided into Parts IIIa and IIIb.

  20. Advanced turbine cooling, heat transfer, and aerodynamic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Je-Chin; Schobeiri, M.T.

    1995-12-31

    The contractual work is in three parts: Part I - Effect of rotation on enhanced cooling passage heat transfer, Part II - Effect of Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) spallation on surface heat transfer, and Part III - Effect of surface roughness and trailing edge ejection on turbine efficiency under unsteady flow conditions. Each section of this paper has been divided into three parts to individually accommodate each part. Part III is further divided into Parts IIIa and IIIb.

  1. High-temperature deformation field measurement by combining transient aerodynamic heating simulation system and reliability-guided digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Bing; Wu, Dafang; Xia, Yong

    2010-09-01

    To determine the full-field high-temperature thermal deformation of the structural materials used in high-speed aerospace flight vehicles, a novel non-contact high-temperature deformation measurement system is established by combining transient aerodynamic heating simulation device with the reliability-guided digital image correlation (RG-DIC). The test planar sample with size varying from several mm 2 to several hundreds mm 2 can be heated from room temperature to 1100 °C rapidly and accurately using the infrared radiator of the transient aerodynamic heating simulation system. The digital images of the test sample surface at various temperatures are recorded using an ordinary optical imaging system. To cope with the possible local decorrelated regions caused by black-body radiation within the deformed images at the temperatures over 450 °C, the RG-DIC technique is used to extract full-field in-plane thermal deformation from the recorded images. In validation test, the thermal deformation fields and the values of coefficient of thermal expansion (CTEs) of a chromiumnickel austenite stainless steel sample from room temperature to 550 °C is measured and compared with the well-established handbook value, confirming the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed technique. The experimental results reveal that the present system using an ordinary optical imaging system, is able to accurately measure full-field thermal deformation of metals and alloys at temperatures not exceeding 600 °C.

  2. NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment phase 3 test objectives and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, D.A.; Fingersh, L.J.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1995-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are conducting research to improve a wind turbine technology. One program, the Combined Experiment, has focused on making measurements needed to understand aerodynamic and structural responses of horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT). A new phase of this program, the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment, will focus on quantifying unsteady aerodynamic phenomena prevalent install controlled HAWTs. Optimally twisted blades and innovative data acquisition systems will be used in these tests. data can now be acquired and viewed interactively during turbine operations. This paper describes the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment and highlights planned future research activities.

  3. Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Phase VI: Wind Tunnel Test Configurations and Available Data Campaigns

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.; Simms, D. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Jager, D. W.; Cotrell, J. R.; Schreck, S.; Larwood, S. M.

    2001-12-01

    The primary objective of the insteady aerodynamics experiment was to provide information needed to quantify the full-scale, three-dimensional aerodynamic behavior of horizontal-axis wind turbines. This report is intended to familiarize the user with the entire scope of the wind tunnel test and to support the use of the resulting data.

  4. Heat Flux Sensor Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the following objectives: Developing secondary calibration capabilities for MSFC's (Marshall Space Flight Center) Hot Gas Facility (HGF), a Mach 4 Aerothermal Wind Tunnel; Evaluating ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) slug/ thinskin calorimeters against current HGF heat flux sensors; Providing verification of baselined AEDC (Arnold Engineering Development Center) / Medtherm gage calibrations; Addressing future calibration issues involving NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) certified radiant gages.

  5. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Rotor Alone Aerodynamic Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Jeracki, Robert J.; Woodward, Richard P.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of an isolated fan or rotor alone model was measured in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9- by 15- Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel as part of the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test conducted at NASA Glenn. The Source Diagnostic Test was conducted to identify the noise sources within a wind tunnel scale model of a turbofan engine and quantify their contribution to the overall system noise level. The fan was part of a 1/5th scale model representation of the bypass stage of a current technology turbofan engine. For the rotor alone testing, the fan and nacelle, including the inlet, external cowl, and fixed area fan exit nozzle, were modeled in the test hardware; the internal outlet guide vanes located behind the fan were removed. Without the outlet guide vanes, the velocity at the nozzle exit changes significantly, thereby affecting the fan performance. As part of the investigation, variations in the fan nozzle area were tested in order to match as closely as possible the rotor alone performance with the fan performance obtained with the outlet guide vanes installed. The fan operating performance was determined using fixed pressure/temperature combination rakes and the corrected weight flow. The performance results indicate that a suitable nozzle exit was achieved to be able to closely match the rotor alone and fan/outlet guide vane configuration performance on the sea level operating line. A small shift in the slope of the sea level operating line was measured, which resulted in a slightly higher rotor alone fan pressure ratio at take-off conditions, matched fan performance at cutback conditions, and a slightly lower rotor alone fan pressure ratio at approach conditions. However, the small differences in fan performance at all fan conditions were considered too small to affect the fan acoustic performance.

  6. Aerodynamic heating and surface temperatures on vehicles for computer-aided design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.; Kania, L. A.; Chitty, A.

    1983-01-01

    A computer subprogram has been developed to calculate aerodynamic and radiative heating rates and to determine surface temperatures by integrating the heating rates along the trajectory of a vehicle. Convective heating rates are calculated by applying the axisymmetric analogue to inviscid surface streamlines and using relatively simple techniques to calculate laminar, transitional, or turbulent heating rates. Options are provided for the selection of gas model, transition criterion, turbulent heating method, Reynolds Analogy factor, and entropy-layer swallowing effects. Heating rates are compared to experimental data, and the time history of surface temperatures are given for a high-speed trajectory. The computer subprogram is developed for preliminary design and mission analysis where parametric studies are needed at all speeds.

  7. Aerodynamic Models for the Low Density Supersonic Declerator (LDSD) Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Norman, John W.; Dyakonov, Artem; Schoenenberger, Mark; Davis, Jody; Muppidi, Suman; Tang, Chun; Bose, Deepak; Mobley, Brandon; Clark, Ian

    2015-01-01

    An overview of pre-flight aerodynamic models for the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) campaign is presented, with comparisons to reconstructed flight data and discussion of model updates. The SFDT campaign objective is to test Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) and large supersonic parachute technologies at high altitude Earth conditions relevant to entry, descent, and landing (EDL) at Mars. Nominal SIAD test conditions are attained by lifting a test vehicle (TV) to 36 km altitude with a large helium balloon, then accelerating the TV to Mach 4 and and 53 km altitude with a solid rocket motor. The first flight test (SFDT-1) delivered a 6 meter diameter robotic mission class decelerator (SIAD-R) to several seconds of flight on June 28, 2014, and was successful in demonstrating the SFDT flight system concept and SIAD-R. The trajectory was off-nominal, however, lofting to over 8 km higher than predicted in flight simulations. Comparisons between reconstructed flight data and aerodynamic models show that SIAD-R aerodynamic performance was in good agreement with pre-flight predictions. Similar comparisons of powered ascent phase aerodynamics show that the pre-flight model overpredicted TV pitch stability, leading to underprediction of trajectory peak altitude. Comparisons between pre-flight aerodynamic models and reconstructed flight data are shown, and changes to aerodynamic models using improved fidelity and knowledge gained from SFDT-1 are discussed.

  8. Validation of Methodology for Estimating Aircraft Unsteady Aerodynamic Parameters from Dynamic Wind Tunnel Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Klein, Vladislav

    2003-01-01

    A basic problem in flight dynamics is the mathematical formulation of the aerodynamic model for aircraft. This study is part of an ongoing effort at NASA Langley to develop a more general formulation of the aerodynamic model for aircraft that includes nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics and to develop appropriate test techniques that facilitate identification of these models. A methodology for modeling and testing using wide-band inputs to estimate the unsteady form of the aircraft aerodynamic model was developed previously but advanced test facilities were not available at that time to allow complete validation of the methodology. The new model formulation retained the conventional static and rotary dynamic terms but replaced conventional acceleration terms with more general indicial functions. In this study advanced testing techniques were utilized to validate the new methodology for modeling. Results of static, conventional forced oscillation, wide-band forced oscillation, oscillatory coning, and ramp tests are presented.

  9. Aerodynamic heating rate distributions induced by trailing edge controls on hypersonic aircraft configurations at Mach 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, L. G., II; Johnson, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    Aerodynamic surface heating rate distributions in three dimensional shock wave boundary layer interaction flow regions are presented for a generic set of model configurations representative of the aft portion of hypersonic aircraft. Heat transfer data were obtained using the phase change coating technique (paint) and, at particular spanwise and streamwise stations for sample cases, by the thin wall transient temperature technique (thermocouples). Surface oil flow patterns are also shown. The good accuracy of the detailed heat transfer data, as attested in part by their repeatability, is attributable partially to the comparatively high temperature potential of the NASA-Langley Mach 8 Variable Density Tunnel. The data are well suited to help guide heating analyses of Mach 8 aircraft, and should be considered in formulating improvements to empiric analytic methods for calculating heat transfer rate coefficient distributions.

  10. Atmospheric testing of wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.S.; Migliore, P.G.; Quandt, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    An experimental investigation was conducted using an instrumented horizontal-axis wind turbine that incorporated variable span trailing-edge aerodynamic brakes. A primary goal was to directly compare study results with (infinite-span) wind tunnel data and to provide information on how to account for device span effects during turbine design or analysis. Comprehensive measurements were utilized to define effective changes in the aerodynamic coefficients, as a function of angle of attack and control deflection, for three device spans and configurations. Differences in the lift and drag behavior are most pronounced near stall and for device spans of less than 15%. Drag performance is affected only minimally (<70%) for 15% or larger span devices. Interestingly, aerodynamic controls with characteristic vents or openings appear most affected by span reductions and three-dimensional flow.

  11. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Tabulated aerodynamic data book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Tabulated aerodynamic data from coannular nozzle performance tests are given for test runs 26 through 37. The data include nozzle thrust coefficient parameters, nozzle discharge coefficients, and static pressure tap measurements.

  12. Ground testing and simulation. II - Aerodynamic testing and simulation: Saving lives, time, and money

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayman, B., Jr.; Fiore, A. W.

    1974-01-01

    The present work discusses in general terms the various kinds of ground facilities, in particular, wind tunnels, which support aerodynamic testing. Since not all flight parameters can be simulated simultaneously, an important problem consists in matching parameters. It is pointed out that there is a lack of wind tunnels for a complete Reynolds-number simulation. Using a computer to simulate flow fields can result in considerable reduction of wind-tunnel hours required to develop a given flight vehicle.

  13. Comparison of Various Supersonic Turbine Tip Designs to Minimize Aerodynamic Loss and Tip Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The rotor tips of axial turbines experience high heat flux and are the cause of aerodynamic losses due to tip clearance flows, and in the case of supersonic tips, shocks. As stage loadings increase, the flow in the tip gap approaches and exceeds sonic conditions. This introduces effects such as shock-boundary layer interactions and choked flow that are not observed for subsonic tip flows that have been studied extensively in literature. This work simulates the tip clearance flow for a flat tip, a diverging tip gap and several contoured tips to assess the possibility of minimizing tip heat flux while maintaining a constant massflow from the pressure side to the suction side of the rotor, through the tip clearance. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code GlennHT was used for the simulations. Due to the strong favorable pressure gradients the simulations assumed laminar conditions in the tip gap. The nominal tip gap width to height ratio for this study is 6.0. The Reynolds number of the flow is 2.4 x 10(exp 5) based on nominal tip width and exit velocity. A wavy wall design was found to reduce heat flux by 5 percent but suffered from an additional 6 percent in aerodynamic loss coefficient. Conventional tip recesses are found to perform far worse than a flat tip due to severe shock heating. Overall, the baseline flat tip was the second best performer. A diverging converging tip gap with a hole was found to be the best choice. Average tip heat flux was reduced by 37 percent and aerodynamic losses were cut by over 6 percent.

  14. Turbulence Modeling and Computation of Turbine Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Luo, J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the present research is to develop improved turbulence models for the computation of complex flows through turbomachinery passages, including the effects of streamline curvature, heat transfer and secondary flows. Advanced turbulence models are crucial for accurate prediction of rocket engine flows, due to existance of very large extra strain rates, such as strong streamline curvature. Numerical simulation of the turbulent flows in strongly curved ducts, including two 180-deg ducts, one 90-deg duct and a strongly concave curved turbulent boundary layer have been carried out with Reynolds stress models (RSM) and algebraic Reynolds stress models (ARSM). An improved near-wall pressure-strain correlation has been developed for capturing the anisotropy of turbulence in the concave region. A comparative study of two modes of transition in gas turbine, the by-pass transition and the separation-induced transition, has been carried out with several representative low-Reynolds number (LRN) k-epsilon models. Effects of blade surface pressure gradient, freestream turbulence and Reynolds number on the blade boundary layer development, and particularly the inception of transition are examined in detail. The present study indicates that the turbine blade transition, in the presence of high freestream turbulence, is predicted well with LRN k-epsilon models employed. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes procedure developed by the present authors has been used to compute the three-dimensional viscous flow through the turbine nozzle passage of a single stage turbine. A low Reynolds number k-epsilon model and a zonal k-epsilon/ARSM (algebraic Reynolds stress model) are utilized for turbulence closure. An assessment of the performance of the turbulence models has been carried out. The two models are found to provide similar predictions for the mean flow parameters, although slight improvement in the prediction of some secondary flow quantities has been obtained by the

  15. Modeling and Simulation of Radiative Compressible Flows in Aerodynamic Heating Arc-Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensassi, Khalil; Laguna, Alejandro A.; Lani, Andrea; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations of an arc heated flow inside NASA's 20 [MW] Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF) are performed in order to investigate the three-dimensional swirling flow and the current distribution inside the wind tunnel. The plasma is considered in Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium(LTE) and is composed of Air-Argon gas mixture. The governing equations are the Navier-Stokes equations that include source terms corresponding to Joule heating and radiative cooling. The former is obtained by solving an electric potential equation, while the latter is calculated using an innovative massively parallel ray-tracing algorithm. The fully coupled system is closed by the thermodynamics relations and transport properties which are obtained from Chapman-Enskog method. A novel strategy was developed in order to enable the flow solver and the radiation calculation to be preformed independently and simultaneously using a different number of processors. Drastic reduction in the computational cost was achieved using this strategy. Details on the numerical methods used for space discretization, time integration and ray-tracing algorithm will be presented. The effect of the radiative cooling on the dynamics of the flow will be investigated. The complete set of equations were implemented within the COOLFluiD Framework. Fig. 1 shows the geometry of the Anode and part of the constrictor of the Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF). Fig. 2 shows the velocity field distribution along (x-y) plane and the streamline in (z-y) plane.

  16. Estimation of Aircraft Unsteady Aerodynamic Parameters from Dynamic Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Klein, Vladislav

    2001-01-01

    Improved aerodynamic mathematical models, for use in aircraft simulation or flight control design, are required when representing nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics. A key limitation of conventional aerodynamic models is the inability to map frequency and amplitude dependent data into the equations of motion directly. In an effort to obtain a more general formulation of the aerodynamic model, researchers have been led to a parallel requirement for more general testing methods. Testing for a more comprehensive model can lead to a very time consuming number of tests especially if traditional single frequency harmonic testing is attempted. This paper presents an alternative to traditional single frequency forced-oscillation testing by utilizing Schroeder sweeps to efficiently obtain the frequency response of the unsteady aerodynamic model. Schroeder inputs provide signals with a flat power spectrum over a specified frequency band. For comparison, experimental results using the traditional single-frequency inputs are also considered. A method for data analysis to determine an adequate unsteady aerodynamic model is presented. Discussion of associated issues that arise during this type of analysis and comparison of results using traditional single frequency analysis are provided.

  17. Heat pipe testing program test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bienert, W.B.

    1980-03-14

    A test plan is given which describes the tests to be conducted on several typical solar receiver heat pipes. The hardware to be used, test fixtures and rationale of the test program are discussed. The program objective is to perform life testing under simulated receiver conditions, and to conduct performance tests with selected heat pipes to further map their performance, particularly with regard to their transient behavior. Performance requirements are defined. Test fixtures designed for the program are described in detail, and their capabilities for simulating the receiver conditions and their limitations are discussed. The heat pipe design is given. (LEW)

  18. Strain measurement of objects subjected to aerodynamic heating using digital image correlation: experimental design and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Jiang, Tianyun; Wu, Dafang

    2014-11-01

    In thermomechanical testing of hypersonic materials and structures, direct observation and quantitative strain measurement of the front surface of a test specimen directly exposed to severe aerodynamic heating has been considered as a very challenging task. In this work, a novel quartz infrared heating device with an observation window is designed to reproduce the transient thermal environment experienced by hypersonic vehicles. The specially designed experimental system allows the capture of test article's surface images at various temperatures using an optical system outfitted with a bandpass filter. The captured images are post-processed by digital image correlation to extract full-field thermal deformation. To verify the viability and accuracy of the established system, thermal strains of a chromiumnickel austenite stainless steel sample heated from room temperature up to 600 °C were determined. The preliminary results indicate that the air disturbance between the camera and the specimen due to heat haze induces apparent distortions in the recorded images and large errors in the measured strains, but the average values of the measured strains are accurate enough. Limitations and further improvements of the proposed technique are discussed.

  19. Strain measurement of objects subjected to aerodynamic heating using digital image correlation: experimental design and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Jiang, Tianyun; Wu, Dafang

    2014-11-01

    In thermomechanical testing of hypersonic materials and structures, direct observation and quantitative strain measurement of the front surface of a test specimen directly exposed to severe aerodynamic heating has been considered as a very challenging task. In this work, a novel quartz infrared heating device with an observation window is designed to reproduce the transient thermal environment experienced by hypersonic vehicles. The specially designed experimental system allows the capture of test article's surface images at various temperatures using an optical system outfitted with a bandpass filter. The captured images are post-processed by digital image correlation to extract full-field thermal deformation. To verify the viability and accuracy of the established system, thermal strains of a chromiumnickel austenite stainless steel sample heated from room temperature up to 600 °C were determined. The preliminary results indicate that the air disturbance between the camera and the specimen due to heat haze induces apparent distortions in the recorded images and large errors in the measured strains, but the average values of the measured strains are accurate enough. Limitations and further improvements of the proposed technique are discussed. PMID:25430144

  20. Atmospheric tests of trailing-edge aerodynamic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L S; Huang, S; Quandt, G A

    1998-01-01

    An experiment was conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s (NREL`s) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) using an instrumented horizontal-axis wind turbine that incorporated variable-span, trailing-edge aerodynamic brakes. The goal of the investigation was to directly compare results with (infinite-span) wind tunnel data and to provide information on how to account for device span effects during turbine design or analysis. Comprehensive measurements were used to define effective changes in the aerodynamic and hinge-moment coefficients, as a function of angle of attack and control deflection, for three device spans (7.5%, 15%, and 22.5%) and configurations (Spoiler-Flap, vented sileron, and unvented aileron). Differences in the lift and drag behavior are most pronounced near stall and for device spans of less than 15%. Drag performance is affected only minimally (about a 30% reduction from infinite-span) for 15% or larger span devices. Interestingly, aerodynamic controls with vents or openings appear most affected by span reductions and three-dimensional flow.

  1. Aerodynamic heating to the gaps and surfaces of simulated reusable-surface-insulation tile arrays in turbulent flow at Mach 6.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, I.; Avery, D. E.; Chapman, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made on a simulated reusable-surface-insulation tile array in a turbulent boundary layer to determine aerodynamic-heating distributions representative of those expected on the surface of the shuttle orbiter during earth entry due to the presence of longitudinal and transverse surface gaps. The tests were conducted in an 8-foot high-temperature structures tunnel in a test medium of methane-air combustion products at a nominal Mach number of 6.6 and over a free-stream Reynolds number range from 2,000,000 to 4,900,000 per meter (600,000 to 1,500,000 per foot). The results were used to assess the aerodynamic heating effects produced by parameters that include gap width, boundary-layer displacement thickness, in-line and staggered tile arrangement, and tile protrusion.

  2. The Effect of Aerodynamic Heating on Air Penetration by Shaped Charge Jets and Their Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backofen, Joseph

    2009-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to present recent work modeling thermal coupling between shaped charge jets and their particles with air while it is being penetrated to form a crater that subsequently collapses back onto the jet. This work complements research published at International Symposia on Ballistics: 1) 1987 - Shaped Charge Jet Aerodynamics, Particulation and Blast Field Modeling; and 2) 2007 - Air Cratering by Eroding Shaped Charge Jets. The current work shows how and when a shaped charge jet's tip and jet particles are softened enough that they can erode in a hydrodynamic manner as modeled in these papers. This paper and its presentation includes models for heat transfer from shocked air as a function of jet velocity as well as heat flow within the jet or particle. The work is supported by an extensive bibliographic search including publications on meteors and ballistic missile re-entry vehicles. The modeling shows that a jet loses its strength to the depth required to justify hydrodynamic erosion when its velocity is above a specific velocity related to the shock properties of air and the jet material's properties. As a result, the portion of a jet's kinetic energy converted at the aerodynamic shock into heating transferred back onto the jet affects the energy deposited into the air through drag and ablation which in turn affect air crater expansion and subsequent collapse back onto the jet and its particles as shown in high-speed photography.

  3. Heat exchanger bypass test report

    SciTech Connect

    De Vries, M.L.

    1995-01-26

    This test report documents the results that were obtained while conducting the test procedure which bypassed the heat exchangers in the HC-21C sludge stabilization process. The test was performed on November 15, 1994 using WHC-SD-CP-TC-031, ``Heat Exchanger Bypass Test Procedure.`` The primary objective of the test procedure was to determine if the heat exchangers were contributing to condensation of moisture in the off-gas line. This condensation was observed in the rotameters. Also, a secondary objective was to determine if temperatures at the rotameters would be too high and damage them or make them inaccurate without the heat exchangers in place.

  4. Estimating monthly-averaged air-sea transfers of heat and momentum using the bulk aerodynamic method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esbensen, S. K.; Reynolds, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Air-sea transfers of sensible heat, latent heat, and momentum are computed from twenty-five years of middle-latitude and subtropical ocean weather ship data in the North Atlantic and North Pacific using the bulk aerodynamic method. The results show that monthly-averaged wind speeds, temperatures, and humidities can be used to estimate the monthly-averaged sensible and latent heat fluxes computed from the bulk aerodynamic equations to within a relative error of approximately 10%. The estimate of monthly-averaged wind stress under the assumption of neutral stability are shown to be within approximately 5% of the monthly-averaged non-neutral values.

  5. Aerodynamic Models for the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Test Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Norman, John W.; Dyakonov, Artem; Schoenenberger, Mark; Davis, Jody; Muppidi, Suman; Tang, Chun; Bose, Deepak; Mobley, Brandon; Clark, Ian

    2016-01-01

    An overview of aerodynamic models for the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) campaign test vehicle is presented, with comparisons to reconstructed flight data and discussion of model updates. The SFDT campaign objective is to test Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) and large supersonic parachute technologies at high altitude Earth conditions relevant to entry, descent, and landing (EDL) at Mars. Nominal SIAD test conditions are attained by lifting a test vehicle (TV) to 36 km altitude with a helium balloon, then accelerating the TV to Mach 4 and 53 km altitude with a solid rocket motor. Test flights conducted in June of 2014 (SFDT-1) and 2015 (SFDT-2) each successfully delivered a 6 meter diameter decelerator (SIAD-R) to test conditions and several seconds of flight, and were successful in demonstrating the SFDT flight system concept and SIAD-R technology. Aerodynamic models and uncertainties developed for the SFDT campaign are presented, including the methods used to generate them and their implementation within an aerodynamic database (ADB) routine for flight simulations. Pre- and post-flight aerodynamic models are compared against reconstructed flight data and model changes based upon knowledge gained from the flights are discussed. The pre-flight powered phase model is shown to have a significant contribution to off-nominal SFDT trajectory lofting, while coast and SIAD phase models behaved much as predicted.

  6. Wind Tunnel Testing on Crosswind Aerodynamic Forces Acting on Railway Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Bin; Nam, Seong-Won; You, Won-Hee

    This study is devoted to measure the aerodynamic forces acting on two railway trains, one of which is a high-speed train at 300km/h maximum operation speed, and the other is a conventional train at the operating speed 100km/h. The three-dimensional train shapes have been modeled as detailed as possible including the inter-car, the upper cavity for pantograph, and the bogie systems. The aerodynamic forces on each vehicle of the trains have been measured in the subsonic wind tunnel with 4m×3m test section of Korea Aerospace Research Institute at Daejeon, Korea. The aerodynamic forces and moments of the train models have been plotted for various yaw angles and the characteristics of the aerodynamic coefficients has been discussed relating to the experimental conditions.

  7. Aerodynamic and heat transfer aspects of tip and casing treatments used for turbine tip leakage control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumusel, Baris

    Axial flow turbine stages are usually designed with a gap between the tips of the rotating blades and a stationary outer casing. The presence of a strong pressure gradient across this gap drives flow from the pressure side of the blade to the suction side. This leakage flow creates a significant amount of energy loss of working fluid in the turbine stage. In a modern gas turbine engine the outer casing of the high-pressure turbine is also exposed to a combination of high flow temperatures and heat transfer coefficients. The casing is consequently subjected to high levels of convective heat transfer, a situation that is aggravated by flow unsteadiness caused by periodic blade-passing events. An experimental investigation of the aerodynamic and heat transfer effect of tip and casing treatments used in turbine tip leakage control was conducted in a large scale, low speed, rotating research turbine facility. The effects of casing treatments were investigated by measuring the total pressure field at the exit of the rotor using a high frequency response total pressure probe. A smooth wall as a baseline case was also investigated. The test cases presented include results of casing treatments with varying dimensions for tip gap height of t/h=2.5%. The results of the rotor exit total pressure indicate that the casing treatment significantly reduced the leakage mass flow rate and the momentum deficit in the core of the tip vortex. The reductions obtained in the tip vortex size and strength influenced the tip-side passage vortex and other typical core flow characteristics in the passage. Casing treatments with the highest ridge height was the most effective in reducing the total pressure loss in the leakage flow of the test blades. This was observed at a radius near the core of the tip vortex. It appears that casing treatments with the highest ridge height is also the most effective from a global point of view, as shown by the passage averaged pressure coefficient obtained in

  8. Description of a Computer Program Written for Approach and Landing Test Post Flight Data Extraction of Proximity Separation Aerodynamic Coefficients and Aerodynamic Data Base Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program written to calculate the proximity aerodynamic force and moment coefficients of the Orbiter/Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) vehicles based on flight instrumentation is described. The ground reduced aerodynamic coefficients and instrumentation errors (GRACIE) program was developed as a tool to aid in flight test verification of the Orbiter/SCA separation aerodynamic data base. The program calculates the force and moment coefficients of each vehicle in proximity to the other, using the load measurement system data, flight instrumentation data and the vehicle mass properties. The uncertainty in each coefficient is determined, based on the quoted instrumentation accuracies. A subroutine manipulates the Orbiter/747 Carrier Separation Aerodynamic Data Book to calculate a comparable set of predicted coefficients for comparison to the calculated flight test data.

  9. A Free-flight Wind Tunnel for Aerodynamic Testing at Hypersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiff, Alvin

    1954-01-01

    The supersonic free-flight wind tunnel is a facility at the Ames Laboratory of the NACA in which aerodynamic test models are gun-launched at high speed and directed upstream through the test section of a supersonic wind tunnel. In this way, test Mach numbers up to 10 have been attained and indications are that still higher speeds will be realized. An advantage of this technique is that the air and model temperatures simulate those of flight through the atmosphere. Also the Reynolds numbers are high. Aerodynamic measurements are made from photographic observation of the model flight. Instruments and techniques have been developed for measuring the following aerodynamic properties: drag, initial lift-curve slope, initial pitching-moment-curve slope, center of pressure, skin friction, boundary-layer transition, damping in roll, and aileron effectiveness. (author)

  10. A laser velocimeter system for large-scale aerodynamic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinath, M. S.; Orloff, K. L.; Snyder, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    A unique laser velocimeter was developed that is capable of sensing two orthogonal velocity components from a variable remote distance of 2.6 to 10 m for use in the 40- by 80-Foot and 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnels and the Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility at Ames Research Center. The system hardware, positioning instrumentation, and data acquisition equipment are described in detail; system capabilities and limitations are discussed; and expressions for systematic and statistical accuracy are developed. Direct and coupled laboratory measurements taken with the system are compared with measurements taken with a laser velocimeter of higher spatial resolution, and sample data taken in the open circuit exhaust flow of a 1/50-scale model of the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented.

  11. Aerodynamic Characterization of a Thin, High-Performance Airfoil for Use in Ground Fluids Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Lee, Sam; Clark, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The FAA has worked with Transport Canada and others to develop allowance times for aircraft operating in ice-pellet precipitation. Wind-tunnel testing has been carried out to better understand the flowoff characteristics and resulting aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids contaminated with ice pellets using a thin, high-performance wing section at the National Research Council of Canada Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel. The objective of this paper is to characterize the aerodynamic behavior of this wing section in order to better understand the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination. Aerodynamic performance data, boundary-layer surveys and flow visualization were conducted at a Reynolds number of approximately 6.0 x 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.12. The clean, baseline model exhibited leading-edge stall characteristics including a leading-edge laminar separation bubble and minimal or no separation on the trailing edge of the main element or flap. These results were consistent with expected 2-D aerodynamics and showed no anomalies that could adversely affect the evaluation of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on the wing. Tests conducted with roughness and leading-edge flow disturbances helped to explain the aerodynamic impact of the anti-icing fluids and contamination. The stalling characteristics of the wing section with fluid and contamination appear to be driven at least partially by the effects of a secondary wave of fluid that forms near the leading edge as the wing is rotated in the simulated takeoff profile. These results have provided a much more complete understanding of the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on this wing section. This is important since these results are used, in part, to develop the ice-pellet allowance times that are applicable to many different airplanes.

  12. Aerodynamic Characterization of a Thin, High-Performance Airfoil for Use in Ground Fluids Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Lee, Sam; Clark, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The FAA has worked with Transport Canada and others to develop allowance times for aircraft operating in ice-pellet precipitation. Wind-tunnel testing has been carried out to better understand the flowoff characteristics and resulting aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids contaminated with ice pellets using a thin, high-performance wing section at the National Research Council of Canada Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel. The objective of this paper is to characterize the aerodynamic behavior of this wing section in order to better understand the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination. Aerodynamic performance data, boundary-layer surveys and flow visualization were conducted at a Reynolds number of approximately 6.0×10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.12. The clean, baseline model exhibited leading-edge stall characteristics including a leading-edge laminar separation bubble and minimal or no separation on the trailing edge of the main element or flap. These results were consistent with expected 2-D aerodynamics and showed no anomalies that could adversely affect the evaluation of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on the wing. Tests conducted with roughness and leading-edge flow disturbances helped to explain the aerodynamic impact of the anti-icing fluids and contamination. The stalling characteristics of the wing section with fluid and contamination appear to be driven at least partially by the effects of a secondary wave of fluid that forms near the leading edge as the wing is rotated in the simulated takeoff profile. These results have provided a much more complete understanding of the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on this wing section. This is important since these results are used, in part, to develop the ice-pellet allowance times that are applicable to many different airplanes.

  13. Portable Heat Pump Testing Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłosowiak, R.; Bartoszewicz, J.; Urbaniak, R.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the design and working principle of a portable testing device for heat pumps in the energy recirculation system. The presented test stand can be used for any refrigerating/reverse flow cycle device to calculate the device energy balance. The equipment is made of two portable containers of the capacity of 250 liters to simulate the air heat source and ground heat source with a system of temperature stabilization, compressor heat pump of the coefficient of performance (COP) of = 4.3, a failsafe system and a control and measurement system.

  14. Experimental aerodynamic and acoustic model testing of the Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) testbed coannular exhaust nozzle system: Comprehensive data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.; Morris, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    The component detail design drawings of the one sixth scale model of the variable cycle engine testbed demonstrator exhaust syatem tested are presented. Also provided are the basic acoustic and aerodynamic data acquired during the experimental model tests. The model drawings, an index to the acoustic data, an index to the aerodynamic data, tabulated and graphical acoustic data, and the tabulated aerodynamic data and graphs are discussed.

  15. Effect of vane opening on aerodynamic performance of the ram-rotor test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ji-ang; Guan, Jian; Zhong, Jingjun; Yuan, Chenguang

    2016-06-01

    In order to research the influence of adjustable vane on the aerodynamic performance of the ram-rotor test system, FLUENT software has been adopted to simulate the flow passage of the ram-rotor test system numerically. The vane opening is controlled by changing the stagger angle of the vane blades. Results show that flow uniformity of vane outlet is influenced by the vane openings, which has an impact on the aerodynamic loss to some extent. Total pressure ratio, adiabatic efficiency and mass flow rate can be regulated by different openings of the vane. Compared with -8° vane opening, top efficiency of the ram-rotor increases by about 13.8% at +6° opening. And total pressure ratio drops by 5.87%. The rising opening increases the relative Mach number at inlet of the ram-rotor and weakens the intensity of the tip clearance leakage, which comes to a decreasing aerodynamic loss.

  16. Aerodynamic and heat transfer analysis of the low aspect ratio turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, O. P.; Nguyen, P.; Ni, R. H.; Rhie, C. M.; White, J. A.

    1987-06-01

    The available two- and three-dimensional codes are used to estimate external heat loads and aerodynamic characteristics of a highly loaded turbine stage in order to demonstrate state-of-the-art methodologies in turbine design. By using data for a low aspect ratio turbine, it is found that a three-dimensional multistage Euler code gives good averall predictions for the turbine stage, yielding good estimates of the stage pressure ratio, mass flow, and exit gas angles. The nozzle vane loading distribution is well predicted by both the three-dimensional multistage Euler and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes codes. The vane airfoil surface Stanton number distributions, however, are underpredicted by both two- and three-dimensional boundary value analysis.

  17. Enthalpy By Energy Balance for Aerodynamic Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center Arc Jet Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, T. Mark; MacDonald, Christine L.; Martinez, Edward R.; Balboni, John A.; Anderson, Karl F.; Arnold, Jim O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Arc Jet Facilities' Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) has been instrumented for the Enthalpy By Energy Balance (EB2) method. Diagnostic EB2 data is routinely taken for all AHF runs. This paper provides an overview of the EB2 method implemented in the AHF. The chief advantage of the AHF implementation over earlier versions is the non-intrusiveness of the instruments used. For example, to measure the change in cooling water temperature, thin film 1000 ohm Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) are used with an Anderson Current Loop (ACL) as the signal conditioner. The ACL with 1000 ohm RTDs allows for very sensitive measurement of the increase in temperature (Delta T) of the cooling water to the arc heater, which is a critical element of the EB2 method. Cooling water flow rates are measured with non-intrusive ultrasonic flow meters.

  18. Thermal stress analysis of space shuttle orbiter subjected to reentry aerodynamic heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fields, Roger A.

    1987-01-01

    A structural performance and resizing (SPAR) finite-element computer program and NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN) finite-element computer programs were used in the thermal stress analysis of the space shuttle orbiter subjected to reentry aerodynamic heating. A SPAR structural model was set up for the entire left wing of the orbiter, and NASTRAN structural models were set up for: (1) a wing segment located at midspan of the orbiter left wing, and (2) a fuselage segment located at midfuselage. The thermal stress distributions in the orbiter structure were obtained and the critical high thermal stress regions were identified. It was found that the thermal stresses induced in the orbiter structure during reentry were relatively low. The thermal stress predictions from the whole wing model were considered to be more accurate than those from the wing segment model because the former accounts for temperature and stress effects throughout the entire wing.

  19. Aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic trade-off analysis of a small hypersonic flying test bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzella, Giuseppe

    2011-08-01

    This paper deals with the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic trade-off analysis aiming to design a small hypersonic flying test bed with a relatively simple vehicle architecture. Such vehicle will have to be launched with a sounding rocket and shall re-enter the Earth atmosphere allowing to perform several experiments on critical re-entry technologies such as boundary-layer transition and shock-shock interaction phenomena. The flight shall be conducted at hypersonic Mach number, in the range 6-8 at moderate angles of attack. In the paper some design analyses are shown as, for example, the longitudinal and lateral-directional stability analysis. A preliminary optimization of the configuration has been also done to improve the aerodynamic performance and stability of the vehicle. Several design results, based both on engineering approach and computational fluid dynamics, are reported and discussed in the paper. The aerodynamic model of vehicle is also provided.

  20. Flow-Visualization Techniques Used at High Speed by Configuration Aerodynamics Wind-Tunnel-Test Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes a variety of optically based flow-visualization techniques used for high-speed research by the Configuration Aerodynamics Wind-Tunnel Test Team of the High-Speed Research Program during its tenure. The work of other national experts is included for completeness. Details of each technique with applications and status in various national wind tunnels are given.

  1. A system for aerodynamic design and analysis of supersonic aircraft. Part 4: Test cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, W. D.; Lundry, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    An integrated system of computer programs was developed for the design and analysis of supersonic configurations. The system uses linearized theory methods for the calculation of surface pressures and supersonic area rule concepts in combination with linearized theory for calculation of aerodynamic force coefficients. Interactive graphics are optional at the user's request. Representative test cases and associated program output are presented.

  2. Nasalance Scores of Children with Repaired Cleft Palate Who Exhibit Normal Velopharyngeal Closure during Aerodynamic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajac, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if children with repaired cleft palate and normal velopharyngeal (VP) closure as determined by aerodynamic testing exhibit greater acoustic nasalance than control children without cleft palate. Method: Pressure-flow procedures were used to identify 2 groups of children based on VP closure during the production of /p/ in the…

  3. 12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF BUILDING 25C (SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS TEST FACILITY) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF BUILDING 25C (SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS TEST FACILITY) (1992). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  4. Predicted Turbine Heat Transfer for a Range of Test Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Lucci, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Comparisons are shown between predictions and experimental data for blade and endwall heat transfer. The comparisons of computational domain parisons are given for both vane and rotor geometries over an extensive range of Reynolds and Mach numbers. Comparisons are made with experimental data from a variety of sources. A number of turbulence models are available for predicting blade surface heat transfer, as well as aerodynamic performance. The results of an investigation to determine the turbulence model which gives the best agreement with experimental data over a wide range of test conditions are presented.

  5. Critical heat flux test apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Welsh, Robert E.; Doman, Marvin J.; Wilson, Edward C.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

  6. Comparative study on aerodynamic heating under perfect and nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiu; Li, JinPing; Zhao, Wei; Jiang, ZongLin

    2016-02-01

    In this study, comparative heat flux measurements for a sharp cone model were conducted by utilizing a high enthalpy shock tunnel JF-10 and a large-scale shock tunnel JF-12, responsible for providing nonequilibrium and perfect gas flows, respectively. Experiments were performed at the Key Laboratory of High Temperature Gas Dynamics (LHD), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Corresponding numerical simulations were also conducted in effort to better understand the phenomena accompanying in these experiments. By assessing the consistency and accuracy of all the data gathered during this study, a detailed comparison of sharp cone heat transfer under a totally different kind of freestream conditions was build and analyzed. One specific parameter, defined as the product of the Stanton number and the square root of the Reynold number, was found to be more characteristic for the aerodynamic heating phenomena encountered in hypersonic flight. Adequate use of said parameter practically eliminates the variability caused by the deferent flow conditions, regardless of whether the flow is in dissociation or the boundary condition is catalytic. Essentially, the parameter identified in this study reduces the amount of ground experimental data necessary and eases data extrapolation to flight.

  7. Structural Testing of a 6m Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. T.; Kazemba, C. D.; Johnson, R. K.; Hughes, S. J.; Calomino, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing low ballistic coefficient technologies to support the Nations long-term goal of landing humans on Mars. Current entry, decent, and landing technologies are not practical for this class of payloads due to geometric constraints dictated by current and future launch vehicle fairing limitations. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (HIADs) are being developed to circumvent this limitation and are now considered a leading technology to enable landing of heavy payloads on Mars. At the beginning of 2014, a 6m diameter HIAD inflatable structure with an integrated flexible thermal protection system (TPS) was subjected to a static load test series to verify its structural performance under flight-relevant loads. The inflatable structure was constructed into a 60 degree sphere-cone configuration using nine inflatable torus segments composed of fiber-reinforced thin films. The inflatable tori were joined together using adhesives and high-strength textile woven structural straps. These straps help distribute the load throughout the inflatable structure. The 6m flexible TPS was constructed using multiple layers of high performance materials that are designed to protect the inflatable structure from heat loads that would be seen in flight during atmospheric entry. A custom test fixture was constructed to perform the static load test series. The fixture consisted of a round structural tub with enough height and width to allow for displacement of the HIAD test article as loads were applied. The bottom of the tub rim had an airtight seal with the floor. The rigid centerbody of the HIAD was mounted to a pedestal in the center of the structural tub. Using an impermeable membrane draped over the HIAD test article, an airtight seal was created with the top rim of the static load tub. This seal allowed partial vacuum to be pulled beneath the HIAD resulting in a uniform static pressure load applied to the outer surface. Using this technique, the test article

  8. Aerodynamic force measurement on a large-scale model in a short duration test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tanno, H.; Kodera, M.; Komuro, T.; Sato, K.; Takahasi, M.; Itoh, K.

    2005-03-01

    A force measurement technique has been developed for large-scale aerodynamic models with a short test time. The technique is based on direct acceleration measurements, with miniature accelerometers mounted on a test model suspended by wires. Measuring acceleration at two different locations, the technique can eliminate oscillations from natural vibration of the model. The technique was used for drag force measurements on a 3 m long supersonic combustor model in the HIEST free-piston driven shock tunnel. A time resolution of 350 {mu}s is guaranteed during measurements, whose resolution is enough for ms order test time in HIEST. To evaluate measurement reliability and accuracy, measured values were compared with results from a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical simulation. The difference between measured values and numerical simulation values was less than 5%. We conclude that this measurement technique is sufficiently reliable for measuring aerodynamic force within test durations of 1 ms.

  9. Small scale noise and wind tunnel tests of upper surface blowing nozzle flap concepts. Volume 1. Aerodynamic test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renselaer, D. J.; Nishida, R. S.; Wilkin, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    The results and analyses of aerodynamic and acoustic studies conducted on the small scale noise and wind tunnel tests of upper surface blowing nozzle flap concepts are presented. Various types of nozzle flap concepts were tested. These are an upper surface blowing concept with a multiple slot arrangement with seven slots (seven slotted nozzle), an upper surface blowing type with a large nozzle exit at approximately mid-chord location in conjunction with a powered trailing edge flap with multiple slots (split flow or partially slotted nozzle). In addition, aerodynamic tests were continued on a similar multi-slotted nozzle flap, but with 14 slots. All three types of nozzle flap concepts tested appear to be about equal in overall aerodynamic performance but with the split flow nozzle somewhat better than the other two nozzle flaps in the landing approach mode. All nozzle flaps can be deflected to a large angle to increase drag without significant loss in lift. The nozzle flap concepts appear to be viable aerodynamic drag modulation devices for landing.

  10. Scramjet exhaust simulation technique for hypersonic aircraft nozzle design and aerodynamic tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Talcott, N. A., Jr.; Cubbage, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Current design philosophy for scramjet-powered hypersonic aircraft results in configurations with the entire lower fuselage surface utilized as part of the propulsion system. The lower aft-end of the vehicle acts as a high expansion ratio nozzle. Not only must the external nozzle be designed to extract the maximum possible thrust force from the high energy flow at the combustor exit, but the forces produced by the nozzle must be aligned such that they do not unduly affect aerodynamic balance. The strong coupling between the propulsion system and aerodynamics of the aircraft makes imperative at least a partial simulation of the inlet, exhaust, and external flows of the hydrogen-burning scramjet in conventional facilities for both nozzle formulation and aerodynamic-force data acquisition. Aerodynamic testing methods offer no contemporary approach for such vehicle design requirements. NASA-Langley has pursued an extensive scramjet/airframe integration R&D program for several years and has recently developed a promising technique for simulation of the scramjet exhaust flow for hypersonic aircraft. Current results of the research program to develop a scramjet flow simulation technique through the use of substitute gas blends are described in this paper.

  11. Aerodynamic heating and the deflection of drops by an obstacle in an air stream in relation to aircraft icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantrowitz, Arthur

    1940-01-01

    Two topics of interest to persons attempting to apply the heat method of preventing ice formation on aircraft are considered. Surfaces moving through air at high speed are shown, both theoretically and experimentally, to be subject to important aerodynamic heating effects that will materially reduce the heat required to prevent ice. Numerical calculations of the path of water drops in an air stream around a circular cylinder are given. From these calculations, information is obtained on the percentage of the swept area cleared of drops.

  12. Presentation of the acoustic and aerodynamic results of the Aladin 2 concept qualification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collard, M.; Doyotte, C.; Sagner, M.

    1985-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted of a scale model of the Aladin 2 aircraft. The propulsion system configuration is described and the air flow caused by jet ejection is analyzed. Three dimensional flow studies in the vicinity of the engine installation were made. Diagrams of the leading and trailing edge flaps are provided. Graphs are developed to show the aerodynamic performance under conditions of various airspeed and flap deflection.

  13. Aerodynamic characteristics of generic flight vehicle configuration from shock tunnel tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwade, A. G.; Narayana, A. S.; Panneerselvam, S.; Sahoo, N.; Saravanan, S.; Jagadeesh, G.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    A generic flight vehicle configuration has been designed as a possible candidate for hypersonic flight. Aerodynamic force coefficients over the test model configuration for different angles of attack are measured using a three-component accelerometer force balance system. Experiments are conducted in HST2 shock tunnel facility of IISc at an enthalpy of 2 MJ/kg and nominal Mach number of 6. This data will be useful for validating numerical results obtained by CFD techniques.

  14. Air/helium ground-test simulation pertinent to the definition of slender body hypersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, W. C.; Thompson, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The capability of air/helium simulations pertinent to the definition of slender body hypersonic aerodynamics is tested, using exact inviscid analytical comparisons to characterize the Mach number and bluntness effects. Comparisons are made with experiments conducted from the 1960s through the 1980s. The results indicate no general rule for air/helium simulation. A feasibility for obtaining sufficient simulation for many types of aero/fluid dynamic studies is demonstrated.

  15. The development and application of aerodynamic uncertainties: And flight test verification for the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, J. D.; Cooke, D. R.; Underwood, J. M.; Stone, H. W., Jr.; Schlosser, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    The approach used in establishing the predicted aerodynamic uncertainties and the process used in applying these uncertainties during the design of the Orbiter flight control system and the entry trajectories are presented. The flight test program that was designed to verify the stability and control derivatives with a minimum of test flights is presented and a comparison of preflight predictions with preliminary flight test results is made. It is concluded that the approach used for the Orbiter is applicable to future programs where testing is limited due to time constraints or funding.

  16. Aerodynamic drag reduction tests on a box-shaped vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. L.; Sandlin, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    The intent of the present experiment is to define a near optimum value of drag coefficient for a high volume type of vehicle through the use of a boattail, on a vehicle already having rounded front corners and an underbody seal, or fairing. The results of these tests will constitute a baseline for later follow-on studies to evaluate candidate methods of obtaining afterbody drag coefficients approaching the boattail values, but without resorting to such impractical afterbody extensions. The current modifications to the box-shaped vehicle consisted of a full and truncated boattail in conjunction with the faired and sealed underbody. Drag results from these configurations are compared with corresponding wind tunnel results of a 1/10 scale model. Test velocities ranged up to 96.6 km/h (60 mph) and the corresponding Reynolds numbers ranged up to 1.3 x 10 to the 7th power based on the vehicles length which includes the boattail. A simple coast-down technique was used to define drag.

  17. Accuracy of Aerodynamic Model Parameters Estimated from Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Klein, Vladislav

    1997-01-01

    An important put of building mathematical models based on measured date is calculating the accuracy associated with statistical estimates of the model parameters. Indeed, without some idea of this accuracy, the parameter estimates themselves have limited value. An expression is developed for computing quantitatively correct parameter accuracy measures for maximum likelihood parameter estimates when the output residuals are colored. This result is important because experience in analyzing flight test data reveals that the output residuals from maximum likelihood estimation are almost always colored. The calculations involved can be appended to conventional maximum likelihood estimation algorithms. Monte Carlo simulation runs were used to show that parameter accuracy measures from the new technique accurately reflect the quality of the parameter estimates from maximum likelihood estimation without the need for correction factors or frequency domain analysis of the output residuals. The technique was applied to flight test data from repeated maneuvers flown on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle. As in the simulated cases, parameter accuracy measures from the new technique were in agreement with the scatter in the parameter estimates from repeated maneuvers, whereas conventional parameter accuracy measures were optimistic.

  18. Ares I and Ares I-X Stage Separation Aerodynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Niskey, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    The aerodynamics of the Ares I crew launch vehicle (CLV) and Ares I-X flight test vehicle (FTV) during stage separation was characterized by testing 1%-scale models at the Arnold Engineering Development Center s (AEDC) von Karman Gas Dynamics Facility (VKF) Tunnel A at Mach numbers of 4.5 and 5.5. To fill a large matrix of data points in an efficient manner, an injection system supported the upper stage and a captive trajectory system (CTS) was utilized as a support system for the first stage located downstream of the upper stage. In an overall extremely successful test, this complex experimental setup associated with advanced postprocessing of the wind tunnel data has enabled the construction of a multi-dimensional aerodynamic database for the analysis and simulation of the critical phase of stage separation at high supersonic Mach numbers. Additionally, an extensive set of data from repeated wind tunnel runs was gathered purposefully to ensure that the experimental uncertainty would be accurately quantified in this type of flow where few historical data is available for comparison on this type of vehicle and where Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational simulations remain far from being a reliable source of static aerodynamic data.

  19. Oxidizer heat exchanger component test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanic, P. G.

    1988-01-01

    The RL10-IIB engine, is capable of multimode thrust operation. The engine operates at two low-thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), approximately 1 to 2 percent of full thrust; and pumped idle, 10 percent of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank prepressurization and maneuver thrust for low-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-IIB engine during the low-thrust operating modes can be accomplished by using a heat exchanger to supply gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector. The oxidized heat exchanger (OHE) vaporizes the liquid oxygen using hydrogen as the energy source. This report summarizes the test activity and post-test data analysis for two possible heat exchangers, each of which employs a completely different design philosophy. One design makes use of a low-heat transfer (PHT) approach in combination with a volume to attenuate pressure and flow oscillations. The test data showed that the LHT unit satisfied the oxygen exit quality of 0.95 or greater in both the THI and PI modes while maintaining stability. The HHT unit fulfilled all PI requirements; data for THI satisfactory operation is implied from experimental data that straddle the exact THI operating point.

  20. Aerodynamic Theory and Tests of Strut Forms-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R H

    1930-01-01

    This report presents the second of two studies under the same title. In this part five theoretical struts are developed from distributed sources and sinks and constructed for pressure and resistance tests in a wind tunnel. The surface pressures for symmetrical inviscid flow are computed for each strut from theory and compared with those found by experiment. The theoretical and experimental pressures are found to agree quantitatively near the bow, only qualitatively over the suction range, the experimental suctions being uniformly a little low, and not at all near the stern. This study is the strut sequel to Fuhrmann's research on airship forms, the one being a study in two dimensions, the other in three. A comparison of results indicates that the agreement between theory and experiment is somewhat better for bodies of revolution than for cylinders when both are shaped for slight resistance. The consistent deficiency of the experimental suctions which is found in the case of struts was not found in the case of airships, for which the experimental suctions were sometimes above sometimes below their theoretical values.

  1. Aerodynamic heating in gaps of thermal protection system tile arrays in laminar and turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental heat-transfer investigation was conducted on two staggered arrays of metallic tiles in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. This investigation was conducted for two purposes. The impingement heating distribution where flow in a longitudinal gap intersects a transverse gap and impinges on a downstream blocking tile was defined. The influence of tile and gap geometries was analyzed to develop empirical relationships for impingement heating in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Tests were conducted in a high temperature structures tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 7, a nominal total temperature of 1800 K, and free-stream unit Reynolds numbers from 1.0 x 10 million to 4.8 x 10 million per meter. The test results were used to assess the impingement heating effects produced by parameters that include gap width, longitudinal gap length, slope of the tile forward-facing wall, boundary-layer displacement thickness, Reynolds number, and local surface pressure.

  2. Aerodynamic Analysis of Simulated Heat Shield Recession for the Orion Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, Karen L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Mcdaniel, Ryan D.

    2008-01-01

    The aerodynamic effects of the recession of the ablative thermal protection system for the Orion Command Module of the Crew Exploration Vehicle are important for the vehicle guidance. At the present time, the aerodynamic effects of recession being handled within the Orion aerodynamic database indirectly with an additional safety factor placed on the uncertainty bounds. This study is an initial attempt to quantify the effects for a particular set of recessed geometry shapes, in order to provide more rigorous analysis for managing recession effects within the aerodynamic database. The aerodynamic forces and moments for the baseline and recessed geometries were computed at several trajectory points using multiple CFD codes, both viscous and inviscid. The resulting aerodynamics for the baseline and recessed geometries were compared. The forces (lift, drag) show negligible differences between baseline and recessed geometries. Generally, the moments show a difference between baseline and recessed geometries that correlates with the maximum amount of recession of the geometry. The difference between the pitching moments for the baseline and recessed geometries increases as Mach number decreases (and the recession is greater), and reach a value of -0.0026 for the lowest Mach number. The change in trim angle of attack increases from approx. 0.5deg at M = 28.7 to approx. 1.3deg at M = 6, and is consistent with a previous analysis with a lower fidelity engineering tool. This correlation of the present results with the engineering tool results supports the continued use of the engineering tool for future work. The present analysis suggests there does not need to be an uncertainty due to recession in the Orion aerodynamic database for the force quantities. The magnitude of the change in pitching moment due to recession is large enough to warrant inclusion in the aerodynamic database. An increment in the uncertainty for pitching moment could be calculated from these results and

  3. Hydrodynamic and Aerodynamic Tests of Models of Flying-boat Hulls Designed Flow Aerodynamic Drag - NACA Models 74, 74-A, and 75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truscott, Starr; Parkinson, J B; Ebert, John W , Jr; Valentine, E Floyd

    1938-01-01

    The present tests illustrate how the aerodynamic drag of a flying boat hull may be reduced by following closely the form of a low drag aerodynamic body and the manner in which the extent of the aerodynamic refinement is limited by poorer hydrodynamic performance. This limit is not sharply defined but is first evidenced by an abnormal flow of water over certain parts of the form accompanied by a sharp increase in resistance. In the case of models 74-A and 75, the resistance (sticking) occurs only at certain combinations of speed, load, and trim and can be avoided by proper control of the trim at high water speeds. Model 75 has higher water resistance at very high speeds than does model 74-A. With constant speed propellers and high takeoff speeds, it appears that the form of model 75 would give slightly better takeoff performance. Model 74-A, however, has lower aerodynamic drag than does model 75 for the same volume of hull.

  4. The use of velodrome tests to evaluate aerodynamic drag in professional cyclists.

    PubMed

    García-López, J; Ogueta-Alday, A; Larrazabal, J; Rodríguez-Marroyo, J A

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the validity, reliability and sensitivity of velodrome tests to detect small changes in aerodynamic drag in cycling. 12 professional cyclists were assessed to obtain the drag area (SCx) during wind tunnel and velodrome tests. Incremental and steady-state protocols were performed in the velodrome with a portable power meter, and 6 bicycle positions were analysed and compared that involved lowering the handlebars and advancing the pads between 2-5 cm. A significant relationship (r=0.88, p<0.001) between the SCx in the wind tunnel and velodrome tests was found (0.240 ± 0.007 and 0.237 ± 0.008 m2, respectively). The velodrome tests underestimated the SCx (0.0035 ± 0.0038 m2 and p<0.01), which decreased (p<0.001) when the bicycle speed increased (0.0013 m2 each 1 km · h(-1)). The SCx values showed high reliability during the steady-state (r=0.99, p<0.001) and incremental protocols (r=0.94, p<0.001). Small changes in the aerodynamic position affected the SCx (p<0.001), which decreased by 0.011 ± 0.007 m2 (4.6 ± 2.9%, 95% CI=2.7-6.4%). In conclusion, the validity, reliability and sensitivity of velodrome tests to detect small changes in aerodynamic drag in cycling were demonstrated. Although SCx values were not interchangeable between different studies, the velodrome tests presented advantages with respect to the wind tunnel tests. PMID:24081618

  5. The use of velodrome tests to evaluate aerodynamic drag in professional cyclists.

    PubMed

    García-López, J; Ogueta-Alday, A; Larrazabal, J; Rodríguez-Marroyo, J A

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the validity, reliability and sensitivity of velodrome tests to detect small changes in aerodynamic drag in cycling. 12 professional cyclists were assessed to obtain the drag area (SCx) during wind tunnel and velodrome tests. Incremental and steady-state protocols were performed in the velodrome with a portable power meter, and 6 bicycle positions were analysed and compared that involved lowering the handlebars and advancing the pads between 2-5 cm. A significant relationship (r=0.88, p<0.001) between the SCx in the wind tunnel and velodrome tests was found (0.240 ± 0.007 and 0.237 ± 0.008 m2, respectively). The velodrome tests underestimated the SCx (0.0035 ± 0.0038 m2 and p<0.01), which decreased (p<0.001) when the bicycle speed increased (0.0013 m2 each 1 km · h(-1)). The SCx values showed high reliability during the steady-state (r=0.99, p<0.001) and incremental protocols (r=0.94, p<0.001). Small changes in the aerodynamic position affected the SCx (p<0.001), which decreased by 0.011 ± 0.007 m2 (4.6 ± 2.9%, 95% CI=2.7-6.4%). In conclusion, the validity, reliability and sensitivity of velodrome tests to detect small changes in aerodynamic drag in cycling were demonstrated. Although SCx values were not interchangeable between different studies, the velodrome tests presented advantages with respect to the wind tunnel tests.

  6. Rotorcraft research testing in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmbrodt, W.; Smith, C. A.; Johnson, W.

    1985-01-01

    The unique capabilities of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) for testing rotorcraft systems are described. The test facilities include the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel, the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel, and the Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility. The Ames 7- by 10-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel is also used in support of the rotor research programs conducted in the NFAC. Detailed descriptions of each of the facilities, with an emphasis on helicopter rotor test capability, are presented. The special purpose rotor test equipment used in conducting helicopter research is reviewed. Test rigs to operate full-scale helicopter main rotors, helicopter tail rotors, and tilting prop-rotors are available, as well as full-scale and small-scale rotor systems for use in various research programs. The test procedures used in conducting rotor experiments are discussed together with representative data obtained from previous test programs. Specific examples are given for rotor performance, loads, acoustics, system interactions, dynamic and aeroelastic stability, and advanced technology and prototype demonstration models.

  7. Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV) Experimental Aerodynamics Test Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Woods, William C.; Engelund, Walter C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the experimental aerodynamics test program to ensure mission success for the autonomous flight of the Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV). The HXRV is a 12-ft long, 2700 lb lifting body technology demonstrator designed to flight demonstrate for the first time a fully airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system. Three flights are currently planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10, beginning in the fall of 2000. The research vehicles will be boosted to the prescribed scramjet engine test point where they will separate from the booster, stabilize, and initiate engine test. Following 5+ seconds of powered flight and 15 seconds of cow-open tares, the cowl will close and the vehicle will fly a controlled deceleration trajectory which includes numerous control doublets for in-flight aerodynamic parameter identification. This paper reviews the preflight testing activities, wind tunnel models, test rationale, risk reduction activities, and sample results from wind tunnel tests supporting the flight trajectory of the HXRV from hypersonic engine test point through subsonic flight termination.

  8. Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV) Experimental Aerodynamics Test Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Woods, William C.; Engelund, Walter C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the experimental aerodynamics test program to ensure mission success for the autonomous flight of the Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV). The HXRV is a 12-ft long, 2700 lb lifting body technology demonstrator designed to flight demonstrate for the first time a fully airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system. Three flights are currently planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10, beginning in the fall of 2000. The research vehicles will be boosted to the prescribed scramjet engine test point where they will separate from the booster, stabilize. and initiate engine test. Following 5+ seconds of powered flight and 15 seconds of cowl-open tares, the cowl will close and the vehicle will fly a controlled deceleration trajectory which includes numerous control doublets for in-flight aerodynamic parameter identification. This paper reviews the preflight testing activities, wind tunnel models, test rationale. risk reduction activities, and sample results from wind tunnel tests supporting the flight trajectory of the HXRV from hypersonic engine test point through subsonic flight termination.

  9. JT9D performance deterioration results from a simulated aerodynamic load test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.; Stromberg, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of testing to identify the effects of simulated aerodynamic flight loads on JT9D engine performance are presented. The test results were also used to refine previous analytical studies on the impact of aerodynamic flight loads on performance losses. To accomplish these objectives, a JT9D-7AH engine was assembled with average production clearances and new seals as well as extensive instrumentation to monitor engine performance, case temperatures, and blade tip clearance changes. A special loading device was designed and constructed to permit application of known moments and shear forces to the engine by the use of cables placed around the flight inlet. The test was conducted in the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft X-Ray Test Facility to permit the use of X-ray techniques in conjunction with laser blade tip proximity probes to monitor important engine clearance changes. Upon completion of the test program, the test engine was disassembled, and the condition of gas path parts and final clearances were documented. The test results indicate that the engine lost 1.1 percent in thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), as measured under sea level static conditions, due to increased operating clearances caused by simulated flight loads. This compares with 0.9 percent predicted by the analytical model and previous study efforts.

  10. APL/JHU free flight tests of the General Purpose Heat Source module. Testing: 5-7 March 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, W.M. II

    1984-01-01

    Purpose of the test was to obtain statistical information on the dynamics of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module at terminal speeds. Models were designed to aerodynamically and dynamically represent the GPHS module. Normal and high speed photographic coverage documented the motion of the models. This report documents test parameters and techniques for the free-spin tests. It does not include data analysis.

  11. Ground vibration test results for Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST)/Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-1R) aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, T. H.; Gilyard, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    The drones for aerodynamic and structural testing (DAST) project was designed to control flutter actively at high subsonic speeds. Accurate knowledge of the structural model was critical for the successful design of the control system. A ground vibration test was conducted on the DAST vehicle to determine the structural model characteristics. This report presents and discusses the vibration and test equipment, the test setup and procedures, and the antisymmetric and symmetric mode shape results. The modal characteristics were subsequently used to update the structural model employed in the control law design process.

  12. Aerodynamic Coefficients of Entry Vehicle Demonstrator from Free Flight Range Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, C.; Fleck, V.; Sommer, E.; Tran, P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper documents the ISL testing programme conducted in the framework of ESA-TRP contract No.AO/1 5031-06/NL/PM on Aerothermodynamics of Aerocapture and High Speed Earth Entry. It presents the results extracted from data collected during a series of free flight tests with instrumented entry space probes conducted at the ISL open range test site. The main objective of this test series was to investigate the basic aerodynamics of two electronic equipped subscale space probes with primary focus on the dynamic stability characteristics. Motion of the models and the corresponding aerodynamic coefficients were obtained by a low-cost and all-weather technique, unique in Europe and developed in the last years at the French-German Research Institute. Launch Mach number was about 3.0 at low and high angles of attack with final Mach number of about 0.6. Comparisons were also made when possible with previous results obtained from computational predictions and/or free flight tests.

  13. Aeroballistic analysis of ERB/TIGER II Aerodynamic Test Unit ATU-2 (SLA R715032)

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R. W.

    1980-07-01

    The results of the first drop test of the 13.3-in-diameter ERB/TIGER II are documented. The test unit, designated Aerodynamic Test Unit-2 (ATU-2), was dropped on August 25, 1977, at the Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range from an Air Force F-4 Aircraft. Nominal release conditions were an altitude of 20,000 ft mean sea level and Mach 0.8. The purpose of the test was to obtain free-flight vehicle characteristics including the effect of the free-floating rollerons, to evaluate release and separation characteristics of the 13.3-in-diameter vehicle, and to evaluate the performance of the recovery system. Modifications to the mathematical model for the vehicle that yield better agreement between simulation and flight test results are presented. The system is also described. 42 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Intermediate Temperature Water Heat Pipe Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devarakonda, Angirasa; Xiong, Da-Xi; Beach, Duane E.

    2005-01-01

    Heat pipes are among the most promising technologies for space radiator systems. Water heat pipes are explored in the intermediate temperature range of 400 to above 500 K. The thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of water are reviewed in this temperature range. Test data are reported for a copper-water heat pipe. The heat pipe was tested under different orientations. Water heat pipes show promise in this temperature range. Fabrication and testing issues are being addressed.

  15. Intermediate Temperature Water Heat Pipe Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devarakonda, Angirasa; Xiong, Daxi; Beach, Duane E.

    2004-01-01

    Heat pipes are among the most promising technologies for space radiator systems. Water heat pipes are explored in the intermediate temperature range of 400 to above 500 K. The thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of water are reviewed in this temperature range. Test Data are reported for a copper-water heat pipe. The heat pipe was tested under different orientations. Water heat pipes show promise in this temperature range.Fabrication and testing issues are being addressed.

  16. Engineering methodology to estimate the aerodynamic heating to the base of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambamurthi, Jay; Warmbrod, John; Seaford, Mark

    1989-01-01

    An engineering methodology has been developed to predict the convective heating and pressure environments to the base surfaces of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle during its earth aeropass. Data obtained from prior flight vehicles, wind tunnel tests, CFD analysis of AFE, and simple one-dimensional isentropic flow expansion relationships along with standard aeroheating methods were employed. With the exception of one corner, the AFE base surfaces are immersed in separated flow and are, therefore, exposed to heating and pressure that are small compared to the front face of the aerobrake.

  17. Progressive Aerodynamic Model Identification From Dynamic Water Tunnel Test of the F-16XL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Klein, Vladislav; Szyba, Nathan M.

    2004-01-01

    Development of a general aerodynamic model that is adequate for predicting the forces and moments in the nonlinear and unsteady portions of the flight envelope has not been accomplished to a satisfactory degree. Predicting aerodynamic response during arbitrary motion of an aircraft over the complete flight envelope requires further development of the mathematical model and the associated methods for ground-based testing in order to allow identification of the model. In this study, a general nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic model is presented, followed by a summary of a linear modeling methodology that includes test and identification methods, and then a progressive series of steps suggesting a roadmap to develop a general nonlinear methodology that defines modeling, testing, and identification methods. Initial steps of the general methodology were applied to static and oscillatory test data to identify rolling-moment coefficient. Static measurements uncovered complicated dependencies of the aerodynamic coefficient on angle of attack and sideslip in the stall region making it difficult to find a simple analytical expression for the measurement data. In order to assess the effect of sideslip on the damping and unsteady terms, oscillatory tests in roll were conducted at different values of an initial offset in sideslip. Candidate runs for analyses were selected where higher order harmonics were required for the model and where in-phase and out-of-phase components varied with frequency. From these results it was found that only data in the angle-of-attack range of 35 degrees to 37.5 degrees met these requirements. From the limited results it was observed that the identified models fit the data well and both the damping-in-roll and the unsteady term gain are decreasing with increasing sideslip and motion amplitude. Limited similarity between parameter values in the nonlinear model and the linear model suggest that identifiability of parameters in both terms may be a

  18. Aerodynamic Thrust Modelling in Wave Tank Tests of Offshore Floating Wind Turbines Using a Ducted Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcona, José; Bouchotrouch, Faisal; González, Marta; Garciandía, Joseba; Munduate, Xabier; Kelberlau, Felix; Nygaard, Tor A.

    2014-06-01

    Wave tank testing of scaled models is standard practice during the development of floating wind turbine platforms for the validation of the dynamics of conceptual designs. Reliable recreation of the dynamics of a full scale floating wind turbine by a scaled model in a basin requires the precise scaling of the masses and inertias and also the relevant forces and its frequencies acting on the system. The scaling of floating wind turbines based on the Froude number is customary for basin experiments. This method preserves the hydrodynamic similitude, but the resulting Reynolds number is much lower than in full scale. The aerodynamic loads on the rotor are therefore out of scale. Several approaches have been taken to deal with this issue, like using a tuned drag disk or redesigning the scaled rotor. This paper describes the implementation of an alternative method based on the use of a ducted fan located at the model tower top in the place of the rotor. The fan can introduce a variable force that represents the total wind thrust by the rotor. A system controls this force by varying the rpm, and a computer simulation of the full scale rotor provides the desired thrust to be introduced by the fan. This simulation considers the wind turbine control, gusts, turbulent wind, etc. The simulation is performed in synchronicity with the test and it is fed in real time by the displacements and velocities of the platform captured by the acquisition system. Thus, the simulation considers the displacements of the rotor within the wind field and the calculated thrust models the effect of the aerodynamic damping. The system is not able currently to match the effect of gyroscopic momentum. The method has been applied during a test campaign of a semisubmersible platform with full catenary mooring lines for a 6MW wind turbine in scale 1/40 at Ecole Centrale de Nantes. Several tests including pitch free decay under constant wind and combined wave and wind cases have been performed. Data

  19. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Flight Test Results for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Cliatt, Larry James; Frederick, Michael A.; Smith, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) program, a 747SP airplane was modified to carry a 2.5 meter telescope in the aft section of the fuselage. The resulting airborne observatory allows for observations above 99 percent of the water vapor in the atmosphere. The open cavity created by the modifications had the potential to significantly affect the airplane in the areas of aerodynamics and acoustics. Several series of flight tests were conducted to clear the airplanes operating envelope for astronomical observations, planned to be performed between the altitudes of 39,000 feet and 45,000 feet. The flight tests were successfully completed. Cavity acoustics were below design limits, and the overall acoustic characteristics of the cavity were better than expected. The modification did have some effects on the stability and control of the airplane, but these effects were not significant. Airplane air data systems were not affected by the modifications. This paper describes the methods used to examine the aerodynamics and acoustic data from the flight tests and provides a discussion of the flight test results in the areas of cavity acoustics, stability and control, and air data.

  20. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Flight Test Results and Results for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Smith, Mark S.; Cliatt, Larry J.; Frederick, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy program, a 747SP airplane was modified to carry a 2.5-m telescope in the aft section of the fuselage. The resulting airborne observatory allows for observations above 99 percent of the water vapor in the atmosphere. The open cavity created by the modifications had the potential to significantly affect the airplane in the areas of aerodynamics and acoustics. Several series of flight tests were conducted to clear the operating envelope of the airplane for astronomical observations, planned to be performed between the altitudes of 35,000 ft and 45,000 ft. The flight tests were successfully completed. Cavity acoustics were below design limits, and the overall acoustic characteristics of the cavity were better than expected. The modification did have some effects on the stability and control of the airplane, but these effects were not significant. Airplane air data systems were not affected by the modifications. This paper describes the methods used to examine the aerodynamics and acoustic data from the flight tests and provides a discussion of the flight-test results in the areas of cavity acoustics, stability and control, and air data.

  1. Flutter analysis and testing of pairs of aerodynamically interfering delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, R. R.; Rauch, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    To examine the effect on flutter of the aerodynamic interference between pairs of closely spaced delta wings, several structurally uncoupled 1/80th-scale models were studied by experiment and analysis. Flutter test boundaries run in a 26-in transonic blowdown wind tunnel were compared with subsonic analytical results generated using the doublet lattice method. Trends for several combinations of vertical and longitudinal wing separation showed that flutter speeds can be significantly lowered in closely spaced configurations. For some configurations, a new flutter mechanism, characterized by coupling of the flexible modes from both surfaces at a distinctive flutter frequency, was predicted and observed.

  2. Aerodynamic Testing of the Orion Launch Abort Tower Separation with Jettison Motor Jet Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhode, Matthew N.; Chan, David T.; Niskey, Charles J.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    The aerodynamic database for the Orion Launch Abort System (LAS) was developed largely from wind tunnel tests involving powered jet simulations of the rocket exhaust plumes, supported by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The LAS contains three solid rocket motors used in various phases of an abort to provide propulsion, steering, and Launch Abort Tower (LAT) jettison from the Crew Module (CM). This paper describes a pair of wind tunnel experiments performed at transonic and supersonic speeds to determine the aerodynamic effects due to proximity and jet interactions during LAT jettison from the CM at the end of an abort. The tests were run using two different scale models at angles of attack from 150deg to 200deg , sideslip angles from -10deg to +10deg , and a range of powered thrust levels from the jettison motors to match various jet simulation parameters with flight values. Separation movements between the CM and LAT included axial and vertical translations as well as relative pitch angle between the two bodies. The paper details aspects of the model design, nozzle scaling methodology, instrumentation, testing procedures, and data reduction. Sample data are shown to highlight trends seen in the results.

  3. Comparison of analytical and flight test identified aerodynamic derivatives for a tandem-rotor transport helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    Flight tests for verifying an analytical aerodynamic derivative model of a CH-47 helicopter were conducted for low cruise speeds and transition to hover portions of curved, decelerating landing approach trajectories. All testing was performed on a closed loop basis with the stability augmentation system of the helicopter operating, and response data were obtained using both manual and computer generated input maneuvers. The results indicate some differences between the measured response time histories and those predicted by both analytical and flight test identified derivatives. With some exceptions the discrepancies are not severe, and the overall agreement between the measured and computed time histories is reasonably good. No adverse effects attributable to closed loop testing were noted, and the use of computer generated inputs proved to be superior to manual ones.

  4. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Schairer, Edward; Hicks, Gary; Wander, Stephen; Blankson, Isiaiah; Rose, Raymond; Olson, Lawrence; Unger, George

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a comprehensive review of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation, transition and turbulence physics, numerical aerodynamic simulation, drag reduction, test techniques and instrumentation, configuration aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, aerothermodynamics, hypersonics, subsonic transport/commuter aviation, fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  5. The Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig: an Acoustic and Aerodynamic Free-jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    1994-01-01

    The nozzle acoustic test rig (NATR) was built at NASA Lewis Research Center to support the High Speed Research Program. The facility is capable of measuring the acoustic and aerodynamic performance of aircraft engine nozzle concepts. Trade-off studies are conducted to compare performance and noise during simulated low-speed flight and takeoff. Located inside an acoustically treated dome with a 62-ft radius, the NATR is a free-jet that has a 53-in. diameter and is driven by an air ejector. This ejector is operated with 125 lb/s of compressed air, at 125 psig, to achieve 375 lb/s at Mach 0.3. Acoustic and aerodynamic data are collected from test nozzles mounted in the free-jet flow. The dome serves to protect the surrounding community from high noise levels generated by the nozzles, and to provide an anechoic environment for acoustic measurements. Information presented in this report summarizes free-jet performance, fluid support systems, and data acquisition capabilities of the NATR.

  6. Flight testing of live Monarch butterflies to determine the aerodynamic benefit of butterfly scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Amy; Cranford, Jacob; Conway, Jasmine; Slegers, Nathan; Dechello, Nicole; Wilroy, Jacob

    2014-11-01

    Evolutionary adaptations in the morphological structure of butterfly scales (0.1 mm in size) to develop a unique micro-patterning resulting in a surface drag alteration, stem from a probable aerodynamic benefit of minimizing the energy requirement to fly a very lightweight body with comparably large surface area in a low Re flow regime. Live Monarch butterflies were tested at UAHuntsville's Autonomous Tracking and Optical Measurement (ATOM) Laboratory, which uses 22 Vicon T40 cameras that allow for millimeter level tracking of reflective markers at 515 fps over a 4 m × 6 m × 7 m volume. Data recorded included the flight path as well as the wing flapping angle and wing-beat frequency. Insects were first tested with their scales intact, and then again with the scales carefully removed. Differences in flapping frequency and/or energy obtained during flight due to the removal of the scales will be discussed. Initial data analysis indicates that scale removal in some specimens leads to increased flapping frequencies for similar energetic flight or reduced flight speed for similar flapping frequencies. Both results point to the scales providing an aerodynamic benefit, which is hypothesized to be linked to leading-edge vortex formation and induced drag. Funding from the National Science Foundation (CBET and REU) is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. An examination of the aerodynamic moment on rotor blade tips using flight test data and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maier, Thomas H.; Bousman, William G.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis CAMRAD/JA is used to model two aircraft, a Puma with a swept-tip blade and a UH-60A Black Hawk. The accuracy of the analysis in predicting the torsion loads is assessed by comparing the predicted loads with measurements from flight tests. The influence of assumptions in the analytical model is examined by varying model parameters and comparing the predicted results to baseline values for the torsion loads. Flight test data from a research Puma are used to identify the source of torsion loads. These data indicate that the aerodynamic section moment in the region of the blade tip dominates torsion loading in high-speed flight. Both the aerodynamic section moment at the blade tip and the pitch-link loads are characterized by large positive (nose-up) moments in the first quadrant with rapid reversal of load so that the moment is negative in the second quadrant. Both the character and magnitude of this loading are missed by the CAMRAD/JA analysis.

  8. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J.; Hessenius, Kristin A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Hicks, Gary; Richardson, Pamela F.; Unger, George; Neumann, Benjamin; Moss, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The annual accomplishments is reviewed for the Aerodynamics Division during FY 1991. The program includes both fundamental and applied research directed at the full spectrum of aerospace vehicles, from rotorcraft to planetary entry probes. A comprehensive review is presented of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications; CFD validation; transition and turbulence physics; numerical aerodynamic simulation; test techniques and instrumentation; configuration aerodynamics; aeroacoustics; aerothermodynamics; hypersonics; subsonics; fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  9. Aerodynamic investigation by infrared imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. Sidney, Jr.; Mcree, Griffith J.; Gartenberg, Ehud

    1988-01-01

    Infrared imaging systems can be used to measure temperatures of actively heated bodies immersed in an airstream. This monitoring of the convective heat transfer process, provides also information about the interaction between the body and the flow. The concept appeals to Nusselt/Reynolds numbers relations in order to produce data of interest from surface temperatures. Two test cases are presented and reference is made to analytical results: the mapping of a laminar jet and the temperature distribution along a constant power heated flat plate in laminar boundary layer regime. Although this research is currently focused on low speed aerodynamics, the extension to high speed aerodynamics, where the body undergoes frictional heating is of interest in this context, too.

  10. Performance deterioration based on simulated aerodynamic loads test, JT9D jet engine diagnostics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stromberg, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    An engine was specially prepared with extensive instrumentation to monitor performance, case temperatures, and clearance changes. A special loading device was used to apply known loads on the engine by the use of cables placed around the flight inlet. These loads simulated the estimated aerodynamic pressure distributions that occur on the inlet in various segments of a typical airplane flight. Test results indicate that the engine lost 1.3 percent in take-off thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC) during the course of the test effort. Permanent clearance changes due to the loads accounted for 1.1 percent; increase in low pressure compressor airfoil roughness and thermal distortion in the high pressure turbine accounted for 0.2 percent. Pretest predicted performance loss due to clearance changes was 0.9 percent in TSFC. Therefore, the agreement between measurement and prediction is considered to be excellent.

  11. Comparison of Analysis with Test for Static Loading of Two Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Acceptance of new spacecraft structural architectures and concepts requires validated design methods to minimize the expense involved with technology demonstration via flight-testing. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) architectures are attractive for spacecraft deceleration because they are lightweight, store compactly, and utilize the atmosphere to decelerate a spacecraft during entry. However, designers are hesitant to include these inflatable approaches for large payloads or spacecraft because of the lack of flight validation. This publication summarizes results comparing analytical results with test data for two concepts subjected to representative entry, static loading. The level of agreement and ability to predict the load distribution is considered sufficient to enable analytical predictions to be used in the design process.

  12. Scaling of Lift Degradation Due to Anti-Icing Fluids Based Upon the Aerodynamic Acceptance Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Riley, James T.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the FAA has worked with Transport Canada, National Research Council Canada (NRC) and APS Aviation, Inc. to develop allowance times for aircraft operations in ice-pellet precipitation. These allowance times are critical to ensure safety and efficient operation of commercial and cargo flights. Wind-tunnel testing with uncontaminated anti-icing fluids and fluids contaminated with simulated ice pellets had been carried out at the NRC Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel (PIWT) to better understand the flowoff characteristics and resulting aerodynamic effects. The percent lift loss on the thin, high-performance wing model tested in the PIWT was determined at 8 angle of attack and used as one of the evaluation criteria in determining the allowance times. Because it was unclear as to how performance degradations measured on this model were relevant to an actual airplane configuration, some means of interpreting the wing model lift loss was deemed necessary. This paper describes how the lift loss was related to the loss in maximum lift of a Boeing 737-200ADV airplane through the Aerodynamic Acceptance Test (AAT) performed for fluids qualification. A loss in maximum lift coefficient of 5.24 percent on the B737-200ADV airplane (which was adopted as the threshold in the AAT) corresponds to a lift loss of 7.3 percent on the PIWT model at 8 angle of attack. There is significant scatter in the data used to develop the correlation related to varying effects of the anti-icing fluids that were tested and other factors. A statistical analysis indicated the upper limit of lift loss on the PIWT model was 9.2 percent. Therefore, for cases resulting in PIWT model lift loss from 7.3 to 9.2 percent, extra scrutiny of the visual observations is required in evaluating fluid performance with contamination.

  13. Scaling of Lift Degradation Due to Anti-Icing Fluids Based Upon the Aerodynamic Acceptance Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy; Riley, Jim

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the FAA has worked with Transport Canada, National Research Council Canada (NRC) and APS Aviation, Inc. to develop allowance times for aircraft operations in ice-pellet precipitation. These allowance times are critical to ensure safety and efficient operation of commercial and cargo flights. Wind-tunnel testing with uncontaminated anti-icing fluids and fluids contaminated with simulated ice pellets had been carried out at the NRC Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel (PIWT) to better understand the flow-off characteristics and resulting aerodynamic effects. The percent lift loss on the thin, high-performance wing model tested in the PIWT was determined at 8 deg. angle of attack and used as one of the evaluation criteria in determining the allowance times. Because it was unclear as to how performance degradations measured on this model were relevant to an actual airplane configuration, some means of interpreting the wing model lift loss was deemed necessary. This paper describes how the lift loss was related to the loss in maximum lift of a Boeing 737-200ADV airplane through the Aerodynamic Acceptance Test (AAT) performed for fluids qualification. A loss in maximum lift coefficient of 5.24% on the B737-200ADV airplane (which was adopted as the threshold in the AAT) corresponds to a lift loss of 7.3% on the PIWT model at 8 deg. angle of attack. There is significant scatter in the data used to develop the correlation related to varying effects of the anti-icing fluids that were tested and other factors. A statistical analysis indicated the upper limit of lift loss on the PIWT model was 9.2%. Therefore, for cases resulting in PIWT model lift loss from 7.3% to 9.2%, extra scrutiny of the visual observations is required in evaluating fluid performance with contamination.

  14. Lewis icing research tunnel test of the aerodynamic effects of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, L. James; Zierten, Thomas A.; Hill, Eugene G.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of the effect of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids on the aerodynamic characteristics of a Boeing 737-200ADV airplane was conducted. The test was carried out in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. Fluids tested include a Newtonian deicing fluid, three non-Newtonian anti-icing fluids commercially available during or before 1988, and eight new experimental non-Newtonian fluids developed by four fluid manufacturers. The results show that fluids remain on the wind after liftoff and cause a measurable lift loss and drag increase. These effects are dependent on the high-lift configuration and on the temperature. For a configuration with a high-lift leading-edge device, the fluid effect is largest at the maximum lift condition. The fluid aerodynamic effects are related to the magnitude of the fluid surface roughness, particularly in the first 30 percent chord. The experimental fluids show a significant reduction in aerodynamic effects.

  15. A New Compendium of Unsteady Aerodynamic Test Cases for CFD: Summary of AVT WG-003 Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz-Calavera, Luis P.; Bennett, Robert; Fox, John H.; Galbraith, Robert W.; Geurts, Evert; Henshaw, Micahel J. deC.; Huang, XingZhong; Kaynes, Ian W.; Loeser, Thomas; Naudin, Pierre; Tamayama, Masato

    1999-01-01

    With the continuous progress in hardware and numerical schemes, Computational Unsteady Aerodynamics (CUA), that is, the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to unsteady flowfields, is slowly finding its way as a useful and reliable tool (turbulence and transition modeling permitting) in the aircraft, helicopter, engine and missile design and development process. Before a specific code may be used with confidence it is essential to validate its capability to describe the physics of the flow correctly, or at least to the level of approximation required, for which purpose a comparison with accurate experimental data is needed. Unsteady wind tunnel testing is difficult and expensive; two factors which dramatically limit the number of organizations with the capability and/or resources to perform it. Thus, unsteady experimental data is scarce, often classified and scattered in diverse documents. Additionally, access to the reports does not necessarily assure access to the data itself. The collaborative effort described in this paper was conceived with the aim of collecting into a single easily accessible document as much quality data as possible. The idea is not new. In the early 80's NATO's AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research & Development) Structures and Material Panel (SMP) produced AGARD Report No. 702 "Compendium of Unsteady Aerodynamic Measurements", which has found and continues to find extensive use within the CUA Community. In 1995 AGARD's Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) decided to update and expand the former database with new geometries and physical phenomena, and launched Working Group WG-22 on "Validation Data for Computational Unsteady Aerodynamic Codes". Shortly afterwards AGARD was reorganized as the RTO (Research and Technology Organization) and the WG was renamed as AVT (Applied Vehicle Technolology) WG-003. Contributions were received from AEDC, BAe, DLR, DERA, Glasgow University, IAR, NAL, NASA, NLR, and ONERA. The final publication

  16. Low-speed aerodynamic test of an axisymmetric supersonic inlet with variable cowl slot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, A. G.; Welge, H. R.; Trefny, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of an axisymmetric mixed-compression supersonic inlet with variable cowl slot are described. The model consisted of the NASA P-inlet centerbody and redesigned cowl with variable cowl slot powered by the JT8D single-stage fan simulator and driven by an air turbine. The model was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center 9- by 15-foot low-speed tunnel at Mach numbers of 0, 0.1, and 0.2 over a range of flows, cowl slot openings, centerbody positions, and angles of attack. The variable cowl slot was effective in minimizing lip separation at high velocity ratios, showed good steady-state and dynamic distortion characteristics, and had good angle-of-attack tolerance.

  17. Results of aerodynamic testing of large-scale wing sections in a simulated natural rain environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos, Gaudy M.; Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.; Campbell, Bryan A.; Melson, W. Edward, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has developed a large-scale ground testing capability for evaluating the effect of heavy rain on airfoil lift. The paper presents the results obtained at the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility on a 10-foot cord NACA 64-210 wing section equipped with a leading-edge slat and double-slotted trailing-edge flap deflected to simulate landing conditions. Aerodynamic lift data were obtained with and without the rain simulation system turned on for an angle-of-attack range of 7.5 to 19.5 deg and for two rainfall conditions: 9 in/hr and 40 in/hr. The results are compared to and correlated with previous small-scale wind tunnel results for the same airfoil section. It appears that to first order, scale effects are not large and the wind tunnel research technique can be used to predict rain effects on airplane performance.

  18. Comparison of aerodynamic data measured in air and Freon-12 wind-tunnel test mediums

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to measure two dimensional static aerodynamic characteristics of a 65 sub l-213 airfoil in air and Freon-12 (dichlorodifluoromethane) test mediums at corresponding test conditions. The purpose of the tests was to compare measurements in the two test mediums and to evaluate reported methods of converting Freon-12 data to equivalent air values. The test article was a two dimensional wing instrumented to measure chordwise surface pressure distributions. The parameters considered were Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.0, angles of attack of zero deg and 1 deg, and Reynolds numbers based on model chord from 2,000,000 to 21,000,000. The agreement between data measured in the two test mediums is further improved by application of the transonic or area ratio similarity laws. Where flow conditions are characterized by surface shocks or stall, the effects of flow separation may not be identically reflected in the Freon-12 data, even when converted in accordance with existing similarity laws.

  19. Test Plan for the Technology Maturation of Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Jenny R.; Cruz, Juan R.

    2009-01-01

    Supersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators (IADs) are drag devices intended to be deployed at high Mach numbers. In the application considered here they assist in the descent and landing of spacecraft on Mars. Although promising, present IAD technology is not yet sufficiently mature for use in the near future. This paper describes a technology maturation plan for tension cone IADs using subscale test articles to reduce development costs. As envisioned, the proposed test plan includes three phases: wind tunnel tests (subsonic), unpowered high-altitude flight tests (transonic), and powered high-altitude tests (supersonic). This test plan is based on a building block approach in which successful completion of each phase adds to the understanding of the behavior of IADs and reduces the risk of the subsequent, more expensive phases. By properly scaling the IADs, test articles of the same size and nearly the same construction can be used for all three phases. The final phase is a dynamically scaled flight test with IAD deployment at the same Mach number as the full-scale vehicle on Mars. Two full-scale example cases are presented: one for a single-stage system (15 m dia. IAD to subsonic retropropulsion), and another for a two-stage system (10.5 m dia. IAD to subsonic parachute). Using scale factors of 0.333 and 0.476 yield subscale test IADs of 5 m dia. The dynamically scaled powered flight test starts at Mach 4 and an altitude of 33.5 km. Existing balloons and rocket motors are shown to be adequate to meet the required test conditions.

  20. Comparisons Between Pretest Prediction and Flight Test Data of Aerodynamic Loading for EFT-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Exploration Flight Test One (EFT-1) was an incredible milestone in the development NASA's Orion spacecraft. It incorporated hundreds of articles of flight test instrumentation and returned with a wealth of data. Aerodynamic surface pressures were collected during launch vehicle ascent and capsule reentry and descent. These discrete surface pressure measurements enable comparisons to computational results and ground test data. This paper details the comparisons between pre-test predictions and flight test data for the Orion MPCV Crew Module (CM) and Launch Abort Tower (LAT) during all phases of flight. Regions with strong comparisons, poor predictions, and lessons learned are discussed. 38 pressure measurements were made on the LAT during ascent. Nine of the gauges were Honeywell PPTs and the remainder were Kulite pressure transducers. In order to address bias in the Kulites, a two-point linear calibration was used and the details are discussed. Results from the flight are compared to existing database products. 44 pressure measurements were made on the CM during reentry and descent. Nine of the gauges were Honeywell PPTs and the remainder were Kulite pressure transducers. In order to address bias in the Kulites, a tare was made against the vacuum measurements as described below. Once the bias was removed from the gauges, comparisons between predicted loading and the measured results are compared.

  1. The development of a capability for aerodynamic testing of large-scale wing sections in a simulated natural rain environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos, Gaudy M.; Cambell, Bryan A.; Melson, W. Edward

    1989-01-01

    A research technique to obtain large-scale aerodynamic data in a simulated natural rain environment has been developed. A 10-ft chord NACA 64-210 wing section wing section equipped with leading-edge and trailing-edge high-lift devices was tested as part of a program to determine the effect of highly-concentrated, short-duration rainfall on airplane performance. Preliminary dry aerodynamic data are presented for the high-lift configuration at a velocity of 100 knots and an angle of attack of 18 deg. Also, data are presented on rainfield uniformity and rainfall concentration intensity levels obtained during the calibration of the rain simulation system.

  2. Aerodynamic characteristics of wheelchairs. [Langley V/STOL wind tunnel tests for human factors engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The overall aerodynamic drag characteristics of a conventional wheelchair were defined and the individual drag contributions of its components were determined. The results show that a fiftieth percentile man sitting in the complete wheelchair would experience an aerodynamic drag coefficient on the order of 1.4.

  3. Test data from solid propellant plume aerodynamics test program in Ames 6 x 6 foot supersonic wind tunnel (shuttle test FA7) (Ames test 033-66)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    The aerodynamic effects of plumes from hot combustion gases in the presence of a transonic external flow field were measured to advance plumes simulation technology, extend a previously acquired data base, and provide data to compare with the effects observed using cold gas plumes. A variety of underexpanded plumes issuing from the base of a strut-mounted ogive-cylinder body were produced by combusting solid propellant gas generators. The gas generator fired in a short-duration mode (200 to 300 msec). Propellants containing 16 percent and 2 percent A1 were used, with chamber pressures from 400 to 1800 psia. Conical nozzles of 15 deg half-angle were tested with area ratios of 4 and 8. Pressures were measured in the gas generator combustion chamber, along the nozzle wall, on the base, and along the body rear exterior. Schlieren photographs were taken for all tests. Test data are presented along with a description of the test setup and procedures.

  4. Propulsion and airframe aerodynamic interactions of supersonic V/STOL configurations. Volume 1: Wind tunnel test pressure data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilz, D. E.; Devereaux, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel model of a supersonic V/STOL fighter configuration has been tested to measure the aerodynamic interaction effects which can result from geometrically close-coupled propulsion system/airframe components. The approach was to configure the model to represent two different test techniques. One was a conventional test technique composed of two test modes. In the Flow-Through mode, absolute configuration aerodynamics are measured, including inlet/airframe interactions. In the Jet-Effects mode, incremental nozzle/airframe interactions are measured. The other test technique is a propulsion simulator approach, where a sub-scale, externally powered engine is mounted in the model. This allows proper measurement of inlet/airframe and nozzle/airframe interactions simultaneously. This is Volume 1 of 2: Wind Tunnel Test Pressure Data Report.

  5. Blended-Wing-Body Transonic Aerodynamics: Summary of Ground Tests and Sample Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Vicroy, Dan D.; Patel, Dharmendra

    2009-01-01

    The Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) concept has shown substantial performance benefits over conventional aircraft configuration with part of the benefit being derived from the absence of a conventional empennage arrangement. The configuration instead relies upon a bank of trailing edge devices to provide control authority and augment stability. To determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the aircraft, several wind tunnel tests were conducted with a 2% model of Boeing's BWB-450-1L configuration. The tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center's National Transonic Facility and the Arnold Engineering Development Center s 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. Characteristics of the configuration and the effectiveness of the elevons, drag rudders and winglet rudders were measured at various angles of attack, yaw angles, and Mach numbers (subsonic to transonic speeds). The data from these tests will be used to develop a high fidelity simulation model for flight dynamics analysis and also serve as a reference for CFD comparisons. This paper provides an overview of the wind tunnel tests and examines the effects of Reynolds number, Mach number, pitch-pause versus continuous sweep data acquisition and compares the data from the two wind tunnels.

  6. Modeling the Launch Abort Vehicle's Subsonic Aerodynamics from Free Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    An investigation into the aerodynamics of the Launch Abort Vehicle for NASA's Constellation Crew Launch Vehicle in the subsonic, incompressible flow regime was conducted in the NASA Langley 20-ft Vertical Spin Tunnel. Time histories of center of mass position and Euler Angles are captured using photogrammetry. Time histories of the wind tunnel's airspeed and dynamic pressure are recorded as well. The primary objective of the investigation is to determine models for the aerodynamic yaw and pitch moments that provide insight into the static and dynamic stability of the vehicle. System IDentification Programs for AirCraft (SIDPAC) is used to determine the aerodynamic model structure and estimate model parameters. Aerodynamic models for the aerodynamic body Y and Z force coefficients, and the pitching and yawing moment coefficients were identified.

  7. Real-time aerodynamic heating and surface temperature calculations for hypersonic flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Robert D.; Gong, Leslie

    1990-01-01

    A real-time heating algorithm was derived and installed on the Ames Research Center Dryden Flight Research Facility real-time flight simulator. This program can calculate two- and three-dimensional stagnation point surface heating rates and surface temperatures. The two-dimensional calculations can be made with or without leading-edge sweep. In addition, upper and lower surface heating rates and surface temperatures for flat plates, wedges, and cones can be calculated. Laminar or turbulent heating can be calculated, with boundary-layer transition made a function of free-stream Reynolds number and free-stream Mach number. Real-time heating rates and surface temperatures calculated for a generic hypersonic vehicle are presented and compared with more exact values computed by a batch aeroheating program. As these comparisons show, the heating algorithm used on the flight simulator calculates surface heating rates and temperatures well within the accuracy required to evaluate flight profiles for acceptable heating trajectories.

  8. Ultra high bypass Nacelle aerodynamics inlet flow-through high angle of attack distortion test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Michael J.; Schweiger, Paul S.

    1992-01-01

    A flow-through inlet test program was conducted to evaluate inlet test methods and determine the impact of the fan on inlet separation when operating at large angles of attack. A total of 16 model configurations of approximately 1/6 scale were tested. A comparison of these flow-through results with powered data indicates the presence of the fan increased separation operation 3 degrees to 4 degrees over the flow through inlet. Rods and screens located at the fan face station, that redistribute the flow, achieved simulation of the powered-fan results for separation angle of attack. Concepts to reduce inlet distortion and increase angle of attack capability were also evaluated. Vortex generators located on the inlet surface increased inlet angle of attack capability up to 2 degrees and reduced inlet distortion in the separated region. Finally, a method of simulating the fan/inlet aerodynamic interaction using blockage sizing method has been defined. With this method, a static blockage device used with a flow-through model will approximate the same inlet onset of separation angle of attack and distortion pattern that would be obtained with an inlet model containing a powered fan.

  9. Predicted thermal response of a cryogenic fuel tank exposed to simulated aerodynamic heating profiles with different cryogens and fill levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, Gregory J.; Stephens, Craig A.

    1991-01-01

    A two dimensional finite difference thermal model was developed to predict the effects of heating profile, fill level, and cryogen type prior to experimental testing the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank (GRCT). These numerical predictions will assist in defining test scenarios, sensor locations, and venting requirements for the GRCT experimental tests. Boiloff rates, tank-wall and fluid temperatures, and wall heat fluxes were determined for 20 computational test cases. The test cases spanned three discrete fill levels and three heating profiles for hydrogen and nitrogen.

  10. Centaur Standard Shroud (CSS) Heated Altitude Jettison Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Altitude jettison tests, at a pressure of 20 torr (0.39 psia), were performed on the Centaur Standard Shroud (CSS) in a 100-foot diameter vacuum chamber. These jettison tests were part of a series of flight qualification tests which were performed on the new CSS system in preparation for the Helios and Viking missions. The first two tests subjected the CSS to a thermal cycle which simulated aerodynamic heating during ascent flight and the third test was performed at altitude pressure and in ambient temperature conditions. The purpose of the ambient temperature test was to provide base line data by which the separate machanical and thermal factors that influence jettison performance could be evaluated individually. The CSS was successfully jettisoned in each of the three tests. Also, thermal, stress, and structural deflection data were obtained which verified the analytical predictions of CSS response to flight environmental conditions and performance during jettison. In addition, much important information was obtained on critical CSS-to-payload clearance losses due to shell motions prior to and during jettison. The effectiveness of the separation system was successfully demonstrated at maximum flight temperatures.

  11. High Reynolds number and turbulence effects on aerodynamics and heat transfer in a turbine cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Frederick C.; Hippensteele, Steven A.; Vanfossen, G. James; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Ameri, Ali

    1993-01-01

    Experimental data on pressure distribution and heat transfer on a turbine airfoil were obtained over a range of Reynolds numbers from 0.75 to 7.5 x 10 exp 6 and a range of turbulence intensities from 1.8 to about 15 percent. The purpose of this study was to obtain fundamental heat transfer and pressure distribution data over a wide range of high Reynolds numbers and to extend the heat transfer data base to include the range of Reynolds numbers encountered in the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) turbopump turbines. Specifically, the study aimed to determine (1) the effect of Reynolds number on heat transfer, (2) the effect of upstream turbulence on heat transfer and pressure distribution, and (3) the relationship between heat transfer at high Reynolds numbers and the current data base. The results of this study indicated that Reynolds number and turbulence intensity have a large effect on both the transition from laminar to turbulent flow and the resulting heat transfer. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for all Reynolds numbers at the leading edge can be correlated with the Frossling number developed for lower Reynolds numbers. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for the airfoil surfaces downstream of the leading edge can be approximately correlated with a dimensionless parameter. Comparison of the experimental results were also made with a numerical solution from a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code.

  12. Acoustic and aerodynamic testing of a scale model variable pitch fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutras, R. R.; Kazin, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    A fully reversible pitch scale model fan with variable pitch rotor blades was tested to determine its aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics. The single-stage fan has a design tip speed of 1160 ft/sec (353.568 m/sec) at a bypass pressure ratio of 1.5. Three operating lines were investigated. Test results show that the blade pitch for minimum noise also resulted in the highest efficiency for all three operating lines at all thrust levels. The minimum perceived noise on a 200-ft (60.96 m) sideline was obtained with the nominal nozzle. At 44% of takeoff thrust, the PNL reduction between blade pitch and minimum noise blade pitch is 1.8 PNdB for the nominal nozzle and decreases with increasing thrust. The small nozzle (6% undersized) has the highest efficiency at all part thrust conditions for the minimum noise blade pitch setting; although, the noise is about 1.0 PNdB higher for the small nozzle at the minimum noise blade pitch position.

  13. Space Launch System Booster Separation Aerodynamic Testing in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Pinier, Jeremy T.; Chan, David T.; Crosby, William A.

    2016-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of a 0.009 scale model of the Space Launch System (SLS) was conducted in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel to characterize the aerodynamics of the core and solid rocket boosters (SRBs) during booster separation. High-pressure air was used to simulate plumes from the booster separation motors (BSMs) located on the nose and aft skirt of the SRBs. Force and moment data were acquired on the core and SRBs. These data were used to corroborate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations that were used in developing a booster separation database. The SRBs could be remotely positioned in the x-, y-, and z-direction relative to the core. Data were acquired continuously while the SRBs were moved in the axial direction. The primary parameters varied during the test were: core pitch angle; SRB pitch and yaw angles; SRB nose x-, y-, and z-position relative to the core; and BSM plenum pressure. The test was conducted at a free-stream Mach number of 4.25 and a unit Reynolds number of 1.5 million per foot.

  14. Aerodynamics and performance verifications of test methods for laboratory fume cupboards.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Li-Ching; Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Chang, Cheng-Ping

    2007-03-01

    The laser-light-sheet-assisted smoke flow visualization technique is performed on a full-size, transparent, commercial grade chemical fume cupboard to diagnose the flow characteristics and to verify the validity of several current containment test methods. The visualized flow patterns identify the recirculation areas that would inevitably exist in the conventional fume cupboards because of the fundamental configurations and structures. The large-scale vortex structures exist around the side walls, the doorsill of the cupboard and in the vicinity of the near-wake region of the manikin. The identified recirculation areas are taken as the 'dangerous' regions where the risk of turbulent dispersion of contaminants may be high. Several existing tracer gas containment test methods (BS 7258:1994, prEN 14175-3:2003 and ANSI/ASHRAE 110:1995) are conducted to verify the effectiveness of these methods in detecting the contaminant leakage. By comparing the results of the flow visualization and the tracer gas tests, it is found that the local recirculation regions are more prone to contaminant leakage because of the complex interaction between the shear layers and the smoke movement through the mechanism of turbulent dispersion. From the point of view of aerodynamics, the present study verifies that the methodology of the prEN 14175-3:2003 protocol can produce more reliable and consistent results because it is based on the region-by-region measurement and encompasses the most area of the entire recirculation zone of the cupboard. A modified test method combined with the region-by-region approach at the presence of the manikin shows substantially different results of the containment. A better performance test method which can describe an operator's exposure and the correlation between flow characteristics and the contaminant leakage properties is therefore suggested.

  15. Flight effects on the aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of inverted profile coannular nozzles, volume 3. [supersonic cruise aircraft research wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic data from tests of the 0.75 area ratio coannular nozzle with ejector and the 1.2 area ratio coannular are presented in tables. Aerodynamic data acquired for the four test configurations are included.

  16. Testing and analysis of immersed heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.; Bingham, C.E.

    1986-08-01

    The objectives were to determine the performance of four immersed, ''supply-side'' heat exchangers used in solar domestic-hot-water systems; to examine the effects of flow rate, temperature difference, and coil configuration on performance; and to develop a simple model to predict the performance of immersed heat exchangers. We tested four immersed heat exchangers: a smooth coil, a finned spiral, a single-wall bayonet, and a double-wall bayonet. We developed two analyticl models and a simple finite difference model. We experimentally verified that the performance of these heat exchangers depends on the flow rate through them; we also showed that the temperature difference between the heat exchanger's inlet and the storage tank can strongly affect a heat exchanger's performance. We also compared the effects of the heat exchanger's configuration and correlated Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers for each heat exchanger tested. The smooth coil had a higher effectiveness than the others, while the double-wall bayonet had a very low effectiveness. We still do not know the long-term effectiveness of heat exchangers regarding scale accumulation, nor do we know the effects of very low flow rates on a heat exchanger's performance.

  17. Lobed Mixer Design for Noise Suppression Acoustic and Aerodynamic Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Dalton, William N.; Boyd, Kathleen (Technical Monitor); Bridges, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive database for the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several model-scale lobe mixers of bypass ratio 5 to 6 has been created for mixed jet speeds up to 1080 ft/s at typical take-off (TO) conditions of small-to-medium turbofan engines. The flight effect was simulated for Mach numbers up to 0.3. The static thrust performance and plume data were also obtained at typical TO and cruise conditions. The tests were done at NASA Lewis anechoic dome and ASK's FluiDyne Laboratories. The effect of several lobe mixer and nozzle parameters, such as, lobe scalloping, lobe count, lobe penetration and nozzle length was examined in terms of flyover noise at constant altitude. Sound in the nozzle reference frame was analyzed to understand the source characteristics. Several new concepts, mechanisms and methods are reported for such lobed mixers, such as, "boomerang" scallops, "tongue" mixer, detection of "excess" internal noise sources, and extrapolation of flyover noise data from one flight speed to different flight speeds. Noise reduction of as much as 3 EPNdB was found with a deeply scalloped mixer compared to annular nozzle at net thrust levels of 9500 lb for a 29 in. diameter nozzle after optimizing the nozzle length.

  18. Aerothermal Ground Testing of Flexible Thermal Protection Systems for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Walter E., III; Mesick, Nathaniel J.; Ferlemann, Paul G.; Siemers, Paul M., III; DelCorso, Joseph A.; Hughes, Stephen J.; Tobin, Steven A.; Kardell, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    Flexible TPS development involves ground testing and analysis necessary to characterize performance of the FTPS candidates prior to flight testing. This paper provides an overview of the analysis and ground testing efforts performed over the last year at the NASA Langley Research Center and in the Boeing Large-Core Arc Tunnel (LCAT). In the LCAT test series, material layups were subjected to aerothermal loads commensurate with peak re-entry conditions enveloping a range of HIAD mission trajectories. The FTPS layups were tested over a heat flux range from 20 to 50 W/cm with associated surface pressures of 3 to 8 kPa. To support the testing effort a significant redesign of the existing shear (wedge) model holder from previous testing efforts was undertaken to develop a new test technique for supporting and evaluating the FTPS in the high-temperature, arc jet flow. Since the FTPS test samples typically experience a geometry change during testing, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models of the arc jet flow field and test model were developed to support the testing effort. The CFD results were used to help determine the test conditions experienced by the test samples as the surface geometry changes. This paper includes an overview of the Boeing LCAT facility, the general approach for testing FTPS, CFD analysis methodology and results, model holder design and test methodology, and selected thermal results of several FTPS layups.

  19. Aerodynamic heating on 3-D bodies including the effects of entropy-layer swallowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.; Hamilton, H. H.

    1974-01-01

    A relatively simple method was developed previously (authors, 1973) for calculating laminar, transitional, and turbulent heating rates on three-dimensional bodies in hypersonic flows. This method was shown to yield reasonably accurate results for laminar heating on blunted circular and elliptical cones and an earlier version of the space shuttle vehicle. As the boundary layer along the surface grows, more and more of the inviscid-flow mass is entrained into the boundary layer, and the streamlines which passed through the nearly normal portion of the bow shock wave are 'swallowed' by the boundary layer. This phenomenon is often referred to as entropy-layer or streamline swallowing, and it can have a significant effect on the calculated heating rates. An approximate, yet simple, method for including the effects of entropy-layer swallowing in the heating-rate calculations is given.

  20. Effects of friction and heat conduction on sound propagation in ducts. [analyzing complex aerodynamic noise problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huerre, P.; Karamcheti, K.

    1976-01-01

    The theory of sound propagation is examined in a viscous, heat-conducting fluid, initially at rest and in a uniform state, and contained in a rigid, impermeable duct with isothermal walls. Topics covered include: (1) theoretical formulation of the small amplitude fluctuating motions of a viscous, heat-conducting and compressible fluid; (2) sound propagation in a two dimensional duct; and (3) perturbation study of the inplane modes.

  1. Experimental Study of Vane Heat Transfer and Aerodynamics at Elevated Levels of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Forrest E.

    1994-01-01

    A four vane subsonic cascade was used to investigate how free stream turbulence influences pressure surface heat transfer. A simulated combustor turbulence generator was built to generate high level (13 percent) large scale (Lu approximately 44 percent inlet span) turbulence. The mock combustor was also moved upstream to generate a moderate level (8.3 percent) of turbulence for comparison to smaller scale grid generated turbulence (7.8 percent). The high level combustor turbulence caused an average pressure surface heat transfer augmentation of 56 percent above the low turbulence baseline. The smaller scale grid turbulence produced the next greatest effect on heat transfer and demonstrated the importance of scale on heat transfer augmentation. In general, the heat transfer scaling parameter U(sub infinity) TU(sub infinity) LU(sub infinity)(exp -1/3) was found to hold for the turbulence. Heat transfer augmentation was also found to scale approximately on Re(sub ex)(exp 1/3) at constant turbulence conditions. Some evidence of turbulence intensification in terms of elevated dissipation rates was found along the pressure surface outside the boundary layer. However, based on the level of dissipation and the resulting heat transfer augmentation, the amplification of turbulence has only a moderate effect on pressure surface heat transfer. The flow field turbulence does drive turbulent production within the boundary layer which in turn causes the high levels of heat transfer augmentation. Unlike heat transfer, the flow field straining was found to have a significant effect on turbulence isotropy. On examination of the one dimensional spectra for u' and v', the effect to isotropy was largely limited to lower wavenumber spectra. The higher wavenumber spectra showed little or no change. The high level large scale turbulence was found to have a strong influence on wake development. The free stream turbulence significantly enhanced mixing resulting in broader and shallower

  2. Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

    2007-04-30

    Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their effect on

  3. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan; Lee, Steve; He, Hung

    2008-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The emitted infrared (IR) heat flux from the lunar surface varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. Due to the extremely high incident IR flux, especially at low beta angles, a radiator is oftentimes unable to reject the vehicle heat load throughout the entire lunar orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when the radiator is unable to reject the required heat load. The stored energy is then removed from the PCM heat exchanger when the environment is more benign. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration Low Lunar Orbit missions. The Advanced Thermal Control project at JSC is completing a PCM heat exchanger life test to determine whether further technology development is warranted. The life test is being conducted on four nPentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed and reported in the current document.

  4. Generation of the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle Aerodynamic Data Book and Comparison To Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Steven X.; Krist, Steven E.; Compton, William B.

    2011-01-01

    A 3.5-year effort to characterize the aerodynamic behavior of the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle (AIX FTV) is described in this paper. The AIX FTV was designed to be representative of the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV). While there are several differences in the outer mold line from the current revision of the CLV, the overall length, mass distribution, and flight systems of the two vehicles are very similar. This paper briefly touches on each of the aerodynamic databases developed in the program, describing the methodology employed, experimental and computational contributions to the generation of the databases, and how well the databases and underlying computations compare to actual flight test results.

  5. Comparison of aerodynamic coefficients obtained from theoretical calculations wind tunnel tests and flight tests data reduction for the alpha jet aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guiot, R.; Wunnenberg, H.

    1980-01-01

    The methods by which aerodynamic coefficients are determined and discussed. These include: calculations, wind tunnel experiments and experiments in flight for various prototypes of the Alpha Jet. A comparison of obtained results shows good correlation between expectations and in-flight test results.

  6. Research on Streamlines and Aerodynamic Heating for Unstructured Grids on High-Speed Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeJarnette, Fred R.; Hamilton, H. Harris (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Engineering codes are needed which can calculate convective heating rates accurately and expeditiously on the surfaces of high-speed vehicles. One code which has proven to meet these needs is the Langley Approximate Three-Dimensional Convective Heating (LATCH) code. It uses the axisymmetric analogue in an integral boundary-layer method to calculate laminar and turbulent heating rates along inviscid surface streamlines. It requires the solution of the inviscid flow field to provide the surface properties needed to calculate the streamlines and streamline metrics. The LATCH code has been used with inviscid codes which calculated the flow field on structured grids, Several more recent inviscid codes calculate flow field properties on unstructured grids. The present research develops a method to calculate inviscid surface streamlines, the streamline metrics, and heating rates using the properties calculated from inviscid flow fields on unstructured grids. Mr. Chris Riley, prior to his departure from NASA LaRC, developed a preliminary code in the C language, called "UNLATCH", to accomplish these goals. No publication was made on his research. The present research extends and improves on the code developed by Riley. Particular attention is devoted to the stagnation region, and the method is intended for programming in the FORTRAN 90 language.

  7. Development of a superconductor magnetic suspension and balance prototype facility for studying the feasibility of applying this technique to large scale aerodynamic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, R. N.; Humphris, R. R.; Henderson, K. C.

    1975-01-01

    The basic research and development work towards proving the feasibility of operating an all-superconductor magnetic suspension and balance device for aerodynamic testing is presented. The feasibility of applying a quasi-six-degree-of freedom free support technique to dynamic stability research was studied along with the design concepts and parameters for applying magnetic suspension techniques to large-scale aerodynamic facilities. A prototype aerodynamic test facility was implemented. Relevant aspects of the development of the prototype facility are described in three sections: (1) design characteristics; (2) operational characteristics; and (3) scaling to larger facilities.

  8. External aerodynamics of heavy ground vehicles: Computations and wind tunnel testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayraktar, Ilhan

    Aerodynamic characteristics of a ground vehicle affect vehicle operation in many ways. Aerodynamic drag, lift and side forces have influence on fuel efficiency, vehicle top speed and acceleration performance. In addition, engine cooling, air conditioning, wind noise, visibility, stability and crosswind sensitivity are some other tasks for vehicle aerodynamics. All of these areas benefit from drag reduction and changing the lift force in favor of the operating conditions. This can be achieved by optimization of external body geometry and flow modification devices. Considering the latter, a thorough understanding of the airflow is a prerequisite. The present study aims to simulate the external flow field around a ground vehicle using a computational method. The model and the method are selected to be three dimensional and time-dependent. The Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes equations are solved using a finite volume method. The Renormalization Group (RNG) k-epsilon model was elected for closure of the turbulent quantities. Initially, the aerodynamics of a generic bluff body is studied computationally and experimentally to demonstrate a number of relevant issues including the validation of the computational method. Experimental study was conducted at the Langley Full Scale Wind Tunnel using pressure probes and force measurement equipment. Experiments and computations are conducted on several geometric configurations. Results are compared in an attempt to validate the computational model for ground vehicle aerodynamics. Then, the external aerodynamics of a heavy truck is simulated using the validated computational fluid dynamics method, and the external flow is presented using computer visualization. Finally, to help the estimation of the error due to two commonly practiced engineering simplifications, a parametric study on the tires and the moving ground effect are conducted on full-scale tractor-trailer configuration. Force and pressure coefficients and velocity

  9. Unsteady Aerodynamic Testing Using the Dynamic Plunge Pitch and Roll Model Mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutze, Frederick H.; Fan, Yigang

    1999-01-01

    A final report on the DyPPiR tests that were run are presented. Essentially it consists of two parts, a description of the data reduction techniques and the results. The data reduction techniques include three methods that were considered: 1) signal processing of wind on - wind off data; 2) using wind on data in conjunction with accelerometer measurements; and 3) using a dynamic model of the sting to predict the sting oscillations and determining the aerodynamic inputs using an optimization process. After trying all three, we ended up using method 1, mainly because of its simplicity and our confidence in its accuracy. The results section consists of time history plots of the input variables (angle of attack, roll angle, and/or plunge position) and the corresponding time histories of the output variables, C(sub L), C(sub D), C(sub m), C(sub l), C(sub m), C(sub n). Also included are some phase plots of one or more of the output variable vs. an input variable. Typically of interest are pitch moment coefficient vs. angle of attack for an oscillatory motion where the hysteresis loops can be observed. These plots are useful to determine the "more interesting" cases. Samples of the data as it appears on the disk are presented at the end of the report. The last maneuver, a rolling pull up, is indicative of the unique capabilities of the DyPPiR, allowing combinations of motions to be exercised at the same time.

  10. Aerodynamic heating on AFE due to nonequilibrium flow with variable entropy at boundary layer edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, P. C.; Rochelle, W. C.; Bouslog, S. A.; Tam, L. T.; Scott, C. D.; Curry, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A method of predicting the aerobrake aerothermodynamic environment on the NASA Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle is described. Results of a three dimensional inviscid nonequilibrium solution are used as input to an axisymmetric nonequilibrium boundary layer program to predict AFE convective heating rates. Inviscid flow field properties are obtained from the Euler option of the Viscous Reacting Flow (VRFLO) code at the boundary layer edge. Heating rates on the AFE surface are generated with the Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure (BLIMP) code for a partially catalytic surface composed of Reusable Surface Insulation (RSI) times. The 1864 kg AFE will fly an aerobraking trajectory, simulating return from geosynchronous Earth orbit, with a 75 km perigee and a 10 km/sec entry velocity. Results of this analysis will provide principal investigators and thermal analysts with aeroheating environments to perform experiment and thermal protection system design.

  11. Solar Heating Systems: Progress Checks & Tests Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Joanne; And Others

    This manual contains Progress Checks and Tests for use in a Solar Heating Systems curriculum (see note). It contains master copies of all Progress Checks and Unit Tests accompanying the curriculum, organized by unit. (The master copies are to be duplicated by each school so that adequate copies are available for student use in a self-paced student…

  12. Solar-heating system performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Report contains results of performance tests on complete system for solar space and hot-water heating system that uses commercially available components. Results were used to determine system suitability for field installation and to generate performance data base for comparison with future tests on field installed systems.

  13. Aerodynamic drag reduction tests on a full-scale tractor-trailer combination with several add-on devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, L. C.; Steers, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Aerodynamic drag tests were performed on a conventional cab-over-engine tractor with a 45-foot trailer and five commercially available or potentially available add-on devices using the coast-down method. The tests ranged in velocity from approximately 30 miles per hour to 65 miles per hour and included some flow visualization. A smooth, level runway at Edwards Air Force Base was used for the tests, and deceleration measurements were taken with both accelerometers and stopwatches. An evaluation of the drag reduction results obtained with each of the five add-on devices is presented.

  14. The Design of Cruciform Test Specimens for Planar Biaxial Testing of Fabrics for Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, Cole K.

    2012-01-01

    A preliminary analytical study was conducted to investigate the effects of cruciform test specimen geometries on strain distribution uniformity in the central gage section under biaxial loads. Three distinct specimen geometries were considered while varying the applied displacements in the two orthogonal directions. Two sets of woven fabric material properties found in literature were used to quantify the influence of specimen geometries on the resulting strain distributions. The uniformity of the strain distribution is quantified by taking the ratio between the two orthogonal strain components and characterizing its gradient across the central area of the gage section. The analysis results show that increasing the specimen s length relative to its width promotes a more uniform strain distribution in the central section of the cruciform test specimen under equibiaxial enforced tensile displacements. However, for the two sets of material properties used in this study, this trend did not necessary hold, when the enforced tensile displacements in the two orthogonal directions were not equal. Therefore, based on the current study, a tail length that is 1.5 times that of the tail width is recommended to be the baseline/initial specimen design.

  15. Phase change paint tests to investigate effects of TPS tiles on heating rates of the Rockwell space shuttle orbiter (test OH4C, model 21-0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quan, M.

    1975-01-01

    Information and data from wind tunnel tests conducted on 0.0175-scale models of the space shuttle orbiter are presented. The primary objective of the tests was to evaluate aerodynamic heating effects of the tiles in the thermal protection system (TPS). Tile gap depth and flow orientation effects on the TPS were investigated. Tile patterns were cut into the undersides of the orbiter models to simulate the gaps. One model was left smooth for comparison.

  16. Aerodynamic Mixing Downstream from Line Source of Heat in High-intensity Sound Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickelson, William R; Baldwin, Lionel V

    1956-01-01

    Theory and measurement showed that the heat wake downstream from a line source is displaced by a transverse standing sound wave in a manner similar to a flag waving in a harmonic mode. With a 147 db, 104 cps standing wave, time-mean temperatures were reduced by an order of magnitude except near the displacement-pattern nodal points. The theory showed that a 161 db, 520 cps standing wave considerably increased the mixing in both the time-mean and instantaneous senses.

  17. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and full nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system (Bragg-Sitton, 2005). The current paper applies the same testing methodology to a direct drive gas cooled reactor system, demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. In each testing application, core power transients were controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. Although both system designs utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility.

  18. Compendium of NASA Langley reports on hypersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabo, Frances E.; Cary, Aubrey M.; Lawson, Shirley W.

    1987-01-01

    Reference is made to papers published by the Langley Research Center in various areas of hypersonic aerodynamics for the period 1950 to 1986. The research work was performed either in-house by the Center staff or by other personnel supported entirely or in part by grants or contracts. Abstracts have been included with the references when available. The references are listed chronologically and are grouped under the following general headings: (1) Aerodynamic Measurements - Single Shapes; (2) Aerodynamic Measurements - Configurations; (3) Aero-Heating; (4) Configuration Studies; (5) Propulsion Integration Experiment; (6) Propulsion Integration - Study; (7) Analysis Methods; (8) Test Techniques; and (9) Airframe Active Cooling Systems.

  19. Measured and predicted aerodynamic heating on a cylinder in wake of AFE configuration at incidence. [Aeroassist Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Thin-film resistance gages were used to measure cylinder surface heat-transfer rates in the near wake of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment vehicle configuration, while surface-streamline directions were ascertained by the oil-flow techniques under the same configuration and test conditions. Both heat transfer distributions and flow over the entire cylinder surface were influenced by impingement of that portion of the free shear layer originating at the forebody shoulder in the upper symmetry plane. Heating rate distributions predicted with a Navier-Stokes solver computer code were in general agreement with measurements.

  20. Heat pipe radiators for space. [vacuum tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    An optimized flight-weight prototype fluid-header panel (heatpipe radiator system) was tested in a vacuum environment over a wide range of coolant inlet temperatures, coolant flow rates, and environmental absorbed heat fluxes. The maximum performance of the system was determined. Results are compared with earlier data obtained on a smaller fluid-header feasibility panel, and computer predictions. Freeze-thaw tests are described and the change in thaw recovery time due to the addition of a low-freezing point feeder heat pipe is evaluated. Experimental panel fin-temperature distributions are compared with calculated results.

  1. The effects of inlet turbulence and rotor/stator interactions on the aerodynamics and heat transfer of a large-scale rotating turbine model, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dring, R. P.; Blair, M. F.; Joslyn, H. D.; Power, G. D.; Verdon, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program was conducted to examine the effects of inlet turbulence on airfoil heat transfer. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using low conductivity airfoils with miniature thermocouples welded to a thin, electrically heated surface skin. Heat transfer data were acquired for various combinations of low or high inlet turbulence intensity, flow coefficient (incidence), first-stator/rotor axial spacing, Reynolds number, and relative circumferential position of the first and second stators. Aerodynamic measurements include distributions of the mean and fluctuating velocities at the turbine inlet and, for each airfoil row, midspan airfoil surface pressures and circumferential distributions of the downstream steady state pressures and fluctuating velocities. Analytical results include airfoil heat transfer predictions and a examination of solutions of the unstead boundary layer equipment.

  2. Aerodynamic Parameters of High Performance Aircraft Estimated from Wind Tunnel and Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Murphy, Patrick C.

    1998-01-01

    A concept of system identification applied to high performance aircraft is introduced followed by a discussion on the identification methodology. Special emphasis is given to model postulation using time invariant and time dependent aerodynamic parameters, model structure determination and parameter estimation using ordinary least squares an mixed estimation methods, At the same time problems of data collinearity detection and its assessment are discussed. These parts of methodology are demonstrated in examples using flight data of the X-29A and X-31A aircraft. In the third example wind tunnel oscillatory data of the F-16XL model are used. A strong dependence of these data on frequency led to the development of models with unsteady aerodynamic terms in the form of indicial functions. The paper is completed by concluding remarks.

  3. Aerodynamic Parameters of High Performance Aircraft Estimated from Wind Tunnel and Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Murphy, Patrick C.

    1999-01-01

    A concept of system identification applied to high performance aircraft is introduced followed by a discussion on the identification methodology. Special emphasis is given to model postulation using time invariant and time dependent aerodynamic parameters, model structure determination and parameter estimation using ordinary least squares and mixed estimation methods. At the same time problems of data collinearity detection and its assessment are discussed. These parts of methodology are demonstrated in examples using flight data of the X-29A and X-31A aircraft. In the third example wind tunnel oscillatory data of the F-16XL model are used. A strong dependence of these data on frequency led to the development of models with unsteady aerodynamic terms in the form of indicial functions. The paper is completed by concluding remarks.

  4. Short Duration Base Heating Test Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Robert L.; Dagostino, Mark G.; Engel, Bradley A.; Engel, Carl D.

    1999-01-01

    Significant improvements have been made to a short duration space launch vehicle base heating test technique. This technique was first developed during the 1960's to investigate launch vehicle plume induced convective environments. Recent improvements include the use of coiled nitrogen buffer gas lines upstream of the hydrogen / oxygen propellant charge tubes, fast acting solenoid valves, stand alone gas delivery and data acquisition systems, and an integrated model design code. Technique improvements were successfully demonstrated during a 2.25% scale X-33 base heating test conducted in the NASA/MSFC Nozzle Test Facility in early 1999. Cost savings of approximately an order of magnitude over previous tests were realized due in large part to these improvements.

  5. Gamma-effects on 2-dimensional transonic aerodynamics. [specific heat ratio due to shock induced separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuzla, K.; Russell, D. A.; Wai, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Nonlifting 10% biconvex airfoils are mounted in a 30 x 40 cm Ludwieg-tube-driven transonic test-section and the flow field recorded with a holographic interferometer. Nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide are used as the principal test gases. Experiments are conducted with Reynolds number based on chord of (0.5-3.5) x 10 to the 6th with Mach numbers of 0.70, 0.75, and 0.80. Supporting calculations use inviscid transonic small-disturbance and full-potential computer codes coupled with simple integral boundary-layer modeling. Systematic studies show that significant gamma-effects can occur due to shock-induced separation.

  6. The effects of inlet turbulence and rotor/stator interactions on the aerodynamics and heat transfer of a large-scale rotating turbine model. Part 4: Aerodynamic data tabulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dring, R. P.; Joslyn, H. D.; Blair, M. F.

    1987-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program was conducted to examine the effects of inlet turbulence and airfoil heat transfer. The experimental portion of the study was conducted in a large-scale (approx. 5X engine), ambient temperature, rotating turbine model configured in both single-stage and stage-and-a-half arrangements. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using low-conductivity airfoils with miniature thermocouples welded to a thin, electrically heated surface skin. Heat transfer data were acquired for various combinations of low or high inlet turbulence intensity, flow coefficient, first stator-rotor axial spacing, Reynolds number and relative circumferential position of the first and second stators. Aerodynamic measurements obtained include distributions of the mean and fluctuating velocities at the turbine inlet and, for each airfoil row, midspan airfoil surface pressures and circumferential distributions of the downstream steady state pressures and fluctuating velocities. Results include airfoil heat transfer predictions produced using existing 2-D boundary layer computation schemes and an examination of solutions of the unsteady boundary layer equations.

  7. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe (HP) cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system. Reactivity feedback calculations were then based on a bulk reactivity feedback coefficient and measured average core temperature. This paper presents preliminary results from similar dynamic testing of a direct drive gas cooled reactor system (DDG), demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. Although the HP and DDG designs both utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility. Planned system upgrades to allow implementation of higher fidelity dynamic testing are also discussed. Proposed DDG

  8. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The IR environment of the space craft varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. The result is a situation where a radiator sized for the maximal heat load in the most adverse situation is subject to freezing on the dark side of the orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when there is too much being produced by the space craft to reject to space, and then feeding that energy back into the thermal loop when conditions are more favorable. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration LLO missions. In order to validate the performance of PCM Heat Exchangers, a life test is being conducted on four n-Pentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed.

  9. Pratt & Whitney Two Dimensional HSR Nozzle Test in the NASA Lewis 9- By 15- Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel: Aerodynamic Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolter, John D.; Jones, Christopher W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a test that was conducted jointly by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Engines and NASA Lewis Research Center. The test was conducted in NASA's 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9x15 LSWT). The test setup, methods, and aerodynamic results of this test are discussed. Acoustical results are discussed in a separate paper by J. Bridges and J. Marino.

  10. Operational considerations for aerodynamic testing of large-scale wing sections in a simulated natural rain environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Bezos, Gaudy M.; Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.; Melson, W. Edward, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    One of the necessary areas of consideration for outdoor heavy rain testing is the effect of wind on both the simulated rain field and the quality and repeatability of the aerodynamic data. This paper discusses the data acquisition and subsequent reduction to nondimensional coefficients of lift and drag, with the appropriate correction for wind and rain field. Sample force data showing these effects are presented, along with estimates for accuracy and repeatability. The capability to produce high-quality data for rain drop size distribution using photographic and computerized image processing techniques was developed. Sample photographs depicting rain drop size are shown.

  11. A flight-test methodology for identification of an aerodynamic model for a V/STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, Ralph E., Jr.; Mcnally, B. David

    1988-01-01

    Described is a flight test methodology for developing a data base to be used to identify an aerodynamic model of a vertical and short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) fighter aircraft. The aircraft serves as a test bed at Ames for ongoing research in advanced V/STOL control and display concepts. The flight envelope to be modeled includes hover, transition to conventional flight, and back to hover, STOL operation, and normaL cruise. Although the aerodynamic model is highly nonlinear, it has been formulated to be linear in the parameters to be identified. Motivation for the flight test methodology advocated in this paper is based on the choice of a linear least-squares method for model identification. The paper covers elements of the methodology from maneuver design to the completed data base. Major emphasis is placed on the use of state estimation with tracking data to ensure consistency among maneuver variables prior to their entry into the data base. The design and processing of a typical maneuver is illustrated.

  12. A Method for Obtaining the Nonlinear Aerodynamic Stability Characteristics of Bodies of Revolution from Free-Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Donn B.

    1961-01-01

    A method is presented for obtaining the nonlinear aerodynamic stability characteristics of bodies of revolution from free-flight test.s The necessary conditions for the application of this method are: (1) that the roll rate and damping encountered in a single cycle of oscillation be small, and (2) that the resulting motion be reasonably planar. Four approximations to the nonlinear restoring moment are considered and solutions are obtained in closed form: 1. A single-term polynomial in an arbitrary power of the angle of attack. 2. A two-term polynomial having linear and cubic terms. 3. A three-term polynomial having linear, quadratic, and cubic terms. 4. A three-term polynomial having linear, quadratic, and cubic terms. An iteration procedure is formulated to allow the use of each of these approximations for obtaining the aerodynamic coefficients of bodies of revolution from free-flight test data. It is found that although the equations that are solved pertain strictly to planar motion, the solutions are applicable to motions that deviate to a fairly large degree from planar motion.

  13. Lateral and longitudinal aerodynamic stability and control parameters of the basic vortex flap research aircraft as determined from flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suit, W. T.; Batterson, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    The aerodynamics of the basic F-106B were determined at selected points in the flight envelope. The test aircraft and flight procedures were presented. Aircraft instrumentation and the data system were discussed. The parameter extraction procedure was presented along with a discussion of the test flight results. The results were used to predict the aircraft motions for maneuvers that were not used to determine the vehicle aerodynamics. The control inputs used to maneuver the aircraft to get data for the determination of the aerodynamic parameters were discussed in the flight test procedures. The results from the current flight tests were compared with the results from wind tunnel test of the basic F-106B.

  14. Aerodynamic potpourri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic developments for vertical axis and horizontal axis wind turbines are given that relate to the performance and aerodynamic loading of these machines. Included are: (1) a fixed wake aerodynamic model of the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine; (2) experimental results that suggest the existence of a laminar flow Darrieus vertical axis turbine; (3) a simple aerodynamic model for the turbulent windmill/vortex ring state of horizontal axis rotors; and (4) a yawing moment of a rigid hub horizontal axis wind turbine that is related to blade coning.

  15. Aerodynamic potpourri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1981-05-01

    Aerodynamic developments for vertical axis and horizontal axis wind turbines are given that relate to the performance and aerodynamic loading of these machines. Included are: (1) a fixed wake aerodynamic model of the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine; (2) experimental results that suggest the existence of a laminar flow Darrieus vertical axis turbine; (3) a simple aerodynamic model for the turbulent windmill/vortex ring state of horizontal axis rotors; and (4) a yawing moment of a rigid hub horizontal axis wind turbine that is related to blade coning.

  16. Experimental aerodynamic and acoustic model testing of the Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) testbed coannular exhaust nozzle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.; Morris, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance and jet noise characteristics of a one sixth scale model of the variable cycle engine testbed exhaust system were obtained in a series of static tests over a range of simulated engine operating conditions. Model acoustic data were acquired. Data were compared to predictions of coannular model nozzle performance. The model, tested with an without a hardwall ejector, had a total flow area equivalent to a 0.127 meter (5 inch) diameter conical nozzle with a 0.65 fan to primary nozzle area ratio and a 0.82 fan nozzle radius ratio. Fan stream temperatures and velocities were varied from 422 K to 1089 K (760 R to 1960 R) and 434 to 755 meters per second (1423 to 2477 feet per second). Primary stream properties were varied from 589 to 1089 K (1060 R to 1960 R) and 353 to 600 meters per second (1158 to 1968 feet per second). Exhaust plume velocity surveys were conducted at one operating condition with and without the ejector installed. Thirty aerodynamic performance data points were obtained with an unheated air supply. Fan nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.8 to 3.2 at a constant primary pressure ratio of 1.6; primary pressure ratio was varied from 1.4 to 2.4 while holding fan pressure ratio constant at 2.4. Operation with the ejector increased nozzle thrust coefficient 0.2 to 0.4 percent.

  17. Repeatability of a running heat tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Mee, Jessica A; Doust, Jo; Maxwell, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    At present there is no standardised heat tolerance test (HTT) procedure adopting a running mode of exercise. Current HTTs may misdiagnose a runner's susceptibility to a hyperthermic state due to differences in exercise intensity. The current study aimed to establish the repeatability of a practical running test to evaluate individual's ability to tolerate exercise heat stress. Sixteen (8M, 8F) participants performed the running HTT (RHTT) (30 min, 9 km h(-1), 2% elevation) on two separate occasions in a hot environment (40 °C and 40% relative humidity). There were no differences in peak rectal temperature (RHTT1: 38.82 ± 0.47 °C, RHTT2: 38.86 ± 0.49 °C, Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.93, typical error of measure (TEM) = 0.13 °C), peak skin temperature (RHTT1: 38.12 ± 0.45, RHTT2: 38.11 ± 0.45 °C, ICC = 0.79, TEM = 0.30 °C), peak heart rate (RHTT1: 182 ± 15 beats min(-1), RHTT2: 183 ± 15 beats min(-1), ICC = 0.99, TEM = 2 beats min(-1)), nor sweat rate (1721 ± 675 g h(-1), 1716 ± 745 g h(-1), ICC = 0.95, TEM = 162 g h(-1)) between RHTT1 and RHTT2 (p>0.05). Results demonstrate good agreement, strong correlations and small differences between repeated trials, and the TEM values suggest low within-participant variability. The RHTT was effective in differentiating between individuals physiological responses; supporting a heat tolerance continuum. The findings suggest the RHTT is a repeatable measure of physiological strain in the heat and may be used to assess the effectiveness of acute and chronic heat alleviating procedures. PMID:25774031

  18. Overview of Low-Speed Aerodynamic Tests on a 5.75% Scale Blended-Wing-Body Twin Jet Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D.; Dickey, Eric; Princen, Norman; Beyar, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project sponsored a series of computational and experimental investigations of the propulsion and airframe integration issues associated with Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) or Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) configurations. NASA collaborated with Boeing Research and Technology (BR&T) to conduct this research on a new twin-engine Boeing BWB transport configuration. The experimental investigations involved a series of wind tunnel tests with a 5.75-percent scale model conducted in two low-speed wind tunnels. This testing focused on the basic aerodynamics of the configuration and selection of the leading edge Krueger slat position for takeoff and landing. This paper reviews the results and analysis of these low-speed wind tunnel tests.

  19. Model aerodynamic test results for a refined actuated inlet ejector nozzle at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Wind tunnel model tests were conducted to demonstrate the aerodynamic performance improvements of a refined actuated inlet ejector nozzle. Models of approximately one-tenth scale were configured to simulate nozzle operation at takeoff, subsonic cruise, transonic cruise and supersonic cruise. Variations of model components provided a performance evaluation of ejector inlet and exit area, forebody boattail angle and ejector inlet operation in the open and closed mode. Approximately 700 data points were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, 1.2, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle flow conditions. Results show that relative to two ejector nozzles previously tested performance was improved significantly at takeoff and subsonic cruise performance, a C sub f of 0.982, was attained equal to the high performance of the previous tests. The established advanced supersonic transport propulsion study performance goals were met or closely approached at takeoff and supersonic cruise.

  20. Aerodynamic Heating and Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, Wilhelmina D.

    1959-01-01

    A review of the physical condition's under which future airplanes will operate has been made and the necessity for considering fatigue in the design has been established. A survey of the literature shows what phases of elevated-temperature fatigue have been investigated. Other studies that would yield data of particular interest to the designer of aircraft structures are indicated.

  1. Flight Test Determined Aerodynamics Force and Moment Characteristics of the X-43A Research Vehicle at Mach 7.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Mark C.; White, J. Terry

    2006-01-01

    The second flight of the HYPER-X Program afforded a unique opportunity to determine the aerodynamic force and moment characteristics of an airframe integrated scramjet powered aircraft in hypersonic flight. These data were gathered via a repeated series of pitch, yaw, and roll doublets, frequency sweeps, and pull-up/push-over maneuvers performed throughout the X-43A cowl-closed descent phase. The subject flight research maneuvers were conducted in a Mach number range of 6.8 to 0.95 at altitudes from 92,000 ft to sea level. In this flight regime, the dynamic pressure varied from 1300 psf to 400 psf with angle-of-attack ranging from 0 deg to 14 deg. The flight-extracted aerodynamics were compared with pre-flight predictions based on wind tunnel test data. The X-43A flight-derived axial force was found to be 10 to 15 percent higher than prediction. Under-predictions of similar magnitude were observed for the normal force. For Mach numbers greater than 4, the X-43A flight-derived stability and control characteristics resulted in larger than predicted static margins, with the largest discrepancy approximately 5-inches forward along the X(CG) at Mach 6. This would result in less static margin in pitch. The X-43A predicted lateral-directional stability and control characteristics matched well with flight data when allowance was made for the high uncertainty in angle-of-sideslip.

  2. X-43A Flight-Test-Determined Aerodynamic Force and Moment Characteristics at Mach 7.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Mark C.; White, J. Terry

    2008-01-01

    The second flight of the Hyper-X program afforded a unique opportunity to determine the aerodynamic force and moment characteristics of an airframe-integrated scramjet-powered aircraft in hypersonic flight. These data were gathered via a repeated series of pitch, yaw, and roll doublets, frequency sweeps, and pushover-pullup maneuvers performed throughout the X-43A cowl-closed descent. Maneuvers were conducted at Mach numbers of 6.80-0.95 and at altitudes from 92,000 ft mean sea level to sea level. The dynamic pressure varied from 1300 to 400 psf with the angle of attack ranging from 0 to 14 deg. The flight-extracted aerodynamics were compared with preflight predictions based on wind-tunnel test data. The X-43A flight-derived axial force was found to be 10-15%higher than prediction. Underpredictions of similar magnitude were observed for the normal force. For Mach numbers above 4.0, the flight-derived stability and control characteristics resulted in larger-than-predicted static margins, with the largest discrepancy approximately 5 in. forward along the x-axis center of gravity at Mach 6.0. This condition would result in less static margin in pitch. The predicted lateral-directional stability and control characteristics matched well with flight data when allowance was made for the high uncertainty in angle of sideslip.

  3. Flight-Test-Determined Aerodynamic Force and Moment Characteristics of the X-43A at Mach 7.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis. Marl C.; White, J. Terry

    2006-01-01

    The second flight of the Hyper-X program afforded a unique opportunity to determine the aerodynamic force and moment characteristics of an airframe-integrated scramjet-powered aircraft in hypersonic flight. These data were gathered via a repeated series of pitch, yaw, and roll doublets; frequency sweeps; and pushover-pullup maneuvers performed throughout the X-43A cowl-closed descent. Maneuvers were conducted at Mach numbers of 6.80 to 0.95 and altitudes from 92,000 ft msl to sea level. The dynamic pressure varied from 1300 psf to 400 psf with the angle of attack ranging from 0 deg to 14 deg. The flight-extracted aerodynamics were compared with preflight predictions based on wind-tunnel-test data. The X-43A flight-derived axial force was found to be 10 percent to 15 percent higher than prediction. Under-predictions of similar magnitude were observed for the normal force. For Mach numbers above 4.0, the flight-derived stability and control characteristics resulted in larger-than-predicted static margins, with the largest discrepancy approximately 5 in. forward along the x-axis center of gravity at Mach 6.0. This condition would result in less static margin in pitch. The predicted lateral-directional stability and control characteristics matched well with flight data when allowance was made for the high uncertainty in angle of sideslip.

  4. Aerodynamic Tests of a Full-scale TBF-1 Aileron Installation in the Langley 16-foot High-Speed Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, John V; Korycinski, Peter F

    1944-01-01

    The failure of wing panels on a number of TBF-1 and TBM-1 airplanes in flight has prompted several investigations of the possible causes of failure. This report describes tests in the Langley 16-foot high-speed tunnel to determine whether these failures could be attributed to changes in the aerodynamic characteristics of the ailerons at high speeds. The tests were made of a 12-foot-span section including the tip and aileron of the right wing of a TBF-1 airplane. Hinge moments, control-link stresses due to aerodynamic buffeting, and fabric-deflection photographs were obtained at true airspeeds ranging from 110 to 365 miles per hour. The aileron hinge-moment coefficients were found to vary only slightly with airspeed in spite of the large fabric deflections that developed as the speed was increased. An analysis of these results indicated that the resultant hinge moment of the ailerons as installed in the airplane would tend to restore the ailerons to their neutral position for all the high-speed flight conditions covered in the tests. Serious aerodynamic buffeting occurred at up aileron angles of -10 degrees or greater because of stalling of the sharp projecting lip of the Frise aileron. The peak stresses set up in the aileron control linkages in the buffeting condition were as high as three times the mean stress. During the hinge-moment investigation, flutter of the test installation occurred at airspeeds of about 150 miles per hour. This flutter condition was investigated in some detail and slow-motion pictures were made of the motion of the wing tip and aileron. The flutter was found to involve simultaneous normal bending and chordwise oscillation of the wing and flapping of the aileron. The aileron motion appeared to be coupled with this flutter condition and was investigated in some detail and slow-motion pictures were made of the motion of the wing tip and aileron. The flutter was found to involve simultaneous normal bending and chordwise oscillation of the

  5. Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: October 31, 2002--January 31, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, M. S.; McGranahan, B. D.

    2004-10-01

    Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbinesrepresents the fourth installment in a series of volumes documenting the ongoing work of th University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Low-Speed Airfoil Tests Program. This particular volume deals with airfoils that are candidates for use on small wind turbines, which operate at low Reynolds numbers.

  6. Tests confirm gas heat as monoxide source

    SciTech Connect

    Besch, E.

    1984-03-01

    Six tests were conducted to demonstrate the potential for natural gas or oil-fired forced warm air heating equipment to produce carbon monoxide emission when the combustion process is impeded by typical causes found in households. In the case of the gas-fired units, impeded combustion produced a smell of aldehyde and various levels of carbon monoxide emission; all within the level dangerous to health. It was concluded that oil-fired warm air systems do not pose a carbon monoxide danger but that natural gas warm air systems do pose a real danger and should be so identified.

  7. Heat Pipes and Heat Rejection Component Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanzi, James L.; Jaworske, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium-water heat pipes are being evaluated for use in the heat rejection system for space fission power systems. The heat rejection syst em currently comprises heat pipes with a graphite saddle and a composite fin. The heat input is a pumped water loop from the cooling of the power conversion system. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been life testing titanium-water heat pipes as well as eval uating several heat pipe radiator designs. The testing includes thermal modeling and verification of model, material compatibility, frozen startup of heat pipe radiators, and simulating low-gravity environments. Future thermal testing of titanium-water heat pipes includes low-g ravity testing of thermosyphons, radiation testing of heat pipes and fin materials, water pump performance testing, as well as Small Busine ss Innovation Research funded deliverable prototype radiator panels.

  8. Development of base pressure similarity parameters for application to space shuttle launch vehicle power-on aerodynamic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulyma, P. R.; Penny, M. M.

    1978-01-01

    A base pressure data correlation study was conducted to define exhaust plume similarity parameters for use in Space Shuttle power-on launch vehicle aerodynamic test programs. Data correlations were performed for single bodies having, respectively, single and triple nozzle configurations and for a triple body configuration with single nozzles on each of the outside bodies. Base pressure similarity parameters were found to differ for the single nozzle and triple nozzle configurations. However, the correlation parameter for each was found to be a strong function of the nozzle exit momentum. Results of the data base evaluation are presented indicating an assessment of all data points. Analytical/experimental data comparisons were made for nozzle calibrations and correction factors derived, where indicated for use in nozzle exit plane data calculations.

  9. Analysis of the Effects of Vitiates on Surface Heat Flux in Ground Tests of Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuda, Vincent; Gaffney, Richard L

    2008-01-01

    To achieve the high enthalpy conditions associated with hypersonic flight, many ground test facilities burn fuel in the air upstream of the test chamber. Unfortunately, the products of combustion contaminate the test gas and alter gas properties and the heat fluxes associated with aerodynamic heating. The difference in the heating rates between clean air and a vitiated test medium needs to be understood so that the thermal management system for hypersonic vehicles can be properly designed. This is particularly important for advanced hypersonic vehicle concepts powered by air-breathing propulsion systems that couple cooling requirements, fuel flow rates, and combustor performance by flowing fuel through sub-surface cooling passages to cool engine components and preheat the fuel prior to combustion. An analytical investigation was performed comparing clean air to a gas vitiated with methane/oxygen combustion products to determine if variations in gas properties contributed to changes in predicted heat flux. This investigation started with simple relationships, evolved into writing an engineering-level code, and ended with running a series of CFD cases. It was noted that it is not possible to simultaneously match all of the gas properties between clean and vitiated test gases. A study was then conducted selecting various combinations of freestream properties for a vitiated test gas that matched clean air values to determine which combination of parameters affected the computed heat transfer the least. The best combination of properties to match was the free-stream total sensible enthalpy, dynamic pressure, and either the velocity or Mach number. This combination yielded only a 2% difference in heating. Other combinations showed departures of up to 10% in the heat flux estimate.

  10. Aerodynamic and Hydrodynamic Tests of a Family of Models of Flying Hulls Derived from a Streamline Body -- NACA Model 84 Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, John B; Olson, Roland E; Draley, Eugene C; Luoma, Arvo A

    1943-01-01

    A series of related forms of flying-boat hulls representing various degrees of compromise between aerodynamic and hydrodynamic requirements was tested in Langley Tank No. 1 and in the Langley 8-foot high-speed tunnel. The purpose of the investigation was to provide information regarding the penalties in water performance resulting from further aerodynamic refinement and, as a corollary, to provide information regarding the penalties in range or payload resulting from the retention of certain desirable hydrodynamic characteristics. The information should form a basis for over-all improvements in hull form.

  11. Langley Symposium on Aerodynamics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, Sharon H. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to present current work and results of the Langley Aeronautics Directorate covering the areas of computational fluid dynamics, viscous flows, airfoil aerodynamics, propulsion integration, test techniques, and low-speed, high-speed, and transonic aerodynamics. The following sessions are included in this volume: theoretical aerodynamics, test techniques, fluid physics, and viscous drag reduction.

  12. Estimation of the Unsteady Aerodynamic Load on Space Shuttle External Tank Protuberances from a Component Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayatana; Martin, Fred W.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    At the wake of the Columbia (STS-107) accident it was decided to remove the Protuberance Aerodynamic Load (PAL) Ramp that was originally intended to protect various protuberances outside of the Space Shuttle External Tank from high buffet load induced by cross-flows at transonic speed. In order to establish the buffet load without the PAL ramp, a wind tunnel test was conducted where segments of the protuberances were instrumented with dynamic pressure transducers; and power-spectra of sectional lift and drag forces at various span-wise locations between two adjacent support brackets were measured under different cross flow angles, Mach number and other conditions. Additionally, frequency-dependent spatial correlations between the sectional forces were also established. The sectional forces were then adjusted by the correlation length to establish span-averaged spectra of normal and lateral forces that can be suitably "added" to various other unsteady forces encountered by the protuberance. This paper describes the methodology used for calculating the correlation-adjusted power spectrum of the buffet load. A second part of the paper describes wind-tunnel results on the difference in the buffet load on the protuberances with and without the PAL ramp. In general when the ramp height is the same as that of the protuberance height, such as that found on the liquid Oxygen part of the tank, the ramp is found to cause significant reduction of the unsteady aerodynamic load. However, on the liquid Hydrogen part of the tank, where the Oxygen feed-line is far larger in diameter than the height of the PAL ramp, little protection is found to be available to all but the Cable Tray.

  13. Propulsion and airframe aerodynamic interactions of supersonic V/STOL configurations. Volume 2: Wind tunnel test force and moment data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilz, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel model of a supersonic V/STOL fighter configuration has been tested to measure the aerodynamic interaction effects which can result from geometrically close-coupled propulsion system/airframe components. The approach was to configure the model to represent two different test techniques. One was a conventional test technique composed of two test modes. In the Flow-Through mode, absolute configuration aerodynamics are measured, including inlet/airframe interactions. In the Jet-Effects mode, incremental nozzle/airframe interactions are measured. The other test technique is a propulsion simulator approach, where a sub-scale, externally powered engine is mounted in the model. This allows proper measurement of inlet/airframe and nozzle/airframe interactions simultaneously. This is Volume 2 of 2: Wind Tunnel Test Force and Moment Data Report.

  14. Tests of Aerodynamically Heated Multiweb Wing Structures in a Free Jet at Mach Number 2: Five Aluminum-Alloy Models of 20-Inch Chord with 0.064-Inch-Thick Skin, 0.025-Inch-Thick Webs, and Various Chordwise Stiffening at 2 deg Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trussell, Donald H.; Thomson, Robert G.

    1960-01-01

    An experimental study was made on five 2024-T3 aluminum-alloy multiweb wing structures (MW-2-(4), MW-4-(3), mw-16, MW-17, and MW-18), at a Mach number of 2 and an angle of attack of 2 deg under simulated supersonic flight conditions. These models, of 20-inch chord and semi-span and 5-percent-thick circular-arc airfoil section, were identical except for the type and amount of chordwise stiffening. One model with no chordwise ribs between root and tip bulkhead fluttered and failed dynamically partway through its test. Another model with no chordwise ribs (and a thinner tip bulkhead) experienced a static bending type of failure while undergoing flutter. The three remaining models with one, two, or three chordwise ribs survived their tests. The test results indicate that the chordwise shear rigidity imparted to the models by the addition of even one chordwise rib precludes flutter and subsequent failure under the imposed test conditions. This paper presents temperature and strain data obtained from the tests and discusses the behavior of the models.

  15. SRB thermal protection systems materials test results in an arc-heated nitrogen environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    The external surface of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) will experience imposed thermal and shear environments due to aerodynamic heating and radiation heating during launch, staging and reentry. This report is concerned with the performance of the various TPS materials during the staging maneuver. During staging, the wash from the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) exhust plumes impose severe, short duration, thermal environments on the SRB. Five different SRB TPS materials were tested in the 1 MW Arc Plasma Generator (APG) facility. The maximum simulated heating rate obtained in the APG facility was 248 Btu/sq ft./sec, however, the test duration was such that the total heat was more than simulated. Similarly, some local high shear stress levels of 0.04 psia were not simulated. Most of the SSME plume impingement area on the SRB experiences shear stress levels of 0.02 psia and lower. The shear stress levels on the test specimens were between 0.021 and 0.008 psia. The SSME plume stagnation conditions were also simulated.

  16. Testing of a sodium heat pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Holtz, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The operation of a heat pipe with both thermal radiation and convection heat rejection has been experimentally examined. The thermal radiation heat rejection conditions are similar to those which would be experienced in a space environment. The experimental results show good agreement with the analytical model. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, E. M.; Chapman, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    The procedure of using numerical optimization methods coupled with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes for the development of an aerodynamic design is examined. Several approaches that replace wind tunnel tests, develop pressure distributions and derive designs, or fulfill preset design criteria are presented. The method of Aerodynamic Design by Numerical Optimization (ADNO) is described and illustrated with examples.

  18. Performance and aerodynamic braking of a horizontal-axis wind turbine from small-scale wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, H. V.; Wentz, W. H., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of three 20" diameter, zero twist, zero pitch wind turbine rotor models were conducted in a 7' x 10' wind tunnel to determine the performance of such rotors with NACA 23024 and NACA 64 sub 3-621 airfoil sections. Aerodynamic braking characteristics of a 38% span, 30% chord, vented aileron configuration were measured on the NACA 23024 rotor. Surface flow patterns were observed using fluorescent mini-tufts attached to the suction side of the rotor blades. Experimental results with and without ailerons are compared to predictions using airfoil section data and a momentum performance code. Results of the performance studies show that the 64 sub 3-621 rotor produces higher peak power than the 23024 rotor for a given rotor speed. Analytical studies, however, indicate that the 23024 should produce higher power. Transition strip experiments show that the 23024 rotor is much more sensitive to roughness than the 64 sub 3-621 rotor. These trends agree with analytical predictions. Results of the aileron test show that this aileron, when deflected, produces a braking torque at all tip speed ratios. In free wheeling coastdowns the rotor blade stopped, then rotated backward at a tip speed ratio of -0.6.

  19. Results of convective heating tests of a longitudinal gap on the Rockwell flat plate model (15-0, insert 7) in the NASA/Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quan, M.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented which were obtained from tests in a hypersonic wind tunnel to determine aerodynamic heating rates in a gap running parallel or slightly askew to the flow direction. The model used was a flat plate instrumented in thin-skin sections with chromelconstantan thermocouples. Heating rate profiles lengthwise along and down into the gap were obtained, and additional data were obtained from a total temperature probe and rake fabricated during the test to investigate an apparent aerodynamic cooling trend in the gap. Model variables were width, depth, length, and orientation of the gap relative to the flow direction. The tests were conducted at Mach 5.1 and Reynolds numbers per foot of 500,000, 1,000,000, and 2,000,000.

  20. Testing and plugging power plant heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Sutor, F.

    1994-12-31

    Heat Exchanger tubes fail for any number of reasons including but certainly not limited to the cumulative effects of corrosion, erosion, thermal stress and fatigue. This presentation will attempt to identify the most common techniques for determining which tubes are leaking and then introduce the products in use to plug the leaking tubes. For the sake of time I will limit the scope of this presentation to include feedwater heaters and secondary system heat exchangers such as Hydrogen Coolers, Lube Oil Coolers, and nuclear Component Cooling Water, Emergency Cooling Water, Regenerative Heat Recovery heat exchangers.

  1. Aerodynamic performance and pressure distributions for a NASA SC(2)-0714 airfoil tested in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Renaldo V.; Hill, Acquilla S.; Ray, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents in graphic and tabular forms the aerodynamic coefficient and surface pressure distribution data for a NASA SC(2)-0714 airfoil tested in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. The test was another in a series of tests involved in the joint NASA/U.S. Industry Advanced Technology Airfoil Tests program. This 14% thick supercritical airfoil was tested at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.76 and angles of attack from -2.0 to 6.0 degrees. The test Reynolds numbers were 4 million, 6 million, 10 million, 15 million, 30 million, 40 million, and 45 million.

  2. Design characteristics of a heat pipe test chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Karl W.; Jang, J. Hoon; Yu, Juin S.

    1992-01-01

    LeRC has designed a heat pipe test facility which will be used to provide data for validating heat pipe computer codes. A heat pipe test chamber that uses helium gas for enhancing heat transfer was investigated. The conceptual design employs the technique of guarded heating and guarded cooling to facilitate accurate measurements of heat transfer rates to the evaporator and from the condenser. The design parameters are selected for a baseline heat pipe made of stainless steel with an inner diameter of 38.10 mm and a wall thickness of 1.016 mm. The heat pipe operates at a design temperature of 1000 K with an evaporator radial heat flux of 53 W/sq. cm.

  3. Nonlinear aerodynamic wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, Ellwood

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of new nonlinear theoretical techniques is demonstrated for supersonic wing design. The new technology was utilized to define outboard panels for an existing advanced tactical fighter model. Mach 1.6 maneuver point design and multi-operating point compromise surfaces were developed and tested. High aerodynamic efficiency was achieved at the design conditions. A corollary result was that only modest supersonic penalties were incurred to meet multiple aerodynamic requirements. The nonlinear potential analysis of a practical configuration arrangement correlated well with experimental data.

  4. Development and testing of heat transport fluids for use in active solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Work on heat transport fluids for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is described. Program objectives and how they were accomplished including problems encountered during testing are discussed.

  5. Thermal Vacuum Testing of Swift XRT Ethane Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobel, Mark; Ku, Jentung

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained from a recent ethane heat pipe program. Three identical ethane heat pipes were tested individually, and then two selected heat pipes were tested collectively in their system configuration. Heat transport, thermal conductance, and non-condensable gas tests were performed on each heat pipe. To gain insight into the reflux operation as seen at spacecraft level ground testing, the test fixture was oriented in a vertical configuration. The system level test included a computer-controlled heater designed to emulate the heat load generated at the thermoelectric cooler interface. The system performance was successfully characterized for a wide range of environmental conditions while staying within the operating limits.

  6. Validation of US3D for Capsule Aerodynamics using 05-CA Wind Tunnel Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Several comparisons of computational fluid dynamics to wind tunnel test data are shown for the purpose of code validation. The wind tunnel test, 05-CA, uses a 7.66% model of NASA's Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle in the 11-foot test section of the Ames Unitary Plan Wind tunnel. A variety of freestream conditions over four Mach numbers and three angles of attack are considered. Test data comparisons include time-averaged integrated forces and moments, time-averaged static pressure ports on the surface, and Strouhal Number. The applicability of the US3D code to subsonic and transonic flow over a bluff body is assessed on a comprehensive data set. With close comparison, this work validates US3D for highly separated flows similar to those examined here.

  7. TsAGI approach to perform the aerodynamics test operation through CFD tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazhan, E. V.; Kursakov, I. A.; Lysenkov, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Some examples of implementation of "Electronic wind tunnel" conception for completing and correcting WT test results are described. The results of validation with the use of comparing experimental and calculation results for transonic flow around the model are presented.

  8. Test and evaluation of a solar-heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Report documents results of evaluation tests performed on components of commerical solar heating and hot water system. Subsystems tested include flat plate solar collector, energy transport module, and control panel. Tests conducted include snow and wind loads, flame spread, and smoke classification as well as solar heating operation.

  9. Aerodynamic performance of a fully film cooled core turbine vane tested with cold air in a two-dimensional cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stabe, R. G.; Kline, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a fully film cooled core turbine vane was investigated experimentally in a two-dimensional cascade of 10 vanes. Three of the 10 vanes were cooled; the others were solid (uncooled) vanes. Cold air was used for both the primary and coolant flows. The cascade test covered a range of pressure ratios corresponding to ideal exit critical velocity ratios of 0.6 to 0.95 and a range of coolant flow rates to 7.5 percent of the primary flow. The coolant flow was varied by changing the coolant supply pressure. The principal measurements were cross-channel surveys of exit total pressure, static pressure, and flow angle. The results presented include exit survey data and overall performance in terms of loss, flow angle, and weight flow for the range of exit velocity ratios and coolant flows investigated. The performance of the cooled vane is compared with the performance of an uncooled vane of the same profile and also with the performance obtained with a single cooled vane in the 10-vane cascade.

  10. Reentry aerodynamics forces and moments on the engine nozzle of the 146-inch solid rocket booster model 473 tested in MSFC 14 by 14 inch trisonic wind tunnel (SA30F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. D.; Braddock, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A test of a model of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's) was performed in a 14 x 14 inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel to determine the aerodynamic forces and moments imposed on the nozzle of the SRB during reentry. The model, with scale dimensions equal to 0.5479 of the actual SRB dimensions, was instrumented with a six-component force balance attached to the model nozzle so that only forces and moments acting on the nozzle were measured. A total of 137 runs (20 deg pitch polars) were performed during this test. The angle of attack ranged from 60 to 185 deg, the Reynolds number from 5.2 million to 7.6 million. The Mach numbers investigated were 1.96, 2.74, and 3.48. Five external protuberances were simulated. The effective roll angle simulated was 180 deg. The effects of three different heat shield configurations were investigated.

  11. The effects of inlet turbulence and rotor/stator interactions on the aerodynamics and heat transfer of a large-scale rotating turbine model. Volume 2: Heat transfer data tabulation. 15 percent axial spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dring, R. P.; Blair, M. F.; Joslyn, H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program was conducted to examine the effects of inlet turbulence on airfoil heat transfer. The experimental portion of the study was conducted in a large-scale (approx 5X engine), ambient temperature, rotating turbine model configured in both single stage and stage-and-a-half arrangements. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using low-conductivity airfoils with miniature thermcouples welded to a thin, electrically heated surface skin. Heat transfer data were acquired for various combinations of low or high inlet turbulence intensity, flow coefficient, first-stator/rotor axial spacing, Reynolds number and relative circumferential position of the first and second stators. Aerodynamic measurements obtained as part of the program include distributions of the mean and fluctuating velocities at the turbine inlet and, for each airfoil row, midspan airfoil surface pressures and circumferential distributions of the downstream steady state pressures and fluctuating velocities. Analytical results include airfoil heat transfer predictions produced using existing 2-D boundary layer computation schemes and an examination of solutions of the unsteady boundary layer equations. The results are reported in four separate volumes, of which this is Volume 2: Heat Transfer Data Tabulation; 15 Percent Axial Spacing.

  12. The oblique-wing research aircraft: A test bed for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn B.

    1989-01-01

    The advantages of oblique wings have been the subject of numerous theoretical studies, wind tunnel tests, low speed flight models, and finally a low speed manned demonstrator, the AD-1. The specific objectives of the OWRA program are: (1) to establish the necessary technology base required to translate theoretical and experimental results into practical mission oriented designs; (2) to design, fabricate and flight test an oblique wing aircraft throughout a realistic flight envelope, and (3) to develop and validate design and analysis tools for asymmetric aircraft configurations. The preliminary design phase of the project is complete and has resulted in a wing configuration for which construction is ready to be initiated.

  13. SEP BIMOD variable conductance heat pipes acceptance and characterization tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemminger, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    A series of six heat pipes, similar in design to those flown on the Comunications Technology Satellite Hermes, for use in a prototype Solar Electric Propulsion BIMOD thrust module are evaluated. The results of acceptance and characterization tests performed on the heat pipe subassemble are reported. The performance of all the heat pipes met, or exceeded, design specifications.

  14. Test results of a Stirling engine utilizing heat exchanger modules with an integral heat pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Skupinski, R.C.; Tower, L.K.; Madi, F.J.; Brusk, K.D.

    1993-04-01

    The Heat Pipe Stirling Engine (HP-1000), a free-piston Stirling engine incorporating three heat exchanger modules, each having a sodium filled heat pipe, has been tested at the NASA-Lewis Research Center as part of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The heat exchanger modules were designed to reduce the number of potential flow leak paths in the heat exchanger assembly and incorporate a heat pipe as the link between the heat source and the engine. An existing RE-1000 free-piston Stirling engine was modified to operate using the heat exchanger modules. This paper describes heat exchanger module and engine performance during baseline testing. Condenser temperature profiles, brake power, and efficiency are presented and discussed.

  15. Test results of a Stirling engine utilizing heat exchanger modules with an integral heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skupinski, Robert C.; Tower, Leonard K.; Madi, Frank J.; Brusk, Kevin D.

    1993-01-01

    The Heat Pipe Stirling Engine (HP-1000), a free-piston Stirling engine incorporating three heat exchanger modules, each having a sodium filled heat pipe, has been tested at the NASA-Lewis Research Center as part of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The heat exchanger modules were designed to reduce the number of potential flow leak paths in the heat exchanger assembly and incorporate a heat pipe as the link between the heat source and the engine. An existing RE-1000 free-piston Stirling engine was modified to operate using the heat exchanger modules. This paper describes heat exchanger module and engine performance during baseline testing. Condenser temperature profiles, brake power, and efficiency are presented and discussed.

  16. Metallized Gelled Propellant Heat Transfer Tests Analyzed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1997-01-01

    A series of rocket engine heat transfer experiments using metallized gelled liquid propellants was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center. These experiments used a small 20- to 40-lbf thrust engine composed of a modular injector, an igniter, a chamber, and a nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-, 5-, and 55-wt % loadings of aluminum particles. Gaseous oxygen was used as the oxidizer. Heat transfer measurements were made with a rocket engine calorimeter chamber and nozzle with a total of 31 cooling channels. Each channel used water flow to carry heat away from the chamber and the attached thermocouples; flow meters allowed heat flux estimates at each of the 31 stations.

  17. The transonic Reynolds number problem. [limitations of transonic aerodynamic test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Problems in modeling the complex interacting flow fields in the transonic speed regime are reviewed. The limitations of wind tunnel test capabilities are identified, and options for resolving the deficiency are examined. The evolution of the National Transonic Facility, and the various needs for research investigations to be done there are discussed. The relative priorities that should be given within and across subdisciplines for guidance in planning for the most effective use of the facility are considered.

  18. Aerodynamic control of NASP-type vehicles through Vortex manipulation. Volume 2: Static wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Kramer, Brian R.; Smith, Brooke C.; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1993-01-01

    Forebody Vortex Control (FVC) was explored in this research program for potential application to a NASP-type configuration. Wind tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate a number of jet blowing schemes. The configuration tested has a slender forebody and a 78 deg swept delta wing. Blowing jets were implemented on the leeward side of the forebody with small circular tubes tangential to the surface that could be directed aft, forward, or at angles in between. The effects of blowing are observed primarily in the yawing and rolling moments and are highly dependent on the jet configuration and the angle of attack. Results show that the baseline flow field, without blowing activated, is quite sensitive to the geometry differences of the various protruding jets, as well as being sensitive to the blowing, particularly in the angle of attack range where the forebody vortices are naturally asymmetric. The time lag of the flow field response to the initiation of blowing was also measured. The time response was very short, on the order of the time required for the flow disturbance to travel the distance from the nozzle to the specific airframe location of interest at the free stream velocity. Overall, results indicate that sizable yawing and rolling moments can be induced with modest blowing levels. However, direct application of this technique on a very slender forebody would require thorough wind tunnel testing to optimize the jet location and configuration.

  19. Aerodynamic design and performance testing of an advanced 30 deg swept, eight bladed propeller at Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. M.; Menthe, R. W.; Wainauski, H. S.

    1978-01-01

    The increased emphasis on fuel conservation in the world has stimulated a series of studies of both conventional and unconventional propulsion systems for commercial aircraft. Preliminary results from these studies indicate that a fuel saving of from 15 to 28 percent may be realized by the use of an advanced high speed turboprop. The turboprop must be capable of high efficiency at Mach 0.8 above 10.68 km (35,000 ft) altitude if it is to compete with turbofan powered commercial aircraft. An advanced turboprop concept was wind tunnel tested. The model included such concepts as an aerodynamically integrated propeller/nacelle, blade sweep and power (disk) loadings approximately three times higher than conventional propeller designs. The aerodynamic design for the model is discussed. Test results are presented which indicate propeller net efficiencies near 80 percent were obtained at high disk loadings at Mach 0.8.

  20. Results of heat transfer tests of a 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle 5 model (60-OTS) in the NASA-Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (test IH48)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, W. H.; Lockman, W. K.

    1976-01-01

    Heat transfer data are presented for a .0175-scale model of the Rockwell International Space Shuttle Vehicle 5. The primary purpose of these tests was to obtain aerodynamic interference heating data on the external tank in the tank alone, second-, and first-stage configurations. Data were also obtained on the Orbiter and solid rocket boosters. Nominal Mach Nos. of 5.2 and 5.3 at nominal freestream unit Reynolds numbers of 1.5 and 5.0 million per foot, respectively, were investigated. Photographs of the tested configurations and test equipment are shown.

  1. NASP aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the critical aerodynamic technologies needed to support the development of a class of aircraft represented by the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The air-breathing, single-stage-to-orbit mission presents a severe challenge to all of the aeronautical disciplines and demands an extension of the state-of-the-art in each technology area. While the largest risk areas are probably advanced materials and the development of the scramjet engine, there remains a host of design issues and technology problems in aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and propulsion integration. The paper presents an overview of the most significant propulsion integration problems, and defines the most critical fluid flow phenomena that must be evaluated, defined, and predicted for the class of aircraft represented by the Aero-Space Plane.

  2. Inlet noise on 0.5-meter-diameter NASA QF-1 fan as measured in an unmodified compressor aerodynamic test facility and in an anechoic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelder, T. F.; Soltis, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Narrowband analysis revealed grossly similar sound pressure level spectra in each facility. Blade passing frequency (BPF) noise and multiple pure tone (MPT) noise were superimposed on a broadband (BB) base noise. From one-third octave bandwidth sound power analyses the BPF noise (harmonics combined), and the MPT noise (harmonics combined, excepting BPF's) agreed between facilities within 1.5 db or less over the range of speeds and flows tested. Detailed noise and aerodynamic performance is also presented.

  3. A longitudinal aerodynamic data repeatability study for a commercial transport model test in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahls, R. A.; Adcock, J. B.; Witkowski, D. P.; Wright, F. L.

    1995-01-01

    A high Reynolds number investigation of a commercial transport model was conducted in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at Langley Research Center. This investigation was part of a cooperative effort to test a 0.03-scale model of a Boeing 767 airplane in the NTF over a Mach number range of 0.70 to 0.86 and a Reynolds number range of 2.38 to 40.0 x 10(exp 6) based on the mean aerodynamic chord. One of several specific objectives of the current investigation was to evaluate the level of data repeatability attainable in the NTF. Data repeatability studies were performed at a Mach number of 0.80 with Reynolds numbers of 2.38, 4.45, and 40.0 x 10(exp 6) and also at a Mach number of 0.70 with a Reynolds number of 40.0 x 10(exp 6). Many test procedures and data corrections are addressed in this report, but the data presented do not include corrections for wall interference, model support interference, or model aeroelastic effects. Application of corrections for these three effects would not affect the results of this study because the corrections are systematic in nature and are more appropriately classified as sources of bias error. The repeatability of the longitudinal stability-axis force and moment data has been accessed. Coefficients of lift, drag, and pitching moment are shown to repeat well within the pretest goals of plus or minus 0.005, plus or minus 0.0001, and plus or minus 0.001, respectively, at a 95-percent confidence level over both short- and near-term periods.

  4. Determining the Accuracy of Aerodynamic Model Parameters Estimated from Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Klein, Vladislav

    1995-01-01

    An important part of building mathematical models based on measured data is calculating the accuracy associated with statistical estimates of the model parameters. Indeed, without some idea of this accuracy, the parameter estimates themselves have limited value. In this work, an expression for computing quantitatively correct parameter accuracy measures for maximum likelihood parameter estimates with colored residuals is developed and validated. This result is important because experience in analyzing flight test data reveals that the output residuals from maximum likelihood estimation are almost always colored. The calculations involved can be appended to conventional maximum likelihood estimation algorithms. Monte Carlo simulation runs were used to show that parameter accuracy measures from the new technique accurately reflect the quality of the parameter estimates from maximum likelihood estimation without the need for correction factors or frequency domain analysis of the output residuals. The technique was applied to flight test data from repeated maneuvers flown on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). As in the simulated cases, parameter accuracy measures from the new technique were in agreement with the scatter in the parameter estimates from repeated maneuvers, while conventional parameter accuracy measures were optimistic.

  5. Aerodynamic control of NASP-type vehicles through Vortex manipulation. Volume 1: Static water tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Ng, T. Terry; Ong, Lih-Yenn; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1993-01-01

    Water tunnel tests were conducted on a NASP-type configuration to evaluate different pneumatic Forebody Vortex Control (FVC) methods. Flow visualization and yawing moment measurements were performed at angles of attack from 0 deg to 30 deg. The pneumatic techniques tested included jet and slot blowing. In general, blowing can be used efficiently to manipulate the forebody vortices at angles of attack greater than 20 deg. These vortices are naturally symmetric up to alpha = 25 deg and asymmetric between 25 deg and 30 deg angle of attack. Results indicate that tangential aft jet blowing is the most promising method for this configuration. Aft jet blowing produces a yawing moment towards the blowing side and the trends with blowing rate are well behaved. The size of the nozzle is not the dominant factor in the blowing process; the change in the blowing 'momentum,' i.e., the product of the mass flow rate and the velocity of the jet, appears to be the important parameter in the water tunnel (incompressible and unchoked flow at the nozzle exit). Forward jet blowing is very unpredictable and sensitive to mass flow rate changes. Slot blowing (with the exception of very low blowing rates) acts as a flow 'separator'; it promotes early separation on the blow side, producing a yawing moment toward the non-blowing side for the C(sub mu) range investigated.

  6. Aerodynamics of Race Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, suspension, road, aerodynamics, and of course the driver. In recent years, however, vehicle aerodynamics gained increased attention, mainly due to the utilization of the negative lift (downforce) principle, yielding several important performance improvements. This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic downforce and how it improves race car performance. After this short introduction various methods to generate downforce such as inverted wings, diffusers, and vortex generators are discussed. Due to the complex geometry of these vehicles, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flows and lifting surface shapes unlike traditional airplane wings. Typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development, are discussed as well. In spite of the tremendous progress of these design tools (due to better instrumentation, communication, and computational power), the fluid dynamic phenomenon is still highly nonlinear, and predicting the effect of a particular modification is not always trouble free. Several examples covering a wide range of vehicle shapes (e.g., from stock cars to open-wheel race cars) are presented to demonstrate this nonlinear nature of the flow field.

  7. Three-Dimensional Unsteady Simulation of Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer in a Modern High Pressure Turbine Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Unsteady 3-D RANS simulations have been performed on a highly loaded transonic turbine stage and results are compared to steady calculations as well as to experiment. A low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model is employed to provide closure for the RANS system. A phase-lag boundary condition is used in the tangential direction. This allows the unsteady simulation to be performed by using only one blade from each of the two rows. The objective of this work is to study the effect of unsteadiness on rotor heat transfer and to glean any insight into unsteady flow physics. The role of the stator wake passing on the pressure distribution at the leading edge is also studied. The simulated heat transfer and pressure results agreed favorably with experiment. The time-averaged heat transfer predicted by the unsteady simulation is higher than the heat transfer predicted by the steady simulation everywhere except at the leading edge. The shock structure formed due to stator-rotor interaction was analyzed. Heat transfer and pressure at the hub and casing were also studied. Thermal segregation was observed that leads to the heat transfer patterns predicted by steady and unsteady simulations to be different.

  8. Spatially-Resolved Analyses of Aerodynamic Fallout from a Uranium-Fueled Nuclear Test

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, L. A.; Knight, K. B.; Matzel, J. E.; Prussin, S. G.; Zimmer, M. M.; Kinman, W S; Ryerson, F. J.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-07-28

    The fiive silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Several samples display compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing between major elements and natural U (238U/235U = 0.00725) and enriched U. Samples exhibit extreme spatial heterogeneity in U isotopic composition with 0.02 < 235U/238U < 11.84 among all five spherules and 0.02 < 235U/238U < 7.41 within a single spherule. Moreover, in two spherules, the 235U/238U ratio is correlated with changes in major element composition, suggesting the agglomeration of chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are nearly homogenous with respect to major element and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due to experiencing higher temperatures or residing longer in the fireball. Linear correlations between 234U/238U, 235U/238U, and 236U/238U ratios are consistent with a two-component mixing model, which is used to illustrate the extent of mixing between natural and enriched U end members.

  9. Spatially-Resolved Analyses of Aerodynamic Fallout from a Uranium-Fueled Nuclear Test

    DOE PAGES

    Lewis, L. A.; Knight, K. B.; Matzel, J. E.; Prussin, S. G.; Zimmer, M. M.; Kinman, W S; Ryerson, F. J.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-07-28

    The fiive silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Several samples display compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing between major elements and natural U (238U/235U = 0.00725) and enriched U. Samples exhibit extreme spatial heterogeneity in U isotopic composition with 0.02 < 235U/238U < 11.84 among all five spherules and 0.02 < 235U/238U < 7.41 within a single spherule. Moreover, in two spherules, the 235U/238U ratio is correlated with changes in major element composition, suggesting the agglomeration ofmore » chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are nearly homogenous with respect to major element and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due to experiencing higher temperatures or residing longer in the fireball. Linear correlations between 234U/238U, 235U/238U, and 236U/238U ratios are consistent with a two-component mixing model, which is used to illustrate the extent of mixing between natural and enriched U end members.« less

  10. Spatially-resolved analyses of aerodynamic fallout from a uranium-fueled nuclear test.

    PubMed

    Lewis, L A; Knight, K B; Matzel, J E; Prussin, S G; Zimmer, M M; Kinman, W S; Ryerson, F J; Hutcheon, I D

    2015-10-01

    Five silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Several samples display compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing between major elements and natural U ((238)U/(235)U = 0.00725) and enriched U. Samples exhibit extreme spatial heterogeneity in U isotopic composition with 0.02 < (235)U/(238)U < 11.84 among all five spherules and 0.02 < (235)U/(238)U < 7.41 within a single spherule. In two spherules, the (235)U/(238)U ratio is correlated with changes in major element composition, suggesting the agglomeration of chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are nearly homogenous with respect to major element and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due to experiencing higher temperatures or residing longer in the fireball. Linear correlations between (234)U/(238)U, (235)U/(238)U, and (236)U/(238)U ratios are consistent with a two-component mixing model, which is used to illustrate the extent of mixing between natural and enriched U end members. PMID:26225462

  11. Spatially-resolved analyses of aerodynamic fallout from a uranium-fueled nuclear test.

    PubMed

    Lewis, L A; Knight, K B; Matzel, J E; Prussin, S G; Zimmer, M M; Kinman, W S; Ryerson, F J; Hutcheon, I D

    2015-10-01

    Five silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Several samples display compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing between major elements and natural U ((238)U/(235)U = 0.00725) and enriched U. Samples exhibit extreme spatial heterogeneity in U isotopic composition with 0.02 < (235)U/(238)U < 11.84 among all five spherules and 0.02 < (235)U/(238)U < 7.41 within a single spherule. In two spherules, the (235)U/(238)U ratio is correlated with changes in major element composition, suggesting the agglomeration of chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are nearly homogenous with respect to major element and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due to experiencing higher temperatures or residing longer in the fireball. Linear correlations between (234)U/(238)U, (235)U/(238)U, and (236)U/(238)U ratios are consistent with a two-component mixing model, which is used to illustrate the extent of mixing between natural and enriched U end members.

  12. SIMS Analyses of Aerodynamic Fallout from a Uranium-Fueled Test

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, L. A.; Knight, K. B.; Matzel, J. E.; Prussin, S. G.; Ryerson, F. J.; Kinman, W. S.; Zimmer, M. M.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2014-09-09

    Five silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x ray spectroscopy. Several samples display distinctive compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing, and exhibit heterogeneity in U isotopes with 0.02 < 235U/ 238U < 11.8 among all five samples and 0.02 < 235U/ 238U < 7.81 within a single sample. In two samples, the 235U/ 238U ratio is correlated with major element composition, consistent with the agglomeration of chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are quasi-homogeneous with respect to composition and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due longer residence time in the fireball. Correlated variations between 234U, 235U, 236U and 238U abundances point to mixing of end-members corresponding to uranium derived from the device and natural U ( 238U/ 235U = 0.00725) found in soil.

  13. Unsteady aerodynamics modeling for flight dynamics application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; He, Kai-Feng; Qian, Wei-Qi; Zhang, Tian-Jiao; Cheng, Yan-Qing; Wu, Kai-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    In view of engineering application, it is practicable to decompose the aerodynamics into three components: the static aerodynamics, the aerodynamic increment due to steady rotations, and the aerodynamic increment due to unsteady separated and vortical flow. The first and the second components can be presented in conventional forms, while the third is described using a one-order differential equation and a radial-basis-function (RBF) network. For an aircraft configuration, the mathematical models of 6-component aerodynamic coefficients are set up from the wind tunnel test data of pitch, yaw, roll, and coupled yawroll large-amplitude oscillations. The flight dynamics of an aircraft is studied by the bifurcation analysis technique in the case of quasi-steady aerodynamics and unsteady aerodynamics, respectively. The results show that: (1) unsteady aerodynamics has no effect upon the existence of trim points, but affects their stability; (2) unsteady aerodynamics has great effects upon the existence, stability, and amplitudes of periodic solutions; and (3) unsteady aerodynamics changes the stable regions of trim points obviously. Furthermore, the dynamic responses of the aircraft to elevator deflections are inspected. It is shown that the unsteady aerodynamics is beneficial to dynamic stability for the present aircraft. Finally, the effects of unsteady aerodynamics on the post-stall maneuverability are analyzed by numerical simulation.

  14. Aerodynamic pressure and heating-rate distributions in tile gaps around chine regions with pressure gradients at a Mach number of 6.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, L. Roane; Notestine, Kristopher K.

    1990-06-01

    Surface and gap pressures and heating-rate distributions were obtained for simulated Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile arrays on the curved surface test apparatus of the Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel at Mach 6.6. The results indicated that the chine gap pressures varied inversely with gap width because larger gap widths allowed greater venting from the gap to the lower model side pressures. Lower gap pressures caused greater flow ingress from the surface and increased gap heating. Generally, gap heating was greater in the longitudinal gaps than in the circumferential gaps. Gap heating decreased with increasing gap depth. Circumferential gap heating at the mid-depth was generally less than about 10 percent of the external surface value. Gap heating was most severe at local T-gap junctions and tile-to-tile forward-facing steps that caused the greatest heating from flow impingement. The use of flow stoppers at discrete locations reduced heating from flow impingement. The use of flow stoppers at discrete locations reduced heating in most gaps but increased heating in others. Limited use of flow stoppers or gap filler in longitudinal gaps could reduce gap heating in open circumferential gaps in regions of high surface pressure gradients.

  15. Aerodynamic pressure and heating-rate distributions in tile gaps around chine regions with pressure gradients at a Mach number of 6.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. Roane; Notestine, Kristopher K.

    1990-01-01

    Surface and gap pressures and heating-rate distributions were obtained for simulated Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile arrays on the curved surface test apparatus of the Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel at Mach 6.6. The results indicated that the chine gap pressures varied inversely with gap width because larger gap widths allowed greater venting from the gap to the lower model side pressures. Lower gap pressures caused greater flow ingress from the surface and increased gap heating. Generally, gap heating was greater in the longitudinal gaps than in the circumferential gaps. Gap heating decreased with increasing gap depth. Circumferential gap heating at the mid-depth was generally less than about 10 percent of the external surface value. Gap heating was most severe at local T-gap junctions and tile-to-tile forward-facing steps that caused the greatest heating from flow impingement. The use of flow stoppers at discrete locations reduced heating from flow impingement. The use of flow stoppers at discrete locations reduced heating in most gaps but increased heating in others. Limited use of flow stoppers or gap filler in longitudinal gaps could reduce gap heating in open circumferential gaps in regions of high surface pressure gradients.

  16. An Overview of Long Duration Sodium Heat Pipe Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Ernst, Donald M.; Lindemuth, James E.; Sanzi, James L.; Geng, Steven M.; Zuo, Jon

    2004-01-01

    High temperature heat pipes are being evaluated for use in energy conversion applications such as fuel cells, gas turbine re-combustors, and Stirling cycle heat sources; with the resurgence of space nuclear power, additional applications include reactor heat removal elements and radiator elements. Long operating life and reliable performance are critical requirements for these applications. Accordingly long-term materials compatibility is being evaluated through the use of high temperature life test heat pipes. Thermacore International, Inc., has carried out several sodium heat pipe life tests to establish long term operating reliability. Four sodium heat pipes have recently demonstrated favorable materials compatibility and heat transport characteristics at high operating temperatures in air over long time periods. A 3l6L stainless steel heat pipe with a sintered porous nickel wick structure and an integral brazed cartridge heater has successfully operated at 650 to 700 C for over 115,000 hours without signs of failure. A second 3l6L stainless steel heat pipe with a specially-designed Inconel 60 I rupture disk and a sintered nickel powder wick has demonstrated over 83,000 hours at 600 to 650 C with similar success. A representative one-tenth segment Stirling Space Power Converter heat pipe with an Inconel 718 envelope and a stainless steel screen wick has operated for over 41 ,000 hours at nearly 700 0c. A hybrid (i.e. gas-fired and solar) heat pipe with a Haynes 230 envelope and a sintered porous nickel wick structure was operated for about 20,000 hours at nearly 700 C without signs of degradation. These life test results collectively have demonstrated the potential for high temperature heat pipes to serve as reliable energy conversion system components for power applications that require long operating lifetime with high reliability, Detailed design specifications, operating hi story, and test results are described for each of these sodium heat pipes. Lessons

  17. An Overview of Long Duration Sodium Heat Pipe Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Ernst, Donald M.; Lindemuth, James E.; Sanzi, James L.; Geng, Steven M.; Zuo, Jon

    2004-02-01

    High temperature heat pipes are being evaluated for use in energy conversion applications such as fuel cells, gas turbine re-combustors, and Stirling cycle heat sources; with the resurgence of space nuclear power, additional applications include reactor heat removal elements and radiator elements. Long operating life and reliable performance are critical requirements for these applications. Accordingly long-term materials compatibility is being evaluated through the use of high temperature life test heat pipes. Thermacore, Inc. has carried out several sodium heat pipe life tests to establish long term operating reliability. Four sodium heat pipes have recently demonstrated favorable materials compatibility and heat transport characteristics at high operating temperatures in air over long time periods. A 316L stainless steel heat pipe with a sintered porous nickel wick structure and an integral brazed cartridge heater has successfully operated at 650C to 700C for over 115,000 hours without signs of failure. A second 316L stainless steel heat pipe with a specially-designed Inconel 601 rupture disk and a sintered nickel powder wick has demonstrated over 83,000 hours at 600C to 650C with similar success. A representative one-tenth segment Stirling Space Power Converter heat pipe with an Inconel 718 envelope and a stainless steel screen wick has operated for over 41,000 hours at nearly 700C. A hybrid (i.e. gas-fired and solar) heat pipe with a Haynes 230 envelope and a sintered porous nickel wick structure was operated for about 20,000 hours at nearly 700C without signs of degradation. These life test results collectively have demonstrated the potential for high temperature heat pipes to serve as reliable energy conversion system components for power applications that require long operating lifetime with high reliability. Detailed design specifications, operating history, and test results are described for each of these sodium heat pipes. Lessons learned and future life

  18. Review of the Aerodynamic Acceptance Test and Application to Anti-Icing Fluids Testing in the NRC Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Riley, James T.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the FAA has worked with Transport Canada, National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and APS Aviation, Inc. to develop allowance times for aircraft operations in ice-pellet precipitation. These allowance times are critical to ensure safety and efficient operation of commercial and cargo flights. Wind-tunnel testing with uncontaminated anti-icing fluids and fluids contaminated with simulated ice-pellets had been carried out at the NRC Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel (PIWT) to better understand the flowoff characteristics and resulting aerodynamic effects. The percent lift loss on the thin, high-performance wing model tested in the PIWT was determined at 8 angle of attack and used as one of the evaluation criteria in determining the allowance times. Because it was unclear as to how performance degradations measured on this model were relevant to an actual airplane configuration, some means of interpreting the wing model lift loss was deemed necessary. In this report, the lift loss was related to the loss in maximum lift of a Boeing 737-200ADV airplane through the Aerodynamic Acceptance Test (AAT) performed for fluids qualification. This report provides a review of the research basis of the AAT in order to understand how this correlation was applied. A loss in maximum lift coefficient of 5.24 percent on the B737-200ADV airplane (which was adopted as the threshold in the AAT) corresponds to a lift loss of 7.3 percent on the PIWT model at 8 degrees angle of attack. There is significant scatter in the data used to develop the correlation related to varying effects of the various antiicing fluids that were tested and other factors. A statistical analysis indicated the upper limit of lift loss on the PIWT model was 9.2 percent. Therefore, for cases resulting in PIWT model lift loss from 7.3 to 9.2 percent, extra scrutiny of the visual observations is required in evaluating fluid performance with contamination. Additional research may result in future

  19. Heat pipe design for sheath insulator reactor test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskolczy, Gabor; Lee, Celia C. M.

    1991-01-01

    A reactor experiment was designed to test the sheath insulator component of the thermionic fuel element (TFE) of a space power reactor. In this fully instrumented reactor test, two gas-controlled sodium heat pipes will be used to control the temperature of the sheath insulator specimens to which an external voltage will be applied. The heat pipes were designed with the aid of a computer program, which predicted performance. A demonstrator heat pipe was built and electrically tested. The test results agreed with the prediction as modeled by the computer program.

  20. Heat pipe design for sheath insulator reactor test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskolczy, Gabor; Lee, Celia C. M.

    A reactor experiment was designed to test the sheath insulator component of the thermionic fuel element (TFE) of a space power reactor. In this fully instrumented reactor test, two gas-controlled sodium heat pipes will be used to control the temperature of the sheath insulator specimens to which an external voltage will be applied. The heat pipes were designed with the aid of a computer program, which predicted performance. A demonstrator heat pipe was built and electrically tested. The test results agreed with the prediction as modeled by the computer program.

  1. Heat pipe design for sheath insulator reactor test

    SciTech Connect

    Miskolczy, G.; Lee, C.C.M. )

    1991-01-05

    A reactor experiment was designed to test the sheath insulator component of the thermionic fuel element (TFE) of a space power reactor. In this fully instrumented reactor test, two gas-controlled sodium heat pipes will be used to control the temperature of the sheath insulator specimens to which an external voltage will be applied. The heat pipes were designed with the aid of a computer program, which predicted performance. A demonstrator heat pipe was built and electrically tested. The test results agreed with the prediction as modeled by the computer program.

  2. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics from wind-tunnel tests of a large-scale advanced arrow-wing supersonic-cruise transport concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. M.

    1978-01-01

    Tests have been conducted to extend the existing low speed aerodynamic data base of advanced supersonic-cruise arrow wing configurations. Principle configuration variables included wing leading-edge flap deflection, wing trailing-edge flap deflection, horizontal tail effectiveness, and fuselage forebody strakes. A limited investigation was also conducted to determine the low speed aerodynamic effects due to slotted training-edge flaps. Results of this investigation demonstrate that deflecting the wing leading-edge flaps downward to suppress the wing apex vortices provides improved static longitudinal stability; however, it also results in significantly reduced static directional stability. The use of a selected fuselage forebody strakes is found to be effective in increasing the level of positive static directional stability. Drooping the fuselage nose, which is required for low-speed pilot vision, significantly improves the later-directional trim characteristics.

  3. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. [Lewis 8 by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of a coannular exhaust nozzle for a proposed variable stream control supersonic propulsion system. Tests were conducted with two simulated configurations differing primarily in the fan duct flowpaths: a short flap mechanism for fan stream control with an isentropic contoured flow splitter, and an iris fan nozzle with a conical flow splitter. Both designs feature a translating primary plug and an auxiliary inlet ejector. Tests were conducted at takeoff and simulated cruise conditions. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. At simulated supersonic cruise, both configurations demonstrated good performance, comparable to levels assumed in earlier advanced supersonic propulsion studies. However, at subsonic cruise, both configurations exhibited performance that was 6 to 7.5 percent less than the study assumptions. At take off conditions, the iris configuration performance approached the assumed levels, while the short flap design was 4 to 6 percent less.

  4. Trough Receiver Heat Loss Testing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, A.; Feik, C.; Hansen, R.; Phillips, S.; Bingham, C.; Netter, J.; Forristal, R.; Burkholder, F.; Meglan, B.; Wolfrum, E.

    2006-02-01

    This presentation describes the design, fabrication, and qualification of an experimental capability for thermal loss testing of full-size trough receiver elements; and the testing on a variety of receivers.

  5. Quiet Clean Short-Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Over-The-Wing (OTW) propulsion system test report. Volume 2: Aerodynamics and performance. [engine performance tests to define propulsion system performance on turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design and testing of the over the wing engine, a high bypass, geared turbofan engine, are discussed. The propulsion system performance is examined for uninstalled performance and installed performance. The fan aerodynamic performance and the D nozzle and reverser thrust performance are evaluated.

  6. Effect of dynamic and thermal prehistory on aerodynamic characteristics and heat transfer behind a sudden expansion in a round tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, V. I.; Bogatko, T. V.

    2016-06-01

    The results of a numerical study of the influence of the thicknesses of dynamic and thermal boundary layers on turbulent separation and heat transfer in a tube with sudden expansion are presented. The first part of this work studies the influence of the thickness of the dynamic boundary layer, which was varied by changing the length of the stabilization area within the maximal extent possible: from zero to half of the tube diameter. In the second part of the study, the flow before separation was hydrodynamically stabilized and the thermal layer before the expansion could simultaneously change its thickness from 0 to D1/2. The Reynolds number was varied in the range of {Re}_{{{{D}}1 }} = 6.7 \\cdot 103 {{to}} 1.33 \\cdot 105 , and the degree of tube expansion remained constant at ER = (D 2/D 1)2 = 1.78. A significant effect of the thickness of the separated boundary layer on both dynamic and thermal characteristics of the flow is shown. In particular, it was found out that with an increase in the thickness of the boundary layer the recirculation zone increases and the maximal Nusselt number decreases. It was determined that the growth of the heat layer thickness does not affect the hydrodynamic characteristics of the flow after separation but does lead to a reduction of heat transfer intensity in the separation area and removal of the coordinates of maximal heat transfer from the point of tube expansion. The generalizing dependence for the maximal Nusselt number at various thermal layer thicknesses is given. Comparison with experimental data confirmed the main trends in the behavior of heat and mass transfer processes in separated flows behind a step with different thermal prehistories.

  7. Radiative Heating in MSL Entry: Comparison of Flight Heating Discrepancy to Ground Test and Predictive Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Brandis, Aaron M.; White, Todd R.; Mahzari, Milad; Bose, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    During the recent entry of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), the heat shield was equipped with thermocouple stacks to measure in-depth heating of the thermal protection system (TPS). When only convective heating was considered, the derived heat flux from gauges in the stagnation region was found to be underpredicted by as much as 17 W/sq cm, which is significant compared to the peak heating of 32 W/sq cm. In order to quantify the contribution of radiative heating phenomena to the discrepancy, ground tests and predictive simulations that replicated the MSL entry trajectory were performed. An analysis is carried through to assess the quality of the radiation model and the impact to stagnation line heating. The impact is shown to be significant, but does not fully explain the heating discrepancy.

  8. Bayesian analysis of heat pipe life test data for reliability demonstration testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, R.J.; Martz, H.F.

    1985-01-01

    The demonstration testing duration requirements to establish a quantitative measure of assurance of expected lifetime for heat pipes was determined. The heat pipes are candidate devices for transporting heat generated in a nuclear reactor core to thermoelectric converters for use as a space-based electric power plant. A Bayesian analysis technique is employed, utilizing a limited Delphi survey, and a geometric mean accelerated test criterion involving heat pipe power (P) and temperature (T). Resulting calculations indicate considerable test savings can be achieved by employing the method, but development testing to determine heat pipe failure mechanisms should not be circumvented.

  9. Vibration test plan for a space station heat pipe subassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, M.B.

    1987-09-29

    This test plan describes the Sundstrand portion of task two of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contract 9-x6H-8102L-1. Sundstrand Energy Systems was awarded a contract to investigate the performance capabilities of a potassium liquid metal heat pipe as applied to the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) solar dynamic power system for the Space Station. The test objective is to expose the heat pipe subassembly to the random vibration environment which simulates the space shuttle launch condition. The results of the test will then be used to modify as required future designs of the heat pipe.

  10. Computational aerodynamics and supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the progress in computational aerodynamics over the last decade is reviewed. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program objectives, computational goals, and implementation plans are described.

  11. Hydrodynamic and Aerodynamic Tests of Four Models of Outboard Floats : (N.A.C.A. Models 51-A, 51-B, 51-C, and 51-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, John R; Hartman, Edwin P

    1938-01-01

    Four models of outboard floats (N.A.C.A. models 51-A, 51-B, 51-C, and 51-D) were tested in the N.A.C.A. tank to determine their hydrodynamic characteristics and in the 20-foot wind tunnel to determine their aerodynamic drag. The results of the tests, together with comparisons of them, are presented in the form of charts. From the comparisons, the order of merit of the models is estimated for each factor considered. The best compromise between the various factors seems to be given by model 51-D. This model is the only one in the series with a transverse step.

  12. In-Situ Load System for Calibrating and Validating Aerodynamic Properties of Scaled Aircraft in Ground-Based Aerospace Testing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Commo, Sean A. (Inventor); Lynn, Keith C. (Inventor); Landman, Drew (Inventor); Acheson, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An In-Situ Load System for calibrating and validating aerodynamic properties of scaled aircraft in ground-based aerospace testing applications includes an assembly having upper and lower components that are pivotably interconnected. A test weight can be connected to the lower component to apply a known force to a force balance. The orientation of the force balance can be varied, and the measured forces from the force balance can be compared to applied loads at various orientations to thereby develop calibration factors.

  13. Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC-Requirements: Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge and Blade Tip Ejection under Rotating Turbine Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schobeiri, Meinhard; Han, Je-Chin

    2014-09-30

    This report deals with the specific aerodynamics and heat transfer problematic inherent to high pressure (HP) turbine sections of IGCC-gas turbines. Issues of primary relevance to a turbine stage operating in an IGCC-environment are: (1) decreasing the strength of the secondary flow vortices at the hub and tip regions to reduce (a), the secondary flow losses and (b), the potential for end wall deposition, erosion and corrosion due to secondary flow driven migration of gas flow particles to the hub and tip regions, (2) providing a robust film cooling technology at the hub and that sustains high cooling effectiveness less sensitive to deposition, (3) investigating the impact of blade tip geometry on film cooling effectiveness. The document includes numerical and experimental investigations of above issues. The experimental investigations were performed in the three-stage multi-purpose turbine research facility at the Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL), Texas A&M University. For the numerical investigations a commercial Navier-Stokes solver was utilized.

  14. An apparatus for the testing of small cryogenic heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatarathnam, G.; Sarangi, Sunil

    1996-02-01

    Most cryogenic processes demand high effectiveness heat exchangers. The performance of these exchangers is determined not only by convective heat transfer resistance, but also by other irreversibilities such as axial conduction, flow maldistribution, heat transfer with surroundings, and finite number of lateral heat transfer paths. While determination of heat transfer correlations for exchanger cores is sufficient in most conventional applications, high-Ntu cryogenic exchangers must be tested under true operating conditions. As a part of our matrix heat exchanger development program, an apparatus has been constructed for testing small, compact heat exchangers at low temperature. The apparatus, enclosed in a vacuum vessel, provides a variable cold end temperature and means for direct measurement of ineffectiveness. Temperature approaches at both ends and pressure drop in both channels are also measured. The construction of the apparatus as well as the instrumentation and data acquisition methods are discussed. The results of a test on a small matrix heat exchanger using the test apparatus are also presented.

  15. Radiant Heat Test Facility (RHTF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelPapa, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the RHTF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  16. GOES Type III Loop Heat Pipe Life Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenstein, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The GOES Type III Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) was built as a life test unit for the loop heat pipes on the GOES N-Q series satellites. This propylene LHP was built by Dynatherm Corporation in 2000 and tested continuously for approximately 14 months. It was then put into storage for 3 years. Following the storage period, the LHP was tested at Swales Aerospace to verify that the loop performance hadn t changed. Most test results were consistent with earlier results. At the conclusion of testing at Swales, the LHP was transferred to NASA/GSFC for continued periodic testing. The LHP has been set up for testing in the Thermal Lab at GSFC since 2006. A group of tests consisting of start-ups, power cycles, and a heat transport limit test have been performed every six to nine months since March 2006. Tests results have shown no change in the loop performance over the five years of testing. This presentation will discuss the test hardware, test set-up, and tests performed. Test results to be presented include sample plots from individual tests, along with conductance measurements for all tests performed.

  17. Life Test Approach for Refractory Metal/Sodium Heat Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James J.; Reid, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    Heat pipe life tests described in the literature have seldom been conducted on a systematic basis. Typically one or more heat pipes are built and tested for an extended period at a single temperature with simple condenser loading. The objective of this work was to establish an approach to generate carefully controlled data that can conclusively establish heat pipe operating life with material-fluid combinations capable of extended operation. Approximately 10 years of operational life might be compressed into 3 years of laboratory testing through a combination of increased temperature and mass fluence. To accomplish this goal test series have been identified, based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications, to investigate long term corrosion rates. The heat pipes selected for demonstration purposes are fabricated from a Molybdenum-44.5%Rhenium refractory metal alloy and include an internal crescent annular wick design formed by hot isostatic pressing. A processing methodology has been devised that incorporates vacuum distillation filling with an integrated purity sampling technique for the sodium working fluid. Energy is supplied by radio frequency induction coils coupled to the heat pipe evaporator with an input range of 1 to 5 kW per unit while a static gas gap coupled water calorimeter provides condenser cooling for heat pipe temperatures ranging from 1123 to 1323 K. The test chamber's atmosphere would require active purification to maintain low oxygen concentrations at an operating pressure of approximately 75 torr. The test is designed to operate round-the-clock with 6-month non-destructive inspection intervals to identify the onset and level of corrosion. At longer intervals specific heat pipes are destructively evaluated to verify the non-destructive observations. Accomplishments prior to project cancellation included successful demonstration of the heat pipe wick fabrication technique, establishment of all engineering designs

  18. Design of Refractory Metal Life Test Heat Pipe and Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. J.; Reid, R. S.; Bragg-Sitton, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    Heat pipe life tests have seldom been conducted on a systematic basis. Typically, one or more heat pipes are built and tested for an extended period at a single temperature with simple condenser loading. Results are often reported describing the wall material, working fluid, test temperature, test duration, and occasionally the nature of any failure. Important information such as design details, processing procedures, material assay, power throughput, and radial power density are usually not mentioned. We propose to develop methods to generate carefully controlled data that conclusively establish heat pipe operating life with material-fluid combinations capable of extended operation. The test approach detailed in this Technical Publication will use 16 Mo-44.5%Re alloy/sodium heat pipe units that have an approximate12-in length and 5/8-in diameter. Two specific test series have been identified: (1) Long-term corrosion rates based on ASTM-G-68-80 (G-series) and (2) corrosion trends in a cross-correlation sequence at various temperatures and mass fluences based on a Fisher multifactor design (F-series). Evaluation of the heat pipe hardware will be performed in test chambers purged with an inert purified gas (helium or helium/argon mixture) at low pressure (10-100 torr) to provide thermal coupling between the heat pipe condenser and calorimeter. The final pressure will be selected to minimize the potential for voltage breakdown between the heat pipe and radio frequency (RF) induction coil (RF heating is currently the planned method of powering the heat pipes). The proposed calorimeter is constructed from a copper alloy and relies on a laminar flow water-coolant channel design to absorb and transport energy

  19. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    SciTech Connect

    Camarda, C.J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-08-01

    Integral heat pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat load levels. The heat pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

  20. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-01-01

    Integral heat-pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat-load levels. The heat-pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat-pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low-distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

  1. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-01-01

    Integral heat pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat load levels. The heat pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

  2. Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems. Laboratory Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olsen, R.; Hewett, M.

    2012-10-01

    Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

  3. Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems: Laboratory Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olson, R.; Hewitt, M.

    2012-10-01

    Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

  4. THERMAL TEST ALCOVE HEATED DRIFT GROUND SUPPORT ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bonabian

    1996-10-03

    The main purpose and objective of this analysis is to analyze the stability of the Thermal Test Facility Heated Drift and to design a ground support system. The stability of the Heated Drift is analyzed considering in situ, seismic, and thermal loading conditions. A ground support system is recommended to provide a stable opening for the Heated Drift. This report summarizes the results of the analyses and provides the details of the recommended ground support system for the Heated Drift. The details of the ground support system are then incorporated into the design output documents for implementation in the field.

  5. Verification tests for a solar-heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Report describes method of verification of solar space heating and hot-water systems using similarity comparison, mathematical analysis, inspections, and tests. Systems, subsystems, and components were tested for performance, durability, safety, and other factors. Tables and graphs compliment test materials.

  6. GPM Avionics Module Heat Pipes Design and Performance Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenstein, Laura; DeChristopher, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow. The GPM core satellite carries an advanced radar / radiometer system to measure precipitation from space and serve as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites. Through improved measurements of precipitation globally, the GPM mission will help to advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycle, improve forecasting of extreme events that cause natural hazards and disasters, and extend current capabilities in using accurate and timely information of precipitation to directly benefit society. The avionics module on the core satellite contains a number of electronics boxes which are cooled by a network of aluminum/ammonia heat pipes and a honeycomb radiator which contains thirteen embedded aluminum/ammonia heat pipes. All heat pipes were individually tested by the vendor (Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc.) prior to delivery. Following delivery to NASA, the flight avionics radiator and the flight spare transport heat pipes were mounted to flight-like test structure and a system level thermal vacuum test was performed. This test, which used simulators in place of all electronics boxes, was done to verify the operation of the thermal control system as a whole. This presentation will discuss the design of the avionics module heat pipes, and then discuss performance tests results for the individual heat pipes prior to delivery and for the system level thermal vacuum test. All heat pipes met their performance requirements. However, it was found that the power was too low in some instances to start all of the smaller radiator spreader heat pipes when they were tested in a reflux configuration (which is the nominal test configuration). Although this lowered the efficiency of the radiator somewhat, it did not impact the operating

  7. Heat-transfer tests of aqueous ethylene glycol solutions in an electrically heated tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardo, Everett; Eian, Carroll S

    1945-01-01

    As part of an investigation of the cooling characteristics of liquid-cooled engines, tests were conducted with an electrically heated single-tube heat exchanger to determine the heat-transfer characteristics of an-e-2 ethylene glycol and other ethylene glycol-water mixtures. Similar tests were conducted with water and commercial butanol (n-butyl alcohol) for check purposes. The results of tests conducted at an approximately constant liquid-flow rate of 0.67 pound per second (Reynolds number, 14,500 to 112,500) indicate that at an average liquid temperature 200 degrees f, the heat-transfer coefficients obtained using water, nominal (by volume) 30 percent-70 percent and 70 percent-30 percent glycol-water mixtures are approximately 3.8, 2.8, and 1.4 times higher, respectively, than the heat-transfer coefficients obtained using an-e-2 ethylene glycol.

  8. Thermodynamic and heat transfer analysis of heat recovery from engine test cell by Organic Rankine Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokati, Naser; Mohammadkhani, Farzad; Farrokhi, Navid; Ranjbar, Faramarz

    2014-12-01

    During manufacture of engines, evaluation of engine performance is essential. This is accomplished in test cells. During the test, a significant portion of heat energy released by the fuel is wasted. In this study, in order to recover these heat losses, Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) is recommended. The study has been conducted assuming the diesel oil to be composed of a single hydrocarbon such as C12H26. The composition of exhaust gases (products of combustion) have been computed (and not determined experimentally) from the stoichiometric equation representing the combustion reaction. The test cell heat losses are recovered in three separate heat exchangers (preheater, evaporator and superheater). These heat exchangers are separately designed, and the whole system is analyzed from energy and exergy viewpoints. Finally, a parametric study is performed to investigate the effect of different variables on the system performance characteristics such as the ORC net power, heat exchangers effectiveness, the first law efficiency, exergy destruction and heat transfer surfaces. The results of the study show that by utilizing ORC, heat recovery equivalent to 8.85 % of the engine power is possible. The evaporator has the highest exergy destruction rate, while the pump has the lowest among the system components. Heat transfer surfaces are calculated to be 173.6, 58.7, and 11.87 m2 for the preheater, evaporator and superheater, respectively.

  9. Nuclear test watchers feel political heat

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, E.

    1987-08-07

    One year after US citizen diplomats signed a remarkable pact with the Soviet Union to monitor nuclear bomb tests, they are running into some of the obstacles that regular diplomats encounter - political flak from the Pentagon and harassment by the Soviet military. But they have devised some technical solutions that they hope will get them around the roadblocks. These solutions are discussed.

  10. Experimental static aerodynamics of a regular hexagonal prism in a low density hypervelocity flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, R. W.; Mueller, J. N.; Lee, L. P.

    1972-01-01

    A regular hexagonal prism, having a fineness ratio of 1.67, has been tested in a wind tunnel to determine its static aerodynamic characteristics in a low-density hypervelocity flow. The prism tested was a 1/4-scale model of the graphite heat shield which houses the radioactive fuel for the Viking spacecraft auxiliary power supply. The basic hexagonal prism was also modified to simulate a prism on which ablation of one of the six side flats had occurred. This modified hexagonal prism was tested to determine the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of a shape change caused by ablation during a possible side-on stable reentry.

  11. HYSHOT-2 Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, T.; Owen, R.; Walton, C.

    2005-02-01

    The scramjet flight test Hyshot-2, flew on the 30 July 2002. The programme, led by the University of Queensland, had the primary objective of obtaining supersonic combustion data in flight for comparison with measurements made in shock tunnels. QinetiQ was one of the sponsors, and also provided aerodynamic data and trajectory predictions for the ballistic re-entry of the spinning sounding rocket. The unconventional missile geometry created by the nose-mounted asymmetric-scramjet in conjunction with the high angle of attack during re-entry makes the problem interesting. This paper presents the wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamic calculations used as input for the trajectory prediction. Indirect comparison is made with data obtained in the Hyshot-2 flight using a 6 degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation.

  12. Life Test Approach for Refractory Metal/Sodium Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James J.; Reid, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    Heat pipe life tests described in the literature have seldom been conducted on a systematic basis. Typically one or more heat pipes are built and tested for an extended period at a single temperature with simple condenser loading. This paper describes an approach to generate carefully controlled data that can conclusively establish heat pipe operating life with material-fluid combinations capable of extended operation. Approximately 10 years of operational life might be compressed into 3 years of laboratory testing through a combination of increased temperature and mass fluence. Two specific test series have been identified and include: investigation of long term corrosion rates based on the guidelines contained in ASTM G-68-80 (using 7 heat pipes); and investigation of corrosion trends in a cross correlation sequence at various temperatures and mass fluences based on a central composite test design (using 9 heat pipes). The heat pipes selected for demonstration purposes are fabricated from a Mo-44.5%Re alloy with a length of 0.3 meters and a diameter of 1.59 cm(to conserve material) with a condenser to evaporator length ratio of approximately 3. The wick is a crescent annular design formed from 400-mesh Mo-Re alloy material hot isostatically pressed to produce a final wick core of 20 microns or less.

  13. Longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a deflected-thrust propulsive-lift transport model. [wind tunnel tests of aircraft models of jet transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the effect of deflecting the engine exit of a four-engine double-slotted flap transport to provide STOL performance. Longitudinal aerodynamic data were obtained at various engine exit positions and deflections. The data were obtained at three flap deflections representing cruise, take-off, and landing conditions for a range of angles of attack and various thrust coefficients. Downwash angles at the location of the horizontal tail were measured. The data are presented without analysis or discussion. Photographs of the test configurations are shown.

  14. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 3: Graphical data book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    A graphical presentation of the aerodynamic data acquired during coannular nozzle performance wind tunnel tests is given. The graphical data consist of plots of nozzle gross thrust coefficient, fan nozzle discharge coefficient, and primary nozzle discharge coefficient. Normalized model component static pressure distributions are presented as a function of primary total pressure, fan total pressure, and ambient static pressure for selected operating conditions. In addition, the supersonic cruise configuration data include plots of nozzle efficiency and secondary-to-fan total pressure pumping characteristics. Supersonic and subsonic cruise data are given.

  15. Aerodynamic laboratory at Cuatro Vientos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    JUBERA

    1922-01-01

    This report presents a listing of the many experiments in aerodynamics taking place at Cuatro Vientos. Some of the studies include: testing spheres, in order to determine coefficients; mechanical and chemical tests of materials; and various tests of propeller strength and flexibility.

  16. Heat Rejection Systems Utilizing Composites and Heat Pipes: Design and Performance Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Beach, Duane E.; Sanzi, James L.

    2007-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites offer the promise of reducing the mass and increasing the performance of future heat rejection systems. With lifetimes for heat rejection systems reaching a decade or more in a micrometeoroid environment, use of multiple heat pipes for fault tolerant design is compelling. The combination of polymer matrix composites and heat pipes is of particular interest for heat rejection systems operating on the lunar surface. A technology development effort is under way to study the performance of two radiator demonstration units manufactured with different polymer matrix composite face sheet resin and bonding adhesives, along with different titanium-water heat pipe designs. Common to the two radiator demonstration units is the use of high thermal conductivity fibers in the face sheets and high thermal conductivity graphite saddles within a light weight aluminum honeycomb core. Testing of the radiator demonstration units included thermal vacuum exposure and thermal vacuum exposure with a simulated heat pipe failure. Steady state performance data were obtained at different operating temperatures to identify heat transfer and thermal resistance characteristics. Heat pipe failure was simulated by removing the input power from an individual heat pipe in order to identify the diminished performance characteristics of the entire panel after a micrometeoroid strike. Freeze-thaw performance was also of interest. This paper presents a summary of the two radiator demonstration units manufactured to support this technology development effort along with the thermal performance characteristics obtained to date. Future work will also be discussed.

  17. A comparison of the aerodynamic characteristics at transonic speeds of four wing-fuselage configurations as determined from different test techniques, 4 October 1960

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlan, C. J.; Myers, B. C., II; Mattson, A. T.

    1976-01-01

    The high speed aerodynamic characteristics of a family of four wing-fuselage configurations of 0, 35, 45, and 60 deg sweepback were determined from transonic bump model tests that were conducted in the Langley high speed 7 by 10 foot tunnel; sting supported model tests were conducted in the Langley 8 foot high speed tunnel and in the Langley high speed 7 by 10 foot tunnel, and rocket model tests were conducted by the Langley Pilotless Aircraft Research Division. A complementary study of the effect of Mach number gradients and streamline curvature on bump results is also included. The qualitative data obtained from the various test facilities for the wing-fuselage configurations were in essential agreement as regards the relative effects of sweepback and Mach number except for drag at zero lift. Quantitatively, important differences were present.

  18. Post-Test Analysis of a 10-Year Sodium Heat Pipe Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Locci, Ivan E.; Sanzi, James L.; Hull, David R.; Geng, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    High-temperature heat pipes are being evaluated for use in energy conversion applications such as fuel cells, gas turbine re-combustors, Stirling cycle heat sources; and with the resurgence of space nuclear power both as reactor heat removal elements and as radiator elements. Long operating life and reliable performance are critical requirements for these applications. Accordingly, long-term materials compatibility is being evaluated through the use of high-temperature life test heat pipes. Thermacore, Inc., has carried out a sodium heat pipe 10-year life test to establish long-term operating reliability. Sodium heat pipes have demonstrated favorable materials compatibility and heat transport characteristics at high operating temperatures in air over long time periods. A representative one-tenth segment Stirling Space Power Converter heat pipe with an Inconel 718 envelope and a stainless steel screen wick has operated for over 87,000 hr (10 years) at nearly 700 C. These life test results have demonstrated the potential for high-temperature heat pipes to serve as reliable energy conversion system components for power applications that require long operating lifetime with high reliability. Detailed design specifications, operating history, and post-test analysis of the heat pipe and sodium working fluid are described. Lessons learned and future life test plans are also discussed.

  19. Longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a vectored-engine-over-wing configuration at subsonic speeds. [Langley V/STOL tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leavitt, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    The Langley V/STOL tunnel was used to determine the effects of vectoring exhaust flow on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a vectored-engine-over-wing configuration. Vectoring was accomplished by blowing from over-wing-mounted engines over a variable trailing-edge flap. Effects of varying canard geometry and wing leading-edge geometry were investigated. Wind-tunnel data were obtained at a Mach number of 0.186 for an angle-of-attack range from -20 deg to 24 deg and engine nozzle pressure ratios from 1.0 (jet off) to approximately 3.75.

  20. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Experimental Operations & Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrene, Aaron; Mehta, Manish; MacLean, Matthew; Seaford, Mark; Holden, Michael

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) uses four clustered liquid rocket engines along with two solid rocket boosters. The interaction between all six rocket exhaust plumes will produce a complex and severe thermal environment in the base of the vehicle. This work focuses on a recent 2% scale, hot-fire SLS base heating test. These base heating tests are short-duration tests executed with chamber pressures near the full-scale values with gaseous hydrogen/oxygen engines and RSRMV analogous solid propellant motors. The LENS II shock tunnel/Ludwieg tube tunnel was used at or near flight duplicated conditions up to Mach 5. Model development was based on the Space Shuttle base heating tests with several improvements including doubling of the maximum chamber pressures and duplication of freestream conditions. Test methodology and conditions are presented, and base heating results from 76 runs are reported in non-dimensional form. Regions of high heating are identified and comparisons of various configuration and conditions are highlighted. Base pressure and radiometer results are also reported.

  1. Measurement technology for micro-scale aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael James

    As micro-technology improves, it may become possible to build flying vehicles at length scales of millimeters, or even microns. Successful design of vehicles at such sizes requires understanding of the fluid mechanics of flight at the micron scale. While biological flight has been studied at these scales, many questions remain to be answered for flight at these scales. Previous work has not determined the limiting scales of continuum aerodynamics for low-speed flight. This study begins with the development of a new scaling law based on boundary layer theory. The laminar boundary layer equations were solved non-dimensionally for slip flow conditions. These results show that a measurable decrease in skin friction, as well as changes in heat transfer, and flow stability, may occur as the boundary layer Knudsen number approaches 0.01. These flow conditions correspond to airfoil chords of up to 100 microns, pressures of 0.1 to 1.0 atmospheres, and velocities from 30 to 100 m/s. Based on this scaling law, specialized wind-tunnel test facilities were designed to operate at scales not previously studied. The novel wind-tunnel allows for independent control of Reynolds and Knudsen numbers on static airfoils. A draw-through, low turbulence, low-pressure wind tunnel with a 1 cm cross section was built and tested. The flow through these facilities is characterized, and recommendations are made for future wind-tunnel development. To allow testing at these scales, micro-scale airfoils, with chords of 100 microns, thicknesses of 5 microns, and a span of 1 cm were fabricated using MEMS fabrication technology. Fabrication of free-standing micro-structures with meso-scale spans and micro-scale cross sections required the development of specialized fabrication processes. These airfoils were integrated with piezoresistive force sensors, allowing measurement of aerodynamic forces. The airfoil structures were successfully released within the tunnel. The actual aerodynamic load on the

  2. Radiant heat test of Perforated Metal Air Transportable Package (PMATP).

    SciTech Connect

    Gronewald, Patrick James; Oneto, Robert; Mould, John; Pierce, Jim Dwight

    2003-08-01

    A conceptual design for a plutonium air transport package capable of surviving a 'worst case' airplane crash has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). A full-scale prototype, designated as the Perforated Metal Air Transport Package (PMATP) was thermally tested in the SNL Radiant Heat Test Facility. This testing, conducted on an undamaged package, simulated a regulation one-hour aviation fuel pool fire test. Finite element thermal predictions compared well with the test results. The package performed as designed, with peak containment package temperatures less than 80 C after exposure to a one-hour test in a 1000 C environment.

  3. Forced Convection Boiling and Critical Heat Flux of Ethanol in Electrically Heated Tube Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Linne, Diane L.; Rousar, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Electrically heated tube tests were conducted to characterize the critical heat flux (transition from nucleate to film boiling) of subcritical ethanol flowing at conditions relevant to the design of a regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chamber. The coolant was SDA-3C alcohol (95% ethyl alcohol, 5% isopropyl alcohol by weight), and tests were conducted over the following ranges of conditions: pressure from 144 to 703 psia, flow velocities from 9.7 to 77 ft/s, coolant subcooling from 33 to 362 F, and critical heat fluxes up to 8.7 BTU/in(exp 2)/sec. For the data taken near 200 psia, critical heat flux was correlated as a function of the product of velocity and fluid subcooling to within +/- 20%. For data taken at higher pressures, an additional pressure term is needed to correlate the critical heat flux. It was also shown that at the higher test pressures and/or flow rates, exceeding the critical heat flux did not result in wall burnout. This result may significantly increase the engine heat flux design envelope for higher pressure conditions.

  4. Advanced High-Temperature Flexible TPS for Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelCorso, Joseph A.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Bruce, Walter E., III; Hughes, Stephen J.; Calomino, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    Typical entry vehicle aeroshells are limited in size by the launch vehicle shroud. Inflatable aerodynamic decelerators allow larger aeroshell diameters for entry vehicles because they are not constrained to the launch vehicle shroud diameter. During launch, the hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (HIAD) is packed in a stowed configuration. Prior to atmospheric entry, the HIAD is deployed to produce a drag device many times larger than the launch shroud diameter. The large surface area of the inflatable aeroshell provides deceleration of high-mass entry vehicles at relatively low ballistic coefficients. Even for these low ballistic coefficients there is still appreciable heating, requiring the HIAD to employ a thermal protection system (TPS). This TPS must be capable of surviving the heat pulse, and the rigors of fabrication handling, high density packing, deployment, and aerodynamic loading. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of flexible TPS tests and results, conducted over the last three years. This paper also includes an overview of each test facility, the general approach for testing flexible TPS, the thermal analysis methodology and results, and a comparison with 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel, Laser-Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory, and Panel Test Facility test data. Results are presented for a baseline TPS layup that can withstand a 20 W/cm2 heat flux, silicon carbide (SiC) based TPS layup, and polyimide insulator TPS layup. Recent work has focused on developing material layups expected to survive heat flux loads up to 50 W/cm2 (which is adequate for many potential applications), future work will consider concepts capable of withstanding more than 100 W/cm2 incident radiant heat flux. This paper provides an overview of the experimental setup, material layup configurations, facility conditions, and planned future flexible TPS activities.

  5. Aerodynamic challenges of ALT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, I.; Homan, D.; Romere, P. O.

    1985-01-01

    The approach and landing test (ALT) of the Space Shuttle Orbiter presented a number of unique challenges in the area of aerodynamics. The purpose of the ALT program was both to confirm the use of the Boeing 747 as a transport vehicle for ferrying the Orbiter across the country and to demonstrate the flight characteristics of the Orbiter in its approach and landing phase. Concerns for structural fatigue and performance dictated a tailcone be attached to the Orbiter for ferry and for the initial landing tests. The Orbiter with a tailcone attached presented additional challenges to the normal aft sting concept of wind tunnel testing. The landing tests required that the Orbiter be separated from the 747 at approximately 20,000 feet using aerodynamic forces to fly the vehicles apart. The concept required a complex test program to determine the relative effects of the two vehicles on each other. Also of concern, and tested, was the vortex wake created by the 747 and the means for the Orbiter to avoid it following separation.

  6. Experimental Breeder Reactor II inherent shutdown and heat removal tests - test results and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Planchon, H.P.; Singer, R.M.; Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Chang, L.K.; Betten, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    A test program is being conducted to demonstrate that a power producing Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) can passively remove shutdown heat by natural convection; passively reduce power in response to a loss of reactor flow and passively reduce power in response to a loss of the balance of plant heat sink. Measurements and pretest predictions confirm that natural convection is a reliable, predictable method of shutdown heat removal and suggest that safety-related pumps or pony motors are not necessary for safe, shutdown heat removal in a LMR. Measurements from tests in which reactor flow and heat rejection to the balance of plant were perturbed show that reactivity feedbacks can passively control power and temperature. This data is a basis for additional tests including a complete loss-of-flow without scram and a complete loss of heat sink without scram.

  7. Rotary wing aerodynamically generated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. J.; Morse, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The history and methodology of aerodynamic noise reduction in rotary wing aircraft are presented. Thickness noise during hover tests and blade vortex interaction noise are determined and predicted through the use of a variety of computer codes. The use of test facilities and scale models for data acquisition are discussed.

  8. DCH-2: Results from the second experiment performed in the Surtsey Direct Heating Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tarbell, W.W.; Nichols, R.T.; Brockmann, J.E.; Ross, J.W.; Oliver, M.S.; Lucero, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    This test involved 80 kg of molten core debris simulant ejected under pressure into a 1:10 linear scale model of a reactor cavity. The apparatus was placed in the Surtsey Direct Heating Test Facility to allow direct measurement of the temperature and pressure rise of the contained atmosphere. The molten material was ejected from the cavity as a dense cloud of particles and gas. The dispersed debris caused a rapid pressurization of the 103-m/sup 3/ atmosphere. Peak pressures ranged from 0.22 to 0.31 MPa above the ambient level. Peak temperatures were from 759/sup 0/C to 1335/sup 0/C, with the highest values recorded near the top of the chamber. Much of the debris (approx.70%) was found adhered to the top and sides of the steel chamber. The pattern of the retained material suggested that the debris field propagated around the chamber following the contour of the vessel. Aerosol measurements indicated that approx.1% to approx.6.6% of the ejected mass was in the size range less than 10..mu..m aerodynamic diameter. 8 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Induction Heating Model of Cermet Fuel Element Environmental Test (CFEET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Carlos F.; Bradley, D. E.; Cavender, D. P.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.; Trent, D.; Stewart, E.

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR) are capable of producing a high specific impulse by employing heat produced by a fission reactor to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements due to large thermal gradients; therefore, high-melting-point ceramics-metallic matrix composites (cermets) are one of the fuels under consideration as part of the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Advance Exploration System (AES) technology project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of testing and analytical modeling is to determine their ability to survive and maintain thermal performance in a prototypical NTR reactor environment of exposure to hydrogen at very high temperatures and obtain data to assess the properties of the non-nuclear support materials. The fission process and the resulting heating performance are well known and do not require that active fissile material to be integrated in this testing. A small-scale test bed; Compact Fuel Element Environmental Tester (CFEET), designed to heat fuel element samples via induction heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed at MSFC to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without utilizing fissile material. This paper details the analytical approach to help design and optimize the test bed using COMSOL Multiphysics for predicting thermal gradients induced by electromagnetic heating (Induction heating) and Thermal Desktop for radiation calculations.

  10. The Design, Fabrication, and Testing of Composite Heat Exchange Coupons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, Derek J.; Meador, Michael A.; Shin, Euy-Sik; Johnston, James C.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    Several heat exchanger (HX) test panels were designed, fabricated and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center to explore the fabrication and performance of several designs for composite heat exchangers. The development of these light weight, high efficiency air-liquid test panels was attempted using polymer composites and carbon foam materials. The fundamental goal of this effort was to demonstrate the feasibility of the composite HX for various space exploration and thermal management applications including Orion CEV and Altair. The specific objectives of this work were to select optimum materials, designs, and to optimize fabrication procedures. After fabrication, the individual design concept prototypes were tested to determine their thermal performance and to guide the future development of full-size engineering development units (EDU). The overall test results suggested that the panel bonded with pre-cured composite laminates to KFOAM Grade L1 scored above the other designs in terms of ease of manufacture and performance.

  11. Aerodynamics and thermal physics of helicopter ice accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yiqiang

    Ice accretion on aircraft introduces significant loss in airfoil performance. Reduced lift-to- drag ratio reduces the vehicle capability to maintain altitude and also limits its maneuverability. Current ice accretion performance degradation modeling approaches are calibrated only to a limited envelope of liquid water content, impact velocity, temperature, and water droplet size; consequently inaccurate aerodynamic performance degradations are estimated. The reduced ice accretion prediction capabilities in the glaze ice regime are primarily due to a lack of knowledge of surface roughness induced by ice accretion. A comprehensive understanding of the ice roughness effects on airfoil heat transfer, ice accretion shapes, and ultimately aerodynamics performance is critical for the design of ice protection systems. Surface roughness effects on both heat transfer and aerodynamic performance degradation on airfoils have been experimentally evaluated. Novel techniques, such as ice molding and casting methods and transient heat transfer measurement using non-intrusive thermal imaging methods, were developed at the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility at Penn State. A novel heat transfer scaling method specifically for turbulent flow regime was also conceived. A heat transfer scaling parameter, labeled as Coefficient of Stanton and Reynolds Number (CSR = Stx/Rex --0.2), has been validated against reference data found in the literature for rough flat plates with Reynolds number (Re) up to 1x107, for rough cylinders with Re ranging from 3x104 to 4x106, and for turbine blades with Re from 7.5x105 to 7x106. This is the first time that the effect of Reynolds number is shown to be successfully eliminated on heat transfer magnitudes measured on rough surfaces. Analytical models for ice roughness distribution, heat transfer prediction, and aerodynamics performance degradation due to ice accretion have also been developed. The ice roughness prediction model was

  12. Enhanced boiling heat transfer in horizontal test bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Trewin, R.R.; Jensen, M.K.; Bergles, A.E.

    1994-08-01

    Two-phase flow boiling from bundles of horizontal tubes with smooth and enhanced surfaces has been investigated. Experiments were conducted in pure refrigerant R-113, pure R-11, and mixtures of R-11 and R-113 of approximately 25, 50, and 75% of R-113 by mass. Tests were conducted in two staggered tube bundles consisting of fifteen rows and five columns laid out in equilateral triangular arrays with pitch-to-diameter ratios of 1.17 and 1.5. The enhanced surfaces tested included a knurled surface (Wolverine`s Turbo-B) and a porous surface (Linde`s High Flux). Pool boiling tests were conducted for each surface so that reference values of the heat transfer coefficient could be obtained. Boiling heat transfer experiments in the tube bundles were conducted at pressures of 2 and 6 bar, heat flux values from 5 to 80 kW/m{sup 2}s, and qualities from 0% to 80%, Values of the heat transfer coefficients for the enhanced surfaces were significantly larger than for the smooth tubes and were comparable to the values obtained in pool boiling. It was found that the performance of the enhanced tubes could be predicted using the pool boiling results. The degradation in the smooth tube heat transfer coefficients obtained in fluid mixtures was found to depend on the difference between the molar concentration in the liquid and vapor.

  13. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Sean; Bigatel, Patrick

    2004-10-17

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

  14. Aerodynamic drag on intermodal railcars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinghorn, Philip; Maynes, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The aerodynamic drag associated with transport of commodities by rail is becoming increasingly important as the cost of diesel fuel increases. This study aims to increase the efficiency of intermodal cargo trains by reducing the aerodynamic drag on the load carrying cars. For intermodal railcars a significant amount of aerodynamic drag is a result of the large distance between loads that often occurs and the resulting pressure drag resulting from the separated flow. In the present study aerodynamic drag data have been obtained through wind tunnel testing on 1/29 scale models to understand the savings that may be realized by judicious modification to the size of the intermodal containers. The experiments were performed in the BYU low speed wind tunnel and the test track utilizes two leading locomotives followed by a set of five articulated well cars with double stacked containers. The drag on a representative mid-train car is measured using an isolated load cell balance and the wind tunnel speed is varied from 20 to 100 mph. We characterize the effect that the gap distance between the containers and the container size has on the aerodynamic drag of this representative rail car and investigate methods to reduce the gap distance.

  15. A vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel tests and its application in pollutant dispersion studies.

    PubMed

    Gromke, Christof

    2011-01-01

    A new vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel investigations was developed. The modeling concept is based on fluid dynamical similarity aspects and allows the small-scale modeling of various kinds of vegetation, e.g. field crops, shrubs, hedges, single trees and forest stands. The applicability of the modeling concept was validated in wind tunnel pollutant dispersion studies. Avenue trees in urban street canyons were modeled and their implications on traffic pollutant dispersion were investigated. The dispersion experiments proved the modeling concept to be practicable for wind tunnel studies and suggested to provide reliable concentration results. Unfavorable effects of trees on pollutant dispersion and natural ventilation in street canyons were revealed. Increased traffic pollutant concentrations were found in comparison to the tree-free reference case.

  16. Simple exercise test for the prediction of relative heat tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, W.L.; Lewis, D.A.; Anderson, R.K.; Kamon, E.

    1986-04-01

    A medical screening exercise test is presented which accurately predicts relative heat tolerance during work in very hot environments. The test consisted of 15-20 min of exercise at a standard absolute intensity of about 600 kcal/hr (140W) with the subject wearing a vapor-barrier suit. Five minutes after the subject exercised, recovery heart rate was measured. When this heart rate is used, a physiological limit (+/- approximately 5 min) can be predicted with 95% confidence for the most intense work-heat conditions found in nuclear power stations. In addition, site health and safety personnel can establish qualification criteria for work on hot jobs, based on the test results. The test as developed can be performed in an office environment with the use of a minimum of equipment by personnel with minimal expertise and training. Total maximal test duration is about 20-25 min per person and only heart rate need be monitored (simple pulse palpation will suffice). Test modality is adaptable to any ergometer, the most readily available and least expensive of which is bench-stepping. It is recommended that this test be available for use for those persons who, based upon routine medical examination or past history, are suspected of being relatively heat intolerant.

  17. Results of phase change paint heat transfer test utilizing 0.040-scale 50% forebody models (no. 82-0) of the Rockwell International Space Shuttle Orbiter in AEDC VKF hypersonic tunnel B (test OH54B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating phase change paint tests for the space shuttle orbiter are reported. The model was a 0.040 scale representation of the forward 50% of the orbiter. Surface roughness effects on boundary layer transition were investigated. The roughness was simulated by steel balls 0.020 and 0.025 inch in diameter and a 0.25 in. diameter hole simulating the forward ET attach socket. A nominal Mach number of was tested with unit Reynolds number varying from 0.75 x 1 million ft through 3.5x 1 million ft. Angle of attack was varied from 20 degrees to 40 degrees.

  18. Building, Testing, and Post Test Analysis of Durability Heat Pipe No.6

    SciTech Connect

    MOSS, TIMOTHY A.

    2002-03-01

    The Solar Thermal Program at Sandia supports work developing dish/Stirling systems to convert solar energy into electricity. Heat pipe technology is ideal for transferring the energy of concentrated sunlight from the parabolic dish concentrators to the Stirling engine heat tubes. Heat pipes can absorb the solar energy at non-uniform flux distributions and release this energy to the Stirling engine heater tubes at a very uniform flux distribution thus decoupling the design of the engine heater head from the solar absorber. The most important part of a heat pipe is the wick, which transports the sodium over the heated surface area. Bench scale heat pipes were designed and built to more economically, both in time and money, test different wicks and cleaning procedures. This report covers the building, testing, and post-test analysis of the sixth in a series of bench scale heat pipes. Durability heat pipe No.6 was built and tested to determine the effects of a high temperature bakeout, 950 C, on wick corrosion during long-term operation. Previous tests showed high levels of corrosion with low temperature bakeouts (650-700 C). Durability heat pipe No.5 had a high temperature bakeout and reflux cleaning and showed low levels of wick corrosion after long-term operation. After testing durability heat pipe No.6 for 5,003 hours at an operating temperature of 750 C, it showed low levels of wick corrosion. This test shows a high temperature bakeout alone will significantly reduce wick corrosion without the need for costly and time consuming reflux cleaning.

  19. Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

  20. Refractory Metal Heat Pipe Life Test - Test Plan and Standard Operating Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. J.; Reid, R. S.

    2010-01-01

    Refractory metal heat pipes developed during this project shall be subjected to various operating conditions to evaluate life-limiting corrosion factors. To accomplish this objective, various parameters shall be investigated, including the effect of temperature and mass fluence on long-term corrosion rate. The test series will begin with a performance test of one module to evaluate its performance and to establish the temperature and power settings for the remaining modules. The performance test will be followed by round-the-clock testing of 16 heat pipes. All heat pipes shall be nondestructively inspected at 6-month intervals. At longer intervals, specific modules will be destructively evaluated. Both the nondestructive and destructive evaluations shall be coordinated with Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the processing, setup, and testing of the heat pipes, standard operating procedures shall be developed. Initial procedures are listed here and, as hardware is developed, will be updated, incorporating findings and lessons learned.

  1. A Liquid-Liquid Thermoelectric Heat Exchanger as a Heat Pump for Testing Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Makinen, Janice; Le, Hung V.

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of the Phase Change HX payload on the International Space Station (ISS) is to test and demonstrate the viability and performance of Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers (PCM HX). The system was required to pump a working fluid through a PCM HX to promote the phase change material to freeze and thaw as expected on Orion's Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. Due to limitations on ISS's Internal Thermal Control System, a heat pump was needed on the Phase Change HX payload to help with reducing the working fluid's temperature to below 0degC (32degF). This paper will review the design and development of a TEC based liquid-liquid heat exchanger as a way to vary to fluid temperature for the freeze and thaw phase of the PCM HX. Specifically, the paper will review the design of custom coldplates and sizing for the required heat removal of the HX.

  2. Classical Aerodynamic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A collection of papers on modern theoretical aerodynamics is presented. Included are theories of incompressible potential flow and research on the aerodynamic forces on wing and wing sections of aircraft and on airship hulls.

  3. Heat transfer phase change paint test (OH-42) of a Rockwell International SSV orbiter in the NASA/LRC Mach 8 variable density wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R.; Creel, T. R., Jr.; Lawing, P.; Quan, M.; Dye, W.; Cummings, J.; Gorowitz, H.; Craig, C.; Rich, G.

    1973-01-01

    Phase change paint tests of a Rockwell International .00593-scale space shuttle orbiter were conducted in the Langley Research Center's Variable Density Wind Tunnel. The test objectives were to determine the effects of various wing/underbody configurations on the aerodynamic heating rates and boundary layer transition during simulated entry conditions. Several models were constructed. Each varied from the other in either wing cuff radius, airfoil thickness, or wing-fuselage underbody blending. Two ventral fins were glued to the fuselage underside of one model to test the interference heating effects. Simulated Mach 8 entry data were obtained for each configuration at angles of attack ranging from 25 to 40 deg, and a Reynolds number variation of one million to eight million. Elevon, bodyflap, and rudder flare deflections were tested. Oil flow visualization and Schlieren photographs were obtained to aid in reducing the phase change paint data as well as to observe the flow patterns peculiar to each configuration.

  4. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-04-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  5. Distributed Aerodynamic Sensing and Processing Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin; Jutte, Christine; Mangalam, Arun

    2011-01-01

    A Distributed Aerodynamic Sensing and Processing (DASP) toolbox was designed and fabricated for flight test applications with an Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) mounted under the fuselage of an F-15B on the Flight Test Fixture (FTF). DASP monitors and processes the aerodynamics with the structural dynamics using nonintrusive, surface-mounted, hot-film sensing. This aerodynamic measurement tool benefits programs devoted to static/dynamic load alleviation, body freedom flutter suppression, buffet control, improvement of aerodynamic efficiency through cruise control, supersonic wave drag reduction through shock control, etc. This DASP toolbox measures local and global unsteady aerodynamic load distribution with distributed sensing. It determines correlation between aerodynamic observables (aero forces) and structural dynamics, and allows control authority increase through aeroelastic shaping and active flow control. It offers improvements in flutter suppression and, in particular, body freedom flutter suppression, as well as aerodynamic performance of wings for increased range/endurance of manned/ unmanned flight vehicles. Other improvements include inlet performance with closed-loop active flow control, and development and validation of advanced analytical and computational tools for unsteady aerodynamics.

  6. Direct containment heating: Surtsey test results and models

    SciTech Connect

    Tarbell, W.W.; Nichols, R.T.; Pilch, M.; Brockmann, J.E.; Powers, D.A.

    1988-08-01

    Direct containment heating is one of the processes that can lead to containment rupture early in a severe reactor accident. The origins and the current understanding of this process are surveyed. Three issues arise in connection with direct containment heating -- threats to containment integrity posed by transfer of energy to the containment atmosphere from dispersed core debris or the generation of hydrogen by reactions of core debris with steam, and the formation of radioactive aerosols available for release from the plant should containment integrity be lost. The two threats to containment integrity have different characteristics. Energy exchange between core debris and the atmosphere depends on the long range dispersal of the debris and the atmosphere depends on the long range dispersal of the debris and can be affected by interactions of the debris with structures and co-dispersed water. Hydrogen generation is dependent on the detailed flows of debris and steam within and near the reactor cavity. Results of four experiments in the Surtsey test facility to explore energy exchange with the atmosphere are presented. These experiments suggest ''single particle'' models of direct heating over-predict the threat to containment integrity and that debris/structure interactions can enhance heating of the containment atmosphere. Results of test to establish the low pressure cut-off to direct heating are reported. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Results of tests of a Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter (-139 configuration) 0.0175-scale model (no. 29-0) in AEDC tunnel F to determine hypersonic heating effects (OH11)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quan, M.

    1975-01-01

    Results from wind tunnel tests to determine hypersonic aerodynamic heating rates on a NASA/Rockwell Space Shuttle Orbiter are reported. The tests were to determine Mach number effects, if any, and to obtain overall heating rate data at high Mach numbers from 10.5 to 16. The model used was a 0.0175-scale model built to Rockwell Orbiter lines VL70-000139. The model identity number is 29-0. These tests, designated OH11, were conducted in the AEDC Tunnel F.

  8. Index for aerodynamic data from the Bumblebee program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronvich, L. L.; Barnes, G. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Bumblebee program, was designed to provide a supersonic guided missile. The aerodynamics program included a fundamental research effort in supersonic aerodynamics as well as a design task in developing both test vehicles and prototypes of tactical missiles. An index of aerodynamic missile data developed in this program is presented.

  9. Preliminary operational results of the industrial process heat field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.; Davenport, R.

    1980-04-01

    There are currently six DOE-funded solar industrial process heat (IPH) field tests which have been operational for one year or longer. These are all low temperature first generation projects which supply heat at temperatures below 100/sup 0/C - three hot water and three hot air. During the 1979 calendar year, personnel from the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) visited all of these sites; the performance and cost results obtained for each project and the operational problems encountered at each site are discussed.

  10. Configuration Aerodynamics: Past - Present - Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Bencze, Daniel P.; Kulfan, Robert M.; Wilson, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    The Configuration Aerodynamics (CA) element of the High Speed Research (HSR) program is managed by a joint NASA and Industry team, referred to as the Technology Integration Development (ITD) team. This team is responsible for the development of a broad range of technologies for improved aerodynamic performance and stability and control characteristics at subsonic to supersonic flight conditions. These objectives are pursued through the aggressive use of advanced experimental test techniques and state of the art computational methods. As the HSR program matures and transitions into the next phase the objectives of the Configuration Aerodynamics ITD are being refined to address the drag reduction needs and stability and control requirements of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. In addition, the experimental and computational tools are being refined and improved to meet these challenges. The presentation will review the work performed within the Configuration Aerodynamics element in 1994 and 1995 and then discuss the plans for the 1996-1998 time period. The final portion of the presentation will review several observations of the HSR program and the design activity within Configuration Aerodynamics.

  11. Using the HARV simulation aerodynamic model to determine forebody strake aerodynamic coefficients from flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messina, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    The method described in this report is intended to present an overview of a process developed to extract the forebody aerodynamic increments from flight tests. The process to determine the aerodynamic increments (rolling pitching, and yawing moments, Cl, Cm, Cn, respectively) for the forebody strake controllers added to the F/A - 18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) aircraft was developed to validate the forebody strake aerodynamic model used in simulation.

  12. Isotope heat source simulator for testing of space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Smith, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    A reliable isotope heat source simulator was designed for use in a Brayton power system. This simulator is composed of an electrically heated tungsten wire which is wound around a boron nitride core and enclosed in a graphite jacket. Simulator testing was performed at the expected operating temperature of the Brayton power system. Endurance testing for 5012 hours was followed by cycling the simulator temperature. The integrity of this simulator was maintained throughout testing. Alumina beads served as a diffusion barrier to prevent interaction between the tungsten heater and boron nitride core. The simulator was designed to maintain a surface temperature of 1311 to 1366 K (1900 to 2000 F) with a power input of approximately 400 watts. The design concept and the materials used in the simulator make possible man different geometries. This flexibility increases its potential use.

  13. Comparison Test and its Evaluation of Flowmeters for Heat Meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hae-Man; Choi, Yong-Moon; Yoon, Byung-Ro

    2010-06-01

    This study selected a total of 24 heat flowmeters consisting of three types: impeller, electromagnetic and ultrasonic, 8 meters each. The diameter was 0.05 m (9 meters), 0.08 m (9 meters), and 0.15 m (6 meters). In accordance with the OIML R 75 testing method accuracy, installation position, external environment, and durability were tested, and the flowmeter property field test was conducted in the field where of heat supply from winter to summer in order to select the type of heat flowmeter best suited for the circumstances in Korea. According to the test result, all 3 types of flowmeters met the OIML Recommendation, but the result of the field test showed that the electromagnetic flowmeters displayed a deviation at the low flow rate during summer. The impeller flowmeters showed accuracy suggested by the OIML Recommendation, but the ultrasonic flowmeter, a next-generation flowmeter, which is strong against contamination, low in maintenance-rate, and high in accuracy as it has no moving part, was found to be the best choice.

  14. Aerodynamics Research Revolutionizes Truck Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center conducted numerous tests to refine the shape of trucks to reduce aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the 1980s and 1990s, a team based at Langley Research Center explored controlling drag and the flow of air around a moving body. Aeroserve Technologies Ltd., of Ottawa, Canada, with its subsidiary, Airtab LLC, in Loveland, Colorado, applied the research from Dryden and Langley to the development of the Airtab vortex generator. Airtabs create two counter-rotating vortices to reduce wind resistance and aerodynamic drag of trucks, trailers, recreational vehicles, and many other vehicles.

  15. New technology in turbine aerodynamics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Cursory review of some recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flowfields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

  16. Development of superconductor magnetic suspension and balance prototype facility for studying the feasibility of applying this technique to large scale aerodynamic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, R. N.; Humphris, R. R.; Henderson, K. C.

    1975-01-01

    The unique design and operational characteristics of a prototype magnetic suspension and balance facility which utilizes superconductor technology are described and discussed from the point of view of scalability to large sizes. The successful experimental demonstration of the feasibility of this new magnetic suspension concept of the University of Virginia, together with the success of the cryogenic wind-tunnel concept developed at Langley Research Center, appear to have finally opened the way to clean-tunnel, high-Re aerodynamic testing. Results of calculations corresponding to a two-step design extrapolation from the observed performance of the prototype magnetic suspension system to a system compatible with the projected cryogenic transonic research tunnel are presented to give an order-of-magnitude estimate of expected performance characteristics. Research areas where progress should lead to improved design and performance of large facilities are discussed.

  17. Sensitivity analysis in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Information on sensitivity analysis in computational aerodynamics is given in outline, graphical, and chart form. The prediction accuracy if the MCAERO program, a perturbation analysis method, is discussed. A procedure for calculating perturbation matrix, baseline wing paneling for perturbation analysis test cases and applications of an inviscid sensitivity matrix are among the topics covered.

  18. Bifurcations in unsteady aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, M.; Unal, A.

    1986-01-01

    Nonlinear algebraic functional expansions are used to create a form for the unsteady aerodynamic response that is consistent with solutions of the time dependent Navier-Stokes equations. An enumeration of means of invalidating Frechet differentiability of the aerodynamic response, one of which is aerodynamic bifurcation, is proposed as a way of classifying steady and unsteady aerodynamic phenomena that are important in flight dynamics applications. Accomodating bifurcation phenomena involving time dependent equilibrium states within a mathematical model of the aerodynamic response raises an issue of memory effects that becomes more important with each successive bifurcation.

  19. Fabrication and test of a variable conductance heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    A variable conductance heat pipe (VCHP) with feedback control was fabricated with a reservoir-condenser volume ratio of 10 and an axially grooved action section. Tests of the heat transport capability were greater than or equal to the analytical predictions for the no gas case. When gas was added, the pipe performance degraded by 18% at zero tilt as was expected. The placement of the reservoir heater and the test fixture cooling fins are believed to have caused a superheated vapor condition in the reservoir. Erroneously high reservoir temperature indications resulted from this condition. The observed temperature gradients in the reservoir lend support to this theory. The net result was higher than predicted reservoir temperatures. Also, significant increases in minimum heat load resulted for controller set point temperatures higher than 0 C. At 30 C, control within the tolerance band was maintained, but high reservoir heater power was required. Analyses showed that control is not possible for reasonably low reservoir heater power. This is supported by the observation of a significant reservoir heat leak through the condenser.

  20. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Tabulated aeroynamic data book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Tabulated data from wind tunnel tests conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of an advanced coannular exhaust nozzle for a future supersonic propulsion system are presented. Tests were conducted with two test configurations: (1) a short flap mechanism for fan stream control with an isentropic contoured flow splitter, and (2) an iris fan nozzle with a conical flow splitter. Both designs feature a translating primary plug and an auxiliary inlet ejector. Tests were conducted at takeoff and simulated cruise conditions. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. At simulated supersonic cruise, both configurations demonstrated good performance, comparable to levels assumed in earlier advanced supersonic propulsion studies. However, at subsonic cruise, both configurations exhibited performance that was 6 to 7.5 percent less than the study assumptions. At takeoff conditions, the iris configuration performance approached the assumed levels, while the short flap design was 4 to 6 percent less. Data are provided through test run 25.

  1. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  2. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  3. Heat tolerance testing: association between heat intolerance and anthropometric and fitness measurements.

    PubMed

    Lisman, Peter; Kazman, Josh B; O'Connor, Francis G; Heled, Yuval; Deuster, Patricia A

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated associations between heat intolerance, as determined by performance on a heat tolerance test (HTT), and anthropometric measurements (body surface-to-mass ratio, percent body fat, body mass index, and waist circumference) and cardiorespiratory fitness (maximal oxygen uptake [VO2max]). Relationships between predictive variables and specific physiological measurements recorded during the HTT were examined. A total of 34 male and 12 female participants, recruited from the military community, underwent anthropometric measurements, a maximal aerobic exercise test, and a standardized HTT, which consisted of walking on a treadmill at 5 km/h at 2% grade for 120 minutes at 40°C and 40% relative humidity. VO2max negatively correlated with maximum core temperature (r = -0.30, p < 0.05) and heart rate (HR) (r = -0.48, p < 0.01) although percent body fat showed a positive correlation with maximum HR (r = 0.36, p < 0.05). VO2max was the only independent attribute that significantly influenced both the maximum HR and core temperature attained during HTT. Logistic regression analyses indicated that VO2max was the only independent parameter (OR = 0.89, p = 0.026) that significantly contributed to overall HTT performance. Low cardiorespiratory fitness was associated with heat intolerance, as defined by HTT performance, and can be addressed as a preventative measure for exertional heat illness. This study provides further evidence that the HTT can be an effective tool for assessment of thermoregulatory patterns.

  4. Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The HFFAF is the only aeroballistic range the nation currently capable of testing in gases other than air and at sub-atmospheric pressures. It is used primarily to study the aerodynamics, Aerotherm...

  5. Manufacturing and thermomechanical testing of actively cooled all beryllium high heat flux test pieces

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliev, N.N.; Sokolov, Yu.A.; Shatalov, G.E.

    1995-09-01

    One of the problems affiliated to ITER high heat flux elements development is a problem of interface of beryllium protection with heat sink routinely made of copper alloys. To get rid of this problem all beryllium elements could be used as heat receivers in places of enhanced thermal loads. In accordance with this objectives four beryllium test pieces of two types have been manufactured in {open_quotes}Institute of Beryllium{close_quotes} for succeeding thermomechanical testing. Two of them were manufactured in accordance with JET team design; they are round {open_quotes}hypervapotron type{close_quotes} test pieces. Another two ones are rectangular test sections with a twisted tape installed inside of the circular channel. Preliminary stress-strain analysis have been performed for both type of the test pieces. Hypervapotrons have been shipped to JET where they were tested on JET test bed. Thermomechanical testing of pieces of the type of {open_quotes}swirl tape inside of tube{close_quotes} have been performed on Kurchatov Institute test bed. Chosen beryllium grade properties, some details of manufacturing, results of preliminary stress-strain analysis and thermomechanical testing of the test pieces {open_quotes}swirl tape inside of tube{close_quotes} type are given in this report.

  6. Results of tests OA12 and IA9 in the Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels on an 0.030-scale model of the Space Shuttle Vehicle 2A to determine aerodynamic loads, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the NASA/ARC Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels during April and May 1973, on an 0.030-scale replica of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Configuration 2A. Aerodynamic loads data were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 3.5. The investigation included tests IA9A, B and C on the integrated (launch) configuration and tests OA12A and C on the isolated orbiter (entry configuration). The integrated vehicle was tested at angles of attack and sideslip from -8 degrees to +8 degrees. The isolated orbiter was tested at angles of attack from -15 degrees to +40 degrees and angles of sideslip from -10 degrees to +10 degrees to as dictated by trajectory considerations. The effects of orbiter/external tank incidence angle and deflected control surfaces on aerodynamic loads were also investigated.

  7. Computational Aerodynamics of Shuttle Orbiter Damage Scenarios in Support of the Columbia Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, Karen L.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    2004-01-01

    In support of the Columbia Accident Investigation, inviscid computations of the aerodynamic characteristics for various Shuttle Orbiter damage scenarios were performed using the FELISA unstructured CFD solver. Computed delta aerodynamics were compared with the reconstructed delta aerodynamics in order to postulate a progression of damage through the flight trajectory. By performing computations at hypervelocity flight and CF4 tunnel conditions, a bridge was provided between wind tunnel testing in Langley's 20-Inch CF4 facility and the flight environment experienced by Columbia during re-entry. The rapid modeling capability of the unstructured methodology allowed the computational effort to keep pace with the wind tunnel and, at times, guide the wind tunnel efforts. These computations provided a detailed view of the flowfield characteristics and the contribution of orbiter components (such as the vertical tail and wing) to aerodynamic forces and moments that were unavailable from wind tunnel testing. The damage scenarios are grouped into three categories. Initially, single and multiple missing full RCC panels were analyzed to determine the effect of damage location and magnitude on the aerodynamics. Next is a series of cases with progressive damage, increasing in severity, in the region of RCC panel 9. The final group is a set of wing leading edge and windward surface deformations that model possible structural deformation of the wing skin due to internal heating of the wing structure. By matching the aerodynamics from selected damage scenarios to the reconstructed flight aerodynamics, a progression of damage that is consistent with the flight data, debris forensics, and wind tunnel data is postulated.

  8. Aerodynamic Performance of Hand Launch Glider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Masaru; Ishii, Mitsuru

    In recent years Micro Air Vehicles (MAV) for disaster aerial video are developed vigorously. In order to improve aerodynamic performance of MAV wing performance in low Reynolds numbers (Re) need to be improved, but research on the theme are very rare. In category of Hand Launch Glider, a kind of model aircraft, glide performance are competed, as a result high performance airfoils in Re is around 20,000 are developed. Therefore for MAV's aerodynamic performance improvement airfoils of Hand Launch Gliders should be referred and aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils desired to be studied. So in this research, aerodynamic characteristics of the gliders are measured in wind tunnel. And also consistency between wind tunnel test and glide test in calm air is examined to confirm reliability of wind tunnel test. Comparison of different airfoils and flow visualization are also performed.

  9. Aerodynamic performance of a core-engine turbine stator vane tested in a two-dimensional cascade of 10 vanes and in a single vane tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stabe, R. G.; Kline, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    A turbine stator vane was tested in a two-dimensional cascade of 10 vanes and in a single-vane tunnel. The single-vane tunnel was a cold air version of a tunnel which will be used for high temperature heat transfer testing of cooled turbine vanes. The purpose of the investigation was to determine if the flow conditions in the single-vane tunnel were sufficiently similar to those of a 10-vane cascade to permit meaningful heat transfer testing. The vane was tested over a range of ideal exit critical velocity ratios. The principal measurements were vane surface static pressure and cross-channel surveys of exit static pressure, total pressure, and flow angle. A brief description of the test vane and tunnels is included. The results of the exit surveys, the vane surface pressure distributions, and overall performance in terms of flow and loss for the two test configurations are compared.

  10. Heat Pump Water Heater Durabliltiy Testing - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, VAND.

    2004-05-29

    Ten heat pump water heaters (HPWH) were placed in an environmentally controlled test facility and run through a durability test program of approximately 7300 duty cycles (actual cycles accumulated ranged from 6640 to 8324 for the ten units). Five of the units were upgraded integral types (HPWH mounted on storage tank, no pump) from the same manufacturer as those tested in our first durability program in 2001 (Baxter and Linkous, 2002). The other five were ''add-on'' type units (HPWH with circulation pump plumbed to a separate storage tank) from another manufacturer. This durability test was designed to represent approximately 7-10 years of normal operation to meet the hot water needs of a residence. The integral units operated without incident apart from two control board failures. Both of these were caused by inadvertent exposure to very hot and humid (>135 F dry bulb and >120 F dew point) conditions that occurred due to a test loop failure. It is not likely that any residential water heater would be installed where such conditions were expected so these failures are not considered a long-term reliability concern. Two of the integral HPWHs featured a condensate management system (CMS) option that effectively eliminated any need for an evaporator condensate drain, but imposed significant efficiency penalties when operating in high humidity ambient conditions. The add-on units experienced no operational failures (breakdowns with loss of hot water production) during the course of the testing. However, their control systems exhibited some performance degradation under the high temperature, high humidity test conditions--HPWHs would shut off with tank water temperatures 15-20 F lower than when operating under moderate ambient conditions. One unit developed a refrigerant leak during the test program and lost about 50% of its charge resulting in reduced efficiency. Efficiency measurements on all the integral units and four of the add-on units showed significantly higher

  11. New technology in turbine aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    A cursory review is presented of some of the recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research at NASA-Lewis Research Center. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. An extensive bibliography is included. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Turbines currently being investigated make use of advanced blading concepts designed to maintain high efficiency under conditions of high aerodynamic loading. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flow fields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

  12. Fabrication and Testing of a Leading-Edge-Shaped Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Merrigan, Michael A.; Sena, J. Tom; Reid, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    The development of a refractory-composite/heat-pipe-cooled leading edge has evolved from the design stage to the fabrication and testing of a full size, leading-edge-shaped heat pipe. The heat pipe had a 'D-shaped' cross section and was fabricated from arc cast Mo-4lRe. An artery was included in the wick. Several issues were resolved with the fabrication of the sharp leading edge radius heat pipe. The heat pipe was tested in a vacuum chamber at Los Alamos National Laboratory using induction heating and was started up from the frozen state several times. However, design temperatures and heat fluxes were not obtained due to premature failure of the heat pipe resulting from electrical discharge between the induction heating apparatus and the heat pipe. Though a testing anomaly caused premature failure of the heat pipe, successful startup and operation of the heat pipe was demonstrated.

  13. Results of tests OA12 and IA9 in the Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnels on an 0.030-scale model of the space shuttle vehicle 2A to determine aerodynamic loads, volume 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted in wind tunnels during April and May 1973, on a 0.030-scale replica of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Configuration 2A. Aerodynamic loads data were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 3.5. The investigation included tests on the integrated (launch) configuration and the isolated orbiter (entry configuration). The integrated vehicle was tested at angles of attack and sideslip from -8 degrees to +8 degrees. The isolated orbiter was tested at angles of attack from -15 degrees to +40 degrees and angles of sideslip from -10 degrees to +10 degrees as dictated by trajectory considerations. The effects of orbiter/external tank incidence angle and deflected control surfaces on aerodynamic loads were also investigated. Tabulated pressure data were obtained for upper and lower wing surfaces and left and right vertical tail surfaces.

  14. Operation and design of selected industrial process heat field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, D. W.

    1981-02-01

    The DOE program of solar industrial process heat field tests has shown solar energy to be compatible with numerous industrial needs. Both the operational projects and the detailed designs of systems that are not yet operational have resulted in valuable insights into design and hardware practice. Typical of these insights are the experiences discussed for the four projects reviewed. Future solar IPH systems should benefit greatly not only from the availability of present information, but also from the wealth of operating experience from projects due to start up in 1981.

  15. Simulated Lunar Testing of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Bower, Chad E.; Iacomini, Christie S.; Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of the MTSA Subassembly (MTSAS) was designed and assembled for optimized Martian operations, but also meets system requirements for lunar operations. For lunar operations the MTSA sorption cycle is driven via a vacuum swing between suit ventilation loop pressure and lunar vacuum. The focus of this effort was testing in a simulated lunar environment. This environment was simulated in Paragon's EHF vacuum chamber. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the full cycle performance of the MTSA Subassembly EDU, and to assess CO2 loading and pressure drop of the wash coated aluminum reticulated foam sorbent bed. Lunar environment testing proved out the feasibility of pure vacuum swing operation, making MTSA a technology that can be tested and used on the Moon prior to going to Mars. Testing demonstrated better than expected CO2 Nomenclature loading on the sorbent and nearly replicates the equilibrium data from the sorbent manufacturer. This exceeded any of the previous sorbent loading tests performed by Paragon. Subsequently, the increased performance of the sorbent bed design indicates future designs will require less mass and volume than the current EDU rendering MTSA as very competitive for Martian PLSS applications.

  16. Aerodynamic results of wind tunnel tests on a 0.010-scale model (32-QTS) space shuttle integrated vehicle in the AEDC VKF-40-inch supersonic wind tunnel (IA61)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daileda, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    Plotted and tabulated aerodynamic coefficient data from a wind tunnel test of the integrated space shuttle vehicle are presented. The primary test objective was to determine proximity force and moment data for the orbiter/external tank and solid rocket booster (SRB) with and without separation rockets firing for both single and dual booster runs. Data were obtained at three points (t = 0, 1.25, and 2.0 seconds) on the nominal SRB separation trajectory.

  17. Status and future plans of the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program. [Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, H. N.

    1981-01-01

    Results from flight tests of the ARW-1 research wing are presented. Preliminary loads data and experiences with the active control system for flutter suppression are included along with comparative results of test and prediction for the flutter boundary of the supercritical research wing and on performance of the flutter suppression system. The status of the ARW-2 research wing is given.

  18. Performance and test section flow characteristics of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.

    1993-01-01

    Results from the performance and test section flow calibration of the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented. Measurements indicating the 80- by 120-ft test section flow quality were obtained throughout the tunnel operational envelope and for atmospheric wind speeds up to approximately 20 knots. Tunnel performance characteristics and a dynamic pressure system calibration were also documented during the process of mapping the test section flow field. Experimental results indicate that the test section flow quality is relatively insensitive to dynamic pressure and the level of atmospheric winds experienced during the calibration. The dynamic pressure variation in the test section is within +/-75 percent of the average. The axial turbulence intensity is less than 0.5 percent up to the maximum test section speed of 100 knots, and the vertical and lateral flow angle variations are within +/-5 deg and +/-7 deg, respectively. Atmospheric winds were found to affect the pressure distribution in the test section only at high ratios of wind speed to test section speed.

  19. Analysis of wind tunnel test results for a 9.39-per cent scale model of a VSTOL fighter/attack aircraft. Volume 1: Study overview. [aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lummus, J. R.; Joyce, G. T.; Omalley, C. D.

    1980-01-01

    The ability of current methodologies to accurately predict the aerodynamic characteristics identified as uncertainties was evaluated for two aircraft configurations. The two wind tunnel models studied horizontal altitude takeoff and landing V/STOL fighter aircraft derivatives.

  20. General-purpose heat source development: Safety test program. Postimpact evaluation, design iteration test 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonfeld, F. W.

    1984-04-01

    The general purpose heat source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of (238)PuO decay to thermoelectric elements. Because of the inevitable return of certain missions, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive reentry and Earth impact. The Design Iteration Test (DIT) series is part of an ongoing impact test program. The first DIT used a full GPHS module containing two graphite impact shells (GISs); each GIS contained two iridium (0.3 wt%) capsules filled with (238)PuO. It was impacted at 57 m/s and 930 C. All four fuel capsules survived and none was breached. However, serious cracking of the iridium alloy capsules was found; some cracks extended through approx. 70% of the wall thickness. Postimpact analyses of the unit are described with emphasis on weld structure and performance.

  1. Heat of detonation, the cylinder test, and performance munitions

    SciTech Connect

    Akst, I.B.

    1989-01-01

    Heats of detonation of CHNO explosives correlate well with copper cylinder test expansion data. The detonation products/calorimetry data can be used to estimate performance in the cylinder test, in munitions, and for new molecules or mixtures of explosives before these are made. Confidence in the accuracy of the performance estimates is presently limited by large deviations of a few materials from the regression predictions; but these same deviations, as in the insensitive explosive DINGU and the low carbon systems, appear to be sources of information useful for detonation and explosives research. The performance correlations are functions more of the detonation products and thermochemical energy than they are of the familiar parameters of detonation pressure and velocity, and the predictions are closer to a regression line on average than are those provided by CJ calculations. The prediction computations are simple but the measurements (detonation calorimetry/products and cylinder experiments) are not. 17 refs., 5 tabs.

  2. Aerodynamic characteristics of forebody and nose strakes based on F-16 wind tunnel test experience. Volume 1: Summary and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Ralston, J. N.; Mann, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The YF-16 and F-16 developmental wind tunnel test program was reviewed. Geometrical descriptions, general comments, representative data, and the initial efforts toward the development of design guides for the application of strakes to future aircraft are presented.

  3. Aerodynamic characteristics of forebody and nose strakes based on F-16 wind tunnel test experience. Volume 2: Data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Bhateley, I. C.

    1978-01-01

    The YF-16 and F-16 developmental wind tunnel test program was reviewed and all force data pertinent to the design of forebody and nose strakes extracted. A complete set of these data is presented without analysis.

  4. A comparison of the acoustic and aerodynamic measurements of a model rotor tested in two anechoic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Lewy, S.; Caplot, M.

    1986-01-01

    Two aeroacoustic facilities--the CEPRA 19 in France and the DNW in the Netherlands--are compared. The two facilities have unique acoustic characteristics that make them appropriate for acoustic testing of model-scale helicopter rotors. An identical pressure-instrumented model-scale rotor was tested in each facility and acoustic test results are compared with full-scale-rotor test results. Blade surface pressures measured in both tunnels were used to correlated nominal rotor operating conditions in each tunnel, and also used to assess the steadiness of the rotor in each tunnel's flow. In-the-flow rotor acoustic signatures at moderate forward speeds (35-50 m/sec) are presented for each facility and discussed in relation to the differences in tunnel geometries and aeroacoustic characteristics. Both reports are presented in appendices to this paper. ;.);

  5. A comparison of the acoustic and aerodynamic measurements of a model rotor tested in two anechoic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Lewy, S.

    1986-01-01

    Two aeroacoustic facilities - the CEPRA 19 in France and the DNW in the Netherlands - are compared. The two facilities have unique acoustic characteristics that make them appropriate for acoustic testing of model-scale helicopter rotors. An identical pressure-instrumented model-scale rotor was tested in each facility and acoustic test results are compared with full-scale-rotor test results. Blade surface pressures measured in both tunnels were used to correlated nominal rotor operating conditions in each tunnel, and also used to assess the steadiness of the rotor in each tunnel's flow. In-the-flow rotor acoustic signatures at moderate forward speeds (35-50 m/sec) are presented for each facility and discussed in relation to the differences in tunnel geometries and aeroacoustic characteristics. Both reports are presented in appendices to this paper.

  6. Model-Scale Aerodynamic Performance Testing of Proposed Modifications to the NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Coston, Calvin W., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Tests were performed on a 1/20th-scale model of the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel to determine the performance effects of insertion of acoustic baffles in the tunnel inlet, replacement of the existing collector with a new collector design in the open jet test section, and addition of flow splitters to the acoustic baffle section downstream of the test section. As expected, the inlet baffles caused a reduction in facility performance. About half of the performance loss was recovered by addition the flow splitters to the downstream baffles. All collectors tested reduced facility performance. However, test chamber recirculation flow was reduced by the new collector designs and shielding of some of the microphones was reduced owing to the smaller size of the new collector. Overall performance loss in the facility is expected to be a 5 percent top flow speed reduction, but the facility will meet OSHA limits for external noise levels and recirculation in the test section will be reduced.

  7. Unsteady transonic aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, D.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on unsteady transonic aerodynamics are presented. The topics addressed include: physical phenomena associated with unsteady transonic flows, basic equations for unsteady transonic flow, practical problems concerning aircraft, basic numerical methods, computational methods for unsteady transonic flows, application of transonic flow analysis to helicopter rotor problems, unsteady aerodynamics for turbomachinery aeroelastic applications, alternative methods for modeling unsteady transonic flows.

  8. Uncertainty in Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Hemsch, M. J.; Morrison, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    An approach is presented to treat computational aerodynamics as a process, subject to the fundamental quality assurance principles of process control and process improvement. We consider several aspects affecting uncertainty for the computational aerodynamic process and present a set of stages to determine the level of management required to meet risk assumptions desired by the customer of the predictions.

  9. Aerodynamic instability: A case history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenmann, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The identification, diagnosis, and final correction of complex machinery malfunctions typically require the correlation of many parameters such as mechanical construction, process influence, maintenance history, and vibration response characteristics. The progression is reviewed of field testing, diagnosis, and final correction of a specific machinery instability problem. The case history presented addresses a unique low frequency instability problem on a high pressure barrel compressor. The malfunction was eventually diagnosed as a fluidic mechanism that manifested as an aerodynamic disturbance to the rotor assembly.

  10. Heat of hydration for fly ash as a predictive test

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Coal combustion residues are commonly used in construction and for other engineering applications. These materials are complex and exhibit highly variable characteristics. Coal combustion fly ash, the most utilized of these materials, is commonly classified by its pozzolanic or cementitious properties. These properties are generally determined and monitored by empirical physical test procedures required for certification of these materials for use as a mineral admixture in cement. The current classification system does not provide a continuous scale rating for pozzolanic/cementitious behavior for these materials, or adequate information to assess the reactivity of these materials outside of their limited use in cement and concrete products. A test procedure, based on the heat of hydration, has been developed at the Energy and Environmental Research Center to more accurately assess the reactivity and behavior of these materials for utilization. The technique employs either a Dewar flask or a modified oxygen bomb calorimeter to determine the temperature change and rate of change after the addition of water to fly ash. X-ray diffraction is performed on the hydrated material following the hydration test to follow mineralogical changes as a result of the hydration process. A study of coal fly ash samples is underway to determine whether correlations exist between the temperature change and empirical test results. A protocol has been developed to assist in an improved classification scheme for coal fly ash.

  11. A trial on performance test method for Cu-water heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Yamamoto, T.

    Because of the increase demand for heat pipes, the establishment of standard methods for the performance test and the performance expression of the heat pipe was requested. Generally, the measurement method for the heat transfer rate of heat pipes is divided into two categories. That is, the heat transfer rate of heat pipe is measured by heat input to the evaporator surface or the quantity of heat removed from the condenser zone. The heat loss to each method described must be determined by circulating some kind of fluid such as water in same size pipe located in the heating unit instead of the heat pipe under actual operating condition before use. The heat transfer rate of Cu-Water heat pipe is measured by means of the measurement method based on the principle of bomb calorimeter. The obtained measuring accuracy may be lower.

  12. Modeling Powered Aerodynamics for the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Aerodynamic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Robinson, Philip E.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling the aerodynamics of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) has presented many technical challenges to the developers of the Orion aerodynamic database. During a launch abort event, the aerodynamic environment around the LAV is very complex as multiple solid rocket plumes interact with each other and the vehicle. It is further complicated by vehicle separation events such as between the LAV and the launch vehicle stack or between the launch abort tower and the crew module. The aerodynamic database for the LAV was developed mainly from wind tunnel tests involving powered jet simulations of the rocket exhaust plumes, supported by computational fluid dynamic simulations. However, limitations in both methods have made it difficult to properly capture the aerodynamics of the LAV in experimental and numerical simulations. These limitations have also influenced decisions regarding the modeling and structure of the aerodynamic database for the LAV and led to compromises and creative solutions. Two database modeling approaches are presented in this paper (incremental aerodynamics and total aerodynamics), with examples showing strengths and weaknesses of each approach. In addition, the unique problems presented to the database developers by the large data space required for modeling a launch abort event illustrate the complexities of working with multi-dimensional data.

  13. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 1/Part 2 publication covers the design optimization and testing sessions.

  14. X-34 Vehicle Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.

    1998-01-01

    The X-34, being designed and built by the Orbital Sciences Corporation, is an unmanned sub-orbital vehicle designed to be used as a flying test bed to demonstrate key vehicle and operational technologies applicable to future reusable launch vehicles. The X-34 will be air-launched from an L-1011 carrier aircraft at approximately Mach 0.7 and 38,000 feet altitude, where an onboard engine will accelerate the vehicle to speeds above Mach 7 and altitudes to 250,000 feet. An unpowered entry will follow, including an autonomous landing. The X-34 will demonstrate the ability to fly through inclement weather, land horizontally at a designated site, and have a rapid turn-around capability. A series of wind tunnel tests on scaled models was conducted in four facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the X-34. Analysis of these test results revealed that longitudinal trim could be achieved throughout the design trajectory. The maximum elevon deflection required to trim was only half of that available, leaving a margin for gust alleviation and aerodynamic coefficient uncertainty. Directional control can be achieved aerodynamically except at combined high Mach numbers and high angles of attack, where reaction control jets must be used. The X-34 landing speed, between 184 and 206 knots, is within the capabilities of the gear and tires, and the vehicle has sufficient rudder authority to control the required 30-knot crosswind.

  15. General-Purpose Heat Source development: safety test program. Postimpact evaluation, Design Iteration Test 2

    SciTech Connect

    Schonfeld, F.W.; George, T.G.

    1984-06-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ decay to thermoelectric elements. Because of the inevitable return of certain missions, the heat source must be Designed and constructed to survive both re-entry and Earth impact. The Design Iteration Test (DIT) series is part of an ongoing test program. In the first Design Iteration Test (DIT-1), a full GPHS module ontaining four iridium-alloy capsules loaded with /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ was impacted at 57 m/s and 930/sup 0/C. All four capsules survived and none was breached. The capsules used in DIT-1 were loaded and welded at Los Alamos. The second Design Iteration Test (DIT-2) also used a full GPHS module and was impacted at 58 m/s and 930/sup 0/C. The four iridium-alloy capsules used in this test were loaded and welded at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Postimpact examination revealed that two capsules had survived and two capsules had breached; a small quantity (approx. = 50 ..mu..g) of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ was released from the breached capsules. Internal cracking similar to that observed in the DIT-1 capsules was evident in all four of the DIT-2 capsules. Postimpact analyses of the units are described with emphasis on weld structure and performance.

  16. Switchable and Tunable Aerodynamic Drag on Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttag, Mark; Lopéz Jiménez, Francisco; Upadhyaya, Priyank; Kumar, Shanmugam; Reis, Pedro

    We report results on the performance of Smart Morphable Surfaces (Smporhs) that can be mounted onto cylindrical structures to actively reduce their aerodynamic drag. Our system comprises of an elastomeric thin shell with a series of carefully designed subsurface cavities that, once depressurized, lead to a dramatic deformation of the surface topography, on demand. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the giant cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) which possesses an array of axial grooves, thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. We perform systematic wind tunnel tests on cylinders covered with our Smorphs and characterize their aerodynamic performance. The switchable and tunable nature of our system offers substantial advantages for aerodynamic performance when compared to static topographies, due to their operation over a wider range of flow conditions.

  17. Switchable and Tunable Aerodynamic Drag on Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttag, Mark; Lopez Jimenez, Francisco; Reis, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    We report results on the performance of Smart Morphable Surfaces (Smporhs) that can be mounted onto cylindrical structures to actively reduce their aerodynamic drag. Our system comprises of an elastomeric thin shell with a series of carefully designed subsurface cavities that, once depressurized, lead to a dramatic deformation of the surface topography, on demand. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the giant cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) which possesses an array of axial grooves, which are thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. We perform systematic wind tunnel tests on cylinders covered with our Smorphs and characterize their aerodynamic performance. The switchable and tunable nature of our system offers substantial advantages for aerodynamic performance when compared to static topographies, due to their operation over a wider range of flow conditions.

  18. Defect characterisation based on heat diffusion using induction thermography testing.

    PubMed

    He, Yunze; Pan, Mengchun; Luo, Feilu

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed eddy current (PEC) thermography (a.k.a. induction thermography) has been successfully applied to detect defects (corrosion, cracks, impact, and delamination) in metal alloy and carbon fiber reinforced plastic. During these applications, the defect detection mechanism is mainly investigated based on the eddy current interaction with defect. In this paper, defect characterisation for wall thinning defect and inner defect in steel is investigated based on heat diffusion. The paper presents the PEC thermography testing, which integrates the reflection mode and transmission mode by means of configuring two cameras on both sides of sample. The defect characterisation methods under transmission mode and reflection mode are investigated and compared through 1D analytical analysis, 3D numerical studies, and experimental studies. The suitable detection mode for wall thinning and inner defects quantification is concluded.

  19. Defect characterisation based on heat diffusion using induction thermography testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunze; Pan, Mengchun; Luo, Feilu

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed eddy current (PEC) thermography (a.k.a. induction thermography) has been successfully applied to detect defects (corrosion, cracks, impact, and delamination) in metal alloy and carbon fiber reinforced plastic. During these applications, the defect detection mechanism is mainly investigated based on the eddy current interaction with defect. In this paper, defect characterisation for wall thinning defect and inner defect in steel is investigated based on heat diffusion. The paper presents the PEC thermography testing, which integrates the reflection mode and transmission mode by means of configuring two cameras on both sides of sample. The defect characterisation methods under transmission mode and reflection mode are investigated and compared through 1D analytical analysis, 3D numerical studies, and experimental studies. The suitable detection mode for wall thinning and inner defects quantification is concluded.

  20. Testing of a high capacity research heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Tests were performed on a high-capacity channel-wick heat pipe to assess the transport limitations of v-grooves and the effects of boiling. The results showed that transport can vary significantly (less than 50 W) under similar conditions and the continuous boiling was observed at power levels as low as 40 W. In addition, some evidence was found to support the predictions using a groove transport model which shows that transport increases with lower groove densities and longer evaporators. However, due to transport variations, these results were not consistent throughout the program. When a glass fiber wick was installed over the grooves, a relatively low transport level was achieved (80 to 140 W). Based on these results and the identification of some potential causes for them, several design suggestions were recommended for reducing the possibility of boiling and improving groove transport.

  1. The reliability of a heat acclimation state test prescribed from metabolic heat production intensities.

    PubMed

    Willmott, A G B; Hayes, M; Dekerle, J; Maxwell, N S

    2015-10-01

    Acclimation state indicates an individual's phenotypic response to a thermally stressful environment, where changes in heat dissipation capacity are determined during a heat acclimation state test (HAST). Variations in thermoregulatory and sudomotor function are reported while exercising at intensities relative to maximal oxygen uptake. This inter-individual variation is not true when intensity is prescribed to elicit a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (Ḣprod). This study investigated the reliability of peak Tre and two composite measures (sweat gain and sweat setpoint) derived from indices of thermosensitivity during a HAST prescribed from Ḣprod intensities. Fourteen participants (mean±SD; age 23±3 years, stature 174±7cm, body mass 75.0±9.4kg, body surface area 1.9±0.1m(2), peak oxygen consumption [V̇O2peak] 3.49±0.53Lmin(-1)) completed a lactate threshold-V̇O2peak test and two duplicate Ḣprod HASTs on a cycle ergometer. The HAST consisted of three, 30-min periods of exercise at fixed Ḣprod intensities relative to body mass (3, 4.5 and 6Wkg(-1)), within hot dry conditions (44.7±1.8°C and 18.1±4.7% relative humidity). Peak Tre (38.20±0.36 vs. 38.16±0.42°C, p=0.54), sweat setpoint (36.76±0.34 and 36.79±0.38°C, p=0.68) and sweat gain (0.37±0.14 and 0.40±0.18gs(-1)°C(-1), p=0.40) did not differ between HASTs. Typical error of measurement (TEM), coefficient variation (CV) and intra-class coefficient of correlation (ICC) were 0.19°C, 0.5% and 0.80 for peak Tre, 0.21°C, 0.6% and 0.65 for sweat setpoint and 0.09gs(-1)°C(-1), 28% and 0.68 for sweat gain, respectively. The use of fixed Ḣprod intensities relative to body mass is a reliable method for measuring Tre and ascertaining sweat setpoint during a HAST, whereas, sweat gain displays greater variability. A Ḣprod HAST appears sufficiently reliable for quantifying heat acclimation state, where TEM in peak Tre and sweat setpoint are small enough to identify physiologically

  2. Results of tests OA12 and IA9 in the Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnels on an 0.030-scale model of the space shuttle vehicle 2A to determine aerodynamic loads, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted in Unitary Plan wind tunnels on a 0.30 scale model of the space shuttle. Tests were conducted on the integrated configuration and on the isolated orbiter. The integrated vehicle was tested at angles of attack and sideslip from minus 8 degrees to plus 8 degrees. The isolated orbiter was tested at angles of attack from minus 15 degrees to plus 40 degrees and angles of sideslip from minus 10 degrees to plus 10 degrees as dictated by trajectory considerations. The effects of orbiter/external tank incidence angle and deflected control surfaces on aerodynamic loads were investigated.

  3. Measured and Computed Hypersonic Aerodynamic/Aeroheating Characteristics for an Elliptically Blunted Flared Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Francis A.; Buck, Gregory M.; Wood, William A.

    2001-01-01

    Computational and experimental hypersonic aerodynamic forces and moments and aeroheating levels for Kistler Aerospace Corporation's baseline orbiter vehicle at incidence are presented. Experimental data were measured in ground-based facilities at the Langley Research Center and predictions were performed using the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm code. The test parameters were incidence (-4 to 24 degrees), freestream Mach number (6 to 10),freestream ratio o specific heats (1.2 to 1.4), and freestream Reynolds number (0.5 to 8.0 million per foot). The effects of these parameters on aerodynamic characteristics, as well as the effects of Reynolds number on measured heating levels are discussed. Good agreement between computational and experimental aerodynamic and aeroheating values were observed over the wide range of test parameters examined. Reynolds number and ratio of specific heats were observed to significantly alter the trim L/D value. At Mach 6, laminar flow was observed along the entire windward centerline tip to the flare for all angles and Reynolds numbers tested. Flow over the flare transitioned from laminar to transitional/turbulent between 4 and 8 million per foot at 8 and 12 degrees angle of attack, and near 4 million per foot at 16 degrees angle of attack.

  4. Fourier functional analysis for unsteady aerodynamic modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward; Chin, Suei

    1991-01-01

    A method based on Fourier analysis is developed to analyze the force and moment data obtained in large amplitude forced oscillation tests at high angles of attack. The aerodynamic models for normal force, lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients are built up from a set of aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions at different frequencies. Based on the aerodynamic models of harmonic data, the indicial responses are formed. The final expressions for the models involve time integrals of the indicial type advocated by Tobak and Schiff. Results from linear two- and three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic theories as well as test data for a 70-degree delta wing are used to verify the models. It is shown that the present modeling method is accurate in producing the aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions and the ramp type motions. The model also produces correct trend for a 70-degree delta wing in harmonic motion with different mean angles-of-attack. However, the current model cannot be used to extrapolate data to higher angles-of-attack than that of the harmonic motions which form the aerodynamic model. For linear ramp motions, a special method is used to calculate the corresponding frequency and phase angle at a given time. The calculated results from modeling show a higher lift peak for linear ramp motion than for harmonic ramp motion. The current model also shows reasonably good results for the lift responses at different angles of attack.

  5. General-Purpose Heat Source Development: safety test program. Postimpact evaluation, Design Iteration Test 4

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.; Schonfeld, F.W.

    1984-12-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of /sup 238/Pu decay to thermoelectric elements. Because of the inevitable return of certain aborted missions, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive both re-entry and Earth impact. The Design Iteration Test (DIT) series is part of an ongoing test program. The fourth test (DIT-4) was designed to evaluate the effect on impact behavior of changing the procedure used at the Mound Facility (MF) to remove surface defects from drawn cups. The change involved switching from a manual abrasion technique to a motorized, rubber-bonded abrasive wheel. In DIT-4 a partial GPHS module containing two fueled clads (one cleaned manually, and one cleaned with an abrasive wheel) was impacted at a velocity of 58 m/s and a temperature of 930/sup 0/C. Both capsules were severely deformed by the impact and contained large internal cracks. Although the manually cleaned capsule breached, the breaching crack was only 2 ..mu..m wide and released negligible amounts of fuel. There did not appear to be any correlation between cleaning method and capsule performance. Postimpact analyses of the DIT-4 test components are described with emphasis on microstructure and impact response.

  6. General-Purpose Heat Source Development: safety test program. Postimpact evaluation, Design Iteration Test 5

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.; Schonfeld, F.W.

    1984-12-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of /sup 238/Pu decay to thermoelectric elements. Because of the inevitable return of certain aborted missions, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive both re-entry and Earth impact. The Design Iteration Test (DIT) series is part of an ongoing impact test program. The fifth test (DIT-5) was designed to compare the impact response of a GPHS fueled clad that had been welded with a four-pole arc oscillator with the impact response of a clad welded with a two-pole oscillator. In DIT-5 a partial GPHS module containing two fueled clads (one welded with a four-pole oscillator and one welded with a two-pole oscillator) was impacted at 60.5 m/s and 930/sup 0/C. The fuel capsules were severely deformed by the impact; both clads breached. The capsule welded with a four-pole oscillator failed extensively. Neither failure was related to the welding technique. Postimpact analyses of the test components are described, with emphasis on microstructure and impact response.

  7. Control of helicopter rotorblade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabunmi, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study of a method for controlling the aerodynamics of helicopter rotorblades using stacks of piezoelectric ceramic plates are presented. A resonant mechanism is proposed for the amplification of the displacements produced by the stack. This motion is then converted into linear displacement for the actuation of the servoflap of the blades. A design which emulates the actuation of the servoflap on the Kaman SH-2F is used to demonstrate the fact that such a system can be designed to produce the necessary forces and velocities needed to control the aerodynamics of the rotorblades of such a helicopter. Estimates of the electrical power requirements are also presented. A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 Program is suggested, whereby a bench-top prototype of the device can be built and tested. A collaborative effort between AEDAR Corporation and Kaman Aerospace Corporation is anticipated for future effort on this project.

  8. High fidelity replication of surface texture and geometric form of a high aspect ratio aerodynamic test component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Karl; Fleming, Leigh; Goodhand, Martin; Racasan, Radu; Zeng, Wenhan

    2016-06-01

    This paper details, assesses and validates a technique for the replication of a titanium wind tunnel test aerofoil in polyurethane resin. Existing resin replication techniques are adapted to overcome the technical difficulties associated with casting a high aspect ratio component. The technique is shown to have high replication fidelity over all important length-scales. The blade chord was accurate to 0.02%, and the maximum blade thickness was accurate to 2.5%. Important spatial and amplitude areal surface texture parameter were accurate to within 2%. Compared to an existing similar system using correlation areal parameters the current technique is shown to have lower fidelity and this difference is discussed. The current technique was developed for the measurement of boundary layer flow ‘laminar to turbulent’ transition for gas turbine compressor blade profiles and this application is illustrated.

  9. An assessment of RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 condensation heat transfer modeling with GIRAFFE heat transfer tests

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, B.D.; Parlatan, Y.; Slovik, G.C.

    1995-09-01

    RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 is being used to simulate Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) for the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) being proposed by General Electric (GE). One of the major components associated with the SBWR is the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) which provides the long-term heat sink to reject decay heat. The RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 code is being assessed for its ability to represent accurately the PCCS. Data from the Phase 1, Step 1 Heat Transfer Tests performed at Toshiba`s Gravity-Driven Integral Full-Height Test for Passive Heat Removal (GIRAFFE) facility will be used for assessing the ability of RELAP5 to model condensation in the presence of noncondensables. The RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 condensation model uses the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) correlation developed by Vierow and Schrock. The RELAP5 code uses this heat transfer coefficient with the gas velocity effect multiplier being limited to 2. This heat transfer option was used to analyze the condensation heat transfer in the GIRAFFE PCCS heat exchanger tubes in the Phase 1, Step 1 Heat Transfer Tests which were at a pressure of 3 bar and had a range of nitrogen partial pressure fractions from 0.0 to 0.10. The results of a set of RELAP5 calculations at these conditions were compared with the GIRAFFE data. The effects of PCCS cell noding on the heat transfer process were also studied. The UCB correlation, as implemented in RELAP5, predicted the heat transfer to {plus_minus}5% of the data with a three--node model. The three-node model has a large cell in the entrance region which smeared out the entrance effects on the heat transfer, which tend to overpredict the condensation. Hence, the UCB correlation predicts condensation heat transfer correlation implemented in the code must be removed to allow for accurate calculations with smaller cell sizes.

  10. Test of an improved gas engine-driven heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.C.; Mei, V.C.; Domitrovic, R.

    1998-01-01

    A new generation of natural gas engine-driven heat pump (GEHP) was introduced to the marketplace recently. While the units installed have performed exceptionally well and earned rave reviews for comfort and savings on utility bills, the higher initial cost and relatively long payback time have affected the wide commercialization of this advanced technology. According to a study done for the southeastern US in the Atlanta metropolitan area, the annual operating cost of the GEHP is less than that of a baseline system consisting of a 92% efficiency gas furnace and a SEER 12 air conditioner. The estimated payback time is around 10 years to cover the difference in initial equipment price between the new and the baseline system. It has been projected that a liquid overfeed (LOF) recuperative cycle concept can simplify the hardware design of a GEHP, resulting in reduced cost and improved performance. Laboratory tests have shown that LOF would improve the energy efficiency of a vapor compression unit by 10%. In addition, LOF will reduce the compressor pressure ratio and thereby improve equipment reliability. Based on the assumed performance improvements and cost reduction, a simple payback calculation indicates LOF can reduce the payback time for an improved GEHP considerably in the Atlanta metropolitan area. Laboratory testing of an improved GEHP has been carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper reports on the equipment design modifications required to implement LOF and the results of performance tests at steady-state conditions. The preliminary cooling test results have indicated that the LOF in conjunction with orifice-type expander can be applied to GEHP for cost and performance enhancements. The improvements in energy efficiency will be dependent upon several controlling parameters including the proper refrigeration charge, the selected ambient temperature, and the system operating condition.

  11. Development, Fabrication, and Testing of a Liquid/Liquid Microchannel Heat Exchanger for Constellation Spacecrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins-Reynolds, Ebony; Le,Hung; Stephans, Ryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Minimizing mass and volume is critically important for space hardware. Microchannel technology can be used to decrease both of these parameters for heat exchangers. Working in concert with NASA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) has developed a microchannel liquid/liquid heat exchanger that has resulted in significant mass and volume savings. The microchannel heat exchanger delivers these improvements without sacrificing thermal and pressure drop performance. A conventional heat exchanger has been tested and the performance of it recorded to compare it to the microchannel heat exchanger that PNNL has fabricated. The microchannel heat exchanger was designed to meet all of the requirements of the baseline heat exchanger, while reducing the heat exchanger mass and volume. The baseline heat exchanger was designed to have an transfer approximately 3.1 kW for a specific set of inlet conditions. The baseline heat exchanger mass was 2.7 kg while the microchannel mass was only 2.0 kg. More impressive, however, was the volumetric savings associated with the microchannel heat exchanger. The microchannel heat exchanger was an order of magnitude smaller than the baseline heat exchanger (2180cm3 vs. 311 cm3). This paper will describe the test apparatus designed to complete performance tests for both heat exchangers. Also described in this paper will be the performance specifications for the microchannel heat exchanger and how they compare to the baseline heat exchanger.

  12. Aerodynamic tailoring of the Learjet Model 60 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekharan, Reuben M.; Hawke, Veronica M.; Hinson, Michael L.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Madson, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    The wing of the Learjet Model 60 was tailored for improved aerodynamic characteristics using the TRANAIR transonic full-potential computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. A root leading edge glove and wing tip fairing were shaped to reduce shock strength, improve cruise drag and extend the buffet limit. The aerodynamic design was validated by wind tunnel test and flight test data.

  13. Tracer Testing for Estimating Heat Transfer Area in Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; van Heel, Ton; Shan, Chao

    2004-05-12

    A key parameter governing the performance and life-time of a Hot Fractured Rock (HFR) reservoir is the effective heat transfer area between the fracture network and the matrix rock. We report on numerical modeling studies into the feasibility of using tracer tests for estimating heat transfer area. More specifically, we discuss simulation results of a new HFR characterization method which uses surface-sorbing tracers for which the adsorbed tracer mass is proportional to the fracture surface area per unit volume. Sorption in the rock matrix is treated with the conventional formulation in which tracer adsorption is volume-based. A slug of solute tracer migrating along a fracture is subject to diffusion across the fracture walls into the adjacent rock matrix. Such diffusion removes some of the tracer from the fluid in the fractures, reducing and retarding the peak in the breakthrough curve (BTC) of the tracer. After the slug has passed the concentration gradient reverses, causing back-diffusion from the rock matrix into the fracture, and giving rise to a long tail in the BTC of the solute. These effects become stronger for larger fracture-matrix interface area, potentially providing a means for estimating this area. Previous field tests and modeling studies have demonstrated characteristic tailing in BTCs for volatile tracers in vapor-dominated reservoirs. Simulated BTCs for solute tracers in single-phase liquid systems show much weaker tails, as would be expected because diffusivities are much smaller in the aqueous than in the gas phase, by a factor of order 1000. A much stronger signal of fracture-matrix interaction can be obtained when sorbing tracers are used. We have performed simulation studies of surface-sorbing tracers by implementing a model in which the adsorbed tracer mass is assumed proportional to the fracture-matrix surface area per unit volume. The results show that sorbing tracers generate stronger tails in BTCs, corresponding to an effective

  14. General-purpose heat source development: Safety test program. Postimpact evaluation, design iteration test 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, T. G.; Schonfeld, F. W.

    1984-12-01

    The general-purpose heat source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of Pu-238 decay to thermoelectric elements. Because of the inevitable return of certain aborted missions, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive both reentry and Earth impact. The design iteration test (DIT) series is part of an ongoing impact test program. The DIT-5 was designed to compare the impact response of a GPHS fueled clad that was welded with a four-pole arc oscillator with the impact response of a clad welded with a two-pole oscillator. In DIT-5 a partial GPHS module containing two fueled clads was impacted at 60.5 m/s and 930 C. The fuel capsules were severly deformed by the impact; both clads breached. The capsule welded with a four-pole oscillator failed extensively. Neither failure was related to the welding technique. Postimpact analyses of the test components are described, with emphasis on microstructure and impact response.

  15. Advanced turboprop installation aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The expected aerodynamic effects of a propfan installed on a thick supercritical wing are summarized qualitatively. Nacelle/wing and jet interactions, slipstream incremental velocity, nonuniform inflow, and swirl loss recovery are discussed.

  16. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  17. Three-dimensional aerodynamic analysis of a subsonic transport high-lift configuration and comparisons with wind-tunnel test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edge, D. Christian; Perkins, John N.

    1995-01-01

    The sizing and efficiency of an aircraft is largely determined by the performance of its high-lift system. Subsonic civil transports most often use deployable multi-element airfoils to achieve the maximum-lift requirements for landing, as well as the high lift-to-drag ratios for take-off. However, these systems produce very complex flow fields which are not fully understood by the scientific community. In order to compete in today's market place, aircraft manufacturers will have to design better high-lift systems. Therefore, a more thorough understanding of the flows associated with these systems is desired. Flight and wind-tunnel experiments have been conducted on NASA Langley's B737-100 research aircraft to obtain detailed full-scale flow measurements on a multi-element high-lift system at various flight conditions. As part of this effort, computational aerodynamic tools are being used to provide preliminary flow-field information for instrumentation development, and to provide additional insight during the data analysis and interpretation process. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the ability and usefulness of a three-dimensional low-order potential flow solver, PMARC, by comparing computational results with data obtained from 1/8 scale wind-tunnel tests. Overall, correlation of experimental and computational data reveals that the panel method is able to predict reasonably well the pressures of the aircraft's multi-element wing at several spanwise stations. PMARC's versatility and usefulness is also demonstrated by accurately predicting inviscid three-dimensional flow features for several intricate geometrical regions.

  18. Photogrammetry of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushner, Laura Kathryn; Littell, Justin D.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, two large-scale models of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic decelerator were tested in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center. One of the objectives of this test was to measure model deflections under aerodynamic loading that approximated expected flight conditions. The measurements were acquired using stereo photogrammetry. Four pairs of stereo cameras were mounted inside the NFAC test section, each imaging a particular section of the HIAD. The views were then stitched together post-test to create a surface deformation profile. The data from the photogram- metry system will largely be used for comparisons to and refinement of Fluid Structure Interaction models. This paper describes how a commercial photogrammetry system was adapted to make the measurements and presents some preliminary results.

  19. Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Jungil; Park, Hyungmin

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the aerodynamics of heavy vehicles, such as tractor-trailers, high-speed trains, and buses. We introduce three-dimensional flow structures around simplified model vehicles and heavy vehicles and discuss the flow-control devices used for drag reduction. Finally, we suggest important unsteady flow structures to investigate for the enhancement of aerodynamic performance and future directions for experimental and numerical approaches.

  20. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  1. Moderated heat pipe thermionic reactor (MOHTR) module development and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrigan, Michael A.; Trujillo, Vincent L.

    1992-01-01

    The Moderated Heat Pipe Thermionic Reactor (MOHTR) thermionic space reactor design combines the low risk technology associated with the Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) Verification Program with the high reliability heat transfer capability of liquid metal heat pipe technology. The resulting design concept, capable of implementation over the power range of 10 to 100 kWe, offers efficiency and reliability with reduced risk of single point failures. The union of TFE and heat pipe technology is achieved by imbedding TFEs and heat pipes in a beryllium matrix to which they are thermally coupled by brazing or by liquid metal (NaK or Na) bonding. The reactor employs an array of TFE modules, each comprising a TFE, a zirconium hydride (ZrH) cylinder for neutron moderation, and heat pipes for transport of heat from the collector surface of the TFE to the waste heat radiator. An advantage of the design is the low temperature drop from the collector surface to the radiating surface. This is a result of the elimination of electrical insulation from the heat transport path through electrical isolation of the modules. The module used in this study consisted of a beryllium core, and electrical cartridge heater simulating the TFE, and three heat pipes to dissipate the waste heat. The investigation was focused on the thermal performance of the assembly, including evaluation of the sodium and braze bonding options for minimizing the thermal resistance between the elements, the temperature distribution in the beryllium matrix, and the heat pipe performance. Continuing subjects of the investigation include performance of the heat pipes through start-up transients, during normal operation, and in a single heat pipe failure mode. Secondary objectives of the investigation include correlation of analytic models for the thermionic element and module including the effects of gap thermal conductances at the modules electrically insulated surfaces.

  2. Prediction of aerodynamic heating and pressures on Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS) nose cap and comparison with STS-61C flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Paul C.; Rochelle, William C.; Curry, Donald M.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from predictions of aerothermodynamic heating rates, temperatures, and pressures on the surface of the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS) nosecap during Orbiter reentry. These results are compared with data obtained by the first actual flight of the SEADS system aboard STS-61C. The data also used to predict heating rates and surface temperatures for a hypothetical Transatlantic Abort Landing entry trajectory, whose analysis involved ascertaining the increases in heating rate as the airstream flowed across regions of the lower surface catalycity carbon/carbon composite to the higher surface catalycity columbium pressure ports.

  3. Experimental Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of the Space Shuttle Orbiter for a Range of Damage Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckman, Gregory J.; Scallion, William I.

    2003-01-01

    Aerodynamic tests in support of the Columbia accident investigation were conducted in two hypersonic wind tunnels at the NASA Langley Research Center, the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel and the 20-Inch Mach 6 CF4 Tunnel. The primary purpose of these tests was to measure the forces and moments generated by a variety of outer mold line alterations (damage scenarios) using 0.0075-scale models of the Space Shuttle Orbiter (approximately 10 inches in length). Simultaneously acquired global heat transfer mappings were obtained for a majority of the configurations tested. Test parameters include angles of attack from 38 to 42 deg, unit Reynolds numbers from 0.26 to 3.0 x10^6 per foot, and normal shock density ratios of 5 (Mach 6 air) and 12 (Mach 6 CF4). The damage scenarios evaluated included asymmetric boundary layer transition, gouges in the windward surface acreage thermal protection system tiles, wing leading edge damage (partially and fully missing reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels), holes through the wing from the windward surface to the leeside, deformation of the wing windward surface, and main landing gear door and/or gear deployment. The aerodynamic data were compared to the magnitudes and directions observed in flight, and the heating images were evaluated in terms of the location of the generated disturbances and how these disturbance might relate to the response of discrete gages on the Columbia Orbiter vehicle during entry. The measured aerodynamic increments were generally small in magnitude, as were the flight-derived values during most of the entry. Asymmetric boundary layer transition (ABLT) results were consistent with the flight-derived Shuttle ABLT model, but not with the observed flight trends for STS-107. The partially missing leading edge panel results best matched both the early aerodynamic and heating trends observed in flight. A progressive damage scenario is presented that qualitatively matches the flight observations for the full entry.

  4. A "TEST OF CONCEPT" COMPARISON OF AERODYNAMIC AND MECHANICAL RESUSPENSION MECHANISMS FOR PARTICLES DEPOSITED ON FIELD RYE GRASS (SECALE CERCELE). PART I. RELATIVE PARTICLE FLUX RATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resuspension of uniform latex micro spheres deposited on a single seed pod of field rye grass stalk and head was investigated experimentally in a wind tunnel. The experiment was designed to distinguish aerodynamic (viscous and turbulent) mechanisms from mechanical resuspension re...

  5. Glenn Heat Transfer Simulation and Solver Graphical User Interface: Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kardamis, Joseph R.

    2004-01-01

    In the Tui ine Branch of the Turbomachinery and Propulsion Systems Division, researching and developing efficient turbine aerothermodynamics technologies is the main objective. Creating effective turbines for jet engines is a process which, if based purely on physical experimental testing, would be extremely expensive. It is for this reason, and also for the reasons of speed and ease, that the Turbine Branch spends a large amount of effort working with simulations of turbines. Specifically, they focus their work on two main fields: Computational Field Dynamics (CFD), and Experimental data analysis. The experimental field involves comparing experimental results to simulated results, whereas the CFD field involves running these simulations. The simulations are applied to aerodynamics and heat transfer cases, for both steady and unsteady flow conditions. By and large this work is applied to the domain of flow and heat transfer in axial turbines. The main application used to run these heat flow simulations is GlennHT. This program, recently rewritten in FORTRAN 90, allows the user to input a job file which specifies all the necessary parameters needed to simulate flow through a user-defined grid. There are several other executables used as well, ranging in application from converting grid files to and from particular formats, to merging blocks in a connectivity file, to converting connectivity files to a GlennHT compatible format. All of these executables are run from the command line in a terminal; some of them have interactive prompts where the user must specify the files to be manipulated after the program starts, while others take all of their parameters from the command line. With this amount of variation comes a good deal of commands and formats to memorize, which can cause slower and less efficient work, as users may forget how to execute a certain program, or not remember the pathnames of the files they wish to use. Two years ago, steps were made to expedite

  6. Aerodynamics of magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schetz, Joseph A.; Marchman, James F., III

    1996-01-01

    High-speed (500 kph) trains using magnetic forces for levitation, propulsion and control offer many advantages for the nation and a good opportunity for the aerospace community to apply 'high tech' methods to the domestic sector. One area of many that will need advanced research is the aerodynamics of such MAGLEV (Magnetic Levitation) vehicles. There are important issues with regard to wind tunnel testing and the application of CFD to these devices. This talk will deal with the aerodynamic design of MAGLEV vehicles with emphasis on wind tunnel testing. The moving track facility designed and constructed in the 6 ft. Stability Wind Tunnel at Virginia Tech will be described. Test results for a variety of MAGLEV vehicle configurations will be presented. The last topic to be discussed is a Multi-disciplinary Design approach that is being applied to MAGLEV vehicle configuration design including aerodynamics, structures, manufacturability and life-cycle cost.

  7. Supercritical heat exchanger field test (SHEFT), I. Field performance data on shell-and-tube heat exchangers in geothermal service

    SciTech Connect

    Silvester, L.F.; Beaulaurier, L.O.; Mirk, K.F.; Fulton, R.L.

    1981-06-01

    Field performance data on shell-and-tube heat exchangers in geothermal service are presented. The test data were taken for geothermal brine on the tube side and hydrocarbon on the shell side in counterflow for six primary heat exchangers, and for hydrocarbon on the shell side and cooling water on the tube side for the condenser. Test data were for heating isobutane, 1 90/10 isobutane/isopentane mixture, and a 80/20 isobutane/isopentane mixture at supercritical conditions in the vicinity of their critical pressure and temperature, and for condensing the same fluids. The test data were used in a preliminary data analysis to determine the reported heat exchanger performance parameters.

  8. Results of phase change paint heat transfer tests utilizing 0.040 scale 50% forebody models (No. 82-0) of the Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter in AEDC VKF hypersonic tunnel B (test OH54A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, W. H.

    1976-01-01

    Results of aerodynamic heating tests conducted in October 1974 on a space shuttle orbiter model using the phase change paint technique are presented. The model was a 0.040 scale representation of the forward 50 percent of the orbiter. Surface roughness effects on boundary layer transition were investigated. Roughness was simulated by using steel balls varying in diameter from 0 (no balls) to 0.039 inch with 0.040 inch wide by 0.080 inch deep gaps. A nominal Mach number of 8 was tested with Reynolds number varying from 0.75 through 3.5 million per foot. Angle of attack was varied from 20 deg to 40 deg.

  9. Hydrodynamic and Aerodynamic Tests of a Family of Models of Seaplane Floats with Varying Angles of Dead Rise - N.A.C.A. Models 57-A, 57-B, and 57-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, John B; Olson, Roland E; House, Rufus O

    1939-01-01

    Three models of V-bottom floats for twin-float seaplanes (N.A.C.A. models 57-A, 57-B, and 57-C) having angles of dead rise of 20 degrees, 25 degrees, and thirty degrees, respectively, were tested in the N.A.C.A. tank and in the N.A.C.A. 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel. Within the range investigated, the effect of angle of dead rise on water resistance was found to be negligible at speeds up to and including the hump speed, and water resistance was found to increase with angle of dead rise at planing speeds. The height of the spray at the hump speed decreased with increase in angle of dead rise and the aerodynamic drag increased with dead rise. Lengthening the forebody of model 57-B decreased the water resistance and the spray at speeds below the hump speed. Spray strips provided an effective means for the control of spray with the straight V sections used in the series but considerably increased the aerodynamic drag. Charts for the determination of the water resistance and the static properties of the model with 25 degrees dead rise and for the aerodynamic drag of all the models are included for use in design.

  10. Numerical modeling of the aerodynamics, heat exchange, and combustion of a polydisperse ensemble of coke-ash particles in ascending axisymmetric two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    B.B. Rokhman

    2009-07-15

    A two-dimensional stationary model of motion, heat and mass exchange, and chemical reaction of polydisperse coke and ash particles in ascending gas-suspension flow has been constructed with allowance for the turbulent and pseudo turbulent mechanisms of transfer in the dispersed phase. The system of equations that describes motion and heat transfer in the solid phase has been closed at the level of the equations for the second moments of velocity and temperature pulsations, whereas the momentum equations of the carrying medium have been closed using the equation for turbulent gas energy, which allows for the influence of the particles and heterogeneous reactions.

  11. Explosion overpressure test series: General-Purpose Heat Source development: Safety Verification Test program

    SciTech Connect

    Cull, T.A.; George, T.G.; Pavone, D.

    1986-09-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular, radioisotope heat source that will be used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to supply electric power for space missions. The first two uses will be the NASA Galileo and the ESA Ulysses missions. The RTG for these missions will contain 18 GPHS modules, each of which contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. A series of Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) was conducted to assess the ability of the GPHS modules to contain the plutonia in accident environments. Because a launch pad or postlaunch explosion of the Space Transportation System vehicle (space shuttle) is a conceivable accident, the SVT plan included a series of tests that simulated the overpressure exposure the RTG and GPHS modules could experience in such an event. Results of these tests, in which we used depleted UO/sub 2/ as a fuel simulant, suggest that exposure to overpressures as high as 15.2 MPa (2200 psi), without subsequent impact, does not result in a release of fuel.

  12. Results of tests of advanced flexible insulation vortex and flow environments in the North American Aerodynamics Laboratory lowspeed wind tunnel using 0.0405-scale Space Shuttle Orbiter model 16-0 (test OA-309)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, B. A.; Nichols, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation (Test OA-309) was conducted using 0.0405-scale Space Shuttle Orbiter Model 16-0 in the North American Aerodynamics Laboratory 7.75 x 11.00-foot Lowspeed Wind Tunnel. The primary purpose was to locate and study any flow conditions or vortices that might have caused damage to the Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation (AFRSI) during the Space Transportation System STS-6 mission. A secondary objective was to evaluate vortex generators to be used for Wind Tunnel Test OS-314. Flowfield visualization was obtained by means of smoke, tufts, and oil flow. The test was conducted at Mach numbers between 0.07 and 0.23 and at dynamic pressures between 7 and 35 pounds per square foot. The angle-of-attack range of the model was -5 degrees through 35 degrees at 0 or 2 degrees of sideslip, while roll angle was held constant at zero degrees. The vortex generators were studied at angles of 0, 5, 10, and 15 degrees.

  13. Gallium-cladding compatibility testing plan: Phase 3 -- Test plan for centrally heated surrogate rodlet test. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.N.; Baldwin, C.A.; Wilson, D.F.

    1998-07-01

    The Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) is investigating the use of weapons grade plutonium in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for light-water reactors (LWR). Commercial MOX fuel has been successfully used in overseas reactors for many years; however, weapons derived fuel may differ from the previous commercial fuels because of small amounts of gallium impurities. A concern presently exists that the gallium may migrate out of the fuel, react with and weaken the clad, and thereby promote loss of fuel pin integrity. Phases 1 and 2 of the gallium task are presently underway to investigate the types of reactions that occur between gallium and clad materials. This is a Level-2 document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water Reactor Mixed-Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. This Plan summarizes the projected Phase 3 Gallium-Cladding compatibility heating test and the follow-on post test examination (PTE). This work will be performed using centrally-heated surrogate pellets, to avoid unnecessary complexities and costs associated with working with plutonium and an irradiation environment. Two sets of rodlets containing pellets prepared by two different methods will be heated. Both sets will have an initial bulk gallium content of approximately 10 ppm. The major emphasis of the PTE task will be to examine the material interactions, particularly indications of gallium transport from the pellets to the clad.

  14. An assessment of RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 condensation heat transfer modeling with GIRAFFE heat transfer tests

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, B.D.; Parlatan, Y.; Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1995-09-01

    RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 is being used to simulate Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) for the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) being proposed by General Electric (GE). One of the major components associated with the SBWR is the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) which provides the long-term heat sink to reject decay heat. The RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 code is being assessed for its ability to represent accurately the PCCS. Data from the Phase 1, Step 1 Heat Transfer Tests performed at Toshiba`s Gravity-Driven Integral Full-Height Test for Passive Heat Removal (GIRAFFE) facility will be used for assessing the ability of RELAP5 to model condensation in the presence of noncondensables. The RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 condensation model uses the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) correlation developed by Vierow and Schrock. The RELAP5 code uses this heat transfer coefficient with the gas velocity effect multiplier being limited to 2. This heat transfer option was used to analyze the condensation heat transfer in the GIRAFFE PCCS heat exchanger tubes in the Phase 1, Step 1 Heat Transfer Tests which were at a pressure of 3 bar and had a range of nitrogen partial pressure fractions from 0.0 to 0.10. The results of a set of RELAP5 calculations al these conditions were compared with the GIRAFFE data. The effects of PCCS cell nodings on the heat transfer process were also studied. The UCB correlation, as implemented in RELAP5, predicted the heat transfer to {+-}5% of the data with a three-node model. The three-node model has a large cell in the entrance region which smeared out the entrance effects on the heat transfer, which tend to overpredict the condensation. Hence, the UCB correlation predicts condensation heat transfer in the presence of noncondensable gases with only a coarse mesh. The cell length term in the condensation heat transfer correlation implemented in the code must be removed to allow for accurate calculations with smaller cell sizes.

  15. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Technology Development Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Stephen J.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Calomino, Anthony M.; Wright, Henry S.

    2013-01-01

    The successful flight of the Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE)-3 has further demonstrated the potential value of Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology. This technology development effort is funded by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). This paper provides an overview of a multi-year HIAD technology development effort, detailing the projects completed to date and the additional testing planned for the future. The effort was divided into three areas: Flexible Systems Development (FSD), Mission Advanced Entry Concepts (AEC), and Flight Validation. FSD consists of a Flexible Thermal Protection Systems (FTPS) element, which is investigating high temperature materials, coatings, and additives for use in the bladder, insulator, and heat shield layers; and an Inflatable Structures (IS) element which includes manufacture and testing (laboratory and wind tunnel) of inflatable structures and their associated structural elements. AEC consists of the Mission Applications element developing concepts (including payload interfaces) for missions at multiple destinations for the purpose of demonstrating the benefits and need for the HIAD technology as well as the Next Generation Subsystems element. Ground test development has been pursued in parallel with the Flight Validation IRVE-3 flight test. A larger scale (6m diameter) HIAD inflatable structure was constructed and aerodynamically tested in the National Full-scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40ft by 80ft test section along with a duplicate of the IRVE-3 3m article. Both the 6m and 3m articles were tested with instrumented aerodynamic covers which incorporated an array of pressure taps to capture surface pressure distribution to validate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model predictions of surface pressure distribution. The 3m article also had a duplicate IRVE-3 Thermal Protection System (TPS) to test in addition to testing with the

  16. Reentry thermal testing of a general purpose heat source fueled clad

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.E.; Frantz, C.E.

    1982-03-01

    A General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module was exposed to heat treatments simulating an isothermal prelaunch condition, followed by thermal pulses corresponding to atmospheric reentry. Helium release rates were determined during each heating and modeled after simple diffusion theory. Following the tests, the module was examined metallurgically with no evidence of swelling of the cladding nor degradation of the fuel.

  17. Testing of an impedance heating system for solar power tower applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, J.E.; Kolb, W.J.

    1996-05-01

    A non-conventional type of heating system is being tested at Sandia National Laboratories for solar thermal power tower applications. In this system, called impedance heating, electric current flows directly through the pipe to maintain the desired temperature. The pipe becomes the resistor where the heat is generated. Impedance heating has many advantages over previously used mineral insulated (MI) heat trace. An impedance heating system should be much more reliable than heat trace cable since delicate junctions and cabling are not used and the main component, a transformer, is inherently reliable. A big advantage of impedance heating is the system can be sized to rapidly heat up the piping to provide rapid response times necessary in cyclic power plants such as solar power towers. In this paper, experimental results from testing an impedance heating system are compared to MI cable heat trace. We found impedance heating was able to heat piping rapidly and effectively. There were not significant stray currents and impedance heating did not affect instrumentation.

  18. Unsteady Aerodynamic Force Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2016-01-01

    A simple approach for computing unsteady aerodynamic forces from simulated measured strain data is proposed in this study. First, the deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the unsteady strain using the two-step approach. Velocities and accelerations of the structure are computed using the autoregressive moving average model, on-line parameter estimator, low-pass filter, and a least-squares curve fitting method together with analytical derivatives with respect to time. Finally, aerodynamic forces over the wing are computed using modal aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices, a rational function approximation, and a time-marching algorithm. A cantilevered rectangular wing built and tested at the NASA Langley Research Center (Hampton, Virginia, USA) in 1959 is used to validate the simple approach. Unsteady aerodynamic forces as well as wing deflections, velocities, accelerations, and strains are computed using the CFL3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code and an MSC/NASTRAN code (MSC Software Corporation, Newport Beach, California, USA), and these CFL3D-based results are assumed as measured quantities. Based on the measured strains, wing deflections, velocities, accelerations, and aerodynamic forces are computed using the proposed approach. These computed deflections, velocities, accelerations, and unsteady aerodynamic forces are compared with the CFL3D/NASTRAN-based results. In general, computed aerodynamic forces based on the lifting surface theory in subsonic speeds are in good agreement with the target aerodynamic forces generated using CFL3D code with the Euler equation. Excellent aeroelastic responses are obtained even with unsteady strain data under the signal to noise ratio of -9.8dB. The deflections, velocities, and accelerations at each sensor location are independent of structural and aerodynamic models. Therefore, the distributed strain data together with the current proposed approaches can be used as distributed deflection

  19. Advanced aerodynamics and active controls. Selected NASA research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic and active control concepts for application to commercial transport aircraft are discussed. Selected topics include in flight direct strike lightning research, triply redundant digital fly by wire control systems, tail configurations, winglets, and the drones for aerodynamic and structural testing (DAST) program.

  20. Launch vehicle aerodynamic data base development comparison with flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, J. T.; Wallace, R. O.; Dill, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The aerodynamic development plan for the Space Shuttle integrated vehicle had three major objectives. The first objective was to support the evolution of the basic configuration by establishing aerodynamic impacts to various candidate configurations. The second objective was to provide continuing evaluation of the basic aerodynamic characteristics in order to bring about a mature data base. The third task was development of the element and component aerodynamic characteristics and distributed air loads data to support structural loads analyses. The complexity of the configurations rendered conventional analytic methods of little use and therefore required extensive wind tunnel testing of detailed complex models. However, the ground testing and analyses did not predict the aerodynamic characteristics that were extracted from the Space Shuttle flight test program. Future programs that involve the use of vehicles similar to the Space Shuttle should be concerned with the complex flow fields characteristics of these types of complex configurations.

  1. Aerodynamic Simulation of Ice Accretion on Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Bragg, Michael B.; Busch, Greg T.; Montreuil, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    This report describes recent improvements in aerodynamic scaling and simulation of ice accretion on airfoils. Ice accretions were classified into four types on the basis of aerodynamic effects: roughness, horn, streamwise, and spanwise ridge. The NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to generate ice accretions within these four types using both subscale and full-scale models. Large-scale, pressurized windtunnel testing was performed using a 72-in.- (1.83-m-) chord, NACA 23012 airfoil model with high-fidelity, three-dimensional castings of the IRT ice accretions. Performance data were recorded over Reynolds numbers from 4.5 x 10(exp 6) to 15.9 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.28. Lower fidelity ice-accretion simulation methods were developed and tested on an 18-in.- (0.46-m-) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model in a small-scale wind tunnel at a lower Reynolds number. The aerodynamic accuracy of the lower fidelity, subscale ice simulations was validated against the full-scale results for a factor of 4 reduction in model scale and a factor of 8 reduction in Reynolds number. This research has defined the level of geometric fidelity required for artificial ice shapes to yield aerodynamic performance results to within a known level of uncertainty and has culminated in a proposed methodology for subscale iced-airfoil aerodynamic simulation.

  2. Aerodynamic analysis of a tumbling American football

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, Daniel Edmundson

    In this study, the aerodynamic effects on an American football are characterized, especially in a tumbling, or end-over-end, motion as seen in a typical kickoff or field goal attempt. The objective of this study is to establish aerodynamic coefficients for the dynamic motion of a tumbling American football. A subsonic wind tunnel was used to recreate a range of air velocities that, when coupled with rotation rates and differing laces orientations, would provide a test bed for aerodynamic drag, side, and lift coefficient analysis. Test results quantify effect of back-spin and top-spin on lift force. Results show that the presence of laces imposes a side force in the opposite direction of the laces orientation. A secondary system was installed to visualize air flow around the tumbling ball and record high-speed video of wake patterns, as a qualitative check of measured force directions.

  3. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 2. Pre- and post-test decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wiles, L.E.; Lombardo, N.J.; Heeb, C.M.; Jenquin, U.P.; Michener, T.E.; Wheeler, C.L.; Creer, J.M.; McCann, R.A.

    1986-06-01

    This report describes the decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses conducted in support of performance testing of a Ridhihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2033 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The cask testing program was conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and by General Electric at the latters' Morris Operation (GE-MO) as reported in Volume I. The analyses effort consisted of performing pretest calculations to (1) select spent fuel for the test; (2) symmetrically load the spent fuel assemblies in the cask to ensure lateral symmetry of decay heat generation rates; (3) optimally locate temperature and dose rate instrumentation in the cask and spent fuel assemblies; and (4) evaluate the ORIGEN2 (decay heat), HYDRA and COBRA-SFS (heat transfer), and QAD and DOT (shielding) computer codes. The emphasis of this second volume is on the comparison of code predictions to experimental test data in support of the code evaluation process. Code evaluations were accomplished by comparing pretest (actually pre-look, since some predictions were not completed until testing was in progress) predictions with experimental cask testing data reported in Volume I. No attempt was made in this study to compare the two heat transfer codes because results of other evaluations have not been completed, and a comparison based on one data set may lead to erroneous conclusions.

  4. Thermal Vacuum Test of GLAS Propylene Loop Heat Pipe Development Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Charles; Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Kaya, Tarik; Nikitkin, Michael

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on Thermal Vacuum Tests of the GLAS (Geoscience Laser Altimeter System) Propylene Loop Heat Pipe Development Model. The topics include: 1) Flight LHP System (Laser); 2) Test Design and Objectives; 3) DM (Development Model) LHP (Loop Heat Pipe) Test Design; 4) Starter Heater and Coupling Blocks; 5) CC Control Heaters and PRT; 6) Heater Plates (Shown in Reflux Mode); 7) Startup Tests; 8) CC Control Heater Power Tests for CC Temperature Control; and 9) Control Temperature Stability.

  5. Analysis of SRM model nozzle calibration test data in support of IA12B, IA12C and IA36 space shuttle launch vehicle aerodynamics tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, L. R., Jr.; Tevepaugh, J. A.; Penny, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    Variations of nozzle performance characteristics of the model nozzles used in the Space Shuttle IA12B, IA12C, IA36 power-on launch vehicle test series are shown by comparison between experimental and analytical data. The experimental data are nozzle wall pressure distributions and schlieren photographs of the exhaust plume shapes. The exhaust plume shapes were simulated experimentally with cold flow while the analytical data were generated using a method-of-characteristics solution. Exhaust plume boundaries, boundary shockwave locations and nozzle wall pressure measurements calculated analytically agree favorably with the experimental data from the IA12C and IA36 test series. For the IA12B test series condensation was suspected in the exhaust plumes at the higher pressure ratios required to simulate the prototype plume shapes. Nozzle calibration tests for the series were conducted at pressure ratios where condensation either did not occur or if present did not produce a noticeable effect on the plume shapes. However, at the pressure ratios required in the power-on launch vehicle tests condensation probably occurs and could significantly affect the exhaust plume shapes.

  6. Tests on an airplane model, AEG D I of the Allgemeine Elektricitats Gesellschft, A-G, airplane construction section conducted at the Gottingen Model Testing Laboratory for Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Max; Molthan, Wilhelm

    1923-01-01

    Tests were carried out in the small wind tunnel of the Gottingen establishment on a complete model of the AEG D I airplane. The agreement between the model and the complete airplane applies particularly to the wings, which have ribs cut out of sheet metal and built up in exactly the same manner as in the actual airplane. Various series of tests were carried out with this model in which one or the other of the control surfaces were adjusted to various angles, while the others remained in their neutral positions. During the first three series of tests, the stabilizer was set at a positive angle of 3 degrees, 45' relative to the axis of the engine crankshaft, after which further tests at a 6 degree 30' we made. Finally, the model was tested with the tail group removed. With the elevators set in the prescribed positions, the lift, the drag, and the moments about an axis passing through the center of gravity and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry were measured. All three sets of readings are given as absolute coefficients. Where one of the other control surfaces was deflected from its normal position, the moment produced by that adjustment of the surface was also measured.

  7. High heat flux testing of divertor plasma facing materials and components using the HHF test facility at IPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yashashri; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Belsare, Sunil; Swamy, Rajamannar; Tripathi, Sudhir; Bhope, Kedar; Kanpara, Shailesh

    2016-02-01

    The High Heat Flux Test Facility (HHFTF) was designed and established recently at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) in India for testing heat removal capability and operational life time of plasma facing materials and components of the ITER-like tokamak. The HHFTF is equipped with various diagnostics such as IR cameras and IR-pyrometers for surface temperature measurements, coolant water calorimetry for absorbed power measurements and thermocouples for bulk temperature measurements. The HHFTF is capable of simulating steady state heat load of several MW m-2 as well as short transient heat loads of MJ m-2. This paper presents the current status of the HHFTF at IPR and high heat flux tests performed on the curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups as well as transient heat flux tests carried out on pure tungsten materials using the HHFTF. Curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups were fabricated using hot radial pressing (HRP) technique. Two curved tungsten monoblock type test mock-ups successfully sustained absorbed heat flux up to 14 MW m-2 with thermal cycles of 30 s ON and 30 s OFF duration. Transient high heat flux tests or thermal shock tests were carried out on pure tungsten hot-rolled plate material (Make:PLANSEE) with incident power density of 0.49 GW m-2 for 20 milliseconds ON and 1000 milliseconds OFF time. A total of 6000 thermal shock cycles were completed on pure tungsten material. Experimental results were compared with mathematical simulations carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics for transient high heat flux tests.

  8. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  9. Applied computational aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The present volume discusses the original development of the panel method, the mapping solutions and singularity distributions of linear potential schemes, the capabilities of full-potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes schemes, the use of the grid-generation methodology in applied aerodynamics, subsonic airfoil design, inverse airfoil design for transonic applications, the divergent trailing-edge airfoil innovation in CFD, Euler and potential computational results for selected aerodynamic configurations, and the application of CFD to wing high-lift systems. Also discussed are high-lift wing modifications for an advanced-capability EA-6B aircraft, Navier-Stokes methods for internal and integrated propulsion system flow predictions, the use of zonal techniques for analysis of rotor-stator interaction, CFD applications to complex configurations, CFD applications in component aerodynamic design of the V-22, Navier-Stokes computations of a complete F-16, CFD at supersonic/hypersonic speeds, and future CFD developments.

  10. Four Schools Put Solar Heating to the Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The National Science Foundation has awarded four companies over a million dollars to carry out solar energy space-heating experiments at different schools in Massachusetts, Minnesota, Maryland, and Virginia. (MLF)

  11. Testing of a Miniature Loop Heat Pipe with Multiple Evaporators and Multiple Condensers for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagano, Hosei; Ku, Jentung

    2006-01-01

    Thermal performance of a miniature loop heat pipe (MLHP) with two evaporators and two condensers is described. A comprehensive test program, including start-up, high power, low power, power cycle, and sink temperature cycle tests, has been executed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for potential space applications. Experimental data showed that the loop could start with heat loads as low as 2W. The loop operated stably with even and uneven evaporator heat loads, and even and uneven condenser sink temperatures. Heat load sharing between the two evaporators was also successfully demonstrated. The loop had a heat transport capability of l00W to 120W, and could recover from a dry-out by reducing the heat load to evaporators. Low power test results showed the loop could work stably for heat loads as low as 1 W to each evaporator. Excellent adaptability of the MLHP to rapid changes of evaporator power and sink temperature were also demonstrated.

  12. Reference values and improvement of aerodynamic drag in professional cyclists.

    PubMed

    García-López, Juan; Rodríguez-Marroyo, José Antonio; Juneau, Carl-Etienne; Peleteiro, José; Martínez, Alfredo Córdova; Villa, José Gerardo

    2008-02-01

    The aims of this study were to measure the aerodynamic drag in professional cyclists, to obtain aerodynamic drag reference values in static and effort positions, to improve the cyclists' aerodynamic drag by modifying their position and cycle equipment, and to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these modifications. The study was performed in a wind tunnel with five professional cyclists. Four positions were assessed with a time-trial bike and one position with a standard racing bike. In all positions, aerodynamic drag and kinematic variables were recorded. The drag area for the time-trial bike was 31% higher in the effort than static position, and lower than for the standard racing bike. Changes in the cyclists' position decreased the aerodynamic drag by 14%. The aero-helmet was not favourable for all cyclists. The reliability of aerodynamic drag measures in the wind tunnel was high (r > 0.96, coefficient of variation < 2%). In conclusion, we measured and improved the aerodynamic drag in professional cyclists. Our results were better than those of other researchers who did not assess aerodynamic drag during effort at race pace and who employed different wheels. The efficiency of the aero-helmet, and the validity, reliability, and sensitivity of the wind tunnel and aerodynamic field testing were addressed.

  13. Flight effects on the aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of inverted profile coannular nozzles, volume 1. [supersonic cruise aircraft research wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    Jet noise spectra obtained at static conditions from an acoustic wind tunnel and an outdoor facility are compared. Data curves are presented for (1) the effect of relative velocity on OASPL directivity (all configurations); (2) the effect of relative velocity on noise spectra (all configurations); (3) the effect of velocity on PNL directivity (coannular nozzle configurations); (4) nozzle exhaust plume velocity profiles; and (5) the effect of relative velocity on aerodynamic performance.

  14. Aerodynamic Parameter Identification of a Venus Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Robert A.

    An analysis was conducted to identify the parameters of an aerodynamic model for a Venus lander based on experimental free-flight data. The experimental free-flight data were collected in the NASA Langley 20-ft Vertical Spin Tunnel with a 25-percent Froude-scaled model. The experimental data were classified based on the wind tunnel run type: runs where the lander model was unperturbed over the course of the run, and runs were the model was perturbed (principally in pitch, yaw, and roll) by the wind tunnel operator. The perturbations allow for data to be obtained at higher wind angles and rotation rates than those available from the unperturbed data. The model properties and equations of motion were used to determine experimental values for the aerodynamic coefficients. An aerodynamic model was selected using a priori knowledge of axisymmetric blunt entry vehicles. The least squares method was used to estimate the aerodynamic parameters. Three sets of results were obtained from the following data sets: perturbed, unperturbed, and the combination of both. The combined data set was selected for the final set of aerodynamic parameters based on the quality of the results. The identified aerodynamic parameters are consistent with that of the static wind tunnel data. Reconstructions, of experimental data not used in the parameter identification analyses, achieved similar residuals as those with data used to identify the parameters. Simulations of the experimental data, using the identified parameters, indicate that the aerodynamic model used is incapable of replicating the limit cycle oscillations with stochastic peak amplitudes observed during the test.

  15. Design and Testing of Metal and Silicon Heat Spreaders with Embedded Micromachined Heat Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.A.; Robino, C.V.

    1999-02-22

    The authors have developed a new type of heat spreader based on the integration of heat pipes directly within a thin planar structure suitable for use as a heat spreader or as the base layer in a substrate. The process uses micromachining methods to produce micron scale patterns that act as a wick in these small scale heat pipes. By using silicon or a low expansion metal as the wall material of these spreaders, they achieve a good match to the thermal coefficient of expansion of the die. The match allows the use of a thin high performance die attachment even on large size die. The embedded heat pipes result in high effective thermal conductivity for the new spreader technology.

  16. Effect of boundary layer thickness before the flow separation on aerodynamic characteristics and heat transfer behind an abrupt expansion in a round tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, V. I.; Bogatko, T. V.

    2008-03-01

    Results of numerical investigation of the boundary layer thickness on turbulent separation and heat transfer in a tube with an abrupt expansion are shown. The Menter turbulence model of shear stress transfer implemented in Fluent package was used for calculations. The range of Reynolds numbers was from 5·103 to 105. The air was used as the working fluid. A degree of tube expansion was ( D 2/ D 1)2 = 1.78. A significant effect of thickness of the separated boundary layer both on dynamic and thermal characteristics of the flow is shown. In particular, it was found that with an increase in the boundary layer thickness the recirculation zone increases, and the maximum heat transfer coefficient decreases.

  17. X-33 Computational Aeroheating/Aerodynamic Predictions and Comparisons With Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Thompson, Richard A.; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alter, Stephen J.

    2003-01-01

    This report details a computational fluid dynamics study conducted in support of the phase II development of the X-33 vehicle. Aerodynamic and aeroheating predictions were generated for the X-33 vehicle at both flight and wind-tunnel test conditions using two finite-volume, Navier-Stokes solvers. Aerodynamic computations were performed at Mach 6 and Mach 10 wind-tunnel conditions for angles of attack from 10 to 50 with body-flap deflections of 0 to 20. Additional aerodynamic computations were performed over a parametric range of free-stream conditions at Mach numbers of 4 to 10 and angles of attack from 10 to 50. Laminar and turbulent wind-tunnel aeroheating computations were performed at Mach 6 for angles of attack of 20 to 40 with body-flap deflections of 0 to 20. Aeroheating computations were performed at four flight conditions with Mach numbers of 6.6 to 8.9 and angles of attack of 10 to 40. Surface heating and pressure distributions, surface streamlines, flow field information, and aerodynamic coefficients from these computations are presented, and comparisons are made with wind-tunnel data.

  18. Computational aerodynamics and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The role of computational aerodynamics in design is reviewed with attention given to the design process; the proper role of computations; the importance of calibration, interpretation, and verification; the usefulness of a given computational capability; and the marketing of new codes. Examples of computational aerodynamics in design are given with particular emphasis on the Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology. Finally, future prospects are noted, with consideration given to the role of advanced computers, advances in numerical solution techniques, turbulence models, complex geometries, and computational design procedures. Previously announced in STAR as N82-33348

  19. Rarefaction Effects in Hypersonic Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    2011-05-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) technique is used for numerical analysis of rarefied-gas hypersonic flows near a blunt plate, wedge, two side-by-side plates, disk, torus, and rotating cylinder. The role of various similarity parameters (Knudsen and Mach numbers, geometrical and temperature factors, specific heat ratios, and others) in aerodynamics of the probes is studied. Important kinetic effects that are specific for the transition flow regime have been found: non-monotonic lift and drag of plates, strong repulsive force between side-by-side plates and cylinders, dependence of drag on torus radii ratio, and the reverse Magnus effect on the lift of a rotating cylinder. The numerical results are in a good agreement with experimental data, which were obtained in a vacuum chamber at low and moderate Knudsen numbers from 0.01 to 10.

  20. Design, development and testing of a cryogenic temperature heat pipe for the icicle system. [breadboard models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimmer, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical model was formulated for a cryogenic heat pipe, and thermal and transport analyses were developed to predict the performance characteristics of various heat pipe designs. These analyses permitted optimization of various design parameters. A series of four breadboard heat pipes were fabricated and tested to provide inputs such as internal film coefficients, minimum capillary radii, and wick permeabilities which are required for the analyses. The results of instrumentation, charging, and testing of cryogenic heat pipes were applied to the prototype heat pipes. After a thorough design analysis of three potential heat pipe wicks (slab, artery, and axial groove), the first two were chosen for application to two prototype heat pipes. Detailed designs were made of the two heat pipes and the units were fabricated. Tests were conducted which verified the integrity and safety margin of the design to withstand the internal pressure at ambient temperature and fatigue of thermal cycling. During the acceptance testing in the vacuum chamber, no difficulty was experienced in priming the slab-wick heat pipe and it met the performance design requirements. The artery-wick heat pipe would not prime with nitrogen working fluid for any test conditions.

  1. Airfoil Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, E.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, ONERA, and the University of Illinois are conducting a major research program whose goal is to improve our understanding of the aerodynamic scaling of ice accretions on airfoils. The program when it is completed will result in validated scaled simulation methods that produce the essential aerodynamic features of the full-scale iced-airfoil. This research will provide some of the first, high-fidelity, full-scale, iced-airfoil aerodynamic data. An initial study classified ice accretions based on their aerodynamics into four types: roughness, streamwise ice, horn ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. Subscale testing using a NACA 23012 airfoil was performed in the NASA IRT and University of Illinois wind tunnel to better understand the aerodynamics of these ice types and to test various levels of ice simulation fidelity. These studies are briefly reviewed here and have been presented in more detail in other papers. Based on these results, full-scale testing at the ONERA F1 tunnel using cast ice shapes obtained from molds taken in the IRT will provide full-scale iced airfoil data from full-scale ice accretions. Using these data as a baseline, the final step is to validate the simulation methods in scale in the Illinois wind tunnel. Computational ice accretion methods including LEWICE and ONICE have been used to guide the experiments and are briefly described and results shown. When full-scale and simulation aerodynamic results are available, these data will be used to further develop computational tools. Thus the purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the program and key results to date.

  2. 76 FR 63211 - Energy Efficiency Program: Test Procedures for Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    .../heating_products_fr_tsd.html . The set point impacts the performance of various types of water heaters... Part 430 RIN 1904-AC53 Energy Efficiency Program: Test Procedures for Residential Water Heaters, Direct... amendments to DOE's test procedures for residential water heaters, direct heating equipment, and pool...

  3. General-Purpose Heat Source Development: Safety Verification Test Program. Flyer plate test series

    SciTech Connect

    Cull, T.A.; Pavone, D.

    1986-09-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular component of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will provide electric power for space missions. The initial RTG applications will be for the NASA Galileo and the ESA Ulysses missions. Each of the 18 GPHS modules in an RTG contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. A series of Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) has been conducted to assess the ability of the GPHS fueled clads to contain the plutonia in accident environments. Because a launch pad or postlaunch explosion of the Space Transportation System Vehicle (space shuttle) is one conceivable accident, the SVT plan included a series of tests to simulate the fragment environment that the RTG and GPHS modules would experience in such an event. These tests deal specifically with the flat-on collision of flyer-plate-type fragments with bare, simulant-fueled (depleted UO/sub 2/) clads. Results of these tests suggest that the fueled clad is only minimally breached by collision with 3.53-mm-thick flyer-plate-type fragments of space shuttle alloy at velocities up to 1170 m/s. However, collision of a 38.1-mm-thick plate with a bare GPHS clad, at a velocity of 270 m/s, results in a total release of fuel.

  4. Design of Refractory Metal Heat Pipe Life Test Environment Chamber, Cooling System, and Radio Frequency Heating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. J.; Bragg-Sitton, S. M.; Reid, R. S.; Stewart, E. T.; Davis, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    A series of 16 Mo-44.5%Re alloy/sodium heat pipes will be experimentally tested to examine heat pipe aging. To support this evaluation, an environmental test chamber and a number of auxiliary subsystems are required. These subsystems include radio frequency (RF) power supplies/inductive coils, recirculation water coolant loops, and chamber gas conditioning. The heat pipes will be grouped, based on like power and gas mixture requirements, into three clusters of five units each, configured in a pentagonal arrangement. The highest powered heat pipe will be tested separately. Test chamber atmospheric purity is targeted at <0.3 ppb oxygen at an approximate operating pressure of 76 torr (.1.5 psia), maintained by active purification (oxygen level is comparable to a 10(exp -6) torr environment). Treated water will be used in two independent cooling circuits to remove .85 kW. One circuit will service the RF hardware while the other will maintain the heat pipe calorimetry. Initial procedures for the startup and operation of support systems have been identified. Each of these subsystems is outfitted with a variety of instrumentation, integrated with distributed real-time controllers and computers. A local area network provides communication between all devices. This data and control network continuously monitors the health of the test hardware, providing warning indicators followed by automatic shutdown should potentially damaging conditions develop. During hardware construction, a number of checkout tests.many making use of stainless steel prototype heat pipes that are already fabricated.will be required to verify operation.

  5. Aerodynamic results of an abort separation effects test (IA8) conducted in the NASA/ARC 14-foot transonic wind tunnel on a model (6-OTS) of the Rockwell International launch configuration integrated vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on a 6-OTS 0.015-scale model. The Ames dual sting support separation rig was used to obtain grid-type data for tank-booster abort from orbiter (SSV). Freestream data were obtained for the orbiter to provide a baseline for evaluation of proximity effects. Data were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.32 to 1.1, and Reynolds number per foot varying from 2.1 million to 3.9 million. Data are not presented. Because of balance failure, a very substantial portion of the test was run with a dummy balance in the tank boosters configuration.

  6. Study of aerodynamic technology for single-cruise-engine V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, J. R.; Bear, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A viable, single engine, supersonic V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft concept was defined. This vectored thrust, canard wing configuration utilizes an advanced technology separated flow engine with fan stream burning. The aerodynamic characteristics of this configuration were estimated and performance evaluated. Significant aerodynamic and aerodynamic propulsion interaction uncertainties requiring additional investigation were identified. A wind tunnel model concept and test program to resolve these uncertainties and validate the aerodynamic prediction methods were defined.

  7. Charts Adapted from Van Driest's Turbulent Flat-plate Theory for Determining Values of Turbulent Aerodynamic Friction and Heat-transfer Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dorothy B; Faget, Maxime A

    1956-01-01

    A modified method of Van Driest's flat-plate theory for turbulent boundary layer has been found to simplify the calculation of local skin-friction coefficients which, in turn, have made it possible to obtain through Reynolds analogy theoretical turbulent heat-transfer coefficients in the form of Stanton number. A general formula is given and charts are presented from which the modified method can be solved for Mach numbers 1.0 to 12.0, temperature ratios 0.2 to 6.0, and Reynolds numbers 0.2 times 10 to the 6th power to 200 times 10 to the 6th power.

  8. Fabrication and Testing of Mo-Re Heat Pipes Embedded in Carbon/Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Merrigan, Michael A.; Sena, J. Tom

    1998-01-01

    Refractory-composite/heat-pipe-cooled wing an tail leading edges are being considered for use on hypersonic vehicles to limit maximum temperatures to values below material reuse limits and to eliminate the need to actively cool the leading edges. The development of a refractory-composite/heat-pipe-cooled leading edge has evolved from the design stage to the fabrication and testing of heat pipes embedded in carbon/carbon (C/C). A three-foot-long, molybdenum-rhenium heat pipe with a lithium working fluid was fabricated and tested at an operating temperature of 2460 F to verify the individual heat-pipe design. Following the fabrication of this heat pipe, three additional heat pipes were fabricated and embedded in C/C. The C/C heat-pipe test article was successfully tested using quartz lamps in a vacuum chamber in both a horizontal and vertical orientation. Start up and steady state data are presented for the C/C heat-pipe test article. Radiography and eddy current evaluations were performed on the test article.

  9. Water table tests of proposed heat transfer tunnels for small turbine vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.

    1974-01-01

    Water-table flow tests were conducted for proposed heat-transfer tunnels which were designed to provide uniform flow into their respective test sections of a single core engine turbine vane and a full annular ring of helicopter turbine vanes. Water-table tests were also performed for the single-vane test section of the core engine tunnel. The flow in the heat-transfer tunnels was shown to be acceptable.

  10. Closeout Report for the Refractory Metal Accelerated Heat Pipe Life Test Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J.; Reid, R.; Stewart, E.; Hickman, R.; Mireles, O.

    2013-01-01

    With the selection of a gas-cooled reactor, this heat pipe accelerated life test activity was closed out and its resources redirected. The scope of this project was to establish the long-term aging effects on Mo-44.5%Re sodium heat pipes when subjected to space reactor temperature and mass fluences. To date, investigators have demonstrated heat pipe life tests of alkali metal systems up to .50,000 hours. Unfortunately, resources have not been available to examine the effect of temperature, mass fluence, or impurity level on corrosion or to conduct post-test forensic examination of heat pipes. The key objective of this effort was to establish a cost/time effective method to systematically test alkali metal heat pipes with both practical and theoretical benefits. During execution of the project, a heat pipe design was established, a majority of the laboratory test equipment systems specified, and operating and test procedures developed. Procurements for the heat pipe units and all major test components were underway at the time the stop work order was issued. An extremely important outcome was the successful fabrication of an annular wick from Mo-5%Re screen (the single, most difficult component to manufacture) using a hot isostatic pressing technique. This Technical Publication (TP) includes specifics regarding the heat pipe calorimeter water-cooling system, vendor design for the radio frequency heating system, possible alternative calorimeter designs, and progress on the vanadium equilibration technique. The methods provided in this TP and preceding project documentation would serve as a good starting point to rapidly implement an accelerated life test. Relevant test data can become available within months, not years, and destructive examination of the first life test heat pipe might begin within 6 months of test initiation. Final conclusions could be drawn in less than a quarter of the mission duration for a long-lived, fission-powered, deep space probe.

  11. Test and evaluation of the heat recovery incinerator system at Naval Station, Mayport, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-05-01

    This report describes test and evaluation of the two-ton/hr heat recovery incinerator (HRI) facility located at Mayport Naval Station, Fla., carried out during November and December 1980. The tests included: (1) Solid Waste: characterization, heating value, and ultimate analysis, (2) Ash: moisture, combustibles, and heating values of both bottom and cyclone ashes; Extraction Procedure toxicity tests on leachates from both bottom and cyclone ashes; trace metals in cyclone particulates, (3) Stack Emissions: particulates (quantity and size distribution), chlorides, oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and trace elements, and (4) Heat and Mass Balance: all measurements required to carry out complete heat and mass balance calculations over the test period. The overall thermal efficiency of the HRI facility while operating at approximately 1.0 ton/hr was found to be 49% when the primary Btu equivalent of the electrical energy consumed during the test program was included.

  12. Heat Pipe Powered Stirling Conversion for the Demonstration Using Flattop Fission (DUFF) Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Marc A.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Sanzi, James L.; Brace, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Design concepts for small Fission Power Systems (FPS) have shown that heat pipe cooled reactors provide a passive, redundant, and lower mass option to transfer heat from the fuel to the power conversion system, as opposed to pumped loop designs typically associated with larger FPS. Although many systems have been conceptually designed and a few making it to electrically heated testing, none have been coupled to a real nuclear reactor. A demonstration test named DUFF Demonstration Using Flattop Fission, was planned by the Los Alamos National Lab (LANL) to use an existing criticality experiment named Flattop to provide the nuclear heat source. A team from the NASA Glenn Research Center designed, built, and tested a heat pipe and power conversion system to couple to Flattop with the end goal of making electrical power. This paper will focus on the design and testing performed in preparation for the DUFF test.

  13. Design and calibration of a novel transient radiative heat flux meter for a spacecraft thermal test.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chunchen; Hu, Peng; Cheng, Xiaofang

    2016-06-01

    Radiative heat flux measurement is significantly important for a spacecraft thermal test. To satisfy the requirements of both high accuracy and fast response, a novel transient radiative heat flux meter was developed. Its thermal receiver consists of a central thermal receiver and two thermal guarded annular plates, which ensure the temperature distribution of the central thermal receiver to be uniform enough for reasonably applying lumped heat capacity method in a transient radiative heat flux measurement. This novel transient radiative heat flux meter design can also take accurate measurements regardless of spacecraft surface temperature and incident radiation spectrum. The measurement principle was elaborated and the coefficients were calibrated. Experimental results from testing a blackbody furnace and an Xenon lamp show that this novel transient radiative heat flux meter can be used to measure transient radiative heat flux up to 1400 W/m(2) with high accuracy and the response time of less than 10 s.

  14. Design and calibration of a novel transient radiative heat flux meter for a spacecraft thermal test.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chunchen; Hu, Peng; Cheng, Xiaofang

    2016-06-01

    Radiative heat flux measurement is significantly important for a spacecraft thermal test. To satisfy the requirements of both high accuracy and fast response, a novel transient radiative heat flux meter was developed. Its thermal receiver consists of a central thermal receiver and two thermal guarded annular plates, which ensure the temperature distribution of the central thermal receiver to be uniform enough for reasonably applying lumped heat capacity method in a transient radiative heat flux measurement. This novel transient radiative heat flux meter design can also take accurate measurements regardless of spacecraft surface temperature and incident radiation spectrum. The measurement principle was elaborated and the coefficients were calibrated. Experimental results from testing a blackbody furnace and an Xenon lamp show that this novel transient radiative heat flux meter can be used to measure transient radiative heat flux up to 1400 W/m(2) with high accuracy and the response time of less than 10 s. PMID:27370482

  15. Development of advanced high-temperature heat flux sensors. Phase 2: Verification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    A two-phase program is conducted to develop heat flux sensors capable of making heat flux measurements throughout the hot section of gas turbine engines. In Phase 1, three types of heat flux sensors are selected; embedded thermocouple, laminated, and Gardon gauge sensors. A demonstration of the ability of these sensors to operate in an actual engine environment is reported. A segmented liner of each of two combustors being used in the Broad Specification Fuels Combustor program is instrumented with the three types of heat flux sensors then tested in a high pressure combustor rig. Radiometer probes are also used to measure the radiant heat loads to more fully characterize the combustor environment. Test results show the heat flux sensors to be in good agreement with radiometer probes and the predicted data trends. In general, heat flux sensors have strong potential for use in combustor development programs.

  16. Design and test of a self-controlled heat pipe radiator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swerdling, B.; Hembach, R.

    1973-01-01

    A 15,000-W spacecraft waste heat rejection system utilizing heat pipe radiator panels has been investigated. Of the several concepts initially identified, a series system was selected for more in-depth analysis. As a demonstration of system feasibility, a nominal 500-W radiator panel has been designed, built, and bench tested. The panel, which is a module of the 15,000-W system, consists of a variable conductance heat pipe (VCHP) header, and six isothermalizer heat pipes attached to a radiator. The thermal load to the VCHP is supplied by a Freon 21 liquid loop via an integral heat exchanger. This paper describes the results of the system studies and the radiator design. Also presented are test data on the VCHP, heat exchanger and isothermalizer heat pipes.

  17. Design and calibration of a novel transient radiative heat flux meter for a spacecraft thermal test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Chunchen; Hu, Peng; Cheng, Xiaofang

    2016-06-01

    Radiative heat flux measurement is significantly important for a spacecraft thermal test. To satisfy the requirements of both high accuracy and fast response, a novel transient radiative heat flux meter was developed. Its thermal receiver consists of a central thermal receiver and two thermal guarded annular plates, which ensure the temperature distribution of the central thermal receiver to be uniform enough for reasonably applying lumped heat capacity method in a transient radiative heat flux measurement. This novel transient radiative heat flux meter design can also take accurate measurements regardless of spacecraft surface temperature and incident radiation spectrum. The measurement principle was elaborated and the coefficients were calibrated. Experimental results from testing a blackbody furnace and an Xenon lamp show that this novel transient radiative heat flux meter can be used to measure transient radiative heat flux up to 1400 W/m2 with high accuracy and the response time of less than 10 s.

  18. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward; Hu, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    A Fourier analysis method was developed to analyze harmonic forced-oscillation data at high angles of attack as functions of the angle of attack and its time rate of change. The resulting aerodynamic responses at different frequencies are used to build up the aerodynamic models involving time integrals of the indicial type. An efficient numerical method was also developed to evaluate these time integrals for arbitrary motions based on a concept of equivalent harmonic motion. The method was verified by first using results from two-dimensional and three-dimensional linear theories. The developed models for C sub L, C sub D, and C sub M based on high-alpha data for a 70 deg delta wing in harmonic motions showed accurate results in reproducing hysteresis. The aerodynamic models are further verified by comparing with test data using ramp-type motions.

  19. History of the numerical aerodynamic simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Victor L.; Ballhaus, William F., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) program has reached a milestone with the completion of the initial operating configuration of the NAS Processing System Network. This achievement is the first major milestone in the continuing effort to provide a state-of-the-art supercomputer facility for the national aerospace community and to serve as a pathfinder for the development and use of future supercomputer systems. The underlying factors that motivated the initiation of the program are first identified and then discussed. These include the emergence and evolution of computational aerodynamics as a powerful new capability in aerodynamics research and development, the computer power required for advances in the discipline, the complementary nature of computation and wind tunnel testing, and the need for the government to play a pathfinding role in the development and use of large-scale scientific computing systems. Finally, the history of the NAS program is traced from its inception in 1975 to the present time.

  20. Assessment of Feasibility of the Beneficial Use of Waste Heat from the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Donna P. Guillen

    2012-07-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using waste heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). A proposed glycol waste heat recovery system was assessed for technical and economic feasibility. The system under consideration would use waste heat from the ATR secondary coolant system to preheat air for space heating of TRA-670. A tertiary coolant stream would be extracted from the secondary coolant system loop and pumped to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, where heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air in the heating and ventilation system. Historical data from Advanced Test Reactor operations over the past 10 years indicates that heat from the reactor coolant was available (when needed for heating) for 43.5% of the year on average. Potential energy cost savings by using the waste heat to preheat intake air is $242K/yr. Technical, safety, and logistics considerations of the glycol waste heat recovery system are outlined. Other opportunities for using waste heat and reducing water usage at ATR are considered.

  1. Structural and preliminary thermal performance testing of a pressure activated contact heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. Y.; Christian, E. L.; Wohlwend, J. W.; Parish, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    A contact heat exchanger concept is being developed for use onboard Space Station as an interface device between external thermal bus and pressurized modules. The concept relies on mechanical contact activated by the fluid pressure inside thin-walled tubes. Structural testings were carried out to confirm the technology feasibility of using such thin-walled tubes. The test results also verified the linear elastic stress analysis which was used to predict the tube mechanical behaviors. A preliminary thermal testing was also performed with liquid Freon-11 flowing inside tubes and heat being supplied by electrical heating from the bottom of the contact heat exchanger baseplate. The test results showed excellent agreement of test data with analytical prediction for all thermal resistances except for the two-phase flow characteristics. Testing with two-phase flow inside tubes will, however, be performed on the NASA-JSC test bed.

  2. Experimental tests for the occurence of convective heat transfer within the bed of rectangular steel profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyczółkowski, Rafał; Musiał, Dorota

    2012-09-01

    The paper describes tests intended to examine the occurrence of natural convection within the space occupied by 40×20 mm rectangular steel sections. Within these tests the bed of four layers of section was heated by the electric palate heater. Depending on the manner in which the heater was positioned, the tests were divided into two series. In the case of heating from above, the heat flowing through the bed is transferred only by conduction and radiation. When heating the bed from below, in addition to conduction and radiation, also a convective heat transfer will occur. Should this be the case, it will result in the intensification of the heat exchange. The results of measurements carried out have not demonstrated that the occurrence of any possible natural convection would influence the development of a temperature field in this type of charge.

  3. High temperature superconducting current lead test facility with heat pipe intercepts

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfeld, P.E.; Prenger, C.; Roth, E.W.; Stewart, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) current lead test facility using heat pipe thermal intercepts is under development at the Superconducting Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility can be configured for tests at currents up to 1,000 A. Mechanical cryocoolers provide refrigeration to the leads. Electrical isolation is maintained by intercepting thermal energy from the leads through cryogenic heat pipes. HST lead warm end temperature is variable from 65 K to over 90 K by controlling heat pipe evaporator temperature. Cold end temperature is variable up to 30 K. Performance predictions in terms of heat pipe evaporator temperature as a function of lead current are presented for the initial facility configuration, which supports testing up to 200 A. Measurements are to include temperature and voltage gradient in the conventional and HTS lead sections, temperature and heat transfer rate in the heat pipes. as well as optimum and off-optimum performance of the conventional lead sections.

  4. TESTING OF REFRIGERANT MIXTURES IN RESIDENTIAL HEAT PUMPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an investigation of four possibilities for replacing Hydrochlorofluorocarbon-22 (HCFC-22) with the non-ozone-depleting new refrigerants R-407D and R-407C in residential heat pumps. The first and simplest scenario was a retrofit with no hardware modific...

  5. A Si/Glass Bulk-Micromachined Cryogenic Heat Exchanger for High Heat Loads: Fabrication, Test, and Application Results

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weibin; White, Michael J.; Nellis, Gregory F.; Klein, Sanford A.; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a micromachined Si/glass stack recuperative heat exchanger with in situ temperature sensors. Numerous high-conductivity silicon plates with integrated platinum resistance temperature detectors (Pt RTDs) are stacked, alternating with low-conductivity Pyrex spacers. The device has a 1 × 1-cm2 footprint and a length of up to 3.5 cm. It is intended for use in Joule–Thomson (J–T) coolers and can sustain pressure exceeding 1 MPa. Tests at cold-end inlet temperatures of 237 K–252 K show that the heat exchanger effectiveness is 0.9 with 0.039-g/s helium mass flow rate. The integrated Pt RTDs present a linear response of 0.26%–0.30%/K over an operational range of 205 K–296 K but remain usable at lower temperatures. In self-cooling tests with ethane as the working fluid, a J–T system with the heat exchanger drops 76.1 K below the inlet temperature, achieving 218.7 K for a pressure of 835.8 kPa. The system reaches 200 K in transient state; further cooling is limited by impurities that freeze within the flow stream. In J–T self-cooling tests with an external heat load, the system reaches 239 K while providing 1 W of cooling. In all cases, there is an additional parasitic heat load estimated at 300–500 mW. PMID:20490284

  6. General-Purpose Heat Source development: Safety Verification Test Program. Bullet/fragment test series

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.; Tate, R.E.; Axler, K.M.

    1985-05-01

    The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will provide power for space missions contains 18 General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. Each module contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. Because a launch-pad or post-launch explosion is always possible, we need to determine the ability of GPHS fueled clads within a module to survive fragment impact. The bullet/fragment test series, part of the Safety Verification Test Plan, was designed to provide information on clad response to impact by a compact, high-energy, aluminum-alloy fragment and to establish a threshold value of fragment energy required to breach the iridium cladding. Test results show that a velocity of 555 m/s (1820 ft/s) with an 18-g bullet is at or near the threshold value of fragment velocity that will cause a clad breach. Results also show that an exothermic Ir/Al reaction occurs if aluminum and hot iridium are in contact, a contact that is possible and most damaging to the clad within a narrow velocity range. The observed reactions between the iridium and the aluminum were studied in the laboratory and are reported in the Appendix.

  7. Experimental Observations and Numerical Prediction of Induction Heating in a Graphite Test Article

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, Todd A; Johnson, Debra P; Jurney, James D; Freer, Jerry E; Dougherty, Lisa M; Stout, Stephen A

    2009-01-01

    The induction heating coils used in the plutonium casting furnaces at the Los Alamos National Laboratory are studied here. A cylindrical graphite test article has been built, instrumented with thermocouples, and heated in the induction coil that is normally used to preheat the molds during casting operations. Preliminary results of experiments aimed at understanding the induction heating process in the mold portion of the furnaces are reported. The experiments have been modeled in COMSOL Multiphysics and the numerical and experimental results are compared to one another. These comparisons provide insight into the heating process and provide a benchmark for COMSOL calculations of induction heating in the mold portion of the plutonium casting furnaces.

  8. Incremental Aerodynamic Coefficient Database for the USA2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Annie Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In March through May of 2016, a wind tunnel test was conducted by the Aerosciences Branch (EV33) to visually study the unsteady aerodynamic behavior over multiple transition geometries for the Universal Stage Adapter 2 (USA2) in the MSFC Aerodynamic Research Facility's Trisonic Wind Tunnel (TWT). The purpose of the test was to make a qualitative comparison of the transonic flow field in order to provide a recommended minimum transition radius for manufacturing. Additionally, 6 Degree of Freedom force and moment data for each configuration tested was acquired in order to determine the geometric effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients (Normal Force, Axial Force, and Pitching Moment). In order to make a quantitative comparison of the aerodynamic effects of the USA2 transition geometry, the aerodynamic coefficient data collected during the test was parsed and incorporated into a database for each USA2 configuration tested. An incremental aerodynamic coefficient database was then developed using the generated databases for each USA2 geometry as a function of Mach number and angle of attack. The final USA2 coefficient increments will be applied to the aerodynamic coefficients of the baseline geometry to adjust the Space Launch System (SLS) integrated launch vehicle force and moment database based on the transition geometry of the USA2.

  9. Measurements of SCRF cavity dynamic heat load in horizontal test system

    SciTech Connect

    DeGraff, B.D.; Bossert, R.J.; Pei, L.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    The Horizontal Test System (HTS) at Fermilab is currently testing fully assembled, dressed superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. These cavities are cooled in a bath of superfluid helium at 1.8K. Dissipated RF power from the cavities is a dynamic heat load on the cryogenic system. The magnitude of heat flux from these cavities into the helium is also an important variable for understanding cavity performance. Methods and hardware used to measure this dynamic heat load are presented. Results are presented from several cavity tests and testing accuracy is discussed.

  10. General-Purpose Heat Source safety verification test series: SVT-1 through SVT-6

    SciTech Connect

    Pavone, D.; George, T.G.; Frantz, C.E.

    1985-06-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular heat source that will supply energy for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) in space missions. The Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) are performed to assess the plutonia containment capability of heat source modules subjected to certain accident environments. This interim report described the GPHS module configuration, the test environment, and the response of the module components following simulated reentry and solid Earth impact. The specific test environment of these initial six tests results from failure of the booster rocket to place the spacecraft in a proper trajectory and subsequent reentry of the GPHS modules from Earth orbit. 36 figs.

  11. General-Purpose Heat Source safety verification test series: SVT-1 through SVT-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavone, D.; George, T. G.; Frantz, C. E.

    1985-06-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular heat source that will supply energy for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) in space missions. The Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) are performed to assess the plutonium containment capability of heat source modules subjected to certain accident environments. This interim report described the GPHS module configuration, the test environment, and the response of the module components following simulated reentry and solid Earth impact. The specific test environment of these initial six tests results from failure of the booster rocket to place the spacecraft in a proper trajectory and subsequent reentry of the GPHS modules from Earth orbit.

  12. Numerical computation of aerodynamics and heat transfer in a turbine cascade and a turn-around duct using advanced turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Luo, J.

    1993-07-01

    The objective of this research is to develop turbulence models to predict the flow and heat transfer fields dominated by the curvature effect such as those encountered in turbine cascades and turn-around ducts. A Navier-Stokes code has been developed using an explicit Runge-Kutta method with a two layer k-epsilon/ARSM (Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model), Chien's Low Reynolds Number (LRN) k-epsilon model and Coakley's LRN q-omega model. The near wall pressure strain correlation term was included in the ARSM. The formulation is applied to Favre-averaged N-S equations and no thin-layer approximations are made in either the mean flow or turbulence transport equations. Anisotropic scaling of artificial dissipation terms was used. Locally variable timestep was also used to improve convergence. Detailed comparisons were made between computations and data measured in a turbine cascade by Arts et al. at Von Karman Institute. The surface pressure distributions and wake profiles were predicted well by all the models. The blade heat transfer is predicted well by k-epsilon/ARSM model, as well as the k-epsilon model. It's found that the onset of boundary layer transition on both surfaces is highly dependent upon the level of local freestream turbulence intensity, which is strongly influenced by the streamline curvature. Detailed computation of the flow in the turn around duct has been carried out and validated against the data by Monson as well as Sandborn. The computed results at various streamwise locations both on the concave and convex sides are compared with flow and turbulence data including the separation zone on the inner well. The k-epsilon/ARSM model yielded relatively better results than the two-equation turbulence models. A detailed assessment of the turbulence models has been made with regard to their applicability to curved flows.

  13. Numerical computation of aerodynamics and heat transfer in a turbine cascade and a turn-around duct using advanced turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Luo, J.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop turbulence models to predict the flow and heat transfer fields dominated by the curvature effect such as those encountered in turbine cascades and turn-around ducts. A Navier-Stokes code has been developed using an explicit Runge-Kutta method with a two layer k-epsilon/ARSM (Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model), Chien's Low Reynolds Number (LRN) k-epsilon model and Coakley's LRN q-omega model. The near wall pressure strain correlation term was included in the ARSM. The formulation is applied to Favre-averaged N-S equations and no thin-layer approximations are made in either the mean flow or turbulence transport equations. Anisotropic scaling of artificial dissipation terms was used. Locally variable timestep was also used to improve convergence. Detailed comparisons were made between computations and data measured in a turbine cascade by Arts et al. at Von Karman Institute. The surface pressure distributions and wake profiles were predicted well by all the models. The blade heat transfer is predicted well by k-epsilon/ARSM model, as well as the k-epsilon model. It's found that the onset of boundary layer transition on both surfaces is highly dependent upon the level of local freestream turbulence intensity, which is strongly influenced by the streamline curvature. Detailed computation of the flow in the turn around duct has been carried out and validated against the data by Monson as well as Sandborn. The computed results at various streamwise locations both on the concave and convex sides are compared with flow and turbulence data including the separation zone on the inner well. The k-epsilon/ARSM model yielded relatively better results than the two-equation turbulence models. A detailed assessment of the turbulence models has been made with regard to their applicability to curved flows.

  14. Fabrication and testing of thermionic heat pipe modules for space nuclear power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner-Richardson, Kevin; Hartenstine, John R.; Ernst, Donald M.; Jacox, Michael G.

    Fabrication and testing of a preprototype thermionic heat pipe module (THPM), 1127A, successfully demonstrated the first cylindrical converter employing an emitter heat pipe for power input and a collector heat pipe for cooling. Dimensional requirements are established and maintained, and methods to gundrill refractory metal tubing of the required lengths are validated. Assembly, processing, and test procedures and equipment are established and debugged. Post mortem analysis is expected to elucidate the life-limiting corrosion mechanisms at work in the molybdenum/lithium emitter heat pipe. These results are expected to provide the growth and validation of technology necessary to launch fabrication of full-length, full-power THPMs.

  15. Test bench HEATREC for heat loss measurement on solar receiver tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, José M.; López-Martín, Rafael; Valenzuela, Loreto; Zarza, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    In Solar Thermal Electricity (STE) plants the thermal energy of solar radiation is absorbed by solar receiver tubes (HCEs) and it is transferred to a heat transfer fluid. Therefore, heat losses of receiver tubes have a direct influence on STE plants efficiency. A new test bench called HEATREC has been developed by Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) in order to determinate the heat losses of receiver tubes under laboratory conditions. The innovation of this test bench consists in the possibility to determine heat losses under controlled vacuum.

  16. Low subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of five irregular planform wings with systematically varying wing fillet geometry tested in the NASA/Ames 12 foot pressure tunnel (LA65)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, J. W.; Watson, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental and analytical aerodynamic program to develop predesign guides for irregular planform wings (also referred to as cranked leading edge or double delta wings is reported; the benefits are linearization of subsonic lift curve slope to high angles of attack and avoidance of subsonic pitch instabilities at high lift by proper tailoring of the planform-fillet-wing combination while providing the desired hypersonic trim angle and stability. Because subsonic and hypersonic conditions were the two prime areas of concern in the initial application of this program to optimize shuttle orbiter landing and entry characteristics, the study was designated the Subsonic/Hypersonic Irregular Planforms Study (SHIPS).

  17. The effects of inlet turbulence and rotor/stator interactions on the aerodynamics and heat transfer of a large-scale rotating turbine model. Volume 3: Heat transfer data tabulation 65 percent axial spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dring, R. P.; Blair, M. F.; Joslyn, H. D.

    1986-01-01

    This is Volume 3 - Heat Transfer Data Tabulation (65 percent Axial Spacing) of a combined experimental and analytical program which was conducted to examine the effects of inlet turbulence on airfoil heat transfer. The experimental portion of the study was conducted in a large-scale (approximately 5X engine), ambient temperature, rotating turbine model configured in both single stage and stage-and-a-half arrangements. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using low-conductivity airfoils with miniature thermocouples welded to a thin, electrically heated surface skin. Heat transfer data were acquired for various combinations of low or high inlet turbulence intensity, flow coefficient, first-stator/rotor axial spacing, Reynolds number and relative circumferential position of the first and second stators.

  18. Effects of ventilation behaviour on indoor heat load based on test reference years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfelder, Madeleine; Koppe, Christina; Pfafferott, Jens; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Since 2003, most European countries established heat health warning systems to alert the population to heat load. Heat health warning systems are based on predicted meteorological conditions outdoors. But the majority of the European population spends a substantial amount of time indoors, and indoor thermal conditions can differ substantially from outdoor conditions. The German Meteorological Service (Deutscher Wetterdienst, DWD) extended the existing heat health warning system (HHWS) with a thermal building simulation model to consider heat load indoors. In this study, the thermal building simulation model is used to simulate a standardized building representing a modern nursing home, because elderly and sick people are most sensitive to heat stress. Different types of natural ventilation were simulated. Based on current and future test reference years, changes in the future heat load indoors were analyzed. Results show differences between the various ventilation options and the possibility to minimize the thermal heat stress during summer by using an appropriate ventilation method. Nighttime ventilation for indoor thermal comfort is most important. A fully opened window at nighttime and the 2-h ventilation in the morning and evening are more sufficient to avoid heat stress than a tilted window at nighttime and the 1-h ventilation in the morning and the evening. Especially the ventilation in the morning seems to be effective to keep the heat load indoors low. Comparing the results for the current and the future test reference years, an increase of heat stress on all ventilation types can be recognized.

  19. Solar residential heating and cooling system development test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R.; Melton, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    A solar heating and cooling system is described, which was installed in a simulated home at Marshall Space Flight Center. Performance data are provided for the checkout and initial operational phase for key subsystems and for the total system. Valuable information was obtained with regard to operation of a solar cooling system during the first summer of operation. Areas where improvements and modifications are required to optimize such a system are discussed.

  20. Efficient Global Aerodynamic Modeling from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for identifying global aerodynamic models from flight data in an efficient manner is explained and demonstrated. A novel experiment design technique was used to obtain dynamic flight data over a range of flight conditions with a single flight maneuver. Multivariate polynomials and polynomial splines were used with orthogonalization techniques and statistical modeling metrics to synthesize global nonlinear aerodynamic models directly and completely from flight data alone. Simulation data and flight data from a subscale twin-engine jet transport aircraft were used to demonstrate the techniques. Results showed that global multivariate nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies could be accurately identified using flight data from a single maneuver. Flight-derived global aerodynamic model structures, model parameter estimates, and associated uncertainties were provided for all six nondimensional force and moment coefficients for the test aircraft. These models were combined with a propulsion model identified from engine ground test data to produce a high-fidelity nonlinear flight simulation very efficiently. Prediction testing using a multi-axis maneuver showed that the identified global model accurately predicted aircraft responses.