Science.gov

Sample records for aerodynamic interference effects

  1. Prediction of nacelle aerodynamic interference effects at low supersonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulfan, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The accuracy of analytical predictions of nacelle aerodynamic interference effects at low supersonic speeds are studied by means of test versus theory comparisons. Comparisons shown include: (1) isolated wing body lift, drag, and pitching moments; (2) isolated nacelle drag and pressure distributions; (3) nacelle interference shock wave patterns and pressure distributions on the wing lower surface; (4) nacelle interference effects on wing body lift, drag, and pitching moments; and (5) total installed nacelle interference effects on lift, drag, and pitching moment. The comparisons also illustrate effects of nacelle location, nacelle spillage, angle of attack, and Mach numbers on the aerodynamic interference. The initial results seem to indicate that the methods can satisfactorily predict lift, drag, pitching moment, and pressure distributions of installed engine nacelles at low supersonic Mach numbers with mass flow ratios from 0.7 to 1.0 for configurations typical of efficient supersonic cruise airplanes.

  2. Performance and Design Investigation of Heavy Lift Tiltrotor with Aerodynamic Interference Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeo, Yyeonsoo; Johnson, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    The aerodynamic interference effects on tiltrotor performance in cruise are investigated using comprehensive calculations, to better understand the physics and to quantify the effects on the aircraft design. Performance calculations were conducted for 146,600-lb conventional and quad tiltrotors, which are to cruise at 300 knots at 4000 ft/95 deg F condition. A parametric study was conducted to understand the effects of design parameters on the performance of the aircraft. Aerodynamic interference improves the aircraft lift-to-drag ratio of the baseline conventional tiltrotor. However, interference degrades the aircraft performance of the baseline quad tiltrotor, due mostly to the unfavorable effects from the front wing to the rear wing. A reduction of rotor tip speed increased the aircraft lift-to-drag ratio the most among the design parameters investigated.

  3. Aerodynamic interference effects on tilting proprotor aircraft. [using the Green function method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soohoo, P.; Morino, L.; Noll, R. B.; Ham, N. D.

    1977-01-01

    The Green's function method was used to study tilting proprotor aircraft aerodynamics with particular application to the problem of the mutual interference of the wing-fuselage-tail-rotor wake configuration. While the formulation is valid for fully unsteady rotor aerodynamics, attention was directed to steady state aerodynamics, which was achieved by replacing the rotor with the actuator disk approximation. The use of an actuator disk analysis introduced a mathematical singularity into the formulation; this problem was studied and resolved. The pressure distribution, lift, and pitching moment were obtained for an XV-15 wing-fuselage-tail rotor configuration at various flight conditions. For the flight configurations explored, the effects of the rotor wake interference on the XV-15 tilt rotor aircraft yielded a reduction in the total lift and an increase in the nose-down pitching moment. This method provides an analytical capability that is simple to apply and can be used to investigate fuselage-tail rotor wake interference as well as to explore other rotor design problem areas.

  4. Aerodynamic interference between two Darrieus wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Schatzle, P.R.; Klimas, P.C.; Spahr, H.R.

    1981-04-01

    The effect of aerodynamic interference on the performance of two curved bladed Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines has been calculated using a vortex/lifting line aerodynamic model. The turbines have a tower-to-tower separation distance of 1.5 turbine diameters, with the line of turbine centers varying with respect to the ambient wind direction. The effects of freestream turbulence were neglected. For the cases examined, the calculations showed that the downwind turbine power decrement (1) was significant only when the line of turbine centers was coincident with the ambient wind direction, (2) increased with increasing tipspeed ratio, and (3) is due more to induced flow angularities downstream than to speed deficits near the downstream turbine.

  5. Theoretical and Experimental studies of aerodynamic interference effects. [aerodynamic forces on winglets and on wing nacelle configurations for the YC-14 and KC-135 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rettie, I. H.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical studies of aerodynamic forces on winglets shed considerable light on the mechanism by which these devices can reduce drag at constant total lift and on the necessity for proper alignment and cambering to achieve optimum favorable interference. Results of engineering studies, wind tunnel tests and performance predictions are reviewed for installations proposed for the AMST YC-14 and the KC-135 airplanes. The other major area of aerodynamic interference discussed is that of engine nacelle installations. Slipper and overwing nacelles have received much attention because of their potential for noise reduction, propulsive lift and improved ground clearance. A major challenge is the integration of such nacelles with the supercritical flow on the upper surface of a swept wing in cruise at high subsonic speeds.

  6. Effect of Length-Beam Ratio on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of Flying-Boat Hulls without Wing Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, John G.; Riebe, John M.

    1948-01-01

    Contains experimental results of an investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of a family of flying boat hulls of length beam ratios 6, 9, 12, and 15 without wing interference. The results are compared with those taken on the same family of hulls in the presence of a wing.

  7. Computation of aerodynamic interference effects on oscillating airfoils with controls in ventilated subsonic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromme, J. A.; Golberg, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Lift interference effects are discussed based on Bland's (1968) integral equation. A mathematical existence theory is utilized for which convergence of the numerical method has been proved for general (square-integrable) downwashes. Airloads are computed using orthogonal airfoil polynomial pairs in conjunction with a collocation method which is numerically equivalent to Galerkin's method and complex least squares. Convergence exhibits exponentially decreasing error with the number n of collocation points for smooth downwashes, whereas errors are proportional to 1/n for discontinuous downwashes. The latter can be reduced to 1/n to the m+1 power with mth-order Richardson extrapolation (by using m = 2, hundredfold error reductions were obtained with only a 13% increase of computer time). Numerical results are presented showing acoustic resonance, as well as the effect of Mach number, ventilation, height-to-chord ratio, and mode shape on wind-tunnel interference. Excellent agreement with experiment is obtained in steady flow, and good agreement is obtained for unsteady flow.

  8. An experimental and analytical study of the aerodynamic interference effects between two Sears-Haack bodies at Mach 2.7. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bantle, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Aerodynamic interference effects were studied for two slender, streamlined bodies of revolution at Mach 2.7. A wind tunnel investigation produced force and moment data and measurements of pressure distributions on the bodies. As these bodies remained parallel with each other and with the freestream flow, their relative lateral and longitudinal spacing were varied. Results of theoretical methods were used in the analysis of results. The interference effects between the two bodies yielded less total drag than a single body of equal total volume and the same length.

  9. The interference aerodynamics caused by the wing elasticity during store separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yang; Zheng-yin, Ye

    2016-04-01

    Air-launch-to-orbit is the technology that has stores carried aloft and launched the store from the plane to the orbit. The separation between the aircraft and store is one of the most important and difficult phases in air-launch-to-orbit technology. There exists strong aerodynamic interference between the aircraft and the store in store separation. When the aspect ratio of the aircraft is large, the elastic deformations of the wing must be considered. The main purpose of this article is to study the influence of the interference aerodynamics caused by the elastic deformations of the wing to the unsteady aerodynamics of the store. By solving the coupled functions of unsteady Navier-Stokes equations, six degrees of freedom dynamic equations and structural dynamic equations simultaneously, the store separation with the elastic deformation of the aircraft considered is simulated numerically. And the interactive aerodynamic forces are analyzed. The study shows that the interference aerodynamics is obvious at earlier time during the separation, and the dominant frequency of the elastic wing determines the aerodynamic forces frequencies of the store. Because of the effect of the interference aerodynamics, the roll angle response and pitch angle response increase. When the store is mounted under the wingtip, the additional aerodynamics caused by the wingtip vortex is obvious, which accelerate the divergence of the lateral force and the lateral-directional attitude angle of the store. This study supports some beneficial conclusions to the engineering application of the air-launch-to-orbit.

  10. The effect of wall interference upon the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil spanning a closed-throat circular wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincenti, Walter G; Graham, Donald J

    1946-01-01

    The results of a theoretical and experimental investigation of wall interference for an airfoil spanning a closed-throat circular wind tunnel are presented. Analytical equations are derived which relate the characteristics of an airfoil in the tunnel at subsonic speeds with the characteristics in free air. The analysis takes into consideration the effect of fluid compressibility and is based upon the assumption that the chord of the airfoil is small as compared with the diameter of the tunnel. The development is restricted to an untwisted, constant-chord airfoil spanning the middle of the tunnel. Brief theoretical consideration is also given to the problem of choking at high speeds. Results are then presented of tests to determine the low-speed characteristics of an NACA 4412 airfoil for two chord-diameter ratios. While, on the basis of these experiments, no appraisal is possible of the accuracy of the corrections at high speeds, the data indicate that at low Mach numbers the analytical results are valid, even for relatively large values of the chord-diameter ratio.

  11. Investigation of Aerodynamic Interference of Double Deck Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Sitek, M. A.; Bojanowski, C.; Lottes, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    Construction of a twin bridge can be a cost effective and minimally disruptive way to increase capacity when an existing bridge is not near the end of its service life. With ever growing vehicular traffic, when demand approaches the capacity of many existing roads and bridges. Remodeling a structure with an insufficient number of lanes can be a good solution in case of smaller and less busy bridges. Closing down or reducing traffic on crossings of greater importance for the construction period, however, can result in major delays and revenue loss for commerce and transportation as well as increasing the traffic load on alternate route bridges. Multiple-deck bridges may be the answer to this issue. A parallel deck can be built next to the existing one, without reducing the flow. Additionally, a new bridge can be designed as a twin or multi-deck structure. Several such structures have been built throughout the United States, among them: - The New NY Bridge Project - the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing, - SR-182 Columbia River Bridge, - The Thaddeus Kosciusko Bridge (I-87), - The Allegheny River Bridge, Pennsylvania, which carries I76, - Fred Hartman Bridge, TX, see Figure 1.2. With a growing number of double deck bridges, additional, more detailed, studies on the interaction of such bridge pairs in windy conditions appears appropriate. Aerodynamic interference effects should be examined to assure the aerodynamic stability of both bridges. There are many studies on aerodynamic response of single deck bridges, but the literature on double-deck structures is not extensive. The experimental results from wind tunnels are still limited in number, as a parametric study is required, they can be very time consuming. Literature review shows that some investigation of the effects of gap-width and angle of wind incidence has been done. Most of the CFD computational studies that have been done were limited to 2D simulations. Therefore, it is desirable to investigate twin decks

  12. Effect of canard location and size on canard-wing interference and aerodynamic center shift related to maneuvering aircraft at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloss, B. B.

    1974-01-01

    A generalized wind-tunnel model, typical of highly maneuverable aircraft, was tested in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.70 to 1.20 to determine the effects of canard location and size on canard-wing interference effects and aerodynamic center shift at transonic speeds. The canards had exposed areas of 16.0 and 28.0 percent of the wing reference area and were located in the chord plane of the wing or in a position 18.5 percent of the wing mean geometric chord above or below the wing chord plane. Two different wing planforms were tested, one with leading-edge sweep of 60 deg and the other 44 deg; both wings had the same reference area and span. The results indicated that the largest benefits in lift and drag were obtained with the canard above the wing chord plane for both wings tested. The low canard configuration for the 60 deg swept wing proved to be more stable and produced a more linear pitching-moment curve than the high and coplanar canard configurations for the subsonic test Mach numbers.

  13. Aerodynamic Leidenfrost effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Anaïs; Bird, James C.; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2016-12-01

    When deposited on a plate moving quickly enough, any liquid can levitate as it does when it is volatile on a very hot solid (Leidenfrost effect). In the aerodynamic Leidenfrost situation, air gets inserted between the liquid and the moving solid, a situation that we analyze. We observe two types of entrainment. (i) The thickness of the air gap is found to increase with the plate speed, which is interpreted in the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin frame: Air is dynamically dragged along the surface and its thickness results from a balance between capillary and viscous effects. (ii) Air set in motion by the plate exerts a force on the levitating liquid. We discuss the magnitude of this aerodynamic force and show that it can be exploited to control the liquid and even to drive it against gravity.

  14. Two dimensional aerodynamic interference effects on oscillating airfoils with flaps in ventilated subsonic wind tunnels. [computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromme, J.; Golberg, M.; Werth, J.

    1979-01-01

    The numerical computation of unsteady airloads acting upon thin airfoils with multiple leading and trailing-edge controls in two-dimensional ventilated subsonic wind tunnels is studied. The foundation of the computational method is strengthened with a new and more powerful mathematical existence and convergence theory for solving Cauchy singular integral equations of the first kind, and the method of convergence acceleration by extrapolation to the limit is introduced to analyze airfoils with flaps. New results are presented for steady and unsteady flow, including the effect of acoustic resonance between ventilated wind-tunnel walls and airfoils with oscillating flaps. The computer program TWODI is available for general use and a complete set of instructions is provided.

  15. Aerodynamic Interference Due to MSL Reaction Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyakonov, Artem A.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Scallion, William I.; VanNorman, John W.; Novak, Luke A.; Tang, Chun Y.

    2009-01-01

    An investigation of effectiveness of the reaction control system (RCS) of Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry capsule during atmospheric flight has been conducted. The reason for the investigation is that MSL is designed to fly a lifting actively guided entry with hypersonic bank maneuvers, therefore an understanding of RCS effectiveness is required. In the course of the study several jet configurations were evaluated using Langley Aerothermal Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) code, Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) code, Fully Unstructured 3D (FUN3D) code and an Overset Grid Flowsolver (OVERFLOW) code. Computations indicated that some of the proposed configurations might induce aero-RCS interactions, sufficient to impede and even overwhelm the intended control torques. It was found that the maximum potential for aero-RCS interference exists around peak dynamic pressure along the trajectory. Present analysis largely relies on computational methods. Ground testing, flight data and computational analyses are required to fully understand the problem. At the time of this writing some experimental work spanning range of Mach number 2.5 through 4.5 has been completed and used to establish preliminary levels of confidence for computations. As a result of the present work a final RCS configuration has been designed such as to minimize aero-interference effects and it is a design baseline for MSL entry capsule.

  16. Data base for the prediction of airframe/propulsion system interference effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, O. J.; Perkins, E. W.; Kuhn, G. D.; Perkins, S. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Supersonic tactical aircraft with highly integrated jet propulsion systems were investigated. Primary attention was given to those interference effects which impact the external aerodynamics of the aircraft.

  17. Aerodynamic lift effect on satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R.; Cleland, J. G.; Devries, L. L.

    1975-01-01

    Numerical quadrature is employed to obtain orbit perturbation results from the general perturbation equations. Both aerodynamic lift and drag forces are included in the analysis of the satellite orbit. An exponential atmosphere with and without atmospheric rotation is used. A comparison is made of the perturbations which are caused by atmospheric rotation with those caused by satellite aerodynamic effects. Results indicate that aerodynamic lift effects on the semi-major axis and orbit inclination can be of the same order as the effects of atmosphere rotation depending upon the orientation of the lift vector. The results reveal the importance of including aerodynamic lift effects in orbit perturbation analysis.

  18. Rarefaction Effects in Hypersonic Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    2011-05-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) technique is used for numerical analysis of rarefied-gas hypersonic flows near a blunt plate, wedge, two side-by-side plates, disk, torus, and rotating cylinder. The role of various similarity parameters (Knudsen and Mach numbers, geometrical and temperature factors, specific heat ratios, and others) in aerodynamics of the probes is studied. Important kinetic effects that are specific for the transition flow regime have been found: non-monotonic lift and drag of plates, strong repulsive force between side-by-side plates and cylinders, dependence of drag on torus radii ratio, and the reverse Magnus effect on the lift of a rotating cylinder. The numerical results are in a good agreement with experimental data, which were obtained in a vacuum chamber at low and moderate Knudsen numbers from 0.01 to 10.

  19. Interference-free measurements of the subsonic aerodynamics of slanted-base ogive cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P.; Alcorn, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    Drag, lift, pitching moment, and base-pressure measurements have been made, free of support interference, on a range of slanted-base ogive cylinders, using the NASA Langley Research Center 13-in magnetic suspension and balance system. Test Mach numbers were in the range 0.04-0.2. Two types of wake flow were observed, a quasi-symmetric turbulent closure or a longitudinal vortex flow. Aerodynamic characteristics differ dramatically between the two wake types. Drag measurements are shown to be in agreement with previous tests. A hysteretic behavior of the wake with varying Reynold's number has been discovered for the 45-deg base. An interaction between forebody boundary-layer state and wake flow and base pressures has been detected for higher slant angles.

  20. Multipolar interference effects in nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2017-03-28

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves by an arbitrary nanoscale object can be characterized by a multipole decomposition of the electromagnetic field that allows one to describe the scattering intensity and radiation pattern through interferences of dominating multipole modes excited. In modern nanophotonics, both generation and interference of multipole modes start to play an indispensable role, and they enable nanoscale manipulation of light with many related applications. Here, we review the multipolar interference effects in metallic, metal-dielectric and dielectric nanostructures, and suggest a comprehensive view on many phenomena involving the interferences of electric, magnetic and toroidal multipoles, which drive a number of recently discussed effects in nanophotonics such as unidirectional scattering, effective optical antiferromagnetism, generalized Kerker scattering with controlled angular patterns, generalized Brewster angle, and non-radiating optical anapoles. We further discuss other types of possible multipolar interference effects not yet exploited in the literature and envisage the prospect of achieving more flexible and advanced nanoscale control of light relying on the concepts of multipolar interference through full phase and amplitude engineering.This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  1. Transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doig, G.

    2014-08-01

    A review of recent and historical work in the field of transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics has been conducted, focussing on applied research on wings and aircraft, present and future ground transportation, projectiles, rocket sleds and other related bodies which travel in close ground proximity in the compressible regime. Methods for ground testing are described and evaluated, noting that wind tunnel testing is best performed with a symmetry model in the absence of a moving ground; sled or rail testing is ultimately preferable, though considerably more expensive. Findings are reported on shock-related ground influence on aerodynamic forces and moments in and accelerating through the transonic regime - where force reversals and the early onset of local supersonic flow is prevalent - as well as more predictable behaviours in fully supersonic to hypersonic ground effect flows.

  2. Effects of ice accretions on aircraft aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Frank T.; Khodadoust, Abdollah

    2001-11-01

    This article is a systematic and comprehensive review, correlation, and assessment of test results available in the public domain which address the aerodynamic performance and control degradations caused by various types of ice accretions on the lifting surfaces of fixed wing aircraft. To help put the various test results in perspective, overviews are provided first of the important factors and limitations involved in computational and experimental icing simulation techniques, as well as key aerodynamic testing simulation variables and governing flow physics issues. Following these are the actual reviews, assessments, and correlations of a large number of experimental measurements of various forms of mostly simulated in-flight and ground ice accretions, augmented where appropriate by similar measurements for other analogous forms of surface contamination and/or disruptions. In-flight icing categories reviewed include the initial and inter-cycle ice accretions inherent in the use of de-icing systems which are of particular concern because of widespread misconceptions about the thickness of such accretions which can be allowed before any serious consequences occur, and the runback/ridge ice accretions typically associated with larger-than-normal water droplet encounters which are of major concern because of the possible potential for catastrophic reductions in aerodynamic effectiveness. The other in-flight ice accretion category considered includes the more familiar large rime and glaze ice accretions, including ice shapes with rather grotesque features, where the concern is that, in spite of all the research conducted to date, the upper limit of penalties possible has probably not been defined. Lastly, the effects of various possible ground frost/ice accretions are considered. The concern with some of these is that for some types of configurations, all of the normally available operating margins to stall at takeoff may be erased if these accretions are not

  3. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2010-03-06

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re approximately 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small

  4. Space Shuttle Plume Simulation Effect on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Technology for simulating plumes in wind tunnel tests was not adequate to provide the required confidence in test data where plume induced aerodynamic effects might be significant. A broad research program was undertaken to correct the deficiency. Four tasks within the program are reported. Three of these tasks involve conducting experiments, related to three different aspects of the plume simulation problem: (1) base pressures; (2) lateral jet pressures; and (3) plume parameters. The fourth task involves collecting all of the base pressure test data generated during the program. Base pressures were measured on a classic cone ogive cylinder body as affected by the coaxial, high temperature exhaust plumes of a variety of solid propellant rockets. Valid data were obtained at supersonic freestream conditions but not at transonic. Pressure data related to lateral (separation) jets at M infinity = 4.5, for multiple clustered nozzles canted to the freestream and operating at high dynamic pressure ratios. All program goals were met although the model hardware was found to be large relative to the wind tunnel size so that operation was limited for some nozzle configurations.

  5. Aerodynamic and Gasdynamic Effects in Cosmogony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, Stuart J.

    2005-01-01

    Senior Scientist Stuart J. Weidenschilling presents his final administrative report for the research program entitled "Aerodynamic and Gasdynamic Effects in Cosmogony" on which he was the Principal Investigator. The research program produced the following publications: 1) Particle-gas dynamics and primary accretion. J . N. Cuzzi and S. J. Weidenschilling. In Meteorites and the Early Solar System II (D. Lauretta and H. Y . McSween, Eds.). Univ. Arizona Press. in press, 2005; 2) Timescales of the solar protoplanetary disk. S. Russell, L. Hartmann. J. N. Cuzzi. A. Krot. M. Gounelle and S . J Weidenschilling. In Meteorites and the Early Solar System II (D. Lauretta and H. Y. McSween, Eds.). Univ. Arizona Press, in press, 2005; 3) From icy grains to comets. In Comets II (M. Festou et al., Eds.). Univ. Arizona Press, pp. 97-104. 2004; 4) Gravitational instability and clustering in a disk of planetesimals. P. Tanga, S. J. N'eidenschilling, P. Michel and D. C. Richardson. Astron. Astrophys. 327, 1 105- 1 1 15, 2004.

  6. Aerodynamic Interaction Effects of a Helicopter Rotor and Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, David D., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A three year Cooperative Research Agreements made in each of the three years between the Subsonic Aerodynamics Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Va. Tech) has been completed. This document presents results from this three year endeavor. The goal of creating an efficient method to compute unsteady interactional effects between a helicopter rotor and fuselage has been accomplished. This paper also includes appendices to support these findings. The topics are: 1) Rotor-Fuselage Interactions Aerodynamics: An Unsteady Rotor Model; and 2) Rotor/Fuselage Unsteady Interactional Aerodynamics: A New Computational Model.

  7. Numerical study of aerodynamic effects on road vehicles lifting surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernat, Mihail Victor; Cernat Bobonea, Andreea

    2017-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance analysis of road vehicles depends on the study of engine intake and cooling flow, internal ventilation, tire cooling, and overall external flow as the motion of air around a moving vehicle affects all of its components in one form or another. Due to the complex geometry of these, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flow and lifting surface shapes. The present study, however focuses on the effects of external aerodynamics only, and in particular on the flow over the lifting surfaces of a common compact car, designed especially for this study.

  8. Transpiration effects in perforated plate aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwaba, R.; Ochrymiuk, T.

    2016-10-01

    Perforated walls find a wide use as a method of flow control and effusive cooling. Experimental investigations of the gas flow past perforated plate with microholes (110μm) were carried out. The wide range of pressure at the inlet were investigated. Two distinguishable flow regimes were obtained: laminar and turbulent regime.The results are in good agreement with theory, simulations and experiments on large scale perforated plates and compressible flows in microtubules. Formulation of the transpiration law was associated with the porous plate aerodynamics properties. Using a model of transpiration flow the “aerodynamic porosity” could be determined for microholes.

  9. Aerodynamic Effects and Modeling of Damage to Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Gautam H.

    2008-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to measure the aerodynamic effects of damage to lifting and stability/control surfaces of a commercial transport aircraft configuration. The modeling of such effects is necessary for the development of flight control systems to recover aircraft from adverse, damage-related loss-of-control events, as well as for the estimation of aerodynamic characteristics from flight data under such conditions. Damage in the form of partial or total loss of area was applied to the wing, horizontal tail, and vertical tail. Aerodynamic stability and control implications of damage to each surface are presented, to aid in the identification of potential boundaries in recoverable stability or control degradation. The aerodynamic modeling issues raised by the wind tunnel results are discussed, particularly the additional modeling requirements necessitated by asymmetries due to damage, and the potential benefits of such expanded modeling.

  10. Rarefaction effects on Galileo probe aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; LeBeau, Gerald J.; Blanchard, Robert C.; Price, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    Solutions of aerodynamic characteristics are presented for the Galileo Probe entering Jupiter's hydrogen-helium atmosphere at a nominal relative velocity of 47.4 km/s. Focus is on predicting the aerodynamic drag coefficient during the transitional flow regime using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Accuracy of the probe's drag coefficient directly impacts the inferred atmospheric properties that are being extracted from the deceleration measurements made by onboard accelerometers as part of the Atmospheric Structure Experiment. The range of rarefaction considered in the present study extends from the free molecular limit to continuum conditions. Comparisons made with previous calculations and experimental measurements show the present results for drag to merge well with Navier-Stokes and experimental results for the least rarefied conditions considered.

  11. The Contextual Interference Effect in Applied Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreiros, Joao; Figueiredo, Teresa; Godinho, Mario

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the research literature that approaches the contextual interference effect in applied settings. In contrast to the laboratory settings, in which high interference conditions depress acquisition and promote learning evaluated in retention and transfer tests, in applied settings most of the studies (60%) fail to observe positive…

  12. Theoretical study of hull-rotor aerodynamic interference on semibuoyant vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, S. B.; Smith, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical methods are developed to predict the pressure distribution and overall loads on the hulls of airships which have close coupled, relatively large and/or high disk loading propulsors for attitude control, station keeping, and partial support of total weight as well as provision of thrust in cruise. The methods comprise a surface-singularity, potential-flow model for the hull and lifting surfaces (such as tails) and a rotor model which calculates the velocity induced by the rotor and its wake at points adjacent to the wake. Use of these two models provides an inviscid pressure distribution on the hull with rotor interference. A boundary layer separation prediction method is used to locate separation on the hull, and a wake pressure is imposed on the separated region for purposes of calculating hull loads. Results of calculations are shown to illustrate various cases of rotor-hull interference and comparisons with small scale data are made to evaluate the method.

  13. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Effects of Ventricular Gap

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Fariborz; Karnell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Supraglottic compression is frequently observed in individuals with dysphonia. It is commonly interpreted as an indication of excessive circumlaryngeal muscular tension and ventricular medialization. The purpose of this study was to describe the aerodynamic and acoustic impact of varying ventricular medialization in a canine model. Methods Subglottal air pressure, glottal airflow, electroglottograph, acoustic signals and high-speed video images were recorded in seven excised canine larynges mounted in vitro for laryngeal vibratory experimentation. The degree of gap between the ventricular folds was adjusted and measured using sutures and weights. Data was recorded during phonation when the ventricular gap was narrow, neutral, and large. Glottal resistance was estimated by measures of subglottal pressure and glottal flow. Results Glottal resistance increased systematically as ventricular gap became smaller. Wide ventricular gaps were associated with increases in fundamental frequency and decreases in glottal resistance. Sound pressure level did not appear to be impacted by the adjustments in ventricular gap used in this research. Conclusions Increases in supraglottic compression and associated reduced ventricular width may be observed in a variety of disorders that affect voice quality. Ventricular compression may interact with true vocal fold posture and vibration resulting in predictable changes in aerodynamic, physiologic, acoustic, and perceptual measures of phonation. The data from this report supports the theory that narrow ventricular gaps may be associated with disordered phonation. In vitro and in vivo human data are needed to further test this association. PMID:24321590

  14. Space shuttle: Determination of the aerodynamic interference between the space shuttle orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket booster on a 0.004 scale ascent configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, P. E.; Buchholz, R.; Allen, E. C. JR.; Dehart, J.

    1973-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to determine the aerodynamic interference between the space shuttle orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket booster on a 0.004 scale ascent configuration. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded over an angle of attack range from minus 10 to plus 10 degrees at zero degree sideslip. A sideslip range of minus 10 to plus 10 degrees at zero degree angle of attack was also tested. The Mach number range was varied from 0.6 to 4.96 with Reynolds number varying between 4.9 and 6.8 times one million per foot.

  15. Estimation of effective aerodynamic roughness with altimeter measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menenti, M.; Ritchie, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    A new method is presented for estimating the aerodynamic roughness length of heterogeneous land surfaces and complex landscapes using elevation measurements performed with an airborne laser altimeter and the Seasat radar altimeter. Land surface structure is characterized at increasing length scales by considering three basic landscape elements: (1) partial to complete canopies of herbaceous vegetation; (2) sparse obstacles (e.g., shrubs and trees); and (3) local relief. Measured parameters of land surface geometry are combined to obtain an effective aerodynamic roughness length which parameterizes the total atmosphere-land surface stress.

  16. Nozzle and wing geometry effects on OTW aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U.; Groesbeck, D.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of nozzle geometry and wing size on the aerodynamic performance of several 5:1 aspect ratio slot nozzles are presented for over-the-wing (OTW) configurations. Nozzle geometry variables include roof angle, sidewall cutback, and nozzle chordwise location. Wing variables include chord size, and flap deflection. Several external deflectors also were included for comparison. The data indicate that good flow turning may not necessarily provide the best aerodynamic performance. The results suggest that a variable exhaust nozzle geometry offers the best solution for a viable OTW configuration.

  17. The effect of aerodynamic parameters on power output of windmills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesner, W.

    1973-01-01

    Aerodynamic results for a study on windpower generation are reported. Windmill power output is presented in terms that are commonly used in rotary wing analysis, namely, power output as a function of drag developed by the windmill. Effect of tip speed ratio, solidity, twist, wind angle, blade setting and airfoil characteristics are given.

  18. Interference effects and phase sensitivity in hearing.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J

    2002-05-15

    This paper reviews interference effects in the auditory system, particularly effects occurring in the outer ear and the inner ear (cochlea). Sounds enter the ear canal both directly and after reflections from the pinna. This results in complex spectral patterns, which vary systematically with the direction of incidence of the sound source relative to the head. Evidence is described indicating that these spectral patterns are used in the localization of sounds in space. The cochlea behaves like a limited-resolution frequency analyser. When the components of a complex sound are closely spaced in frequency, they can interfere on the basilar membrane (BM) within the cochlea. Interference effects on the BM are complex, as they are influenced by a physiologically active mechanism which introduces strong nonlinearities, including level-dependent amplification. Interference effects on the BM play a role in many aspects of auditory perception, including the perception of consonance and dissonance, the perception of pitch, the perception of changes in phase, and the perception of timbre. Interference effects in the cochlea may also play a role in producing the spectral regularity observed in sounds reflected from the ear (otoacoustic emissions).

  19. Retroactive interference effects in implicit memory.

    PubMed

    Eakin, Deborah K; Smith, Robert

    2012-09-01

    One source of evidence for separate explicit and implicit memory systems is that explicit but not implicit memory is impacted by interference (e.g., Graf & Schacter, 1987). The present experiment examined whether retroactive interference (RI) effects could be obtained in implicit memory when a strong test of RI was used. People studied an original list of word pairs (e.g., COTTON-PRIZE) using the typical RI paradigm. During the interpolated phase, participants studied either interference pairs for which the same cue was re-paired with a different target (e.g., COTTON-PRINT) or novel pairs (e.g., HOST-VASE). RI was tested with the modified opposition cued recall test (Eakin, Schreiber, & Sergent-Marshall, 2003). The original-list cue was presented along with the beginning stem of its target (e.g., COTTON-PRI-) and a hint (e.g., not PRINT). RI effects were obtained for explicit and implicit memory. Taken together with prior research finding proactive interference effects in implicit memory, the findings indicate that implicit memory is not immune from retroactive interference.

  20. Time and interference: Effects on working memory.

    PubMed

    Botto, Marta; Palladino, Paola

    2016-05-01

    This study tested predictions from the time-based resource-sharing (TBRS) model with a classical verbal working memory (WM) task, where target and non-target information interfere strongly with each other. Different predictions can be formulated according to the dominant perspectives (TBRS and interference hypothesis) on the role of inhibitory control in WM task performance. Here, we aimed to trace the activation of irrelevant information, examining priming effects in a lexical decision task immediately following WM recall. Results indicate the roles of both time and interference constraints in determining task performance. In particular, the role of time available seemed crucial at the highest WM loads (i.e., 3 and 4 memoranda). These were also associated with a higher activation of no-longer-relevant information but, in this case, independently from time available for processing.

  1. Aerodynamic Effects in Weakly Ionized Gas: Phenomenology and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Svetozar

    2006-10-01

    Successful application of gas discharges in aerodynamics requires their efficient generation, sustaining and control at supersonic or hypersonic flow conditions. Wall-free plasma formations that meet the requirements may then act as time-controlled and space-localized actuators to modify the flow. Potential candidates for this challenging task are plasmas contained in open or linear-cavity microwave field structures. We present and discuss direct observations of aerodynamic effects activated or modified by wall-free discharges. Further, we compare two generic types of wall-free discharges. First group, applicable for inlet-type structures, consists of a periodic series of microwave-induced plasmoids generated in a linear cavity, using the outgoing wave from a microwave antenna and the reflected wave from a nearby on-axis concave reflector. The plasmoids are spaced at half-wavelength separations according to the standing-wave pattern. The plasmoids are enhanced by an ``effective focusing'' in the near field of the antenna (Fresnel region) as a result of diffraction effects and mode structure. Second group, applicable to supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers, are the surface microwave discharges enhanced by a structure of Hertz dipoles. Standard microwave discharge phenomenology, such as microwave breakdown, mode structure and plasma parameters, is revisited to present a quantitative interpretation of the observed effects. Special attention is given to complex phenomena specific to flow-plasma interaction (double electric layers, ionization waves, instabilities), which provide the physical basis for localized heating in the aerodynamic flow.

  2. Interference effects of categorization on decision making.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2016-05-01

    Many decision making tasks in life involve a categorization process, but the effects of categorization on subsequent decision making has rarely been studied. This issue was explored in three experiments (N=721), in which participants were shown a face stimulus on each trial and performed variations of categorization-decision tasks. On C-D trials, they categorized the stimulus and then made an action decision; on X-D trials, they were told the category and then made an action decision; on D-alone trials, they only made an action decision. An interference effect emerged in some of the conditions, such that the probability of an action on the D-alone trials (i.e., when there was no explicit categorization before the decision) differed from the total probability of the same action on the C-D or X-D trials (i.e., when there was explicit categorization before the decision). Interference effects are important because they indicate a violation of the classical law of total probability, which is assumed by many cognitive models. Across all three experiments, a complex pattern of interference effects systematically occurred for different types of stimuli and for different types of categorization-decision tasks. These interference effects present a challenge for traditional cognitive models, such as Markov and signal detection models, but a quantum cognition model, called the belief-action entanglement (BAE) model, predicted that these results could occur. The BAE model employs the quantum principles of superposition and entanglement to explain the psychological mechanisms underlying the puzzling interference effects. The model can be applied to many important and practical categorization-decision situations in life.

  3. Size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics: an integrated computational study.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Aono, H

    2009-03-01

    Hovering is a miracle of insects that is observed for all sizes of flying insects. Sizing effect in insect hovering on flapping-wing aerodynamics is of interest to both the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community and also of importance to comparative morphologists. In this study, we present an integrated computational study of such size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics, which is performed using a biology-inspired dynamic flight simulator that integrates the modelling of realistic wing-body morphology, the modelling of flapping-wing and body kinematics and an in-house Navier-Stokes solver. Results of four typical insect hovering flights including a hawkmoth, a honeybee, a fruit fly and a thrips, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers from O(10(4)) to O(10(1)) are presented, which demonstrate the feasibility of the present integrated computational methods in quantitatively modelling and evaluating the unsteady aerodynamics in insect flapping flight. Our results based on realistically modelling of insect hovering therefore offer an integrated understanding of the near-field vortex dynamics, the far-field wake and downwash structures, and their correlation with the force production in terms of sizing and Reynolds number as well as wing kinematics. Our results not only give an integrated interpretation on the similarity and discrepancy of the near- and far-field vortex structures in insect hovering but also demonstrate that our methods can be an effective tool in the MAVs design.

  4. Multi-colored layers for visualizing aerodynamic flow effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Ronald N. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for visualizing aerodynamic flow effects on a test surface. First, discrete quantities of a sublimating chemical such as naphthalene are distinctively colored via appropriate dyes or paints. Next, a uniform layer of the sublimating chemical having a particular color is applied to the test surface. This layer is covered with a second uniform layer of a different colored sublimating chemical, and so on until a composite of multi-colored layers is formed having a discrete thickness. Friction caused by an airflow results in the distinctly colored layers being removed in proportion to such aerodynamic flow characteristics as velocity and temperature, resulting in a multi-colored portrait which approximates the air flow on the underlying test surface.

  5. Computational Investigation of the Aerodynamic Effects on Fluidic Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, K. A.

    2000-01-01

    A computational investigation of the aerodynamic effects on fluidic thrust vectoring has been conducted. Three-dimensional simulations of a two-dimensional, convergent-divergent (2DCD) nozzle with fluidic injection for pitch vector control were run with the computational fluid dynamics code PAB using turbulence closure and linear Reynolds stress modeling. Simulations were computed with static freestream conditions (M=0.05) and at Mach numbers from M=0.3 to 1.2, with scheduled nozzle pressure ratios (from 3.6 to 7.2) and secondary to primary total pressure ratios of p(sub t,s)/p(sub t,p)=0.6 and 1.0. Results indicate that the freestream flow decreases vectoring performance and thrust efficiency compared with static (wind-off) conditions. The aerodynamic penalty to thrust vector angle ranged from 1.5 degrees at a nozzle pressure ratio of 6 with M=0.9 freestream conditions to 2.9 degrees at a nozzle pressure ratio of 5.2 with M=0.7 freestream conditions, compared to the same nozzle pressure ratios with static freestream conditions. The aerodynamic penalty to thrust ratio decreased from 4 percent to 0.8 percent as nozzle pressure ratio increased from 3.6 to 7.2. As expected, the freestream flow had little influence on discharge coefficient.

  6. Effects of Ice Accretion on Aircraft Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to support the development of a new ice accretion model by improving our physical understanding of the ice accretion process through experimental measurements. The focus was on the effect of the initial ice roughness (smooth/rough boundary) on the accretion process. This includes understanding the boundary-layer development over the roughness and especially its effect on the heat transfer which is fundamental to the ice accretion process. The research focused on acquiring the experimental data needed to formulate a new ice accretion physical model. Research was conducted to analyze boundary-layer data taken on a NACA 0012 airfoil with roughness to simulate the smooth/rough boundary. The effect of isolated roughness on boundary-layer transition was studied experimentally to determine if the classical critical roughness Reynolds number criteria could be applied to transition in the airfoil leading-edge area. The effect of simulated smooth/rough boundary roughness on convective heat transfer was studied to complete the study. During the course of this research the effect of free-stream wind tunnel turbulence on the boundary layer was measured. Since this quantity was not well known, research to accurately measure the wind tunnel turbulence in an icing cloud was undertaken. Preliminary results were attained and the final data were acquired, reduced and presented under a subsequent grant.

  7. Transonic wall interference effects on bodies of revolution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couch, L. M.

    1972-01-01

    Efforts to develop a near sonic transport have placed renewed emphasis on obtaining accurate aerodynamic force and pressure data in the near sonic speed range. Comparison of wind-tunnel and flight data obtained for a blunt-nose body of revolution showed significant discrepancies in drag levels near Mach 1 - apparently due to wind-tunnel wall interference. Subsequent tests of geometrically similar bodies of revolution showed that increasing the model-to-test-section blockage ratio from 0.00017 to 0.0043 resulted in altered drag curve shapes, delayed drag divergence, and 'transonic creep' from subsonic drag levels due to increased wall interference.

  8. Wake shape and its effects on aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emdad, H.; Lan, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    The wake shape under symmetrical flight conditions and its effects on aerodynamic characteristics are examined. In addition, the effect of wake shape in sideslip and discrete vortices such as strake or forebody vortex on lateral characteristics is presented. The present numerical method for airplane configurations, which is based on discretization of the vortex sheet into vortex segments, verified the symmetrical and asymmetrical roll-up process of the trailing vortices. Also, the effect of wing wake on tail planes is calculated. It is concluded that at high lift the assumption of flat wake for longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics should be reexamined.

  9. Aerodynamic Ground Effect in Fruitfly Sized Insect Takeoff

    PubMed Central

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Maeda, Masateru; Engels, Thomas; Liu, Hao; Schneider, Kai; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Aerodynamic ground effect in flapping-wing insect flight is of importance to comparative morphologies and of interest to the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community. Recent studies, however, show apparently contradictory results of either some significant extra lift or power savings, or zero ground effect. Here we present a numerical study of fruitfly sized insect takeoff with a specific focus on the significance of leg thrust and wing kinematics. Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling and high performance computing. The aerodynamic forces are calculated using a three-dimensional Navier–Stokes solver based on a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. It is coupled with a flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia and the leg thrust, while only having two degrees of freedom: the vertical and the longitudinal horizontal displacement. The natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly is considered as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. These modified takeoffs include cases with decreased leg thrust parameter, and/or with periodic wing kinematics, constant body pitch angle. The results show that the ground effect during natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, when the rate of climb is slow, the difference in the aerodynamic forces due to the interaction with the ground is up to 6%. Surprisingly, depending on the kinematics, the difference is either positive or negative, in contrast to the intuition based on the helicopter theory, which suggests positive excess lift. This effect is attributed to unsteady wing-wake interactions. A similar effect is found during hovering. PMID:27019208

  10. Aerodynamic and gasdynamic effects in cosmogony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    An improved numerical code was constructed to model coagulation and settling of particles in disk nebula containing generic turbulence with arbitrary velocities in the gas. The turbulence is assumed to have a Kolmogorov eddy spectrum. Relative velocities of particles, which lead to collisions and possible coagulation, are computed as due all significant causes in their appropriate regimes: thermal motion, shear and inertial effects in turbulent eddies, and systematic motions due to settling and non-keplerian rotation of the gas. Significant improvements to this program were produced. One significant problem was the disparity of timescales for turbulent mixing and coagulation. To accurately compute the former, the timestep must be shorter than the smallest spatial scale (layer thickness) divided by the turbulent velocity. However, the size distribution often varies due to coagulation on much longer timescales. To minimize the computational overhead associated with collisions between particles of all sizes, a dual timestep was introduced. Collisional changes in the size distribution are computed once in every N substeps, where the substep is controlled by the turbulent diffusion velocity, and N is determined by the rate of collisions. This algorithm allowed simulations to be extended to longer times and later stages.

  11. Effects of wing flexibility on aerodynamic performance in hovering flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Wei, Mingjun

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we use a strong-coupling approach to simulate three dimensional flexible flapping wings in hovering flight. The approach is based on a uniform description of both fluid and solid in global Eulerian framework. There has been extensive validation of the current approach with other numerical simulation and experiments. Then we apply our approach to simulate flapping wings with different flexibility and other control parameters. The simulation results allow us to study directly the effects of wing flexibility on the aerodynamic performance of hovering flight. Supported by ARL.

  12. Effect of symmetrical vortex shedding on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of wing-body-tail combinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, M. R.; Nielsen, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    An engineering prediction method for determining the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of wing-body-tail combinations is developed. The method includes the effects of nonlinear aerodynamics of components and the interference between components. Nonlinearities associated with symmetrical vortex shedding from the nose of the body are considered as well as the nonlinearities associated with the separation vortices from the leading edges and side edges of the lifting surfaces. The wing and tail characteristics are calculated using lifting surface theories which include effects of incidence, camber, twist, and induced velocities from external sources of disturbance such as bodies and vortices. The lifting surface theories calculate the distribution of leading edge and side edge suction which is converted to vortex lift using the Polhamus suction analogy. Correlation curves are developed to determine the fraction of the theoretical suction force which is converted into vortex lift. The prediction method is compared with experimental data on a variety of aircraft configurations to assess the accuracy and limitations of the method.

  13. The cost of learning: interference effects in memory development.

    PubMed

    Darby, Kevin P; Sloutsky, Vladimir M

    2015-04-01

    Learning often affects future learning and memory for previously learned information by exerting either facilitation or interference effects. Several theoretical accounts of interference effects have been proposed, each making different developmental predictions. This research examines interference effects across development, with the goal of better understanding mechanisms of interference and of memory development. Preschool-aged children and adults participated in a 3-phased associative learning paradigm containing stimuli that were either unique or repeated across phases. Both age groups demonstrated interference effects, but only for repeated items. Whereas proactive interference effects were comparable across age groups, retroactive interference reached catastrophic-like levels in children. Additionally, retroactive interference increased in adults when contextual differences between phases were minimized (Experiment 2), and decreased in adults who were more successful at encoding repeated pairs of stimuli during a training phase (Experiment 3). These results are discussed with respect to theories of memory and memory development.

  14. Effect of body aerodynamics on the dynamic flight stability of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Han, Jong-Seob; Han, Jae-Hung

    2016-12-14

    This study explores the effects of the body aerodynamics on the dynamic flight stability of an insect at various different forward flight speeds. The insect model, whose morphological parameters are based on measurement data from the hawkmoth Manduca sexta, is treated as an open-loop six-degree-of-freedom dynamic system. The aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the insect are computed by an aerodynamic model that combines the unsteady panel method and the extended unsteady vortex-lattice method. The aerodynamic model is then coupled to a multi-body dynamic code to solve the system of motion equations. First, the trimmed flight conditions of insect models with and without consideration of the body aerodynamics are obtained using a trim search algorithm. Subsequently, the effects of the body aerodynamics on the dynamic flight stability are analysed through modal structures, i.e., eigenvalues and eigenvectors in this case, which are based on linearized equations of motion. The solutions from the nonlinear and linearized equations of motion due to gust disturbances are obtained, and the effects of the body aerodynamics are also investigated through these solutions. The results showed the important effect of the body aerodynamics at high-speed forward flight (in this paper at 4.0 and 5.0 m s(-1)) and the movement trends of eigenvalues when the body aerodynamics is included.

  15. Interference Effects in Young Children's Long-Term Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.

    1995-01-01

    Two experiments examined the effects of interference on young children's long-term memory using paired-association recall and free recall. The results indicated that children were susceptible to interference, the locus of interference effects was at storage, and that both younger (preschool) and older (kindergarten) children experienced similar…

  16. Dynamic Stall in Pitching Airfoils: Aerodynamic Damping and Compressibility Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corke, Thomas C.; Thomas, Flint O.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stall is an incredibly rich fluid dynamics problem that manifests itself on an airfoil during rapid, transient motion in which the angle of incidence surpasses the static stall limit. It is an important element of many manmade and natural flyers, including helicopters and supermaneuverable aircraft, and low-Reynolds number flapping-wing birds and insects. The fluid dynamic attributes that accompany dynamic stall include an eruption of vorticity that organizes into a well-defined dynamic stall vortex and massive excursions in aerodynamic loads that can couple with the airfoil structural dynamics. The dynamic stall process is highly sensitive to surface roughness that can influence turbulent transition and to local compressibility effects that occur at free-stream Mach numbers that are otherwise incompressible. Under some conditions, dynamic stall can result in negative aerodynamic damping that leads to limit-cycle growth of structural vibrations and rapid mechanical failure. The mechanisms leading to negative damping have been a principal interest of recent experiments and analysis. Computational fluid dynamic simulations and low-order models have not been good predictors so far. Large-eddy simulation could be a viable approach although it remains computationally intensive. The topic is technologically important owing to the desire to develop next-generation rotorcraft that employ adaptive rotor dynamic stall control.

  17. Aerodynamic effects of trees on pollutant concentration in street canyons.

    PubMed

    Buccolieri, Riccardo; Gromke, Christof; Di Sabatino, Silvana; Ruck, Bodo

    2009-09-15

    This paper deals with aerodynamic effects of avenue-like tree planting on flow and traffic-originated pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons by means of wind tunnel experiments and numerical simulations. Several parameters affecting pedestrian level concentration are investigated, namely plant morphology, positioning and arrangement. We extend our previous work in this novel aspect of research to new configurations which comprise tree planting of different crown porosity and stand density, planted in two rows within a canyon of street width to building height ratio W/H=2 with perpendicular approaching wind. Sulfur hexafluoride was used as tracer gas to model the traffic emissions. Complementary to wind tunnel experiments, 3D numerical simulations were performed with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT using a Reynolds Stress turbulence closure for flow and the advection-diffusion method for concentration calculations. In the presence of trees, both measurements and simulations showed considerable larger pollutant concentrations near the leeward wall and slightly lower concentrations near the windward wall in comparison with the tree-less case. Tree stand density and crown porosity were found to be of minor importance in affecting pollutant concentration. On the other hand, the analysis indicated that W/H is a more crucial parameter. The larger the value of W/H the smaller is the effect of trees on pedestrian level concentration regardless of tree morphology and arrangement. A preliminary analysis of approaching flow velocities showed that at low wind speed the effect of trees on concentrations is worst than at higher speed. The investigations carried out in this work allowed us to set up an appropriate CFD modelling methodology for the study of the aerodynamic effects of tree planting in street canyons. The results obtained can be used by city planners for the design of tree planting in the urban environment with regard to air quality issues.

  18. Effects of vortex generator on cylindrical protrusion aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignesh Ram, P. S.; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2016-02-01

    Experimental and numerical studies were carried out to evaluate the effect of vortex generator on a small cylindrical protrusion at Mach number 2.0. The experiments were performed using the supersonic blow down wind tunnel on different heights of cylindrical protrusion with vortex generator placed ahead of them. The upstream and downstream flow around the cylindrical protrusion is influenced by vortex generator as is observed using both visualization and pressure measurement techniques. Numerical studies using three dimensional steady implicit formulations with standard k-ω turbulence model was performed. Results obtained through the present computation are compared with the experimental results at Mach 2.0. Good agreements between computation and experimental results have been achieved. The results indicate that the aerodynamic drag acting on cylindrical protrusion can be reduced by adopting vortex generator.

  19. Subsonic sting interference on the aerodynamic characteristics of a family of slanted-base ogive-cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P.; Alcorn, Charles W.; Kilgore, W. Allen

    1990-01-01

    Support interference free drag, lift, and pitching moment measurements on a range of slanted base ogive cylinders were made using the NASA Langley 13 inch magnetic suspension and balance system. Typical test Mach numbers were in the range 0.04 to 0.2. Drag results are shown to be in broad agreement with previous tests with this configuration. Measurements were repeated with a dummy sting support installed in the wind tunnel. Significant support interferences were found at all test conditions and are quantified. Further comparison is made between interference free base pressures, obtained using remote telemetry, and sting cavity pressures.

  20. Interference effects of aircraft components on the local blade angle of attack of a wing-mounted propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic interference effects on a propeller operating in the presence of different wing-body-nacelle combinations was studied. The unsteady blade angle of attack variation with azimuth angle by varying the pitch and yaw of the nacelle was minimized. Results indicate for the particular configuration of interest the minimum blade angle of attack variation occurred with the nacelle pitched downward 4.5 deg and yawed inward 3.0 deg.

  1. Special opportunities in helicopter aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccroskey, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Aerodynamic research relating to modern helicopters includes the study of three dimensional, unsteady, nonlinear flow fields. A selective review is made of some of the phenomenon that hamper the development of satisfactory engineering prediction techniques, but which provides a rich source of research opportunities: flow separations, compressibility effects, complex vortical wakes, and aerodynamic interference between components. Several examples of work in progress are given, including dynamic stall alleviation, the development of computational methods for transonic flow, rotor-wake predictions, and blade-vortex interactions.

  2. Quantifying the Effect of Pressure Sensitive Paint On Aerodynamic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, T. R.; Obara, C. J.; Liu, T.

    2003-01-01

    A thin pressure sensitive paint (PSP) coating can slightly modify the overall shape of a wind-tunnel model and produce surface roughness or smoothness that does not exist on the unpainted model. These undesirable changes in model geometry may alter flow over the model, and affect the pressure distribution and aerodynamic forces and moments on the model. This study quantifies the effects of PSP on three models in low-speed, transonic and supersonic flow regimes. At a 95% confidence level, the PSP effects on the integrated forces are insignificant for a slender arrow-wing-fuselage model and delta wing model with two different paints at Mach 0.2, 1.8, and 2.16 relative to the total balance accuracy limit. The data displayed a repeatability of 2.5 drag counts, while the balance accuracy limit was about 5.5 drag counts. At transonic speeds, the paint has a localized effect at high angles of attack and has a resolvable effect on the normal force, which is significant relative to the balance accuracy limit. For low speeds, the PSP coating has a localized effect on the pressure tap measurements, which leads to an appreciable decrease in the pressure tap reading. Moreover, the force and moment measurements had a poor precision, which precluded the ability to measure the PSP effect for this particular test.

  3. Technical evaluation report, AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel Symposium on Effects of Adverse Weather on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting on Effects of Adverse Weather on Aerodynamics was to provide an update of the stae-of-the-art with respect to the prediction, simulation, and measurement of the effects of icing, anti-icing fluids, and various precipitation on the aerodynamic characteristics of flight vehicles. Sessions were devoted to introductory and survey papers and icing certification issues, to analytical and experimental simulation of ice frost contamination and its effects of aerodynamics, and to the effects of heavy rain and deicing/anti-icing fluids.

  4. Characterization of Pressure Sensitive Paint Intrusiveness Effects on Aerodynamic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Tahani R.; Liu, Tianshu; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2001-01-01

    One effect of using pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is the potential intrusiveness to the aerodynamic characteristics of the model. The paint thickness and roughness may affect the pressure distribution. and therefore, the forces and moments on the wind tunnel model. A study of these potential intrusive effects was carried out at NASA Langley Research Center where a series of wind tunnel tests were conducted using the Modem Design of Experiments (MDOE) test approach. The PSP effects on the integrated forces were measured on two different models at different test conditions in both the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at Langley. The paint effect was found to be very small over a range of Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers and angles of attack. This is due to the very low surface roughness of the painted surface. The surface roughness, after applying the NASA Langley developed PSP, was lower than that of the clean wing. However, the PSP coating had a localized effects on the pressure taps, which leads to an appreciable decrease in the pressure tap reading.

  5. Characteristics of Pressure Sensitive Paint Intrusiveness Effects on Aerodynamic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Tahani R.; Liu, Tianshu; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2001-01-01

    One effect of using pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is the potential intrusiveness to the aerodynamic characteristics of the model. The paint thickness and roughness may affect the pressure distribution, and therefore, the forces and moments on the wind tunnel model. A study of these potential intrusive effects was carried out at NASA Langley Research Center where a series of wind tunnel tests were conducted using the Modem Design of Experiments (MDOE) test approach. The PSP effects on the integrated forces were measured on two different models at different test conditions in both the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at Langley. The paint effect was found to be very small over a range of Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers and angles of attack. This is due to the very low surface roughness of the painted surface. The surface roughness, after applying the NASA Langley developed PSP, was lower than that of the clean wing. However, the PSP coating had a localized effects on the pressure taps, which leads to an appreciable decrease in the pressure tap reading.

  6. Task characteristics and the contextual interference effect.

    PubMed

    Kruisselbrink, L Darren; Van Gyn, Geraldine H

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the influence of blocked and random practice on the acquisition and retention of a criterion multisegment motor task practiced alongside either two similar-distractors tasks or two different-distractors tasks. The random-practice similar-distractors group made more decision-making errors and performed the criterion task more slowly than the blocked-practice similar-distractors group during the acquisition phase. Following a brief filled retention interval, the blocked-practice similar-distractors group demonstrated a loss of acquired performance capabilities, whereas the random-practice similar-distractors group did not. The blocked- and random-practice different-distractors groups performed similarly throughout the experiment. Results are interpreted within Glenberg's component-levels theory, in which it was argued that random practice must stimulate the differential storage of multilevel contextual components associated with the multiple motor tasks being learned to produce a contextual interference effect. The theoretical and practical implications of differential storage versus nonrepetition as a function of random practice are discussed.

  7. Interference Mitigation Effects on Synthetic Aperture Radar Coherent Data Products

    SciTech Connect

    Musgrove, Cameron

    2015-07-01

    For synthetic aperture radars radio frequency interference from sources external to the radar system and techniques to mitigate the interference can degrade the quality of the image products. Usually the radar system designer will try to balance the amount of mitigation for an acceptable amount of interference to optimize the image quality. This dissertation examines the effect of interference mitigation upon coherent data products of fine resolution, high frequency synthetic aperture radars using stretch processing. Novel interference mitigation techniques are introduced that operate on single or multiple apertures of data that increase average coherence compared to existing techniques. New metrics are applied to evaluate multiple mitigation techniques for image quality and average coherence. The underlying mechanism for interference mitigation techniques that affect coherence is revealed.

  8. NASA Aerodynamics Program Annual Report 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    95 ROTONET Phase IV System Multirotor Source Noise Module ...................................................... 97 Acoustic Results...94 Figure 6-7. ROTONET Phase IV System Multirotor Source Noise Module .................................. 96 Figure 6-8. Effects of Reduced...focusing on the areas of hybrid laminar flow technology and the reduction of aerodynamic interference between major aircraft components. A hybrid

  9. Effects of empennage surface location on aerodynamic characteristics of a twin-engine afterbody model with nonaxisymmetric nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Carson, George T., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects of empennage surface location and vertical tail cant angle on the aft-end aerodynamic characteristics of a twin-engine fighter-type configuration. The configuration featured two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles and twin-vertical tails. The investigation was conducted with different empennage locations that included two horizontal and three vertical tail positions. Vertical tail cant angle was varied from -10 deg to 20 deg for one selected configuration. Tests were conducted at Mach number 0.60 to 1.20 and at angles of attack -3 to 9 deg. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from jet off to approximately 9, depending upon Mach number. Tail interference effects were present throughout the range of Mach numbers tested and found to be either favorable or adverse, depending upon test condition and model configuration. At a Mach number of 0.90, adverse interference effects accounted for a significant percentage of total aft-end drag. Interference effects on the nozzle were generally favorable but became adverse as the horizontal tails were moved from a mid to an aft position. The configuration with nonaxisymmetric nozzles had lower total aft-end drag with tails-off than a similar configuration with axisymmetric nozzles at Mach numbers of 0.60 and 0.90.

  10. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction Apparatus For Wheeled Vehicles In Ground Effect

    DOEpatents

    Ortega, Jason M.; Salari, Kambiz

    2005-12-13

    An apparatus for reducing the aerodynamic drag of a wheeled vehicle in a flowstream, the vehicle having a vehicle body and a wheel assembly supporting the vehicle body. The apparatus includes a baffle assembly adapted to be positioned upstream of the wheel assembly for deflecting airflow away from the wheel assembly so as to reduce the incident pressure on the wheel assembly.

  11. Stroop-interference effect in post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hong; Chen, Guoliang; Liu, Xiaohui; Shan, Moshui; Jia, Yanyan

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the conflict processing in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients, we conducted the classical Stroop task by recording event-related potentials. Although the reaction time was overall slower for PTSD patients than healthy age-matched control group, the Stroop-interference effect of reaction time did not differ between the two groups. Compared with normal controls, the interference effects of N 2 and N 450 components were larger and the interference effect of slow potential component disappeared in PTSD. These data indicated the dysfunction of conflict processing in individuals with PTSD.

  12. Effects of Nozzle Geometry and Intermittent Injection of Aerodynamic Tab on Supersonic Jet Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Mikiya; Sano, Takayuki; Fukuda, Masayuki; Kojima, Takayuki; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Shiga, Seiichi; Obokata, Tomio

    Effects of the nozzle geometry and intermittent injection of aerodynamic tabs on exhaust noise from a rectangular plug nozzle were investigated experimentally. In JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), a pre-cooled turbojet engine for an HST (Hypersonic transport) is planned. A 1/100-scaled model of the rectangular plug nozzle is manufactured, and the noise reduction performance of aerodynamic tabs, which is small air jet injection from the nozzle wall, was investigated. Compressed air is injected through the rectangular plug nozzle into the atmosphere at the nozzle pressure ratio of 2.7, which corresponds to the take-off condition of the vehicle. Aerodynamic tabs were installed at the sidewall ends, and 4 kinds of round nozzles and 2 kinds of wedge nozzles were applied. Using a high-frequency solenoid valve, intermittent gas injection is also applied. It is shown that, by use of wedge nozzles, the aerodynamic tab mass flow rate, necessary to gain 2.3dB reduction in OASPL (Overall sound pressure level), decreases by 29% when compared with round nozzles. It is also shown that, by use of intermittent injection, the aerodynamic tab mass flow rate, necessary to gain 2.3dB reduction in OASPL, decreases by about 40% when compared with steady injection. By combination of wedge nozzles and intermittent injection, the aerodynamic tab mass flow rate significantly decreases by 57% when compared with the conventional strategy.

  13. The Effects of Surfaces on the Aerodynamics and Acoustics of Jet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew J.; Miller, Steven A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft noise mitigation is an ongoing challenge for the aeronautics research community. In response to this challenge, low-noise aircraft concepts have been developed that exhibit situations where the jet exhaust interacts with an airframe surface. Jet flows interacting with nearby surfaces manifest a complex behavior in which acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics are altered. In this paper, the variation of the aerodynamics, acoustic source, and far-field acoustic intensity are examined as a large at plate is positioned relative to the nozzle exit. Steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solutions are examined to study the aerodynamic changes in the field-variables and turbulence statistics. The mixing noise model of Tam and Auriault is used to predict the noise produced by the jet. To validate both the aerodynamic and the noise prediction models, results are compared with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and free-field acoustic data respectively. The variation of the aerodynamic quantities and noise source are examined by comparing predictions from various jet and at plate configurations with an isolated jet. To quantify the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic installation effects on the aerodynamic noise source, a non-dimensional number is formed that contains the flow-conditions and airframe installation parameters.

  14. Interference effects in reticon photodiode array detectors.

    PubMed

    Mount, G H; Sanders, R W; Brault, J W

    1992-03-01

    A detector system incorporating the Reticon RL1024S photodiode array has been constructed at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aeronomy Laboratory as part of a double spectrograph to be used to study the Earth's atmosphere from ground-based and aircraft-based platforms. To determine accurately the abundances of atmospheric trace gases, this new system must be able to measure spectral absorptions as small as 0.02%. The detector, manufactured by EG&G Reticon, exhibits superior signal-to-noise characteristics at the light levels characteristic of scattered skylights, but interference in the passivating layer (a thin layer of SiO(2) that is deposited during the manufacture to protect the silicon active area from water vapor) causes major problems in achieving the required precision. The mechanism of the problems and the solution we have implemented are described in detail.

  15. Development and application of an analysis of axisymmetric body effects on helicopter rotor aerodynamics using modified slender body theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, G.; Johnson, W.

    1984-01-01

    A computationally efficient body analysis designed to couple with a comprehensive helicopter analysis is developed in order to calculate the body-induced aerodynamic effects on rotor performance and loads. A modified slender body theory is used as the body model. With the objective of demonstrating the accuracy, efficiency, and application of the method, the analysis at this stage is restricted to axisymmetric bodies at zero angle of attack. By comparing with results from an exact analysis for simple body shapes, it is found that the modified slender body theory provides an accurate potential flow solution for moderately thick bodies, with only a 10%-20% increase in computational effort over that of an isolated rotor analysis. The computational ease of this method provides a means for routine assessment of body-induced effects on a rotor. Results are given for several configurations that typify those being used in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel and in the rotor-body aerodynamic interference tests being conducted at Ames. A rotor-hybrid airship configuration is also analyzed.

  16. Nonclassical and nonlocal effects in the interference of light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, L.

    1992-01-01

    Although we tend to think of optical interference as a classical wave phenomenon, recent experiments have revealed a number of effects that are not describable in classical terms. This is particularly true of interference effects involving the detection of a photon pair. We shall refer to them as fourth order interference, on the grounds that the joint probability density for the detection of one photon at r sub 1 at time t and another r sub 2 at time t is proportional to the fourth order correlation function of the field. This probability is readily measured when two photodetectors are positioned at r sub 1 and r sub 2 and the signals from the two detectors are fed to a coincidence counter that registers 'simultaneous' detections by the two detectors in coincidence. The topics covered include: fourth order interference measurements; the Franson experiment; and experimental test of the de Broglie guided wave theory.

  17. Effects of Reynolds number and model support on the supersonic aerodynamic chacteristics of a 140 deg-included-angle cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trescot, C. D., Jr.; Brown, C. A., Jr.; Howell, D. T.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel to determine the effects of Reynolds number and sting-support interference on the static aerodynamic characteristics of a 140 deg-included-angle cone. Base pressures and forces and moments of the model were measured at Mach numbers of 1.50, 2.00, 2.94, and 4.00 for ratios of sting diameter to model diameter that varied from 0.125 to 0.500 through an angle-of-attack range from about minus 4 deg to 13 deg. The Reynolds number, based on model diameter 4.80 in. was varied from 161,000 to 415,000.

  18. Training Reveals the Sources of Stroop and Flanker Interference Effects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Antao; Tang, Dandan; Chen, Xuefei

    2013-01-01

    In the field of cognitive control, dimensional overlap and pathway automaticity are generally believed to be critical for the generation of congruency effects. However, their specific roles in the generation of congruency effects are unclear. In two experiments, with the 4∶2 mapping design, we investigated this issue by examining the training-related effects on congruency effects (the Stroop interference effect and the Flanker interference effect in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively) normally expressed as incongruent minus congruent difference and on their subcomponents (the stimulus interference and response interference). Experiment 1 revealed that the stimulus interference in the Stroop task, wherein the task-relevant (printed color of word) and the task-irrelevant (semantics of word) dimensions of the stimuli were processed in different pathways, was present during early training but was virtually eliminated at the late stage of training. This indicates that the two dimensions overlap at the early stage but separate at the late stage. In contrast, Experiment 2 showed that the response interference in a variant of the Flanker task, wherein the task-relevant (central color word printed in black font) and the task-irrelevant (flanking color words printed in black font) dimensions of the stimuli were processed in the same pathway, was enhanced after training. This indicates that the enhanced automaticity of irrelevant-dimension processing induces stronger response competition, which therefore results in the larger response interference. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that (1) dimensional overlap is necessary for the generation of congruency effects, (2) pathway automaticity can affect the size of congruency effects, and (3) training enhances the degree of automatic processing in a given pathway. PMID:24146892

  19. The predicted effect of aerodynamic detuning on coupled bending-torsion unstalled supersonic flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyniak, D.; Fleeter, S.

    1986-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to predict the enhanced coupled bending-torsion unstalled supersonic flutter stability due to alternate circumferential spacing aerodynamic detuning of a turbomachine rotor. The translational and torsional unsteady aerodynamic coefficients are developed in terms of influence coefficients, with the coupled bending-torsion stability analysis developed by considering the coupled equations of motion together with the unsteady aerodynamic loading. The effect of this aerodynamic detuning on coupled bending-torsion unstalled supersonic flutter as well as the verification of the modeling are then demonstrated by considering an unstable 12 bladed rotor, with Verdon's uniformly spaced Cascade B flow geometry as a baseline. However, with the elastic axis and center of gravity at 60 percent of the chord, this type of aerodynamic detuning has a minimal effect on stability. For both uniform and nonuniform circumferentially space rotors, a single degree of freedom torsion mode analysis was shown to be appropriate for values of the bending-torsion natural frequency ratio lower than 0.6 and higher 1.2. When the elastic axis and center of gravity are not coincident, the effect of detuning on cascade stability was found to be very sensitive to the location of the center of gravity with respect to the elastic axis. In addition, it was determined that when the center of gravity was forward of an elastic axis located at midchord, a single degree of freedom torsion model did not accurately predict cascade stability.

  20. Interference effects between manual and oral motor skills.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Marie-Hélène; Cohen, Henri

    2016-03-01

    Consolidation of a motor skill is characterized by spontaneous improvement in performance between practice sessions. These offline gains can be eliminated if another skill is introduced soon afterward-a phenomenon called retroactive interference. Interference effects have been found in studies using two similar tasks involving the same motor effectors in a manual mode. The present study aimed to determine the extent to which differences in motor production mode modulate interference in skill learning. Healthy participants were assigned to one of three conditions and trained on a finger opposition sequence (FOS) learning task. All subjects were tested 24 h later on the original FOS learning task. Control subjects who were not exposed to a secondary learning task exhibited the expected offline gains after 24 h. Subjects who immediately learned a secondary task after the FOS training, either in the same manual mode (French Sign Language) or in an oral mode (CVC syllables), did not show any offline gains. Interestingly, the amount of interference was equivalent in the manual and oral learning conditions. The results reveal that interference effects in motor skill learning can occur when different effectors are involved in the primary and secondary tasks. The sequence processing abilities of the basal ganglia appear to play a major role in these interference effects.

  1. Quantum interference effects in molecular spin hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esat, Taner; Friedrich, Rico; Matthes, Frank; Caciuc, Vasile; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Blügel, Stefan; Bürgler, Daniel E.; Tautz, F. Stefan; Schneider, Claus M.

    2017-03-01

    We have studied by means of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) single molecular spin hybrids formed upon chemisorbing a polycyclic aromatic, threefold symmetric hydrocarbon molecule on Co(111) nanoislands. The spin-dependent hybridization between the Co d states and the π orbitals of the molecule leads to a spin-imbalanced electronic structure of the chemisorbed organic molecule. Spin-sensitive measurements reveal that the spin polarization shows intramolecular variations among the different aromatic rings in spite of the highly symmetric adsorption geometry promoted by symmetry matching of the threefold symmetric molecule and the sixfold symmetric Co(111) lattice. Hence the varying degree of spin polarization on the organic molecule does not stem from a different hybridization of the aromatic rings with the Co atoms, but is proposed to be a consequence of the superposition of the spin polarization of the molecule and the spatially modulated spin polarization of the spin-dependent quantum interference pattern of the Co(111) surface state.

  2. Wind Tunnel Interference Effects on Tilt Rotor Testing Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koning, Witold J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental techniques to measure rotorcraft aerodynamic performance are widely used. However, most of them are either unable to capture interference effects from bodies, or require an extremely large computational budget. The objective of the present research is to develop an XV-15 Tiltrotor Research Aircraft rotor model for investigation of wind tunnel wall interference using a novel Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver for rotorcraft, RotCFD. In RotCFD, a mid-fidelity Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver is used with an incompressible flow model and a realizable k-e turbulence model. The rotor is, however, not modeled using a computationally expensive, unsteady viscous body-fitted grid, but is instead modeled using a blade-element model (BEM) with a momentum source approach. Various flight modes of the XV-15 isolated rotor, including hover, tilt, and airplane mode, have been simulated and correlated to existing experimental and theoretical data. The rotor model is subsequently used for wind tunnel wall interference simulations in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) at Ames Research Center in California. The results from the validation of the isolated rotor performance showed good correlation with experimental and theoretical data. The results were on par with known theoretical analyses. In RotCFD the setup, grid generation, and running of cases is faster than many CFD codes, which makes it a useful engineering tool. Performance predictions need not be as accurate as high-fidelity CFD codes, as long as wall effects can be properly simulated. For both test sections of the NFAC wall, interference was examined by simulating the XV-15 rotor in the test section of the wind tunnel and with an identical grid but extended boundaries in free field. Both cases were also examined with an isolated rotor or with the rotor mounted on the modeled geometry of the Tiltrotor Test Rig (TTR). A "quasi linear trim" was used to trim the thrust

  3. Wind Tunnel Interference Effects on Tilt Rotor Testing Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koning, Witold J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental techniques to measure rotorcraft aerodynamic performance are widely used. However, most of them are either unable to capture interference effects from bodies, or require an extremely large computational budget. The objective of the present research is to develop an XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft rotor model for investigation of wind tunnel wall interference using a novel Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver for rotorcraft, RotCFD. In RotCFD, a mid-fidelity URANS solver is used with an incompressible flow model and a realizable k-e turbulence model. The rotor is, however, not modeled using a computationally expensive, unsteady viscous body-fitted grid, but is instead modeled using a blade element model with a momentum source approach. Various flight modes of the XV-15 isolated rotor, including hover, tilt and airplane mode, have been simulated and correlated to existing experimental and theoretical data. The rotor model is subsequently used for wind tunnel wall interference simulations in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) at NASA Ames Research Center in California. The results from the validation of the isolated rotor performance showed good correlation with experimental and theoretical data. The results were on par with known theoretical analyses. In RotCFD the setup, grid generation and running of cases is faster than many CFD codes, which makes it a useful engineering tool. Performance predictions need not be as accurate as high-fidelity CFD codes, as long as wall effects can be properly simulated. For both test sections of the NFAC wall interference was examined by simulating the XV-15 rotor in the test section of the wind tunnel and with an identical grid but extended boundaries in free field. Both cases were also examined with an isolated rotor or with the rotor mounted on the modeled geometry of the Tiltrotor Test Rig (TTR). A 'quasi linear trim' was used to trim the thrust for the rotor to compare the power as a unique

  4. Aerodynamic effects of wing corrugation at gliding flight at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xue Guang; Sun, Mao

    2013-07-01

    Corrugation gives an insect-wing the advantages of low mass, high stiffness, and low membrane stress. Researchers are interested to know if it is also advantageous aerodynamically. Previous works reported that corrugation enhanced the aerodynamic performance of wings at gliding flight. However, Reynolds numbers considered in these studies were higher than that of gliding insects. The present study showed that in the Reynolds number range of gliding insects, corrugation had negative aerodynamic effects. We studied aerodynamic effects of corrugation at gliding motion using the method of computational fluid dynamics, in the Reynolds number range of Re = 200-2400. Different corrugation patterns were considered. The effect of corrugation on aerodynamic performance was identified by comparing the aerodynamic forces between the corrugated and flat-plate wings, and the underlying flow mechanisms of the corrugation effects were revealed by analyzing the flow fields and surface pressure distributions. The findings are as follows: (1) the effect of corrugation is to decrease the lift, and change the drag only slightly (at 15°-25° angles of attack, lift is decreased by about 16%; at smaller angles of attack, the percentage of lift reduction is even larger because the lift is small). (2) Two mechanisms are responsible for the lift reduction. One is that the pleats at the lower surface of the corrugated wing produce relatively strong vortices, resulting in local low-pressure regions on the lower surface of the wing. The other is that corrugation near the leading edge pushes the leading-edge-separation layer slightly upwards and increases the size of the separation bubble above the upper surface, reducing the "suction pressure," or increasing the pressure, on the upper surface.

  5. Effect of wind tunnel acoustic modes on linear oscillating cascade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, D. H.; Fleeter, S.

    1994-01-01

    The aerodynamics of a biconvex airfoil cascade oscillating in torsion is investigated using the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. For subsonic flow and reduced frequencies as large as 0.9, airfoil surface unsteady pressures resulting from oscillation of one of the airfoils are measured using flush-mounted high-frequency-response pressure transducers. The influence coefficient data are examined in detail and then used to predict the unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade oscillating at various interblade phase angles. These results are correlated with experimental data obtained in the traveling-wave mode of oscillation and linearized analysis predictions. It is found that the unsteady pressure disturbances created by an oscillating airfoil excite wind tunnel acoustic modes, which have detrimental effects on the experimental results. Acoustic treatment is proposed to rectify this problem.

  6. Effect of wind tunnel acoustic modes on linear oscillating cascade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, Daniel H.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamics of a biconvex airfoil cascade oscillating in torsion is investigated using the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. For subsonic flow and reduced frequencies as large as 0.9, airfoil surface unsteady pressures resulting from oscillation of one of the airfoils are measured using flush-mounted high-frequency-response pressure transducers. The influence coefficient data are examined in detail and then used to predict the unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade oscillating at various interblade phase angles. These results are correlated with experimental data obtained in the traveling-wave mode of oscillation and linearized analysis predictions. It is found that the unsteady pressure disturbances created by an oscillating airfoil excite wind tunnel acoustic modes which have detrimental effects on the experimental data. Acoustic treatment is proposed to rectify this problem.

  7. On-shell interference effects in Higgs boson final states

    SciTech Connect

    Englert, Christoph; Low, Ian; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-04-29

    Top quark loops in Higgs production via gluon fusion at large invariant final state masses can induce important interference effects in searches for additional Higgs bosons as predicted in, e.g., Higgs portal scenarios and the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model when the heavy scalar is broad or the final state resolution is poor. Currently, the limit setting as performed by both ATLAS and CMS is based on injecting a heavy Higgs-like signal neglecting interference effects. In this study, we perform a study of such “on-shell” interference effects in pp → ZZ and find that they lead to a ≲O(30%) width scheme-dependent modification of the signal strength. Finally, including the continuum contributions to obtain, e.g., the full pp → ZZ → 4l final state, this modification is reduced to the 10% level in the considered intermediate mass range.

  8. On-shell interference effects in Higgs boson final states

    DOE PAGES

    Englert, Christoph; Low, Ian; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-04-29

    Top quark loops in Higgs production via gluon fusion at large invariant final state masses can induce important interference effects in searches for additional Higgs bosons as predicted in, e.g., Higgs portal scenarios and the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model when the heavy scalar is broad or the final state resolution is poor. Currently, the limit setting as performed by both ATLAS and CMS is based on injecting a heavy Higgs-like signal neglecting interference effects. In this study, we perform a study of such “on-shell” interference effects in pp → ZZ and find that they lead to a ≲O(30%) width scheme-dependentmore » modification of the signal strength. Finally, including the continuum contributions to obtain, e.g., the full pp → ZZ → 4l final state, this modification is reduced to the 10% level in the considered intermediate mass range.« less

  9. Spatial compatibility interference effects: a double dissociation between two measures

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, Alexander J.; Tipper, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In spatial compatibility tasks, when the spatial location of a stimulus is irrelevant it nevertheless interferes when a response is required in a different spatial location. For example, response with a left key-press is slowed when the stimulus is presented to the right as compared to the left side of a computer screen. However, in some conditions this interference effect is not detected in reaction time (RT) measures. It is typically assumed that the lack of effect means the irrelevant spatial code was not analysed or that the information rapidly decayed before response. However, we show that even in conditions where there appears to be no spatial interference when measuring RTs, effects can nevertheless be detected after response when recording facial electromyography responses. This dissociation between two measures highlights the importance of diverging methods to investigate visuomotor processes as conclusions based on only one measure can be misleading. PMID:26924937

  10. Assessing effects of cholera vaccination in the presence of interference.

    PubMed

    Perez-Heydrich, Carolina; Hudgens, Michael G; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Clemens, John D; Ali, Mohammad; Emch, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    Interference occurs when the treatment of one person affects the outcome of another. For example, in infectious diseases, whether one individual is vaccinated may affect whether another individual becomes infected or develops disease. Quantifying such indirect (or spillover) effects of vaccination could have important public health or policy implications. In this article we use recently developed inverse-probability weighted (IPW) estimators of treatment effects in the presence of interference to analyze an individually-randomized, placebo-controlled trial of cholera vaccination that targeted 121,982 individuals in Matlab, Bangladesh. Because these IPW estimators have not been employed previously, a simulation study was also conducted to assess the empirical behavior of the estimators in settings similar to the cholera vaccine trial. Simulation study results demonstrate the IPW estimators can yield unbiased estimates of the direct, indirect, total, and overall effects of vaccination when there is interference provided the untestable no unmeasured confounders assumption holds and the group-level propensity score model is correctly specified. Application of the IPW estimators to the cholera vaccine trial indicates the presence of interference. For example, the IPW estimates suggest on average 5.29 fewer cases of cholera per 1000 person-years (95% confidence interval 2.61, 7.96) will occur among unvaccinated individuals within neighborhoods with 60% vaccine coverage compared to neighborhoods with 32% coverage. Our analysis also demonstrates how not accounting for interference can render misleading conclusions about the public health utility of vaccination.

  11. Interference Effects from Grammatically Unavailable Constituents during Sentence Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dyke, Julie A.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence from 3 experiments reveals interference effects from structural relationships that are inconsistent with any grammatical parse of the perceived input. Processing disruption was observed when items occurring between a head and a dependent overlapped with either (or both) syntactic or semantic features of the dependent. Effects of syntactic…

  12. Oscillatory quantum interference effects in narrow-gap semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillianfeld, R. B.; Kallaher, R. L.; Heremans, J. J.; Chen, Hong; Goel, N.; Chung, S. J.; Santos, M. B.; Van Roy, W.; Borghs, G.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate quantum interference phenomena in narrow bandgap semiconductors under strong spin-orbit interaction, by measuring the magnetoresistance across mesoscopic closed-path structures fabricated in two-dimensional electron systems. We discuss our results in terms of four quantum interference effects brought about by geometric phases acquired by the electron wave functions: the Aharonov-Bohm phase, the Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak effect, the Berry's phase due to the evolution of the spin degree of freedom, and the Aharonov-Casher phase.

  13. Observing interference effect in binary (e, 2e) of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangjun; Yang, Jing; Shan, Xu; Zhang, Zhe; Tian, Qiguo; Wang, Enliang

    2015-04-01

    We present investigations on the two-center and multi-center interference effects of molecules in binary (e, 2e) experiments. The high energy resolution electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) measurements on H2 are reported with final vibrational states resolved. The experimental momentum profiles for ionization transitions to the individual final vibrational states of the ion are obtained. The measured and calculated vibrational ratios of the cross sections deviate from Franck-Condon principle, which can be ascribed to the Young-type two-center interference. Furthermore, with the help of our latest version of EMS spectrometer which has considerably higher sensitivity and much wider momentum range from 0 to 8 a.u., we are able to extend our observations to multi-center interference effect in high symmetry molecules like NF3 and CF4 with several oscillation periods included.

  14. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Effects of Abrupt Frequency Changes in Excised Larynges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alipour, Fariborz; Finnegan, Eileen M.; Scherer, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the aerodynamic and acoustic effects due to a sudden change from chest to falsetto register or vice versa. It was hypothesized that the continuous change in subglottal pressure and flow rate alone (pressure-flow sweep [PFS]) can trigger a mode change in the canine larynx. Method: Ten canine larynges were each mounted over a…

  15. Aerodynamic Interference During Sabot Discard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    J. Mik.WNe, - -desirc4 trajoctory. For the rouns tested , the impulse due to aerodynsmic interaction during sabot discard is of the sae magnitude as...TABLE OF CONiENTS Page LIST OFILLUSTRATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1, INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II...Figure Page 1. Test Projectile (60mm, AAAC). . . . . . ... . 19 2. Schematic of Test Set-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3. Sample X-ray Exposure

  16. Diffraction Interference Induced Superfocusing in Nonlinear Talbot Effect

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongmei; Zhang, Yong; Wen, Jianming; Chen, Zhenhua; Wei, Dunzhao; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhao, Gang; Zhu, S. N.; Xiao, Min

    2014-01-01

    We report a simple, novel subdiffraction method, i.e. diffraction interference induced superfocusing in second-harmonic (SH) Talbot effect, to achieve focusing size of less than λSH/4 (or λpump/8) without involving evanescent waves or subwavelength apertures. By tailoring point spread functions with Fresnel diffraction interference, we observe periodic SH subdiffracted spots over a hundred of micrometers away from the sample. Our demonstration is the first experimental realization of the Toraldo di Francia's proposal pioneered 62 years ago for superresolution imaging. PMID:25138077

  17. Effect of residual phase gradients in optical null interference.

    PubMed

    Naik, Dinesh N; Pradeep Chakravarthy, T; Viswanathan, Nirmal K

    2016-01-01

    A scheme to study the effect of residual phase gradients in an optical interference between two out-of-phase Gaussian beams is proposed. In a Sagnac interferometer configured to provide a null output, a variable linear phase swept across the null point unfolds an optical field rotation due to an apparently negligible residual phase gradient present orthogonal to the linear phase sweep. As the optical beam that rotates around its propagation axis carries orbital angular momentum, the experimental results presented in this Letter could provide an insight into the momentum change associated with the energy redistribution in the fundamental phenomenon of optical interference.

  18. General relativistic effects in quantum interference of “clocks”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zych, M.; Pikovski, I.; Costa, F.; Brukner, Č.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics and general relativity have been each successfully tested in numerous experiments. However, the regime where both theories are jointly required to explain physical phenomena remains untested by laboratory experiments, and is also not fully understood by theory. This contribution reviews recent ideas for a new type of experiments: quantum interference of “clocks”, which aim to test novel quantum effects that arise from time dilation. “Clock” interference experiments could be realised with atoms or photons in near future laboratory experiments.

  19. Cortical interference effects in the cocktail party problem.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Rajiv; Best, Virginia; Ozmeral, Erol; McClaine, Elizabeth; Dent, Micheal; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara; Sen, Kamal

    2007-12-01

    Humans and animals must often discriminate between complex natural sounds in the presence of competing sounds (maskers). Although the auditory cortex is thought to be important in this task, the impact of maskers on cortical discrimination remains poorly understood. We examined neural responses in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) field L (homologous to primary auditory cortex) to target birdsongs that were embedded in three different maskers (broadband noise, modulated noise and birdsong chorus). We found two distinct forms of interference in the neural responses: the addition of spurious spikes occurring primarily during the silent gaps between song syllables and the suppression of informative spikes occurring primarily during the syllables. Both effects systematically degraded neural discrimination as the target intensity decreased relative to that of the masker. The behavioral performance of songbirds degraded in a parallel manner. Our results identify neural interference that could explain the perceptual interference at the heart of the cocktail party problem.

  20. RCS jet-flow field interaction effects on the aerodynamics of the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, J. R.; Roberge, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the external effects caused by operation of the reaction control system during entry of the space shuttle orbiter. The effects of jet plume-external flow interactions were emphasized. Force data were obtained for the basic airframe characteristics plus induced effects when the reaction control system is operating. Resulting control amplification and/or coupling were derived and their effects on the aerodynamic stability and control of the orbiter and the reaction control system thrust were determined.

  1. How Persistent and General Is the Contextual Interference Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Daniel M.; Newell, Karl M.

    2007-01-01

    The persistence and generality of the contextual interference (CI) effect was tested using a rapid sequential aiming task. Participants (N = 48) practiced three movement patterns for three blocks of 18 trials under a blocked (BL) or random (RA) schedule. Movement patterns were displayed and KR provided throughout practice and testing. A 24-hr…

  2. Memory consolidation and contextual interference effects with computer games.

    PubMed

    Shewokis, Patricia A

    2003-10-01

    Some investigators of the contextual interference effect contend that there is a direct relation between the amount of practice and the contextual interference effect based on the prediction that the improvement in learning tasks in a random practice schedule, compared to a blocked practice schedule, increases in magnitude as the amount of practice during acquisition on the tasks increases. Research using computer games in contextual interference studies has yielded a large effect (f = .50) with a random practice schedule advantage during transfer. These investigations had a total of 36 and 72 acquisition trials, respectively. The present study tested this prediction by having 72 college students, who were randomly assigned to a blocked or random practice schedule, practice 102 trials of three computer-game tasks across three days. After a 24-hr. interval, 6 retention and 5 transfer trials were performed. Dependent variables were time to complete an event in seconds and number of errors. No significant differences were found for retention and transfer. These results are discussed in terms of how the amount of practice, task-related factors, and memory consolidation mediate the contextual interference effect.

  3. Long-Term Interference Effect: An Alternative to "Learned Helplessness"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazer, Howard I.; Weiss, Jay M.

    1976-01-01

    Presents three experiments that explore whether inescapable shock of long duration and moderate intensity (LoShk) produces an avoidance-escape deficit (called an interference effect) by causing animals to learn to respond less actively or by causing them to learn to be "helpless". (Editor)

  4. Chaff Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    further improve the contrast all of the interior surfaces of the test chamber are painted flat black and the bac!-,ground walls in view of the cameras...to be adequate to eliminate wall effects on the chaff aerodynamics. Secondly, the chamber air mass had to be sufficiently small that it would damp out...independently- supported special rotating-shutter system to "strobe" the dipole images. The integral shutter in each lens assembly is also retained for

  5. Structural effects of unsteady aerodynamic forces on horizontal-axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.S.; Shipley, D.E.

    1994-08-01

    Due to its renewable nature and abundant resources, wind energy has the potential to fulfill a large portion of this nation`s energy needs. The simplest means of utilizing wind energy is through the use of downwind, horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) with fixed-pitch rotors. This configuration regulates the peak power by allowing the rotor blade to aerodynamically stall. The stall point, the point of maximum coefficient of lift, is currently predicted using data obtained from wind tunnel tests. Unfortunately, these tests do not accurately simulate conditions encountered in the field. Flow around the tower and nacelle coupled with inflow turbulence and rotation of the turbine blades create unpredicted aerodynamic forces. Dynamic stall is hypothesized to occur. Such aerodynamic loads are transmitted into the rotor and tower causing structural resonance that drastically reduces the design lifetime of the wind turbine. The current method of alleviating this problem is to structurally reinforce the tower and blades. However, this adds unneeded mass and, therefore, cost to the turbines. A better understanding of the aerodynamic forces and the manner in which they affect the structure would allow for the design of more cost effective and durable wind turbines. Data compiled by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for a downwind HAWT with constant chord, untwisted, fixed-pitch rotors is analyzed. From these data, the actual aerodynamic characteristics of the rotor are being portrayed and the potential effects upon the structure can for the first time be fully analyzed. Based upon their understanding, solutions to the problem of structural resonance are emerging.

  6. An interference account of the missing-VP effect

    PubMed Central

    Häussler, Jana; Bader, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Sentences with doubly center-embedded relative clauses in which a verb phrase (VP) is missing are sometimes perceived as grammatical, thus giving rise to an illusion of grammaticality. In this paper, we provide a new account of why missing-VP sentences, which are both complex and ungrammatical, lead to an illusion of grammaticality, the so-called missing-VP effect. We propose that the missing-VP effect in particular, and processing difficulties with multiply center-embedded clauses more generally, are best understood as resulting from interference during cue-based retrieval. When processing a sentence with double center-embedding, a retrieval error due to interference can cause the verb of an embedded clause to be erroneously attached into a higher clause. This can lead to an illusion of grammaticality in the case of missing-VP sentences and to processing complexity in the case of complete sentences with double center-embedding. Evidence for an interference account of the missing-VP effect comes from experiments that have investigated the missing-VP effect in German using a speeded grammaticality judgments procedure. We review this evidence and then present two new experiments that show that the missing-VP effect can be found in German also with less restricting procedures. One experiment was a questionnaire study which required grammaticality judgments from participants without imposing any time constraints. The second experiment used a self-paced reading procedure and did not require any judgments. Both experiments confirm the prior findings of missing-VP effects in German and also show that the missing-VP effect is subject to a primacy effect as known from the memory literature. Based on this evidence, we argue that an account of missing-VP effects in terms of interference during cue-based retrieval is superior to accounts in terms of limited memory resources or in terms of experience with embedded structures. PMID:26136698

  7. Effects of nicotine on response inhibition and interference control.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Ulrich; Faiola, Eliana; Kasparbauer, Anna-Maria; Petrovsky, Nadine; Chan, Raymond C K; Liepelt, Roman; Kumari, Veena

    2017-04-01

    Nicotine is a cholinergic agonist with known pro-cognitive effects in the domains of alerting and orienting attention. However, its effects on attentional top-down functions such as response inhibition and interference control are less well characterised. Here, we investigated the effects of 7 mg transdermal nicotine on performance on a battery of response inhibition and interference control tasks. A sample of N = 44 healthy adult non-smokers performed antisaccade, stop signal, Stroop, go/no-go, flanker, shape matching and Simon tasks, as well as the attentional network test (ANT) and a continuous performance task (CPT). Nicotine was administered in a within-subjects, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, with order of drug administration counterbalanced. Relative to placebo, nicotine led to significantly shorter reaction times on a prosaccade task and on CPT hits but did not significantly improve inhibitory or interference control performance on any task. Instead, nicotine had a negative influence in increasing the interference effect on the Simon task. Nicotine did not alter inter-individual associations between reaction times on congruent trials and error rates on incongruent trials on any task. Finally, there were effects involving order of drug administration, suggesting practice effects but also beneficial nicotine effects when the compound was administered first. Overall, our findings support previous studies showing positive effects of nicotine on basic attentional functions but do not provide direct evidence for an improvement of top-down cognitive control through acute administration of nicotine at this dose in healthy non-smokers.

  8. Effects of nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics on performance, stability and control of an F-18 configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guofeng

    Large-amplitude forced oscillation data for an F-18 configuration are analyzed with two modeling methods: Fourier functional analysis to form the indicial integrals, and a generalized dynamic aerodynamic model for stability and control analysis. The indicial integral is first applied to calculate the pitch damping parameter for comparison with the conventional forced oscillation test. It is shown that the reduced frequency affects the damping much more strongly than the test amplitude. Using the indicial integral models in a flight simulation code for an F-18 configuration, it is found that the configuration with unsteady aerodynamics becomes unstable in pitch if the pitch rate is high, in contrast to the quasi-steady configuration which depends mainly on the instantaneous angle of attack. In a pitch-up maneuver in the post-stall regime the configuration with unsteady aerodynamics can stay at a high pitch attitude and angle of attack without losing altitude for a much longer duration than the quasi-steady model. However, the speed will decrease faster because of higher drag. The newly developed generalized dynamic aerodynamic model is of the nonlinear algebraic form with the coefficients being determined from a set of large amplitude oscillatory experimental data by using least-square fitting. The resulting model coefficients are functions of the reduced frequency and amplitude. The new aerodynamic models have been verified with data in harmonic oscillation with a smaller amplitude and in constant pitch-rate motions. The new algebraic models are especially useful in stability and control analysis, and are used in bifurcation analysis and control studies for the same F-18 HARV configuration. The results show significant differences in the equilibrium surfaces and dynamic stability. It is also shown that control gains developed with the conventional quasi-steady aerodynamic data may not be adequate when the effect of unsteady aerodynamics is significant. A numerical

  9. The cumulative semantic interference effect in normal and pathological ageing.

    PubMed

    Mulatti, Claudio; Calia, Clara; De Caro, Maria Fara; Della Sala, Sergio

    2014-12-01

    People affected by mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a precursor of Alzheimer's Disease, present with impairments in picture naming, a lexical/semantic task which rests on the activation of perceptual, semantic, and phonological representations. The poor performance of MCI individuals in picture naming has been accounted for in terms of deficits of either the perceptual, semantic, or phonological stages. To disentangle the source of this deficit we compared the cumulative semantic interference effect (Howard et al., 2006. Cognition. 100, 464-482.) and the repetition priming effect of a group of people with MCI to that of a group of healthy elderly participants and with a group of healthy young participants. The cumulative semantic interference effect defines a linear increase in the picture naming reaction times which is function of the already named pictures belonging to the same semantic category to which the named picture belongs. The repetition priming effect refers to an increase in performance for repeated items compared to unrepeated items. Results showed that whereas the cumulative semantic interference effect was present in the healthy elderly and young samples, it was absent in the MCI sample; instead, all groups showed comparable repetition priming effects. This pattern of results suggests that the impairment in picture naming exhibited by MCI individuals is due to an inefficient semantic access.

  10. Some aspects of the aerodynamics of separating strap-ons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, K. K.; Krishnan, C. G.

    1994-11-01

    An aerodynamics model for analyzing strap-on separation is proposed. This model comprises both interference aerodynamics and free-body aerodynamics. The interference aerodynamics is primarily due to the close proximity of core and strap-ons. The free-body aerodynamics is solely due to the body geometry of the strap-ons. Using this aerodynamic model, the dynamics of separating strap-ons has been simulated in a six-degree-of-freedom mode to determine if a collision occurs. This aerodynamic model is very handy for various off-design studies relating to separating strap-ons.

  11. Experimental tests of interference commensurate effect in TMTSF conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Heon-Ick; Naughton, M. J.

    2004-03-01

    It has recently been suggested via analytical theory [1] and experiment that the origin of certain "LN"-type [2] angular magnetoresistance oscillations in (TMTSF)_2PF6 is related to interference effects due to commensurate electron trajectories in a tilted magnetic field. Here we show similar effects via calculation and experiment on (TMTSF)_2ClO4 that relate to the physical meaning of the oscillations and demonstrate unique behavior in magnetic field, where the magnetoresistance obeys different power laws at different angles. These results address the physical nature of the LN oscillations with respect to an interference effect and projections of Lebed magic angles. [1] A.G. Lebed and M.J. Naughton, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 187003 (2003). [2] I.J. Lee and M.J. Naughton, Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 7423 (1998).

  12. High fidelity quasi steady-state aerodynamic model effects on race vehicle performance predictions using multi-body simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrfeld-Halterman, J. A.; Uddin, M.

    2016-07-01

    We described in this paper the development of a high fidelity vehicle aerodynamic model to fit wind tunnel test data over a wide range of vehicle orientations. We also present a comparison between the effects of this proposed model and a conventional quasi steady-state aerodynamic model on race vehicle simulation results. This is done by implementing both of these models independently in multi-body quasi steady-state simulations to determine the effects of the high fidelity aerodynamic model on race vehicle performance metrics. The quasi steady state vehicle simulation is developed with a multi-body NASCAR Truck vehicle model, and simulations are conducted for three different types of NASCAR race tracks, a short track, a one and a half mile intermediate track, and a higher speed, two mile intermediate race track. For each track simulation, the effects of the aerodynamic model on handling, maximum corner speed, and drive force metrics are analysed. The accuracy of the high-fidelity model is shown to reduce the aerodynamic model error relative to the conventional aerodynamic model, and the increased accuracy of the high fidelity aerodynamic model is found to have realisable effects on the performance metric predictions on the intermediate tracks resulting from the quasi steady-state simulation.

  13. Delaying Interference Training Has Equivalent Effects in Various Pavlovian Interference Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Elizabeth J.; Escobar, Martha; Kimble, Whitney

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous recovery in extinction appears to be inversely related to the acquisition-to-extinction interval, but it remains unclear why this is the case. Rat subjects trained with one of three interference paradigms exhibited less spontaneous recovery of the original response after delayed than immediate interference, regardless of whether…

  14. Aerodynamic effects of simulated ice shapes on two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alansatan, Sait

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of simulated glaze ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance characteristics of two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail. The two dimensional tests involved two NACA 0011 airfoils with chords of 24 and 12 inches. Glaze ice shapes computed with the LEWICE code that were representative of 22.5-min and 45-min ice accretions were simulated with spoilers, which were sized to approximate the horn heights of the LEWICE ice shapes. Lift, drag, pitching moment, and surface pressure coefficients were obtained for a range of test conditions. Test variables included Reynolds number, geometric scaling, control deflection and the key glaze ice features, which were horn height, horn angle, and horn location. For the three-dimensional tests, a 25%-scale business jet empennage (BJE) with a T-tail configuration was used to study the effect of ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance of a swept horizontal tail. Simulated glaze ice shapes included the LEWICE and spoiler ice shapes to represent 9-min and 22.5-min ice accretions. Additional test variables included Reynolds number and elevator deflection. Lift, drag, hinge moment coefficients as well as boundary layer velocity profiles were obtained. The experimental results showed substantial degradation in aerodynamic performance of the airfoils and the swept horizontal tail due to the simulated ice shapes. For the two-dimensional airfoils, the largest aerodynamic penalties were obtained when the 3-in spoiler-ice, which was representative of 45-min glaze ice accretions, was set normal to the chord. Scale and Reynolds effects were not significant for lift and drag. However, pitching moments and pressure distributions showed great sensitivity to Reynolds number and geometric scaling. For the threedimensional study with the swept finite tail, the 22.5-min ice shapes resulted in greater aerodynamic performance degradation than the 9-min ice shapes. The addition of 24

  15. The Effect of Stress on Crossmodal Interference During Visual Search

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    1997; Rees, Firth, & Lavie , 2001), few have examined the effects of stress on crossmodal attention . The purpose of the present experiment was to...of both the high and low perceptual load . Conversely, if induced stress results in a narrowing of attention , then it is hypothesized that...distracting visual information will not interfere under conditions of high or low load . At first blush, one might assume that a broadening of attention may

  16. Effects of wing modification on an aircraft's aerodynamic parameters as determined from flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    A study of the effects of four wing-leading-edge modifications on a general aviation aircraft's stability and control parameters is presented. Flight data from the basic aircraft configuration and configurations with wing modifications are analyzed to determine each wing geometry's stability and control parameters. The parameter estimates and aerodynamic model forms are obtained using the stepwise regression and maximum likelihood techniques. The resulting parameter estimates and aerodynamic models are verified using vortex-lattice theory and by analysis of each model's ability to predict aircraft behavior. Comparisons of the stability and control derivative estimates from the basic wing and the four leading-edge modifications are accomplished so that the effects of each modification on aircraft stability and control derivatives can be determined.

  17. Effect of compressibility on the nonlinear prediction of the aerodynamic loads on lifting surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, O. A.; Mook, D. T.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The vortex-lattice technique for incompressible flow which accounts for separation at sharp edges is modified to account for compressibility. This is accomplished by extending the Prandtl-Glauert transformation to moderate angles of attack. Thus, the aerodynamic characteristics for the compressible case are obtained from the solution of an equivalent incompressible problem. Numerical results are presented for parallelogram and delta wings to assess the effects of compressibility. The results are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  18. Three-dimensional aerodynamics of an annular airfoil cascade including loading effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleeter, S.; Stauter, R. C.; Manwaring, S. R.

    1989-10-01

    A series of experiments are described which investigate and quantify the effect of loading on the three-dimensional flow through a subsonic annular cascade of cambered airfoils. At two levels of loading, detailed data quantify the cascade inlet velocity, the intrapassage flow field, the airfoil surface pressure distributions, the exit flow field, and the total pressure loss distributions. Aerodynamic loading is shown to strengthen the radial pressure gradient, the passage vortex structure, the vortex-endwall boundary layer interactions, and the losses.

  19. Three-dimensional aerodynamics of an annular airfoil cascade including loading effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleeter, S.; Stauter, R. C.; Manwaring, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    A series of experiments are described which investigate and quantify the effect of loading on the three-dimensional flow through a subsonic annular cascade of cambered airfoils. At two levels of loading, detailed data quantify the cascade inlet velocity, the intrapassage flow field, the airfoil surface pressure distributions, the exit flow field, and the total pressure loss distributions. Aerodynamic loading is shown to strengthen the radial pressure gradient, the passage vortex structure, the vortex-endwall boundary layer interactions, and the losses.

  20. Effect of leading-edge vortex flaps on aerodynamic performance of delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of leading-edge vortex flaps on the aerodynamic characteristics of highly swept-back wings is analytically investigated, using the free vortex sheet method. The method, based on a three-dimensional inviscid flow model, is an advanced panel type employing quadratic doublet distributions to represent the wing surface, rolled-up vortex sheet and wake and is capable of computing forces, moments and surface pressures.

  1. Interference effect in elastic parton energy loss in a finitemedium

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-04-18

    Similar to the radiative parton energy loss due to gluonbremsstrahlung, elastic energy loss of a parton undergoing multiplescattering in a finite medium is demonstrated to be sensitive tointerference effect. The interference between amplitudes of elasticscattering via a gluon exchange and that of gluon radiation reduces theeffective elastic energy loss in a finite medium and gives rise to anon-trivial length dependence. The reduction is most significant for apropagation length L<4/\\pi T in a medium with a temperature T. Thoughthe finite size effect is not significant for the average partonpropagation in the most central heavy-ion collisions, it will affect thecentrality dependence of its effect on jet quenching.

  2. Effects of Nose Radius and Aerodynamic Loading on Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammerton, P. W.; Kerschen, E. J.

    1998-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the effects of airfoil thickness and mean aerodynamic loading on boundary-layer receptivity in the leading-edge region. The case of acoustic free-stream disturbances, incident on a thin cambered airfoil with a parabolic leading edge in a low Mach number flow, is considered. An asymptotic analysis based on large Reynolds number is developed, supplemented by numerical results. The airfoil thickness distribution enters the theory through a Strouhal number based on the nose radius of the airfoil, S = (omega)tau(sub n)/U, where omega is the frequency of the acoustic wave and U is the mean flow speed. The influence of mean aerodynamic loading enters through an effective angle-of-attack parameter ti, related to flow around the leading edge from the lower surface to the upper. The variation of the receptivity level is analyzed as a function of S, mu, and characteristics of the free-stream acoustic wave. For an unloaded leading edge, a finite nose radius dramatically reduces the receptivity level compared to that for a flat plate, the amplitude of the instability waves in the boundary layer being decreased by an order of magnitude when S = 0.3. Modest levels of aerodynamic loading are found to further decrease the receptivity level for the upper surface of the airfoil, while an increase in receptivity level occurs for the lower surface. For larger angles of attack close to the critical angle for boundary layer separation, a local rise in the receptivity level occurs for the upper surface, while for the lower surface the receptivity decreases. The effects of aerodynamic loading are more pronounced at larger values of S. Oblique acoustic waves produce much higher receptivity levels than acoustic waves propagating downstream parallel to the airfoil chord.

  3. Space Launch System Ascent Static Aerodynamic Database Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Bennett, David W.; Blevins, John A.; Erickson, Gary E.; Favaregh, Noah M.; Houlden, Heather P.; Tomek, William G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the wind tunnel testing work and data analysis required to characterize the static aerodynamic environment of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) ascent portion of flight. Scaled models of the SLS have been tested in transonic and supersonic wind tunnels to gather the high fidelity data that is used to build aerodynamic databases. A detailed description of the wind tunnel test that was conducted to produce the latest version of the database is presented, and a representative set of aerodynamic data is shown. The wind tunnel data quality remains very high, however some concerns with wall interference effects through transonic Mach numbers are also discussed. Post-processing and analysis of the wind tunnel dataset are crucial for the development of a formal ascent aerodynamics database.

  4. Aerodynamic drag crisis and its possible effect on the flight of baseballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohlich, Cliff

    1984-04-01

    At Reynolds numbers above about 105 the aerodynamic drag force on a sphere drops sharply as the flow begins to become turbulent in the boundary layer. For baseballs, this ``drag crisis'' may occur at speeds which are typical for pitched or batted balls. The effects of the drag reduction on the behavior of both pitched and batted balls is significant, and may explain several features of the game of baseball which previously have been unexplained or attributed to other causes. In particular, the drag reduction may help to explain why pitched fastballs appear to rise, why pitched curve balls appear to drop sharply, and why home run production has increased since the introduction of the alleged ``lively ball.'' Calculations suggest that aerodynamic forces are as important a factor in fastpitch softball as in baseball, and that they are a critical factor in a number of other ball games.

  5. Effects of flow curvature on the aerodynamics of Darrieus wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P. G.; Wolfe, W. P.

    1980-07-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation was conducted which clearly showed the effects of flow curvature to be significant determinants of Darrieus turbine blade aerodynamics; qualitatively, these results apply equally to straight or curved bladed machines. Unusually large boundary layer radial pressure gradients and virtually altered camber and incidence are the phenomena of primary importance. Conformal mapping techniques were developed which transform the geometric turbine airfoils in curved flow to their virtual equivalents in rectilinear flow, thereby permitting the more accurate selection of airfoil aerodynamic coefficients from published sectional data. It is demonstrated that once the flow idiosyncracies are fully understood, they may be used to advantage to improve the wind energy extraction efficiency of these machines.

  6. Aerodynamic static stability and control effectiveness of a parametric shuttle launch configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in the NASA/MSFC 14-inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel on a 0.004-scale model of the NR ATP baseline Shuttle launch configuration. The test model consisted of the NR ATP baseline orbiter, external tank, and SRB's with nozzles. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded over an angle of attack range from minus 10 deg to 10 deg at zero degrees sideslip and angle of sideslip range of minus 10 deg to 10 deg at zero angle of attack for a Mach range of 0.6 to 4.96. Rudder flare was constant at 10 deg during the entire test. The purpose of the test was to define the performance, stability, and control characteristics of the launch configuration as well as to investigate the buildup effect of two geometrical parameters.

  7. Assessment of 3D aerodynamic effects on the behaviour of floating wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolas, D.; Riziotis, V.; Voutsinas, S.

    2014-12-01

    Current state-of-art models for floating wind turbines are built by merging separate modules addressing the four basic aspects leading to a compound hydro-servo-aero-elastic time domain solver. While current state-of-the-art models differ in many aspects, they all use the blade element momentum (BEM) aerodynamic modelling. Due to its low cost, BEM is the standard choice for design purposes. However the use of BEM entails several semi-empirical corrections and add-ons that need reconsideration and recalibration when new features appear. For floating wind turbines, the effect of the floater motions is such a new feature. In the present paper, this aspect is investigated by comparing BEM based results against 3D free-wake simulations. Deterministic as well as stochastic simulations are presented in pure aerodynamic and full aeroelastic context. It is confirmed that asymmetric inflow originating from yaw misalignment and shear give significant differences reflected on mean values and amplitudes.

  8. Ground effects on the low-speed aerodynamics of a powered, generic hypersonic configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.

    1990-01-01

    A study was undertaken in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-foot subsonic tunnel to determine the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a powered, generic, hypersonic configuration in ground effect. The model was a simplified configuration consisting of a triangular wedge forebody, a rectangular mid-section which housed the flow through, an ejector type propulsion simulation system, and a rectangular wedge afterbody. Additional model components included a delta wing, a rectangular wedge forebody, inlet fences, exhaust flow deflectors, and afterbody fences. Aerodynamic force and moment data were obtaind over an angle of attack range from -4 to 18 degrees while model height above the tunnel floor was varied from 1/4 inch to 6 feet. Variations in freestream dynamic pressure, from 10 psf to 80 psf, and engine ejector pressure yielded a range of thrust coefficients from 0 to 0.8.

  9. Effects of Single-Task Interference on Dual-Task Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, James C.; Ruthruff, Eric; VanSelst, Mark; Remington, Roger W.

    1998-01-01

    Van Sergi, Ruthruff and Johnston found that dual-task practice can markedly reduce interference in the Psychological Refractory Period paradigm. Their results are consistent with a bottleneck model in which practice serves primarily to reduce stage durations. This model predicts that single-task practice on Task 1 alone should produce marked reductions in interference, whereas single-task practice on Task 2 should not. New experiments test these predictions. Alternative theoretical accounts are also considered.

  10. Uncovering changes in spider orb-web topology owing to aerodynamic effects.

    PubMed

    Zaera, Ramón; Soler, Alejandro; Teus, Jaime

    2014-09-06

    An orb-weaving spider's likelihood of survival is influenced by its ability to retain prey with minimum damage to its web and at the lowest manufacturing cost. This set of requirements has forced the spider silk to evolve towards extreme strength and ductility to a degree that is rare among materials. Previous studies reveal that the performance of the web upon impact may not be based on the mechanical properties of silk alone, aerodynamic drag could play a role in the dissipation of the prey's energy. Here, we present a thorough analysis of the effect of the aerodynamic drag on wind load and prey impact. The hypothesis considered by previous authors for the evaluation of the drag force per unit length of thread has been revisited according to well-established principles of fluid mechanics, highlighting the functional dependence on thread diameter that was formerly ignored. Theoretical analysis and finite-element simulations permitted us to identify air drag as a relevant factor in reducing deterioration of the orb web, and to reveal how the spider can take greater-and not negligible-advantage of drag dissipation. The study shows the beneficial air drag effects of building smaller and less dense webs under wind load, and larger and denser webs under prey impact loads. In essence, it points out why the aerodynamics need to be considered as an additional driving force in the evolution of silk threads and orb webs.

  11. Uncovering changes in spider orb-web topology owing to aerodynamic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zaera, Ramón; Soler, Alejandro; Teus, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    An orb-weaving spider's likelihood of survival is influenced by its ability to retain prey with minimum damage to its web and at the lowest manufacturing cost. This set of requirements has forced the spider silk to evolve towards extreme strength and ductility to a degree that is rare among materials. Previous studies reveal that the performance of the web upon impact may not be based on the mechanical properties of silk alone, aerodynamic drag could play a role in the dissipation of the prey's energy. Here, we present a thorough analysis of the effect of the aerodynamic drag on wind load and prey impact. The hypothesis considered by previous authors for the evaluation of the drag force per unit length of thread has been revisited according to well-established principles of fluid mechanics, highlighting the functional dependence on thread diameter that was formerly ignored. Theoretical analysis and finite-element simulations permitted us to identify air drag as a relevant factor in reducing deterioration of the orb web, and to reveal how the spider can take greater—and not negligible—advantage of drag dissipation. The study shows the beneficial air drag effects of building smaller and less dense webs under wind load, and larger and denser webs under prey impact loads. In essence, it points out why the aerodynamics need to be considered as an additional driving force in the evolution of silk threads and orb webs. PMID:24966235

  12. Effects of Aerodynamic Tabs onExhaust Noise from a Rectangular Plug Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Mikiya; Sano, Takayuki; Kojima, Takayuki; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Shiga, Seiichi; Obokata, Tomio

    Effects of aerodynamic tabs on exhaust noise from a rectangular plug nozzle were investigated experimentally. In JAXA (Japan Aerospace Explanation Agency), a pre-cooled turbojet engine for the 1st stage propulsion of a TSTO (Two stage to orbit) is planned. In the present study, a 1/100-scaled model of the rectangular plug nozzle for the pre-cooled turbojet engine is manufactured and the exhaust noise characteristics were investigated. Compressed air is injected through the rectangular plug nozzle into the atmosphere. The nozzle pressure ratio was set at 2.7, which corresponds to the take-off condition of the vehicle. Aerodynamic tabs were installed at the ramp end (Upper AT), the cowl end (Lower AT) and the sidewall end (Side AT). The SPL (Sound pressure level) was measured with a high-frequency microphone. Without AT, the sound spectrum has a broadband peak at which the SPL is around 105dB. For Lower and Side ATs, the OASPL (Overall SPL) of the exhaust noise decreases, especially around ramp end. At the maximum, the OASPL was reduced by 2.4dB with about 2% loss of the main jet total pressure at the cowl exit. It is shown that the aerodynamic tabs are effective in noise reduction in a rectangular plug nozzle.

  13. A lifting surface computer code with jet-in-crossflow interference effects. Volume 1: Theoretical description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlong, K. L.; Fearn, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    A method is proposed to combine a numerical description of a jet in a crossflow with a lifting surface panel code to calculate the jet/aerodynamic-surface interference effects on a V/STOL aircraft. An iterative technique is suggested that starts with a model for the properties of a jet/flat plate configuration and modifies these properties based on the flow field calculated for the configuration of interest. The method would estimate the pressures, forces, and moments on an aircraft out of ground effect. A first-order approximation to the method suggested is developed and applied to two simple configurations. The first-order approximation is a noniterative precedure which does not allow for interactions between multiple jets in a crossflow and also does not account for the influence of lifting surfaces on the jet properties. The jet/flat plate model utilized in the examples presented is restricted to a uniform round jet injected perpendicularly into a uniform crossflow for a range of jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios from three to ten.

  14. High-order dispersion effects in two-photon interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzotta, Zeudi; Cialdi, Simone; Cipriani, Daniele; Olivares, Stefano; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2016-12-01

    Two-photon interference and Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) effect are relevant tools for quantum metrology and quantum information processing. In optical coherence tomography, the HOM effect is exploited to achieve high-resolution measurements with the width of the HOM dip being the main parameter. On the other hand, applications like dense coding require high-visibility performance. Here we address high-order dispersion effects in two-photon interference and study, theoretically and experimentally, the dependence of the visibility and the width of the HOM dip on both the pump spectrum and the downconverted photon spectrum. In particular, a spatial light modulator is exploited to experimentally introduce and manipulate a custom phase function to simulate the high-order dispersion effects. Overall, we show that it is possible to effectively introduce high-order dispersion effects on the propagation of photons and also to compensate for such effect. Our results clarify the role of the different dispersion phenomena and pave the way for optimization procedures in quantum technological applications involving PDC photons and optical fibers.

  15. Interference effects in luminescence studies of thin films.

    PubMed

    Holm, R T; McKnight, S W; Palik, E D; Lukosz, W

    1982-07-15

    Interference effects, including multiple-beam and wide-angle, associated with luminescence from within a thin film are described. A simple geometrical model is used to calculate the s- and p-polarized luminescent light assuming electric-dipole radiation. The luminescence exhibits fringes when measured both as a function of the film thickness and as a function of the wavelength of the light. In the latter case the fringes can also show a beating effect. The model is applied to several experimental examples of cathodoluminescence in SiO(2) and an example of photoluminescence in a-Si.

  16. Effects of Exposure to Sulfur Mustard on Speech Aerodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heydari, Fatemeh; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating agent with highly cytotoxic properties even at low exposure. It was used widely against both military and civilian population by Iraqi forces in the Iraq-Iran war (1983-1988). Although various aspects of mustard gas effects on patients with chemical injury have been relatively well characterized, its effects on…

  17. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    The modern theory of aerodynamic sound originates from Lighthill's two papers in 1952 and 1954, as is well known. I have heard that Lighthill was motivated in writing the papers by the jet-noise emitted by the newly commercialized jet-engined airplanes at that time. The technology of aerodynamic sound is destined for environmental problems. Therefore the theory should always be applied to newly emerged public nuisances. This issue of Fluid Dynamics Research (FDR) reflects problems of environmental sound in present Japanese technology. The Japanese community studying aerodynamic sound has held an annual symposium since 29 years ago when the late Professor S Kotake and Professor S Kaji of Teikyo University organized the symposium. Most of the Japanese authors in this issue are members of the annual symposium. I should note the contribution of the two professors cited above in establishing the Japanese community of aerodynamic sound research. It is my pleasure to present the publication in this issue of ten papers discussed at the annual symposium. I would like to express many thanks to the Editorial Board of FDR for giving us the chance to contribute these papers. We have a review paper by T Suzuki on the study of jet noise, which continues to be important nowadays, and is expected to reform the theoretical model of generating mechanisms. Professor M S Howe and R S McGowan contribute an analytical paper, a valuable study in today's fluid dynamics research. They apply hydrodynamics to solve the compressible flow generated in the vocal cords of the human body. Experimental study continues to be the main methodology in aerodynamic sound, and it is expected to explore new horizons. H Fujita's study on the Aeolian tone provides a new viewpoint on major, longstanding sound problems. The paper by M Nishimura and T Goto on textile fabrics describes new technology for the effective reduction of bluff-body noise. The paper by T Sueki et al also reports new technology for the

  18. Effects of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Plumes on Aerodynamics and Controllability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicker, Darby; Childs, Robert; Rogers,Stuart E.; McMullen, Matthew; Garcia, Joseph; Greathouse, James

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the launch abort system of the Multi-purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) for control design and accurate simulation has provided a significant challenge to aerodynamicists and design engineers. The design space of the launch abort vehicle (LAV) includes operational altitudes from ground level to approximately 300,000 feet, Mach numbers from 0-9, and peak dynamic pressure near 1300psf during transonic flight. Further complicating the characterization of the aerodynamics and the resultant vehicle controllability is the interaction of the vehicle flowfield with the plumes of the two solid propellant motors that provide attitude control and the main propulsive impulse for the LAV. These interactions are a function of flight parameters such as Mach number, altitude, dynamic pressure, vehicle attitude, as well as parameters relating to the operation of the motors themselves - either as a function of time for the AM, or as a result of the flight control system requests for control torque from the ACM. This paper discusses the computational aerodynamic modeling of the aerodynamic interaction caused by main abort motor and the attitude control motor of the MPCV LAV, showing the effects of these interactions on vehicle controllability.

  19. Supersonic aerodynamic interference effects of store separation. Part 1: Computational analysis of cavity flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1986-01-01

    An explicit-implicit and an implicit two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code along with various grid generation capabilities were developed. A series of classical benckmark cases were simulated using these codes.

  20. Feasibility study for analyzing plasma-aerodynamic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B; Sherohman, J

    1999-05-07

    The purpose of this feasibility study was to conduct preliminary modeling to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the effects observed in the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) shock tube experiment. It was assumed that the plasma is simply a region of gas in the shock tube that has a higher gas temperature. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations were performed to simulate the propagation of a shock wave through the tube, using the same parameters in the experiment. Both 1- D and 3-D CFD calculations were performed to determine which effects can be explained simply by axial temperature gradients and which effects require the presence of radial temperature gradients. Discharge plasma physics calculations of a longitudinal glow discharge were then used to establish if the electrical currents used in the experiment are consistent with the gas temperature distributions that are necessary to explain the observed effects.

  1. Iced-airfoil aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, M. B.; Broeren, A. P.; Blumenthal, L. A.

    2005-07-01

    Past research on airfoil aerodynamics in icing are reviewed. This review emphasizes the time period after the 1978 NASA Lewis workshop that initiated the modern icing research program at NASA and the current period after the 1994 ATR accident where aerodynamics research has been more aircraft safety focused. Research pre-1978 is also briefly reviewed. Following this review, our current knowledge of iced airfoil aerodynamics is presented from a flowfield-physics perspective. This article identifies four classes of ice accretions: roughness, horn ice, streamwise ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. For each class, the key flowfield features such as flowfield separation and reattachment are discussed and how these contribute to the known aerodynamic effects of these ice shapes. Finally Reynolds number and Mach number effects on iced-airfoil aerodynamics are summarized.

  2. CFD Simulations on Interference Effects between Offshore Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihing, P.; Meister, K.; Schulz, C.; Lutz, Th; Krämer, E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents results of detailed 3D CFD simulations of two 5MW wind turbines sited in the German wind farm Alpha Ventus which are located behind each other at half-wake conditions. The focus of interest in this study is put on wake - turbine interaction, in order to derive the main shadow effects and their influence on blade loads and power response of the downstream turbine. For this purpose, Detached Eddy Simulations (DES) were performed using the flow solver FLOWer from DLR (German Aerospace Center). To consider all relevant aerodynamic effects, the main turbine components are represented as direct model with resolved boundary layers. Measurement-based turbulent inflow conditions are prescribed to realistically account for the atmospheric boundary layer. In order to analyze the flow conditions in front of the downstream turbine, wake propagation and velocity spectra are evaluated and compared with the undisturbed atmospheric boundary layer. Their impact on loads and power production and their corresponding fluctuations is discussed by comparing these with the upstream turbine. It was found, that fatigue loads occurring at half-wake conditions are significantly higher for the downstream turbine, since blade load fluctuations are highly amplified by the unsteady wake of the upstream turbine.

  3. Physical Insights, Steady Aerodynamic Effects, and a Design Tool for Low-Pressure Turbine Flutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, Joshua Joseph

    The successful, efficient, and safe turbine design requires a thorough understanding of the underlying physical phenomena. This research investigates the physical understanding and parameters highly correlated to flutter, an aeroelastic instability prevalent among low pressure turbine (LPT) blades in both aircraft engines and power turbines. The modern way of determining whether a certain cascade of LPT blades is susceptible to flutter is through time-expensive computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. These codes converge to solution satisfying the Eulerian conservation equations subject to the boundary conditions of a nodal domain consisting fluid and solid wall particles. Most detailed CFD codes are accompanied by cryptic turbulence models, meticulous grid constructions, and elegant boundary condition enforcements all with one goal in mind: determine the sign (and therefore stability) of the aerodynamic damping. The main question being asked by the aeroelastician, "is it positive or negative?'' This type of thought-process eventually gives rise to a black-box effect, leaving physical understanding behind. Therefore, the first part of this research aims to understand and reveal the physics behind LPT flutter in addition to several related topics including acoustic resonance effects. A percentage of this initial numerical investigation is completed using an influence coefficient approach to study the variation the work-per-cycle contributions of neighboring cascade blades to a reference airfoil. The second part of this research introduces new discoveries regarding the relationship between steady aerodynamic loading and negative aerodynamic damping. Using validated CFD codes as computational wind tunnels, a multitude of low-pressure turbine flutter parameters, such as reduced frequency, mode shape, and interblade phase angle, will be scrutinized across various airfoil geometries and steady operating conditions to reach new design guidelines regarding the influence

  4. Temporal coherence and indistinguishability in two-photon interference effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Anand Kumar; O'Sullivan, Malcolm N.; Chan, Kam Wai Clifford; Boyd, Robert W.

    2008-02-15

    We show that temporal two-photon interference effects involving the signal and idler photons created by parametric down-conversion can be fully characterized in terms of the variations of two length parameters--called the biphoton path-length difference and the biphoton path-asymmetry-length difference--which we construct using the six different length parameters that a general two-photon interference experiment involves. We perform an experiment in which the effects of the variations of these two parameters can be independently controlled and studied. In our experimental setup, which does not involve mixing of signal and idler photons at a beam splitter, we further report observations of Hong-Ou-Mandel- (HOM-)like effects both in coincidence and in one-photon count rates. As an important consequence, we argue that the HOM and the HOM-like effects are best described as observations of how two-photon coherence changes as a function of the biphoton path-asymmetry-length difference.

  5. Singlet model interference effects with high scale UV physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, S.; Lewis, I. M.

    2017-01-01

    One of the simplest extensions of the Standard Model (SM) is the addition of a scalar gauge singlet, S . If S is not forbidden by a symmetry from mixing with the Standard Model Higgs boson, the mixing will generate non-SM rates for Higgs production and decays. In general, there could also be unknown high energy physics that generates additional effective low energy interactions. We show that interference effects between the scalar resonance of the singlet model and the effective field theory (EFT) operators can have significant effects in the Higgs sector. We examine a non-Z2 symmetric scalar singlet model and demonstrate that a fit to the 125 GeV Higgs boson couplings and to limits on high mass resonances, S , exhibit an interesting structure and possible large cancellations of effects between the resonance contribution and the new EFT interactions, that invalidate conclusions based on the renormalizable singlet model alone.

  6. Singlet model interference effects with high scale UV physics

    DOE PAGES

    Dawson, S.; Lewis, I. M.

    2017-01-06

    One of the simplest extensions of the Standard Model (SM) is the addition of a scalar gauge singlet, S . If S is not forbidden by a symmetry from mixing with the Standard Model Higgs boson, the mixing will generate non-SM rates for Higgs production and decays. Generally, there could also be unknown high energy physics that generates additional effective low energy interactions. We show that interference effects between the scalar resonance of the singlet model and the effective field theory (EFT) operators can have significant effects in the Higgs sector. Here, we examine a non- Z 2 symmetric scalarmore » singlet model and demonstrate that a fit to the 125 GeV Higgs boson couplings and to limits on high mass resonances, S , exhibit an interesting structure and possible large cancellations of effects between the resonance contribution and the new EFT interactions, that invalidate conclusions based on the renormalizable singlet model alone.« less

  7. Interference effects in L-shell atomic double photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheifets, A. S.; Bray, I.; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    Angular correlation pattern in two-electron continuum is very similar in double photoionization (DPI) of a neutral atom γ + A → A2 + + 2e- and electron-impact ionization of the corresponding singly charged ion e- + A+ → A2 + + 2e-. This allows us to identify and interpret interference effects in DPI of various L-shell atomic targets such as the metastable He* 1s 2s 1S and the ground state Li 1s22s and Be 1s22s2.

  8. Interference Mitigation Effects on Synthetic Aperture Radar Coherent Data Products

    SciTech Connect

    Musgrove, Cameron

    2014-05-01

    For synthetic aperture radar image products interference can degrade the quality of the images while techniques to mitigate the interference also reduce the image quality. Usually the radar system designer will try to balance the amount of mitigation for the amount of interference to optimize the image quality. This may work well for many situations, but coherent data products derived from the image products are more sensitive than the human eye to distortions caused by interference and mitigation of interference. This dissertation examines the e ect that interference and mitigation of interference has upon coherent data products. An improvement to the standard notch mitigation is introduced, called the equalization notch. Other methods are suggested to mitigation interference while improving the quality of coherent data products over existing methods.

  9. Introductory remarks. [fluid mechanics research for the National Transonic Facility: theoretical aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gessow, A.

    1977-01-01

    Suggested fluid mechanics research to be conducted in the National Transonic Facility include: wind tunnel calibration; flat plate skin friction, flow visualization and measurement techniques; leading edge separation; high angle of attack separation; shock-boundary layer interaction; submarine shapes; low speed studies of cylinder normal to flow; and wall interference effects. These theoretical aerodynamic investigations will provide empirical inputs or validation data for computational aerodynamics, and increase the usefulness of existing wind tunnels.

  10. Effect of relative humidity on the aerodynamic diameter and respiratory deposition of fungal spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reponen, Tiina; Willeke, Klaus; Ulevicius, Vidmantas; Reponen, Auvo; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    Exposure to airborne fungal spores may cause respiratory symptoms. The hygroscopicity of airborne spores may significantly affect their aerodynamic diameter, and thus change their deposition pattern in the human respiratory tract. We have investigated the change in aerodynamic diameter of five different fungal species as a function of relative humidity. Liquid and dry dispersion methods were explored for the aerosolization of the fungal spores. A new system that produces non-aggregated spore aerosol directly from a moldy surface was designed and found suitable for this study. The spores were aerosolized from a mold growth on agar by ducting dry air over the surface, and spore chains in the flow were broken up by passing the entire flow through a critical orifice. Size-spectrometric measurements with an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer showed that the aerodynamic diameter of the tested fungal spores does not change significantly when the relative humidity increases from 30% to 90%. A more distinct spore size increase was found at a relative humidity of ˜ 100%. The highest change of the aerodynamic diameter was found with Cladosporium cladosporioides: it increased from 1.8 μm to 2.3 μm when the relative humidity increased from 30% to ˜ 100%. The size increase corresponds to an approximate doubling of the particle volume. In order to estimate the effect of hygroscopic growth on the respiratory deposition of spores, the mean depositions in the human respiratory tract were calculated for fungal spores with various size changes due to hygroscopic growth. A recently developed model of the International Commission of Radiological Protection was used for the respiratory deposition calculations. We found that the 27% increase in Cladosporium size results in a 20-30% increase in the respiratory deposition of these spores. We conclude that most fungal spores are only slightly hygroscopic and the hygroscopic increase does not significantly affect their respiratory deposition. Our

  11. Reynolds Number, Compressibility, and Leading-Edge Bluntness Effects on Delta-Wing Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of Reynolds number, compressibility, and leading edge bluntness effects is presented for a 65 degree delta wing. The results of this study address both attached and vortex-flow aerodynamics and are based upon a unique data set obtained in the NASA-Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) for i) Reynolds numbers ranging from conventional wind-tunnel to flight values, ii) Mach numbers ranging from subsonic to transonic speeds, and iii) leading-edge bluntness values that span practical slender wing applications. The data were obtained so as to isolate the subject effects and they present many challenges for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies.

  12. Purcell effect and Lamb shift as interference phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Mingaleev, Sergei F.; Limonov, Mikhail F.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2016-01-01

    The Purcell effect and Lamb shift are two well-known physical phenomena which are usually discussed in the context of quantum electrodynamics, with the zero-point vibrations as a driving force of those effects in the quantum approach. Here we discuss the classical counterparts of these quantum effects in photonics, and explain their physics trough interference wave phenomena. As an example, we consider a waveguide in a planar photonic crystal with a side-coupled defect, and demonstrate a perfect agreement between the results obtained on the basis of quantum and classic approaches and reveal their link to the Fano resonance. We find that in such a waveguide-cavity geometry the Purcell effect can modify the lifetime by at least 25 times, and the Lamb shift can exceed 3 half-widths of the cavity spectral line. PMID:26860195

  13. Purcell effect and Lamb shift as interference phenomena.

    PubMed

    Rybin, Mikhail V; Mingaleev, Sergei F; Limonov, Mikhail F; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-02-10

    The Purcell effect and Lamb shift are two well-known physical phenomena which are usually discussed in the context of quantum electrodynamics, with the zero-point vibrations as a driving force of those effects in the quantum approach. Here we discuss the classical counterparts of these quantum effects in photonics, and explain their physics trough interference wave phenomena. As an example, we consider a waveguide in a planar photonic crystal with a side-coupled defect, and demonstrate a perfect agreement between the results obtained on the basis of quantum and classic approaches and reveal their link to the Fano resonance. We find that in such a waveguide-cavity geometry the Purcell effect can modify the lifetime by at least 25 times, and the Lamb shift can exceed 3 half-widths of the cavity spectral line.

  14. Purcell effect and Lamb shift as interference phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Mingaleev, Sergei F.; Limonov, Mikhail F.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2016-02-01

    The Purcell effect and Lamb shift are two well-known physical phenomena which are usually discussed in the context of quantum electrodynamics, with the zero-point vibrations as a driving force of those effects in the quantum approach. Here we discuss the classical counterparts of these quantum effects in photonics, and explain their physics trough interference wave phenomena. As an example, we consider a waveguide in a planar photonic crystal with a side-coupled defect, and demonstrate a perfect agreement between the results obtained on the basis of quantum and classic approaches and reveal their link to the Fano resonance. We find that in such a waveguide-cavity geometry the Purcell effect can modify the lifetime by at least 25 times, and the Lamb shift can exceed 3 half-widths of the cavity spectral line.

  15. Sex and Contextual Effects on Children's Use of Interference Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Rosanne; Benenson, Joyce F.

    2002-01-01

    Compared boys' and girls' use of interference competition during game play when resources were scarce or plentiful, among children from kindergarten or fourth grade. Found that fourth-grade girls used less interference competition when resources were plentiful, while their male peers and kindergartners of both sexes used interference competition…

  16. Aerodynamic Effects of Simulated Ice Accretion on a Generic Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Lee, Sam; Shah, Gautam H.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental research effort was begun to develop a database of airplane aerodynamic characteristics with simulated ice accretion over a large range of incidence and sideslip angles. Wind-tunnel testing was performed at the NASA Langley 12-ft Low-Speed Wind Tunnel using a 3.5 percent scale model of the NASA Langley Generic Transport Model. Aerodynamic data were acquired from a six-component force and moment balance in static-model sweeps from alpha = -5deg to 85deg and beta = -45 deg to 45 deg at a Reynolds number of 0.24 x10(exp 6) and Mach number of 0.06. The 3.5 percent scale GTM was tested in both the clean configuration and with full-span artificial ice shapes attached to the leading edges of the wing, horizontal and vertical tail. Aerodynamic results for the clean airplane configuration compared favorably with similar experiments carried out on a 5.5 percent scale GTM. The addition of the large, glaze-horn type ice shapes did result in an increase in airplane drag coefficient but had little effect on the lift and pitching moment. The lateral-directional characteristics showed mixed results with a small effect of the ice shapes observed in some cases. The flow visualization images revealed the presence and evolution of a spanwise-running vortex on the wing that was the dominant feature of the flowfield for both clean and iced configurations. The lack of ice-induced performance and flowfield effects observed in this effort was likely due to Reynolds number effects for the clean configuration. Estimates of full-scale baseline performance were included in this analysis to illustrate the potential icing effects.

  17. Analytical model of rotor wake aerodynamics in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saberi, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    The model and the computer program developed provides the velocity, location, and circulation of the tip vortices of a two-blade helicopter in and out of the ground effect. Comparison of the theoretical results with some experimental measurements for the location of the wake indicate that there is excellent accuracy in the vicinity of the rotor and fair amount of accuracy far from it. Having the location of the wake at all times enables us to compute the history of the velocity and the location of any point in the flow. The main goal of out study, induced velocity at the rotor, can also be calculated in addition to stream lines and streak lines. Since the wake location close to the rotor is known more accurately than at other places, the calculated induced velocity over the disc should be a good estimate of the real induced velocity, with the exception of the blade location, because each blade was replaced only by a vortex line. Because no experimental measurements of the wake close to the ground were available to us, quantitative evaluation of the theoretical wake was not possible. But qualitatively we have been able to show excellent agreement. Comparison of flow visualization with out results has indicated the location of the ground vortex is estimated excellently. Also the flow field in hover is well represented.

  18. Motion of a ballistic missile angularly misaligned with the flight path upon entering the atmosphere and its effect upon aerodynamic heating, aerodynamic loads, and miss distance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Julian H

    1957-01-01

    An analysis is given of the oscillating motion of a ballistic missile which upon entering the atmosphere is angularly misaligned with respect to the flight path. The history of the motion for some example missiles is discussed from the point of view of the effect of the motion on the aerodynamic heating and loading. The miss distance at the target due to misalignment and to small accidental trim angles is treated. The stability problem is also discussed for the case where the missile is tumbling prior to atmospheric entry.

  19. How nonlinear optical effects degrade Hong-Ou-Mandel like interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Imran M.; van Enk, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    Two-photon interference effects, such as the Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) effect, can be used to characterize to what extent two photons are identical [20]. Furthermore, these interference effects underly linear optics quantum computation. We show here how nonlinear optical effects, such as those mediated by atoms or quantum dots in a cavity, degrade the interference. This implies that, on the one hand, nonlinearities are to be avoided if one wishes to utilize the interference, but on the other hand, one may be able to measure or detect nonlinearities by observing the disappearance of the interference.

  20. A parametric study of planform and aeroelastic effects on aerodynamic center, alpha- and q- stability derivatives. Appendix C: Method for computing the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix of nonplanar wing-body-tail configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1972-01-01

    Expressions are derived for computing the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix for nonplanar wing-body-tail configurations. An aerodynamic influence coefficient is defined as the load in lbs. induced on a panel as a result of a unit angle of attack on another panel. Fuselage, wing and tail thickness are assumed to be small with the result that the thickness effect on the flow-field is negligible. The method for determining the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix is based on the lifting solution to the small perturbation, steady potential flow equation.

  1. Analysis of aerodynamic coefficients using gradient data: Spanwise turbulence effects on airplane response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringnes, E. A.; Frost, W.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of spanwise turbulence on airplane dynamic behavior is determined. Calculations are based on data collected from test flights with the NASA B-57 research aircraft. The approach is to first compute aerodynamic forces and moments due to a spanwise distribution of angle of attack and airspeed. Secondly, these quantities are incorporated into the equations of motion. Simulation of flights done with the effects of spanwise turbulence included are compared to simulations without any spanwise turbulence. The findings of the study are that the moments developed by turbulence along the span are significant and that more realistic flight simulation can be achieved by including the spanwise turbulence terms.

  2. The characteristics of the ground vortex and its effect on the aerodynamics of the STOL configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Vearle R.

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of the free stream velocity on the wall jet formed by the impingement of deflected engine thrust results in a rolled up vortex which exerts sizable forces on a short takeoff (STOL) airplane configuration. Some data suggest that the boundary layer under the free stream ahead of the configuration may be important in determining the extent of the travel of the wall jet into the oncoming stream. Here, early studies of the ground vortex are examined, and those results are compared to some later data obtained with moving a model over a fixed ground board. The effect of the ground vortex on the aerodynamic characteristics are discussed.

  3. General relativistic effects in quantum interference of photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zych, Magdalena; Costa, Fabio; Pikovski, Igor; Ralph, Timothy C.; Brukner, Časlav

    2012-11-01

    Quantum mechanics and general relativity have been extensively and independently confirmed in many experiments. However, the interplay of the two theories has never been tested: all experiments that measured the influence of gravity on quantum systems are consistent with non-relativistic, Newtonian gravity. On the other hand, all tests of general relativity can be described within the framework of classical physics. Here we discuss a quantum interference experiment with single photons that can probe quantum mechanics in curved space-time. We consider a single photon traveling in superposition along two paths in an interferometer, with each arm experiencing a different gravitational time dilation. If the difference in the time dilations is comparable with the photon’s coherence time, the visibility of the quantum interference is predicted to drop, while for shorter time dilations the effect of gravity will result only in a relative phase shift between the two arms. We discuss what aspects of the interplay between quantum mechanics and general relativity are probed in such experiments and analyze the experimental feasibility.

  4. Sting Interference Effects as Determined by Measurements of Dynamic Stability Derivatives, Surface Pressure, and Base Pressure for Mach Numbers 2 through 8

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Ericsson, Lars E. and Reding , J. Peter, "Aerodynamic Effects of Bulbous Bases." NASA CR-1339, August 1969. 21. Wehrend, William R., Jr. "An Experimental...Flight at Mach Numbers from 0.7 to 1.3." NACA-RM-L52E06, September 1952. 36. Ericsson, Lars E. and Reding , J. Peter. "Viscous Interactions or Support...Interference -The Dynamicist’s Dilemma." AJAA Journal, Vol. 16, No.4, April 1978, pp. 363-368. 37. Reding , J. Peter and Ericsson, Lars E. "Dynamic

  5. Contrasting effects of interference and of breaks in interval timing.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Rémi; Fortin, Claudette; Macar, Françoise

    2010-01-01

    When a break is introduced during an interval to be timed, the interval is perceived shorter as break location is delayed. This is interpreted as a result of attention sharing between timing and monitoring the source of the break signal. Similar effects and interpretations are found in another context involving interfering tasks. Such tasks are assumed to induce transient interruptions in timing, comparable to those obtained with breaks. Break and interference conditions were contrasted in a temporal reproduction procedure with identical stimuli. Both conditions induced temporal underestimation and similar location effects. Similar trends occurred in a control condition where no processing of the interfering signal was required. The data suggest that expectancy, intentional processing, and automatic attraction of attention shorten temporal estimates.

  6. Lewis icing research tunnel test of the aerodynamic effects of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, L. James; Zierten, Thomas A.; Hill, Eugene G.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of the effect of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids on the aerodynamic characteristics of a Boeing 737-200ADV airplane was conducted. The test was carried out in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. Fluids tested include a Newtonian deicing fluid, three non-Newtonian anti-icing fluids commercially available during or before 1988, and eight new experimental non-Newtonian fluids developed by four fluid manufacturers. The results show that fluids remain on the wind after liftoff and cause a measurable lift loss and drag increase. These effects are dependent on the high-lift configuration and on the temperature. For a configuration with a high-lift leading-edge device, the fluid effect is largest at the maximum lift condition. The fluid aerodynamic effects are related to the magnitude of the fluid surface roughness, particularly in the first 30 percent chord. The experimental fluids show a significant reduction in aerodynamic effects.

  7. Aerodynamics of the Viggen 37 aircraft. Part 1: General characteristics at low speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karling, K.

    1986-01-01

    A description of the aerodynamics of the Viggen 37 and its performances, especially at low speeds is presented. The aerodynamic requirements for the design of the Viggen 37 aircraft are given, including the basic design, performance requirement, and aerodynamic characteristics, static and dynamic load test results and flight test results. The Viggen 37 aircraft is designed to be used for air attack, surveillance, pursuit, and training applications. It is shown that this aircraft is suitable for short runways, and has good maneuvering, acceleration, and climbing characteristics. The design objectives for this aircraft were met by utilizing the effect produced by the interference between two triangular wings, positioned in tandem.

  8. Radio frequency interference effects of continuous wave signals on telemetry data, part 2. [Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. W.

    1979-01-01

    The results of radio frequency interference tests and the derived telemetry bit SNR degradation model, which includes the telemetry data rate and the telemetry data power as independent variables for characterizing the continuous wave interference effects on telemetry data, are presented. The telemetry bit SNR degradation model was implemented in the second version of the Deep Space Interference Prediction software.

  9. Aharonov-Bohm interference in neutral excitons: effects of built-in electric fields.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, M D; Campo, V L; Lopez-Richard, V; Marega, E; Marques, G E; Gobato, Y Galvão; Iikawa, F; Brasil, M J S P; Abuwaar, Z Y; Dorogan, V G; Mazur, Yu I; Benamara, M; Salamo, G J

    2010-02-26

    We report a comprehensive discussion of quantum interference effects due to the finite structure of neutral excitons in quantum rings and their first experimental corroboration observed in the optical recombinations. The signatures of built-in electric fields and temperature on quantum interference are demonstrated by theoretical models that describe the modulation of the interference pattern and confirmed by complementary experimental procedures.

  10. Fluidic Control of Aerodynamic Forces on an Axisymmetric Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Philip; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2007-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a wind tunnel model of an axisymmetric bluff body are modified by induced local vectoring of the separated base flow. Control is effected by an array of four integrated aft-facing synthetic jets that emanate from narrow, azimuthally-segmented slots, equally distributed around the perimeter of the circular tail end within a small backward facing step that extends into a Coanda surface. The model is suspended in the wind tunnel by eight thin wires for minimal support interference with the wake. Fluidic actuation results in a localized, segmented vectoring of the separated base flow along the rear Coanda surface and induces asymmetric aerodynamic forces and moments to effect maneuvering during flight. The aerodynamic effects associated with quasi-steady and transitory differential, asymmetric activation of the Coanda effect are characterized using direct force and PIV measurements.

  11. Effects of plasma aerodynamic actuation on oblique shock wave in a cold supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Li, Yinghong; Cheng, Bangqin; Su, Changbing; Song, Huimin; Wu, Yun

    2009-08-01

    Wedge oblique shock wave control using an arc discharge plasma aerodynamic actuator was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Schlieren photography measurements in a small-scale short-duration supersonic wind tunnel indicated that the shock wave angle decreased and its start point shifted upstream with the plasma aerodynamic actuation. Also the shock wave intensity weakened, as shown by the decrease in the gas static pressure ratio of flow downstream and upstream of the shock wave. Moreover, the shock wave control effect was intensified when a static magnetic field was applied. Under test conditions of Mach 2.2, magnetic control and input voltage 3 kV, the start point of the shock wave shifted 4 mm upstream, while its angle and intensity decreased 8.6% and 8.8%, respectively. A thermal choking model was proposed to deduce the change laws of oblique shock wave control by surface arc discharge. The theoretical result was consistent with the experimental result, which demonstrated that the thermal choking model can effectively forecast the effect of plasma actuation on an oblique shock wave in a cold supersonic flow.

  12. The variation of heat transfer coefficient, adiabatic effectiveness and aerodynamic loss with film cooling hole shape.

    PubMed

    Sargison, J E; Guo, S M; Oldfield, M L; Rawlinson, A J

    2001-05-01

    The heat transfer coefficient and adiabatic effectiveness of cylindrical, fan shaped holes and a slot are presented for the region zero to 50 diameters downstream of the holes. Narrow-band liquid crystals were used on a heated flat plate with heated air coolant. These parameters have been measured in a steady state, low speed facility at engine representative Reynolds number based on hole diameter and pressure difference ratio (ideal momentum flux ratio). The aerodynamic loss due to each of the film cooling geometries has been measured using a traverse of the boundary layer far downstream of the film cooling holes. Compared to the cylindrical holes, the fan shaped hole case showed an improvement in the uniformity of cooling downstream of the holes and in the level of laterally averaged film cooling effectiveness. The fan effectiveness approached the slot level and both the fan and cylindrical hole cases show lower heat transfer coefficients than the slot and non film cooled cases based on the laterally averaged results. The drawback to the fan shaped hole was that the aerodynamic loss was significantly higher than both the slot and cylindrical hole values due to inefficient diffusion in the hole exit expansion.

  13. Effect of a simulated ice accretion on the aerodynamics of a swept wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, M. B.; Khodadoust, A.; Soltani, R.; Wells, S.; Kerho, M.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of a simulated glaze ice accretion on the aerodynamic performance of a three-dimensional swept wing is studied experimentally. A semispan wing of effective aspect ratio four was mounted from the sidewall of the UIUC subsonic wind tunnel. The model uses a NACA 0012 airfoil section on a rectangular planform with interchangeable tip and root sections to allow for 0- and 30-degree sweep. A sidewall suction system is used to minmize the tunnel boundary-layer interaction with the model. Surface pressure data from five spanwise stations are compared to earlier data from a similar tunnel. A three-component sidewall balance has been designed, built and used to measure lift, drag and pitching moment on the clean and iced model. The data compare well to the integrated pressure data and to theory on the clean model. In addition, helium-bubble flow visualization has been performed on the iced model and reveals extensive spanwise flow in the separation bubble aft of the upper surface horn. This compares well to the computational results of other researchers. Sidewall suction was found to have no effect on the aerodynamics of the swept wing.

  14. Aerodynamic Investigation of Incidence Angle Effects in a Large Scale Transonic Turbine Cascade. Revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McVetta, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    Aerodynamic measurements showing the effects of large incidence angle variations on an HPT turbine blade set are presented. Measurements were made in NASA's Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility which has been used in previous studies to acquire detailed aerodynamic and heat transfer measurements for CFD code validation. The current study supports the development of variable-speed power turbine (VSPT) speed-change technology for the NASA Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR) vehicle. In order to maintain acceptable main rotor propulsive efficiency, the VSPT operates over a nearly 50 percent speed range from takeoff to altitude cruise. This results in 50 deg or more variations in VSPT blade incidence angles. The cascade facility has the ability to operate over a wide range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers, but had to be modified in order to accommodate the negative incidence angle variation required by the LCTR VSPT operation. Using existing blade geometry with previously acquired aerodynamic data, the tunnel was re-baselined and the new incidence angle range was exercised. Midspan exit total pressure and flow angle measurements were obtained at seven inlet flow angles. For each inlet angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with inlet Reynolds numbers varying from 6.83×10 (exp 5) to 0.85×10(exp 5) and two isentropic exit Mach numbers of 0.74 and 0.34. The midspan flowfield measurements were acquired using a three-hole pneumatic probe located in a survey plane 8.6 percent axial chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressure distributions were also acquired for each flow condition.

  15. Aerodynamic Investigation of Incidence Angle Effects in a Large Scale Transonic Turbine Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McVetta, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic measurements showing the effects of large incidence angle variations on an HPT turbine blade set are presented. Measurements were made in NASA's Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility which has been used in previous studies to acquire detailed aerodynamic and heat transfer measurements for CFD code validation. The current study supports the development of variable-speed power turbine (VSPT) speed-change technology for the NASA Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR) vehicle. In order to maintain acceptable main rotor propulsive efficiency, the VSPT operates over a nearly 50 percent speed range from takeoff to altitude cruise. This results in 50deg or more variations in VSPT blade incidence angles. The cascade facility has the ability to operate over a wide range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers, but had to be modified in order to accommodate the negative incidence angle variation required by the LCTR VSPT operation. Using existing blade geometry with previously acquired aerodynamic data, the tunnel was re-baselined and the new incidence angle range was exercised. Midspan exit total pressure and flow angle measurements were obtained at seven inlet flow angles. For each inlet angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with inlet Reynolds numbers varying from 6.83×10(exp 5) to 0.85×10(exp 5) and two isentropic exit Mach numbers of 0.74 and 0.34. The midspan flowfield measurements were acquired using a three-hole pneumatic probe located in a survey plane 8.6 percent axial chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressure distributions were also acquired for each flow condition.

  16. Aerodynamic Investigation of Incidence Angle Effects in a Large Scale Transonic Turbine Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McVetta, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic measurements showing the effects of large incidence angle variations on an HPT turbine blade set are presented. Measurements were made in NASA's Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility which has been used in previous studies to acquire detailed aerodynamic and heat transfer measurements for CFD code validation. The current study supports the development of variable-speed power turbine (VSPT) speed-change technology for the NASA Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR) vehicle. In order to maintain acceptable main rotor propulsive efficiency, the VSPT operates over a nearly 50% speed range from takeoff to altitude cruise. This results in 50 degrees or more variations in VSPT blade incidence angles. The cascade facility has the ability to operate over a wide range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers, but had to be modified in order to accommodate the negative incidence angle variation required by the LCTR VSPT operation. Using existing blade geometry with previously acquired aerodynamic data, the tunnel was re-baselined and the new incidence angle range was exercised. Midspan exit total pressure and flow angle measurements were obtained at seven inlet flow angles. For each inlet angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with inlet Reynolds numbers varying from 6.83 × 10(exp 5) to 0.85 ×10(exp 5) and two isentropic exit Mach numbers of 0.74 and 0.34. The midspan flowfield measurements were acquired using a three-hole pneumatic probe located in a survey plane 8.6% axial chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressure distributions were also acquired for each flow condition

  17. Magnetoelectric transport and quantum interference effect in ultrathin manganite films

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cong; Jin, Kui-juan Gu, Lin; Lu, Hui-bin; Li, Shan-ming; Zhou, Wen-jia; Zhao, Rui-qiang; Guo, Hai-zhong; He, Meng; Yang, Guo-zhen

    2014-04-21

    The magnetoelectric transport behavior with respect to the thicknesses of ultrathin La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} films is investigated in detail. The metal-insulator phase transition, which has never been observed in bulk La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3}, is found in ultrathin films with thicknesses larger than 6 unit cells. Low-temperature resistivity minima appeared in films with thicknesses less than 10 unit cells. This is attributed to the presence of quantum interference effects. These data suggest that the influence of the weak localization becomes much pronounced as the film thickness decreases from 16 to 8 unit cells.

  18. Level broadening and quantum interference effects in insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Ernesto; Pastawski, Horacio

    2000-03-01

    We study quantum interference effects in the context of the Nguyen-Spivak-Shklovskii (NSS) model including level broadening due to inelastic events. Improving on a recent mean-field approach, we incorporate path correlations and study both the log-conductance and its fluctuations. In contrast with mean field, we find that all changes in the conductance, due to broadening, imply corrections to the localization length. Furthermore, the change in the magnetoconductance sign, predicted by mean field, is not borne out by direct solution of the NSS model within reasonable broadening parameters. We compute a phase diagram for the magnetoconductance in the broadening parameter space and propose a replica theory for weak inelastic events.

  19. Aerodynamics of flapping insect wing in inclined stroke plane hovering with ground effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda v, Krishne; Vengadesan, S.

    2014-11-01

    This work presents the time-varying aerodynamic forces and the unsteady flow structures of flapping insect wing in inclined stroke plane hovering with ground effect. Two-dimensional dragonfly model wing is chosen and the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically by using immersed boundary method. The main objective of the present work is to analyze the ground effect on the unsteady forces and vortical structures for the inclined stroke plane motions. We also investigate the influences of kinematics parameters such as Reynolds number (Re), stroke amplitude, wing rotational timing, for various distances between the airfoil and the ground. The effects of aforementioned parameters together with ground effect, on the stroke averaged force coefficients and regimes of force behavior are similar in both normal (horizontal) and inclined stroke plane motions. However, the evolution of the vortex structures which produces the effects are entirely different.

  20. Effect of Trailing Edge Flow Injection on Fan Noise and Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian; Woodward, Richard P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    implementation of injecting flow at/near the trailing edge as a wake filling strategy. However, data do support the notion that noise reductions can be realized not only for tones but perhaps more importantly, also for broadband. Furthermore, the technique can be implemented without adversely effecting overall fan aerodynamic performance.

  1. Effects of aerodynamic interaction between main and tail rotors on helicopter hover performance and noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menger, R. P.; Wood, T. L.; Brieger, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    A model test was conducted to determine the effects of aerodynamic interaction between main rotor, tail rotor, and vertical fin on helicopter performance and noise in hover out of ground effect. The experimental data were obtained from hover tests performed with a .151 scale Model 222 main rotor, tail rotor and vertical fin. Of primary interest was the effect of location of the tail rotor with respect to the main rotor. Penalties on main rotor power due to interaction with the tail rotor ranged up to 3% depending upon tail rotor location and orientation. Penalties on tail rotor power due to fin blockage alone ranged up to 10% for pusher tail rotors and up to 50% for tractor tail rotors. The main rotor wake had only a second order effect on these tail rotor/fin interactions. Design charts are presented showing the penalties on main rotor power as a function of the relative location of the tail rotor.

  2. Interference Effects in Bimanual Coordination Are Independent of Movement Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvin, Sarah; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2010-01-01

    Simultaneously executed limb movements interfere with each other. Whereas the interference between discrete movements is examined mostly from a cognitive perspective, that between rhythmic movements is studied mainly from a dynamical systems perspective. As the tools and concepts developed by both communities are limited in their applicability to…

  3. Aerodynamics of Sounding-Rocket Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, J.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical aerodynamics program TAD predicts aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles with sounding-rocket configurations. These slender, Axisymmetric finned vehicles have a wide range of aeronautical applications from rockets to high-speed armament. TAD calculates characteristics of separate portions of vehicle, calculates interference between portions, and combines results to form total vehicle solution.

  4. Effect of underwing aft-mounted nacelles on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a high-wing transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeyounis, W. K.; Patterson, J. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a propulsion/airframe integration program, tests were conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the longitudinal aerodynamic effects of installing flow through engine nacelles in the aft underwing position of a high wing transonic transfer airplane. Mixed flow nacelles with circular and D-shaped inlets were tested at free stream Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.85 and angles of attack from -2.5 deg to 4.0 deg. The aerodynamic effects of installing antishock bodies on the wing and nacelle upper surfaces as a means of attaching and supporting nacelles in an extreme aft position were investigated.

  5. Effect of wing design on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a wing-body model at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, W. P.; Huffman, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine the effects of wing camber and twist on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a wingbody configuration. Three wings were used each having the same planform (aspect ratio of 2.5 and leading-edge sweep angle of 44 deg.) but differing in amounts of camber and twist (wing design lift coefficient). The wing design lift coefficients were 0, 0.35, and 0.70. The investigation was conducted over a Mach number range from 0.20 to 0.70 at angles of attack up to about 22 deg. The effect of wing strakes on the aerodynamic characteristics of the cambered wings was also studied. A comparison of the experimentally determined aerodynamic characteristics with theoretical estimates is also included.

  6. Effects of a Rotating Aerodynamic Probe on the Flow Field of a Compressor Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2008-01-01

    An investigation of distortions of the rotor exit flow field caused by an aerodynamic probe mounted in the rotor is described in this paper. A rotor total pressure Kiel probe, mounted on the rotor hub and extending up to the mid-span radius of a rotor blade channel, generates a wake that forms additional flow blockage. Three types of high-response aerodynamic probes were used to investigate the distorted flow field behind the rotor. These probes were: a split-fiber thermo-anemometric probe to measure velocity and flow direction, a total pressure probe, and a disk probe for in-flow static pressure measurement. The signals acquired from these high-response probes were reduced using an ensemble averaging method based on a once per rotor revolution signal. The rotor ensemble averages were combined to construct contour plots for each rotor channel of the rotor tested. In order to quantify the rotor probe effects, the contour plots for each individual rotor blade passage were averaged into a single value. The distribution of these average values along the rotor circumference is a measure of changes in the rotor exit flow field due to the presence of a probe in the rotor. These distributions were generated for axial flow velocity and for static pressure.

  7. Effect of planform and body on supersonic aerodynamics of multibody configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillin, S. Naomi; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Howell, Dorothy T.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the effect of the wing planform and bodies on the supersonic aerodynamics of a low-fineness-ratio, multibody configuration has been conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.60, 1.80, 2.00, and 2.16. Force and moment data, flow-visualization data, and surface-pressure data were obtained on eight low-fineness-ratio, twin-body configurations. These configurations varied in inboard wing planform shape, outboard wing planform shape, outboard wing planform size, and presence of the bodies. The force and moment data showed that increasing the ratio of outboard wing area to total wing area or increasing the leading-edge sweep of the inboard wing influenced the aerodynamic characteristics. The flow-visualization data showed a complex flow-field system of shocks, shock-induced separation, and body vortex systems occurring between the side bodies. This flow field was substantially affected by the inboard wing planform shape but minimally affected by the outboard wing planform shape. The flow-visualization and surface-pressure data showed that flow over the outboard wing developed as expected with changes in angle of attack and Mach number and was affected by the leading-edge sweep of the inboard wing and the presence of the bodies. Evaluation of the linear-theory prediction methods revealed their general inability to consistently predict the characteristics of these multibody configurations.

  8. Effects of fluid behavior around low aspect ratio, low Reynolds number wings on aerodynamic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Matthew; Mohseni, Kamran

    2011-11-01

    The innovation of micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) has brought to attention the unique flow regime associated with low aspect ratio (LAR), low Reynolds number fliers. The dominant effects of developing tip vortices and leading edge vortices create a fundamentally different flow regime than that of conventional aircraft. An improved knowledge of low aspect ratio, low Reynolds number aerodynamics can be greatly beneficial for future MAV design. A little investigated but vital aspect of LAR aerodynamics is the behavior of the fluid as the wing yaws. Flow visualization experiments undertaken in the group for the canonical case of varying AR flat plates indicate that the propagation of the tip vortex keeps the flow attached over the upstream portion of the wing, while the downstream vortex is convected away from the wing. This induces asymmetric, destabilizing loading on the wing which has been observed to adversely affect MAV flight. In addition, experimental load measurements indicate significant nonlinearities in forces and moments which can be attributed to the development and propagation of these vortical structures. A non-dimensional analysis of the rigid body equations of motion indicates that these nonlinearities create dependencies which dramatically change the conventional linearization process. These flow phenomena are investigated with intent to apply to future MAV design.

  9. Beneficial aerodynamic effect of wing scales on the climbing flight of butterflies.

    PubMed

    Slegers, Nathan; Heilman, Michael; Cranford, Jacob; Lang, Amy; Yoder, John; Habegger, Maria Laura

    2017-01-30

    It is hypothesized that butterfly wing scale geometry and surface patterning may function to improve aerodynamic efficiency. In order to investigate this hypothesis, a method to measure butterfly flapping kinematics optically over long uninhibited flapping sequences was developed. Statistical results for the climbing flight flapping kinematics of 11 butterflies, based on a total of 236 individual flights, both with and without their wing scales, are presented. Results show, that for each of the 11 butterflies, the mean climbing efficiency decreased after scales were removed. Data was reduced to a single set of differences of climbing efficiency using are paired t-test. Results show a mean decrease in climbing efficiency of 32.2% occurred with a 95% confidence interval of 45.6%-18.8%. Similar analysis showed that the flapping amplitude decreased by 7% while the flapping frequency did not show a significant difference. Results provide strong evidence that butterfly wing scale geometry and surface patterning improve butterfly climbing efficiency. The authors hypothesize that the wing scale's effect in measured climbing efficiency may be due to an improved aerodynamic efficiency of the butterfly and could similarly be used on flapping wing micro air vehicles to potentially achieve similar gains in efficiency.

  10. Analysis of the effect of engine characteristics on the external aerodynamics of STOL wing propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of engine presssure ratio, engine size, and engine location on the pressure distribution, lift coefficient, and flow field of a STOL wing propulsion system are presented. The flow variables of the engines are included in the two-dimensional potential flow analysis by considering the effects of mass flow coefficient at the engine inlet and thrust coefficient at the engine exit. A functional relation between these coefficients and engine pressure ratio is given. The results of this study indicate that the effect of engine pressure ratio on the external aerodynamics is a function of engine location. For engines located on the bottom of the wing, the highest pressure ratio engine resulted in the highest lift coefficient. For engines located on the top of the wing, the lowest pressure ratio engine resulted in the highest lift coefficient.

  11. Effects of proactive interference on non-verbal working memory.

    PubMed

    Cyr, Marilyn; Nee, Derek E; Nelson, Eric; Senger, Thea; Jonides, John; Malapani, Chara

    2017-02-01

    Working memory (WM) is a cognitive system responsible for actively maintaining and processing relevant information and is central to successful cognition. A process critical to WM is the resolution of proactive interference (PI), which involves suppressing memory intrusions from prior memories that are no longer relevant. Most studies that have examined resistance to PI in a process-pure fashion used verbal material. By contrast, studies using non-verbal material are scarce, and it remains unclear whether the effect of PI is domain-general or whether it applies solely to the verbal domain. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of PI in visual WM using both objects with high and low nameability. Using a Directed-Forgetting paradigm, we varied discriminability between WM items on two dimensions, one verbal (high-nameability vs. low-nameability objects) and one perceptual (colored vs. gray objects). As in previous studies using verbal material, effects of PI were found with object stimuli, even after controlling for verbal labels being used (i.e., low-nameability condition). We also found that the addition of distinctive features (color, verbal label) increased performance in rejecting intrusion probes, most likely through an increase in discriminability between content-context bindings in WM.

  12. Coherent interference effects and squeezed light generation in optomechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Kenan

    My Ph.D. dissertation is on the fundamental effects in optomechanical systems (OMS) and their important applications. The OMS are based on the possibility of the mechanical motion produced by few photons incident on the mechanical device. This dissertation presents several applications of the OMS in the area of storage of light in long-lived phonons, single mode optomechanical Ramsey interferometry, and generation of large amount of squeezing in the output radiation. The long-lived phonons can be monitored and controlled via optical means as was experimentally demonstrated. To show this, I develop the theory of transient electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). For further applications like state transfer, especially over very different frequency regimes, I consider double-cavity OMS, where the two cavities can correspond to different spectral domains, yet the state transfer is possible via phonons. The state transfer is based on a new effect, electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA), where one uses a second control field from the other cavity to produce an absorption peak inside the EIT window. All these involve the interference of various path ways via which a final state is reached. The following chapter shows how Fano-like interference can arise in OMS. A Fano asymmetry parameter for OMS was defined. The last two chapters deal with the question if OMS can be efficient generators of squeezed light. I show by blue and red tuning the two cavities in a double-cavity OMS, one can generate effectively a two-mode parametric interaction which yields two-mode squeezed output with the squeezing magnitude of the order of 10dB. This requires a bath temperature of 10mK. Such temperatures obtained by using Helium dilution refrigerator are routinely used with superconducting OMS. The major part of this dissertation is devoted to the dispersive optomechanical interaction. However, the interaction can also be dissipative, where the mechanical displacement modulates

  13. The effect of winglets on the static aerodynamic stability characteristics of a representative second generation jet transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. F.; Flechner, S. G.

    1976-01-01

    A baseline wing and a version of the same wing fitted with winglets were tested. The longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics were determined through an angle-of-attack range from -1 deg to 10 deg at an angle of sideslip of 0 deg for Mach numbers of 0.750, 0.800, and 0.825. The lateral aerodynamic characteristics were determined through the same angle-of-attack range at fixed sideslip angles of 2.5 deg and 5 deg. Both configurations were investigated at Reynolds numbers of 13,000,000, per meter (4,000,000 per foot) and approximately 20,000,000 per meter (6,000,000 per foot). The winglet configuration showed slight increases over the baseline wing in static longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic stability throughout the test Mach number range for a model design lift coefficient of 0.53. Reynolds number variation had very little effect on stability.

  14. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of polypropylene/conducting fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pyoung-Chan; Kim, Bo-Ram; Jeoung, Sun Kyoung; Kim, Yeung Keun

    2016-03-01

    Electromagnetic released from the automotive electronic parts is harmful to human body. Electromagnetic interference (EMT) shielding refers to the reflection and/or adsorption of electromagnetic radiation by a material, which thereby acts as a shield against the penetration of the radiation through the shield. Polypropylene (PP)/conductive micro fiber composites containing various fiber contents and fiber length were injection-molded. The effect of fiber content and length on electrical properties of the composites was studied by electrical resistivity and EMT shielding measurements. The through-plane electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity were obtained by measuring dielectric properties. The EMT shielding effectiveness (SE) was investigated by using S-parameter in the range of 100 ~ 1500 MHz. Reflection, absorption and multiple-reflection are the EMT attenuation mechanisms. From the measurement of S-Parameters, the absorption coefficient, reflection coefficient, and the shielding efficiency of the materials were calculated. The EMT SE of PP/conducing fiber composites is 40 dB over a wide frequency range up to 1.5 GHz, which is higher than that of PP/talc composite used automotive parts, viz. 0 dB.

  15. Interference effect of body shadow in action control.

    PubMed

    Badets, Arnaud; Toussaint, Lucette; Blandin, Yannick; Bidet-Ildei, Christel

    2013-01-01

    Observing actions performed by other persons can subsequently influence our own motor behaviours. However, it is unknown whether the shadows cast by such actions can also have an impact on the observers' actions. Here we show that the mere observation of a cast shadow can influence imitative behaviours. Specifically, participants were shown a hand picture and its associated cast shadow in a neutral position. In a 'compatible trial' the hand and the shadow that followed were turned in the same open or closed direction, whereas in an 'incompatible trial' the hand and the shadow were turned in different directions. We contrasted two experimental conditions: (i) 'hand-shadow' in which participants observed a hand and its cast shadow (the hand covered the shadow); (ii) 'hand-hand' in which participants observed a hand and another black hand (the shadow covered the hand). The participants' task was to imitate (ie by closing or opening their own hands) the hand or the cast shadow of an action. For both conditions results revealed interference (ie longer response latencies) for incompatible trials. This suggests for the first time that the mere observation of a cast shadow of a hand can influence imitative behaviours. However, time courses of the response latencies revealed that imitative effect in the hand-shadow condition was different than the imitative effect in the hand-hand condition. Therefore, we suggest considering the cast shadow of an action as an important feature during motor control for humans.

  16. The Effect on Rudder Control of Slip Stream Body, and Ground Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, H I; Bacon, D L

    1922-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the relative effects of those factors which may interfere with the rudder control of an airplane, with especial reference to the process of landing. It shows that ground interference is negligible, but that the effects of a large rounded body and of the slip stream may combine to interfere seriously with rudder control at low flying speeds and when taxiing.

  17. Effect of sex, age and genetics on crossover interference in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiying; Shen, Botong; Jiang, Jicai; Li, Jinquan; Ma, Li

    2016-01-01

    Crossovers generated by homologous recombination ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis. Crossover interference results in chiasmata being more evenly distributed along chromosomes, but the mechanism underlying crossover interference remains elusive. Based on large pedigrees of Holstein and Jersey cattle with genotype data, we extracted three-generation families, including 147,327 male and 71,687 female meioses in Holstein, and 108,163 male and 37,008 female meioses in Jersey, respectively. We identified crossovers in these meioses and fitted the Housworth-Stahl “interference-escape” model to study crossover interference patterns in the cattle genome. Our result reveals that the degree of crossover interference is stronger in females than in males. We found evidence for inter-chromosomal variation in the level of crossover interference, with smaller chromosomes exhibiting stronger interference. In addition, crossover interference levels decreased with maternal age. Finally, sex-specific GWAS analyses identified one locus near the NEK9 gene on chromosome 10 to have a significant effect on crossover interference levels. This locus has been previously associated with recombination rate in cattle. Collectively, this large-scale analysis provided a comprehensive description of crossover interference across chromosome, sex and age groups, identified associated candidate genes, and produced useful insights into the mechanism of crossover interference. PMID:27892966

  18. Software Reduces Radio-Interference Effects in Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Charles T-C; Hensley, Scott; Chapin, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    A computer program suppresses the effects of narrow-band radio-frequency interference (RFI) on the data collected by a wide-band radar system. The need for this program arises because some advanced wide-band synthetic-aperture radar systems utilize frequency bands that include frequencies used by other radio services. In this program, the RFI environment is represented by an auto-regressive process, the frequency band of which is narrow relative to that of the radar. Most of the RFI signals, both narrow- and wide-band, are estimated in one pass of a least-mean-square (LMS) adaptive filter. The program implements three popular LMS algorithms: the time-domain LMS, the frequency-domain LMS, and the filter-bank LMS adaptive-filter algorithms. The program can be run in a manual or automatic mode. In the manual mode, the user selects the filter parameters prior to execution. In the automatic mode, the program utilizes median-filter and spectral-estimation techniques plus the variable-step-size LMS algorithm for automatic determination of filter parameters, and the parameters are adaptively changed as functions of the inputs, resulting in better overall performance.

  19. Effective rotational correlation times of proteins from NMR relaxation interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghan; Hilty, Christian; Wider, Gerhard; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the effective rotational correlation times, τc, for the modulation of anisotropic spin-spin interactions in macromolecules subject to Brownian motion in solution is of key interest for the practice of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. The value of τc enables an estimate of the NMR spin relaxation rates, and indicates possible aggregation of the macromolecular species. This paper reports a novel NMR pulse scheme, [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT, which is based on transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy and permits to determine τc for 15N- 1H bonds without interference from dipole-dipole coupling of the amide proton with remote protons. [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT is highly efficient since only a series of one-dimensional NMR spectra need to be recorded. Its use is suggested for a quick estimate of the rotational correlation time, to monitor sample quality and to determine optimal parameters for complex multidimensional NMR experiments. Practical applications are illustrated with the 110 kDa 7,8-dihydroneopterin aldolase from Staphylococcus aureus, the uniformly 15N-labeled Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) in 60 kDa mixed OmpX/DHPC micelles with approximately 90 molecules of unlabeled 1,2-dihexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), and the 16 kDa pheromone-binding protein from Bombyx mori, which cover a wide range of correlation times.

  20. Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with Fowler flaps including flap loads, downwash, and calculated effect on take-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Robert C

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests of a wing in combination with each of three sizes of Fowler flap. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the aerodynamic characteristics as affected by flap chord and position, the air loads on the flaps, and the effect of flaps on the downwash.

  1. Effect of the Surface Condition of a Wing on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defrance, S J

    1934-01-01

    In order to determine the effect of the surface conditions of a wing on the aerodynamic characteristics of an airplane, tests were conducted in the N.A.C.A. full-scale wind tunnel on the Fairchild F-22 airplane first with normal commercial finish of wing surface and later with the same wing polished. Comparison of the characteristics of the airplane with the two surface conditions shows that the polish caused a negligible change in the lift curve, but reduced the minimum drag coefficient by 0.001. This reduction in drag if applied to an airplane with a given speed of 200 miles per hour and a minimum drag coefficient of 0.025 would increase the speed only 2.9 miles per hour, but if the speed remained the same, the power would be reduced 4 percent.

  2. Nonlinear panel flutter in a rarefied atmosphere - Aerodynamic shear stress effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resende, Hugo B.

    1991-01-01

    The panel flutter phenomenon is studied assuming free-molecule flow. This kind of analysis is relevant in the case of hypersonic flight vehicles traveling at high altitudes, especially in the leeward portion of the vehicle. In these conditions the aerodynamic shear can be expected to be considerably larger than the pressure at a given point, so that the effects of such a loading are incorporated into the structural model. This is accomplished by introducing distributed longitudinal and bending moment loads. The former can lead to buckling of the panel, with the second mode in the case of a simply-supported panel playing a important role, and becoming the dominant mode in the solution. The presence of equivalent springs in the longitudinal direction at the panel's ends also becomes of relative importance, even for the evaluation of the linear flutter parameter. Finally, the behavior of the system is studied in the presence of applied compressive forces, that is, classical buckling.

  3. Application of Computational Stability and Control Techniques Including Unsteady Aerodynamics and Aeroelastic Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Edwards, John W.

    2004-01-01

    The motivation behind the inclusion of unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelastic effects in the computation of stability and control (S&C) derivatives will be discussed as they pertain to aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic analysis. This topic will be addressed in the context of two applications, the first being the estimation of S&C derivatives for a cable-mounted aeroservoelastic wind tunnel model tested in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The second application will be the prediction of the nonlinear aeroservoelastic phenomenon known as Residual Pitch Oscillation (RPO) on the B-2 Bomber. Techniques and strategies used in these applications to compute S&C derivatives and perform flight simulations will be reviewed, and computational results will be presented.

  4. Experimental research of surface roughness effects on highly-loaded compressor cascade aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-wen; Xu, Hao; Wang, Song-tao; Wang, Zhong-qi

    2014-08-01

    Aircraft engines deteriorate during continuous operation under the action of external factors including fouling, corrosion, and abrasion. The increased surface roughness of compressor passage walls limits airflow and leads to flow loss. However, the partial increase of roughness may also restrain flow separation and reduce flow loss. It is necessary to explore methods that will lower compressor deterioration, thereby improving the overall performance. The experimental research on the effects of surface roughness on highly loaded compressor cascade aerodynamics has been conducted in a low-speed linear cascade wind tunnel. The different levels of roughness are arranged on the suction surface and pressure surface, respectively. Ink-trace flow visualization has been used to measure the flow field on the walls of cascades, and a five-hole probe has been traversed across one pitch at the outlet. By comparing the total pressure loss coefficient, the distributions of the secondary-flow speed vector, and flow fields of various cases, the effects of surface roughness on the aerodynamics of a highly loaded compressor cascade are analyzed and discussed. The results show that adding surface roughness on the suction surface and pressure surface make the loss decrease in most cases. Increasing the surface roughness on the suction surface causes reduced flow speed near the blade, which helps to decrease mixing loss at the cascades outlet. Meanwhile, adding surface roughness on the suction surface restrains flow separation, leading to less flow loss. Various levels of surface roughness mostly weaken the flow turning capacity to various degrees, except in specific cases.

  5. Combined experimental and numerical investigations on the roughness effects on the aerodynamic performances of LPT blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrino, Marco; Bigoni, Fabio; Simoni, Daniele; Giovannini, Matteo; Marconcini, Michele; Pacciani, Roberto; Bertini, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a high-load low-pressure turbine blade cascade has been analyzed for three different distributed surface roughness levels (Ra) for steady and unsteady inflows. Results from CFD simulations and experiments are presented for two different Reynolds numbers (300000 and 70000 representative of take-off and cruise conditions, respectively) in order to evaluate the roughness effects for two typical operating conditions. Computational fluid dynamics has been used to support and interpret experimental results, analyzing in detail the flow field on the blade surface and evaluating the non-dimensional local roughness parameters, further contributing to understand how and where roughness have some influence on the aerodynamic performance of the blade. The total pressure distributions in the wake region have been measured by means of a five-hole miniaturized pressure probe for the different flow conditions, allowing the evaluation of profile losses and of their dependence on the surface finish, as well as a direct comparison with the simulations. Results reported in the paper clearly highlight that only at the highest Reynolds number tested (Re=300000) surface roughness have some influence on the blade performance, both for steady and unsteady incoming flows. In this flow condition profile losses grow as the surface roughness increases, while no appreciable variations have been found at the lowest Reynolds number. The boundary layer evolution and the wake structure have shown that this trend is due to a thickening of the suction side boundary layer associated to an anticipation of transition process. On the other side, no effects have been observed on the pressure side boundary layer.

  6. Effects of blade bending on aerodynamic control of fluctuating loads on teetered HAWT rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Eggers, A.J. Jr.; Ashley, H.; Rock, S.M.; Chaney, K.; Digumarthi, R.

    1996-11-01

    Active aerodynamic control, in the form of closed-loop actuation of blade-tip ailerons or all-movable blades, is investigated as a means of increasing the structural fatigue life of HAWT rotors. The rotor considered is upwind and teetered, with two blades of diameter 29.2 m., fiberglass construction and other properties representative of modern light-weight construction. The paper begins with a review of prior work which studied the problem for an essentially rigid structure. For that and the present research, two loading conditions were invoked: exposure to a Rayleigh distribution of operating winds with vertical shear and a 15 percent superimposed spectrum of turbulence; and occasional exposure to 62 m/s hurricanes. Accounted for herein is the effect of flatwise bending flexibility on the loads spectra of root flatwise bending moment, thrust, and torque (both open loop and closed loop). Using Miner`s rule, the moments are converted to fatigue lives. With aerodynamic control, RMS flatwise moments for the flexible blade in turbulence are found to be less than {1/2} of those without control. At a fixed blade weight of 540 kg when hurricane loads are added, the aileron-controlled blade is designed by that limit-load condition. In contrast, the all-movable blade can be feather controlled in the high wind so that its life is dominated by turbulent loads. Simplified fatigue analysis permits weight reductions to be estimated which yield controlled blades capable of 30 years` operation with a safety factor of 11. The resulting weights are about 400 kg for the aileron-controlled blade, and 230 kg for the all-movable blade. However, such light-weight rotors require attention to other design considerations, such as start-stop cycles. Apart from limit loads, the methods of analysis are linearized (locally for aerodynamic loads). It follows that the results are likely to be meaningful in terms of comparative, rather than absolute, values of fatigue life and weight.

  7. CW Interference Effects on High Data Rate Transmission Through the ACTS Wideband Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Ngo, Duc H.; Tran, Quang K.; Tran, Diepchi T.; Yu, John; Kachmar, Brian A.; Svoboda, James S.

    1996-01-01

    Satellite communications channels are susceptible to various sources of interference. Wideband channels have a proportionally greater probability of receiving interference than narrowband channels. NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) includes a 900 MHz bandwidth hardlimiting transponder which has provided an opportunity for the study of interference effects of wideband channels. A series of interference tests using two independent ACTS ground terminals measured the effects of continuous-wave (CW) uplink interference on the bit-error rate of a 220 Mbps digitally modulated carrier. These results indicate the susceptibility of high data rate transmissions to CW interference and are compared to results obtained with a laboratory hardware-based system simulation and a computer simulation.

  8. Effect of posture on the aerodynamic characteristics during take-off in ski jumping.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Keizo; Tsubokura, Makoto; Ikeda, Jun; Onishi, Keiji; Baleriola, Sophie

    2016-11-07

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of posture of a ski jumper on aerodynamic characteristics during the take-off using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The CFD method adopted for this study was based on Large-Eddy Simulation. Body surface data were obtained by 3-D laser scanning of an active ski jumper. Based on video analysis of the actual take-off movement, two sets of motion data were generated (world-class jumper A and less-experienced jumper B). The inlet flow velocity that corresponds to the in-run velocity in actual ski jumping was set to 23.23m/s in the CFD. The aerodynamic force, flow velocity, and vortexes for each model were compared between models. The total drag force acting upon jumper A was lower than that acting upon jumper B through the whole movement. Regarding the total lift force, although jumper A׳s total lift force was less in the in-run posture, it became greater than that of jumper B at the end of the movement. In the latter half of the movement, low air-speed domain expansion was observed at the model׳s back. This domain of jumper B was larger. There were two symmetric vortexes in the wake of jumper A, but the disordered vortexes were observed behind the jumper B. In the case of jumper A, these two distinct vortexes generated by the arms produced a downwash flow in the wake. It is considered that the positioning of the arms in a very low position strongly influences the flow structure.

  9. CFD modelling of the aerodynamic effect of trees on urban air pollution dispersion.

    PubMed

    Amorim, J H; Rodrigues, V; Tavares, R; Valente, J; Borrego, C

    2013-09-01

    The current work evaluates the impact of urban trees over the dispersion of carbon monoxide (CO) emitted by road traffic, due to the induced modification of the wind flow characteristics. With this purpose, the standard flow equations with a kε closure for turbulence were extended with the capability to account for the aerodynamic effect of trees over the wind field. Two CFD models were used for testing this numerical approach. Air quality simulations were conducted for two periods of 31h in selected areas of Lisbon and Aveiro, in Portugal, for distinct relative wind directions: approximately 45° and nearly parallel to the main avenue, respectively. The statistical evaluation of modelling performance and uncertainty revealed a significant improvement of results with trees, as shown by the reduction of the NMSE from 0.14 to 0.10 in Lisbon, and from 0.14 to 0.04 in Aveiro, which is independent from the CFD model applied. The consideration of the plant canopy allowed to fulfil the data quality objectives for ambient air quality modelling established by the Directive 2008/50/EC, with an important decrease of the maximum deviation between site measurements and CFD results. In the non-aligned wind situation an average 12% increase of the CO concentrations in the domain was observed as a response to the aerodynamic action of trees over the vertical exchange rates of polluted air with the above roof-level atmosphere; while for the aligned configuration an average 16% decrease was registered due to the enhanced ventilation of the street canyon. These results show that urban air quality can be optimised based on knowledge-based planning of green spaces.

  10. Retrieval Practice Can Insulate Items against Intralist Interference: Evidence from the List-Length Effect, Output Interference, and Retrieval-Induced Forgetting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliegl, Oliver; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz T.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether nonselective retrieval practice after study can reduce memories' susceptibility to intralist interference, as it is observed in the list-length effect, output interference, and retrieval-induced forgetting. Across 3 experiments, we compared the effects of nonselective retrieval practice and restudy on…

  11. Aerodynamic load distributions at transonic speeds for a close-coupled wing-canard configuration: Tabulated pressure data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, K. E.; Gloss, B. B.

    1978-01-01

    Wind tunnel studies are reported on both the canard and wing surfaces of a model that is geometrically identical to one used in several force and moment tests to provide insight into the various aerodynamic interference effects. In addition to detailed pressures measurements, the pressures were integrated to illustrate the effects of Mach number, canard location, and canard-wing interference on various aerodynamic parameters. Transonic pressure tunnel Mach numbers ranged from 0.70 to 1.20 for data taken from 0 deg to approximately 16 deg angle-of-attack at 0 deg sideslip.

  12. Antireflection effects at nanostructured material interfaces and the suppression of thin-film interference.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiaoyin; Zhang, Xu A; Bagal, Abhijeet; Guo, Wei; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2013-06-14

    Thin-film interference is a well-known effect, and it is commonly observed in the colored appearance of many natural phenomena. Caused by the interference of light reflected from the interfaces of thin material layers, such interference effects can lead to wavelength and angle-selective behavior in thin-film devices. In this work, we describe the use of interfacial nanostructures to eliminate interference effects in thin films. Using the same principle inspired by moth-eye structures, this approach creates an effective medium where the index is gradually varying between the neighboring materials. We present the fabrication process for such nanostructures at a polymer-silicon interface, and experimentally demonstrate its effectiveness in suppressing thin-film interference. The principle demonstrated in this work can lead to enhanced efficiency and reduce wavelength/angle sensitivity in multilayer optoelectronic devices.

  13. The role of wind tunnels in predicting sounding rocket aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of sounding rockets, in some cases, may be adequately determined by various estimating procedures, however, there are cases where these procedures fail and wind tunnel studies become necessary. The present paper deals with configurations of the latter type, for which the problems of concern include mismatched diameters between stages, mutual fin interference effects, fin alignment and orientation, body deflections between stages, boundary layer growth, and stability changes that occur as stages are dropped. Some characteristics related to separated flow, interference flow fields, and Reynolds number are examined.

  14. Corrections for 17O interference, effects on Δ47 determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olack, G.; He, B.; Colman, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    The measurements of 13C on CO2 samples are routinely corrected for 17O contribution to the m/z 45 signal (Craig, 1957; Santrock, et al., 1985). The 17O abundance affects the Δ47 calculation, and the amount of 17O present is routinely determined using the relationship between 18O and 17O presented in IAEA TECDOC 825 (Dennis, et al., 2011; Huntington, et al., 2009; Gonfiantini, et al., 1995). In 2010, the IAEA released new recommendations for 17O determinations to be used for 13C corrections (Brand, et al., 2010). We compare the effect of using different ways to determine 17O interference, as well as using the currently accepted N(13C)/N(12C) value for VPDB (Brand, et al., 2010), on heated gas lines, model data, and on CO2 gases made to have similar δ47 and Δ47, but with highly contrasting δ18O and δ13C values. The 2010 IAEA recommendations give a better fit for heated gas data than the TECDOC 825 recommendations. Comparing differences in the data points relative to their respective fitted lines, we see differences on the order of 5 to 10 ppm in Δ47. That corresponds to a systematic error of 2 °C in the temperature estimate (room temperature range), and one that varies with δ13C and δ18O, but not necessarily with δ47. The preliminary work on equilibrated CO2 gases having similar δ47, but very different δ13C and δ18O, showed large (ca. 70 ppm) differences in Δ47 when using the (standard) TECDOC 825 recommendations. The Δ47 values were much closer when the 2010 IUPAC recommendations were used. This also serves as a test of the updated factors for 17O determination, as well as the overall robustness of the Δ47 measurement.

  15. Effects of Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation on Corner Separation in a Highly Loaded Compressor Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuede; Zhao, Xiaohu; Li, Yinghong; Wu, Yun; Zhao, Qin

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports experimental results on the effects of plasma aerodynamic actuation (PAA) on corner separation control in a highly loaded, low speed, linear compressor cascade. Total pressure loss coefficient distribution was adopted to evaluate the corner separation control effect in wind tunnel experiments. Results of pressure measurements and particle image velocimetry (PIV) show that the control effect of pitch-wise PAA on the endwall is much better than that of stream-wise PAA on the suction surface. When both the pitch-wise PAA on the endwall and stream-wise PAA on the suction surface are turned on simultaneously, the control effect is the best among all three PAA types. The mechanisms of nanosecond discharge and microsecond discharge PAA are different in corner separation control. The control effect of microsecond discharge PAA turns out better with the increase of discharge voltage and duty cycle. Compared with microsecond discharge PAA, nanosecond discharge PAA is more effective in preventing corner separation when the freestream velocity increases. Frequency is one of the most important parameters in plasma flow control. The optimum excitation frequency of microsecond discharge PAA is 500 Hz, which is different from the frequency corresponding to the case with a Strouhal number of unity.

  16. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Feathered Dinosaur Measured Using Physical Models. Effects of Form on Static Stability and Control Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Dennis; Cardona, Griselda; Guenther-Gleason, Eric; Huynh, Tony; Kwong, Austin; Marks, Dylan; Ray, Neil; Tisbe, Adrian; Tse, Kyle; Koehl, Mimi

    2014-01-01

    We report the effects of posture and morphology on the static aerodynamic stability and control effectiveness of physical models based on the feathered dinosaur, Microraptor gui, from the Cretaceous of China. Postures had similar lift and drag coefficients and were broadly similar when simplified metrics of gliding were considered, but they exhibited different stability characteristics depending on the position of the legs and the presence of feathers on the legs and the tail. Both stability and the function of appendages in generating maneuvering forces and torques changed as the glide angle or angle of attack were changed. These are significant because they represent an aerial environment that may have shifted during the evolution of directed aerial descent and other aerial behaviors. Certain movements were particularly effective (symmetric movements of the wings and tail in pitch, asymmetric wing movements, some tail movements). Other appendages altered their function from creating yaws at high angle of attack to rolls at low angle of attack, or reversed their function entirely. While M. gui lived after Archaeopteryx and likely represents a side experiment with feathered morphology, the general patterns of stability and control effectiveness suggested from the manipulations of forelimb, hindlimb and tail morphology here may help understand the evolution of flight control aerodynamics in vertebrates. Though these results rest on a single specimen, as further fossils with different morphologies are tested, the findings here could be applied in a phylogenetic context to reveal biomechanical constraints on extinct flyers arising from the need to maneuver. PMID:24454820

  17. Development of an efficient procedure for calculating the aerodynamic effects of planform variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, J. E.; Geller, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical procedures to compute gradients in aerodynamic loading due to planform shape changes using panel method codes were studied. Two procedures were investigated: one computed the aerodynamic perturbation directly; the other computed the aerodynamic loading on the perturbed planform and on the base planform and then differenced these values to obtain the perturbation in loading. It is indicated that computing the perturbed values directly can not be done satisfactorily without proper aerodynamic representation of the pressure singularity at the leading edge of a thin wing. For the alternative procedure, a technique was developed which saves most of the time-consuming computations from a panel method calculation for the base planform. Using this procedure the perturbed loading can be calculated in about one-tenth the time of that for the base solution.

  18. Aerodynamic Performance of Missile Configurations at Transonic Speeds Including the Effects of a Jet Plume

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-02-18

    speeds. The goal of the entire research project is to develop calculation techniques that allow the aerodynamic characteristics of missile ...Shock attachment angle and Mach number relationship . . II. ANALYSIS OF INVISCID FLOW In order to calculate the aerodynamic performance of missile ...and a change in any part of the flow field affects every other part. Along each characteristic line the dependent variables have to satisfy the

  19. Gap and stagger effects on the aerodynamic performance and the wake behind a biplane with endplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hantae

    Modern flow diagnostics applied to a very old aerodynamic problem has produced a number of intriguing new results and new insight into previous results. The aerodynamic performance and associated flow physics of the biplane with endplates as a function of variation in gap and stagger were analytically and experimentally investigated. A combination of vortex lattice method, integrated force measurement, streamwise PIV, and Trefftz plane Stereo PIV were used to better understand the flowfield around the biplane with endplates. This study was performed to determine the configuration with the optimal aerodynamic performance and to understand the fluid mechanics behind optimal and suboptimal performance of the configuration. The Vortex Lattice code (AVL) shows that the gap and stagger have the most dramatic effects out of the six parameters studied: gap, stagger, dihedral, decalage, sweep and overhang. The force balance measurements with fourteen biplane configurations of different gaps and staggers show that as gap and stagger increase, the lift efficiency also increases at all angles of attack tested at both Re 60,000 and 120,000. Using the force balance data, a generalized empirical method for the prediction of lift coefficient as a function of gap, stagger and angle of attack has been determined and validated when combined with existing relations for CL--α adjustments for AR and taper effects. The resulting empirical approach allows for a rapid determination of CL for a biplane having different gap, stagger, AR and taper without the need for a complete flowfield analysis. Two Dimensional PIV results show a distinctive pattern in the downwash angle for the different gap and stagger configurations tested. The downwash angle increases with increasing gap and stagger. It is also evident that the change in downwash angle is directly proportional to the change in lift coefficient as would be expected. Increasing gap spacing increases the downwash angle as well. Based on

  20. Investigation of Aerodynamics Scale Effects for a Generic Fighter Configuration in the National Transonic Facility (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomek, W. G.; Wahls, R. A.; Owens, L. R.; Burner, A. B.; Graves, S. S.; Luckring, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Two wind tunnel tests of a generic fighter configuration have been completed in the National Transonic Facility. The primary purpose of the tests was to assess Reynolds number scale effects on a thin-wing, fighter-type configuration up to full-scale flight conditions (that is, Reynolds numbers of the order of 60 million). The tests included longitudinal and lateral/directional studies at subsonic and transonic conditions across a range of Reynolds numbers from that available in conventional wind tunnels to flight conditions. Results are presented for three Mach numbers (0.6, 0.8, and 0.9) and three configurations: 1) Fuselage / Wing, 2) Fuselage / Wing / Centerline Vertical Tail / Horizontal Tail, and 3) Fuselage / Wing / Trailing-Edge Extension / Twin Vertical Tails. Reynolds number effects on the lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics are presented herein, along with longitudinal data demonstrating the effects of fixing the boundary layer transition location for low Reynolds number conditions. In addition, an improved model videogrammetry system and results are discussed.

  1. Effects of Shrouded Stator Cavity Flows on Multistage Axial Compressor Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellborn, Steven R.; Okiishi, Theodore H.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were performed on a low-speed multistage axial-flow compressor to assess the effects of shrouded stator cavity flows on aerodynamic performance. Five configurations, which involved changes in seal-tooth leakage rates and/or elimination of the shrouded stator cavities, were tested. Data collected enabled differences in overall individual stage and the third stage blade element performance parameters to be compared. The results show conclusively that seal-tooth leakage ran have a large impact on compressor aerodynamic performance while the presence of the shrouded stator cavities alone seemed to have little influence. Overall performance data revealed that for every 1% increase in the seal-tooth clearance to blade-height ratio the pressure rise dropped up to 3% while efficiency was reduced by 1 to 1.5 points. These observed efficiency penalty slopes are comparable to those commonly reported for rotor and cantilevered stator tip clearance variations. Therefore, it appears that in order to correctly predict overall performance it is equally important to account for the effects of seal-tooth leakage as it is to include the influence of tip clearance flows. Third stage blade element performance data suggested that the performance degradation observed when leakage was increased was brought about in two distinct ways. First, increasing seal-tooth leakage directly spoiled the near hub performance of the stator row in which leakage occurred. Second, the altered stator exit now conditions caused by increased leakage impaired the performance of the next downstream stage by decreasing the work input of the downstream rotor and increasing total pressure loss of the downstream stator. These trends caused downstream stages to progressively perform worse. Other measurements were acquired to determine spatial and temporal flow field variations within the up-and-downstream shrouded stator cavities. Flow within the cavities involved low momentum fluid traveling primarily

  2. Effect of the cutter parameters and machining parameters on the interference in gear slicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinchun; Li, Jia; Lou, Benchao; Shi, Jiang; Yang, Qijun

    2013-11-01

    Current researches have not yet found the effect law of the cutter parameters and machining parameters on the interference in gear slicing, the interference between the cutter and machined gear often happens because the appropriate cutter parameters and machining parameters cannot be set, which reduces the gear machining accuracy. The relative position between the major flank face and edge-sweeping surface, distribution law of the interference area in forming process of edge-sweeping surface, and effect law of relative positions among edge-sweeping surfaces on the interference are studied by graphical analysis. The effect law of the cutter parameters and machining parameters on the interference is found. The effect law shows that the interference in gear slicing can be controlled when the relief angle measured on the top edge and feed of every rotation are chosen respectively larger than 9° and smaller than 0.15 mm/r. An internal helical gear is sliced with the spur slice cutter and the cutter parameters and machining parameters are set based on above the effect law. The machined gear is measured in Gear Measuring Center and the detection result shows that the comprehensive accuracy reaches GB/T Class 7, where some reach GB/T Class 6. The result can meet the gear machining accuracy requirement and shows that the effect law found is valid. The problem of the interference in gear slicing is solved and the gear machining accuracy can be improved.

  3. Hub vortex instability within wind turbine wakes: Effects of wind turbulence, loading conditions, and blade aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Ryan; Viola, Francesco; Camarri, Simone; Gallaire, Francois; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio

    2016-11-01

    The near wake of wind turbines is characterized by the presence of the hub vortex, which is a coherent vorticity structure generated from the interaction between the root vortices and the boundary layer evolving over the turbine nacelle. By moving downstream, the hub vortex undergoes an instability with growth rate, azimuthal and axial wavenumbers determined by the characteristics of the incoming wind and turbine aerodynamics. Thus, a large variability of the hub vortex instability is expected for wind energy applications with consequent effects on wake downstream evolution, wake interactions within a wind farm, power production, and fatigue loads on turbines invested by wakes generated upstream. In order to predict characteristics of the hub vortex instability for different operating conditions, linear stability analysis is carried out by considering different statistics of the incoming wind turbulence, thrust coefficient, tip speed ratio, and blade lift distribution of a wind turbine. Axial and azimuthal wake velocity fields are modeled through Carton-McWilliams velocity profiles by mimicking the presence of the hub vortex, helicoidal tip vortices, and matching the wind turbine thrust coefficient predicted through the actuator disk model. The linear stability analysis shows that hub vortex instability is strongly affected by the wind turbine loading conditions, and specifically it is promoted by a larger thrust coefficient. A higher load of the wind turbines produces an enhanced axial velocity deficit and, in turn, higher shear in the radial direction of the streamwise velocity. The axial velocity shear within the turbine wake is also the main physical mechanism promoting the hub vortex instability when varying the lift distribution over the blade span for a specific loading condition. Cases with a larger velocity deficit in proximity of the wake center and less aerodynamic load towards the blade tip result to be more unstable. Moreover, wake swirl promotes hub

  4. Interpretation of interference effects in three production wells in the Kawerau geothermal field, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Lynell; Koorey, Kevin J.

    1996-01-24

    Downhole temperature and pressure, mass flow, and enthalpy measurements on three production wells at Kawerau geothermal field are interpretted to illustrate interference effects between these wells. Feed zone locations within the wells, together with geology and chemistry are discussed. Downhole measurements are made in one well while production flow changes are made on another well to monitor pressure transient effects. The interference effects have implications for planning future production drilling.

  5. The effect of inlet stagnation supercooling degree on the aerodynamics of the steam flow field around a rotor tip section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti Amiri, H.; Kermani, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of inlet stagnation supercooling degree on the aerodynamics of the flow field around the rotor tip section of a steam turbine are investigated. To do so, non-equilibrium thermodynamics model for simulating the condensing flow is employed. The results show that formation of liquid droplets and their further growth can remarkably change the design parameters like deviation angle, pressure loss coefficient, mass flow rate and shock wave pattern.

  6. Aerodynamic forces and flow structures of the leading edge vortex on a flapping wing considering ground effect.

    PubMed

    Van Truong, Tien; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Min Jun; Yoon, Kwang Joon; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide an insight into the aerodynamic performance of the beetle during takeoff, which has been estimated in previous investigations. We employed a scaled-up electromechanical model flapping wing to measure the aerodynamic forces and the three-dimensional flow structures on the flapping wing. The ground effect on the unsteady forces and flow structures were also characterized. The dynamically scaled wing model could replicate the general stroke pattern of the beetle's hind wing kinematics during takeoff flight. Two wing kinematic models have been studied to examine the influences of wing kinematics on unsteady aerodynamic forces. In the first model, the angle of attack is asymmetric and varies during the translational motion, which is the flapping motion of the beetle's hind wing. In the second model, the angle of attack is constant during the translational motion. The instantaneous aerodynamic forces were measured for four strokes during the beetle's takeoff by the force sensor attached at the wing base. Flow visualization provided a general picture of the evolution of the three-dimensional leading edge vortex (LEV) on the beetle hind wing model. The LEV is stable during each stroke, and increases radically from the root to the tip, forming a leading-edge spiral vortex. The force measurement results show that the vertical force generated by the hind wing is large enough to lift the beetle. For the beetle hind wing kinematics, the total vertical force production increases 18.4% and 8.6% for the first and second strokes, respectively, due to the ground effect. However, for the model with a constant angle of attack during translation, the vertical force is reduced during the first stroke. During the third and fourth strokes, the ground effect is negligible for both wing kinematic patterns. This finding suggests that the beetle's flapping mechanism induces a ground effect that can efficiently lift its body from the ground during takeoff.

  7. Effects of thickness on the aerodynamic characteristics of an initial low-speed family of airfoils for general aviation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghee, R. J.; Beasley, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to determine the effects of airfoil thickness-ratio on the low speed aerodynamic characteristics of an initial family of airfoils. The results were compared with theoretical predictions obtained from a subsonic viscous method. The tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.10 to 0.28. Chord Reynolds numbers varied from about 2.0 x 1 million to 9.0 x 1 million.

  8. Computational Investigations on the Effects of Gurney Flap on Airfoil Aerodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shubham; Sitaram, Nekkanti; Krishnaswamy, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    The present study comprises steady state, two-dimensional computational investigations performed on NACA 0012 airfoil to analyze the effect of Gurney flap (GF) on airfoil aerodynamics using k-ε RNG turbulence model of FLUENT. Airfoil with GF is analyzed for six different heights from 0.5% to 4% of the chord length, seven positions from 0% to 20% of the chord length from the trailing edge, and seven mounting angles from 30° to 120° with the chord. Computed values of lift and drag coefficients with angle of attack are compared with experimental values and good agreement is found at low angles of attack. In addition static pressure distribution on the airfoil surface and pathlines and turbulence intensities near the trailing edge are present. From the computational investigation, it is recommended that Gurney flaps with a height of 1.5% chord be installed perpendicular to chord and as close to the trailing edge as possible to obtain maximum lift enhancement with minimum drag penalty. PMID:27347517

  9. Effect of longitudinal ridges on the aerodynamic performance of a leatherback turtle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Kyeongtae; Kim, Jooha; Kim, Heesu; Lee, Sang-Im; Choi, Haecheon

    2012-11-01

    Leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) are known as the fastest swimmer and the deepest diver in the open ocean among marine turtles. Unlike other marine turtles, leatherback sea turtles have five longitudinal ridges on their carapace. To investigate the effect of these longitudinal ridges on the aerodynamic performance of a leatherback turtle model, the experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel at Re = 1.0 × 105 - 1.4 × 106 (including that of real leatherback turtle in cruising condition) based on the model length. We measure the drag and lift forces on the leatherback turtle model with and without longitudinal ridges. The presence of longitudinal ridges increases both the lift and drag forces on the model, but increases the lift-to-drag ratio by 15 - 40%. We also measure the velocity field around the model with and without the ridges using particle image velocimetry. More details will be shown in the presentation. Supported by the NRF program (2011-0028032).

  10. Computational Investigations on the Effects of Gurney Flap on Airfoil Aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shubham; Sitaram, Nekkanti; Krishnaswamy, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    The present study comprises steady state, two-dimensional computational investigations performed on NACA 0012 airfoil to analyze the effect of Gurney flap (GF) on airfoil aerodynamics using k-ε RNG turbulence model of FLUENT. Airfoil with GF is analyzed for six different heights from 0.5% to 4% of the chord length, seven positions from 0% to 20% of the chord length from the trailing edge, and seven mounting angles from 30° to 120° with the chord. Computed values of lift and drag coefficients with angle of attack are compared with experimental values and good agreement is found at low angles of attack. In addition static pressure distribution on the airfoil surface and pathlines and turbulence intensities near the trailing edge are present. From the computational investigation, it is recommended that Gurney flaps with a height of 1.5% chord be installed perpendicular to chord and as close to the trailing edge as possible to obtain maximum lift enhancement with minimum drag penalty.

  11. Effects of incoming wind condition and wind turbine aerodynamics on the hub vortex instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, R.; Viola, F.; Gallaire, F.; Iungo, G. V.

    2015-06-01

    Dynamics and instabilities occurring in the near-wake of wind turbines have a crucial role for the wake downstream evolution, and for the onset of far-wake instabilities. Furthermore, wake dynamics significantly affect the intra-wind farm wake flow, wake interactions and potential power losses. Therefore, the physical understanding and predictability of wind turbine wake instabilities become a nodal point for prediction of wind power harvesting and optimization of wind farm layout. This study is focused on the prediction of the hub vortex instability encountered within wind turbine wakes under different operational conditions of the wind turbine. Linear stability analysis of the wake flow is performed by means of a novel approach that enables to take effects of turbulence on wake instabilities into account. Stability analysis is performed by using as base flow the time-averaged wake velocity field at a specific downstream location. The latter is modeled through Carton-McWilliams velocity profiles by mimicking the presence of the hub vortex and helicoidal tip vortices, and matching the wind turbine thrust coefficient predicted through the actuator disc model. The results show that hub vortex instability is promoted by increasing the turbine thrust coefficient. Indeed, a larger aerodynamic load produces an enhanced wake velocity deficit and axial shear, which are considered the main sources for the wake instability. Nonetheless, wake swirl also promotes hub vortex instability, and it can also affect the azimuthal wavenumber of the most unstable mode.

  12. Detection of airborne viruses using electro-aerodynamic deposition and a field-effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyu-Tae; Cho, Dong-Guk; Park, Ji-Woon; Hong, Seunghun; Hwang, Jungho

    2015-01-01

    We report a technique for the detection of aerosolized viruses. Conventional field-effect-transistor (FET)-based techniques use solution-based processes, thus require antibody binding to the detection region of the FET prior to the supply of the analyte. With the method described here, virus–antibody-bound particles are delivered to the FET during detection; therefore, neither a pre-treatment antibody binding step on the FET channel nor washing process for virus–antibody-binding are necessary. Our method is based on the concept that virus–antibody-bound particles are larger than the virus or antibody alone, and thus have larger charge numbers following aerosol charging. When these particles are charged by negative ions and electro-aerodynamically deposited on a substrate, there exists a location on the substrate where neither lone virus nor antibody particles land, and where only virus–antibody-bound particles are deposited. If this location coincides with the channel of the FET, the resulting variation in the current can be used to indicate the existence of a virus. By aerosolizing a mixed solution of the virus and the antibody, only the virus–antibody-bound particles were transported to the swCNT-FET, and the electric current in the swCNT-FET decreased to 30% of that measured with no deposited particles. PMID:26642822

  13. Effects of statistical similarity in Young's interference experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mengwen; Zhao, Daomu

    2015-11-01

    Some new results are established on the condition that the fluctuating field at the pinholes in Young's interference experiment is statistically similar at a frequency ω0. It is shown that this condition ensures complete spectral coherence of the light in the plane of observation. Under this circumstance, the spectral degree of polarization and cross-polarization of the stochastic electromagnetic beam in the plane of observation are exactly the same as that in the pinholes. Furthermore, we derive a condition that ensures complete spatial coherence at the pinholes in the space-time domain.

  14. Interference effects of vocalization on dual task performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, J. M.; Goodman, L. S.; Pianka, M. J.

    1984-09-01

    Voice command and control systems have been proposed as a potential means of off-loading the typically overburdened visual information processing system. However, prior to introducing novel human-machine interfacing technologies in high workload environments, consideration must be given to the integration of the new technologists within existing task structures to ensure that no new sources of workload or interference are systematically introduced. This study examined the use of voice interactive systems technology in the joint performance of two cognitive information processing tasks requiring continuous memory and choice reaction wherein a basis for intertask interference might be expected. Stimuli for the continuous memory task were presented aurally and either voice or keyboard responding was required in the choice reaction task. Performance was significantly degraded in each task when voice responding was required in the choice reaction time task. Performance degradation was evident in higher error scores for both the choice reaction and continuous memory tasks. Performance decrements observed under conditions of high intertask stimulus similarity were not statistically significant. The results signal the need to consider further the task requirements for verbal short-term memory when applying speech technology in multitask environments.

  15. The Effect of Break Edge Configuration on the Aerodynamics of Anti-Ice Jet Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, V.; Yildizay, H.; Aras, H.

    2015-05-01

    One of the components of a turboprop gas turbine engine is the Front Bearing Structure (FBS) which leads air into the compressor. FBS directly encounters with ambient air, as a consequence ice accretion may occur on its static vanes. There are several aerodynamic parameters which should be considered in the design of anti-icing system of FBS, such as diameter, position, exit angle of discharge holes, etc. This research focuses on the effects of break edge configuration over anti-ice jet flow. Break edge operation is a process which is applied to the hole in order to avoid sharp edges which cause high stress concentration. Numerical analyses and flow visualization test have been conducted. Four different break edge configurations were used for this investigation; without break edge, 0.35xD, 74xD, 0.87xD. Three mainstream flow conditions at the inlet of the channel are defined; 10m/s, 20 m/s and 40 m/s. Shear stresses are extracted from numerical analyses near the trailing edge of pressure surface where ice may occur under icing conditions. A specific flow visualization method was used for the experimental study. Vane surface near the trailing edge was dyed and thinner was injected into anti-ice jet flow in order to remove dye from the vane surface. Hence, film effect on the surface could be computed for each testing condition. Thickness of the dye removal area of each case was examined. The results show noticeable effects of break edge operation on jet flow, and the air film effectiveness decreases when mainstream inlet velocity decreases.

  16. Effect of vane opening on aerodynamic performance of the ram-rotor test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ji-ang; Guan, Jian; Zhong, Jingjun; Yuan, Chenguang

    2016-06-01

    In order to research the influence of adjustable vane on the aerodynamic performance of the ram-rotor test system, FLUENT software has been adopted to simulate the flow passage of the ram-rotor test system numerically. The vane opening is controlled by changing the stagger angle of the vane blades. Results show that flow uniformity of vane outlet is influenced by the vane openings, which has an impact on the aerodynamic loss to some extent. Total pressure ratio, adiabatic efficiency and mass flow rate can be regulated by different openings of the vane. Compared with -8° vane opening, top efficiency of the ram-rotor increases by about 13.8% at +6° opening. And total pressure ratio drops by 5.87%. The rising opening increases the relative Mach number at inlet of the ram-rotor and weakens the intensity of the tip clearance leakage, which comes to a decreasing aerodynamic loss.

  17. Analytical and experimental study of the effects of wing-body aerodynamic interaction on space shuttle subsonic flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, R. R.; Rauch, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    The effects on flutter of the aerodynamic interaction between the space shuttle bodies and wing, 1/80th-scale semispan models of the orbiter wing, the complete shuttle and intermediate component combinations were tested in the NASA Langley Research Center 26-inch Transonic Blowdown Wind Tunnel. Using the double lattice method combined with slender body theory to calculate unsteady aerodynamic forces, subsonic flutter speeds were computed for comparison. Using calculated complete vehicle modes, flutter speed trends were computed for the full scale vehicle at an altitude of 15,200 meters and a Mach number of 0.6. Consistent with findings of the model studies, analysis shows the shuttle to have the same flutter speed as an isolated cantilevered wing.

  18. Unsteady aerodynamics of blade rows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.

    1989-01-01

    The requirements placed on an unsteady aerodynamic theory intended for turbomachinery aeroelastic or aeroacoustic applications are discussed along with a brief description of the various theoretical models that are available to address these requirements. The major emphasis is placed on the description of a linearized inviscid theory which fully accounts for the affects of a nonuniform mean or steady flow on unsteady aerodynamic response. Although this linearization was developed primarily for blade flutter prediction, more general equations are presented which account for unsteady excitations due to incident external aerodynamic disturbances as well as those due to prescribed blade motions. The motivation for this linearized unsteady aerodynamic theory is focused on, its physical and mathematical formulation is outlined and examples are presented to illustrate the status of numerical solution procedures and several effects of mean flow nonuniformity on unsteady aerodynamic response.

  19. Effects of Leading Edge Defect on the Aerodynamic and Flow Characteristics of an S809 Airfoil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiaojing; Hu, Ruifeng; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Unexpected performance degradation occurs in wind turbine blades due to leading edge defect when suffering from continuous impacts with rain drops, hails, insects, or solid particles during its operation life. To assess this issue, this paper numerically investigates the steady and dynamic stall characteristics of an S809 airfoil with various leading edge defects. More leading edge defect sizes and much closer to practical parameters are investigated in the paper. Methodology Numerical computation is conducted using the SST k-ω turbulence model, and the method has been validated by comparison with existed published data. In order to ensure the calculation convergence, the residuals for the continuity equation are set to be less than 10−7 and 10−6 in steady state and dynamic stall cases. The simulations are conducted with the software ANSYS Fluent 13.0. Results It is found that the characteristics of aerodynamic coefficients and flow fields are sensitive to leading edge defect both in steady and dynamic conditions. For airfoils with the defect thickness of 6%tc, leading edge defect has a relative small influence on the aerodynamics of S809 airfoil. For other investigated defect thicknesses, leading edge defect has much greater influence on the flow field structures, pressure coefficients and aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil at relative small defect lengths. For example, the lift coefficients decrease and drag coefficients increase sharply after the appearance of leading edge defect. However, the aerodynamic characteristics could reach a constant value when the defect length is large enough. The flow field, pressure coefficient distribution and aerodynamic coefficients do not change a lot when the defect lengths reach to 0.5%c,1%c, 2%c and 3%c with defect thicknesses of 6%tc, 12%tc,18%tc and 25%tc, respectively. In addition, the results also show that the critical defect length/thickness ratio is 0.5, beyond which the aerodynamic characteristics

  20. Interactive effects of working memory and trial history on Stroop interference in cognitively healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Aschenbrenner, Andrew J; Balota, David A

    2015-03-01

    Past studies have suggested that Stroop interference increases with age; however the robustness of this effect after controlling for processing speed has been questioned. Both working memory (WM) and the congruency of the immediately preceding trial have also been shown to moderate the magnitude of Stroop interference. Specifically, interference is smaller both for individuals with higher working memory capacity and following an incongruent trial. At present, it is unclear whether and how these 3 variables (age, WM and previous congruency) interact to predict interference effects in the standard Stroop color-naming task. We present analyses of Stroop interference in a large database of Stroop color-naming trials from a lifespan sample of well-screened, cognitively healthy, older adults. Our results indicated age-related increases in interference (after controlling for processing speed) that were exaggerated for individuals with low WM. This relationship between age and WM occurred primarily when the immediately preceding trial was congruent. Following an incongruent trial, interference increased consistently with age, regardless of WM. Taken together, these results support previous accounts of multiple mechanisms underlying control in the Stroop task and provide insight into how each component is jointly affected by age, WM, and trial history.

  1. Aerodynamic characteristics of a feathered dinosaur measured using physical models. Effects of form on static stability and control effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Dennis; Cardona, Griselda; Guenther-Gleason, Eric; Huynh, Tony; Kwong, Austin; Marks, Dylan; Ray, Neil; Tisbe, Adrian; Tse, Kyle; Koehl, Mimi

    2014-01-01

    We report the effects of posture and morphology on the static aerodynamic stability and control effectiveness of physical models based on the feathered dinosaur, [Formula: see text]Microraptor gui, from the Cretaceous of China. Postures had similar lift and drag coefficients and were broadly similar when simplified metrics of gliding were considered, but they exhibited different stability characteristics depending on the position of the legs and the presence of feathers on the legs and the tail. Both stability and the function of appendages in generating maneuvering forces and torques changed as the glide angle or angle of attack were changed. These are significant because they represent an aerial environment that may have shifted during the evolution of directed aerial descent and other aerial behaviors. Certain movements were particularly effective (symmetric movements of the wings and tail in pitch, asymmetric wing movements, some tail movements). Other appendages altered their function from creating yaws at high angle of attack to rolls at low angle of attack, or reversed their function entirely. While [Formula: see text]M. gui lived after [Formula: see text]Archaeopteryx and likely represents a side experiment with feathered morphology, the general patterns of stability and control effectiveness suggested from the manipulations of forelimb, hindlimb and tail morphology here may help understand the evolution of flight control aerodynamics in vertebrates. Though these results rest on a single specimen, as further fossils with different morphologies are tested, the findings here could be applied in a phylogenetic context to reveal biomechanical constraints on extinct flyers arising from the need to maneuver.

  2. Effects of adjacent channel interference in MSK and OQPSK on hard limited satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayamanne, N.; Oka, I.; Endo, I.

    1986-06-01

    This paper presents an analytical technique for performance assessments of Minimum Shift Keying (MSK) and Offset Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (OQPSK) signals transmitted over hard limited satellite channels in the presence of intersymbol and adjacent channel interference. Introducing a new equivalent model in which the intersymbol and adjacent channel interference components do not pass through the hard-limiter, the bit error probability is obtained with the aid of Gram-Charlier expansion. The effects of the interference on the bit error probability are estimated.

  3. Observation of two-center interference effects for electron impact ionization of N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaluvadi, Hari; Nur Ozer, Zehra; Dogan, Mevlut; Ning, Chuangang; Colgan, James; Madison, Don

    2015-08-01

    In 1966, Cohen and Fano (1966 Phys. Rev. 150 30) suggested that one should be able to observe the equivalent of Young’s double slit interference if the double slits were replaced by a diatomic molecule. This suggestion inspired many experimental and theoretical studies searching for double slit interference effects both for photon and particle ionization of diatomic molecules. These effects turned out to be so small for particle ionization that this work proceeded slowly and evidence for interference effects were only found by looking at cross section ratios. Most of the early particle work concentrated on double differential cross sections for heavy particle scattering and the first evidence for two-center interference for electron-impact triple differential cross section (TDCS) did not appear until 2006 for ionization of H2. Subsequent work has now firmly established that two-center interference effects can be seen in the TDCS for electron-impact ionization of H2. However, in spite of several experimental and theoretical studies, similar effects have not been found for electron-impact ionization of N2. Here we report the first evidence for two-center interference for electron-impact ionization of N2.

  4. The spatial Stroop effect: a comparison of color-word and position-word interference.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Sven; Nakagawa, Tristan Toyo; Bindl, Manuela; Bühner, Markus

    2014-12-01

    The Stroop effect is one of the most famous examples of interference in human perception. The present study demonstrates that a position Stroop paradigm, comparable to the classical color-word interference paradigm, resulted in the same pattern of interference for the spatial dimension; however, the interference was significantly weaker. By exchanging the original oral response for a manual response in the spatial paradigm, we showed that the verbal component is crucial for the Stroop effect: Manual responses lead to a disappearance of the interference effect. Moreover, with manual responses word position was recognized at the same speed for the baseline condition and for words that were incongruent as well as congruent with the spatial position. The results indicate (1) that the Stoop effect depends heavily on verbal components and (2) that differing processing speeds between reading and position recognition do not serve as a proper explanation for the effect. In addition, the provided paradigm plausibly transfers the classical color-word interference to the spatial dimension.

  5. Incompressible lifting-surface aerodynamics for a rotor-stator combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandra, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    Current literature on the three dimensional flow through compressor cascades deals with a row of rotor blades in isolation. Since the distance between the rotor and stator is usually 10 to 20 percent of the blade chord, the aerodynamic interference between them has to be considered for a proper evaluation of the aerothermodynamic performance of the stage. A unified approach to the aerodynamics of the incompressible flow through a stage is presented that uses the lifting surface theory for a compressor cascade of arbitrary camber and thickness distribution. The effects of rotor stator interference are represented as a linear function of the rotor and stator flows separately. The loading distribution on the rotor and stator flows separately. The loading distribution on the rotor and stator blades and the interference factor are determined concurrently through a matrix iteration process.

  6. An Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Propellers Used as Aerodynamic Brakes on Stability and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Frederick H

    1945-01-01

    Tests were made of a model representative of a single-engine tractor-type airplane for the purpose of determining the stability and control effects of a propeller used as an aerodynamic brake. The tests were made with single-and dual-rotation propellers to show the effect of type of propeller rotation, and with positive thrust to provide basic data with which to compare the effects of negative thrust. Four configurations of the model were used to give the effects of tilting the propeller thrust axis down 5 deg., raising the horizontal tail, and combining both tilt and raised tail. Results of the tests are reported herein. The effects of negative thrust were found to be significant. The longitudinal stability was increased because of the loss of wing lift and increase of the angle of attack of the tail. Directional stability and both longitudinal and directional control were decreased because of the reduced velocity at the tail. These effects are moderate for moderate braking but become pronounced with full-power braking, particularly at high values of lift coefficient. The effects of model configuration changes were small when compared with the over-all effects of negative-thrust operation; however, improved stability and control characteristics were exhibited by the model with the tilted thrust axis. Raising the horizontal tail improved the longitudinal characteristics, but was detrimental to directional characteristics. The use of dual-rotation propeller reduced the directional trim charges resulting from the braking operation. A prototype airplane was assumed and handling qualities were computed and analyzed for normal (positive thrust) and braking operation with full and partial power. The results of these analyses are presented for the longitudinal characteristics in steady and accelerated flight, and for the directional characteristics in high- and low-speed flight. It was found that by limiting the power output of the engine (assuming the constant

  7. Parametric interference effect in electron-nucleus scattering in the field of two pulsed laser waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchupkin, S. P.; Lebed', A. A.

    2014-09-01

    Electron scattering on a nucleus in a field of two unidirectional pulsed laser waves is considered. The parametric interference effect is studied, which manifests in electron scattering within the plane formed by both the direction of laser-wave propagation and the initial electron momentum (the interference region). In this kinematics the electron emits and absorbs photons of both waves in a correlated manner. The distribution of the differential cross section of the final-electron energy for the process of electron-nucleus scattering in the field of two pulsed waves is considered. This distribution in the interference region differs qualitatively and quantitatively from the corresponding distribution in any other geometry. The appearance of the parametric interference effect may be experimentally verified by measuring the energy spectrum of final electrons in the framework of modern research projects, which use sources of pulsed laser radiation (XFEL, ELI, PHELIX).

  8. The relevance of fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation to interference effect.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuqin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Xiaoqian; Tang, Yi-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence has indicated a potential connection between resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) signal and cognitive performance. However, the relationship between intrinsic neural activity and behavioral interference effect on cognitive control has been poorly understood. In the present study, seventy-eight healthy subjects underwent RS-fMRI and performed Multi-Source Interference Task (MSIT). The fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) was measured as an indicator of intrinsic brain activity. The difference in reaction times between interference and control conditions in MSIT was evaluated as interference effect. Then we examined the associations between fALFF and interference effect using partial correlation analysis controlling for age, gender and mean framewise displacement. The results demonstrated that fALFF values in orbital prefrontal cortex (OPFC) and right inferior frontal cortex (IFC) were negatively correlated with the interference effect in MSIT. The findings manifest that OPFC and right IFC may influence the processing efficiency of cognitive conflict and play a crucial role in cognitive control.

  9. Laser interference effect evaluation method based on character of laser-spot and image feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianfeng; Luo, Xiaolin; Wu, Lingxia

    2016-10-01

    Evaluating the laser interference effect to CCD objectively and accurately has great research value. Starting from the change of the image's feature before and after interference, meanwhile, considering the influence of the laser-spot distribution character on the masking degree of the image feature information, a laser interference effect evaluation method based on character of laser-spot and image feature was proposed. It reflected the laser-spot distribution character using the distance between the center of the laser-spot and center of the target. It reflected the change of the global image feature using the changes of image's sparse coefficient matrix, which was obtained by the SSIM-inspired orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) sparse coding algorithm. What's more, the assessment method reflected the change of the local image feature using the changes of the image's edge sharpness, which could be obtained by the change of the image's gradient magnitude. Taken together, the laser interference effect can be evaluated accurately. In terms of the laser interference experiment results, the proposed method shows good rationality and feasibility under the disturbing condition of different laser powers, and it can also overcome the inaccuracy caused by the change of the laser-spot position, realizing the evaluation of the laser interference effect objectively and accurately.

  10. Interference phenomena in the dynamical Casimir effect for a single mirror with Robin conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Jeferson D. Lima; Braga, Alessandra N.; Rego, Andreson L. C.; Alves, Danilo T.

    2015-07-01

    In the literature, the interference phenomenon in the particle creation via the dynamical Casimir effect is investigated for cavities with two moving mirrors. Here, considering the Robin boundary condition (BC), we investigate the interference phenomenon produced by just a single moving mirror. Specifically, we consider a real massless scalar field in 1 +1 dimensions submitted to a Robin BC with a time-dependent Robin parameter at the instantaneous position of a moving mirror, and compute the expressions for the spectral distribution and the rate of created particles. These expressions, which include interference terms, generalize those found in the literature related to the isolated effects of a Robin BC with a time-dependent Robin parameter for a fixed mirror, or a Robin BC with a time-independent Robin parameter for a moving mirror. Differently from models where the problem of interference in the dynamical Casimir effect is considered for cavities with two Dirichlet moving mirrors, in the present model the spectrum is a continuum, and the interference pattern exhibits new features, in the sense that different regions of the spectrum can be affected in different manners by constructive or destructive effects. Furthermore, we also investigate interference in the context of superconducting circuits.

  11. Effects of spanwise camber on delta wing aerodynamics: An experimental and theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traub, Lance Wayne

    1999-12-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation into the effects of spanwise camber on delta wings is described. Twenty four flat plate delta wings, encompassing various spanwise camber variations were examined. Testing comprised force balance, surface pressure measurement, 7- hole probe surveys, on-surface flow visualization and measurement of vortex burst trajectories. The low speed experimental investigation was conducted in Texas A&M University's 3' x 4' low speed wind tunnel and a 2' x 3' water tunnel. Theoretical methods developed include an explicit analytic method to predict the lift of spanwise cambered delta wings of constant camber, as well as various other methods to predict the characteristics of vortex flows and their effects on delta wing aerodynamics. The investigation shows that the net effect of non-planarity is an increase in lift for anhedral and a decrease in lift for dihedral compared to the planar wing, with these effects increasing with wing sweep. Consequently, anhedral shows the greatest benefit for most applications. Small anhedral angles are most effective in augmenting lift. Anhedral increases wing efficiency over a comparative planar wing. Anhedral does not, appear to greatly augment the strength of the leading edge vortex as demonstrated by data detailing vortex circulation and from peak surface loading from surface pressures. The major benefit from anhedral would appear to be due to its displacing effect on the vortex trajectory: both drawing it closer to the wing surface and inboard. As the vortex is drawn inboard, its induced surface loading acts on a greater area of the wing. In addition anhedral does not appear to introduce any detrimental effects on longitudinal stability, and does not incur any penalties in terms of vortex burst characteristics. Somewhat surprisingly, although limited in scope, the present variations in the distribution of spanwise camber suggest that camber is most beneficial applied near the wing tips: as is

  12. Unsteady Aerodynamic Effects on the Flight Characteristics of an F-16XL Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhongjun; Lan, C. Edward; Brandon, Jay M.

    2000-01-01

    Unsteady aerodynamic models based on windtunnel forced oscillation test data and analyzed with a fuzzy logic algorithm arc incorporated into an F-16XL flight simulation code. The reduced frequency needed in the unsteady models is numerically calculated by using a limited prior time history of state variables in a least-square sense. Numerical examples arc presented to show the accuracy of the calculated reduced frequency. Oscillatory control inputs are employed to demonstrate the differences in the flight characteristics based on unsteady and quasi-steady aerodynamic models. Application of the unsteady aerodynamic models is also presented and the results are compared with one set of F16XIL longitudinal maneuver flight data. It is shown that the main differences in dynamic response are in the lateral-directional characteristics, with the quasi-steady model being more stable than the flight vehicle, while the unsteady model being more unstable. Similar conclusions can also be made in a simulated rapid sideslipping roll. To improve unsteady aerodynamic modeling, it is recommended to acquire test data with coupled motions in pitch, roll and yaw.

  13. Experimental Study of Electronic Quantum Interference, Photonic Crystal Cavity, Photonic Band Edge Effects for Optical Amplification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-26

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2016-0003 TR-2016-0003 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF ELECTRONIC QUANTUM INTERFERENCE, PHOTONIC CRYSTAL CAVITY, PHOTONIC BAND...2014 – 11 Jan 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Experimental Study of Electronic Quantum Interference, Photonic Crystal Cavity, Photonic Band Edge Effects...tailoring of dispersion and the photonic band gap. The band gap frequency can be matched to tailor the emission from active medium such as quantum

  14. Effect of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) on the Precision of GPS Relative Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, A. N.; Sathyamoorthy, D.; Suldi, A. M.; Hamid, J. R. A.

    2014-02-01

    The successful of GPS observations are dependent on several factors between satellite vehicles and GPS receivers, where low GPS power levels have led to the threat of radio frequency interference (RFI) on the GPS signals. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of RFI on the precision of positions of single and dual frequency receivers through relative positioning technique by taking into consideration the radius of GPS receiver from interference source, length of baseline and response of rejection. Several tests were conducted in real environment by simulating the interference signal towards GPS receivers in the nominated GPS L1 and L2 bands. Calculations were made to indentify the distance and interference signal power between interference source and GPS receiver in order to investigate the level of effect. To be able to study this effect on the precision of GPS positions, the 3D residual positions and geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) have been used. The findings of this study have demonstrated that a sufficient time for the GPS receiver to respond in particular interference signal power level and the radius from the interference source were made as compared to previous work. It was also indicated that the residual positions and GDOPs were affected proportionally when nearly to interference source but not similar for both days due to GPS coverage and other probable errors. Therefore, a good investigation on RFI towards GPS signals should be conducted in secured environment which can control the various GPS error parameters in order to obtain a reliable result on this effect.

  15. Experimental investigation on the effect of slat geometrical configurations on aerodynamic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, Carlos C.; Souza, Daniel S.; Medeiros, Marcello A. F.

    2017-04-01

    Relatively few studies have addressed the slat noise dependence on gap, overlap and deflection angle, although slat noise level and spectral content are topics of increasing concern in the aeronautical industry. This paper presents new experimental data on the subject. An array of microphones placed in a closed-section wind tunnel was used in the experiments. Beamforming signal processing enhanced by DAMAS (Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources) was applied to the data. The experimental data covered a range of angles of attack and Mach numbers, for which the typical slat noise signature features high-level narrow-band peaks, broadband noise and a single broad tone. The narrow-band peaks often dominate the slat noise spectra and arise at Strouhal numbers up to approximately 5. The broadband noise is well characterized for Strouhal numbers between 5 and 20, whereas the broad tone arises for Strouhal above 20. A total of 10 different slat configurations, including variations in gap, overlap and deflection angle were tested. The slat noise dependence on gap, overlap and slat deflection angle was assessed by letting each of them vary separately. The slat configuration exerted a substantial effect on all slat noise components, with variations of up to 20 dB/Hz in the level of the narrow-band peaks. In general, the level of the narrow-band peaks reduced and the high frequency content increased as the gap, overlap, angle of attack and slat deflection increased separately or in combination. The aerodynamically optimized baseline configuration is very distinct from the lowest noise one.

  16. Ground effect on the aerodynamics of three-dimensional hovering wings.

    PubMed

    Lu, H; Lua, K B; Lee, Y J; Lim, T T; Yeo, K S

    2016-10-25

    This paper reports the results of combined experimental and numerical studies on the ground effect on a pair of three-dimensional (3D) hovering wings. Parameters investigated include hovering kinematics, wing shapes, and Reynolds numbers (Re). The results are consistent with the observation by another study (Gao and Lu, 2008 Phys. Fluids, 20 087101) which shows that the cycle-averaged aerodynamic forces generated by two-dimensional (2D) wings in close proximity to the ground can be broadly categorized into three regimes with respect to the ground clearance; force enhancement, force reduction, and force recovery. However, the ground effect on a 3D wing is not as significant as that on a 2D flapping wing reported in (Lu et al 2014 Exp. Fluids, 55 1787); this could be attributed to a weaker wake capture effect on 3D wings. Also, unlike a 2D wing, the leading edge vortex (LEV) remains attached on a 3D wing regardless of ground clearance. For all the wing kinematics considered, the three above-mentioned regimes are closely correlated to a non-monotonic trend in the strength of downwash due to the restriction of root and tip vortex formation, and a positional shift of wake vortices. The root vortices in interaction with the ground induce an up-wash in-between the two wings, causing a strong 'fountain effect' (Maeda and Liu, 2013 J. Biomech. Sci. Eng., 8 344) that may increase the body lift of insects. The present study further shows that changes in wing planform have insignificant influence on the overall trend of ground effect except for a parallel shift in force magnitude, which is caused mainly by the difference in aspect ratio and leading edge pivot point. On the two Reynolds numbers investigated, the results for the low Re case of 100 do not deviate significantly from those of a higher Re = 5000 except for the difference in force magnitudes, since low Reynolds number generates lower downwash, weaker LEV, and lower rotational circulation. Additionally, lower Re

  17. Effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Le; Li, Dayou; Wang, Zuobin Yue, Yong; Zhang, Jinjin; Yu, Miao; Li, Siwei

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference. In this work, four-beam laser interference was used to pattern single crystal silicon wafers for the fabrication of surface structures, and the number of laser pulses was applied to the process in air. By controlling the parameters of laser irradiation, different shapes of silicon structures were fabricated. The results were obtained with the single laser fluence of 354 mJ/cm{sup 2}, 495 mJ/cm{sup 2}, and 637 mJ/cm{sup 2}, the pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, the laser exposure pulses of 30, 100, and 300, the laser wavelength of 1064 nm, and the pulse duration of 7–9 ns. The effects of the heat transfer and the radiation of laser interference plasma on silicon wafer surfaces were investigated. The equations of heat flow and radiation effects of laser plasma of interfering patterns in a four-beam laser interference distribution were proposed to describe their impacts on silicon wafer surfaces. The experimental results have shown that the laser fluence has to be properly selected for the fabrication of well-defined surface structures in a four-beam laser interference process. Laser interference patterns can directly fabricate different shape structures for their corresponding applications.

  18. Unsteady aerodynamic analysis of space shuttle vehicles. Part 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of the unsteady aerodynamics of space shuttle vehicles was performed. The results show that slender wing theory can be modified to give the potential flow static and dynamic characteristics over a large Mach number range from M = 0 to M 1. A semi-empirical analytic approximation is derived for the loads induced by the leading edge vortex; and it is shown that the developed analytic technique gives good prediction of experimentally determined steady and unsteady delta wing aerodynamics, including the effects of leading edge roundness. At supersonic speeds, attached leading edge flow is established and shock-induced flow separation effects become of concern. Analysis of experimental results for a variety of boost configurations led to a definition of the main features of the flow interference effects between orbiter (delta wing) and booster. The effects of control deflection on the unsteady aerodynamics of the delta-wing orbiter were also evaluated.

  19. Probing quantum interference effects in the work distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solinas, P.; Gasparinetti, S.

    2016-11-01

    What is the role of coherence in determining the distribution of work done on a quantum system? We approach this question from an operational perspective and consider a setup in which the internal energy of a closed system is recorded by a quantum detector before and after the system is acted upon by an external drive. We find that the resulting work distribution depends on the initial state of the detector as well as on the choice of the final measurement. We consider two complementary measurement schemes, both of which show clear signatures of quantum interference. We specifically discuss how to implement these schemes in the circuit QED architecture, using an artificial atom as the system and a quantized mode of the electromagnetic field as the detector. Different measurement schemes can be realized by preparing the field either in a superposition of Fock states or in a coherent state and exploiting state-of-the art techniques for the characterization of microwave radiation at the quantum level. More generally, the single bosonic mode we utilize is arguably the minimal quantum detector capable of capturing the complementary aspects of the work distribution discussed here.

  20. Experimental determination of flow-interference effects of wing-mounted, two-dimensional, full-capture propulsion nacelles in close proximity to a vehicle body at a Mach number of 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vahl, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental tests have been conducted to determine possible aerodynamic interference effects due to the lateral positioning of two dimensional propulsion nacelles mounted on a wing surface in close proximity to a vehicle body. The tests were conducted at a Mach number of 6 and a Reynolds number 7 million per foot. The angle of attack range for force tests was -9 deg to 9 deg. The model configurations consisted of combinations of rectangular and trapezoidal cross section bodies with a wing swept 65 and a rectangular planform wing. A pair of two dimensional, flow through propulsion nacelles simulated full capture inlet operation.

  1. Jet Interference Effects on a Model of a Single-Engine Four Jet V/STOL Airplane at Mach Numbers from 0.60 to 1.00

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmeer, James W.; Runckel, Jack F.

    1962-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel to determine the interference from four exhaust jets on the aerodynamic characteristics of a model of a V/STOL airplane. The single- engine four-jet turbofan power plant of the airplane was simulated by inducing tunnel airflow through two large side inlets and injecting the decomposition products of hydrogen peroxide into the internal flow. The heated gas mixture was exhausted through four nozzles located on the sides of the fuselage under the wing, two near the wing leading edge and two forward of the trailing edge; the nozzles were deflected downward 1.5 deg and outward 5.0 deg to simulate cruise conditions. The wing of the model was a clipped delta with leading-edge sweep of 40 deg, aspect ratio of 3.06, taper ratio of 0.218, thickness-chord ratio of 0.09 at the root and 0.07 at the tip, and 10 deg negative dihedral. Aerodynamic and longitudinal stability coefficients were obtained for the model with the tail removed, and for horizontal-tail incidences of 0 deg and -5 deg. Data were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.00, angles of attack from 0 deg to 12 deg, and with jet total-pressure ratios up to 3.1. Jet operation generally caused a decrease in lift, an increase in pitching-moment coefficient, and a decrease in longitudinal stability at subsonic speeds. The jet interference effects on drag were detrimental at a Mach number of 0.60 and favorable at higher speeds for cruising-flight attitudes.

  2. Concurrent working memory task decreases the Stroop interference effect as indexed by the decreased theta oscillations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Tang, D; Hu, L; Zhang, L; Hitchman, G; Wang, L; Chen, A

    2014-03-14

    Working memory (WM) tasks may increase or decrease the interference effect of concurrently performed cognitive control tasks. However, the neural oscillatory correlates of this modulation effect of WM on the Stroop task are still largely unknown. In the present study, behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded from 32 healthy participants during their performance of the single Stroop task and the same task with a concurrent WM task. We observed that the Stroop interference effect represented in both response times (RTs) and theta-band event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP) magnitude reduced under the dual-task condition compared with the single-task condition. The reduction of interference in theta-band ERSP was further positively correlated with interference reduction in RTs, and was mainly explained by the source in the left middle frontal gyrus. In conclusion, the present study suggests that the effect of concurrent WM tasks on the reduction of the Stroop interference effect can be indexed by EEG oscillations in theta-band rhythm in the centro-frontal regions and this modulation was mediated by the reduced cognitive control under the concurrent WM task.

  3. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Sean; Bigatel, Patrick

    2004-10-17

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

  4. TAD- THEORETICAL AERODYNAMICS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, J.

    1994-01-01

    This theoretical aerodynamics program, TAD, was developed to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles with sounding rocket configurations. These slender, axisymmetric finned vehicle configurations have a wide range of aeronautical applications from rockets to high speed armament. Over a given range of Mach numbers, TAD will compute the normal force coefficient derivative, the center-of-pressure, the roll forcing moment coefficient derivative, the roll damping moment coefficient derivative, and the pitch damping moment coefficient derivative of a sounding rocket configured vehicle. The vehicle may consist of a sharp pointed nose of cone or tangent ogive shape, up to nine other body divisions of conical shoulder, conical boattail, or circular cylinder shape, and fins of trapezoid planform shape with constant cross section and either three or four fins per fin set. The characteristics computed by TAD have been shown to be accurate to within ten percent of experimental data in the supersonic region. The TAD program calculates the characteristics of separate portions of the vehicle, calculates the interference between separate portions of the vehicle, and then combines the results to form a total vehicle solution. Also, TAD can be used to calculate the characteristics of the body or fins separately as an aid in the design process. Input to the TAD program consists of simple descriptions of the body and fin geometries and the Mach range of interest. Output includes the aerodynamic characteristics of the total vehicle, or user-selected portions, at specified points over the mach range. The TAD program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 360 computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 123K of 8 bit bytes. The TAD program was originally developed in 1967 and last updated in 1972.

  5. Effects of wing shape, aspect ratio and deviation angle on aerodynamic performance of flapping wings in hover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Aamer; Tian, Fang-Bao; Young, John; Lai, Joseph C. S.

    2016-11-01

    This numerical study is focused on assessing the effect on the aerodynamic hovering performance of wing shapes defined by the radius of the first moment of the wing area ( r 1 ¯ ) and aspect ratio (AR). In addition, the effect of introducing a deviation angle in the kinematics is examined. The performance of r 1 ¯ = 0 . 43 , 0.53, and 0.63 wings with AR of 1.5, 2.96, 4.5, and 6.0 is investigated at Reynolds numbers (Re) = 12, 400, and 13 500. The performance trends of the wing shapes have been observed to be independent of Re for both 2-angle and 3-angle kinematics. This is because high suction pressures associated with the leading-edge vortex are predominantly spread in the distal (away from the wing root) and leeward regions (towards the trailing-edge) of high flapping velocities for all the cases. While the deviation angle is detrimental to the production of lift and power economy (PE, defined as the ratio of the mean lift coefficient to the mean aerodynamic power coefficient) at Re = 12 due to strong viscous effects, it improves PE at Re = 400 and 13 500. A high instantaneous angle of attack at the stroke reversal results in high lift peak for 3-angle kinematics but its effect at Re = 400 and 13 500 is attenuated by strong vortical structures on the underside of the wing. Maximum PE is achieved at AR = 2.96, as a low AR wing does not produce enough lift and high AR wings consume more aerodynamic power. Although the lift is maximized using high r 1 ¯ and AR wings, our results show that low r 1 ¯ and high AR wings are best for maximizing PE for a given lift in insects.

  6. Effect of wing-wake interaction on aerodynamic force generation on a 2D flapping wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lua, K. B.; Lim, T. T.; Yeo, K. S.

    2011-07-01

    This paper is motivated by the works of Dickinson et al. (Science 284:1954-1960, 1999) and Sun and Tang (J Exp Biol 205:55-70, 2002) which provided two different perspectives on the influence of wing-wake interaction (or wake capture) on lift generation during flapping motion. Dickinson et al. (Science 284:1954-1960, 1999) hypothesize that wake capture is responsible for the additional lift generated at the early phase of each stroke, while Sun and Tang (J Exp Biol 205:55-70, 2002) believe otherwise. Here, we take a more fundamental approach to study the effect of wing-wake interaction on the aerodynamic force generation by carrying out simultaneous force and flow field measurements on a two-dimensional wing subjected to two different types of motion. In one of the motions, the wing at a fixed angle of attack was made to follow a motion profile described by "acceleration-constant velocity-deceleration". Here, the wing was first linearly accelerated from rest to a predetermined maximum velocity and remains at that speed for set duration before linearly decelerating to a stop. The acceleration and deceleration phase each accounted for only 10% of the stroke, and the stroke covered a total distance of three chord lengths. In another motion, the wing was subjected to the same above-mentioned movement, but in a back and forth manner over twenty strokes. Results show that there are two possible outcomes of wing-wake interaction. The first outcome occurs when the wing encounters a pair of counter-rotating wake vortices on the reverse stroke, and the induced velocity of these vortices impinges directly on the windward side of the wing, resulting in a higher oncoming flow to the wing, which translates into a higher lift. Another outcome is when the wing encounters one vortex on the reverse stroke, and the close proximity of this vortex to the windward surface of the wing, coupled with the vortex suction effect (caused by low pressure region at the center of the vortex

  7. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Propeller Spinner/Shank Interference. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    A fundamental experimental and theoretical investigation into the aerodynamic interference associated with propeller spinner and shank regions was conducted. The research program involved a theoretical assessment of solutions previously proposed, followed by a systematic experimental study to supplement the existing data base. As a result, a refined computational procedure was established for prediction of interference effects in terms of interference drag and resolved into propeller thrust and torque components. These quantities were examined with attention to engineering parameters such as two spinner finess ratios, three blade shank forms, and two/three/four/six/eight blades. Consideration of the physics of the phenomena aided in the logical deduction of two individual interference quantities (cascade effects and spinner/shank juncture interference). These interference effects were semi-empirically modeled using existing theories and placed into a compatible form with an existing propeller performance scheme which provided the basis for examples of application.

  8. Effect of Escitalopram on Hot Flash Interference: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Janet S.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Larson, Joseph C.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Joffe, Hadine; Reed, Susan D.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the effect of escitalopram 10–20 mg/day versus placebo for reducing hot flash interference in daily life and understand correlates and predictors of reductions in hot flash interference, a key measure of quality of life. Design Multi-site, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Patients 205 midlife women (46% African-American) who met criteria participated. Setting MsFLASH clinical sites in Boston, Indianapolis, Oakland, and Philadelphia. Intervention After baseline, women were randomized to 1 pill of escitalopram 10 mg/day (n=104) or placebo (n=101) with follow-up at 4- and 8-weeks. At week 4, those not achieving 50% fewer hot flashes were increased to 2 pills daily (20 mg/day or 2 placebo pills). Main outcome measures The Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale; Correlates were variables from hot flash diaries; Predictors were baseline demographics, clinical variables, depression, anxiety, sleep quality, and hot flashes. Results Compared to placebo, escitalopram significantly reduced hot flash interference by 6.0 points at week 4 and 3.4 points at week 8 more than placebo (p=0.012). Reductions in hot flash interference correlated with changes in hot flash diary variables. However, baseline variables did not significantly predict reductions in hot flash interference. Conclusions Escitalopram 10–20mg/day for 8 weeks improves women’s quality of life and this benefit did not vary by demographic, clinical, mood, sleep, or hot flash variables. PMID:22480818

  9. Turbulence Effects on the High Angle of Attack Aerodynamics of a Vertically Launched Missile

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    aerodynamic characteristics of the missile may vary greatly as it transitions through these operating speeds. All surface- to - air missiles ...representative of a cruciform tail - control missile with very low aspect ratio wings or dorsal fins. The model was fabricated from 6061 and 2024 aluminum alloy...Lilsewise, in the tail section, are four tail control fins which are fixed in postion at 00 incidence relative

  10. The effect of interference on temporal order memory in individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    DeFord, Nicole E; Landy, Kelly M; Pirogovsky-Turk, Eva; Van Etten, Emily J; Graves, Lisa V; Salmon, David P; Filoteo, J Vincent; Gilbert, Paul E

    2016-08-01

    Memory for the temporal order of items or events in a sequence has been shown to be impaired in older adults and individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). The present study examined the effects of high and low interference on temporal order memory in individuals diagnosed with PD (n=20) and demographically similar healthy older adults (n=20) utilizing a computerized task used in previously published studies. During the sample phase of each trial, a series of eight circles were randomly presented one at a time in eight different spatial locations. Participants were instructed to remember the sequence in which the circles appeared in the locations. During the choice phase, participants were presented with two circles in two different locations and were asked to indicate which circle appeared earliest in the sample phase sequence. The two circles were separated by one of four possible temporal separation lags (0, 2, 4, and 6), defined as the number of circles occurring in the sample phase sequence between the two choice phase circles. Shorter temporal lags (e.g., 0 and 2 lags) were hypothesized to result in higher interference compared to longer temporal lags (e.g., 4 and 6 lags). The results demonstrated that on trials involving high interference, no differences were found between the two groups. However, healthy older adults significantly outperformed individuals with PD (p<0.05) on trials involving low interference. Although differences were found between the PD and healthy older adult groups, both groups significantly improved on low interference trials compared to high interference trials (p<0.001). The findings indicate that temporal order memory improves in healthy older adults and individuals with PD when interference is reduced. However, individuals with PD demonstrated poorer temporal order memory even with less interference. Therefore, temporal order memory is differentially affected by interference in healthy older adults and individuals with PD. Given

  11. Study of the interference effects in an optical cavity for organic light-emitting diode applications.

    PubMed

    Villani, Fulvia; Grimaldi, Immacolata Angelica; Nenna, Giuseppe; Del Mauro, Anna De Girolamo; Loffredo, Fausta; Minarini, Carla

    2010-10-15

    The interference effects generated in a bottom-emitting electroluminescent device fabricated on a polymer underlayer introduced with the aim of improving the anode roughness have been studied. The analysis of the interference fringes at different detection angles and the spatial coherence demonstrates that this phenomenon is due to multiple internal reflections that propagate in the polymer layer. This effect can be eliminated by modifying the polymer thickness and the incidence angle of the electromagnetic radiation at the anode-polymer interface. Inkjet etching technology is adopted for microcavities-shaped polymer structuring to destroy the resonator effect of the optical cavity.

  12. Mechanisms of Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.; Mace, W. Derry; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of the aerodynamic load that acts on a generic rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active flow control was investigated in a wind tunnel test conducted on an approximately 1/3-scale powered rotorcraft model simulating forward flight. The aerodynamic mechanisms that make these reductions, in both the drag and the download, possible were examined in detail through the use of the measured surface pressure distribution on the fuselage, velocity field measurements made in the wake directly behind the ramp of the fuselage and computational simulations. The fuselage tested was the ROBIN-mod7, which was equipped with a series of eight slots located on the ramp section through which flow control excitation was introduced. These slots were arranged in a U-shaped pattern located slightly downstream of the baseline separation line and parallel to it. The flow control excitation took the form of either synthetic jets, also known as zero-net-mass-flux blowing, and steady blowing. The same set of slots were used for both types of excitation. The differences between the two excitation types and between flow control excitation from different combinations of slots were examined. The flow control is shown to alter the size of the wake and its trajectory relative to the ramp and the tailboom and it is these changes to the wake that result in a reduction in the aerodynamic load.

  13. The Effect of Aerodynamic Evaluators on the Multi-Objective Optimization of Flatback Airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M.; Slew, K. Lee; Matida, E.

    2016-09-01

    With the long lengths of today's wind turbine rotor blades, there is a need to reduce the mass, thereby requiring stiffer airfoils, while maintaining the aerodynamic efficiency of the airfoils, particularly in the inboard region of the blade where structural demands are highest. Using a genetic algorithm, the multi-objective aero-structural optimization of 30% thick flatback airfoils was systematically performed for a variety of aerodynamic evaluators such as lift-to-drag ratio (Cl/Cd), torque (Ct), and torque-to-thrust ratio (Ct/Cn) to determine their influence on airfoil shape and performance. The airfoil optimized for Ct possessed a 4.8% thick trailing-edge, and a rather blunt leading-edge region which creates high levels of lift and correspondingly, drag. It's ability to maintain similar levels of lift and drag under forced transition conditions proved it's insensitivity to roughness. The airfoil optimized for Cl/Cd displayed relatively poor insensitivity to roughness due to the rather aft-located free transition points. The Ct/Cn optimized airfoil was found to have a very similar shape to that of the Cl/Cd airfoil, with a slightly more blunt leading-edge which aided in providing higher levels of lift and moderate insensitivity to roughness. The influence of the chosen aerodynamic evaluator under the specified conditions and constraints in the optimization of wind turbine airfoils is shown to have a direct impact on the airfoil shape and performance.

  14. The influence of the elastic vibration of the carrier to the aerodynamics of the external store in air-launch-to-orbit process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Ye, Zheng-Yin; Wu, Jie

    2016-11-01

    The separation between the carrier and store is one of the most important and difficult phases in Air-launch-to-orbit technology. Based on the previous researches, the interference aerodynamic forces of the store caused by the carrier are obvious in the earlier time during the separation. And the interference aerodynamics will be more complex when considering the elastic deformation of the carrier. Focusing on the conditions that in the earlier time during the separation, the steady and unsteady interference aerodynamic forces of the store are calculated at different angle of attacks and relative distances between the carrier and store. During the calculation, the elastic vibrations of the carrier are considered. According to the cause of formations of the interference aerodynamics, the interference aerodynamic forces of the store are divided into several components. The relative magnitude, change rule, sphere of influence and mechanism of interference aerodynamic forces components of the store are analyzed quantitatively. When the relative distance between the carrier and store is small, the interference aerodynamic forces caused by the elastic vibration of the carrier is about half of the total aerodynamic forces of the store. And as the relative distance increases, the value of interference aerodynamic forces decrease. When the relative distance is larger than twice the mean aerodynamic chord of the carrier, the values of interference aerodynamic forces of the store can be ignored. Besides, under the influence of the steady interference aerodynamic forces, the lift characteristics of the store are worse and the static stability margin is poorer.

  15. Exploring the Effect of Sleep and Reduced Interference on Different Forms of Declarative Memory

    PubMed Central

    Schönauer, Monika; Pawlizki, Annedore; Köck, Corinna; Gais, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Many studies have found that sleep benefits declarative memory consolidation. However, fundamental questions on the specifics of this effect remain topics of discussion. It is not clear which forms of memory are affected by sleep and whether this beneficial effect is partly mediated by passive protection against interference. Moreover, a putative correlation between the structure of sleep and its memory-enhancing effects is still being discussed. Design: In three experiments, we tested whether sleep differentially affects various forms of declarative memory. We varied verbal content (verbal/nonverbal), item type (single/associate), and recall mode (recall/recognition, cued/free recall) to examine the effect of sleep on specific memory subtypes. We compared within-subject differences in memory consolidation between intervals including sleep, active wakefulness, or quiet meditation, which reduced external as well as internal interference and rehearsal. Participants: Forty healthy adults aged 18–30 y, and 17 healthy adults aged 24–55 y with extensive meditation experience participated in the experiments. Results: All types of memory were enhanced by sleep if the sample size provided sufficient statistical power. Smaller sample sizes showed an effect of sleep if a combined measure of different declarative memory scales was used. In a condition with reduced external and internal interference, performance was equal to one with high interference. Here, memory consolidation was significantly lower than in a sleep condition. We found no correlation between sleep structure and memory consolidation. Conclusions: Sleep does not preferentially consolidate a specific kind of declarative memory, but consistently promotes overall declarative memory formation. This effect is not mediated by reduced interference. Citation: Schönauer M, Pawlizki A, Köck C, Gais S. Exploring the effect of sleep and reduced interference on different forms of declarative memory

  16. A method of estimating the aerodynamic effects of ordinary and split flaps of airfoils similar to the Clark Y

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, H A

    1936-01-01

    An empirical method is given for estimating the aerodynamic effect of ordinary and split flaps on airfoils similar to the Clark Y. The method is based on a series of charts that have been derived from an analysis of existing wind-tunnel data. Factors are included by which such variables as flap location, flap span, wing aspect ratio, and wing taper may be taken into account. A series of comparisons indicate that the method would be suitable for use in making preliminary performance calculations and in structural design.

  17. Aerodynamics in ground effect and predicted landing ground roll of a fighter configuration with a secondary-nozzle thrust reverser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the in-ground effect aerodynamic characteristics and predicted landing-ground-roll performance of wing-canard fighter configuration with a secondary nozzle thrust reverser was completed. These tests were conducted in the Langley 14 by 22 foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel using a model equipped with a pneumatic jet for thrust simulation of nozzle pressure ratios up to 4.0. The model was tested in the landing rollout configuration at approx. wheel touchdown height for a range of decreasing dynamic pressure from 50 psf down to 10 psf. Landing-ground-roll predictions of the configuration were calculated using the wind tunnel results.

  18. Development of the method of an electrohydrodynamic force effect on a boundary layer for active control of aerodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, B. S.; Khomich, V. Yu.; Chernyshev, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    The results of investigations on the possibility of an electrohydrodynamic force effect on a gas flow implemented with the help of a barrier discharge are presented. A new method of controlling the laminar flow around a base with suppression of instabilities of the incoming flow due to electrohydrodynamic force action on the boundary layer near the forward edge of a swept wing is proposed. An efficient multidischarge actuator system is developed and created for active control of aerodynamic flows with induced-air-flow characteristics exceeding the world analogues.

  19. Effect of location of aft-mounted nacelles on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a high-wing transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeyounis, William K.; Patterson, James C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    As part of a propulsion/airframe integration program at Langley Research Center, tests were conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects of locating flow-through mixed flow engine nacelles in several aft underwing positions on the longitudinal aerodynamics of a high wing transport airplane. D-shaped inlet nacelles were used in the test. Some configurations with antishock bodies and with nacelle toe-in were also tested. Data were obtained for a free stream Mach number range of 0.70 to 0.85 and a model angle-of-attack range from -2.5 to 4.0 degrees.

  20. How personal earthquake experience impacts on the Stroop interference effect: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiang; Su, Yanhua; Li, Hong; Wei, Dongtao; Tu, Shen; Zhang, Qinglin

    2010-11-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were measured when 24 Chinese subjects performed the classical Stroop task. All of subjects had experienced the great Sichuan earthquake (5/12), with 12 people in each of the Far (Chengdu city) and the Close (Deyang city) earthquake experience groups. The behavioral data showed that the Stroop task yielded a robust Stroop interference effect as indexed by longer RT for incongruent than congruent color words in both the Chengdu and Deyang groups. Scalp ERP data showed that incongruent stimuli elicited a more negative ERP deflection (N400-600; Stroop interference effect) than did congruent stimuli between 400-600 ms in the Chengdu group, while the Stroop interference ERP effect was not found in the Deyang group. Dipole source analysis localized the generator of the N400-600 in the right prefrontal cortex (PFC) and was possibly related to conflict monitoring and cognitive control.

  1. Interference effects of two scalar boson propagators on the LHC search for the singlet fermion DM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, P.; Li, Jinmian

    2017-02-01

    A gauge invariant UV-completion for singlet fermion DM interacting with the standard model (SM) particles involves a new singlet scalar. Therefore the model contains two scalar mediators, mixtures of the SM Higgs boson and a singlet scalar boson. Collider phenomenology of the interference effect between these two scalar propagators is studied in this work. This interference effect can be either constructive or destructive in the DM production cross section depending on both singlet scalar and DM masses, and it will soften the final state jets in the full mass region. Applying the CMS mono-jet search to our model, we find the interference effect plays a very important role in the DM search sensitivity, and the DM production cross section of our model is more than one order of magnitude below the LHC sensitivity at current stage.

  2. Aerodynamic braking of high speed ground transportation vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marte, J. E.; Marko, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    The drag effectiveness of aerodynamic brakes arranged in series on a train-like vehicle was investigated. Fixed- and moving-model testing techniques were used in order to determine the importance of proper vehicle-ground interference simulation. Fixed-model tests were carried out on a sting-mounted model: alone; with a fixed ground plane; and in proximity to an image model. Moving-model tests were conducted in a vertical slide-wire facility with and without a ground plane. Results from investigations of one brake configuration are presented which show the effect of the number of brakes in the set and of spacing between brakes.

  3. Interference effects for Higgs boson mediated Z-pair plus jet production

    DOE PAGES

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Furlan, Elisabetta; ...

    2014-11-25

    Here, we study interference effects in the production channel ZZ + jet, in particular focusing on the role of the Higgs boson. This production channel receives contributions both from Higgs boson mediated diagrams via the decay H → ZZ (signal diagrams), as well as from diagrams where the Z bosons couple directly to a quark loop (background diagrams). We consider the partonic processes gggZZ and gqmore » $$\\bar{q}$$ZZ in which interference between signal and background diagrams first occurs. Since interference is primarily an off-resonant effect for the Higgs boson, we treat the Z bosons as on shell. Thus our analysis is limited to the region above threshold, where the invariant mass of the Z-pair mZZ satisfies the condition mZZ>2mZ. In the region mZZ > 300 GeV we find that the interference in the ZZ + jet channel is qualitatively similar to interference in the inclusive ZZ channel. Moreover, the rates are sufficient to study these effects at the LHC once jet-binned data become available.« less

  4. Picture-word interference is a Stroop effect: A theoretical analysis and new empirical findings.

    PubMed

    Starreveld, Peter A; La Heij, Wido

    2016-10-06

    The picture-word interference (PWI) paradigm and the Stroop color-word interference task are often assumed to reflect the same underlying processes. On the basis of a PRP study, Dell'Acqua et al. (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 14: 717-722, 2007) argued that this assumption is incorrect. In this article, we first discuss the definitions of Stroop- and picture-word interference. Next, we argue that both effects consist of at least four components that correspond to four characteristics of the distractor word: (1) response-set membership, (2) task relevance, (3) semantic relatedness, and (4) lexicality. On the basis of this theoretical analysis, we conclude that the typical Stroop effect and the typical PWI effect mainly differ in the relative contributions of these four components. Finally, the results of an interference task are reported in which only the nature of the target - color or picture - was manipulated and all other distractor task characteristics were kept constant. The results showed no difference between color and picture targets with respect to all behavioral measures examined. We conclude that the assumption that the same processes underlie verbal interference in color and picture naming is warranted.

  5. Increased cognitive demands boost the spatial interference effect in bimanual pointing.

    PubMed

    Stanciu, Ioana; Biehl, Stefanie C; Hesse, Constanze

    2016-03-02

    It is beyond controversy that in bimanual coordination tasks, parameter planning related to the movements of one hand influences the planning and execution of movements simultaneously performed with the other hand. A well-researched example of such bimanual interference is the finding that reaction times tend to be longer when preparing bimanual pointing movements with different amplitudes than for equal amplitude movements. Interestingly, these reaction time costs were found to increase when movement targets were cued symbolically (e.g., using letters) as compared to spatially. Therefore, it was suggested that interference may be primarily related to cue translation and response selection processes rather than resulting from cross-talk at the motor programming level. Here, we argue that spatial interference effects do not necessarily depend on the type of cues used but instead depend on the general task demands (difficulty). In two experiments we show that bimanual interference effects can (1) be abolished in symbolic cueing conditions when highly compatible cues placing minimal demands on response selection processes are used and (2) occur in direct/spatial cueing conditions when a secondary cognitively demanding, but movement-unrelated task is performed. Thus, our findings suggest that whether or not interference effects emerge during movement planning depends on the overall task difficulty and hence the resources available during movement preparation.

  6. Interaction Induced Electron Self-Interference in a Semiconductor: The Phonon Staircase Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenrow, J. A.; El Sayed, K.; Stanton, C. J.

    1997-06-01

    The exact quantum mechanics of a model semiconductor system of an electron with a discrete and equidistant energy spectrum interacting with a single phonon mode is presented. An electron initially excited into a coherent superposition of states interacts with phonons thereby creating a self-interference in time which reduces the emission of phonons to isolated bursts. This self-interference effect gives rise to steplike behavior in the relaxation kinetics of the electron and phonons. We show that this ``phonon staircase'' effect is a consequence of a correlated initial electron distribution and the violation of energy conservation in the electron-phonon interaction on short time scales.

  7. Rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith

    1992-01-01

    Means for relatively simple and quick procedures are examined for estimating aerodynamic coefficients of lifting reentry vehicles. The methods developed allow aerospace designers not only to evaluate the aerodynamics of specific shapes but also to optimize shapes under given constraints. The analysis was also studied of the effect of thermomolecular flow on pressures measured by an orifice near the nose of a Space Shuttle Orbiter at altitudes above 75 km. It was shown that pressures corrected for thermomolecular flow effect are in good agreement with values predicted by independent theoretical methods. An incidental product was the insight gained about the free molecular thermal accommodation coefficient applicable under 'real' conditions of high speed flow in the Earth's atmosphere. The results are presented as abstracts of referenced papers. One reference paper is presented in its entirety.

  8. Sleep and memory consolidation: motor performance and proactive interference effects in sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Borragán, Guillermo; Urbain, Charline; Schmitz, Rémy; Mary, Alison; Peigneux, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    That post-training sleep supports the consolidation of sequential motor skills remains debated. Performance improvement and sensitivity to proactive interference are both putative measures of long-term memory consolidation. We tested sleep-dependent memory consolidation for visuo-motor sequence learning using a proactive interference paradigm. Thirty-three young adults were trained on sequence A on Day 1, then had Regular Sleep (RS) or were Sleep Deprived (SD) on the night after learning. After two recovery nights, they were tested on the same sequence A, then had to learn a novel, potentially competing sequence B. We hypothesized that proactive interference effects on sequence B due to the prior learning of sequence A would be higher in the RS condition, considering that proactive interference is an indirect marker of the robustness of sequence A, which should be better consolidated over post-training sleep. Results highlighted sleep-dependent improvement for sequence A, with faster RTs overnight for RS participants only. Moreover, the beneficial impact of sleep was specific to the consolidation of motor but not sequential skills. Proactive interference effects on learning a new material at Day 4 were similar between RS and SD participants. These results suggest that post-training sleep contributes to optimizing motor but not sequential components of performance in visuo-motor sequence learning.

  9. Spin interference controlled by electric field: Ensemble average effect on AAS and AB oscillation amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Junsaku; Bergsten, Tobias

    2008-03-01

    Time reversal symmetric Al’tshuler-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) oscillations are measured in an array of InGaAs mesoscopic loops. We confirm that gate voltage dependence of h/2 e period oscillations is due to spin interference from the effect of ensemble average on the AAS and Aharonov-Bohm (AB) amplitudes. This spin interference is based on the time reversal Aharonov-Casher (AC) effect. The AC interference oscillations are controlled over several periods. This result shows evidence for electrical manipulation of the spin precession angle in an InGaAs two-dimensional electron gas channel. We control the precession rate in a precise and predictable way with an electrostatic gate.

  10. Effect of milling machine roughness and wing dihedral on the supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of a highly swept wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, Christine M.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to assess the effect of surface finish on the longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics of a highly-swept wing at supersonic speeds. A study of the effects of wing dihedral was also made. Included in the tests were four wing models: three models having 22.5 degrees of outboard dihedral, identical except for surface finish, and a zero-dihedral, smooth model of the same planform for reference. Of the three dihedral models, two were taken directly from the milling machine without smoothing: one having a maximum scallop height of 0.002 inches and the other a maximum scallop height of 0.005 inches. The third dihedral model was handfinished to a smooth surface. Tests were conducted in Test Section 1 of the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at NASA-Langley over a range of Mach numbers from 1.8 to 2.8, a range of angle of attack from -5 to 8 degrees, and at a Reynolds numbers per foot of 2 x 10(6). Selected data were also taken at a Reynolds number per foot of 6 x 10(6). Drag coefficient increases, with corresponding lift-drag ratio decreases were the primary aerodynamic effects attributed to increased surface roughness due to milling machine grooves. These drag and lift-drag ratio increments due to roughness increased as Reynolds number increased.

  11. Wind-tunnel studies of the effects of simulated damage on the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes and missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    In order to assess the effects on static aerodynamic characteristics of battle damage to an aircraft or missile, wind tunnel studies were performed on models from which all or parts of the wing or horizontal or vertical tail had been removed. The effects of damage on the lift, longitudinal stability, lateral stability and directional stability of a swept-wing fighter are presented, along with the effects of wing removal on the control requirements of a delta-wing fighter. Results indicate that the loss of a major part of the vertical tail will probably result in the loss of the aircraft at any speed, while the loss of major parts of the horizontal tail generally results in catastrophic instability at subsonic speeds but, at low supersonic speeds, may allow the aircraft to return to friendly territory before pilot ejection. Major damage to the wing may be sustained without the loss of aircraft or pilot. The loss of some of the aerodynamic surfaces of cruise or surface-to-air missiles may result in catastrophic instability or may permit a ballistic trajectory to be maintained, depending upon the location of the lost surface with respect to the center of gravity of the missile.

  12. Aerodynamics: The Wright Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Jennifer Hansen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the basic principles of aerodynamics. Included in the presentation are: a few demonstrations of the principles, an explanation of the concepts of lift, drag, thrust and weight, a description of Bernoulli's principle, the concept of the airfoil (i.e., the shape of the wing) and how that effects lift, and the method of controlling an aircraft by manipulating the four forces using control surfaces.

  13. The site of interference in the saccadic Stroop effect.

    PubMed

    Hermens, Frouke; Walker, Robin

    2012-11-15

    In two experiments, the source of competition in the saccadic Stroop effect was investigated. Colored strings of letters were presented at fixation with colored patches in the surround. The task of the participants was to make an eye movement to the patch in the same color as the central string of letters. Three types of cues were compared: Either the string of letters composed a word indicating a direction (the saccadic Stroop condition), or it was a set of arrow signs, or a peripheral stimulus appeared. Whereas response times and saccade errors were similarly influenced by the different types of cues, saccade trajectory deviations away from the cue were found only for peripheral onsets. A second experiment demonstrated that the absence of the curvature effects for direction words was not due to insufficient time to process the words. The results raise doubts on whether the saccadic Stroop effect is effectively an oculomotor effect and could pose a challenge to models of saccade target selection.

  14. RNA Interference

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIGMS Home > Science Education > RNA Interference Fact Sheet RNA Interference Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is RNA interference? RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural process ...

  15. Effect on interference fits on roller bearing fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine the effects of inner-ring speed and press fits on roller bearing fatigue life. The effects of the resultant hoop and radial stresses on the principal stresses were considered. The maximum shear stresses below the Hertzian contact were determined for different conditions of inner-ring speed and load, and were applied to a conventional roller bearing life analysis. The effect of mean stress was determined using Goodman diagram approach. Hoop stresses caused by press fits and centrifugal force can reduce bearing life by as much as 90 percent. Use of a Goodman diagram predicts life reductions of 20 to 30 percent. The depth of the maximum shear stress remains virtually unchanged.

  16. Prediction of forces and moments for flight vehicle control effectors. Part 2: An analysis of delta wing aerodynamic control effectiveness in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughmer, Mark D.; Ozoroski, L.; Ozoroski, T.; Straussfogel, D.

    1990-01-01

    Many types of hypersonic aircraft configurations are currently being studied for feasibility of future development. Since the control of the hypersonic configurations throughout the speed range has a major impact on acceptable designs, it must be considered in the conceptual design stage. Here, an investigation of the aerodynamic control effectiveness of highly swept delta planforms operating in ground effect is presented. A vortex-lattice computer program incorporating a free wake is developed as a tool to calculate aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. Data generated using this program are compared to experimental data and to data from other vortex-lattice programs. Results show that an elevon deflection produces greater increments in C sub L and C sub M in ground effect than the same deflection produces out of ground effect and that the free wake is indeed necessary for good predictions near the ground.

  17. CO2 absorption/emission and aerodynamic effects of trees on the concentrations in a street canyon in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Feng; Zhan, Jie-Min; Li, Y S; Wai, Onyx W H

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, the effects of trees on CO2 concentrations in a street canyon in Guangzhou, China are examined by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the concentration distribution, taking into account both the CO2 absorption/emission and aerodynamic effects of trees. Simulation results show that, under a 2 m/s southerly prevailing wind condition, CO2 absorption by trees will reduce the CO2 concentration by around 2.5% in the daytime and at the same time the trees' resistance will increase the difference of CO2 concentrations in the street and at the inflow by 43%. As the traffic density increases to 50 vehicles/min, the effect of trees on the ambient CO2 concentration will change from positive to negative. At night, trees have a negative effect on the concentration in the street canyon mainly because of their resistance to airflow. When environmental wind changes, the effect of trees will be different.

  18. Real-Gas Effects on the Aerodynamics of Blunt Cones as Measured in a Hypervelocity Range

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    and 0.3. The cones tested had nominal base diameters of either 1.0 or 1.5 in. and were fabricated of aluminum except for the nosetlps. All cones...high aerodynamic heating conditions. Sabots used were of a conventional four-component design and were fabricated o f Lexan ® . All cones were...whereas the test cones were fabricated with a nominal edge radius of 0.03 in. "Provided b.’, E. O. Marchand, formerly of ARO, Inc. 15 A E D C - T R

  19. Explanation of the effects of leading-edge tubercles on the aerodynamics of airfoils and finite wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Mehdi; Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Fish, Frank

    2010-11-01

    A computational study was conducted to explain the aerodynamic effect of leading edge tubercles on maximum lift coefficient, stall angle of attack (AoA), drag, and post stall characteristics for airfoils as well as finite wings. Past experiments demonstrated airfoils with leading edge tubercles do not improve Clmax, drag, or stall AoA but smoothen post stall characteristics to a great degree. In contrast to airfoils, finite wings with L.E. tubercles improved all aerodynamic characteristics. We explain the stall mechanism of the tubercled wing by considering each L.E. tubercle as a combination of a swept forward and a swept backward wing.There are 3 mechanisms (streamline curvature, accelerated stall, and upwash) that cause Clmax of airfoils with L.E. tubercles always be lower than that of smooth airfoils. We also identify two additional mechanisms which are responsible for improved post-stall characteristics of airfoils with L.E. tubercles. Finally, we discuss why finite wings with L.E. tubercles have higher Clmax and lower drag than their smooth L.E. counterparts by studying effects of wing tip, sweep, and taper ratio.

  20. Effect of bacterial interference on biofilm development by Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Guerrieri, Elisa; Bondi, Moreno; Sabia, Carla; de Niederhäusern, Simona; Borella, Paola; Messi, Patrizia

    2008-12-01

    In the ecology of Legionella pneumophila a crucial role may be played by its relationship with the natural flora; thus we investigated the interactions between Legionella and other aquatic bacteria, particularly within biofilms. Among 80 aquatic bacteria screened for the production of bacteriocin-like substances (BLSs), 66.2% of them were active against L. pneumophila. The possible effect of some of these aquatic bacteria on the development and stability of L. pneumophila biofilms was studied. Pseudomonas fluorescens, the best BLS producer, showed the greatest negative effect on biofilm formation and strongly enhanced the detachment of Legionella. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Pseudomonas putida, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, although producing BLSs at different levels, were less active in the biofilm experiments. Acinetobacter lwoffii did not produce any antagonistic compound and was the only one able to strongly enhance L. pneumophila biofilm. Our results highlight that BLS production may contribute to determining the fate of L. pneumophila within ecological niches. The interactions observed in this study are important features of L. pneumophila ecology, which knowledge may lead to more effective measures to control the persistence of the germ in the environment.

  1. Nutrition and interference competition have interactive effects on the behavior and performance of Argentine ants.

    PubMed

    Kay, Adam D; Zumbusch, Taylor; Heinen, Justa L; Marsh, Tom C; Holway, David A

    2010-01-01

    Food availability often influences competitive outcomes through effects on consumer growth. Although it has received less attention, food availability may also affect competition through nutritional effects on behavior. One hypothesis linking nutrition and competition in ants posits that increased access to carbohydrates favors greater investment in worker traits that underlie behavioral dominance. We tested this hypothesis by varying dietary protein:carbohydrate (P:C) ratios and levels of interspecific interference for Argentine ants (Linepithema humile), a widespread invasive species. As predicted, colonies facing interference increased patrolling more when reared on low P:C diets; this result is the first demonstration of an interactive effect of nutrition and interference on ant colonies. Several results suggest that this dietary effect on patrolling was due primarily to changes in colony size rather than worker behavior. Colonies on lower P:C diets had lower worker mortality and larger final colony sizes. Diet had little effect on per capita patrolling, and worker behavior in performance assays depended more on previous exposure to interference than on diet. Our findings indicate that dietary P:C ratios can influence Argentine ant performance in a competitive environment and suggest a mechanism by which monopolization of carbohydrate-rich resources can help invasive ants displace native ant competitors.

  2. Observation of the Interference Effect in Vibrationally Resolved Electron Momentum Spectroscopy of H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Shan, Xu; Wang, Tian; Wang, Enliang; Chen, Xiangjun

    2014-01-01

    We report the first measurement on vibrationally resolved electron momentum spectroscopy of H2 by using a high-resolution (e, 2e) spectrometer. The vibrational-specific experimental momentum profiles have been obtained and shown to be in agreement with calculations of (e, 2e) ionization cross sections taking into account the vibrational wave functions. Distinct deviations from Franck-Condon predictions have been observed in vibrational ratios of cross sections, which can readily be ascribed to the Young-type two-center interference. Unlike previous (e, 2e) work, the present observation of an interference effect does not rely on the comparison with the one-center atomic cross section.

  3. Quantum Interference and Surface States Effects in Bismuth Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopko, L.; Huber, T.; Nikolaeva, A.

    2010-02-01

    We report the observation of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations for single Bi nanowires with diameter d< 80 nm. The single nanowire samples with glass coating were prepared by the Ulitovsky technique; they were cylindrical single crystals with (10 bar{1} 1) orientation along the wire axis. The surface of Bi nanowire supports surface states which give rise to a significant population of charge carriers with high effective mass that form a highly conducting tube around the nanowire. The oscillations of longitudinal magnetoresistance (MR) of Bi nanowires with two periods Δ B 1 and Δ B 2 proportional to Φ0 and Φ0/2 were observed, where Φ0= h/ e is the flux quantum. From B˜ 8 T down to B = 0 the extremums of Φ0/2 oscillations are shifted up to 3 π at B = 0 which is the manifestation of Berry phase shift due to electron moving in a nonuniform magnetic field. A derivative of MR was measured at various inclined angles. The observed angle variation of the periods is not in agreement with the theoretical dependence Δ( α)=Δ(0)/cos α of the size effect oscillations of the “flux quantization” type. Moreover, the equidistant oscillations of MR exist in transverse magnetic fields under certain rotation angles. An interpretation of the MR oscillations is presented.

  4. Effects of activity interference on annoyance due to aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, K. F.; Powell, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of aircraft flyover noise on annoyance were compared for face to face conversation, reverie, and television viewing. Eighteen 5 minute sessions, each composed of three flyovers, were presented on each of 2 days to subjects in a simulated living room. Twelve pairs of females and 12 pairs of males were tested, once before and once after work. Flyovers varied in peak noise level from 53 to 83 dB, A weighted. On each day, subjects engaged in 18 sessions, six of conversation, six of television viewing, and six of reverie. The subjects completed subjective ratings of annoyance and acceptability following every session. Annoyance and unacceptability rating scores were significantly higher for the activity of television viewing compared to conversation or reverie. There was no difference between judgments during the latter two activities. No differences were found in the judgments when compared on the basis of "fatigue" (before/after work) or sex of the subject.

  5. Repeated Retention Testing Effects Do Not Generalize to a Contextual Interference Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbrother, Jeffrey T.; Shea, John B.; Marzilli, T. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Three experiments examined repeated retention testing effects in a contextual interference (CI) protocol. Retention was assessed at 10 min and 24 hr following acquisition or at just 24-hr for the one-test conditions. Experiments 1 and 2 used speeded-response key-pressing tasks. Dependent measures were total time and errors. Experiment 3 used…

  6. Effects of Interference Between Selected Loci on the Mutation Load, Inbreeding Depression, and Heterosis

    PubMed Central

    Roze, Denis

    2015-01-01

    A classical prediction from single-locus models is that inbreeding increases the efficiency of selection against partially recessive deleterious alleles (purging), thereby decreasing the mutation load and level of inbreeding depression. However, previous multilocus simulation studies found that increasing the rate of self-fertilization of individuals may not lead to purging and argued that selective interference among loci causes this effect. In this article, I derive simple analytical approximations for the mutation load and inbreeding depression, taking into account the effects of interference between pairs of loci. I consider two classical scenarios of nonrandomly mating populations: a single population undergoing partial selfing and a subdivided population with limited dispersal. In the first case, correlations in homozygosity between loci tend to reduce mean fitness and increase inbreeding depression. These effects are stronger when deleterious alleles are more recessive, but only weakly depend on the strength of selection against deleterious alleles and on recombination rates. In subdivided populations, interference increases inbreeding depression within demes, but decreases heterosis between demes. Comparisons with multilocus, individual-based simulations show that these analytical approximations are accurate as long as the effects of interference stay moderate, but fail for high deleterious mutation rates and low dominance coefficients of deleterious alleles. PMID:26269503

  7. Effects of Interference Between Selected Loci on the Mutation Load, Inbreeding Depression, and Heterosis.

    PubMed

    Roze, Denis

    2015-10-01

    A classical prediction from single-locus models is that inbreeding increases the efficiency of selection against partially recessive deleterious alleles (purging), thereby decreasing the mutation load and level of inbreeding depression. However, previous multilocus simulation studies found that increasing the rate of self-fertilization of individuals may not lead to purging and argued that selective interference among loci causes this effect. In this article, I derive simple analytical approximations for the mutation load and inbreeding depression, taking into account the effects of interference between pairs of loci. I consider two classical scenarios of nonrandomly mating populations: a single population undergoing partial selfing and a subdivided population with limited dispersal. In the first case, correlations in homozygosity between loci tend to reduce mean fitness and increase inbreeding depression. These effects are stronger when deleterious alleles are more recessive, but only weakly depend on the strength of selection against deleterious alleles and on recombination rates. In subdivided populations, interference increases inbreeding depression within demes, but decreases heterosis between demes. Comparisons with multilocus, individual-based simulations show that these analytical approximations are accurate as long as the effects of interference stay moderate, but fail for high deleterious mutation rates and low dominance coefficients of deleterious alleles.

  8. Orthographic and Phonological Effects in the Picture-Word Interference Paradigm: Evidence from a Logographic Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bi, Yanchao; Xu, Yaoda; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    One important finding with the picture-word interference paradigm is that picture-naming performance is facilitated by the presentation of a distractor (e.g., CAP) formally related to the picture name (e.g., "cat"). In two picture-naming experiments we investigated the nature of such form facilitation effect with Mandarin Chinese, separating the…

  9. Emotional Facilitation Effect in the Picture-Word Interference Task: An ERP Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Baolin; Xin, Shuai; Jin, Zhixing; Hu, Yu; Li, Yang

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we aimed to verify the emotional facilitation effect in the picture-word interference task using event-related potentials. Twenty-one healthy subjects were asked to categorize the emotional valences of pictures accompanied by emotionally congruent, either centrally or laterally positioned Chinese words. For both the foveal and…

  10. Effects of recent word exposure on emotion-word Stroop interference: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Gootjes, Liselotte; Coppens, Leonora C; Zwaan, Rolf A; Franken, Ingmar H A; Van Strien, Jan W

    2011-03-01

    Attentional bias towards emotional linguistic material has been examined extensively with the emotion-word Stroop task. Although findings in clinical groups show an interference effect of emotional words that relate to the specific concern of the group, findings concerning healthy groups are less clear. In the present study, we investigated whether emotional Stroop interference in healthy individuals is affected by exposure of the words prior to the task. We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine the temporal aspects of Stroop interference. Participants took longer to indicate the colour of negative than of neutral words. Exposure of words prior to the Stroop task increased response latencies, but this effect was equal for neutral and negative words. At the neurophysiological level, we found more positive-going ERPs at later latencies (P290, N400 and LPP) in response to negative than in response to neutral Stroop words. The N400 was less negative for exposed than for new words, but this effect did not interact with the emotional valence of the words. For new (i.e., unexposed) words, the behavioural Stroop interference correlated with the P290, N400 and LPP emotion effects (negative minus neutral words). The successive ERP components suggest better prelexical, semantic, and sustained attentional processing of emotion words, even when the emotional content of the words is task-irrelevant.

  11. Possible role of interference, protein noise, and sink effects in nonphotochemical quenching in photosynthetic complexes.

    PubMed

    Berman, Gennady P; Nesterov, Alexander I; Gurvitz, Shmuel; Sayre, Richard T

    2017-01-01

    We analyze theoretically a simple and consistent quantum mechanical model that reveals the possible role of quantum interference, protein noise, and sink effects in the nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in light-harvesting complexes (LHCs). The model consists of a network of five interconnected sites (excitonic states of light-sensitive molecules) responsible for the NPQ mechanism. The model also includes the "damaging" and the dissipative channels. The damaging channel is responsible for production of singlet oxygen and other destructive outcomes. In our model, both damaging and "dissipative" charge transfer channels are described by discrete electron energy levels attached to their sinks, that mimic the continuum part of electron energy spectrum. All five excitonic sites interact with the protein environment that is modeled using a stochastic process. Our approach allowed us to derive the exact and closed system of linear ordinary differential equations for the reduced density matrix and its first momentums. These equations are solved numerically including for strong interactions between the light-sensitive molecules and protein environment. As an example, we apply our model to demonstrate possible contributions of quantum interference, protein noise, and sink effects in the NPQ mechanism in the CP29 minor LHC. The numerical simulations show that using proper combination of quantum interference effects, properties of noise, and sinks, one can significantly suppress the damaging channel. Our findings demonstrate the possible role of interference, protein noise, and sink effects for modeling, engineering, and optimizing the performance of the NPQ processes in both natural and artificial light-harvesting complexes.

  12. A Novel Effect of Scattered-Light Interference in Misted Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, N. James

    2005-01-01

    Interference rings can be observed in mirrors clouded by condensation, even in diffuse lighting. The effect depends on individual droplets acting as point sources by refracting light into the mirror, so producing coherent wave-trains which are reflected and then scattered again by diffraction round the same source droplet. The secondary wave-train…

  13. The Effect of Aerodynamic Heating on Air Penetration by Shaped Charge Jets and Their Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backofen, Joseph

    2009-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to present recent work modeling thermal coupling between shaped charge jets and their particles with air while it is being penetrated to form a crater that subsequently collapses back onto the jet. This work complements research published at International Symposia on Ballistics: 1) 1987 - Shaped Charge Jet Aerodynamics, Particulation and Blast Field Modeling; and 2) 2007 - Air Cratering by Eroding Shaped Charge Jets. The current work shows how and when a shaped charge jet's tip and jet particles are softened enough that they can erode in a hydrodynamic manner as modeled in these papers. This paper and its presentation includes models for heat transfer from shocked air as a function of jet velocity as well as heat flow within the jet or particle. The work is supported by an extensive bibliographic search including publications on meteors and ballistic missile re-entry vehicles. The modeling shows that a jet loses its strength to the depth required to justify hydrodynamic erosion when its velocity is above a specific velocity related to the shock properties of air and the jet material's properties. As a result, the portion of a jet's kinetic energy converted at the aerodynamic shock into heating transferred back onto the jet affects the energy deposited into the air through drag and ablation which in turn affect air crater expansion and subsequent collapse back onto the jet and its particles as shown in high-speed photography.

  14. About the unidirectionality of interference: insight from the musical Stroop effect.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, Laurent; Perruchet, Pierre; Poulin-Charronnat, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    The asymmetry of interference in a Stroop task usually refers to the well-documented result that incongruent colour words slow colour naming (Stroop effect) but incongruent colours do not slow colour word reading (no reverse Stroop effect). A few other studies have suggested that, more generally, a reverse Stroop effect can be occasionally observed but at the expense of the Stroop effect itself, as if interference was inherently unidirectional, from the stronger to the weaker of the two competing processes. We describe here a situation conducive to a pervasive mutual interference effect. Musicians were exposed to congruent and incongruent note name/note position patterns, and they were asked either to read the word while ignoring the location of the note within the staff, or to name the note while ignoring the note name written inside the note picture. Most of the participants exhibited interference in the two tasks. Overall, this result pattern runs against the still prevalent model of the Stroop phenomenon [Cohen, J. D., Dunbar, K., & McClelland, J. L. (1990). On the control of automatic processes: A parallel distributed processing account of the Stroop effect. Psychological Review, 97(3), 332-361]. However, further analyses lend support to one of the key tenets of the model, namely that the pattern of interference depends on the relative strength of the two competing pathways. The reasons for the impressive differences between the results collected in the present study and in the standard colour-word (or picture-word) paradigms are also examined. We suggest that these differences reveal the importance of stimulus-response contingency in the formation of automatisms.

  15. Retrieval practice can insulate items against intralist interference: Evidence from the list-length effect, output interference, and retrieval-induced forgetting.

    PubMed

    Kliegl, Oliver; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz T

    2016-02-01

    This study sought to determine whether nonselective retrieval practice after study can reduce memories' susceptibility to intralist interference, as it is observed in the list-length effect, output interference, and retrieval-induced forgetting. Across 3 experiments, we compared the effects of nonselective retrieval practice and restudy on previously studied material with regard to these 3 forms of episodic forgetting. When study of an item list was followed by a restudy cycle, recall from a longer list was worse than recall from a shorter list (list-length effect), preceding recall of studied nontarget items impaired recall of the list's target items (output interference), and repeated selective retrieval of some list items attenuated recall of other nonretrieved items at test (retrieval-induced forgetting). In contrast, none of these effects arose when study of the list was followed by a nonselective retrieval cycle. The findings are consistent with a combination of contextual variability theory and a variant of study-phase retrieval theory that assumes that retrieval can create more distinct context features for retrieved items than restudy does for restudied items, thus reducing items' susceptibility to interference relative to restudy cycles. The findings add to the view that nonselective retrieval practice can stabilize and consolidate memories.

  16. The effect of interference on delta modulation encoded video signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a study on the use of the delta modulator as a digital encoder of television signals are presented. The computer simulation was studied of different delta modulators in order to find a satisfactory delta modulator. After finding a suitable delta modulator algorithm via computer simulation, the results are analyzed and then implemented in hardware to study the ability to encode real time motion pictures from an NTSC format television camera. The effects were investigated of channel errors on the delta modulated video signal and several error correction algorithms were tested via computer simulation. A very high speed delta modulator was built (out of ECL logic), incorporating the most promising of the correction schemes, so that it could be tested on real time motion pictures. The final area of investigation concerned itself with finding delta modulators which could achieve significant bandwidth reduction without regard to complexity or speed. The first such scheme to be investigated was a real time frame to frame encoding scheme which required the assembly of fourteen, 131,000 bit long shift registers as well as a high speed delta modulator. The other schemes involved two dimensional delta modulator algorithms.

  17. Quantum Interference Effects and Electrical Conduction in Disordered Metals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisenheimer, Timothy Lee

    We have conducted a series of experiments on thin, disordered metallic films made from a number of different materials, which were aimed at investigating for time dependent conductance fluctuations at low temperatures. The materials included in our survey were Pt, AuPd, Sb, Ag and Bi. Values of the phase breaking length, L_{phi }, which is important in theoretical calculations, were determined from weak localization theory in conjunction with magneto-resistance measurements. Large co-deposited films (typically 50 μm times 10,000 μm) were used as references for system noise and other systematic effects. Samples used in the fluctuation studies were as small as 0.5 μm times 0.5 μm and were made with photo-lithography. The temperature range for this survey was from ~50 mK to ~10K. We have observed conductance fluctuations in samples of Pt, Ag and Bi. Two types of phenomenon were found: single, discrete jumps in the resistance of possibly long duration time (many hours), similar to random telegraph noise, and much faster broad band noise. Comparisons with theories by Feng, Lee, and Stone, and Al'tshuler and co -workers show excellent agreement. Significant conductance fluctuations were not observed in AuPd and Sb samples. However, more extensive experiments are needed with these two materials to show conclusively that no mechanisms are available for producing conductance fluctuations.

  18. A computational platform for considering the effects of aerodynamic and seismic load combination for utility scale horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asareh, Mohammad-Amin; Prowell, Ian; Volz, Jeffery; Schonberg, William

    2016-03-01

    The wide deployment of wind turbines in locations with high seismic hazard has led engineers to take into account a more comprehensive seismic design of such structures. Turbine specific guidelines usually use simplified methods and consider many assumptions to combine seismic demand with the other operational loads effecting the design of these structures. As the turbines increase in size and capacity, the interaction between seismic loads and aerodynamic loads becomes even more important. In response to the need for a computational tool that can perform coupled simulations of wind and seismic loads, a seismic module is developed for the FAST code and described in this research. This platform allows engineers working in this industry to directly consider interaction between seismic and other environmental loads for turbines. This paper details the practical application and theory of this platform and provides examples for the use of different capabilities. The platform is then used to show the suitable earthquake and operational load combination with the implicit consideration of aerodynamic damping by estimating appropriate load factors.

  19. Effects of bending-torsional duct-induced swirl distortion on aerodynamic performance of a centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Hongjuan; Wang, Leilei; Wang, Rui; Yang, Yanzhao

    2017-04-01

    A turbocharger compressor working in commercial vehicles, especially in some passenger cars, often works together with some pipes with complicated geometry as an air intake system, due to limit of available space in internal combustion engine compartments. These pipes may generate various distortions of physical parameters of the air at the inlet of the compressor and therefore the compressor aerodynamic performance deteriorates. Sometimes, the turbocharging engine fails to work at some operation points. This paper investigates the effects of various swirl distortions induced by different bending-torsional intake ducts on the aerodynamic performance of a turbocharger compressor by both 3D numerical simulations and experimental measurements. It was found that at the outlet of the pipes the different inlet ducts can generate different swirl distortions, twin vortices and bulk-like vortices with different rotating directions. Among them, the bulk-like vortices not only affect seriously the pressure distribution in the impeller domain, but also significantly deteriorate the compressor performance, especially at high flow rate region. And the rotating direction of the bulk-like vortices is also closely associated with the efficiency penalty. Besides the efficiency, the transient flow rate through a single impeller channel, or the asymmetric mass flow crossing the whole impeller, can be influenced by two disturbances. One is from the upstream bending-torsional ducts; other one is from the downstream volute.

  20. Effects of forebody strakes and Mach number on overall aerodynamic characteristics of configuration with 55 deg cropped delta wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Rogers, Lawrence W.

    1992-01-01

    A wind tunnel data base was established for the effects of chine-like forebody strakes and Mach number on the longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics of a generalized 55 degree cropped delta wing-fuselage-centerline vertical tail configuration. The testing was conducted in the 7- by 10-Foot Transonic Tunnel at the David Taylor Research Center at free-stream Mach numbers of 0.40 to 1.10 and Reynolds numbers based on the wing mean aerodynamic chord of 1.60 x 10(exp 6) to 2.59 x 10(exp 6). The best matrix included angles of attack from 0 degree to a maximum of 28 degree, angles of sidesip of 0, +5, and -5 degrees, and wing leading-edge flat deflection angles of 0 and 30 degrees. Key flow phenomena at subsonic and transonic conditions were identified by measuring off-body flow visualization with a laser screen technique. These phenomena included coexisting and interacting vortex flows and shock waves, vortex breakdown, vortex flow interactions with the vertical tail, and vortices induced by flow separation from the hinge line of the deflected wing flap. The flow mechanisms were correlated with the longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic data trends.

  1. Impaired cognitive inhibition in schizophrenia: a meta-analysis of the Stroop interference effect.

    PubMed

    Westerhausen, René; Kompus, Kristiina; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2011-12-01

    Schizophrenia has been consistently shown to be associated with impairment in executive functioning. However, although frequently treated as such, the term executive functioning does not refer to a unitary cognitive function; it rather represents a set of basic, lower-level cognitive sub-components, e.g. updating, shifting, and cognitive inhibition. This specification into sub-components allows for a further differentiation of the executive deficits found in schizophrenia. Focusing on the sub-component of cognitive inhibition, we here present a meta-analysis of interference effect as assessed with the Stroop Color-Word Interference paradigm. Including the results of 36 studies with 1081 schizophrenia patients and 1026 healthy control subjects, it was shown that schizophrenia patients exhibit an increased Stroop interference effect both in response time (mean effect size: M(g) = 0.43; 95% confidence interval, CI95%: 0.35-0.52) and accuracy (M(g) = 0.62; CI95%: 0.47-0.77) measures of interference. However, a meta-regression analysis revealed that the size of the effect varies depending on the version of the Stroop paradigm used. Regarding the response time measures of interference, studies using the classical card version of the paradigm showed a significantly larger effect size than studies using a single-trial computerized version of the paradigm (M(g) = 0.60 vs. M(g) = 0.19). Despite of the dissociation between the two versions of the paradigm, the results of the present meta-analysis indicate that the reported global deficits in executive functioning found to be associated with schizophrenia are at least partly due to a reduced ability of cognitive inhibition.

  2. Bleach interference in forensic luminol tests on porous surfaces: more about the drying time effect.

    PubMed

    Castelló, Ana; Francés, Francesc; Verdú, Fernando

    2009-02-15

    As criminals try to avoid leaving clues at the scene of a crime, bloodstains are often washed away, but fortunately for investigators, they are difficult to eliminate completely. Porous surfaces easily retain blood traces, which are sometimes invisible to the naked eye. The reagent of choice for detecting latent blood traces on all types of surfaces is luminol, but its main disadvantage is a high degree of sensitivity to oxidising contaminants in the blood sample. If household bleach is used to clean bloodstains, presumptive tests are invalidated. Hypochlorites, however, are known to be unstable and deteriorate over time, and this feature could be of help in preventing household bleach-induced interference. Previous studies have evaluated the effect of the drying time on nonporous surfaces, but nothing has as yet been published about this effect on porous surfaces. Consequently, this paper reports on hypochlorite interference with luminol reagents used on this type of surface, evaluating the effects of drying time on the household bleach-luminol reaction, and ascertaining whether the drying procedure could be applied to prevent household bleach interference on bloodstained porous surfaces. The results indicate that the drying method may very well overcome household bleach interference in luminol reaction tests, if the investigation allows for an appropriate waiting time.

  3. Gluon-gluon contributions to W+ W- production and Higgs interference effects

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R.Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we complete our re-assessment of the production of W boson pairs at the LHC, by calculating analytic results for the gg {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} {yields} {nu}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}} process including the effect of massive quarks circulating in the loop. Together with the one-loop amplitudes containing the first two generations of massless quarks propagating in the loop, these diagrams can give a significant contribution with a large flux of gluons. One of the component parts of this calculation is the production of a standard model Higgs boson, gg {yields} H and its subsequent decay, H {yields} W{sup +}({yields} {nu}{ell}{sup +})W{sup -}({yields} {ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}). We will quantify the importance of the interference between the Higgs boson production process and the gluon-induced continuum production in the context of searches for the Higgs boson at the Tevatron and the LHC. For instance, for m{sub H} < 140 GeV the effect of the interference typically results in around a 10% reduction in the expected number of Higgs signal events. The majority of this interference is due to non-resonant contributions. Therefore cuts on the transverse mass such as those currently used by the ATLAS collaboration reduce the destructive interference to about a 1% effect. We advocate that a cut on the maximum transverse mass be used in future Higgs searches in this channel.

  4. Quantum interference effects in laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen, deuterium, and helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro, Pedro; Franke, Beatrice; Krauth, Julian J.; Diepold, Marc; Fratini, Filippo; Safari, Laleh; Machado, Jorge; Antognini, Aldo; Kottmann, Franz; Indelicato, Paul; Pohl, Randolf; Santos, José Paulo

    2015-08-01

    Quantum interference between energetically close states is theoretically investigated, with the state structure being observed via laser spectroscopy. In this work, we focus on hyperfine states of selected hydrogenic muonic isotopes, and on how quantum interference affects the measured Lamb shift. The process of photon excitation and subsequent photon decay is implemented within the framework of nonrelativistic second-order perturbation theory. Due to its experimental interest, calculations are performed for muonic hydrogen, deuterium, and helium-3. We restrict our analysis to the case of photon scattering by incident linear polarized photons and the polarization of the scattered photons not being observed. We conclude that while quantum interference effects can be safely neglected in muonic hydrogen and helium-3, in the case of muonic deuterium there are resonances with close proximity, where quantum interference effects can induce shifts up to a few percent of the linewidth, assuming a pointlike detector. However, by taking into account the geometry of the setup used by the CREMA collaboration, this effect is reduced to less than 0.2% of the linewidth in all possible cases, which makes it irrelevant at the present level of accuracy.

  5. The Influence of the Aerodynamic Span Effect on the Magnitude of the Torsional-Divergence Velocity and on the Shape of the Corresponding Deflection Mode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1944-02-01

    torsional- divergente problem.which takes into.account the a.erod.ynadicspan - effect. The developments are-based on-the theory of tor- sion of straight...indicat-ethat neglect of the aerodynamic span effect may lead to an appreciable underestimation of the torsional- divergente velocity, the difference

  6. Lifetime-vibrational interference effects in resonantly excited x-ray emission spectra of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.

    1997-04-01

    The parity selection rule for resonant X-ray emission as demonstrated for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} can be seen as an effect of interference between coherently excited degenerate localized core states. One system where the core state degeneracy is not exact but somewhat lifted was previously studied at ALS, namely the resonant X-ray emission of amino-substituted benzene (aniline). It was shown that the X-ray fluorescence spectrum resulting from excitation of the C1s at the site of the {open_quotes}aminocarbon{close_quotes} could be described in a picture separating the excitation and the emission processes, whereas the spectrum corresponding to the quasi-degenerate carbons could not. Thus, in this case it was necessary to take interference effects between the quasi-degenerate intermediate core excited states into account in order to obtain agreement between calculations and experiment. The different vibrational levels of core excited states in molecules have energy splittings which are of the same order of magnitude as the natural lifetime broadening of core excitations in the soft X-ray range. Therefore, lifetime-vibrational interference effects are likely to appear and influence the band shapes in resonant X-ray emission spectra. Lifetime-vibrational interference has been studied in non-resonant X-ray emission, and in Auger spectra. In this report the authors discuss results of selectively excited soft X-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules, where they focus on lifetime-interference effects appearing in the band shapes.

  7. Long-lasting semantic interference effects in object naming are not necessarily conceptually mediated

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Emma; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig

    2015-01-01

    Long-lasting interference effects in picture naming are induced when objects are presented in categorically related contexts in both continuous and blocked cyclic paradigms. Less consistent context effects have been reported when the task is changed to semantic classification. Experiment 1 confirmed the recent finding of cumulative facilitation in the continuous paradigm with living/non-living superordinate categorization. To avoid a potential confound involving participants responding with the identical superordinate category in related contexts in the blocked cyclic paradigm, we devised a novel set of categorically related objects that also varied in terms of relative age – a core semantic type associated with the adjective word class across languages. Experiment 2 demonstrated the typical interference effect with these stimuli in basic level naming. In Experiment 3, using the identical blocked cyclic paradigm, we failed to observe semantic context effects when the same pictures were classified as younger–older. Overall, the results indicate the semantic context effects in the two paradigms do not share a common origin, with the effect in the continuous paradigm arising at the level of conceptual representations or in conceptual-to-lexical connections while the effect in the blocked cyclic paradigm most likely originates at a lexical level of representation. The implications of these findings for current accounts of long-lasting interference effects in spoken word production are discussed. PMID:25999892

  8. Interference of Wing and Fuselage from Tests of 209 Combinations in the NACA Variable-Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Ward, Kenneth E

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests of 209 simple wing-fuselage combinations made in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel to provide information regarding the effects of aerodynamic interference between wings and fuselages at a large value of Reynolds number.

  9. Interference effect on a heavy Higgs resonance signal in the γγ and ZZ channels

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Jeonghyeon; Yoon, Yeo Woong; Jung, Sunghoon

    2016-03-24

    The resonance-continuum interference is usually neglected when the width of a resonance is small compared to the resonance mass. We reexamine this standard by studying the interference effects in high-resolution decay channels, γγ and ZZ, of the heavy Higgs boson H in nearly aligned two-Higgs-doublet models. For the H with a sub-percent width-to-mass ratio, we find that, in the parameter space where the LHC 14 TeV ZZ resonance search can be sensitive, the interference effects can modify the ZZ signal rate by O(10)% and the exclusion reach by O(10) GeV. In other parameter space where the ZZ or γγ signalmore » rate is smaller, the LHC 14 TeV reach is absent, but a resonance shape can be much more dramatically changed. In particular, the γγ signal rate can change by O(100)%. Relevant to such parameter space, we suggest variables that can characterize a general resonance shape. Furthermore, we also illustrate the relevance of the width on the interference by adding nonstandard decay modes of the heavy Higgs boson.« less

  10. Predator interference effects on biological control: The "paradox" of the generalist predator revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshad, Rana D.; Bhowmick, Suman; Quansah, Emmanuel; Basheer, Aladeen; Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar

    2016-10-01

    An interesting conundrum in biological control questions the efficiency of generalist predators as biological control agents. Theory suggests, generalist predators are poor agents for biological control, primarily due to mutual interference. However field evidence shows they are actually quite effective in regulating pest densities. In this work we provide a plausible answer to this paradox. We analyze a three species model, where a generalist top predator is introduced into an ecosystem as a biological control, to check the population of a middle predator, that in turn is depredating on a prey species. We show that the inclusion of predator interference alone, can cause the solution of the top predator equation to blow-up in finite time, while there is global existence in the no interference case. This result shows that interference could actually cause a population explosion of the top predator, enabling it to control the target species, thus corroborating recent field evidence. Our results might also partially explain the population explosion of certain species, introduced originally for biological control purposes, such as the cane toad (Bufo marinus) in Australia, which now functions as a generalist top predator. We also show both Turing instability and spatio-temporal chaos in the model. Lastly we investigate time delay effects.

  11. Interference effects between memory systems in the acquisition of a skill.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Marie-Hélène; Cohen, Henri

    2016-10-01

    There is now converging evidence that the declarative memory system (hippocampus dependent) contributes to sequential motor learning in concert with the procedural memory system (striatum dependent). Because of the competition for shared neuronal resources, introducing a declarative memory task can impair learning of a new motor sequence and interference may occur during the procedural consolidation process. Here, we investigated the extent to which interference effects between memory systems are seen at the retrieval phase of skill learning. Healthy participants were assigned to a control (n = 15) or a declarative condition (n = 15) and trained on a sequence of finger movements (FOS task). Both groups showed similar improvement at the end of the practice session on the first day. Twenty-four hours later, controls were tested solely on the FOS task, while subjects in the declarative condition first engaged in a visuospatial task. Additional offline gains in performance were observed only in the control condition. The introduction of a visuospatial memory task just before retrieval of the motor skill was sufficient to eliminate these gains. This suggests that interference between procedural and declarative memory systems may also occur during subsequent motor recall. It is proposed that the interference effects are linked, in part, to the spatial nature of the motor and declarative tasks, which specifically depends upon hippocampal involvement.

  12. Does motor interference arise from mirror system activation? The effect of prior visuo-motor practice on automatic imitation.

    PubMed

    Capa, Rémi L; Marshall, Peter J; Shipley, Thomas F; Salesse, Robin N; Bouquet, Cédric A

    2011-03-01

    Action perception may involve a mirror-matching system, such that observed actions are mapped onto the observer's own motor representations. The strength of such mirror system activation should depend on an individual's experience with the observed action. The motor interference effect, where an observed action interferes with a concurrently executed incongruent action, is thought to arise from mirror system activation. However, this view was recently challenged. If motor interference arises from mirror system activation, this effect should be sensitive to prior sensorimotor experience with the observed action. To test this prediction, we measured motor interference in two groups of participants observing the same incongruent movements. One group had received brief visuo-motor practice with the observed incongruent action, but not the other group. Action observation induced a larger motor interference in participants who had practiced the observed action. This result thus supports a mirror system account of motor interference.

  13. Experimental study of the effects of Reynolds number on high angle of attack aerodynamic characteristics of forebodies during rotary motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauley, H.; Ralston, J.; Dickes, E.

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Defense Research Agency (United Kingdom) have ongoing experimental research programs in rotary-flow aerodynamics. A cooperative effort between the two agencies is currently underway to collect an extensive database for the development of high angle of attack computational methods to predict the effects of Reynolds number on the forebody flowfield at dynamic conditions, as well as to study the use of low Reynolds number data for the evaluation of high Reynolds number characteristics. Rotary balance experiments, including force and moment and surface pressure measurements, were conducted on circular and rectangular aftbodies with hemispherical and ogive noses at the Bedford and Farnborough wind tunnel facilities in the United Kingdom. The bodies were tested at 60 and 90 deg angle of attack for a wide range of Reynolds numbers in order to observe the effects of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow separation on the forebody characteristics when rolling about the velocity vector.

  14. Effect of aileron deflections on the aerodynamic characteristics of a semispan model of a subsonic energy-efficient transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. F.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 8 Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel to determine the effect of aileron deflections on the aerodynamic characteristics of a subsonic energy efficient transport (EET) model. The semispan model had an aspect ratio 10 supercritical wing and was configured with a conventionally located set of ailerons (i.e., a high speed aileron located inboard and a low speed aileron located outboard). Data for the model were taken over a Mach number range from 0.30 to 0.90 and an angle of attack range from approximately -2 deg to 10 deg. The Reynolds number was 2.5 million per foot for Mach number = 0.30 and 4 million per foot for the other Mach numbers. Model force and moment data, aileron effectiveness parameters, aileron hinge moment data, otherwise pressure distributions, and spanwise load data are presented.

  15. Forcing function effects on unsteady aerodynamic gust response. I - Forcing functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Gregory H.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1992-01-01

    The paper investigates the fundamental gust modeling assumption on the basis of a series of experiments performed in the Purdue Annular Cascade Research Facility. The measured unsteady flow fields are compared to linear-theory gust requirements. The perforated plate forcing functions closely resemble linear-theory forcing functions, with the static pressure fluctuations small and the periodic velocity vectors parallel to the downstream mean-relative flow angle over the entire periodic cycle. The airfoil forcing functions exhibit characteristics far from linear-theory gusts, with the alignment of the velocity vectors and the static pressure fluctuation amplitudes dependent on the rotor-loading condition, rotor solidity, and the inlet mean-relative flow angle. It is shown that airfoil wakes, both compressor and turbine, cannot be modeled with the boundary conditions of current state-of-the-art linear unsteady aerodynamic theory.

  16. Effect of anisotropic turbulence on aerodynamic noise. [Lighthill theory mathematical model for axisymmetric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M.; Rosenbaum, B.

    1973-01-01

    A model based on Lighthill's theory for predicting aerodynamic noise from a turbulent shear flow is developed. This model is a generalization of the one developed by Ribner. It does not require that the turbulent correlations factor into space and time-dependent parts. It replaces his assumption of isotropic turbulence by the more realistic one of axisymmetric turbulence. In the course of the analysis, a hierarchy of equations is developed wherein each succeeding equation involves more assumptions than the preceding equation but requires less experimental information for its use. The implications of the model for jet noise are discussed. It is shown that for the particular turbulence data considered anisotropy causes the high-frequency self-noise to be beamed downstream.

  17. A computer program for wing subsonic aerodynamic performance estimates including attainable thrust and vortex lift effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.; Walkley, K. B.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical methods incorporated into a computer program to provide estimates of the subsonic aerodynamic performance of twisted and cambered wings of arbitrary planform with attainable thrust and vortex lift considerations are described. The computational system is based on a linearized theory lifting surface solution which provides a spanwise distribution of theoretical leading edge thrust in addition to the surface distribution of perturbation velocities. The approach used relies on a solution by iteration. The method also features a superposition of independent solutions for a cambered and twisted wing and a flat wing of the same planform to provide, at little additional expense, results for a large number of angles of attack or lift coefficients. A previously developed method is employed to assess the portion of the theoretical thrust actually attainable and the portion that is felt as a vortex normal force.

  18. Effects of aerodynamic heating and TPS thermal performance uncertainties on the Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, W. D.; Derry, S. M.; Maraia, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for estimating uncertainties in the aerodynamic-heating and thermal protection system (TPS) thermal-performance methodologies developed for the Shuttle Orbiter is presented. This procedure is used in predicting uncertainty bands around expected or nominal TPS thermal responses for the Orbiter during entry. Individual flowfield and TPS parameters that make major contributions to these uncertainty bands are identified and, by statistical considerations, combined in a manner suitable for making engineering estimates of the TPS thermal confidence intervals and temperature margins relative to design limits. Thus, for a fixed TPS design, entry trajectories for future Orbiter missions can be shaped subject to both the thermal-margin and confidence-interval requirements. This procedure is illustrated by assessing the thermal margins offered by selected areas of the existing Orbiter TPS design for an entry trajectory typifying early flight test missions.

  19. Effects of independent variation of Mach and Reynolds numbers on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of the NACA 0012 airfoil section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladson, Charles L.

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive data base is given for the low speed aerodynamic characteristics of the NACA 0012 airfoil section. The Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel is the facility used to obtain the data. Included in the report are the effects of Mach number and Reynolds number and transition fixing on the aerodynamic characteristics. Presented are also comparisons of some of the results with previously published data and with theoretical estimates. The Mach number varied from 0.05 to 0.36. The Reynolds number, based on model chord, varied from 3 x 10 to the 6th to 12 x 10 to the 6th power.

  20. Effects of quantum interference in spectra of cascade spontaneous emission from multilevel systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, A. A.; Yudson, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    A general expression for the spectrum of cascade spontaneous emission from an arbitrary multilevel system is presented. Effects of the quantum interference of photons emitted in different transitions are analyzed. These effects are especially essential when the transition frequencies are close. Several examples are considered: (i) Three-level system; (ii) Harmonic oscillator; (iii) System with equidistant levels and equal rates of the spontaneous decay for all the transitions; (iv) Dicke superradiance model.

  1. Application of the controlled boundary layer concept for the wall interference reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. I.; Kursakov, I. A.; Streltsov, E. V.

    2016-10-01

    Traditional boundaries of transonic wind tunnels (perforated and slotted walls) have some disadvantages that do not allow to completely remove wall interference on all main aerodynamic characteristics. This article focuses on the results of implementation of new boundary condition based, in general, on the idea of jet boundaries. Authors examine the implementation of the controlled boundary layer on solid walls, which characteristics were artificially increased with the aim of near-wall spoiler grid mounted at the test section entrance. The analysis underlines significant decreasing of wall interference on all main aerodynamic characteristics, including lift coefficient and pitching moment coefficient. We conclude that realization of the controlled boundary layer might become simple and rather effective method of wall-interference reduction.

  2. Typicality effects in picture-word interference paradigm: An evaluation of the response exclusion hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yanhong; Zhang, Jijia; Yin, Guanhai; Hu, Senqi; Zhang, Entao

    2015-06-01

    The response exclusion hypothesis suggests that the polarity of semantic effects in the picture-word interference paradigm is determined by the response-relevant criteria. Semantic interference effects would be observed when semantically related distractor words satisfy the response-relevant criteria; otherwise, semantic facilitation effects should be found. The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the response exclusion hypothesis by exploring the typicality effects in pictures naming. In two experiments, pictures of objects were named either in the context of verb distractor words with different typicality of passive functions or in the context of adjective distractor words with different typicality of characteristics. Facilitation effects were observed in context of typical verbs and adjectives, while interference effects were observed in the context of atypical verbs and adjectives. Given that neither typical nor atypical distractor words satisfy the response-relevant criteria to produce noun, these findings are problematic for the response exclusion hypothesis. Role of syntagmatic relationships in lexical retrieval was invoked to explain present findings.

  3. Effect of quantum interference on absorption of light in metamaterial hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mahi R.; Davieau, Kieffer; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the effect of quantum interference on the absorption of light in a quantum emitter and metamaterial system. The system was comprised of a dielectric substrate doped with quantum emitters and metallic split ring resonators that included metallic rods. At the interface between the dielectric substrate and the metal are surface plasmon polaritons; these interact with excitons, which are present in quantum emitters. Quantum interference occurs due to the interaction between excitons and surface plasmon polaritons. It is also considered that excitons decay from an excited state to the ground state due to the radiative and nonradiative decay processes. The quantum interference phenomenon occurs between excitons decay rates. The density matrix method is used to calculate the absorption of light in the presence of both radiative and nonradiative processes. It is found that there is a decrease in the absorption of light by metamaterial hybrids due to quantum interference. There is also an increase in the absorption of light when the resonant frequencies of two excitons are in resonance with the surface plasmon polariton. Absorption peaks are shifted and broadened due to the surface plasmon polariton coupling. These findings suggest that the optical absorption properties of a metamaterial hybrid can be tuned by doping the supporting substrate with quantum emitters.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic interference with the edge pedestal motional Stark effect diagnostic on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    King, J. D.; Makowski, M. A.; Holcomb, C. T.; Allen, S. L.; Hill, D. N.; Meyer, W. H.; Geer, R.; La Haye, R. J.; Petty, C. C.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Turco, F.; Rhodes, T. L.; Morse, E. C.

    2011-03-15

    Accurate measurement of internal magnetic field direction using motional Stark effect (MSE) polarimetry in the edge pedestal is desired for nearly all tokamak scenario work. A newly installed 500 kHz 32-channel digitizer on the MSE diagnostic of DIII-D allows full spectral information of the polarimeter signal to be recovered for the first time. Fourier analysis of this data has revealed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations in the plasma edge pedestal at {rho}{>=} 0.92. By correlating edge localized mode fluctuations seen on lock-in amplifier outputs with MSE spectrograms, it has been shown that edge pedestal tearing mode fluctuations cause interference with MSE second harmonic instrument frequencies. This interference results in unrecoverable errors in the real-time polarization angle measurement that are more than an order of magnitude larger than typical polarimeter uncertainties. These errors can cause as much as a 38% difference in local q. By using a redundant measure of the linear polarization found at the fourth harmonic photo-elastic modulator (PEM) frequency, MHD interference can be avoided. However, because of poorer signal-to-noise the fourth harmonic signal computed polarization angle shows no improvement over the MHD polluted second harmonics. MHD interference could be avoided in future edge pedestal tokamak polarimeters by utilizing PEMs with higher fundamental frequencies and a greater separation between their frequencies.

  5. Rubber hand presentation modulates visuotactile interference effect especially in persons with high autistic traits.

    PubMed

    Wada, Makoto; Ide, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Persons with high autistic traits showed diverse reactions as to their multisensory integration, whereas neurotypical persons adequately integrate visual and tactile information. Successive visual stimuli sometimes interfere ordering of successive tactile stimuli. Presentation of a hand-shaped object would affect the interference. Besides, its associations with autistic traits have not been reported. Here, we investigated the effect of a rubber hand presentation on interferences to tactile temporal order judgment by successive visual stimuli. We also investigated whether individual differences associated with autistic traits. A rubber hand was placed palm down in front of the participant in one condition, while in other conditions, it was inverted or was not presented. Participants were required to judge the temporal order of tactile stimuli presented to the index finger and ring finger of their unseen right hand, and needed to ignore the visual stimuli placed on the corresponding fingers of the rubber hand. When incongruent visual stimuli were delivered along with presentation of the rubber hand, the participant's judgment was notably reversed. In contrast, the degree of reversals significantly decreased when the rubber hand was not presented or presented in an inverted direction. Additionally, we found that participants with high autistic traits tended to show large reversal with the rubber hand presentation, while they showed small reversal when the rubber hand was inverted. Our results suggest that rubber hand corresponding to one's own hand facilitates visuotactile interference. Furthermore, autistic traits may affect the integration of visuotactile inputs when the rubber hand is presented.

  6. Learning to diminish the effects of proactive interference: Reducing false memory for young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, Larry L.; Wahlheim, Christopher N.; Rhodes, Matthew G.; Daniels, Karen A.; Rogers, Chad S.

    2011-01-01

    Results from two experiments revealed that prior experience with proactive interference (PI) diminished PI’s effects for both young and older adults. Participants were given two rounds of experience, with different materials, in a situation that produced PI. Comparisons with a control condition showed that the effects of PI on accuracy and on high-confidence intrusion errors (false memory) were reduced on the second round, as compared with those on the first. Also, the ability of confidence to diagnose accuracy of responding improved across rounds. Effects of prior experience with PI depended on feedback given at the time of test (Experiment 1). At least in part, the diminishment of PI resulted from participants’ allocating more attention to interference items during study in the second round than in the first (Experiment 2). Implications of the results for interpreting age differences in PI and false memory are discussed. PMID:20852244

  7. Classical Aerodynamic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A collection of papers on modern theoretical aerodynamics is presented. Included are theories of incompressible potential flow and research on the aerodynamic forces on wing and wing sections of aircraft and on airship hulls.

  8. Aerodynamics at NASA JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicker, Darby

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing aerodynamics at NASA Johnson Space Center is shown. The topics include: 1) Personal Background; 2) Aerodynamic Tools; 3) The Overset Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Process; and 4) Recent Applicatoins.

  9. The word class effect in the picture–word interference paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Niels; Melinger, Alissa; Mahon, Bradford Z.; Finkbeiner, Matthew; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    The word class effect in the picture–word interference paradigm is a highly influential finding that has provided some of the most compelling support for word class constraints on lexical selection. However, methodological concerns called for a replication of the most convincing of those effects. Experiment 1 was a direct replication of Pechmann and Zerbst (2002; Experiment 4). Participants named pictures of objects in the context of noun and adverb distractors. Naming took place in bare noun and sentence frame contexts. A word class effect emerged in both bare noun and sentence frame naming conditions, suggesting a semantic origin of the effect. In Experiment 2, participants named objects in the context of noun and verb distractors whose word class relationship to the target and imageability were orthogonally manipulated. As before, naming took place in bare noun and sentence frame naming contexts. In both naming contexts, distractor imageability but not word class affected picture naming latencies. These findings confirm the sensitivity of the picture–word interference paradigm to distractor imageability and suggest the paradigm is not sensitive to distractor word class. The results undermine the use of the word class effect in the picture–word interference paradigm as supportive of word class constraints during lexical selection. PMID:19998070

  10. Subgap tunneling via a quantum interference effect: Insulators and charge density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhot, S.; Mélin, R.

    2007-11-01

    A quantum interference effect is discussed for subgap tunneling over a distance comparable to the coherence length, which is a consequence of “advanced-advanced” and “retarded-retarded” transmission modes [Altland and Zirnbauer, Phys. Rev. B 55, 1142 (1997)]. Effects typical of disorder are obtained from the interplay between multichannel averaging and higher order processes in the tunnel amplitudes. Quantum interference effects similar to those occurring in normal tunnel junctions explain magnetoresistance oscillations of a CDW pierced by nanoholes [Latyshev , Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 919 (1997)], having periodicity h/2e as a function of the flux enclosed in the nanohole. Subgap tunneling is coupled to the sliding motion by charge accumulation in the interrupted chains. The effect is within the same trend as random matrix theory for normal metal-CDW hybrids [Visscher , Phys. Rev. B 62, 6873 (2000)]. We suggest that the experiment by Latyshev probes weak localizationlike properties of evanescent quasiparticles, not an interference effect related to the quantum-mechanical ground state.

  11. The aerodynamic effect of fillet radius in a low speed compressor cascade. Thesis - Von Karman Inst. for Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlett, Brian P.

    1991-01-01

    The aerodynamic effects of fillet size in a low speed compressor cascade were experimentally studied. Two blade profiles were used during the experiment, namely a controlled diffusion blade and a double circular arc blade. Cascades were tested with three fillet radii and two boundary layer thicknesses over a large range of incidence angles. The cascade performance was determined by extensive downstream flow measurements using a two head, 5 hole pressure probe. Results differ significantly between the two types of blades tested. As fillet radius increases secondary flows and total pressure losses were found to increase for the controlled diffusion blades; whereas, for the double circular arc blades the losses decrease, particularly at high incidence angles.

  12. An Investigation of the Impact of Aerodynamic Model Fidelity on Close-In Combat Effectiveness Prediction in Piloted Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persing, T. Ray; Bellish, Christine A.; Brandon, Jay; Kenney, P. Sean; Carzoo, Susan; Buttrill, Catherine; Guenther, Arlene

    2005-01-01

    Several aircraft airframe modeling approaches are currently being used in the DoD community for acquisition, threat evaluation, training, and other purposes. To date there has been no clear empirical study of the impact of airframe simulation fidelity on piloted real-time aircraft simulation study results, or when use of a particular level of fidelity is indicated. This paper documents a series of piloted simulation studies using three different levels of airframe model fidelity. This study was conducted using the NASA Langley Differential Maneuvering Simulator. Evaluations were conducted with three pilots for scenarios requiring extensive maneuvering of the airplanes during air combat. In many cases, a low-fidelity modified point-mass model may be sufficient to evaluate the combat effectiveness of the aircraft. However, in cases where high angle-of-attack flying qualities and aerodynamic performance are a factor or when precision tracking ability of the aircraft must be represented, use of high-fidelity models is indicated.

  13. Effect of tail size reductions on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a three surface F-15 model with nonaxisymmetric nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frassinelli, Mark C.; Carson, George T., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects of horizontal and vertical tail size reductions on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a modified F-15 model with canards and 2-D convergent-divergent nozzles. Quantifying the drag decrease at low angles of attack produced by tail size reductions was the primary focus. The model was tested at Mach numbers of 0.40, 0.90, and 1.20 over an angle of attack of -2 degree to 10 degree. The nozzle exhaust flow was simulated using high pressure air at nozzle pressure ratios varying from 1.0 (jet off) to 7.5. Data were obtained on the baseline configuration with and without tails as well as with reduced horizontal and/or vertical tail sizes that were 75, 50, and 25 percent of the baseline tail areas.

  14. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J.; Hessenius, Kristin A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Hicks, Gary; Richardson, Pamela F.; Unger, George; Neumann, Benjamin; Moss, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The annual accomplishments is reviewed for the Aerodynamics Division during FY 1991. The program includes both fundamental and applied research directed at the full spectrum of aerospace vehicles, from rotorcraft to planetary entry probes. A comprehensive review is presented of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications; CFD validation; transition and turbulence physics; numerical aerodynamic simulation; test techniques and instrumentation; configuration aerodynamics; aeroacoustics; aerothermodynamics; hypersonics; subsonics; fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  15. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Schairer, Edward; Hicks, Gary; Wander, Stephen; Blankson, Isiaiah; Rose, Raymond; Olson, Lawrence; Unger, George

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a comprehensive review of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation, transition and turbulence physics, numerical aerodynamic simulation, drag reduction, test techniques and instrumentation, configuration aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, aerothermodynamics, hypersonics, subsonic transport/commuter aviation, fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  16. Large sample randomization inference of causal effects in the presence of interference

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lan; Hudgens, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, increasing attention has focused on making causal inference when interference is possible. In the presence of interference, treatment may have several types of effects. In this paper, we consider inference about such effects when the population consists of groups of individuals where interference is possible within groups but not between groups. A two stage randomization design is assumed where in the first stage groups are randomized to different treatment allocation strategies and in the second stage individuals are randomized to treatment or control conditional on the strategy assigned to their group in the first stage. For this design, the asymptotic distributions of estimators of the causal effects are derived when either the number of individuals per group or the number of groups grows large. Under certain homogeneity assumptions, the asymptotic distributions provide justification for Wald-type confidence intervals (CIs) and tests. Empirical results demonstrate the Wald CIs have good coverage in finite samples and are narrower than CIs based on either the Chebyshev or Hoeffding inequalities provided the number of groups is not too small. The methods are illustrated by two examples which consider the effects of cholera vaccination and an intervention to encourage voting. PMID:24659836

  17. The Effect of Aging on the Dynamics of Reactive and Proactive Cognitive Control of Response Interference

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Ling; Zhang, Baoqiang; Wang, Baoxi; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Fenghua; Hu, Zhujing

    2016-01-01

    A prime-target interference task was used to investigate the effects of cognitive aging on reactive and proactive control after eliminating frequency confounds and feature repetitions from the cognitive control measures. We used distributional analyses to explore the dynamics of the two control functions by distinguishing the strength of incorrect response capture and the efficiency of suppression control. For reactive control, within-trial conflict control and between-trial conflict adaption were analyzed. The statistical analysis showed that there were no reliable between-trial conflict adaption effects for either young or older adults. For within-trial conflict control, the results revealed that older adults showed larger interference effects on mean RT and mean accuracy. Distributional analyses showed that the decline mainly stemmed from inefficient suppression rather than from stronger incorrect responses. For proactive control, older adults showed comparable proactive conflict resolution to young adults on mean RT and mean accuracy. Distributional analyses showed that older adults were as effective as younger adults in adjusting their responses based on congruency proportion information to minimize automatic response capture and actively suppress the direct response activation. The results suggest that older adults were less proficient at suppressing interference after conflict was detected but can anticipate and prevent inference in response to congruency proportion manipulation. These results challenge earlier views that older adults have selective deficits in proactive control but intact reactive control. PMID:27847482

  18. Interference effects of very high bypass ratio nacelle installations on a low-wing transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingraldi, Anthony M.; Re, Richard J.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.; Kariya, Timmy T.

    1991-01-01

    A twin-engine, low-wing transport model, with a supercritical wing designed for a cruise Mach number of 0.77 and a lift coefficient of 0.55 was tested in the 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of this test was to compare the wing/nacelle interference effects of superfans (BPR 18) with the interference effects of advanced turbofans (BPR 6). Flow-through nacelles were used. Forces and moments on the complete model were measured using a strain gage balance, and extensive surface static pressure measurements were made on the model's wing, nacelles, and pylons. Results of the investigation indicate that superfan nacelles can be installed with approximately the same drag penalty as conventional turbofan nacelles.

  19. Analysis of the effects of wing interference on the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, William H , Jr

    1952-01-01

    An analysis of the effects of wing interference on the tail contributions to the rolling stability derivatives of complete airplane configurations is made by calculating the angularity of the air stream at the vertical tail due to rolling and determining the resulting forces and moments. Some of the important factors which affect the resultant angularity on the vertical tail are wing aspect ratio and sweepback, vertical-tail span, and considerations associated with angle of attack and airplane geometry. Some calculated sidewash results for a limited range of plan forms and vertical-tail sizes are presented. Equations taking into account the sidewash results are given for determining the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives. Comparisons of estimated and experimental results indicate that a consideration of wing interference effects improves the estimated values of the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives and that fair agreement with available experimental data is obtained.

  20. Interaction Induced Electron Self-Interference in a Semiconductor: The Phonon Staircase Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kenrow, J.A.; El Sayed, K.; Stanton, C.J.

    1997-06-01

    The exact quantum mechanics of a model semiconductor system of an electron with a discrete and equidistant energy spectrum interacting with a single phonon mode is presented. An electron initially excited into a coherent superposition of states interacts with phonons thereby creating a self-interference {ital in time} which reduces the emission of phonons to isolated bursts. This self-interference effect gives rise to steplike behavior in the relaxation kinetics of the electron and phonons. We show that this {open_quotes}phonon staircase{close_quotes} effect is a consequence of a correlated initial electron distribution and the violation of energy conservation in the electron-phonon interaction on short time scales. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Interference effects in photodetachment of F{sup -} in a strong circularly polarized laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Bivona, S.; Bonanno, G.; Burlon, R.; Leone, C.

    2007-08-15

    A numerical simulation of photodetachment of F{sup -} by a circularly polarized laser pulse has been accomplished by using a Keldysh-type approach. The numerical results are in agreement with measurements of photoelectron energy spectra recently reported in the literature. The features exhibited by the spectra are traced back to quantum interference effects, in the same spirit as in a double-slit experiment in the time doma0008.

  2. Possible role of interference, protein noise, and sink effects in nonphotochemical quenching in photosynthetic complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Berman, Gennady P.; Nesterov, Alexander I.; Gurvitz, Shmuel; ...

    2016-04-30

    Here, we analyze theoretically a simple and consistent quantum mechanical model that reveals the possible role of quantum interference, protein noise, and sink effects in the nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in light-harvesting complexes (LHCs). The model consists of a network of five interconnected sites (excitonic states of light-sensitive molecules) responsible for the NPQ mechanism. The model also includes the “damaging” and the dissipative channels. The damaging channel is responsible for production of singlet oxygen and other destructive outcomes. In this model, both damaging and “dissipative” charge transfer channels are described by discrete electron energy levels attached to their sinks, that mimicmore » the continuum part of electron energy spectrum. All five excitonic sites interact with the protein environment that is modeled using a stochastic process. Our approach allowed us to derive the exact and closed system of linear ordinary differential equations for the reduced density matrix and its first momentums. Moreover, these equations are solved numerically including for strong interactions between the light-sensitive molecules and protein environment. As an example, we apply our model to demonstrate possible contributions of quantum interference, protein noise, and sink effects in the NPQ mechanism in the CP29 minor LHC. The numerical simulations show that using proper combination of quantum interference effects, properties of noise, and sinks, one can significantly suppress the damaging channel. Finally, our findings demonstrate the possible role of interference, protein noise, and sink effects for modeling, engineering, and optimizing the performance of the NPQ processes in both natural and artificial light-harvesting complexes.« less

  3. Possible role of interference, protein noise, and sink effects in nonphotochemical quenching in photosynthetic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Gennady P.; Nesterov, Alexander I.; Gurvitz, Shmuel; Sayre, Richard T.

    2016-04-30

    Here, we analyze theoretically a simple and consistent quantum mechanical model that reveals the possible role of quantum interference, protein noise, and sink effects in the nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in light-harvesting complexes (LHCs). The model consists of a network of five interconnected sites (excitonic states of light-sensitive molecules) responsible for the NPQ mechanism. The model also includes the “damaging” and the dissipative channels. The damaging channel is responsible for production of singlet oxygen and other destructive outcomes. In this model, both damaging and “dissipative” charge transfer channels are described by discrete electron energy levels attached to their sinks, that mimic the continuum part of electron energy spectrum. All five excitonic sites interact with the protein environment that is modeled using a stochastic process. Our approach allowed us to derive the exact and closed system of linear ordinary differential equations for the reduced density matrix and its first momentums. Moreover, these equations are solved numerically including for strong interactions between the light-sensitive molecules and protein environment. As an example, we apply our model to demonstrate possible contributions of quantum interference, protein noise, and sink effects in the NPQ mechanism in the CP29 minor LHC. The numerical simulations show that using proper combination of quantum interference effects, properties of noise, and sinks, one can significantly suppress the damaging channel. Finally, our findings demonstrate the possible role of interference, protein noise, and sink effects for modeling, engineering, and optimizing the performance of the NPQ processes in both natural and artificial light-harvesting complexes.

  4. The Effect of Bypass Nozzle Exit Area on Fan Aerodynamic Performance and Noise in a Model Turbofan Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Podboy, Gary, G.; Woodward, Richard P.; Jeracki, Robert, J.

    2013-01-01

    The design of effective new technologies to reduce aircraft propulsion noise is dependent on identifying and understanding the noise sources and noise generation mechanisms in the modern turbofan engine, as well as determining their contribution to the overall aircraft noise signature. Therefore, a comprehensive aeroacoustic wind tunnel test program was conducted called the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test as part of the NASA Quiet Aircraft Technology program. The test was performed in the anechoic NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel using a 1/5 scale model turbofan simulator which represented a current generation, medium pressure ratio, high bypass turbofan aircraft engine. The investigation focused on simulating in model scale only the bypass section of the turbofan engine. The test objectives were to: identify the noise sources within the model and determine their noise level; investigate several component design technologies by determining their impact on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the fan stage; and conduct detailed flow diagnostics within the fan flow field to characterize the physics of the noise generation mechanisms in a turbofan model. This report discusses results obtained for one aspect of the Source Diagnostic Test that investigated the effect of the bypass or fan nozzle exit area on the bypass stage aerodynamic performance, specifically the fan and outlet guide vanes or stators, as well as the farfield acoustic noise level. The aerodynamic performance, farfield acoustics, and Laser Doppler Velocimeter flow diagnostic results are presented for the fan and four different fixed-area bypass nozzle configurations. The nozzles simulated fixed engine operating lines and encompassed the fan stage operating envelope from near stall to cruise. One nozzle was selected as a baseline reference, representing the nozzle area which would achieve the design point operating conditions and fan stage performance. The total area change from

  5. The Effect of Interference on Temporal Order Memory for Random and Fixed Sequences in Nondemented Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolentino, Jerlyn C.; Pirogovsky, Eva; Luu, Trinh; Toner, Chelsea K.; Gilbert, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments tested the effect of temporal interference on order memory for fixed and random sequences in young adults and nondemented older adults. The results demonstrate that temporal order memory for fixed and random sequences is impaired in nondemented older adults, particularly when temporal interference is high. However, temporal order…

  6. Effects of interference among three equidistantly arranged cylinders in a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsuno, Masakazu; Amamoto, Hajime; Ishi-i, Koji

    1998-05-01

    The effects of flow interference among three identical circular cylinders, which were arranged in an equidistant triangular cluster with their axes perpendicular to the uniform flow, were studied at various incidence angles to the uniform flow and at different spacing ratios. The static pressures around the circumference of each cylinder were measured individually and the drag and lift coefficients of each cylinder were determined at Reynolds number of 6.2×10 4 based on the diameter of a single cylinder. The effects of flow interference among the three cylinders are severe when the spacing ratios are small. When two cylinders arranged side by side are upstream of or behind the third one, the flow patterns are not symmetrical with respect to the uniform flow direction and the drag or lift coefficients of the two cylinders in the side-by-side arrangement are not always equal to each other at small spacing ratios. The inclination angles to the uniform flow strongly influence the drag and lift coefficients, the direction of force exerted on each cylinder and the flow patterns around the cylinders. The effects of interference among three cylinders become weak as the spacing ratios are increased.

  7. Effects of prestudy and poststudy rest on memory: Support for temporal interference accounts of forgetting.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Ullrich K H; Tay, Jia-Xin; Brown, Gordon D A

    2015-06-01

    According to interference-based theories of memory, including temporal-distinctiveness theory, both prestudy and poststudy rest should have beneficial impacts on memory performance. Specifically, higher temporal isolation of a memorandum should reduce proactive and/or retroactive interference, and thus should result in better recall. In the present study, we investigated the effects of prestudy and poststudy rest in a free recall paradigm. Participants studied three lists of words, separated by either a short or a long period of low mental activity (a tone-detection task). Recall targeted the second list; this list was studied in one of four conditions, defined by the fully crossed factors of prestudy and poststudy rest duration. Two experiments revealed a beneficial effect of prestudy rest (and, to a lesser extent, of poststudy rest) on list recall. This result is in line with interference-based theories of memory. By contrast, a beneficial effect of prestudy rest is not predicted by consolidation accounts of memory and forgetting; our results thus require additional assumptions and/or a better specification of the consolidation process and its time course in order to be reconciled with consolidation theory.

  8. Effect of Two Advanced Noise Reduction Technologies on the Aerodynamic Performance of an Ultra High Bypass Ratio Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christoper E.; Gazzaniga, John A.

    2013-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center anechoic 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel to investigate two new advanced noise reduction technologies in support of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. The goal of the experiment was to demonstrate the noise reduction potential and effect on fan model performance of the two noise reduction technologies in a scale model Ultra-High Bypass turbofan at simulated takeoff and approach aircraft flight speeds. The two novel noise reduction technologies are called Over-the-Rotor acoustic treatment and Soft Vanes. Both technologies were aimed at modifying the local noise source mechanisms of the fan tip vortex/fan case interaction and the rotor wake-stator interaction. For the Over-the-Rotor acoustic treatment, two noise reduction configurations were investigated. The results showed that the two noise reduction technologies, Over-the-Rotor and Soft Vanes, were able to reduce the noise level of the fan model, but the Over-the-Rotor configurations had a significant negative impact on the fan aerodynamic performance; the loss in fan aerodynamic efficiency was between 2.75 to 8.75 percent, depending on configuration, compared to the conventional solid baseline fan case rubstrip also tested. Performance results with the Soft Vanes showed that there was no measurable change in the corrected fan thrust and a 1.8 percent loss in corrected stator vane thrust, which resulted in a total net thrust loss of approximately 0.5 percent compared with the baseline reference stator vane set.

  9. Flight effects on the aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of inverted profile coannular nozzles, volume 1. [supersonic cruise aircraft research wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    Jet noise spectra obtained at static conditions from an acoustic wind tunnel and an outdoor facility are compared. Data curves are presented for (1) the effect of relative velocity on OASPL directivity (all configurations); (2) the effect of relative velocity on noise spectra (all configurations); (3) the effect of velocity on PNL directivity (coannular nozzle configurations); (4) nozzle exhaust plume velocity profiles; and (5) the effect of relative velocity on aerodynamic performance.

  10. Efficient Creation of Overset Grid Hole Boundaries and Effects of Their Locations on Aerodynamic Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William Machado; Pandya, Shishir Ashok; Rogers, Stuart E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments on the automation of the X-rays approach to hole-cutting in over- set grids is further improved. A fast method to compute an auxiliary wall-distance function used in providing a rst estimate of the hole boundary location is introduced. Subsequent iterations lead to automatically-created hole boundaries with a spatially-variable o set from the minimum hole. For each hole boundary location, an averaged cell attribute measure over all fringe points is used to quantify the compatibility between the fringe points and their respective donor cells. The sensitivity of aerodynamic loads to di erent hole boundary locations and cell attribute compatibilities is investigated using four test cases: an isolated re-entry capsule, a two-rocket con guration, the AIAA 4th Drag Prediction Workshop Common Research Model (CRM), and the D8 \\Double Bubble" subsonic aircraft. When best practices in hole boundary treatment are followed, only small variations in integrated loads and convergence rates are observed for different hole boundary locations.

  11. Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects: A CFD Validation Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    A rotorcraft fuselage is typically designed with an emphasis on operational functionality with aerodynamic efficiency being of secondary importance. This results in a significant amount of drag during high-speed forward flight that can be a limiting factor for future high-speed rotorcraft designs. To enable higher speed flight, while maintaining a functional fuselage design (i.e., a large rear cargo ramp door), the NASA Rotary Wing Project has conducted both experimental and computational investigations to assess active flow control as an enabling technology for fuselage drag reduction. This paper will evaluate numerical simulations of a flow control system on a generic rotorcraft fuselage with a rotor in forward flight using OVERFLOW, a structured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver developed at NASA. The results are compared to fuselage forces, surface pressures, and PN flow field data obtained in a wind tunnel experiment conducted at the NASA Langley 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel where significant drag and download reductions were demonstrated using flow control. This comparison showed that the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver was unable to predict the fuselage forces and pressure measurements on the ramp for the baseline and flow control cases. While the CFD was able to capture the flow features, it was unable to accurately predict the performance of the flow control.

  12. Aerodynamic Effects of a 24-Foot, Multisegmented Telescoping Nose Boom on an F-15B Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Smith, Mark S.; Frederick, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    An experimental multisegmented telescoping nose boom has been installed on an F-15B airplane to be tested in a flight environment. The experimental nose boom is representative of one that could be used to tailor the sonic boom signature of an airplane such as a supersonic business jet. The nose boom consists of multiple sections and could be extended during flight to a length of 24 ft. The preliminary analyses indicated that the addition of the experimental nose boom could adversely affect vehicle flight characteristics and air data systems. Before the boom was added, a series of flights was flown to update the aerodynamic model and characterize the air data systems of the baseline airplane. The baseline results have been used in conjunction with estimates of the nose boom s influence to prepare for a series of research flights conducted with the nose boom installed. Data from these flights indicate that the presence of the experimental boom reduced the static pitch and yaw stability of the airplane. The boom also adversely affected the static-position error of the airplane but did not significantly affect angle-of-attack or angle-of-sideslip measurements. The research flight series has been successfully completed.

  13. Forcing function effects on unsteady aerodynamic gust response. II - Low solidity airfoil row response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Gregory H.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1992-01-01

    The paper investigates the fundamental gust modeling assumption on the basis of a series of experiments performed in the Purdue Annular Cascade Research Facility. The unsteady period flow field is generated by rotating flows of perforated plates and airfoil cascades, with the resulting unsteady periodic chordwise pressure response of a downstream low solidity stator row determined by miniature pressure transducers embedded within selected airfoils. When the forcing function exhibited the characteristics of a linear-theory gust, the resulting response on the downstream stator airfoils was in excellent agreement with the linear-theory models. When the forcing function did not exhibit linear-theory gust characteristics, the resulting unsteady aerodynamic response of the downstream stators was much more complex and correlated poorly with the linear-theory gust predictions. It is shown that the forcing function generator significantly affects the resulting gust response, with the complexity of the response characteristics increasing from the perforated-plate to the airfoil-cascade forcing functions.

  14. Forcing function effects on unsteady aerodynamic gust response: Part 2--Low solidity airfoil row response

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, G.H.; Fleeter, S. . School of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    The fundamental gust modeling assumption is investigated by means of series of experiments performed in the Purdue Annular Cascade Research Facility. The unsteady periodic flow field is generated by rotating rows of perforated plates and airfoil cascades, with the resulting unsteady periodic chord wise pressure response of a downstream low-solidity stator row determined by miniature pressure transducers embedded within selected airfoils. When the forcing function exhibited the characteristic of a linear-theory vortical gust, as was the case for the perforated-plate wake generators, the resulting response on the downstream stator airfoils was in excellent agreement with the linear-theory models. In contrast, when the forcing function did not exhibit linear-theory vortical gust characteristics, i.e., for the airfoil wake generators, the resulting unsteady aerodynamic responses of the downstream stators were much more complex and correlated poorly with the linear-theory gust predictions. Thus, this investigation has quantitatively shown that the forcing function generator significantly affects the resulting gust response, with the complexity of the response characteristics increasing from the perforated-plate to the airfoil-cascade forcing functions.

  15. Effect of Trailing Edge Shape on the Unsteady Aerodynamics of Reverse Flow Dynamic Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2015-11-01

    This work considers dynamic stall in reverse flow, where flow travels over an oscillating airfoil from the geometric trailing edge towards the leading edge. An airfoil with a sharp geometric trailing edge causes early formation of a primary dynamic stall vortex since the sharp edge acts as the aerodynamic leading edge in reverse flow. The present work experimentally examines the potential merits of using an airfoil with a blunt geometric trailing edge to delay flow separation and dynamic stall vortex formation while undergoing oscillations in reverse flow. Time-resolved and phase-averaged flow fields and pressure distributions are compared for airfoils with different trailing edge shapes. Specifically, the evolution of unsteady flow features such as primary, secondary, and trailing edge vortices is examined. The influence of these flow features on the unsteady pressure distributions and integrated unsteady airloads provide insight on the torsional loading of rotor blades as they oscillate in reverse flow. The airfoil with a blunt trailing edge delays reverse flow dynamic stall, but this leads to greater downward-acting lift and pitching moment. These results are fundamental to alleviating vibrations of high-speed helicopters, where much of the rotor operates in reverse flow.

  16. Forcing function effects on unsteady aerodynamic gust response: Part 1--Forcing functions

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, G.H.; Fleeter, S. . School of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    The fundamental gust modeling assumption is investigated by means of a series of experiments performed in the Purdue Annular Cascade Research Facility. The unsteady periodic flow field is generated by rotating rows of perforated plates and airfoil cascades. In this paper, the measured unsteady flow fields are compared to linear-theory vortical gust requirements, with the resulting unsteady gust response of a downstream stator cascade correlated with linear theory predictions in an accompanying paper. The perforated-plate forcing functions closely resemble linear-theory forcing functions, with the static pressure fluctuations small and the periodic velocity vectors parallel to the downstream mean-relative flow angle over the entire periodic cycle. In contrast, the airfoil forcing functions exhibit characteristics far from linear-theory vortical gusts, with the alignment of the velocity vectors and the static pressure fluctuation amplitudes dependent on the rotor-loading conditions, rotor solidity, and the inlet mean-relative flow angle. Thus, these unique data clearly show that airfoil wakes, both compressor and turbine, are not able to be modeled with the boundary conditions of current state-of-the-art linear unsteady aerodynamic theory.

  17. Aerodynamic Effects of a 24-foot Multisegmented Telescoping Nose Boom on an F-15B Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Smith, Mark S.; Frederick, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental multisegmented telescoping nose boom has been installed on an F-15B airplane to be tested in a flight environment. The experimental nose boom is representative of one that could be used to tailor the sonic boom signature of an airplane such as a supersonic business jet. The nose boom consists of multiple sections and could be extended during flight to a length of 24 ft. The preliminary analyses indicate that the addition of the experimental nose boom could adversely affect vehicle flight characteristics and air data systems. Before the boom was added, a series of flights was conducted to update the aerodynamic model and characterize the air data systems of the baseline airplane. The baseline results have been used in conjunction with estimates of the nose boom's influence to prepare for a series of research flights conducted with the nose boom installed. Data from these flights indicate that the presence of the experimental boom reduced the static pitch and yaw stability of the airplane. The boom also adversely affected the static-position error of the airplane but did not significantly affect angle-of-attack or angle-of-sideslip measurements. The research flight series has been successfully completed.

  18. Icing flight research: Aerodynamic effects of ice and ice shape documentation with stereo photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, K. L.; Mcknight, R. C.; Ranaudo, R. J.; Perkins, P. J., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Aircraft icing flight research was performed in natural icing conditions. A data base consisting of icing cloud measurements, ice shapes, and aerodynamic measurements is being developed. During research icing encounters the icing cloud was continuously measured. After the encounter, the ice accretion shapes on the wing were documented with a stereo camera system. The increase in wing section drag was measured with a wake survey probe. The overall aircraft performance loss in terms of lift and drag coefficient changes was obtained by steady level speed/power measurements. Selective deicing of the airframe components was performed to determine their contributions to the total drag increase. Engine out capability in terms of power available was analyzed for the iced aircraft. It was shown that the stereo photography system can be used to document ice shapes in flight and that the wake survey probe can measure increases in wing section drag caused by ice. On one flight, the wing section drag coefficient (c sub d) increased approximately 120 percent over the uniced baseline at an aircraft angle of attack of 6 deg. On another flight, the aircraft darg coefficient (c sub d) increased by 75 percent over the uniced baseline at an aircraft lift coefficient (C sub d) of 0.5.

  19. The effect of plasma actuator on the depreciation of the aerodynamic drag on box model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harinaldi, Budiarso, Julian, James; Rabbani M., N.

    2016-06-01

    Recent active control research advances have provided many benefits some of which in the field of transportation by land, sea as well as by air. Flow engineering by using active control has proven advantages in energy saving significantly. One of the active control equipment that is being developed, especially in the 21st century, is a plasma actuator, with the ability to modify the flow of fluid by the approach of ion particles makes these actuators a very powerful and promising tool. This actuator can be said to be better to the previously active control such as suction, blowing and synthetic jets because it is easier to control, more flexible because it has no moving parts, easy to be manufactured and installed, and consumes a small amount of energy with maximum capability. Plasma actuator itself is the composition of a material composed of copper and a dielectric sheet, where the copper sheets act as an electricity conductor and the dielectric sheet as electricity insulator. Products from the plasma actuators are ion wind which is the result of the suction of free air around the actuator to the plasma zone. This study investigates the ability of plasma actuators in lowering aerodynamic drag which is commonly formed in the models of vehicles by varying the shape of geometry models and the flow speed.

  20. Improvements to the missile aerodynamic prediction code DEMON3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillenius, Marnix F. E.; Johnson, David L.; Lesieutre, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The computer program DEMON3 was developed for the aerodynamic analysis of nonconventional supersonic configurations comprising a body with noncircular cross section and up to two wing or fin sections. Within a wing or fin section, the lifting surfaces may be cruciform, triform, planar, or low profile layouts; the planforms of the lifting surfaces allow for breaks in sweep. The body and fin sections are modeled by triplet and constant u-velocity panels, respectively, accounting for mutual body-fin interference. Fin thickness effects are included for the use of supersonic planar source panels. One of the unique features of DEMON3 is the modeling of high angle of attack vortical effects associated with the lifting surfaces and the body. In addition, shock expansion and Newtonian pressure calculation methods can be optionally engaged. These two dimensional nonlinear methods are augmented by aerodynamic interference determined from the linear panel methods. Depending on the geometric details of the body, the DEMON3 program can be used to analyze nonconventional configurations at angles of attack up to 25 degrees for Mach numbers from 1.1 to 6. Calculative results and comparisons with experimental data demonstrate the capabilities of DEMON3. Limitations and deficiencies are listed.

  1. Piloted Simulation Study of the Effects of High-Lift Aerodynamics on the Takeoff Noise of a Representative High-Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Riley, Donald R.; Brandon, Jay M.; Person, Lee H., Jr.; Glaab, Patricia C.

    1999-01-01

    As part of an effort between NASA and private industry to reduce airport-community noise for high-speed civil transport (HSCT) concepts, a piloted simulation study was initiated for the purpose of predicting the noise reduction benefits that could result from improved low-speed high-lift aerodynamic performance for a typical HSCT configuration during takeoff and initial climb. Flight profile and engine information from the piloted simulation were coupled with the NASA Langley Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) to estimate jet engine noise and to propagate the resulting source noise to ground observer stations. A baseline aircraft configuration, which also incorporated different levels of projected improvements in low-speed high-lift aerodynamic performance, was simulated to investigate effects of increased lift and lift-to-drag ratio on takeoff noise levels. Simulated takeoff flights were performed with the pilots following a specified procedure in which either a single thrust cutback was performed at selected altitudes ranging from 400 to 2000 ft, or a multiple-cutback procedure was performed where thrust was reduced by a two-step process. Results show that improved low-speed high-lift aerodynamic performance provides at least a 4 to 6 dB reduction in effective perceived noise level at the FAA downrange flyover measurement station for either cutback procedure. However, improved low-speed high-lift aerodynamic performance reduced maximum sideline noise levels only when using the multiple-cutback procedures.

  2. Aerodynamic drag on intermodal railcars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinghorn, Philip; Maynes, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The aerodynamic drag associated with transport of commodities by rail is becoming increasingly important as the cost of diesel fuel increases. This study aims to increase the efficiency of intermodal cargo trains by reducing the aerodynamic drag on the load carrying cars. For intermodal railcars a significant amount of aerodynamic drag is a result of the large distance between loads that often occurs and the resulting pressure drag resulting from the separated flow. In the present study aerodynamic drag data have been obtained through wind tunnel testing on 1/29 scale models to understand the savings that may be realized by judicious modification to the size of the intermodal containers. The experiments were performed in the BYU low speed wind tunnel and the test track utilizes two leading locomotives followed by a set of five articulated well cars with double stacked containers. The drag on a representative mid-train car is measured using an isolated load cell balance and the wind tunnel speed is varied from 20 to 100 mph. We characterize the effect that the gap distance between the containers and the container size has on the aerodynamic drag of this representative rail car and investigate methods to reduce the gap distance.

  3. Interference effects in double ionization of spatially aligned hydrogen molecules by fast highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, A.L.; Alnaser, A.S.; Tanis, J.A.; Wells, E.; Osipov, T.; Carnes, K.D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Cocke, C.L.; McGuire, J.H.

    2004-10-01

    Cross sections differential in target orientation angle were measured for 19 MeV F{sup 8+}+D{sub 2} collisions. Multihit position-sensitive detectors were used to isolate the double-ionization channel and determine a posteriori the full momentum vectors of both ejected D{sup +} fragments. A strong dependence of the double ionization cross section on the angle between the incident ion direction and the target molecular axis is observed with a {approx_equal}3.5:1 enhancement for molecules aligned perpendicular to the projectile axis. This clear asymmetry is attributed to interference effects, analogous to Young's two-slit experiment, arising from coherent contributions to the ionization from both atomic centers. The data are compared to a simple scattering model based on two center interference.

  4. Effect of interferences on indoor visible light car-to-car communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Young; Park, Bong-Seok; Choi, Hyun-Sik; Kim, So Eun; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Chung Ghiu

    2016-04-01

    We report the effect of interferences on visible light car-to-car communication system. The interferences from floor reflections and fluorescent lamps are taken into account for indoor car-to-car visible light communication (VLC) systems. The system is composed of a white LED lamp as a VLC transmitter and a photo-receiver with an appropriate optical filter as a VLC receiver. The signal power distribution patterns are measured and analyzed at a transmission distance, considering the positions of the transmitter and receiver. Generally, the light from fluorescent lamps in indoor environment affects the DC level of the received signal power, which is more significant at higher receiver positions. The measurements show that the indoor VLC communication performance can be varied depending on floor reflections. Also, the fluorescent ceiling illuminations affect the DC level change of the received VLC signal waveforms.

  5. Effects of fading and interference in narrowband land-mobile networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnartz, Johan Paul Marie Gerard

    1991-05-01

    The performance of mobile radio systems with narrowband radio channels is studied. Several results of previous research are included. In particular, the effects of multipath and shadow 'fading' and of mutual 'interference' between mobile users is investigated. To this end, initially the relevant propagation mechanisms are addressed, focusing on statistical channel models. For the planning of real systems, the suitability of some propagation models using terrain data is empirically evaluated. The statistical channel description is used to compute the performance of mobile radio links. Expressions are given for the outage probability and for the average duration of fades, taking account of mutual interference between users. A simplified model for the bit error rate in digital transmission is proposed. Numerical results are given for mobile telephone networks.

  6. Quantum Walks with Neutral Atoms: Quantum Interference Effects of One and Two Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robens, Carsten; Brakhane, Stefan; Meschede, Dieter; Alberti, A.

    We report on the state of the art of quantum walk experiments with neutral atoms in state-dependent optical lattices. We demonstrate a novel state-dependent transport technique enabling the control of two spin-selective sublattices in a fully independent fashion. This transport technique allowed us to carry out a test of single-particle quantum interference based on the violation of the Leggett-Garg inequality and, more recently, to probe two-particle quantum interference effects with neutral atoms cooled into the motional ground state. These experiments lay the groundwork for the study of discrete-time quantum walks of strongly interacting, indistinguishable particles to demonstrate quantum cellular automata of neutral atoms.

  7. Effective elimination of laser interference fringing in fluorescence microscopy by spinning azimuthal incidence angle.

    PubMed

    Mattheyses, Alexa L; Shaw, Keith; Axelrod, Daniel

    2006-08-01

    Laser illumination used in both conventional widefield epi-fluorescence as well as in total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is subject to nonuniformities in intensity that obscure true image details. These intensity variations are interference fringes arising from coherent light scattering and diffraction at every surface in the laser light's optical path, including the lenses, mirrors, and coverslip. We present an inexpensive technique for effectively eliminating these interference fringes based upon introduction of the excitation laser beam by oblique through-the-objective incidence coupled with rapid azimuthal rotation of the plane of incidence. Although this rotation can be accomplished in several ways, a particularly simple method applicable to a free laser beam is to use an optical wedge, spun on a motor, which diverts the beam into a hollow cone of fixed angle. A system of lenses converts this collimated beam cone into a focused spot that traces a circle at the objective's back focal plane. Consequently, a collimated beam with fixed polar angle and spinning azimuthal angle illuminates the sample. If the wedge is spun rapidly, then the different interference patterns at every particular azimuthal incidence angle average out over a single camera exposure to produce an effectively uniform field of illumination.

  8. The effect of speed-accuracy strategy on response interference control in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wylie, S A; van den Wildenberg, W P M; Ridderinkhof, K R; Bashore, T R; Powell, V D; Manning, C A; Wooten, G F

    2009-07-01

    Studies that used conflict paradigms such as the Eriksen Flanker task show that many individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) have pronounced difficulty resolving the conflict that arises from the simultaneous activation of mutually exclusive responses. This finding fits well with contemporary views that postulate a key role for the basal ganglia in action selection. The present experiment aims to specify the cognitive processes that underlie action selection deficits among PD patients in the context of variations in speed-accuracy strategy. PD patients (n=28) and healthy controls (n=17) performed an arrow version of the flanker task under task instructions that either emphasized speed or accuracy of responses. Reaction time (RT) and accuracy rates decreased with speed compared to accuracy instructions, although to a lesser extent for the PD group. Differences in flanker interference effects among PD and healthy controls depended on speed-accuracy strategy. Compared to the healthy controls, PD patients showed larger flanker interference effects under speed stress. RT distribution analyses suggested that PD patients have greater difficulty suppressing incorrect response activation when pressing for speed. These initial findings point to an important interaction between strategic and computational aspects of interference control in accounting for cognitive impairments of PD. The results are also compatible with recent brain imaging studies that demonstrate basal ganglia activity to co-vary with speed-accuracy adjustments.

  9. Wave-interference Effects in the Presence of a Shear Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Ellingsen, Simen; Noblesse, Francis

    2016-11-01

    Wave-interference effects, based on a 2-point wavemaker model of monohull ships, are analysed when a shear current of uniform vorticity is present. Indeed, wave interferences in the presence of a shear current, similar to the cases in finite water depth, are considerably more complicated than in deep water without vorticity. The effects of a shear current on far-field waves that are formed by 2-point wavemaker models greatly depend on the shear Froude number VS/g, where V is the speed of the ship, S is the uniform vorticity of the shear, g is the gravitational acceleration, as well as the angle between the ship's motion direction and the shear current. Various circumstances, under which ray angles of the highest waves that are associated with constructive interferences between waves are much narrower than the wake angles of the cusps or the asymptotes of wave patterns formed by Kelvin's classical 1-point wavemaker, are shown. In particular, cusp shear Froude numbers Frscusp where ray angles of the highest waves are equal to the cusp angles are determined. As for shear Froude numbers VS/g that are larger than Frscusp, the apparent angles where highest waves are found are significantly smaller than the cusp/asymptote angles. Furthermore, the asymmetry due to the presence of a shear current results in remarkable differences between the cases where a ship moves upstream or downstream.

  10. Calculation of aerodynamic characteristics of airplane configurations at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, J. B.; Lan, C. Edward

    1988-01-01

    Calculation of longitudinal and lateral directional aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes by the VORSTAB code is examined. The numerical predictions are based on the potential flow theory with corrections of high angle of attack phenomena; namely, vortex flow and boundary layer separation effects. To account for the vortex flow effect, vortex lift, vortex action point, augmented vortex lift and vortex breakdown effect through the method of suction analogy are included. The effect of boundary layer separation is obtained by matching the nonlinear section data with the three dimensional lift characteristics iteratively. Through correlation with results for nine fighter configurations, it is concluded that reasonably accurate prediction of longitudinal and static lateral directional aerodynamics can be obtained with the VORSTAB code up to an angle of attack at which wake interference and forebody vortex effect are not important. Possible reasons for discrepancy at higher angles of attack are discussed.

  11. Temperature Effect on Exploitation and Interference Competition among Microcystis aeruginosa, Planktothrix agardhii and, Cyclotella meneghiniana

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Andreia Maria da Anunciação; Azevedo, Sandra Maria Feliciano de Oliveira e; Lürling, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effect of temperature (18 and 30°C) on growth and on the exploitation and interference competition of three species: Microcystis aeruginosa (MIJAC), Planktothrix agardhii (PAT), and Cyclotella meneghiniana (CCAP). Coculturing the organisms in batch systems allowed for the examination of both competitive interactions, while the interference competition was studied in cross-cultures. The experiments were done during 10–12 days, and samples were taken for chlorophyll-a analysis, using PHYTO-PAM. The temperature did not influence exploitation competition between MIJAC and other competitors and it was the best competitor in both temperatures. PAT presented higher growth rates than CCAP in competition at 18 and 30°C. The temperature influenced the interference competition. The growth of MIJAC was favored in strains exudates at 30°C, while CCAP was favored at 18°C, revealing that the optimum growth temperature was important to establish the competitive superiority. Therefore, we can propose two hypotheses: (i) different temperatures may results in production of distinct compounds that influence the competition among phytoplankton species and (ii) the target species may have different vulnerability to these compounds depending on the temperature. At last, we suggest that both the sensitivity and the physiological status of competing species can determine their lasting coexistence. PMID:26380369

  12. Nanometre optical coatings based on strong interference effects in highly absorbing media.

    PubMed

    Kats, Mikhail A; Blanchard, Romain; Genevet, Patrice; Capasso, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Optical coatings, which consist of one or more films of dielectric or metallic materials, are widely used in applications ranging from mirrors to eyeglasses and photography lenses. Many conventional dielectric coatings rely on Fabry-Perot-type interference, involving multiple optical passes through transparent layers with thicknesses of the order of the wavelength to achieve functionalities such as anti-reflection, high-reflection and dichroism. Highly absorbing dielectrics are typically not used because it is generally accepted that light propagation through such media destroys interference effects. We show that under appropriate conditions interference can instead persist in ultrathin, highly absorbing films of a few to tens of nanometres in thickness, and demonstrate a new type of optical coating comprising such a film on a metallic substrate, which selectively absorbs various frequency ranges of the incident light. These coatings have a low sensitivity to the angle of incidence and require minimal amounts of absorbing material that can be as thin as 5-20 nm for visible light. This technology has the potential for a variety of applications from ultrathin photodetectors and solar cells to optical filters, to labelling, and even the visual arts and jewellery.

  13. Temperature Effect on Exploitation and Interference Competition among Microcystis aeruginosa, Planktothrix agardhii and, Cyclotella meneghiniana.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Andreia Maria da Anunciação; de Oliveira e Azevedo, Sandra Maria Feliciano; Lürling, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effect of temperature (18 and 30°C) on growth and on the exploitation and interference competition of three species: Microcystis aeruginosa (MIJAC), Planktothrix agardhii (PAT), and Cyclotella meneghiniana (CCAP). Coculturing the organisms in batch systems allowed for the examination of both competitive interactions, while the interference competition was studied in cross-cultures. The experiments were done during 10-12 days, and samples were taken for chlorophyll-a analysis, using PHYTO-PAM. The temperature did not influence exploitation competition between MIJAC and other competitors and it was the best competitor in both temperatures. PAT presented higher growth rates than CCAP in competition at 18 and 30°C. The temperature influenced the interference competition. The growth of MIJAC was favored in strains exudates at 30°C, while CCAP was favored at 18°C, revealing that the optimum growth temperature was important to establish the competitive superiority. Therefore, we can propose two hypotheses: (i) different temperatures may results in production of distinct compounds that influence the competition among phytoplankton species and (ii) the target species may have different vulnerability to these compounds depending on the temperature. At last, we suggest that both the sensitivity and the physiological status of competing species can determine their lasting coexistence.

  14. Nanometre optical coatings based on strong interference effects in highly absorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, Mikhail A.; Blanchard, Romain; Genevet, Patrice; Capasso, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Optical coatings, which consist of one or more films of dielectric or metallic materials, are widely used in applications ranging from mirrors to eyeglasses and photography lenses. Many conventional dielectric coatings rely on Fabry-Perot-type interference, involving multiple optical passes through transparent layers with thicknesses of the order of the wavelength to achieve functionalities such as anti-reflection, high-reflection and dichroism. Highly absorbing dielectrics are typically not used because it is generally accepted that light propagation through such media destroys interference effects. We show that under appropriate conditions interference can instead persist in ultrathin, highly absorbing films of a few to tens of nanometres in thickness, and demonstrate a new type of optical coating comprising such a film on a metallic substrate, which selectively absorbs various frequency ranges of the incident light. These coatings have a low sensitivity to the angle of incidence and require minimal amounts of absorbing material that can be as thin as 5-20 nm for visible light. This technology has the potential for a variety of applications from ultrathin photodetectors and solar cells to optical filters, to labelling, and even the visual arts and jewellery.

  15. Effects of potential environmental interferents on kinesin-powered molecular shuttles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachand, Marlene; Bachand, George D.

    2012-05-01

    Biomolecular motor-powered active transport represents an alternate means for analyte processing in nanoscale biosensors and bioanalytical devices. For example, a prototype ``smart dust'' biosensor has recently been reported in which the motor protein kinesin processes antibody-functionalized microtubules (MTs) to capture and separate optically tagged protein analytes. A potential limitation of this technology, however, involves the inhibition of transport function by interfering compounds that may be present in raw samples. Here we characterized the response of kinesin-MT transport to a range of potential interferents including solvents, acids, oxidizers, and environmental contaminants. The results of kinesin motility assays suggest that, among the tested interferents, only acetic acid and sodium hypochlorite adversely affected MT transport, primarily due to depolymerization of MT filaments. While negative effects were not observed for the remaining compounds tested, enhancement in motility was observed in the presence of acetone, antifreeze, and organic matter. Overall, the data suggest that kinesin-MT transport is resilient against a variety of common interferents, but primarily susceptible to failure due to significant changes in pH or the presence of an oxidizer.

  16. Aerodynamic Characteristics and Control Effectiveness of the HL-20 Lifting Body Configuration at Mach 10 in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scallion, William I.

    1999-01-01

    A 0.0196-scale model of the HL-20 lifting-body, one of several configurations proposed for future crewed spacecraft, was tested in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel. The purpose of the tests was to determine the effectiveness of fin-mounted elevons, a lower surface flush-mounted body flap, and a flush-mounted yaw controller at hypersonic speeds. The nominal angle-of-attack range, representative of hypersonic entry, was 2 deg to 41 deg, the sideslip angles were 0 deg, 2 deg, and -2 deg, and the test Reynolds number was 1.06 x 10 E6 based on model reference length. The aerodynamic, longitudinal, and lateral control effectiveness along with surface oil flow visualizations are presented and discussed. The configuration was longitudinally and laterally stable at the nominal center of gravity. The primary longitudinal control, the fin-mounted elevons, could not trim the model to the desired entry angle of attack of 30 deg. The lower surface body flaps were effective for roll control and the associated adverse yawing moment was eliminated by skewing the body flap hinge lines. A yaw controller, flush-mounted on the lower surface, was also effective, and the associated small rolling moment was favorable.

  17. An investigation of the effect of in vivo interferences on Raman glucose measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Bongchu; Oh, Hyunho; Oh, Jeankun; Yang, Yongju; Ku, Yunhee; Kim, Moosub; Kim, Dami; Eum, Hyejin; Cho, Seongmoon; Miller, David R.

    2011-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a promising technology for noninvasive blood glucose monitoring because of its good selectivity for the glucose molecule. The low sensitivity of the Raman signal however, makes it difficult to quantify the concentration of glucose directly from the Raman spectra. To solve this, statistical methods such as PCA (principle component analysis) and PLS (partial least square) are traditionally used. These statistical methods general work very well and give highly accurate results, provided there is no interference. In the in-vivo case however, there are many interferences such as the inhomogeneity of tissue, physiological changes, and denaturation of the tissue by the light source. This study investigates the affect of in-vivo interferences on Raman glucose measurements. In this study, a high throughput dispersive Raman system was constructed with an 830nm multimode laser, a multiple conductor optical fiber bundle, and a back-illuminated CCD spectrometer. A simply phantom was devised, which was comprised of a plastic cuvette fitted with a human fingernail window and glucose doped human serum used as the sample. To test the inhomogeneity of tissue samples, different sites of the phantom were exposed to the laser. In the case of denaturation, tests were conducted under two laser power densities: low (3.7mW/mm2) and high density (110mW/mm2). To simulate the physiological change, gelatin phantoms of varied concentration were investigated. The results of the study indicate that the dominant interferers for Raman in-vivo glucose measurements are the inhomogeneity of the tissue and the denaturation by the laser power density. The next phase for this study will be the design of a high SNR Raman system which affords a low power density laser sample illumination as well as larger volumetric illumination to mitigate the effects of tissue inhomogeneity.

  18. Modulating effect of COMT Val(158)Met polymorphism on interference resolution during a working memory task.

    PubMed

    Jaspar, Mathieu; Dideberg, Vinciane; Bours, Vincent; Maquet, Pierre; Collette, Fabienne

    2015-04-01

    Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene has received increasing attention in the last 15years, in particular as a potential modulator of the neural substrates underlying inhibitory processes and updating in working memory (WM). In an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we administered a modified version of the Sternberg probe recency task (Sternberg, 1966) to 43 young healthy volunteers, varying the level of interference across successive items. The task was divided into two parts (high vs. low interference) to induce either proactive or reactive control processes. The participants were separated into three groups according to their COMT Val(158)Met genotype [Val/Val (VV); Val/Met (VM); Met/Met (MM)]. The general aim of the study was to determine whether COMT polymorphism has a modulating effect on the neural substrates of interference resolution during WM processing. Results indicate that interfering trials were associated with greater involvement of frontal cortices (bilateral medial frontal gyrus, left precentral and superior frontal gyri, right inferior frontal gyrus) in VV homozygous subjects (by comparison to Met allele carriers) only in the proactive condition of the task. In addition, analysis of peristimulus haemodynamic responses (PSTH) revealed that the genotype-related difference observed in the left SFG was specifically driven by a larger increase in activity from the storage to the recognition phase of the interfering trials in VV homozygous subjects. These results confirm the impact of COMT genotype on inhibitory processes during a WM task, with an advantage for Met allele carriers. Interestingly, this impact on frontal areas is present only when the level of interference is high, and especially during the transition from storage to recognition in the left superior frontal gyrus.

  19. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  20. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  1. Aerodynamics of sounding rockets at supersonic speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vira, N. R.

    This dissertation presents a practical and low cost method of computing the aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles such as sounding rockets, high speed bombs, projectiles and guided missiles in supersonic flight. The vehicle configuration consists of a slender axisymmetric body with a conical or ogive noise, cylinders, shoulders and boattails, if any, and have sets of two, three or four fins. Geometry of the fin cross section can be single wedge, double wedge, modified single wedge or modified double wedge. First the aerodynamics of the fins and the body are analyzed separately; then fin body and fore and aft fin interferences are accounted for when they are combined to form the total vehicle. Results and formulas documented in this work are the basis of the supersonic portion of the Theoretical Aerodynamic Derivatives (TAD) computer program operating at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  2. Effect of Power Line Interference on Microphone Calibration Measurements Made at or Near Harmonics of the Power Line Frequency.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Randall P; Nedzelnitsky, Victor

    2007-01-01

    The electrical measurements required during the primary calibrations of laboratory standard microphones by the reciprocity method can be influenced by power line interference. Because of this influence, the protocols of international inter-laboratory key comparisons of microphone calibrations usually have not included measurements at power line frequencies. Such interference has been observed in microphone output voltage measurements made with a microphone pressure reciprocity calibration system under development at NIST. This system was configured for a particular type of standard microphone in such a way that measurements of relatively small signal levels, which are more susceptible to the effect of power line interference, were required. This effect was investigated by acquiring microphone output voltage measurement data with the power line frequency adjusted to move the frequency of the interference relative to the center frequency of the measurement system passband. These data showed that the effect of power line interference for this system configuration can be more than one percent at test frequencies harmonically related to the power line frequency. These data also showed that adjusting the power line frequency to separate the interference and test frequencies by as little as 1.0 Hz can reduce the effect of the interference by at least an order of magnitude. Adjustment of the power line frequency could enable accurate measurements at test frequencies that otherwise might be avoided.

  3. Effect of interferents on the performance of direct-reading organic vapor monitors

    PubMed Central

    LeBouf, Ryan F.; Coffey, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Direct-reading organic vapor monitors are often used to measure volatile organic compound concentrations in complex chemical gas mixtures. However, there is a paucity of data on the impact of multiple gases on monitor performance, even though it is known that monitor sensitivity may vary by chemical. This study investigated the effects of interferents on the performance of the MIRAN SapphIRe Portable Ambient Air Analyzer (SAP) and Century Portable Toxic Vapor Analyzer (TVA-1000) when sampling a specific agent of interest (cyclohexane). The TVA-1000 contained a dual detector: a photoionization detector (PID) and a flame ionization detector (FID). Three devices of each monitor were challenged with different combinations of cyclohexane and potential interferent vapors (hexane, methyl ethyl ketone, trichloroethylene, and toluene) at 21°C and 90% relative humidity (RH), an extreme environmental condition. Five replicates at four target concentrations were tested: 30, 150, 300, and 475 ppm. Multiple proportions of cyclohexane to interferent enabled the determination of the interferent effect on monitor performance. The monitor concentrations were compared to reference concentrations measured using NIOSH Method 1500. Three scenarios were investigated: no response factor, cyclohexane response factor, and weighted-mixed response factor applied. False negatives occurred more frequently for PID (21.1%), followed by FID (4.8%) and SAP (0.2%). Measurements from all monitors generally had a positive bias compared to the reference measurements. Some monitor measurements exceeded twice the reference concentrations: PID (36.8%), SAP (19.8%), and FID (6.3%). Evaluation of the 95% confidence intervals indicated that performance of all monitors varied by concentration. In addition, the performance of the PID and SAP varied by presence of an interfering compound, especially toluene and hexane for the PID and trichloroethylene for the SAP. Variability and bias associated with all these

  4. Combined effects of adjacent channel, intersymbol and CW interference in MSK and OQPSK hard-limited satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayamanne, Nympha; Mori, Shinsaku; Oka, Ikuo

    A new analytical method for evaluating the bit error probability performance of minimum shift keying and offset quadrature phase shift keying signals transmitted over hard limited satellite channels subject to the combined effects of adjacent channel, intersymbol interference, uplink and downlink noise, and a continuous wave interference in the downlink is presented. Introducing an equivalent model, the bit error probability is obtained with the aid of Gram-Charlier expansion. The effects of the interference on the bit error probability are demonstrated with numerical results and the results are compared with the linear channel case.

  5. Effect of Ground Proximity on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of Aspect-Ratio-1 Airfoils With and Without End Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Arthur W.

    1961-01-01

    An investigation has been made to determine the effect of ground proximity on the aerodynamic characteristics of aspect-ratio-1 airfoils. The investigation was made with the model moving over the water in a towing tank in order to eliminate the effects of wind-tunnel walls and of boundary layer on ground boards at small ground clearances. The results indicated that, as the ground was approached, the airfoils experienced an increase in lift-curve slope and a reduction in induced drag; thus, lift-drag ratio was increased. As the ground was approached, the profile drag remained essentially constant for each airfoil. Near the ground, the addition of end plates to the airfoil resulted in a large increase in lift-drag ratio. The lift characteristics of the airfoils indicated stability of height at positive angles of attack and instability of height at negative angles; therefore, the operating range of angles of attack would be limited to positive values. At positive angles of attack, the static longitudinal stability was increased as the height above the ground was reduced. Comparison of the experimental data with Wieselsberger's ground-effect theory (NACA Technical Memorandum 77) indicated generally good agreement between experiment and theory for the airfoils without end plates.

  6. A 0.15-scale study of configuration effects on the aerodynamic interaction between main rotor and fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trept, Ted

    1984-01-01

    Hover and forward flight tests were conducted to investigate the mutual aerodynamic interaction between the main motor and fuselage of a conventional helicopter configuration. A 0.15-scale Model 222 two-bladed teetering rotor was combined with a 0.15-scale model of the NASA Ames 40x80-foot wind tunnel 1500 horsepower test stand fairing. Configuration effects were studied by modifying the fairing to simulate a typical helicopter forebody. Separation distance between rotor and body were also investigated. Rotor and fuselage force and moment as well as pressure data are presented in graphical and tabular format. Data was taken over a range of thrust coefficients from 0.002 to 0.007. In forward flight speed ratio was varied from 0.1 to 0.3 with shaft angle varying from +4 to -12 deg. The data show that the rotors effect on the fuselage may be considerably more important to total aircraft performance than the effect of the fuselage on the rotor.

  7. Aerodynamic challenges of ALT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, I.; Homan, D.; Romere, P. O.

    1985-01-01

    The approach and landing test (ALT) of the Space Shuttle Orbiter presented a number of unique challenges in the area of aerodynamics. The purpose of the ALT program was both to confirm the use of the Boeing 747 as a transport vehicle for ferrying the Orbiter across the country and to demonstrate the flight characteristics of the Orbiter in its approach and landing phase. Concerns for structural fatigue and performance dictated a tailcone be attached to the Orbiter for ferry and for the initial landing tests. The Orbiter with a tailcone attached presented additional challenges to the normal aft sting concept of wind tunnel testing. The landing tests required that the Orbiter be separated from the 747 at approximately 20,000 feet using aerodynamic forces to fly the vehicles apart. The concept required a complex test program to determine the relative effects of the two vehicles on each other. Also of concern, and tested, was the vortex wake created by the 747 and the means for the Orbiter to avoid it following separation.

  8. Quantum interference in a four-level system of a {sup 87}Rb atom: Effects of spontaneously generated coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dongsheng; Zheng Yujun

    2011-01-15

    In this work, the effects of quantum interference and spontaneously generated coherence (SGC) are theoretically analyzed in a four-level system of a {sup 87}Rb atom. For the effects of SGC, we find that a new kind of electromagnetically induced transparency channel can be induced due to destructive interference, and the nonlinear Kerr absorption can be coherently narrowed or eliminated under different strengths of the coupling and switching fields.

  9. Prediction of the hub vortex instability within wind turbine wakes and effects of the incoming wind and turbine aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Viola, Francesco; Camarri, Simone; Porté-Agel, Fernando; Gallaire, Francois

    2014-11-01

    Instability of the hub vortex, which is a vorticity structure present in wind turbine near-wake and mainly oriented along the streamwise direction, is predicted from wake velocity measurements. In this work, stability analysis is performed on wind tunnel velocity measurements acquired in the wake produced from a wind turbine model immersed in a uniform flow. Turbulence effects on wake dynamics are taken into account by modeling the Reynolds stresses through eddy-viscosity models, which are calibrated on the wind tunnel data. This formulation leads to the identification of one dominant mode associated with the hub vortex instability, which is characterized by a counter-winding single-helix mode. Moreover, this analysis also predicts accurately the frequency of the hub vortex instability observed experimentally. The hub vortex instability is also investigated by considering incoming wind fields with different turbulence characteristics, different turbine aerodynamic designs and operational regimes, which affect the morphology of the wake vorticity structures and their dynamics. The ultimate goal of this work consists in providing useful information for predicting wind turbine wake dynamics and their effects on downstream wake recovery, thus to maximize wind power harvesting.

  10. The Effects of a Highly Cambered Low-Drag Wing and of Auxiliary Flaps on the High-Speed Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Twin-Engine Pursuit Airplane Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganzer, Victor M

    1944-01-01

    Results are presented for tests of two wings, an NACA 230-series wing and a highly-cambered NACA 66-series wing on a twin-engine pursuit airplane. Auxiliary control flaps were tested in combinations with each wing. Data showing comparison of high-speed aerodynamic characteristics of the model when equipped with each wing, the effect of the auxiliary control flaps on aerodynamic characteristics, and elevator effectiveness for the model with the 66-series wing are presented. High-speed aerodynamic characteristics of the model were improved with the 66-series wing.

  11. The role of quantum-mechanical interference and quasi-classical effects in conjugated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, Felipe; Cardozo, Thiago Messias; Nascimento, Marco Antonio Chaer

    2012-04-28

    The nature of the chemical bond in conjugated hydrocarbons is analyzed through the generalized product function energy partitioning (GPF-EP) method, which allows the calculation of the quantum-mechanical interference and quasi-classical contributions to the energy. The method is applied to investigate the differences between the chemical bonding in conjugated and non-conjugated hydrocarbon isomers and to evaluate the contribution from the energy components to the stabilization of the molecules. It is shown that in all cases quantum-mechanical interference has the effect of concentrating π electron density between the two carbon atoms directly involved in the (C-C)π bonds. For the conjugated isomers, this effect is accompanied by a substantial reduction of electron density in the π space of the neighbouring (C-C)σ bond. On the other hand, quasi-classical effects are shown to be responsible for the extra stabilization of the conjugated isomers, in which a decrease of the π space kinetic reference energy seems to play an important role. Finally, it is shown that the polarization of p-like orbitals in compounds with alternating single and double bonds ultimately increases electron density in the π space of the neighbouring (C-C)σ bond. Therefore, quasi-classical effects, rather than covalent ones, seem to be responsible for several properties of conjugated molecules, such as thermodynamic stability, planarity and (C-C)σ bond shortening. The shortcomings of the delocalization concept are discussed.

  12. The quantum interference effects in the SC II 4247 Å line of the second solar spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Smitha, H. N.; Nagendra, K. N.; Stenflo, J. O.; Bianda, M.; Ramelli, R. E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in E-mail: mbianda@irsol.ch

    2014-10-10

    The Sc II 4247 Å line formed in the chromosphere is one of the lines well known, like the Na I D{sub 2} and Ba II D{sub 2}, for its prominent triple-peak structure in Q/I and the underlying quantum interference effects governing it. In this paper, we try to study the nature of this triple-peak structure using the theory of F-state interference including the effects of partial frequency redistribution (PRD) and radiative transfer (RT). We compare our results with the observations taken in a quiet region near the solar limb. In spite of accounting for PRD and RT effects, it has not been possible to reproduce the observed triple-peak structure in Q/I. While the two wing PRD peaks (on either side of central peak) and the near wing continuum can be reproduced, the central peak is completely suppressed by the enhanced depolarization resulting from the hyperfine structure splitting. This suppression remains for all the tested widely different one-dimensional model atmospheres or for any multi-component combinations of them. While multidimensional RT effects may improve the fit to the intensity profiles, they do not appear capable of explaining the enigmatic central Q/I peak. This leads us to suspect that some aspect of quantum physics is missing.

  13. Enhancement of thermoelectric efficiency by quantum interference effects in trilayer silicene flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, Natalia; Rosales, L.; Chico, Leonor; Pacheco, M.; Orellana, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the enhancement of thermoelectric efficiencies has been accomplished in nanoscale systems by making use of quantum effects. We exploit the presence of quantum interference phenomena such as bound states in the continuum and Fano antiresonances in trilayer silicene flakes to produce sharp changes in the electronic transmission of the system. By applying symmetric gate voltages the thermoelectric properties can be tuned and, for particular flake lengths, a great enhancement of the figure of merit can be achieved. We show that the most favorable configurations are those in which the electronic transmission is dominated by the coupling of bound states to the continuum, tuned by an external gate.

  14. Widely tunable erbium-doped fiber laser based on multimode interference effect.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Guzman, A; Antonio-Lopez, J E; Selvas-Aguilar, R; May-Arrioja, D A; Estudillo-Ayala, J; LiKamWa, P

    2010-01-18

    A widely tunable erbium-doped all-fiber laser has been demonstrated. The tunable mechanism is based on a novel tunable filter using multimode interference effects (MMI). The tunable MMI filter was applied to fabricate a tunable erbium-doped fiber laser via a standard ring cavity. A tuning range of 60 nm was obtained, ranging from 1549 nm to 1609 nm, with a signal to noise ratio of 40 dB. The tunable MMI filter mechanism is very simple and inexpensive, but also quite efficient as a wavelength tunable filter.

  15. NASA Iced Aerodynamics and Controls Current Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Gene

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the state of current research in the area of aerodynamics and aircraft control with ice conditions by the Aviation Safety Program, part of the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Controls Project (IRAC). Included in the presentation is a overview of the modeling efforts. The objective of the modeling is to develop experimental and computational methods to model and predict aircraft response during adverse flight conditions, including icing. The Aircraft icing modeling efforts includes the Ice-Contaminated Aerodynamics Modeling, which examines the effects of ice contamination on aircraft aerodynamics, and CFD modeling of ice-contaminated aircraft aerodynamics, and Advanced Ice Accretion Process Modeling which examines the physics of ice accretion, and works on computational modeling of ice accretions. The IRAC testbed, a Generic Transport Model (GTM) and its use in the investigation of the effects of icing on its aerodynamics is also reviewed. This has led to a more thorough understanding and models, both theoretical and empirical of icing physics and ice accretion for airframes, advanced 3D ice accretion prediction codes, CFD methods for iced aerodynamics and better understanding of aircraft iced aerodynamics and its effects on control surface effectiveness.

  16. Effects of orbital and spin current interference in E1 and M2 nuclear excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharova, N. G.

    2015-12-15

    The interference of contributions from the orbital and spin currents to the E1 and M2 resonances is investigated. The results of the current interference analysis within the shell model are compared with the experimental data.

  17. Parameter Estimation of Actuators for Benchmark Active Control Technology (BACT) Wind Tunnel Model with Analysis of Wear and Aerodynamic Loading Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Fung, Jimmy

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the development of transfer function models for the trailing-edge and upper and lower spoiler actuators of the Benchmark Active Control Technology (BACT) wind tunnel model for application to control system analysis and design. A simple nonlinear least-squares parameter estimation approach is applied to determine transfer function parameters from frequency response data. Unconstrained quasi-Newton minimization of weighted frequency response error was employed to estimate the transfer function parameters. An analysis of the behavior of the actuators over time to assess the effects of wear and aerodynamic load by using the transfer function models is also presented. The frequency responses indicate consistent actuator behavior throughout the wind tunnel test and only slight degradation in effectiveness due to aerodynamic hinge loading. The resulting actuator models have been used in design, analysis, and simulation of controllers for the BACT to successfully suppress flutter over a wide range of conditions.

  18. Neural correlates of the contextual interference effect in motor learning: a transcranial magnetic stimulation investigation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Ho Janice; Winstein, Carolee J; Fisher, Beth E; Wu, Allan D

    2010-01-01

    The authors applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the causal role of the primary motor cortex (M1) for the contextual-interference effect in motor learning. Previous work using a nonfocal TMS coil suggested a casual role for M1 during high-interference practice conditions, but this hypothesis has not yet been proven. In the 1st experiment, participants practiced 3 rapid elbow flexion-extension tasks in either a blocked or random order, with learning assessed by a delayed retention test. TMS was delivered immediately after feedback during practice using a circular coil, centered over the contralateral M1. Each participant practiced with 1 of 3 TMS conditions: no TMS, real TMS, or sham TMS. Although no significant differences were observed between groups during acquisition, retention of the random group was better than the blocked group. The learning benefits of random practice were attenuated in the real-TMS condition, but not in the sham-TMS or no-TMS conditions. In the second experiment, the authors studied the effects of suprathreshold TMS and subthreshold TMS over M1, lateral premotor cortex, and peripheral arm stimulation using a focal figure-8 coil on motor learning under random practice conditions. The authors found that only suprathreshold TMS on M1 produced significant disruption of retention compared to the other stimulation conditions. Results suggest that a high-threshold neuronal population within M1 is causally important for enhanced retention following random, but not block, practice. Results also support the early intertrial interval as a critical period of M1 activity during practice. Overall, these results suggest neural circuits within M1 contribute to motor learning processing that depends on learners' training experience. Results contribute to knowledge of the critical and specific role that M1 plays in generating a learning advantage following high-interference practice conditions.

  19. Excitation dependent Fano-like interference effects in plasmonic silver nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Sean M.; Nicoletti, Olivia; Rossouw, David; Ostasevicius, Tomas; Midgley, Paul A.

    2014-10-01

    Surface plasmon resonances in metal nanoparticles are an emerging technology platform for nano-optics applications from sensing to solar energy conversion. The electromagnetic near field associated with these resonances arises from modes determined by the shape, size, and composition of the metal nanoparticle. When coupled in the near field, multiple resonant modes can interact to give rise to interference effects offering fine control of both the spectral response and spatial distribution of fields near the particle. Here, we present an examination of experimental electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of silver nanorod monomer surface plasmon modes and present an explanation of observed spatial amplitude modulation of the Fabry-Pérot resonance modes of these silver nanorods using electrodynamics simulations. For these simulations, we identify differences in spectral peak symmetry in light scattering and electron spectroscopies (EELS and cathodoluminescence) and analyze the distinct near-field responses of silver nanorods to plane-wave light and electron beam excitation in terms of a coupled oscillator model. Effects of properties of the material and the incident field are evaluated, and the spatially resolved EELS signals are shown to provide a signature for assessing Fano-like interference effects in silver nanorods. These findings outline key considerations and challenges for interpreting electron microscopy data on plasmonic nanoparticles for understanding nanoscale optics and for characterization and design of photonic devices.

  20. Simulated Assessment of Interference Effects in Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) QPSK Receiver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    Faculty Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University...band jammers including broad-band noise (BBN), frequency hopping interference (FHI), comb-spectrum interference (CSI), multi-tone jamming (MTJ), random...33 3.4.1.1 Broad-band Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 3.4.1.2 Random Frequency Modulated Interference

  1. Aerodynamics of Combat Aircraft Controls and of Ground Effects (L’Aerodynamique des Commandes des Avions de Combat et des Effets de Sol)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    maneuverability and short field capability. Mangold and Wedekind (ref 16) addressed some of the same issues as Ref 1, but with an emphasis on pitch...Deployment on the Transient Forces on an Aerofoil" 16. Mangold, P., Wedekind , G., "Inflight Thrust Vectoring - A Further Degree of Freedom in the...Aerodynamic/Flightmechanical Design of Modern Fighter Aicraft" 17. Holmes, M., et.al., "A Propulsion View of Ground Effects Research" 12 18. Wedekind , G

  2. The Effect of Blade-Section Thickness Ratio on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of Related Full-Scale Propellers at Mach Numbers up to 0.65

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Julian D; Steinberg, Seymour

    1953-01-01

    The results of an investigation of two 10-foot-diameter, two-blade NACA propellers are presented for a range of blade angles from 20 degrees to 55 degrees at airspeeds up to 500 miles per hour. These results are compared with those from previous investigations of five related NACA propellers in order to evaluate the effects of blade-section thickness ratios on propeller aerodynamic characteristics.

  3. The effect of incidence angle on the overall three-dimensional aerodynamic performance of a classical annular airfoil cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergsten, D. E.; Fleeter, S.

    1983-01-01

    To be of quantitative value to the designer and analyst, it is necessary to experimentally verify the flow modeling and the numerics inherent in calculation codes being developed to predict the three dimensional flow through turbomachine blade rows. This experimental verification requires that predicted flow fields be correlated with three dimensional data obtained in experiments which model the fundamental phenomena existing in the flow passages of modern turbomachines. The Purdue Annular Cascade Facility was designed specifically to provide these required three dimensional data. The overall three dimensional aerodynamic performance of an instrumented classical airfoil cascade was determined over a range of incidence angle values. This was accomplished utilizing a fully automated exit flow data acquisition and analysis system. The mean wake data, acquired at two downstream axial locations, were analyzed to determine the effect of incidence angle, the three dimensionality of the cascade exit flow field, and the similarity of the wake profiles. The hub, mean, and tip chordwise airfoil surface static pressure distributions determined at each incidence angle are correlated with predictions from the MERIDL and TSONIC computer codes.

  4. Interference effects on (e, 2e) electron momentum profiles: a comparative study for CCl4 and CF4*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Noboru; Katafuchi, Keisuke; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2016-12-01

    Interference effects on electron momentum density distributions have been studied using electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) for the three outermost orbitals of CCl4, which are constructed from the Cl 3p nonbonding atomic orbitals. The EMS experiment was conducted in the symmetric noncoplanar geometry at an incident electron energy of 2.0 keV. Interference pattern has then been obtained by dividing the experimental data by distorted-wave-Born-approximation cross section for an isolated Cl 3p atomic orbital. A comparison with the result of our earlier study on CF4 [N. Watanabe, X.-J. Chen, M. Takahashi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 173201 (2012)] has demonstrated that the period of the interference pattern reflects the internuclear distance between the constituent halogen atoms. Furthermore, the present result strongly suggests that distorted-wave effects lead to partial destruction of the interference for CCl4 at large momentum.

  5. Age difference in dual-task interference effects on procedural learning in children.

    PubMed

    Lejeune, Caroline; Desmottes, Lise; Catale, Corinne; Meulemans, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the role played by explicit mechanisms during procedural learning in two age groups of children (7 and 10 years) using a dual-task paradigm. To do this, we explored the effect of an interference task during the early and late phases of a mirror tracing learning task. The results showed a differential impact of the secondary task on the two age groups, but only during the first learning phase; the performance of 10-year-olds was affected by the second task, whereas in 7-year-olds no performance difference was found between the single- and dual-task conditions. Overall, our study suggests that there are differences in the amount of effortful processing in which 7- and 10-year-olds engage at the beginning of the learning process; procedural learning in young children is mainly implicit, as attested by its lesser sensitivity to an interference task, whereas high-level explicit mechanisms seem to contribute to the procedural performance of 10-year-olds. However, these explicit mechanisms, even if they have an effect on performance, might not have an impact on the learning curve given that no difference in rate of acquisition was found between age groups. These findings are discussed in the light of classical conceptions of procedural learning.

  6. Fluorometric Quantification of Polyphosphate in Environmental Plankton Samples: Extraction Protocols, Matrix Effects, and Nucleic Acid Interference

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Polyphosphate (polyP) is a ubiquitous biochemical with many cellular functions and comprises an important environmental phosphorus pool. However, methodological challenges have hampered routine quantification of polyP in environmental samples. We tested 15 protocols to extract inorganic polyphosphate from natural marine samples and cultured cyanobacteria for fluorometric quantification with 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) without prior purification. A combination of brief boiling and digestion with proteinase K was superior to all other protocols, including other enzymatic digestions and neutral or alkaline leaches. However, three successive extractions were required to extract all polyP. Standard addition revealed matrix effects that differed between sample types, causing polyP to be over- or underestimated by up to 50% in the samples tested here. Although previous studies judged that the presence of DNA would not complicate fluorometric quantification of polyP with DAPI, we show that RNA can cause significant interference at the wavelengths used to measure polyP. Importantly, treating samples with DNase and RNase before proteinase K digestion reduced fluorescence by up to 57%. We measured particulate polyP along a North Pacific coastal-to-open ocean transect and show that particulate polyP concentrations increased toward the open ocean. While our final method is optimized for marine particulate matter, different environmental sample types may need to be assessed for matrix effects, extraction efficiency, and nucleic acid interference. PMID:23104409

  7. The PRP Effect Following Callosotomy: Residual Interference Despite Uncoupling of Lateralized Response Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivry, Richard B.; Franz, Elizabeth A.; Kingstone, Alan; Johnston, James C.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A callosotomy patient was tested in two dual-task experiments requiring successive speeded responses to lateralized stimuli. In accord with the recent findings of Pashler, O'Brien, Luck, Hillyard, Mangun, and Gazzaniga (in press), the patient showed a robust psychological refractory period effect (PRP) responses on Task 2 were inversely related to the stimulus-onset asynchrony (SOA). However, three aspects of our data indicated that the processing limitations for the patient were different than those observed with control subjects. First, the split-brain patient did not show an increase in reaction time when the two tasks required responses from a common output system (i.e., both manual responses) in comparison to when different output systems were used (i.e., manual-vocal). Second, inconsistent stimulus-response mappings for the two tasks greatly inflated response latencies for the control subjects, but had minimal effect on the performance of the split-brain patient. Third, the consistency manipulation was underadditive with SOA for only the patient, suggesting a later bottleneck in processing following callosotomy than was observed for the control subjects. It is proposed that sectioning the corpus callosum eliminates interference resulting from competing stimulus response codes. Nonetheless, dual-task interference persists for the split-brain subject because a subcortical gate constrains when selected responses can be implemented.

  8. Interference effects in the H($\\to \\gamma\\gamma$)+2 jets channel at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Coradeschi, F.; de Florian, D.; Dixon, L. J.; Fidanza, N.; Hoeche, S.; Ita, H.; Li, Y.; Mazzitelli, J.

    2015-07-08

    We compute the interference between the resonant process pp → H(→γγ)+2 jets and the corresponding continuum background at leading order in QCD. For the Higgs signal, we include gluon fusion (GF) and vector boson fusion (VBF) production channels, while for the background we consider all tree-level contributions, including pure EW effects (O(α4QED)) and QCD contributions (O(α2QEDα2s)), plus the loop-induced gluon-initiated process. After convolution with the experimental mass resolution, the main effect of the interference is to shift the position of the mass peak, as in the inclusive GF case studied previously. The apparent mass shift is small in magnitude but strongly dependent on the Higgs width, potentially allowing for a measurement of, or bound on, the width itself. In the H(→γγ)+2 jets channel, the VBF and GF contributions generate shifts of opposite signs which largely cancel, depending on the sets of cuts used, to as little as 5 MeV (toward a lower Higgs mass). As a result, the small magnitude of the shift makes this channel a good reference mass for measuring the inclusive mass shift of around 60 MeV in the Standard Model.

  9. Pulsed-field study of the interference commensurate effect in quasi-one-dimensional organic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, J.; Oh, J. I.; Yoshino, H.; Dhakal, P.; Naughton, M. J.

    2008-03-01

    We report angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations for fields up to 43 T oriented mainly in the most conducting x-y plane, with small field component along the least conducting z axis, in the q1d compounds (TMTSF)2ClO4 and (DMET)2I3 at 1.5 K. A hybrid plastic-metal cryoprobe system with pseudo dual-axis rotation has been built for these pulsed-field measurements. Due to the interference commensurate effect, (aka Lee-Naughton oscillations) [1-3], we have observed rich magnetoresistance oscillations, resulting from an interference effect of commensurate electron trajectories in the extended Brillouin zone. Also, we have found that, as theoretically expected [2], field-dependent magnetoresistance shows 1D and 2D transport behavior at local resistance maxima and^ minima (versus field angle), respectively. [1] I.J. Lee and M.J. Naughton, Phys. Rev. B 57, 7423 (1998).[2] A.G. Lebed, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 187003 (2003).[3] H.I. Ha, et al., Phys. Rev. B 73, 033107 (2006).

  10. Interference effects of choice on confidence: Quantum characteristics of evidence accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kvam, Peter D; Pleskac, Timothy J; Yu, Shuli; Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2015-08-25

    Decision-making relies on a process of evidence accumulation which generates support for possible hypotheses. Models of this process derived from classical stochastic theories assume that information accumulates by moving across definite levels of evidence, carving out a single trajectory across these levels over time. In contrast, quantum decision models assume that evidence develops over time in a superposition state analogous to a wavelike pattern and that judgments and decisions are constructed by a measurement process by which a definite state of evidence is created from this indefinite state. This constructive process implies that interference effects should arise when multiple responses (measurements) are elicited over time. We report such an interference effect during a motion direction discrimination task. Decisions during the task interfered with subsequent confidence judgments, resulting in less extreme and more accurate judgments than when no decision was elicited. These results provide qualitative and quantitative support for a quantum random walk model of evidence accumulation over the popular Markov random walk model. We discuss the cognitive and neural implications of modeling evidence accumulation as a quantum dynamic system.

  11. Interference effects of choice on confidence: Quantum characteristics of evidence accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Kvam, Peter D.; Pleskac, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Decision-making relies on a process of evidence accumulation which generates support for possible hypotheses. Models of this process derived from classical stochastic theories assume that information accumulates by moving across definite levels of evidence, carving out a single trajectory across these levels over time. In contrast, quantum decision models assume that evidence develops over time in a superposition state analogous to a wavelike pattern and that judgments and decisions are constructed by a measurement process by which a definite state of evidence is created from this indefinite state. This constructive process implies that interference effects should arise when multiple responses (measurements) are elicited over time. We report such an interference effect during a motion direction discrimination task. Decisions during the task interfered with subsequent confidence judgments, resulting in less extreme and more accurate judgments than when no decision was elicited. These results provide qualitative and quantitative support for a quantum random walk model of evidence accumulation over the popular Markov random walk model. We discuss the cognitive and neural implications of modeling evidence accumulation as a quantum dynamic system. PMID:26261322

  12. Effects of CW interference on the carrier tracking loop of the deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sue, M. K.

    1984-01-01

    A radio-frequency interference (RFI) environment can cause serious problems for communications systems, such as the Deep Space Network (DSN). For this reason, it is necessary to determine first the RFI susceptibility characteristics for DSN receiving systgms. The present investigation is concerned with CW RFI's which are close in frequency to the carrier frequency. The carrier tracking loop is highly sensitive, and this type of RFI will degrade the carrier loop performance before saturation effects become noticeable. The investigation has the objective to develop an analytical model which will make it possible to predict the tracking performance of the Block IV receiver when operated in the presence of a CW RFI in the receiver passband. The Block IV receiver represents one of the DSN receivers. Attention is given to the effects of a CW RFI on a phase-locked loop, the effects of a bandpass limiter, numerical results, experimental verification, and aspects of computer simulation.

  13. Modulating the interference effect on spatial working memory by applying transcranial direct current stimulation over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Jen; Tseng, Philip; Chang, Chi-Fu; Pai, Ming-Chyi; Hsu, Kuei-Sen; Lin, Chou-Ching; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2014-11-01

    Spatial working memory (SWM) is the ability to temporarily store and manipulate spatial information. It has a limited capacity and is quite vulnerable to interference. Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has been shown to be a part of the SWM network but its specific functional role still remains unknown. Here we applied transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a noninvasive brain stimulation technique that provides polarity-specific stimulation over the targeted region, to investigate the specific role of the right DLPFC in resolving interference in SWM. A forward- and backward-recall computerized Corsi Block Tapping task (CBT), both with and without a concurrent motor interference task (the modified Luria manual sequencing task) was used to measure SWM capacity and reaction time. The results showed that motor interference impeded accuracy and prolonged reaction time in forward and backward recall for SWM. Anodal tDCS over right DLPFC yielded the tendency to shorten participants' reaction time in the conditions with interference (forward with interference, and backward with interference). Most importantly, anodal tDCS significantly improved participants' SWM span when cognitive demand was the highest (the "backward-recall with motor interference" condition). These results suggest that (1) the right DLPFC plays a crucial role in dealing with the cross-domain motor interference for spatial working memory and (2) the anodal tDCS over right DLPFC improved SWM capacity particularly when task difficulty demands more complex mental manipulations that could be due to the facilitatory effect of anodal tDCS which enhanced the DLPFC function within central executive system at the top-down attentional level.

  14. Minimizing off-target effects by using diced siRNAs for RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jason W; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Gong, Delquin; Schaner, Marci E; Brown, Patrick O; Ferrell, James E

    2006-01-01

    Microarray studies have shown that individual synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can have substantial off-target effects. Pools of siRNAs, produced by incubation of dsRNAs with recombinant Dicer or RNase III, can also be used to silence genes. Here we show that diced siRNA pools are highly complex, containing hundreds of different individual siRNAs. This high complexity could either compound the problem of off-target effects, since the number of potentially problematic siRNAs is high, or it could diminish the problem, since the concentration of any individual problematic siRNA is low. We therefore compared the off-target effects of diced siRNAs to chemically synthesized siRNAs. In agreement with previous reports, we found that two chemically synthesized siRNAs targeted against p38α MAPK (MAPK14) induced off-target changes in the abundance of hundreds of mRNAs. In contrast, three diced siRNA pools against p38α MAPK had almost no off-target effects. The off-target effects of a synthetic siRNA were reduced when the siRNA was diluted 3-fold in a diced pool and completely alleviated when it was diluted 30- or 300-fold, suggesting that when problematic siRNAs are present within a diced pool, their absolute concentration is too low to result in significant off-target effects. These data rationalize the observed high specificity of RNA interference in C. elegans and D. melanogaster, where gene suppression is mediated by endogenously-generated diced siRNA pools, and provide a strategy for improving the specificity of RNA interference experiments and screens in mammalian cells. PMID:19771225

  15. Direct measurements of controlled aerodynamic forces on a wire-suspended axisymmetric body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Philip; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2011-06-01

    A novel in-line miniature force transducer is developed for direct measurements of the net aerodynamic forces and moments on a bluff body. The force transducers are integrated into each of the eight mounting wires that are utilized for suspension of an axisymmetric model in a wind tunnel having minimal wake interference. The aerodynamic forces and moments on the model are altered by induced active local attachment of the separated base flow. Fluidic control is effected by an array of four integrated aft-facing synthetic jet actuators that emanate from narrow, azimuthally segmented slots, equally distributed around the perimeter of the circular tail end. The jet orifices are embedded within a small backward-facing step that extends into a Coanda surface. The altered flow dynamics associated with both quasi-steady and transitory asymmetric activation of the flow control effect is characterized by direct force and PIV measurements.

  16. Unsteady transonic aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, D.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on unsteady transonic aerodynamics are presented. The topics addressed include: physical phenomena associated with unsteady transonic flows, basic equations for unsteady transonic flow, practical problems concerning aircraft, basic numerical methods, computational methods for unsteady transonic flows, application of transonic flow analysis to helicopter rotor problems, unsteady aerodynamics for turbomachinery aeroelastic applications, alternative methods for modeling unsteady transonic flows.

  17. Uncertainty in Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Hemsch, M. J.; Morrison, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    An approach is presented to treat computational aerodynamics as a process, subject to the fundamental quality assurance principles of process control and process improvement. We consider several aspects affecting uncertainty for the computational aerodynamic process and present a set of stages to determine the level of management required to meet risk assumptions desired by the customer of the predictions.

  18. The present status and the future of missile aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N.

    1988-01-01

    Some recent developments in the state of the art in missile aerodynamics are reviewed. Among the subjects covered are: (1) tri-service/NASA data base, (2) wing-body interference, (3) nonlinear controls, (4) hypersonic transition, (5) vortex interference, (6) airbreathers, supersonic inlets, (7) store separation problems, (8) correlation of missile data, (9) CFD codes for complete configurations, (10) engineering prediction methods, and (11) future configurations. Suggestions are made for future research and development to advance the state of the art of missile aerodynamics.

  19. Vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H. B.; Campbell, J. F.; Young, A. D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The principal emphasis of the meeting was to be on the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads. This report shows that a substantial amount of the papers covering this area were received from a wide range of countries, together with an attendance that was even more diverse. In itself, this testifies to the current interest in the subject and to the appropriateness of the Panel's choice of topic and approach. An attempt is made to summarize each paper delivered, and to relate the contributions made in the papers and in the discussions to some of the important aspects of vortex flow aerodynamics. This reveals significant progress and important clarifications, but also brings out remaining weaknesses in predictive capability and gaps in understanding. Where possible, conclusions are drawn and areas of continuing concern are identified.

  20. Ionization of N2 in collisions with fast electrons: Evidence of an interference effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chowdhury, Madhusree; Stia, C. R.; Tachino, C. A.; Fojon, O. A.; Rivarola, Roberto D.; Tribedi, Lokesh C.

    2016-11-01

    Absolute double differential cross sections (DDCS) of electron emission were measured for ionization of N2 by fast electrons with energy 7 keV. Measurements were performed for different electron emission angles and energies. Evidence of oscillation due to Young-type interference was observed in the DDCS ratios for all angles. The frequency for large backward angle is found to be larger compared to that for small forward angle. Consequently, the forward-backward asymmetry parameter reveals the oscillatory structure even more clearly. The oscillations observed for both experimental-to-theoretical DDCS ratios and forward-backward asymmetry were well explained by the Cohen-Fano model of interference in a molecular double slit. A periodic deviation of the Cohen-Fano model from the asymmetry parameter data reveals the presence of a higher-frequency component. The first Born model was employed to explain the results of molecular nitrogen for which a complete-neglect-of-differential-overlap approximation was used along with an effective atomic number.

  1. Interference effects in one- and two-photon ionization by femtosecond VUV pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryzlova, Elena V.; Staroselskaya, Ekaterina I.; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.; Venzke, Joel; Bartschat, Klaus

    2015-05-01

    Investigations of coherent control of atomic and molecular processes have rapidly developed since the advent of coherent light sources such as X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) and achievements in high harmonic generation. In practice, radiation from XFELs contains a small fraction of the second harmonic, which is difficult to filter out but can strongly influence experimental data on the two-photon ionization process, such as the angular distribution. Specifically, the direct first-order second-harmonic ionization process may interfere with, and possibly even dominate a second-order two-photon process caused by the fundamental. While this interference has been investigated in the optical regime with many-cycle pulses, possible effects due to short pulses, as well as a physical intermediate resonance state that may serve as a stepping stone for the second-order process, need a careful study for particular experimental conditions. Here we consider the photoionization of atomic hydrogen for photon energies near the excitation energy of the 2p state (0.375 a.u. or 121.6 nm). We compare results obtained from a direct numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation and second-order perturbation theory. This work is supported by the United States National Science Foundation under grant No. PHY-1430245 and the XSEDE allocation PHY-090031, and by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research under Grant No. 12-02-01123.

  2. Aharonov-Bohm-type quantum interference effects in narrow gap semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillianfeld, R. B.; Kallaher, R. L.; Heremans, J. J.; Chen, Hong; Goel, N.; Chung, S. J.; Santos, M. B.; van Roy, W.; Borghs, G.

    2009-03-01

    We present experiments on quantum interference phenomena in semiconductors with strong spin-orbit interaction, using mesoscopic parallel ring arrays fabricated on InSb/InAlSb and InAs/AlGaSb heterostructures. Both external electric field effects and temperature dependence of the ring magnetoresistance are examined. Top-gate voltage-dependent oscillations in ring resistance in the absence of an external magnetic field are suggestive of Aharonov-Casher interference. At low magnetic fields the ring magnetoresistance is dominated by oscillations with h/2e periodicity characteristic of Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) oscillations, whereas the h/e periodicity characteristic of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations persists to high magnetic fields. Fourier spectra (FS) reveal AB amplitudes on the same order as AAS amplitudes at low fields, and in some samples reveal a splitting of the AB peaks, which has been interpreted as a signature of Berry's phase. The FS are also used to quantify the temperature dependence of the oscillation amplitudes (NSF DMR-0618235, DOE DE-FG02-08ER46532, NSF DMR-0520550).

  3. Two-color interference effect involving three-photon atomic excitation and four-wave mixing in crossed laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peet, V.

    2007-09-15

    Through multiphoton ionization measurements, the polarization effects in destructive quantum interference under three-photon resonant excitation have been studied. Recent observations [V. Peet, Phys. Rev. A 74, 033406 (2006)] have indicated that contrary to the well-known pattern of a total suppression of resonance excitation, the destructive interference becomes incomplete if three-photon transition is driven by crossed beams with orthogonal polarization planes. These observations have been tested for a more general case of two-color excitation and very similar polarization-dependent anomalies in the interference character have been registered. It has been shown that the destructive interference is modified and the resonance excitation does occur if two crossed laser beams have opposite circular polarizations. The pressure-induced evolution of the uncanceled ionization peaks has the ratio of blue shift to width close to 0.5 exactly as it is known for resonance ionization peaks registered under excitation by counterpropagating laser beams.

  4. Effect of sweep and aspect ratio on the longitudinal aerodynamics of a spanloader wing in and out of ground effect. [wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kjelgaard, S. O.; Paulson, J. W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted in the Langley 4 by 7 meter tunnel to determine the effects of leading edge sweep, aspect ratio, flap deflection, and elevon deflection on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a span distributed load advanced cargo aircraft (spanloader). Model configurations consisted of leading edge sweeps of 0, 15, 30 and 45 deg and aspect ratios of approximately 2, 4, 6, and 8. Data were obtained for angles of attack of -8 to 18 deg out of ground effect and at angles of attack of -2, 0, and 2 deg in ground effect at Mach number equal 0.14. Flap and elevon deflections ranged from -20 to 20 deg. The data are represented in tabulated form.

  5. Implementation of a multiblock sensitivity analysis method in numerical aerodynamic shape optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacasse, James M.

    1995-01-01

    A multiblock sensitivity analysis method is applied in a numerical aerodynamic shape optimization technique. The Sensitivity Analysis Domain Decomposition (SADD) scheme which is implemented in this study was developed to reduce the computer memory requirements resulting from the aerodynamic sensitivity analysis equations. Discrete sensitivity analysis offers the ability to compute quasi-analytical derivatives in a more efficient manner than traditional finite-difference methods, which tend to be computationally expensive and prone to inaccuracies. The direct optimization procedure couples CFD analysis based on the two-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations with a gradient-based numerical optimization technique. The linking mechanism is the sensitivity equation derived from the CFD discretized flow equations, recast in adjoint form, and solved using direct matrix inversion techniques. This investigation is performed to demonstrate an aerodynamic shape optimization technique on a multiblock domain and its applicability to complex geometries. The objectives are accomplished by shape optimizing two aerodynamic configurations. First, the shape optimization of a transonic airfoil is performed to investigate the behavior of the method in highly nonlinear flows and the effect of different grid blocking strategies on the procedure. Secondly, shape optimization of a two-element configuration in subsonic flow is completed. Cases are presented for this configuration to demonstrate the effect of simultaneously reshaping interfering elements. The aerodynamic shape optimization is shown to produce supercritical type airfoils in the transonic flow from an initially symmetric airfoil. Multiblocking effects the path of optimization while providing similar results at the conclusion. Simultaneous reshaping of elements is shown to be more effective than individual element reshaping due to the inclusion of mutual interference effects.

  6. Aerodynamic Simulation of the MARINTEK Braceless Semisubmersible Wave Tank Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Gordon; Muskulus, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Model scale experiments of floating offshore wind turbines are important for both platform design for the industry as well as numerical model validation for the research community. An important consideration in the wave tank testing of offshore wind turbines are scaling effects, especially the tension between accurate scaling of both hydrodynamic and aerodynamic forces. The recent MARINTEK braceless semisubmersible wave tank experiment utilizes a novel aerodynamic force actuator to decouple the scaling of the aerodynamic forces. This actuator consists of an array of motors that pull on cables to provide aerodynamic forces that are calculated by a blade-element momentum code in real time as the experiment is conducted. This type of system has the advantage of supplying realistically scaled aerodynamic forces that include dynamic forces from platform motion, but does not provide the insights into the accuracy of the aerodynamic models that an actual model-scale rotor could provide. The modeling of this system presents an interesting challenge, as there are two ways to simulate the aerodynamics; either by using the turbulent wind fields as inputs to the aerodynamic model of the design code, or by surpassing the aerodynamic model and using the forces applied to the experimental turbine as direct inputs to the simulation. This paper investigates the best practices of modeling this type of novel aerodynamic actuator using a modified wind turbine simulation tool, and demonstrates that bypassing the dynamic aerodynamics solver of design codes can lead to erroneous results.

  7. Nacelle Aerodynamic and Inertial Loads (NAIL) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A flight test survey of pressures measured on wing, pylon, and nacelle surfaces and of the operating loads on Boeing 747/Pratt & Whitney JT9D-7A nacelles was made to provide information on airflow patterns surrounding the propulsion system installations and to clarify processes responsible for inservice deterioration of fuel economy. Airloads at takeoff rotation were found to be larger than at any other normal service condition because of the combined effects of high angle of attack and high engine airflow. Inertial loads were smaller than previous estimates indicated. A procedure is given for estimating inlet airloads at low speeds and high angles of attack for any underwing high bypass ratio turbofan installation approximately resembling the one tested. Flight procedure modifications are suggested that may result in better fuel economy retention in service. Pressures were recorded on the core cowls and pylons of both engine installations and on adjacent wing surfaces for use in development of computer codes for analysis of installed propulsion system aerodynamic drag interference effects.

  8. Approach to establishing the effect of aeroelasticity on aerodynamic characteristics of the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, D. C.; Dominik, D. F.

    1983-01-01

    The static aeroelastic effects on the longitudinal stability and elevon/aileron effectiveness of the space transportation system (STS) Space Shuttle orbiter were estimated by a simplified approach called the elevon torsional stiffness (ETS) method. This method employs rigid model wind tunnel test results to predict aeroelastic effects. Lateral/directional stability and rudder effectiveness were based on results of a wind tunnel test in which a flexible tail model was used. Comparisons with selective flight data are made in this paper. Results of correlations with flight data (although limited at the present time) verify the predicted aeroelastic effects for the orbiter. The orbiter's structural characteristics are such that the effects of aeroelasticity, whether estimated using analytical techniques or simplified methods, do not appear to affect the vehicle performance to any great extent. The large amount of scatter in the flight-extracted data made verification of the aeroelastic corrections very difficult. Generally, the simplified elevon torsional stiffness method provided better correlation with flight test results than he analytical method and reduced the verification effort and cost.

  9. An eye-to-hand magnet effect reveals distinct spatial interference in motor planning and execution.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Brian A; Cluff, Tyler; Lyons, James; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2013-03-01

    An important question in oculomanual control is whether motor planning and execution modulate interference between motion of the eyes and hands. Here we investigated oculomanual interference using a novel paradigm that required saccadic eye movements and unimanual finger tapping. We examined finger trajectories for spatial interference caused by concurrent saccades. The first experiment used synchronous cues so that saccades and taps shared a common timekeeping goal. We found that finger trajectories showed bilateral interference where either finger was attracted in the direction of the accompanying saccade. The second experiment avoided interference due to shared planning resources by examining interference caused by reactive saccades. Here, we observed a lesser degree of execution-dependent coupling where the finger trajectory deviated only when reactive saccades were directed toward the hemifield of the responding hand. Our results show that distinct forms of eye-to-hand coupling emerge according to the demands of the task.

  10. Effects of Different Contextual Interference Training Programs on Straight Sprinting and Agility Performance of Primary School Students

    PubMed Central

    Yanci, Javier; Reina, Raúl; Los Arcos, Asier; Camara, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a different degree of contextual interference (CI) training program on the change of direction ability (CODA) itself and on the straight sprinting (SSP) performance (5 m and 15 m) in students in the first year of primary school. It also evaluated which CI training program was more effective. Eighty eight students (6.42 ± 0.38 yr) volunteered as participants for the present study. Participants were randomized into 5 different CI training programs (LCI: low contextual interference, MCI: moderate contextual interference, HCI: high contextual interference, VCI: variable contextual interference, and CG: control group) during a 3 week period. Significant CODA improvements (p < 0.05) in pre-post-test were found in MCI (4.39%, ES 0.41) and VCI (9.37%, ES 1. 12) groups. Furthermore, LCI, MCI and HCI groups ameliorated their SSP performance, both in 5 m (5. 92%, ES 0.81; 6.67%, ES 0.90; 8.05%, ES 1.33 respectively) and 15 m SSP (5.86%, ES 0.76; 6.47%, ES 0.80; 2.47% ES 0.41 respectively). These results suggest that training through games of tag (VCI) was the most effective in improving the CODA and training with moderate contextual interference (MCI) was the only type which induced improvements in both capacities (SSP and CODA). Key Points We investigated the CODA and SSP performance of students in the first year of primary school and the influence of 5 different training programs on their CODA and SSP ability. Training through games of tag (VCI) was the most effective in improving the CODA Training with moderate contextual interference (MCI) was the only one which induced improvements in both capacities (SSP and CODA). PMID:24149171

  11. Effects of spanwise nozzle geometry and location on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a vectored-engine-over-wing configuration at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leavitt, L. D.; Yip, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    A V/STOL tunnel study was performed to determine the effects of spanwise blowing on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a model using a vectored-over-wing powered lift concept. The effects of spanwise nozzle throat area, internal and external nozzle geometry, and vertical and axial location were investigated. These effects were studied at a Mach number of 0.186 over an angle-of-attack range from 14 deg to 40 deg. A high pressure air system was used to provide jet-exhaust simulation. Engine nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to approximately 3.75.

  12. Aerodynamic characteristics of supersonic fighter airplane configurations based on Soviet design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.; Fournier, R. H.; Lamb, M.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic, stability, and control characteristics of several supersonic fighter airplane concepts are examined. The configurations, which are based on Soviet design concepts, include fixed-wing aircraft having delta wings, swept wings, and trapezoidal wings, and a variable wing-sweep aircraft. Each concept employs aft tail controls. The concepts vary from lightweight, single-engine, air superiority, point interceptor, or ground attack types to larger twin-engine interceptor and reconnaissance designs. Analytical and experimental results indicate that careful application of the transonic or supersonic area rule can provide nearly optimum shaping for minimum drag for a specified Mach number requirement. In addition, through the proper location of components and the exploitation of interference flow fields, the concepts provide linear pitching moment characteristics, high control effectiveness, and reasonably small variations in aerodynamic center location with a resulting high potential for maneuvering capability.

  13. Interference and non-Franck-Condon effects in ionization of H2 molecules by photon impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fojón, O. A.; Fernández, J.; Palacios, A.; Martín, F.

    2011-04-01

    We analyze theoretically interference effects in the spectra of electrons emitted in the H2 photoionization by high energy linearly polarized photons. Molecular bound and continuum states are accurately described by means of B-spline basis allowing the inclusion of the nuclear degrees of freedom. One interesting feature is observed: the usual Franck-Condon behavior is not followed when the H2 internuclear axis is parallel to the polarization direction. Moreover, this is related to the fact that for this molecular orientation and under certain conditions, the electron cannot be emitted in the direction of the radiation field. On the contrary, for H2 molecules perpendicular to the polarization direction, the angular distribution of electrons is analogous to the one observed in the two slits Young's experiment.

  14. Interference effects on the hypersonic, rarefied flow about a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, Richard G.

    1988-01-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method is used to study the hypersonic, rarified flow interference effects on a flat plate caused by nearby surfaces. Calculations focus on shock-boundary-layer and shock-lip interactions in hypersonic inlets. Results are presented for geometries consisting of a flat plate with different leading-edge shapes over a flat lower wall and a blunt-edge flat plate over a 5-degree wedge. The problems simulated correspond to a typical entry flight condition of 7.5 km/s at altitudes of 75 to 90 km. The results show increases in predicted local heating rates for shock-boundary-layer and shock-lip interactions that are quantitatively similar to those observed experimentally at much higher densities.

  15. Third harmonic generation from graphene lying on different substrates: optical-phonon resonances and interference effects.

    PubMed

    Savostianova, N A; Mikhailov, S A

    2017-02-20

    Graphene is a nonlinear material which can be used as a saturable absorber, frequency mixer and frequency multiplier. We theoretically study the third harmonic generation from graphene lying on different dielectric (dispersionless or polar) substrates, metalized or non-metalized on the back side. We show that the third harmonic intensity emitted from graphene lying on a substrate, can be increased by orders of magnitude as compared to the isolated graphene, due the LO-phonon resonances in a polar dielectric or due to the interference effects in the substrates metalized on the back side. In some frequency intervals, the presence of the polar dielectric substrate compensates the strongly decreasing with ω frequency dependence of the third-order conductivity of graphene making the response almost frequency independent. Our results can be used for the development of graphene based frequency multipliers operating in microwave through infrared frequencies.

  16. Highly accurate spectral retardance characterization of a liquid crystal retarder including Fabry-Perot interference effects

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Asticio; Mar Sánchez-López, María del; García-Martínez, Pascuala; Arias, Julia; Moreno, Ignacio

    2014-01-21

    Multiple-beam Fabry-Perot (FP) interferences occur in liquid crystal retarders (LCR) devoid of an antireflective coating. In this work, a highly accurate method to obtain the spectral retardance of such devices is presented. On the basis of a simple model of the LCR that includes FP effects and by using a voltage transfer function, we show how the FP features in the transmission spectrum can be used to accurately retrieve the ordinary and extraordinary spectral phase delays, and the voltage dependence of the latter. As a consequence, the modulation characteristics of the device are fully determined with high accuracy by means of a few off-state physical parameters which are wavelength-dependent, and a single voltage transfer function that is valid within the spectral range of characterization.

  17. Pulsed radio frequency interference effects on data communications via satellite transponder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, A.; Hong, Y.

    1979-01-01

    Power-limited communication links may be susceptible to significant degradation if intentional or unintentional pulsed high level radio frequency interference (RFI) is present. Pulsed RFI is, in fact, of current interest to NASA in studies relating to its Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The present paper examines the impact of pulsed RFI on the error probability performance of a power-limited satellite communication link: the assumed modulation scheme is PN coded binary PSK. The composite effects of thermal noise, pulsed CW and pulsed Gaussian noise are analyzed, where RFI arrivals are assumed to follow Poisson statistics. Under the assumption that the satellite repeater is ideal and that integrate and dump filtering is employed at the ground receiver, an exact error probability expression and associated approximations are derived. Computed results are generated using an arbitrarily specified RFI model.

  18. Multiple-path Quantum Interference Effects in a Double-Aharonov-Bohm Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xf; Liu, Ys

    2010-05-22

    We investigate quantum interference effects in a double-Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometer consisting of five quantum dots sandwiched between two metallic electrodes in the case of symmetric dot-electrode couplings by the use of the Green's function equation of motion method. The analytical expression for the linear conductance at zero temperature is derived to interpret numerical results. A three-peak structure in the linear conductance spectrum may evolve into a double-peak structure, and two Fano dips (zero conductance points) may appear in the quantum system when the energy levels of quantum dots in arms are not aligned with one another. The AB oscillation for the magnetic flux threading the double-AB interferometer is also investigated in this paper. Our results show the period of AB oscillation can be converted from 2π to π by controlling the difference of the magnetic fluxes threading the two quantum rings.

  19. Interference effects on the hypersonic, rarefied flow about a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, Richard G.

    1989-01-01

    The Direct Simulatiaon Monte Carlo method is used to study the hypersonic, rarefied flow interference effects on a flat plate caused by nearby surfaces. Calculations focus on shock-boundary-layer and shock-lip interactions in hypersonic inlets. Results are presented for geometries consisting of a flat plate with different leading-edge shapes over a flat lower wall and a blunt-edge flat plate over a 5-degree wedge. The problems simulated correspond to a typical entry flight condition of 7.5 km/s at altitudes of 75 to 90 km. The results show increases in predicted local heating rates for shock-boundary-layer and shock-lip interactions that are quantitatively similar to those observed experimentally at much higher densities.

  20. Nonlinear interference effects and all-optical switching in optically dense inhomogeneously broadened media

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A.K.; Myslivets, S.A.; George, Thomas F.

    2005-04-01

    Specific features of nonlinear interference processes at quantum transitions in near- and fully resonant Doppler-broadened optically dense media are studied. The possibility of all-optical switching of the medium to opaque or, alternatively, to absolutely transparent, or even to strongly amplifying states is explored, which is controlled by a small variation of two driving or probe radiations and does not require any change of the level populations. Optimum conditions for inversionless amplification of short-wavelength radiation above the oscillation threshold at the expense of the longer-wavelength control fields are investigated. The feasibility of overcoming the fundamental limitation on a velocity-interval of resonantly coupled molecules imposed by the Doppler effect is shown, based on quantum coherence.

  1. Quantum Interference Effects in Molecular Y- and Rhomb-Type Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xia, Hui-Rong; Ye, Cen-Yun; Xu, Jian-We; Ding, Liang-En

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we report the first observation of molecular population trapping in four level systems. Constructive and destructive quantum interferences between two sum-frequncy two-photon transitions in Y- and rhomb-type four-level systems, respectively, im sodium molecules have been experimentally achieved by using only one laser source. Their energy level schemes are featured by the extremely near-resonant enhancement of the equal-frequency two-photon transitions, sharing both the initial and the intermediate levels for the Y-type, and sharing both the initial and the final levels for the rhomb-type systems. Their novel spectral effects are to show seriously restrained Doppler-free UV peak at the nominal location of the induced two-photon transition with visible fluorescence in rhomb-type schems, and to show a strong extra UV peak but null visible fluorescence in the middle between the two dipole allowed two-photon transitions.

  2. Spectroscopy of systems of two identical atoms: effects of quantum interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, A. A.; Yudson, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    Several effects of quantum interference in spectroscopy of a system of two atoms are discussed. (i) In the system of spatially separated atoms in a one-dimensional (1D) geometry (a single-mode waveguide or photon crystal), a (meta)stable excited entangled state can be formed, its decay being very sensitive to the distance between the atoms and to perturbations which cause a difference between their resonance frequencies. (ii) In a system of closely located atoms in 3D space, the extreme sensitivity of absorption and fluorescence spectra to the direction of the applied magnetic field is demonstrated. These theoretical predictions can be useful for the quantum information processing and ultrasensitive measurements.

  3. Effects of shielding on the aerodynamic performance of Savonius wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Morcos, S.M.; Khalafallah, M.G.; Heikel, H.A.

    1981-08-01

    The effect of the flat plate shield on the performance of two-bladed Savonius rotor was experimentally determined. Tests were carried out in a low speed wind tunnel with a working section of 1.0 m/sup 2/. Flat plate shields with various values of plate width and inclination angle were tested in order to determine the optimum configuration. 7 refs.

  4. Effects of leading and trailing edge flaps on the aerodynamics of airfoil/vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, Ahmed A.; Sankar, L. N.; Tadghighi, H.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed for predicting the two-dimensional parallel interaction between a free convecting vortex and a NACA 0012 airfoil having leading and trailing edge integral-type flaps. Special emphasis is placed on the unsteady flap motion effects which result in alleviating the interaction at subcritical and supercritical onset flows. The numerical procedure described here is based on the implicit finite-difference solutions to the unsteady two-dimensional full potential equation. Vortex-induced effects are computed using the Biot-Savart Law with allowance for a finite core radius. The vortex-induced velocities at the surface of the airfoil are incorporated into the potential flow model via the use of the velocity transpiration approach. Flap motion effects are also modeled using the transpiration approach. For subcritical interactions, our results indicate that trailing edge flaps can be used to alleviate the impulsive loads experienced by the airfoil. For supercritical interactions, our results demonstrate the necessity of using a leading edge flap, rather than a trailing edge flap, to alleviate the interaction. Results for various time-dependent flap motions and their effect on the predicted temporal sectional loads, differential pressures, and the free vortex trajectories are presented

  5. Long-term effect of systemic RNA interference on circadian clock genes in hemimetabolous insects.

    PubMed

    Uryu, Outa; Kamae, Yuichi; Tomioka, Kenji; Yoshii, Taishi

    2013-04-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) strategy, which enables gene-specific knock-down of transcripts, has been spread across a wide area of insect studies for investigating gene function without regard to model and non-model insects. This technique is of particular benefit to promote molecular studies on non-model insects. However, the optimal conditions for RNAi are still not well understood because of its variable efficiency depending on the species, target genes, and experimental conditions. To apply RNAi technique to long-running experiments such as chronobiological studies, the effects of RNAi have to persist throughout the experiment. In this study, we attempted to determine the optimal concentration of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) for systemic RNAi and its effective period in two different insect species, the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus and the firebrat Thermobia domestica. In both species, higher concentrations of dsRNA principally yielded a more efficient knock-down of mRNA levels of tested clock genes, although the effect depended on the gene and the species. Surprisingly, the effect of the RNAi reached its maximum effect 1-2 weeks and 1 month after the injection of dsRNA in the crickets and the firebrats, respectively, suggesting a slow but long-term effect of RNAi. Our study provides fundamental information for utilizing RNAi technique in any long-running experiment.

  6. Experimental investigation of the aerodynamic effects of distributed spanwise blowing on a fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, J. K.; Hahne, D. E.; Johnson, T. D., Jr.

    1948-01-01

    The results of wind tunnel tests at NASA Langley targeted at the performance and configurational characteristics of 0.1 and 0.13 scale model spanwise blowing (SWB) jet wing concepts are reported. The concept involves redirection of engine compressor bleed air to provide SWB at the fuselage-wing juncture near the wing leading edge. The tests covered the orientation of the outer panel nozzles, the effects of SWB operation on the performance of leading and trailing edge flaps and the effects of SWB on lateral stability. The trials were run at low speeds and angles of attack from 24-45 deg (landing). Both lift and longitudinal stability improved with the SWB, stall and leading edge vortex breakdown were delayed and performance increased with the SWB rate. Lateral stability was degraded below 20 deg angle of attack while instabilities were delayed above 20 deg due to roll damping.

  7. The effects of cactus inspired spines on the aerodynamics of a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Benjamin; Liu, Yingzheng

    2013-05-01

    The effect of cactus-like spines on the topology and the dynamics of the flow past a stationary or pivoted cylinder are experimentally studied. The experiments are performed either in a water channel or a wind tunnel at low to moderate Reynolds number (390-12 500). The instantaneous velocity field is recorded using TR-PIV and investigated for three different configurations: no spines, short spines (0.1D) and long spines (0.2D). The results show how the spines are able to slow the flow past the cylinder and then increase the recirculation area by up to 128% while the maximum fluctuating kinetic energy intensity is decreased by up to 35%. Moreover, the spines have a significant effect on the vortex shedding and the dynamic pressure at the surface of the cylinder, thus significantly reducing both the amplitude and the frequency at which a pivoted cylinder oscillates.

  8. Effect of afterbody geometry on aerodynamic characteristics of isolated nonaxisymmetric afterbodies at transonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, Linda S.; Carson, George T., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel on an isolated nonaxisymmetic fuselage model that simulates a twin-engine fighter. The effects of aft-end closure distribution (top/bottom) nozzle-flap boattail angle versus nozzle-sidewall boattail angle) and afterbody and nozzle corner treatment (sharp or radius) were investigated. Four different closure distributions with three different corner radii were tested. Tests were conducted over a range of Mach numbers from 0.40 to 1.25 and over a range of angles of attack from -3 to 9 degrees. Solid plume simulators were used to simulate the jet exhaust. For a given closure distribution in the range of Mach numbers tested, the sharp-corner nozzles generally had the highest drag, and the 2-in. corner-radius nozzles generally had the lowest drag. The effect of closure distribution on afterbody drag was highly dependent on configuration and flight condition.

  9. Effects of stores on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a fighter at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollyhigh, S. M.; Sangiorgio, G.; Monta, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental investigations of single and twin stores representative of advanced, elliptical cross section missile concepts were made at Mach numbers from 1.60 to 2.16 to substantiate theoretically predicted results. The stores were mounted on the fuselage of a model representing a fighter configuration. Store base closure effects in the carriage condition were also obtained through tests with and without base closure fairings.

  10. Flight effects on the aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of inverted profile coannular nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of forward flight on the jet noise of coannular exhaust nozzles, suitable for Variable Stream Control Engines (VSCE), was investigated in a series of wind tunnel tests. The primary stream properties were maintained constant at 300 mps and 394 K. A total of 230 acoustic data points was obtained. Force measurement tests using an unheated air supply covered the same range of tunnel speeds and nozzle pressure ratios on each of the nozzle configurations. A total of 80 points was taken. The coannular nozzle OASPL and PNL noise reductions observed statically relative to synthesized values were basically retained under simulated flight conditions. The effect of fan to primary stream area ratio on flight effects was minor. At take-off speed, the peak jet noise for a VSCE was estimated to be over 6 PNdB lower than the static noise level. High static thrust coefficients were obtained for the basic coannular nozzles, with a decay of 0.75 percent at take-off speeds.

  11. Modeling the transient aerodynamic effects during the motion of a flexible trailing edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, T.; Seume, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbine blades have been becoming longer and more slender during the last few decades. The longer lever arm results in higher stresses at the blade root. Hence, the unsteady loads induced by turbulence, gust, or wind shear increase. One promising way to control these loads is to use flexible trailing edges near the blade tip. The unsteady effects which appear during the motion of a flexible trailing edge must be considered for the load calculation during the design process because of their high influence on aeroelastic effects and hence on the fatigue loads. This is not yet possible in most of the wind turbine simulation environments. Consequently, an empirical model is developed in the present study which accounts for unsteady effects during the motion of the trailing edge. The model is based on Fourier analyses of results generated with Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations of a typical thin airfoil with a deformable trailing edge. The validation showed that the model fits Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results simulated with a random time series of the deflection angle.

  12. High Reynolds number and turbulence effects on aerodynamics and heat transfer in a turbine cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Frederick C.; Hippensteele, Steven A.; Vanfossen, G. James; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Ameri, Ali

    1993-01-01

    Experimental data on pressure distribution and heat transfer on a turbine airfoil were obtained over a range of Reynolds numbers from 0.75 to 7.5 x 10 exp 6 and a range of turbulence intensities from 1.8 to about 15 percent. The purpose of this study was to obtain fundamental heat transfer and pressure distribution data over a wide range of high Reynolds numbers and to extend the heat transfer data base to include the range of Reynolds numbers encountered in the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) turbopump turbines. Specifically, the study aimed to determine (1) the effect of Reynolds number on heat transfer, (2) the effect of upstream turbulence on heat transfer and pressure distribution, and (3) the relationship between heat transfer at high Reynolds numbers and the current data base. The results of this study indicated that Reynolds number and turbulence intensity have a large effect on both the transition from laminar to turbulent flow and the resulting heat transfer. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for all Reynolds numbers at the leading edge can be correlated with the Frossling number developed for lower Reynolds numbers. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for the airfoil surfaces downstream of the leading edge can be approximately correlated with a dimensionless parameter. Comparison of the experimental results were also made with a numerical solution from a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code.

  13. Interference effects for Higgs boson mediated Z-pair plus jet production

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Furlan, Elisabetta; Rontsch, Raoul

    2014-11-25

    Here, we study interference effects in the production channel ZZ + jet, in particular focusing on the role of the Higgs boson. This production channel receives contributions both from Higgs boson mediated diagrams via the decay H → ZZ (signal diagrams), as well as from diagrams where the Z bosons couple directly to a quark loop (background diagrams). We consider the partonic processes gggZZ and gq$\\bar{q}$ZZ in which interference between signal and background diagrams first occurs. Since interference is primarily an off-resonant effect for the Higgs boson, we treat the Z bosons as on shell. Thus our analysis is limited to the region above threshold, where the invariant mass of the Z-pair mZZ satisfies the condition mZZ>2mZ. In the region mZZ > 300 GeV we find that the interference in the ZZ + jet channel is qualitatively similar to interference in the inclusive ZZ channel. Moreover, the rates are sufficient to study these effects at the LHC once jet-binned data become available.

  14. On the effect of leading edge blowing on circulation control airfoil aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    In the present context the term circulation control is used to denote a method of lift generation that utilizes tangential jet blowing over the upper surface of a rounded trailing edge airfoil to determine the location of the boundary layer separation points, thus setting an effective Kutta condition. At present little information exists on the flow structure generated by circulation control airfoils under leading edge blowing. Consequently, no theoretical methods exist to predict airfoil performance under such conditions. An experimental study of the flow field generated by a two dimensional circulation control airfoil under steady leading and trailing edge blowing was undertaken. The objective was to fundamentally understand the overall flow structure generated and its relation to airfoil performance. Flow visualization was performed to define the overall flow field structure. Measurements of the airfoil forces were also made to provide a correlation of the observed flow field structure to airfoil performance. Preliminary results are presented, specifically on the effect on the flow field structure of leading edge blowing, alone and in conjunction with trailing edge blowing.

  15. Aerodynamics and deposition effects of inhaled submicron drug aerosol in airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Faiyazuddin, Md; Mujahid, Md; Hussain, Talib; Siddiqui, Hefazat H; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Khar, Roop K; Ahmad, Farhan J

    2013-01-01

    Particle engineering is the prime focus to improve pulmonary drug targeting with the splendor of nanomedicines. In recent years, submicron particles have emerged as prettyful candidate for improved fludisation and deposition. For effective deposition, the particle size must be in the range of 0.5-5 μm. Inhalers design for the purpose of efficient delivery of powders to lungs is again a crucial task for pulmonary scientists. A huge number of DPI devices exist in the market, a significant number are awaiting FDA approval, some are under development and a large number have been patented or applied for patent. Even with superior design, the delivery competence is still deprived, mostly due to fluidisation problems which cause poor aerosol generation and deposition. Because of the cohesive nature and poor flow characteristics, they are difficult to redisperse upon aerosolization with breath. These problems are illustrious in aerosol research, much of which is vastly pertinent to pulmonary therapeutics. A technical review is presented here of advances that have been utilized in production of submicron drug particles, their in vitro/in vivo evaluations, aerosol effects and pulmonary fate of inhaled submicron powders.

  16. The effect of solar forcing induced atmospheric perturbations on LEO satellites' nominal aerodynamic drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Weigel, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric drag is the strongest force perturbing the motion of satellites in low Earth orbits LEO, and could cause re-entry of satellites, difficulty in identifying and tracking of the satellites and other space objects, manuvering and prediction of lifetime and re-entry. Solar activities influence the temperature, density and composition of the upper atmosphere. These effects thus strongly depend on the phase of a solar cycle. The frequency of intense flares and storms increase during solar maximum. Heating up of the atmosphere causes its expansion eventually leading to accelerated drag of orbiting satellites, especially those in LEO. In this paper, we present the model of the atmospheric drag effect on the trajectory of hypothetical LEO satellites of different ballistic coefficients. We investigate long-term trend of atmospheric drag on LEO satellites due to solar forcing induced atmospheric perturbations and heating at different phases of the solar cycle, and during interval of strong geomagnetic disturbances or storms. We show the dependence of orbital decay on severity of both the solar cycle and phase, and the extent of geomagnetic perturbations. The result of the model compares well with the observed decay profile of existing LEO satellites and provides a better understanding of the issue of the orbital decay. Our result may also be useful for selection of launch window of satellites for an extended lifetime in the orbit.

  17. Investigating the Contextual Interference Effect Using Combination Sports Skills in Open and Closed Skill Environments

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Jadeera P.G.; Lay, Brendan; Razman, Rizal

    2016-01-01

    This study attempted to present conditions that were closer to the real-world setting of team sports. The primary purpose was to examine the effects of blocked, random and game-based training practice schedules on the learning of the field hockey trap, close dribble and push pass that were practiced in combination. The secondary purpose was to investigate the effects of predictability of the environment on the learning of field hockey sport skills according to different practice schedules. A game-based training protocol represented a form of random practice in an unstable environment and was compared against a blocked and a traditional random practice schedule. In general, all groups improved dribble and push accuracy performance during the acquisition phase when assessed in a closed environment. In the retention phase, there were no differences between the three groups. When assessed in an open skills environment, all groups improved their percentage of successful executions for trapping and passing execution, and improved total number of attempts and total number of successful executions for both dribbling and shooting execution. Between-group differences were detected for dribbling execution with the game-based group scoring a higher number of dribbling successes. The CI effect did not emerge when practicing and assessing multiple sport skills in a closed skill environment, even when the skills were practiced in combination. However, when skill assessment was conducted in a real-world situation, there appeared to be some support for the CI effect. Key points The contextual interference effect was not supported when practicing several skills in combination when the sports skills were assessed in a closed skill environment. There appeared to be some support for the contextual interference effect when sports skills were assessed in an open skill environment, which were similar to a real game situation. A game-based training schedule can be used as an alternative

  18. The effect of shielding on the aerodynamic performance of Savonius wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcos, S. M.; Khalafallah, M. G.; Heikel, H. A.

    The effect of the flat plate shield on the performance of two-bladed Savonius rotor has been experimentally determined. Tests were carried out in a low speed wind tunnel with a working section of 1.0 sq m. Flat plate shields with various values of plate width and inclination angle were tested in order to determine the optimum configuration. The maximum power coefficient of the Savonius rotor was increased from 0.22 for the case without shielding to 0.34 for the case with an optimum shielding configuration. The addition of a flat plate shield to the Savonius rotor can, therefore, enhance the power coefficient to values approaching the more elaborate wind turbines without affecting the simplicity of the Savonius rotor.

  19. The effect of over-the-wing nacelles on wing-body aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reubush, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel to further study benefits in climb and cruise performance due to blowing the jet over the wing for a transport-type wing-body configuration. In this investigation a wing-body model/powered-nacelle test rig combination was tested at Mach numbers of 0.5 and 0.8 at angles of attack from -2 to 4 deg and jet total-pressure ratios from jet off to 3 or 4 (depending on Mach number) for a variety of nacelle locations relative to the wing. Results from this investigation show that positioning of the nacelles can have very large effects on the wing-body drag (nacelles were nonmetric). Some positions yielded much higher drag than the baseline wing-body while others yielded drag which was somewhat lower than the baseline.

  20. Gamma-effects on 2-dimensional transonic aerodynamics. [specific heat ratio due to shock induced separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuzla, K.; Russell, D. A.; Wai, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Nonlifting 10% biconvex airfoils are mounted in a 30 x 40 cm Ludwieg-tube-driven transonic test-section and the flow field recorded with a holographic interferometer. Nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide are used as the principal test gases. Experiments are conducted with Reynolds number based on chord of (0.5-3.5) x 10 to the 6th with Mach numbers of 0.70, 0.75, and 0.80. Supporting calculations use inviscid transonic small-disturbance and full-potential computer codes coupled with simple integral boundary-layer modeling. Systematic studies show that significant gamma-effects can occur due to shock-induced separation.

  1. The Effect of Colour-Word Interference on Children's Memory for Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malliet, Gineva M.

    The Stroop color-word test involves a conflict situation in which subjects are asked to say aloud the ink color used to print a color word on a card. Interference occurs when the ink color is in conflict with the color word, such as 'red' printed in green ink. On the other hand, little interference occurs when asked to name the color words…

  2. Interference Effects on the Recall of Pictures, Printed Words, and Spoken Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, John K.; Bruning, Roger H.

    1982-01-01

    Nouns were presented in triads as pictures, printed words, or spoken words and followed by various types of interference. Measures of short- and long-term memory were obtained. In short-term memory, pictorial superiority occurred with acoustic, and visual and acoustic, but not visual interference. Long-term memory showed superior recall for…

  3. Effect of nacelles on aerodynamic characteristics of an executive-jet model with simulated, partial-chord, laminar-flow-control wing glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley High-Speed 7- by 10-Foot Tunnel using a 1/10-scale model of an executive jet to examine the effects of the nacelles on the wing pressures and model longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics. For the present investigation, each wing panel was modified with a simulated, partial-chord, laminar-flow-control glove. Horizontal-tail effects were also briefly examined. The tests covered a range of Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.82 and lift coefficients from 0.20 to 0.55. Oil-flow photographs of the wing at selected conditions are included.

  4. Interference Effects as a Function of Semantic Similarity in the Translation Recognition Task in Bilinguals of Catalan and Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moldovan, Cornelia D.; Sanchez-Casas, Rosa; Demestre, Josep; Ferre, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Previous evidence has shown that word pairs that are either related in form (e.g., "ruc-berro"; donkey-watercress) or very closely semantically related (e.g., "ruc-caballo", donkey-horse) produce interference effects in a translation recognition task (Ferre et al., 2006; Guasch et al., 2008). However, these effects are not…

  5. Assessing the Effects of Momentary Priming on Memory Retention During an Interference Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, Paul C.

    2007-01-01

    A memory aid, that used brief (33ms) presentations of previously learned information (target words), was assessed on its ability to reinforce memory for target words while the subject was performing an interference task. The interference task required subjects to learn new words and thus interfered with their memory of the target words. The brief presentation (momentary memory priming) was hypothesized to refresh the subjects memory of the target words. 143 subjects, in a within subject design, were given a 33ms presentation of the target memory words during the interference task in a treatment condition and a blank 33ms presentation in the control condition. The primary dependent measure, memory loss over the interference trial, was not significantly different between the two conditions. The memory prime did not appear to hinder the subjects performance on the interference task. This paper describes the experiment and the results along with suggestions for future research.

  6. Evaluating the effect of aging on interference resolution with time-varying complex networks analysis.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Pedro; Solesio-Jofre, Elena; Martínez, Johann H; Pineda-Pardo, José A; Niso, Guiomar; Maestú, Fernando; Buldú, Javier M

    2015-01-01

    In this study we used graph theory analysis to investigate age-related reorganization of functional networks during the active maintenance of information that is interrupted by external interference. Additionally, we sought to investigate network differences before and after averaging network parameters between both maintenance and interference windows. We compared young and older adults by measuring their magnetoencephalographic recordings during an interference-based working memory task restricted to successful recognitions. Data analysis focused on the topology/temporal evolution of functional networks during both the maintenance and interference windows. We observed that: (a) Older adults require higher synchronization between cortical brain sites in order to achieve a successful recognition, (b) The main differences between age groups arise during the interference window,

  7. Fluid dynamic mechanisms and interactions within separated flows and their effects on missile aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addy, A. L.; Chow, W. L.; Korst, H. H.; White, R. A.

    1983-05-01

    Significant data and detailed results of a joint research effort investigating the fluid dynamic mechanisms and interactions within separated flows are presented. The results were obtained through analytical, experimental, and computational investigations of base flow related configurations. The research objectives focus on understanding the component mechanisms and interactions which establish and maintain separated flow regions. Flow models and theoretical analyses were developed to describe the base flowfield. The research approach has been to conduct extensive small-scale experiments on base flow configurations and to analyze these flows by component models and finite-difference techniques. The modeling of base flows of missiles (both powered and unpowered) for transonic and supersonic freestreams has been successful by component models. Research on plume effects and plume modeling indicated the need to match initial plume slope and plume surface curvature for valid wind tunnel simulation of an actual rocket plume. The assembly and development of a state-of-the-art laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system for experiments with two-dimensional small-scale models has been completed and detailed velocity and turbulence measurements are underway. The LDV experiments include the entire range of base flowfield mechanisms - shear layer development, recompression/reattachment, shock-induced separation, and plume-induced separation.

  8. Effect of Inlet Clearance on the Aerodynamic Performance of a Centrifugal Blower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, C.; Govardhan, M.

    2016-09-01

    The present work reports the effect of inlet clearance on the performance of a centrifugal blower, with parallel wall volute, over its full operating range. For a particular impeller configuration, four volutes based on constant angular momentum principle, have been designed and analysed numerically for varying inlet clearances ranging from 0 mm (ideal clearance) to 5 mm. The computational methodology is validated using experimental data. The results indicate that as the clearance increases, the impeller performance in terms of both static and total pressure rise deteriorate. Further, the stage performances deteriorate in terms of efficiency and specific work for all mass flow rates. However, the performance of volute improves at lower mass flow rates compared to the Best Efficiency Point (BEP). A set of correlations have been developed to predict the change in stage performance as a function of clearance ratio. The non-dimensional values of change in specific work, isentropic efficiency and static pressure are found to be same irrespective of the shape of the volute.

  9. Thick Film Interference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trefil, James

    1983-01-01

    Discusses why interference effects cannot be seen with a thick film, starting with a review of the origin of interference patterns in thin films. Considers properties of materials in films, properties of the light source, and the nature of light. (JN)

  10. Manifestation of New Interference Effects in a Superconductor-Ferromagnet Spin Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leksin, P. V.; Garif'Yanov, N. N.; Garifullin, I. A.; Schumann, J.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O. G.; Büchner, B.

    2011-02-01

    Superconductor-ferromagnet (S/F) spin valve effect theories based on the S/F proximity phenomenon assume that the superconducting transition temperature Tc of F1/F2/S or F1/S/F2 trilayers for parallel magnetizations of the F1 and F2 layers (TcP) are smaller than for the antiparallel orientations (TcAP). Here, we report for CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/In multilayers with varying Fe2-layer thickness the sign-changing oscillating behavior of the spin valve effect ΔTc=TcAP-TcP. We observe the full direct effect with TcAP>TcP for Fe2-layer thickness dFe2<1nm and the full inverse (TcAPeffect for dFe2≥1nm. Interference of Cooper pair wave functions reflected from both surfaces of the Fe2 layer appear as the most probable reason for the observed behavior of ΔTc.

  11. Parasitic effects in superconducting quantum interference device-based radiation comb generators

    SciTech Connect

    Bosisio, R.; Giazotto, F.; Solinas, P.

    2015-12-07

    We study several parasitic effects on the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) driven by an external magnetic field. This system can be used as a radiation generator similarly to what is done in optics and metrology, and allows one to generate up to several hundreds of harmonics of the driving frequency. First we take into account how the assumption of a finite loop geometrical inductance and junction capacitance in each SQUID may alter the operation of the devices. Then, we estimate the effect of imperfections in the fabrication of an array of SQUIDs, which is an unavoidable source of errors in practical situations. We show that the role of the junction capacitance is, in general, negligible, whereas the geometrical inductance has a beneficial effect on the performance of the device. The errors on the areas and junction resistance asymmetries may deteriorate the performance, but their effect can be limited to a large extent by a suitable choice of fabrication parameters.

  12. The effects of a single bout of exercise on motor memory interference in the trained and untrained hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Lauber, Benedikt; Franke, Steffen; Taube, Wolfgang; Gollhofer, Albert

    2017-04-07

    Increasing evidence suggests that cardiovascular exercise has positive effects on motor memory consolidation. In this study, we investigated whether a single session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) mitigates the effects of practicing an interfering motor task. Furthermore, learning and interference effects were assessed in the actively trained and untrained limb as it is known that unilateral motor learning can cause bilateral adaptations. Subjects performed a ballistic training and then the HIIT either before (HIIT_before) or after (HIIT_after) practicing an interfering accuracy task (AT). The control group (No_HIIT) did not participate in the HIIT but rested instead. Performance in the ballistic task (BT) was tested before and after the ballistic training, after the exercise and practice of the AT and 24h later. After ballistic training, all groups showed comparable increases in performance in the trained and untrained limb. Despite the practice of the AT, HIIT_before maintained their BT performance after the high-intensity interval training whereas HIIT_after (trend) & No_HIIT showed prominent interference effects. After 24h, HIIT_before still did not show any interference effects but further improved ballistic motor performance. HIIT_after counteracted the interference resulting in a comparable BT performance after 24h than directly after the ballistic training while No_HIIT had a significantly lower BT performance in the retention test. The results were similar in the trained and untrained limb. The current results imply that a single session of cardiovascular exercise can prevent motor interference in the trained and untrained hemisphere. Overall learning was best, and interference least, when HIIT was performed before the interfering motor task.

  13. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  14. Two-center interference effects in (e, 2e) ionization of H2 and CO2 at large momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masakazu; Nakajima, Isao; Satoh, Hironori; Watanabe, Noboru; Jones, Darryl; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in understanding quantum mechanical interference effects in molecular ionization. Since this interference appears as a consequence of coherent electron emission from the different molecular centers, it should depend strongly on the nature of the ionized molecular orbital. Such molecular orbital patterns can be investigated by means of binary (e, 2e) spectroscopy, which is a kinematically-complete electron-impact ionization experiment performed under the high-energy Bethe ridge conditions. In this study, two-center interference effects in the (e, 2e) cross sections of H2 and CO2 at large momentum transfer are demonstrated with a high-statistics experiment, in order to elucidate the relationship between molecular orbital patterns and the interference structure. It is shown that the two-center interference is highly sensitive to the phase, spatial pattern, symmetry of constituent atomic orbital, and chemical bonding nature of the molecular orbital. This work was partially supported by Grant-in-Aids for Scientific Research (S) (No. 20225001) and for Young Scientists (B) (No. 21750005) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

  15. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  16. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 4: 747/orbiter aeroelastic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    A quasi-steady analysis of the aeroelastic stability of the lateral (antisymmetric) modes of the 747/orbiter vehicle was accomplished. The interference effect of the orbiter wake on the 747 tail furnishes an aerodynamic undamping contribution to the elastic modes. Likewise, the upstream influence of the 747 tail and aft fuselage on the orbiter beaver-tail rail fairing also is undamping. Fortunately these undamping effects cannot overpower the large damping contribution of the 747 tail and the modes are damped for the configurations analyzed. However, significant interference effects of the orbiter on the 747 tail have been observed in the pitch plane. The high response of the 747 vertical tail in the orbiter wave was also considered. Wind tunnel data points to flapping of the OMS pod wakes as the source of the wake resonance phenomenon.

  17. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Four-Propeller Tilt-Wing VTOL Model with Twin Vertical Tails, Including Effects of Ground Proximity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, Kalman J.

    1961-01-01

    Results are presented of a wind-tunnel investigation of the aerodynamic stability, control, and performance characteristics of a model of a four-propeller tilt-wing VTOL airplane employing flaps and speed brakes through the transition speed range. The results indicate that the wing was stalled for steady level flight for all conditions of the investigation; however, the flapped configuration did produce a higher maximum lift. The effectiveness of the flap in delaying the stall in the present investigation was not as great as in some previous investigations because the flap used was smaller than that used previously. The wing stall resulted in an appreciable reduction of aileron effectiveness during the transition. Out of ground effect the low horizontal tail did not appear to be in an adverse flow field as had been expected and showed no erratic changes in effectiveness; however, in ground effect a large nose-down moment was experienced by the model. In general, the lateral aerodynamic data indicate that the configuration is directionally stable and possesses positive dihedral effect throughout the transition, and the data show no signs of erratic flow at the vertical tails.

  18. The effects of inlet turbulence and rotor/stator interactions on the aerodynamics and heat transfer of a large-scale rotating turbine model. Part 4: Aerodynamic data tabulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dring, R. P.; Joslyn, H. D.; Blair, M. F.

    1987-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program was conducted to examine the effects of inlet turbulence and airfoil heat transfer. The experimental portion of the study was conducted in a large-scale (approx. 5X engine), ambient temperature, rotating turbine model configured in both single-stage and stage-and-a-half arrangements. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using low-conductivity airfoils with miniature thermocouples welded to a thin, electrically heated surface skin. Heat transfer data were acquired for various combinations of low or high inlet turbulence intensity, flow coefficient, first stator-rotor axial spacing, Reynolds number and relative circumferential position of the first and second stators. Aerodynamic measurements obtained include distributions of the mean and fluctuating velocities at the turbine inlet and, for each airfoil row, midspan airfoil surface pressures and circumferential distributions of the downstream steady state pressures and fluctuating velocities. Results include airfoil heat transfer predictions produced using existing 2-D boundary layer computation schemes and an examination of solutions of the unsteady boundary layer equations.

  19. Tests of Four Full-scale Propellers to Determine the Effect of Trailing-edge Extensions on Propeller Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Julian D.; Evans, Albert J

    1945-01-01

    Propellers with trailing-edge extensions were studied to determine aerodynamic characteristics. Trailing-edge extension increased power absorbed by propeller with little loss in efficiency. Power coefficient for maximum efficiency was greater for 20% camber type extension than for 20% straight type extension over range of advance ratio of 1.0 to 2.5 although camber type was less efficient. Efficiency was about the same for cruising and high-speed at a high power coefficient for propeller with extension.

  20. Longitudinal aerodynamics of a low-wing lift-fan transport including hover characteristics in and out of ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, D. R.; Gentry, G. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel to determine the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a six-fan, tip-driven (remote) lift-fan VTOL transport throughout transition. The large midspan lift-fan pods and cruise fans were removed to determine their influence on the stability and control of the configuration. Data were obtained in the hovering mode for ranges of model height above ground. The data are presented without analysis or discussion.