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Sample records for aerodynamic measurements obtained

  1. Unsteady Aerodynamic Force Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2016-01-01

    A simple approach for computing unsteady aerodynamic forces from simulated measured strain data is proposed in this study. First, the deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the unsteady strain using the two-step approach. Velocities and accelerations of the structure are computed using the autoregressive moving average model, on-line parameter estimator, low-pass filter, and a least-squares curve fitting method together with analytical derivatives with respect to time. Finally, aerodynamic forces over the wing are computed using modal aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices, a rational function approximation, and a time-marching algorithm. A cantilevered rectangular wing built and tested at the NASA Langley Research Center (Hampton, Virginia, USA) in 1959 is used to validate the simple approach. Unsteady aerodynamic forces as well as wing deflections, velocities, accelerations, and strains are computed using the CFL3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code and an MSC/NASTRAN code (MSC Software Corporation, Newport Beach, California, USA), and these CFL3D-based results are assumed as measured quantities. Based on the measured strains, wing deflections, velocities, accelerations, and aerodynamic forces are computed using the proposed approach. These computed deflections, velocities, accelerations, and unsteady aerodynamic forces are compared with the CFL3D/NASTRAN-based results. In general, computed aerodynamic forces based on the lifting surface theory in subsonic speeds are in good agreement with the target aerodynamic forces generated using CFL3D code with the Euler equation. Excellent aeroelastic responses are obtained even with unsteady strain data under the signal to noise ratio of -9.8dB. The deflections, velocities, and accelerations at each sensor location are independent of structural and aerodynamic models. Therefore, the distributed strain data together with the current proposed approaches can be used as distributed deflection

  2. Aerodynamic Measurement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.

    2002-01-01

    Ohio State University developed a new spectrally filtered light-scattering apparatus based on a diode laser injected-locked titanium: sapphire laser and rubidium vapor filter at 780.2 nm. When the device was combined with a stimulated Brillouin scattering phase conjugate mirror, the realizable peak attenuation of elastic scattering interferences exceeded 105. The potential of the system was demonstrated by performing Thomson scattering measurements. Under USAF-NASA funding, West Virginia University developed a Doppler global velocimetry system using inexpensive 8-bit charged coupled device cameras and digitizers and a CW argon ion laser. It has demonstrated a precision of +/- 2.5 m/sec in a swirling jet flow. Low-noise silicon-micromachined microphones developed and incorporated in a novel two-tier, hybrid packaging scheme at the University of Florida used printed circuit board technology to realize a MEMS-based directional acoustic array. The array demonstrated excellent performance relative to conventional sensor technologies and provides scaling technologies that can reduce cost and increase speed and mobility.

  3. Estimation of effective aerodynamic roughness with altimeter measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menenti, M.; Ritchie, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    A new method is presented for estimating the aerodynamic roughness length of heterogeneous land surfaces and complex landscapes using elevation measurements performed with an airborne laser altimeter and the Seasat radar altimeter. Land surface structure is characterized at increasing length scales by considering three basic landscape elements: (1) partial to complete canopies of herbaceous vegetation; (2) sparse obstacles (e.g., shrubs and trees); and (3) local relief. Measured parameters of land surface geometry are combined to obtain an effective aerodynamic roughness length which parameterizes the total atmosphere-land surface stress.

  4. Aerodynamic measurement techniques. [laser based diagnostic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Laser characteristics of intensity, monochromatic, spatial coherence, and temporal coherence were developed to advance laser based diagnostic techniques for aerodynamic related research. Two broad categories of visualization and optical measurements were considered, and three techniques received significant attention. These are holography, laser velocimetry, and Raman scattering. Examples of the quantitative laser velocimeter and Raman scattering measurements of velocity, temperature, and density indicated the potential of these nonintrusive techniques.

  5. Aerodynamic Performance and Turbulence Measurements in a Turbine Vane Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Lucci, Barbara L.; Senyitko, Richard G.

    2002-01-01

    Turbine vane aerodynamics were measured in a three vane linear cascade. Surface pressures and blade row losses were obtained over a range of Reynolds and Mach number for three levels of turbulence. Comparisons are made with predictions using a quasi-3D Navier-Stokes analysis. Turbulence intensity measurement were made upstream and downstream of the vane. The purpose of the downstream measurements was to determine how the turbulence was affected by the strong contraction through 75 deg turning.

  6. Mars Pathfider Rarefied Aerodynamics: Computations and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Blanchard, Robert C.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; Braun, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    On July 4, 1997, after traveling close to 500 million km, the Pathfinder spacecraft successfully completed entry, descent, and landing at Mars. In the present paper, the focus is on the hypersonic rarefied portion of Pathfinder's atmospheric entry where the synergy of flight measurements, aerodynamic calculations, and atmospheric modeling tools are used to extract Pathfinder's attitude and the freestream density. Accuracy of the capsule aerodynamics directly impacts the inferred atmospheric properties extracted from deceleration measurements made by on-board accelerometers. The range of rarefaction considered in this study extends from the free molecular to continuum conditions and angles of attack from O to 30 deg. The aerodynamic computations are made with free-molecular and direct simulation Monte Carlo codes. The calculations show that Pathfinder is statically unstable for much of the transitional rarefied regime. Due to the relatively modest forces and the gyroscopic motion of the spacecraft, the angle of attack excursions were less than 5 deg as inferred from force measurements for the rarefied portion of entry and approached a nominal zero degree trim angle near hypersonic continuum conditions.

  7. Determining Aerodynamic Loads Based on Optical Deformation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Barrows, D. A.; Burner, A. W.; Rhew, R. D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a videogrammetric technique for determining aerodynamic loads based on optical elastic deformation measurements. The data reduction methods are developed to extract the normal force and pitching moment from beam deformation data. The axial force is obtained by measuring the axial translational motion of a movable shaft in a spring/bearing device. Proof-of-concept calibration experiments are conducted to assess the accuracy of this optical technique.

  8. Determining Aerodynamic Loads Based on Optical Deformation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Barrows, D. A.; Burner, A. W.; Rhew, R. D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a videogram metric technique for determining aerodynamic loads based on optical elastic deformation measurements. The data reduction methods are developed to extract the normal force and pitching moment from beam deformation data. The axial force is obtained by measuring the axial translational motion of a movable shaft in a spring/bearing device. Proof-of-concept calibration experiments are conducted to assess the accuracy of this optical technique.

  9. A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics of a blunt lifting body is being developed by NASA. This experiment, called the Rarefied-Flow Aerodynamic Measurement Experiment (RAME), is part of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) mission, which is a Pathfinder design tool for aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles. The RAME will use flight measurements from accelerometers, rate gyros, and pressure transducers, combined with knowledge of AFE in-flight mass properties and trajectory, to infer aerodynamic forces and moments in the rarefied-flow environment, including transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Preflight estimates of the aerodynamic measurements are based upon environment models, existing computer simulations, and ground test results. Planned maneuvers at several altitudes will provide a first-time opportunity to examine gas-surface accommondation effects on aerodynamic coefficients in an environment of changing atmospheric composition. A description is given of the RAME equipment design.

  10. Reliability and Applicability of Aerodynamic Measures in Dysphonia Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yiu, Edwin M.-L.; Yuen, Yuet-Ming; Whitehill, Tara; Winkworth, Alison

    2004-01-01

    Aerodynamic measures are frequently used to analyse and document pathological voices. Some normative data are available for speakers from the English-speaking population. However, no data are available yet for Chinese speakers despite the fact that they are one of the largest populations in the world. The high variability of aerodynamic measures…

  11. Measured Aerodynamic Interaction of Two Tiltrotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Wadcock, Alan J.; Derby, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamic interaction of two model tilrotors in helicopter-mode formation flight is investigated. Three cenarios representing tandem level flight, tandem operations near the ground, and a single tiltrotor operating above thc ground for varying winds are examined. The effect of aircraft separation distance on the thrust and rolling moment of the trailing aircraft with and without the presence of a ground plane are quantified. Without a ground plane, the downwind aircraft experiences a peak rolling moment when the right (left) roto- of the upwind aircraft is laterally aligned with the left (right) rotor of the downwind aircraft. The presence of the ground plane causes the peak rolling moment on the downwind aircraft to occur when the upwind aircraft is further outboard of the downwind aircraft. Ground plane surface flow visualization images obtained using rufts and oil are used to understand mutual interaction between the two aircraft. These data provide guidance in determining tiltrotor flight formations which minimize disturbance to the trailing aircraft.

  12. Aerodynamic Synthesis of a Centrifugal Impeller Using CFD and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, L. M.; Skoch, G. J.; Prahst, P. S.

    1997-01-01

    The performance and flow structure in an unshrouded impeller of approximately 4:1 pressure ratio is synthesized on the basis of a detailed analysis of 3D viscous CFD results and aerodynamic measurements. A good data match was obtained between CFD and measurements using laser anemometry and pneumatic probes. This solidified the role of the CFD model as a reliable representation of the impeller internal flow structure and integrated performance. Results are presented showing the loss production and secondary flow structure in the impeller. The results indicate that while the overall impeller efficiency is high, the impeller shroud static pressure recovery potential is underdeveloped leading to a performance degradation in the downstream diffusing element. Thus, a case is made for a follow-on impeller parametric design study to improve the flow quality. A strategy for aerodynamic performance enhancement is outlined and an estimate of the gain in overall impeller efficiency that might be realized through improvements to the relative diffusion process is provided.

  13. Real-Time Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation without Air Flow Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for estimating aerodynamic parameters in real time from flight data without air flow angle measurements is described and demonstrated. The method is applied to simulated F-16 data, and to flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Modeling results obtained with the new approach using flight data without air flow angle measurements were compared to modeling results computed conventionally using flight data that included air flow angle measurements. Comparisons demonstrated that the new technique can provide accurate aerodynamic modeling results without air flow angle measurements, which are often difficult and expensive to obtain. Implications for efficient flight testing and flight safety are discussed.

  14. Deformation measurements of smart aerodynamic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Burner, Alpheus W.

    1999-10-01

    Video Model Deformation (VMD) and Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) were used to acquire wind tunnel model deformation measurements of the Northrop Grumman-built Smart Wing tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The F18-E/F platform Smart Wing was outfitted with embedded shape memory alloys to actuate a seamless trailing edge aileron and flat, and an embedded torque tube to generate wing twist. The VMD system was used to obtain highly accurate deformation measurements at three spanwise locations along the main body of the wing, and at spanwise locations on the flap and aileron. The PMI system was used to obtain full-field wing shape and deformation measurements over the entire wing lower surface. Although less accurate than the VMD system, the PMI system revealed deformations occurring between VMD target rows indistinguishable by VMD. This paper presents the VMD and PMI techniques and discusses their application in the Smart Wing test.

  15. Deformation Measurements of Smart Aerodynamic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Burner, Alpheus

    2005-01-01

    Video Model Deformation (VMD) and Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) were used to acquire wind tunnel model deformation measurements of the Northrop Grumman-built Smart Wing tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The F18-E/F planform Smart Wing was outfitted with embedded shape memory alloys to actuate a seamless trailing edge aileron and flap, and an embedded torque tube to generate wing twist. The VMD system was used to obtain highly accurate deformation measurements at three spanwise locations along the main body of the wing, and at spanwise locations on the flap and aileron. The PMI system was used to obtain full-field wing shape and deformation measurements over the entire wing lower surface. Although less accurate than the VMD system, the PMI system revealed deformations occurring between VMD target rows indistinguishable by VMD. This paper presents the VMD and PMI techniques and discusses their application in the Smart Wing test.

  16. MEMS Applications in Aerodynamic Measurement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshotko, E.; Mehregany, M.; Bang, C.

    1998-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) embodies the integration of sensors, actuators, and electronics on a single substrate using integrated circuit fabrication techniques and compatible bulk and surface micromachining processes. Silicon and its derivatives form the material base for the MEMS technology. MEMS devices, including microsensors and microactuators, are attractive because they can be made small (characteristic dimension about 100 microns), be produced in large numbers with uniform performance, include electronics for high performance and sophisticated functionality, and be inexpensive. For aerodynamic measurements, it is preferred that sensors be small so as to approximate measurement at a point, and in fact, MEMS pressure sensors, wall shear-stress sensors, heat flux sensors and micromachined hot wires are nearing application. For the envisioned application to wind tunnel models, MEMS sensors can be placed on the surface or in very shallow grooves. MEMS devices have often been fabricated on stiff, flat silicon substrates, about 0.5 mm thick, and therefore were not easily mounted on curved surfaces. However, flexible substrates are now available and heat-flux sensor arrays have been wrapped around a curved turbine blade. Electrical leads can also be built into the flexible substrate. Thus MEMS instrumented wind tunnel models do not require deep spanwise grooves for tubes and leads that compromise the strength of conventionally instrumented models. With MEMS, even the electrical leads can potentially be eliminated if telemetry of the signals to an appropriate receiver can be implemented. While semiconductor silicon is well known for its electronic properties, it is also an excellent mechanical material for MEMS applications. However, silicon electronics are limited to operations below about 200 C, and silicon's mechanical properties start to diminish above 400 C. In recent years, silicon carbide (SiC) has emerged as the leading material candidate for

  17. Measurements of Aerodynamic Damping in the MIT Transonic Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, E. F.

    1981-01-01

    A method was developed and demonstrated for the direct measurement of aerodynamic forcing and aerodynamic damping of a transonic compressor. The method is based on the inverse solution of the structural dynamic equations of motion of the blade disk system in order to determine the forces acting on the system. The disturbing and damping forces acting on a given blade are determined if the equations of motion are expressed in individual blade coordinates. If the structural dynamic equations are transformed to multiblade coordinates, the damping can be measured for blade disk modes, and related to a reduced frequency and interblade phase angle. In order to measure the aerodynamic damping in this way, the free response to a known excitation is studied.

  18. Overview of Selected Measurement Techniques for Aerodynamics Testing in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2000-01-01

    An overview is given of selected measurement techniques used in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of aerospace vehicles operating at supersonic speeds. A broad definition of a measurement technique is adopted in this paper and is any qualitative or quantitative experimental approach that provides information leading to the improved understanding of the supersonic aerodynamic characteristics. On surface and off-surface measurement techniques used to obtain discrete (point) and global (field) measurements and planar and global flow visualizations are described, and examples of all methods are included. The discussion is limited to recent experiences in the UPWT and is. therefore, not an exhaustive review of existing experimental techniques. The diversity and high quality of the measurement techniques and the resultant data illustrate the capabilities of a around-based experimental facility and the key role that it plays in the advancement of our understanding, prediction, and control of supersonic aerodynamics.

  19. Aerodynamic performance of aerofoils obtained from a geometric offset applied to a given initial aerofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Diogo; Gamboa, Pedro; Melo, David

    2016-12-01

    Many studies concerning morphing aircraft concepts in which enhanced performance and increased energy efficiency are two of the main goals have been recently conducted. Some of those concepts deal with wing span changes. In line with those, in a variable-span wing of the telescopic type, the cross-sections of the sliding panels, whether be two, three or more, must be made geometrically compatible among them. This requirement serves two purposes: to minimize the aerofoils' geometric discontinuity which negatively affects wing drag and lift; and to provide a simple structural support between any two sliding panels. This paper describes the methodology employed to develop geometrically compatible aerofoils obtained from a constant geometric offset applied to a given initial aerofoil. This methodology is used to create inward offset aerofoils and outward offset aerofoils. The geometric and aerodynamic characteristics of the resulting offset aerofoils are compared with those of the original aerofoils. From the analysis of six different original aerofoils, strong trends in the geometric changes and in the aerodynamic characteristics of the resulting inward and outward offset aerofoils are observed. Ultimately, this study can help a telescopic wing designer decide whether an inward or an outward offset aerofoil is more appropriate for the specific design at hand.

  20. Aerodynamic Flow Field Measurements for Automotive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepner, Timothy E.

    1999-01-01

    The design of a modern automotive air handling system is a complex task. The system is required to bring the interior of the vehicle to a comfortable level in as short a time as possible. A goal of the automotive industry is to predict the interior climate of an automobile using advanced computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods. The development of these advanced prediction tools will enable better selection of engine and accessory components. The goal of this investigation was to predict methods used by the automotive industry. To accomplish this task three separate experiments were performed. The first was a laboratory setup where laser velocimeter (LV) flow field measurements were made in the heating and air conditioning unit of a Ford Windstar. The second involved flow field measurements in the engine compartment of a Ford Explorer, with the engine running idle. The third mapped the flow field exiting the center dashboard panel vent inside the Explorer, while the circulating fan operated at 14 volts. All three experiments utilized full-coincidence three-component LV systems. This enabled the mean and fluctuating velocities to be measured along with the Reynolds stress terms.

  1. Method for obtaining aerodynamic data on hypersonic configurations with scramjet exhaust flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartill, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    A hypersonic wind tunnel test method for obtaining credible aerodynamic data on a complete hypersonic vehicle (generic X-24c) with scramjet exhaust flow simulation is described. The general problems of simulating the scramjet exhaust as well as accounting for scramjet inlet flow and vehicle forces are analyzed, and candidate test methods are described and compared. The method selected as most useful makes use of a thrust-minus-drag flow-through balance with a completely metric model. Inlet flow is diverted by a fairing. The incremental effect of the fairing is determined in the testing of two reference models. The net thrust of the scramjet module is an input to be determined in large-scale module tests with scramjet combustion. Force accounting is described, and examples of force component levels are predicted. Compatibility of the test method with candidate wind tunnel facilities is described, and a preliminary model mechanical arrangement drawing is presented. The balance design and performance requirements are described in a detailed specification. Calibration procedures, model instrumentation, and a test plan for the model are outlined.

  2. In-Flight Aerodynamic Measurements of an Iced Horizontal Tailplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.; VanZante, Judith Foss

    1999-01-01

    The effects of tailplane icing on aircraft dynamics and tailplane aerodynamics were investigated using, NASA's modified DHC-6 Twin Otter icing research aircraft. This flight program was a major element of the four-year NASA/FAA research program that also included icing wind tunnel testing, dry-air aerodynamic wind tunnel testing, and analytical code development. Flight tests were conducted to obtain aircraft dynamics and tailplane aerodynamics of the DHC-6 with four tailplane leading-edge configurations. These configurations included a clean (baseline) and three different artificial ice shapes. Quasi-steady and various dynamic flight maneuvers were performed over the full range of angles of attack and wing flap settings with each iced tailplane configuration. This paper presents results from the quasi-steady state flight conditions and describes the range of flow fields at the horizontal tailplane, the aeroperformance effect of various ice shapes on tailplane lift and elevator hinge moment, and suggests three paths that can lead toward ice-contaminated tailplane stall. It was found that wing, flap deflection was the most significant factor in driving the tailplane angle of attack toward alpha(tail stall). However, within a given flap setting, an increase in airspeed also drove the tailplane angle of attack toward alpha(tail stall). Moreover, increasing engine thrust setting also pushed the tailplane to critical performance limits, which resulted in premature tailplane stall.

  3. Wing motion measurement and aerodynamics of hovering true hoverflies.

    PubMed

    Mou, Xiao Lei; Liu, Yan Peng; Sun, Mao

    2011-09-01

    Most hovering insects flap their wings in a horizontal plane (body having a large angle from the horizontal), called `normal hovering'. But some of the best hoverers, e.g. true hoverflies, hover with an inclined stroke plane (body being approximately horizontal). In the present paper, wing and body kinematics of four freely hovering true hoverflies were measured using three-dimensional high-speed video. The measured wing kinematics was used in a Navier-Stokes solver to compute the aerodynamic forces of the insects. The stroke amplitude of the hoverflies was relatively small, ranging from 65 to 85 deg, compared with that of normal hovering. The angle of attack in the downstroke (∼50 deg) was much larger that in the upstroke (∼20 deg), unlike normal-hovering insects, whose downstroke and upstroke angles of attack are not very different. The major part of the weight-supporting force (approximately 86%) was produced in the downstroke and it was contributed by both the lift and the drag of the wing, unlike the normal-hovering case in which the weight-supporting force is approximately equally contributed by the two half-strokes and the lift principle is mainly used to produce the force. The mass-specific power was 38.59-46.3 and 27.5-35.4 W kg(-1) in the cases of 0 and 100% elastic energy storage, respectively. Comparisons with previously published results of a normal-hovering true hoverfly and with results obtained by artificially making the insects' stroke planes horizontal show that for the true hoverflies, the power requirement for inclined stroke-plane hover is only a little (<10%) larger than that of normal hovering.

  4. Aerodynamic influences on atmospheric in situ measurements from sounding rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbel, Jörg

    2001-06-01

    Sounding rockets are essential tools for studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. However, in situ measurements from rockets are potentially subject to a number of perturbations related to the gas flow around the vehicle. This paper reviews the aerodynamic principles behind these perturbations. With respect to both data analysis and experiment design, there is a substantial need for improved understanding of aerodynamic effects. Any such analysis is complicated by the different flow regimes experienced during a rocket flight through the rarefied environment of the mesosphere and thermosphere. Numerical studies are presented using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) approach, which is based on a tracing of individual molecules. Complementary experiments have been performed in a low-density wind tunnel. These experiments are crucial for the development of appropriate model parameterization. However, direct similarity between scaled wind tunnel results and arbitrary atmospheric flight conditions is usually difficult to achieve. Density, velocity, and temperature results are presented for different payload geometries and flow conditions. These illustrate a wide range of aerodynamic effects representative for rocket flights in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  5. Moving Model Test of High-Speed Train Aerodynamic Drag Based on Stagnation Pressure Measurements.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingzhi; Du, Juntao; Li, Zhiwei; Huang, Sha; Zhou, Dan

    2017-01-01

    A moving model test method based on stagnation pressure measurements is proposed to measure the train aerodynamic drag coefficient. Because the front tip of a high-speed train has a high pressure area and because a stagnation point occurs in the center of this region, the pressure of the stagnation point is equal to the dynamic pressure of the sensor tube based on the obtained train velocity. The first derivation of the train velocity is taken to calculate the acceleration of the train model ejected by the moving model system without additional power. According to Newton's second law, the aerodynamic drag coefficient can be resolved through many tests at different train speeds selected within a relatively narrow range. Comparisons are conducted with wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations, and good agreement is obtained, with differences of less than 6.1%. Therefore, the moving model test method proposed in this paper is feasible and reliable.

  6. Moving Model Test of High-Speed Train Aerodynamic Drag Based on Stagnation Pressure Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingzhi; Du, Juntao; Huang, Sha; Zhou, Dan

    2017-01-01

    A moving model test method based on stagnation pressure measurements is proposed to measure the train aerodynamic drag coefficient. Because the front tip of a high-speed train has a high pressure area and because a stagnation point occurs in the center of this region, the pressure of the stagnation point is equal to the dynamic pressure of the sensor tube based on the obtained train velocity. The first derivation of the train velocity is taken to calculate the acceleration of the train model ejected by the moving model system without additional power. According to Newton’s second law, the aerodynamic drag coefficient can be resolved through many tests at different train speeds selected within a relatively narrow range. Comparisons are conducted with wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations, and good agreement is obtained, with differences of less than 6.1%. Therefore, the moving model test method proposed in this paper is feasible and reliable. PMID:28095441

  7. Aeroacoustic Study of a High-Fidelity Aircraft Model: Part 1- Steady Aerodynamic Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Hannon, Judith A.; Neuhart, Danny H.; Markowski, Gregory A.; VandeVen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present steady aerodynamic measurements for an 18% scale model of a Gulfstream air-craft. The high fidelity and highly-instrumented semi-span model was developed to perform detailed aeroacoustic studies of airframe noise associated with main landing gear/flap components and gear-flap interaction noise, as well as to evaluate novel noise reduction concepts. The aeroacoustic tests, being conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, are split into two entries. The first entry, completed November 2010, was entirely devoted to the detailed mapping of the aerodynamic characteristics of the fabricated model. Flap deflections of 39?, 20?, and 0? with the main landing gear on and off were tested at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24. Additionally, for each flap deflection, the model was tested with the tunnel both in the closed-wall and open-wall (jet) modes. During this first entry, global forces (lift and drag) and extensive steady and unsteady surface pressure measurements were obtained. Preliminary analysis of the measured forces indicates that lift, drag, and stall characteristics compare favorably with Gulfstream?s high Reynolds number flight data. The favorable comparison between wind-tunnel and flight data allows the semi-span model to be used as a test bed for developing/evaluating airframe noise reduction concepts under a relevant environment. Moreover, initial comparison of the aerodynamic measurements obtained with the tunnel in the closed- and open-wall configurations shows similar aerodynamic behavior. This permits the acoustic and off-surface flow measurements, planned for the second entry, to be conducted with the tunnel in the open-jet mode.

  8. Overview of Supersonic Aerodynamics Measurement Techniques in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    An overview is given of selected measurement techniques used in the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of aerospace vehicles operating at supersonic speeds. A broad definition of a measurement technique is adopted in this paper and is any qualitative or quantitative experimental approach that provides information leading to the improved understanding of the supersonic aerodynamic characteristics. On-surface and off-surface measurement techniques used to obtain discrete (point) and global (field) measurements and planar and global flow visualizations are described, and examples of all methods are included. The discussion is limited to recent experiences in the UPWT and is, therefore, not an exhaustive review of existing experimental techniques. The diversity and high quality of the measurement techniques and the resultant data illustrate the capabilities of a ground-based experimental facility and the key role that it plays in the advancement of our understanding, prediction, and control of supersonic aerodynamics.

  9. Automated Wing Twist And Bending Measurements Under Aerodynamic Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Martinson, S. D.

    1996-01-01

    An automated system to measure the change in wing twist and bending under aerodynamic load in a wind tunnel is described. The basic instrumentation consists of a single CCD video camera and a frame grabber interfaced to a computer. The technique is based upon a single view photogrammetric determination of two dimensional coordinates of wing targets with a fixed (and known) third dimensional coordinate, namely the spanwise location. The measurement technique has been used successfully at the National Transonic Facility, the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The advantages and limitations (including targeting) of the technique are discussed. A major consideration in the development was that use of the technique must not appreciably reduce wind tunnel productivity.

  10. Wing kinematics measurement and aerodynamics of hovering droneflies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanpeng; Sun, Mao

    2008-07-01

    The time courses of wing and body kinematics of three freely hovering droneflies (Eristalis tenax) were measured using 3D high-speed video, and the morphological parameters of the wings and body of the insects were also measured. The measured wing kinematics was used in a Navier-Stokes solver to compute the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the insects. The time courses of the geometrical angle of attack and the deviation angle of the wing are considerably different from that of fruit flies recently measured using the same approach. The angle of attack is approximately constant in the mid portions of a half-stroke (a downstroke or upstroke) and varies rapidly during the stroke reversal. The deviation angle is relatively small and is higher at the beginning and the end of a half-stroke and lower at the middle of the half-stroke, giving a shallow U-shaped wing-tip trajectory. For all three insects considered, the computed vertical force is approximately equal to the insect weight (the difference is less than 6% of the weight) and the computed horizontal force and pitching moment about the center of mass of the insect are approximately zero. The computed results satisfying the equilibrium flight conditions, especially the moment balance condition, validate the computation model. The lift principle is mainly used to produce the weight-supporting vertical force, unlike the fruit flies who use both lift and drag principles to generate the vertical force; the vertical force is mainly due to the delayed stall mechanism. The magnitude of the inertia power is larger than that of the aerodynamic power, and the largest possible effect of elastic storage amounts to a reduction of flight power by around 40%, much larger than in the case of the fruit fly.

  11. Aerodynamic measurements on a finite wing with simulated ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, M. B.; Khodadoust, A.; Soltani, R.; Wells, S.; Kerho, M.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of a simulated glaze ice accretion on the aerodynamic performance of a three-dimensional straight and swept wing is studied experimentally. A semispan wing of effective aspect ratio five was mounted from the sidewall of the UIUC subsonic wind tunnel. The model uses an NACA 0012 airfoil section on a rectangular planform with interchangeable tip and root sections to allow for 0- and 30-deg sweep. A sidewall suction system is used to minimize the tunnel boundary-layer interaction with the model. A three-component sidewall balance has been designed, built and used to measure lift, drag and pitching moment on the clean and iced model. Fluorescent oil flow visualization has been performed on the iced model and reveals extensive spanwise flow in the separation bubble aft of the upper surface horn. These results are compared to computational results for the surface pressures, span loads and surface oil flow.

  12. Accurate measurement of streamwise vortices in low speed aerodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldman, Rye M.; Kudo, Jun; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2010-11-01

    Low Reynolds number experiments with flapping animals (such as bats and small birds) are of current interest in understanding biological flight mechanics, and due to their application to Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) which operate in a similar parameter space. Previous PIV wake measurements have described the structures left by bats and birds, and provided insight to the time history of their aerodynamic force generation; however, these studies have faced difficulty drawing quantitative conclusions due to significant experimental challenges associated with the highly three-dimensional and unsteady nature of the flows, and the low wake velocities associated with lifting bodies that only weigh a few grams. This requires the high-speed resolution of small flow features in a large field of view using limited laser energy and finite camera resolution. Cross-stream measurements are further complicated by the high out-of-plane flow which requires thick laser sheets and short interframe times. To quantify and address these challenges we present data from a model study on the wake behind a fixed wing at conditions comparable to those found in biological flight. We present a detailed analysis of the PIV wake measurements, discuss the criteria necessary for accurate measurements, and present a new dual-plane PIV configuration to resolve these issues.

  13. Aerodynamic Measurements on a Large Splitter Plate for the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.

    2001-01-01

    Tests conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) assess the aerodynamic characteristics of a splitter plate used to test some semispan models in this facility. Aerodynamic data are analyzed to determine the effect of the splitter plate on the operating characteristics of the TDT, as well as to define the range of conditions over which the plate can be reasonably used to obtain aerodynamic data. Static pressures measurements on the splitter plate surface and the equipment fairing between the wind tunnel wall and the splitter plate are evaluated to determine the flow quality around the apparatus over a range of operating conditions. Boundary layer rake data acquired near the plate surface define the viscous characteristics of the flow over the plate. Data were acquired over a range of subsonic, transonic and supersonic conditions at dynamic pressures typical for models tested on this apparatus. Data from this investigation should be used as a guide for the design of TDT models and tests using the splitter plate, as well as to guide future splitter plate design for this facility.

  14. Hypersonic rarefied-flow aerodynamics inferred from Shuttle Orbiter acceleration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Hinson, E. W.

    1989-01-01

    Data obtained from multiple flights of sensitive accelerometers on the Space Shuttle Orbiter during reentry have been used to develop an improved aerodynamic model for the Orbiter normal- and axial-force coefficients in hypersonic rarefied flow. The lack of simultaneous atmospheric density measurements was overcome in part by using the ratio of normal-to-axial acceleration, in which density cancels, as a constraint. Differences between the preflight model and the flight-acceleration-derived model in the continuum regime are attributed primarily to real gas effects. New insights are gained into the variation of the force coefficients in the transition between the continuum regime and free molecule flow.

  15. Aerodynamic Measurements of a Gulfstream Aircraft Model With and Without Noise Reduction Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Hannon, Judith A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2014-01-01

    Steady and unsteady aerodynamic measurements of a high-fidelity, semi-span 18% scale Gulfstream aircraft model are presented. The aerodynamic data were collected concurrently with acoustic measurements as part of a larger aeroacoustic study targeting airframe noise associated with main landing gear/flap components, gear-flap interaction noise, and the viability of related noise mitigation technologies. The aeroacoustic tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel with the facility in the acoustically treated open-wall (jet) mode. Most of the measurements were obtained with the model in landing configuration with the flap deflected at 39º and the main landing gear on and off. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24. Global forces (lift and drag) and extensive steady and unsteady surface pressure measurements were obtained. Comparison of the present results with those acquired during a previous test shows a significant reduction in the lift experienced by the model. The underlying cause was traced to the likely presence of a much thicker boundary layer on the tunnel floor, which was acoustically treated for the present test. The steady and unsteady pressure fields on the flap, particularly in the regions of predominant noise sources such as the inboard and outboard tips, remained unaffected. It is shown that the changes in lift and drag coefficients for model configurations fitted with gear/flap noise abatement technologies fall within the repeatability of the baseline configuration. Therefore, the noise abatement technologies evaluated in this experiment have no detrimental impact on the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft model.

  16. Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging for aerodynamic and thermodynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, Nathan David

    This thesis presents applications of Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) to a variety of aerodynamic and thermodynamic measurements. FLEET tagged line characteristics such as intensity, width and spectral features are investigated in various flow conditions (pressure, temperature, velocity, steadiness, etc.) and environments (gas composition) for both temporally and spatially instantaneous and averaged data. Special attention is drawn to the nature of first and second positive systems of molecular nitrogen and the ramifications on FLEET measurements. Existing laser-based diagnostic techniques are summarized and FLEET is directly compared with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in various low speed flows. Multidimensional velocity, acceleration, vorticity and other flow parameters are extracted in supersonic free jets and within an enclosed in-draft tunnel test section. Probability distribution functions of the mean and standard deviation of critical flow parameters are unveiled by utilizing a Bayesian statistical framework wherein likelihood functions are established from prior and posterior distributions. Advanced image processing techniques based on fuzzy logic are applied to single-shot FLEET images with low signal-to-noise ratio to improve image quality and reduce uncertainty in data processing algorithms. Lastly, FLEET second positive and first negative emission are considered at a wide range of pressures to correct for changes in select rovibrational peak magnitude and shape due to density from which bulk gas temperature may be extracted.

  17. Aerodynamic Performance Measurements for a Forward Swept Low Noise Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian

    2006-01-01

    One source of noise in high tip speed turbofan engines, caused by shocks, is called multiple pure tone noise (MPT's). A new fan, called the Quiet High Speed Fan (QHSF), showed reduced noise over the part speed operating range, which includes MPT's. The QHSF showed improved performance in most respects relative to a baseline fan; however, a partspeed instability discovered during testing reduced the operating range below acceptable limits. The measured QHSF adiabatic efficiency on the fixed nozzle acoustic operating line was 85.1 percent and the baseline fan 82.9 percent, a 2.2 percent improvement. The operating line pressure rise at design point rotational speed and mass flow was 1.764 and 1.755 for the QHSF and baseline fan, respectively. Weight flow at design point speed was 98.28 lbm/sec for the QHSF and 97.97 lbm/sec for the baseline fan. The operability margin for the QHSF approached 0 percent at the 75 percent speed operating condition. The baseline fan maintained sufficient margin throughout the operating range as expected. Based on the stage aerodynamic measurements, this concept shows promise for improved performance over current technology if the operability limitations can be solved.

  18. Aerodynamic Synthesis of Biocompatible Matrices and their Functionalization by Nanoparticles Obtained by the Method of Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol'basov, E. N.; Lapin, I. N.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Svetlichnyi, V. A.

    2014-07-01

    For applications in tissue engineering, three-dimensional biodegradable polymeric matrices, whose surface is functionalized by nanoparticles obtained in the liquid phase by the method of laser ablation from bulk metal (Ag or Zn) targets, are synthesized by the method of aerodynamic synthesis from a solution of poly-l-lactide acid. Their properties are investigated. It is demonstrated that the matrices represent a very porous spatial fibrous structure consisting of polymorphic fibers with diameters from 0.25 to 2.5 μm. It is established that functional coatings consisting of agglomerates of semiconductor (ZnO) or metal (Ag) nanoparticles can be produced on the surface of structural matrix elements by repeated matrix impregnation.

  19. Orbiter Aerodynamic Acceleration Flight Measurements in the Rarefied-Flow Transition Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; LeBeau, Gerald J.

    1996-01-01

    Acceleration data taken from the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) during reentry on STS-62 have been analyzed using calibration factors taken on orbit. This is the first Orbiter mission which collected OARE data during the Orbiter reentry phase. The data examined include the flight regime from orbital altitudes down to about 90 km which covers the free-molecule-flow regime and the upper altitude fringes of the rarefied-flow transition into the hypersonic continuum. Ancillary flight data on Orbiter position, orientation, velocity, and rotation rates have been used in models to transform the measured accelerations to the Orbiter center-of-gravity, from which aerodynamic accelerations along the Orbiter body axes have been calculated. Residual offsets introduced in the measurements by unmodeled Orbiter forces are identified and discussed. Direct comparisons are made between the OARE flight data and an independent micro-gravity accelerometer experiment, the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), which also obtained flight data on reentry during the mission down to about 95 km. The resulting OARE aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's body axis, aid the normal to axial acceleration ratio in the free-molecule-flow and transition-flow regimes are presented and compared with numerical simulations from three direct simulation Monte Carlo codes.

  20. Measured wavenumber: frequency spectrum associated with acoustic and aerodynamic wall pressure fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Arguillat, Blandine; Ricot, Denis; Bailly, Christophe; Robert, Gilles

    2010-10-01

    Direct measurements of the wavenumber-frequency spectrum of wall pressure fluctuations beneath a turbulent plane channel flow have been performed in an anechoic wind tunnel. A rotative array has been designed that allows the measurement of a complete map, 63×63 measuring points, of cross-power spectral densities over a large area. An original post-processing has been developed to separate the acoustic and the aerodynamic exciting loadings by transforming space-frequency data into wavenumber-frequency spectra. The acoustic part has also been estimated from a simple Corcos-like model including the contribution of a diffuse sound field. The measured acoustic contribution to the surface pressure fluctuations is 5% of the measured aerodynamic surface pressure fluctuations for a velocity and boundary layer thickness relevant for automotive interior noise applications. This shows that for aerodynamically induced car interior noise, both contributions to the surface pressure fluctuations on car windows have to be taken into account.

  1. Recent Dynamic Measurements and Considerations for Aerodynamic Modeling of Fighter Airplane Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Jay M.; Foster, John V.

    1998-01-01

    As airplane designs have trended toward the expansion of flight envelopes into the high angle of attack and high angular rate regimes, concerns regarding modeling the complex unsteady aerodynamics for simulation have arisen. Most current modeling methods still rely on traditional body axis damping coefficients that are measured using techniques which were intended for relatively benign flight conditions. This paper presents recent wind tunnel results obtained during large-amplitude pitch, roll and yaw testing of several fighter airplane configurations. A review of the similitude requirements for applying sub-scale test results to full-scale conditions is presented. Data is then shown to be a strong function of Strouhal number - both the traditional damping terms, but also the associated static stability terms. Additionally, large effects of sideslip are seen in the damping parameter that should be included in simulation math models. Finally, an example of the inclusion of frequency effects on the data in a simulation is shown.

  2. Comparison of aerodynamic coefficients obtained from theoretical calculations wind tunnel tests and flight tests data reduction for the alpha jet aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guiot, R.; Wunnenberg, H.

    1980-01-01

    The methods by which aerodynamic coefficients are determined and discussed. These include: calculations, wind tunnel experiments and experiments in flight for various prototypes of the Alpha Jet. A comparison of obtained results shows good correlation between expectations and in-flight test results.

  3. Wind Tunnel Measurements and Calculations of Aerodynamic Interactions Between Tiltrotor Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Derby, Michael R.; Wadcock, Alan J.

    2002-01-01

    Wind tunnel measurements and calculations of the aerodynamic interactions between two tiltrotor aircraft in helicopter mode are presented. The measured results include the roll moment and thrust change on the downwind aircraft, as a function of the upwind aircraft position (longitudinal, lateral, and vertical). Magnitudes and locations of the largest interactions are identified. The calculated interactions generally match the measurements, with discrepancies attributed to the unsteadiness of the wake and aerodynamic forces on the airframe. To interpret the interactions in terms of control and power changes on the aircraft, additional calculations are presented for trimmed aircraft with gimballed rotors.

  4. Structural dynamics and aerodynamics measurements of biologically inspired flexible flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Wu, P; Stanford, B K; Sällström, E; Ukeiley, L; Ifju, P G

    2011-03-01

    Flapping wing flight as seen in hummingbirds and insects poses an interesting unsteady aerodynamic problem: coupling of wing kinematics, structural dynamics and aerodynamics. There have been numerous studies on the kinematics and aerodynamics in both experimental and computational cases with both natural and artificial wings. These studies tend to ignore wing flexibility; however, observation in nature affirms that passive wing deformation is predominant and may be crucial to the aerodynamic performance. This paper presents a multidisciplinary experimental endeavor in correlating a flapping micro air vehicle wing's aeroelasticity and thrust production, by quantifying and comparing overall thrust, structural deformation and airflow of six pairs of hummingbird-shaped membrane wings of different properties. The results show that for a specific spatial distribution of flexibility, there is an effective frequency range in thrust production. The wing deformation at the thrust-productive frequencies indicates the importance of flexibility: both bending and twisting motion can interact with aerodynamic loads to enhance wing performance under certain conditions, such as the deformation phase and amplitude. By measuring structural deformations under the same aerodynamic conditions, beneficial effects of passive wing deformation can be observed from the visualized airflow and averaged thrust. The measurements and their presentation enable observation and understanding of the required structural properties for a thrust effective flapping wing. The intended passive responses of the different wings follow a particular pattern in correlation to their aerodynamic performance. Consequently, both the experimental technique and data analysis method can lead to further studies to determine the design principles for micro air vehicle flapping wings.

  5. Measuring flux of soil fumigants using the aerodynamic and dynamic flux chamber methods.

    PubMed

    van Wesenbeeck, I J; Knuteson, J A; Barnekow, D E; Phillips, A M

    2007-01-01

    Methods for measuring and estimating flux density of soil fumigants under field conditions are important for the purpose of providing inputs to air dispersion models and for comparing the effects of management practices on emission reduction. The objective of this study was to measure the flux of 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin at a site in Georgia (GA) using the aerodynamic method and the dynamic flux chamber (FC) method. A secondary objective was to compare the effects of high density polyethylene (HDPE), and virtually impermeable film (VIF) tarps on fumigant flux at a site in Florida (FL). Chloropicrin and 1,3-D were applied by surface drip application of In-Line soil fumigant on vegetable beds covered by low density polyethylene (LDPE), HDPE, or VIF. The surface drip fumigation using In-Line and LDPE tarp employed in this study resulted in volatilization of 26.5% of applied 1,3-D and 11.2% of the applied chloropicrin at the GA site, as determined using the aerodynamic method. Estimates of mass loss obtained from dynamic FCs were 23.6% for 1,3-D and 18.0% for chloropicrin at the GA site. Flux chamber trials at the FL site indicate significant additional reduction in flux density, and cumulative mass loss when VIF tarp is used. This study supports the use of dynamic FCs as a valuable tool for estimating gas flux density from agricultural soils, and evaluating best management practices for reducing fumigant emissions to the atmosphere.

  6. The aerodynamics of avian take-off from direct pressure measurements in Canada geese (Branta canadensis).

    PubMed

    Usherwood, James R; Hedrick, Tyson L; Biewener, Andrew A

    2003-11-01

    Direct pressure measurements using electronic differential pressure transducers along bird wings provide insight into the aerodynamics of these dynamically varying aerofoils. Acceleration-compensated pressures were measured at five sites distributed proximally to distally from the tertials to the primaries along the wings of Canada geese. During take-off flight, ventral-to-dorsal pressure is maintained at the proximal wing section throughout the wingstroke cycle, whereas pressure sense is reversed at the primaries during upstroke. The distal sites experience double pressure peaks during the downstroke. These observations suggest that tertials provide weight-support throughout the wingbeat, that the wingtip provides thrust during upstroke and that the kinetic energy of the rapidly flapping wings may be dissipated via retarding aerodynamic forces (resulting in aerodynamic work) at the end of downstroke.

  7. Aerodynamic and Performance Measurements on a SWT-2.3-101 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, P.; Singh, M.; Johansen, J.; Jove, A.R.; Machefaux, E.; Fingersh, L. J.; Schreck, S.

    2011-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of a detailed wind turbine field experiment being conducted at NREL under U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship. The purpose of the experiment is to obtain knowledge about the aerodynamics, performance, noise emission and structural characteristics of the Siemens SWT-2.3-101 wind turbine.

  8. Aerodynamic roughness measured in the field and simulated in a wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Robert; Greeley, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluates how well values of aerodynamic surface roughness, z sub 0, measured over scale models in wind tunnels correlate with values of z sub 0 measured at full scale in the field. A field experiment was conducted in which values of z sub 0 and u* (wind friction speed) were measured over three arrays of non-erodible roughness elements on a dry lake bed. Wind profiles were measured by ten anemometers on a 15 m mast under thermally neutral atmospheric conditions. Values of z sub 0 increased from .00014 m (dry lake bed only) to .026 m with increasing roughness element density. The three roughness element arrays were simulated at 1/10 and 1/20 scale in an open-circuit atmospheric boundary-layer wind tunnel. Velocities were measured with a boundary-layer pitot-tube rake from the same relative position within the scale model arrays as the anemometers were relative to the field arrays. Each array at each scale was sampled three times at five freestream velocities. Average values of z sub 0 for each model array at each scale were compared with full-scale values of z sub 0 obtained in the field. The field vs. wind tunnel correspondence of z sub 0 is found to be z sub 0 field = 0.2661 x (z sub(0 model) x scale(exp -1))exp .8159.

  9. In vivo measurement of aerodynamic weight support in freely flying birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2014-11-01

    Birds dynamically change the shape of their wing during the stroke to support their body weight aerodynamically. The wing is partially folded during the upstroke, which suggests that the upstroke of birds might not actively contribute to aerodynamic force production. This hypothesis is supported by the significant mass difference between the large pectoralis muscle that powers the down-stroke and the much smaller supracoracoideus that drives the upstroke. Previous works used indirect or incomplete techniques to measure the total force generated by bird wings ranging from muscle force, airflow, wing surface pressure, to detailed kinematics measurements coupled with bird mass-distribution models to derive net force through second derivatives. We have validated a new method that measures aerodynamic force in vivo time-resolved directly in freely flying birds which can resolve this question. The validation of the method, using independent force measurements on a quadcopter with pulsating thrust, show the aerodynamic force and impulse are measured within 2% accuracy and time-resolved. We demonstrate results for quad-copters and birds of similar weight and size. The method is scalable and can be applied to both engineered and natural flyers across taxa. The first author invented the method, the second and third authors validated the method and present results for quadcopters and birds.

  10. Preliminary Measurements From A New Flat Plate Facility For Aerodynamic Research

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. McEligot; D. W. Nigg; E. J. Walsh; D. Hernon; M.R.D. Davies

    2005-03-01

    This paper details the design and preliminary measurements used in the characterisation of a new flat plate research facility. The facility is designed specifically to aid in the understanding of entropy generation throughout the boundary layer with special attention given to non-equilibrium flows. Hot-wire measurements were obtained downstream of two turbulence generating grids. The turbulence intensity, integral and dissipation length scale ranges measured are 1.6%-7%, 5mm-17mm and 0.7mm-7mm, respectively. These values compared well to existing correlations. The flow downstream of both grids was found to be homogenous and isotropic. Flow visualisation is employed to determine aerodynamic parameters such as flow 2-dimensionality and the effect of the flap angle on preventing separation at the leading edge. The flow was found to be 2-dimensional over all measurement planes. The non-dimensional pressure distribution of a modern turbine blade suction surface is simulated on the flat plate through the use of a variable upper wall. The Reynolds number range based on wetted plate length and inlet velocity is 70,000-4,000,000.

  11. USE OF THE AERODYNAMIC PARTICLE SIZER TO MEASURE PM-COARSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aerodynamic particle sizer (APS 3321, TSI, Inc.) measures particle size distributions from 0.5 µm to 20 µm by determining the time-of-flight of individual particles in an accelerating flow field. A complete particle size distribution may be determined in a matter of s...

  12. USE OF THE AERODYNAMIC PARTICLE SIZER TO MEASURE PM-COARSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aerodynamic particle sizer (APS 3321, TSI, Inc.) measures particle size distributions from 0.5 µm to 20 µm by determining the time-of-flight of individual particles in an accelerating flow field. A complete particle size distribution may be determined in a matter of ...

  13. Calibration of the aerodynamic coefficient identification package measurements from the shuttle entry flights using inertial measurement unit data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heck, M. L.; Findlay, J. T.; Compton, H. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Aerodynamic Coefficient Identification Package (ACIP) is an instrument consisting of body mounted linear accelerometers, rate gyros, and angular accelerometers for measuring the Space Shuttle vehicular dynamics. The high rate recorded data are utilized for postflight aerodynamic coefficient extraction studies. Although consistent with pre-mission accuracies specified by the manufacturer, the ACIP data were found to contain detectable levels of systematic error, primarily bias, as well as scale factor, static misalignment, and temperature dependent errors. This paper summarizes the technique whereby the systematic ACIP error sources were detected, identified, and calibrated with the use of recorded dynamic data from the low rate, highly accurate Inertial Measurement Units.

  14. Aerodynamic measurements and thermal tests of a strain-gage balance in a cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyden, Richmond P.; Ferris, Alice T.; Johnson, William G., Jr.; Dress, David A.; Hill, Acquilla S.

    1987-01-01

    An internal strain-gage balance designed and constructed in Europe for use in cryogenic wind tunnels has been tested in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Part of the evaluation was made at equilibrium balance temperatures and it consisted of comparing the data taken at a tunnel stagnation temperature of 300 K with the data taken at 200 K and 110 K while maintaining either the Reynolds number or the stagnation pressure. A sharp-leading-edge delta-wing model was used to provide the aerodynamic loading for these tests. Results obtained with the balance during the force tests were found to be accurate and repeatable both with and without the use of a convection shield on the balance. An additional part of this investigation involved obtaining data on the transient temperature response of the balance during both normal and rapid changes in the tunnel stagnation temperature. The variation of the temperature with time was measured at three locations on the balance near the physical locations of the strain gages. The use of a convection shield significantly increased the time required for the balance to stabilize at a new temperature during the temperature response tests.

  15. Development of a system for aerodynamic fast-response probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossweiler, C.; Humm, H.; Kupferschmied, P.

    This paper describes the development of a fast-response probe measurement system. Small pressure probes have been equipped with up to 4 miniature pressure sensors. The high frequency response of such sensors allied to minimized cavities between the flow and the sensing diaphragm enables the probe system to take measurements up to 40 kHz bandwidth (typical blade passing frequency: 2-10 kHz). First results of investigations on the aerodynamic of high frequency response measurement probes are presented including experiments in a water towing channel with unsteady flows around different probe geometries. The packaging of the sensor chip into the probe, the properties of the sensors and the measurement errors are examined. Probe calibration methods and aerodynamic evaluation procedures are discussed, followed by a presentation of the data acquisition system and of the data evaluation software. Measurements in a radial compressor test rig and in a fully developed pipe flow are shown as applications.

  16. Aerodynamic Measurements of an Incidence Tolerant Blade in a Transonic Turbine Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McVetta, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the recent facility modifications to NASA s Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility and aerodynamic measurements on the VSPT incidence-tolerant blade are presented. This work supports the development of variable-speed power turbine (VSPT) speed-change technology for the NASA Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR) vehicle. In order to maintain acceptable main rotor propulsive efficiency, the VSPT operates over a nearly 50% speed range from takeoff to altitude cruise. This results in 50 or more variations in VSPT blade incidence angles. The Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility has the ability to operate over a wide range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers, but had to be modified in order to accommodate the negative incidence angle variation required by the LCTR VSPT operation. Details of the modifications are described. An incidence-tolerant blade was developed under an RTPAS study contract and tested in the cascade to look at the effects of large incidence angle and Reynolds number variations. Recent test results are presented which include midspan exit total pressure and flow angle measurements obtained at three inlet angles representing the cruise, take-off, and maximum incidence flight mission points. For each inlet angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with exit Reynolds numbers varying from 2.12 106 to 2.12 105 and two isentropic exit Mach numbers of 0.72 and 0.35. Three-dimensional flowfield measurements were also acquired at the cruise and take-off points. The flowfield measurements were acquired using a five-hole and three-hole pneumatic probe located in a survey plane 8.6% axial chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressure distributions were also acquired for each flow condition.

  17. Validation of 3-D Ice Accretion Measurement Methodology for Experimental Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Lee, Sam; Monastero, Marianne C.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the adverse aerodynamic effects due to ice accretion often relies on dry-air wind-tunnel testing of artificial, or simulated, ice shapes. Recent developments in ice accretion documentation methods have yielded a laser-scanning capability that can measure highly three-dimensional features of ice accreted in icing wind tunnels. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the aerodynamic accuracy of ice-accretion simulations generated from laser-scan data. Ice-accretion tests were conducted in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel using an 18-inch chord, 2-D straight wing with NACA 23012 airfoil section. For six ice accretion cases, a 3-D laser scan was performed to document the ice geometry prior to the molding process. Aerodynamic performance testing was conducted at the University of Illinois low-speed wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.8 x 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.18 with an 18-inch chord NACA 23012 airfoil model that was designed to accommodate the artificial ice shapes. The ice-accretion molds were used to fabricate one set of artificial ice shapes from polyurethane castings. The laser-scan data were used to fabricate another set of artificial ice shapes using rapid prototype manufacturing such as stereolithography. The iced-airfoil results with both sets of artificial ice shapes were compared to evaluate the aerodynamic simulation accuracy of the laser-scan data. For four of the six ice-accretion cases, there was excellent agreement in the iced-airfoil aerodynamic performance between the casting and laser-scan based simulations. For example, typical differences in iced-airfoil maximum lift coefficient were less than 3% with corresponding differences in stall angle of approximately one degree or less. The aerodynamic simulation accuracy reported in this paper has demonstrated the combined accuracy of the laser-scan and rapid-prototype manufacturing approach to simulating ice accretion for a NACA 23012 airfoil. For several of the ice

  18. Validation of 3-D Ice Accretion Measurement Methodology for Experimental Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Lee, Sam; Monastero, Marianne C.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the adverse aerodynamic effects due to ice accretion often relies on dry-air wind-tunnel testing of artificial, or simulated, ice shapes. Recent developments in ice-accretion documentation methods have yielded a laser-scanning capability that can measure highly three-dimensional (3-D) features of ice accreted in icing wind tunnels. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the aerodynamic accuracy of ice-accretion simulations generated from laser-scan data. Ice-accretion tests were conducted in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel using an 18-in. chord, two-dimensional (2-D) straight wing with NACA 23012 airfoil section. For six ice-accretion cases, a 3-D laser scan was performed to document the ice geometry prior to the molding process. Aerodynamic performance testing was conducted at the University of Illinois low-speed wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.8 × 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.18 with an 18-in. chord NACA 23012 airfoil model that was designed to accommodate the artificial ice shapes. The ice-accretion molds were used to fabricate one set of artificial ice shapes from polyurethane castings. The laser-scan data were used to fabricate another set of artificial ice shapes using rapid prototype manufacturing such as stereolithography. The iced-airfoil results with both sets of artificial ice shapes were compared to evaluate the aerodynamic simulation accuracy of the laser-scan data. For five of the six ice-accretion cases, there was excellent agreement in the iced-airfoil aerodynamic performance between the casting and laser-scan based simulations. For example, typical differences in iced-airfoil maximum lift coefficient were less than 3 percent with corresponding differences in stall angle of approximately 1 deg or less. The aerodynamic simulation accuracy reported in this paper has demonstrated the combined accuracy of the laser-scan and rapid-prototype manufacturing approach to simulating ice accretion for a NACA 23012 airfoil. For several

  19. Error Evaluation of Methyl Bromide Aerodynamic Flux Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Methyl bromide volatilization fluxes were calculated for a tarped and a nontarped field using 2 and 4 hour sampling periods. These field measurements were averaged in 8, 12, and 24 hour increments to simulate longer sampling periods. The daily flux profiles were progressively smoothed and the cumulative volatility losses increased by 20 to 30% with each longer sampling period. Error associated with the original flux measurements was determined from linear regressions of measured wind speed and air concentration as a function of height, and averaged approximately 50%. The high errors resulted from long application times, which resulted in a nonuniform source strength; and variable tarp permeability, which is influenced by temperature, moisture, and thickness. The increase in cumulative volatilization losses that resulted from longer sampling periods were within the experimental error of the flux determination method.

  20. Direct measurements of controlled aerodynamic forces on a wire-suspended axisymmetric body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Philip; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2011-06-01

    A novel in-line miniature force transducer is developed for direct measurements of the net aerodynamic forces and moments on a bluff body. The force transducers are integrated into each of the eight mounting wires that are utilized for suspension of an axisymmetric model in a wind tunnel having minimal wake interference. The aerodynamic forces and moments on the model are altered by induced active local attachment of the separated base flow. Fluidic control is effected by an array of four integrated aft-facing synthetic jet actuators that emanate from narrow, azimuthally segmented slots, equally distributed around the perimeter of the circular tail end. The jet orifices are embedded within a small backward-facing step that extends into a Coanda surface. The altered flow dynamics associated with both quasi-steady and transitory asymmetric activation of the flow control effect is characterized by direct force and PIV measurements.

  1. The Oxford Probe: an open access five-hole probe for aerodynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, B. F.; Povey, T.

    2017-03-01

    The Oxford Probe is an open access five-hole probe designed for experimental aerodynamic measurements. The open access probe can be manufactured by the end user via additive manufacturing (metal or plastic). The probe geometry, drawings, calibration maps, and software are available under a creative commons license. The purpose is to widen access to aerodynamic measurement techniques in education and research environments. There are many situations in which the open access probe will allow results of comparable accuracy to a well-calibrated commercial probe. We discuss the applications and limitations of the probe, and compare the calibration maps for 16 probes manufactured in different materials and at different scales, but with the same geometrical design.

  2. Measured and Computed Hypersonic Aerodynamic/Aeroheating Characteristics for an Elliptically Blunted Flared Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Francis A.; Buck, Gregory M.; Wood, William A.

    2001-01-01

    Computational and experimental hypersonic aerodynamic forces and moments and aeroheating levels for Kistler Aerospace Corporation's baseline orbiter vehicle at incidence are presented. Experimental data were measured in ground-based facilities at the Langley Research Center and predictions were performed using the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm code. The test parameters were incidence (-4 to 24 degrees), freestream Mach number (6 to 10), freestream ratio of specific heats (1.2 to 1.4), and freestream Reynolds number (0.5 to 8.0 million per foot). The effects of these parameters on aerodynamic characteristics, as well as the effects of Reynolds number on measured heating levels are discussed. Good agreement between computational and experimental aerodynamic and aeroheating values were observed over the wide range of test parameters examined. Reynolds number and ratio of specific heats were observed to significantly alter the trim L/D value. At Mach 6, laminar flow, was observed along the entire windward centerline up to the flare for all angles and Reynolds numbers tested. Flow over the flare transitioned front laminar to transitional turbulent between 4 and 8 million per foot at 8 and 12 degrees angle of attack, and near 4 million per foot at 16 degrees angle of attack.

  3. Measured and Computed Hypersonic Aerodynamic/Aeroheating Characteristics for an Elliptically Blunted Flared Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Francis A.; Buck, Gregory M.; Wood, William A.

    2001-01-01

    Computational and experimental hypersonic aerodynamic forces and moments and aeroheating levels for Kistler Aerospace Corporation's baseline orbiter vehicle at incidence are presented. Experimental data were measured in ground-based facilities at the Langley Research Center and predictions were performed using the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm code. The test parameters were incidence (-4 to 24 degrees), freestream Mach number (6 to 10),freestream ratio o specific heats (1.2 to 1.4), and freestream Reynolds number (0.5 to 8.0 million per foot). The effects of these parameters on aerodynamic characteristics, as well as the effects of Reynolds number on measured heating levels are discussed. Good agreement between computational and experimental aerodynamic and aeroheating values were observed over the wide range of test parameters examined. Reynolds number and ratio of specific heats were observed to significantly alter the trim L/D value. At Mach 6, laminar flow was observed along the entire windward centerline tip to the flare for all angles and Reynolds numbers tested. Flow over the flare transitioned from laminar to transitional/turbulent between 4 and 8 million per foot at 8 and 12 degrees angle of attack, and near 4 million per foot at 16 degrees angle of attack.

  4. Luminescence imaging for aerodynamic temperature and pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gallery, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    A luminescent temperature sensitive paint containing the molecule rhodamine B base (rhBb) is described whose emission intensity can be monitored by video camera to produce qualitative and quantitative two dimensional surface temperature maps. This paint was designed for use with the pressure sensitive paint containing platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP), but is also a useful tool when used alone in the measurement of heat flow, boundary layer transition, and quantitative surface temperature during wind tunnel studies. The ability of the rhBb paint to produce a continuous temperature map makes it possible to locate structures in the temperature field on an airfoil that are otherwise undetected by surface mounted thermocouples spaced a finite distance apart. A dual temperature/pressure sensitive paint was investigated with both the rhBb and PtOEP dyes incorporated into the silicone polymer paint base of the pressure sensor. Photodegradation and batch variations in the polymer were found to compromise the calibration parameters of the PtOEP paint and therefore the accuracy of pressure predictions. Suggestions are made for improving the prediction ability of the paint. The molecule europium(III) thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (EuTTA) is also discussed as a temperature sensor for a two layer temperature/pressure paint. EuTTA can not be directly incorporated into the silicone paint base of the PtOEP paint (as the rhBp paint can), but performs well in non-oxygenpermeable coatings. Benefits of the EuTTA temperature paint include: (1) decreased photodegradation, (2) very bright luminescence intensity, and (3) long luminescent lifetime (several hundred microseconds). The long lifetime facilitates lifetime imaging, a technique currently under development as an alternative detection method where luminescent lifetimes rather than emission intensity are related to temperature and pressure.

  5. Wing kinematics measurement and aerodynamics of a dragonfly in turning flight.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengyu; Dong, Haibo

    2017-02-03

    This study integrates high-speed photogrammetry, 3D surface reconstruction, and computational fluid dynamics to explore a dragonfly (Erythemis Simplicicollis) in free flight. Asymmetric wing kinematics and the associated aerodynamic characteristics of a turning dragonfly are analyzed in detail. Quantitative measurements of wing kinematics show that compared to the outer wings, the inner wings sweep more slowly with a higher angle of attack during the downstroke, whereas they flap faster with a lower angle of attack during the upstroke. The inner-outer asymmetries of wing deviations result in an oval wingtip trajectory for the inner wings and a figure-eight wingtip trajectory for the outer wings. Unsteady aerodynamics calculations indicate significantly asymmetrical force production between the inner and outer wings, especially for the forewings. Specifically, the magnitude of the drag force on the inner forewing is approximately 2.8 times greater than that on the outer forewing during the downstroke. In the upstroke, the outer forewing generates approximately 1.9 times greater peak thrust than the inner forewing. To keep the body aloft, the forewings contribute approximately 64% of the total lift, whereas the hindwings provide 36%. The effect of forewing-hindwing interaction on the aerodynamic performance is also examined. It is found that the hindwings can benefit from this interaction by decreasing power consumption by 13% without sacrificing force generation.

  6. An approach to evaluating and correcting aerodynamic particle sizer measurements for phantom particle count creation.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, W A; Baron, P A

    1992-07-01

    An aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) can be used to make real-time measurements of the aerodynamic particle size distribution over the range of 0.5 to 32 microns. This instrument is very useful in conducting health-related aerosol measurements involving aerosol generation, respirator efficiency, and particulate sampling efficiency. One of the two signal processors within the APS can create spurious or phantom particle counts that can significantly affect relative measurements and calculated mass distributions. In the APS, particle size measurement is based upon a particle's transit time between two laser beams that are perpendicular to an accelerating airflow. The signal processors measure each particle's transit from the time between the two pulses of scattered light that are generated as the particle passes through the two laser beams. When only a single pulse from a particle is detected, another pulse can cause the recording of a randomly sized phantom particle. The small particle processor (SPP), which measures particle transit from the times in digital increments of 4 nanoseconds, can create phantom particles; the large particle processor (LPP), which measures particle transit times in digital increments of 66.67 nanoseconds, is designed to prevent the creation of phantom particles. These two processors overlap in the range of 5.2 to 15.4 microns.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Determination of longitudinal aerodynamic derivatives from steady-state measurement of an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, V.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the estimation of aerodynamic derivatives from steady-state symmetric flight data is developed. The derivatives considered are the longitudinal static stability and control derivatives, damping derivatives due to tail, and the derivatives expressing the speed effect on the lift and pitching moment coefficients. The method is an extension of the well known theory of longitudinal static stability and control, and corresponding flight data interpretation. Measured data is assumed in the form of trim curves and lift vs angle of attack. The expressions for the derivative estimates are in the form of algebraic relationships containing known constants, and directly or indirectly measured quantities.

  8. Measured unsteady transonic aerodynamic characteristics of an elastic supercritical wing with an oscillating control surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, D. A.; Sandford, M. C.; Eckstrom, C. V.

    1985-01-01

    Transonic steady and unsteady aerodynamic data were measured on a large elastic wing in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The wing had a supercritical airfoil shape and a leading-edge sweepback of 28.8 deg. The wing was heavily instrumented to measure both static and dynamic pressures and deflections. A hydraulically driven outboard control surface was oscillated to generate unsteady airloads on the wing. Representative results from the wind tunnel tests are presented and discussed, and the unexpected occurrence of an unusual dynamic wing instability, which was sensitive to angle of attack, is reported.

  9. Aerodynamic pressure and flow-visualization measurement from a rotating wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C P

    1988-11-01

    Aerodynamic, load, flow-visualization, and inflow measurements have been made on a 10-m, three-bladed, downwind, horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). A video camera mounted on the rotor was used to record nighttime and daytime video images of tufts attached to the low-pressure side of a constant-chord, zero-twist blade. Load measurements were made using strain gages mounted at every 10% of the blade's span. Pressure measurements were made at 80% of the blade's span. Pressure taps were located at 32 chordwise positions, revealing pressure distributions comparable with wind tunnel data. Inflow was measured using a vertical-plane array of eight propvane and five triaxial (U-V-W) prop-type anemometers located 10 m upwind in the predominant wind direction. One objective of this comprehensive research program was to study the effects of blade rotation on aerodynamic behavior below, near, and beyond stall. To this end, flow patterns are presented here that reveal the dynamic and steady behavior of flow conditions on the blade. Pressure distributions are compared to flow patterns and two-dimensional wind tunnel data. Separation boundary locations are shown that change as a function of spanwise location, pitch angle, and wind speed. 6 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The aerodynamic cost of flight in the short-tailed fruit bat (Carollia perspicillata): comparing theory with measurement.

    PubMed

    von Busse, Rhea; Waldman, Rye M; Swartz, Sharon M; Voigt, Christian C; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2014-06-06

    Aerodynamic theory has long been used to predict the power required for animal flight, but widely used models contain many simplifications. It has been difficult to ascertain how closely biological reality matches model predictions, largely because of the technical challenges of accurately measuring the power expended when an animal flies. We designed a study to measure flight speed-dependent aerodynamic power directly from the kinetic energy contained in the wake of bats flying in a wind tunnel. We compared these measurements with two theoretical predictions that have been used for several decades in diverse fields of vertebrate biology and to metabolic measurements from a previous study using the same individuals. A high-accuracy displaced laser sheet stereo particle image velocimetry experimental design measured the wake velocities in the Trefftz plane behind four bats flying over a range of speeds (3-7 m s(-1)). We computed the aerodynamic power contained in the wake using a novel interpolation method and compared these results with the power predicted by Pennycuick's and Rayner's models. The measured aerodynamic power falls between the two theoretical predictions, demonstrating that the models effectively predict the appropriate range of flight power, but the models do not accurately predict minimum power or maximum range speeds. Mechanical efficiency--the ratio of aerodynamic power output to metabolic power input--varied from 5.9% to 9.8% for the same individuals, changing with flight speed.

  11. The aerodynamic cost of flight in the short-tailed fruit bat (Carollia perspicillata): comparing theory with measurement

    PubMed Central

    von Busse, Rhea; Waldman, Rye M.; Swartz, Sharon M.; Voigt, Christian C.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Aerodynamic theory has long been used to predict the power required for animal flight, but widely used models contain many simplifications. It has been difficult to ascertain how closely biological reality matches model predictions, largely because of the technical challenges of accurately measuring the power expended when an animal flies. We designed a study to measure flight speed-dependent aerodynamic power directly from the kinetic energy contained in the wake of bats flying in a wind tunnel. We compared these measurements with two theoretical predictions that have been used for several decades in diverse fields of vertebrate biology and to metabolic measurements from a previous study using the same individuals. A high-accuracy displaced laser sheet stereo particle image velocimetry experimental design measured the wake velocities in the Trefftz plane behind four bats flying over a range of speeds (3–7 m s−1). We computed the aerodynamic power contained in the wake using a novel interpolation method and compared these results with the power predicted by Pennycuick's and Rayner's models. The measured aerodynamic power falls between the two theoretical predictions, demonstrating that the models effectively predict the appropriate range of flight power, but the models do not accurately predict minimum power or maximum range speeds. Mechanical efficiency—the ratio of aerodynamic power output to metabolic power input—varied from 5.9% to 9.8% for the same individuals, changing with flight speed. PMID:24718450

  12. HYSHOT-2 Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, T.; Owen, R.; Walton, C.

    2005-02-01

    The scramjet flight test Hyshot-2, flew on the 30 July 2002. The programme, led by the University of Queensland, had the primary objective of obtaining supersonic combustion data in flight for comparison with measurements made in shock tunnels. QinetiQ was one of the sponsors, and also provided aerodynamic data and trajectory predictions for the ballistic re-entry of the spinning sounding rocket. The unconventional missile geometry created by the nose-mounted asymmetric-scramjet in conjunction with the high angle of attack during re-entry makes the problem interesting. This paper presents the wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamic calculations used as input for the trajectory prediction. Indirect comparison is made with data obtained in the Hyshot-2 flight using a 6 degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation.

  13. In-situ X-ray structure measurements on aerodynamically levitated high temperature liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Richard; Benmore, Christopher; Mei Qiang; Wilding, Martin

    2009-01-29

    High energy, high flux X-ray sources enable new measurements of liquid and amorphous materials in extreme conditions. Aerodynamic levitation in combination with laser beam heating can be used to access high purity and non-equilibrium liquids at temperatures up to 3000 K. In this work, a small aerodynamic levitator was integrated with high energy beamline 11 ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source. Scattered X-rays were detected with a Mar345 image plate. The experiments investigated a series of binary in the CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO-SiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} metal oxide compositions and pure SiO{sub 2}. The results show that the liquids exhibit large changes in structure when the predominant network former is diluted. Measurements on glasses with the same compositions as the liquids suggest that significant structural rearrangement consistent with a fragile-strong transition occurs in these reluctant glass forming liquids as they vitrify.

  14. Coupling particle simulation with aerodynamic measurement in hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel in JAXA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Ozawa, Takashi; Fujita, Kazuhisa

    2012-11-01

    Characteristics of test flow produced by the hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel in JAXA are investigated experimentally and numerically. To probe the test flow, a stainless sphere model with a diameter of 5mm is put into the test flow. Its displacement due to the aerodynamic force is measured under the several operating conditions of the wind tunnel. A spatial variation of total pressure of the test flow is also measured by using a pitot pressure tube. The flowfield in the test section of wind tunnel is also analyzed by using the direct simulation Monte Carlo technique. The flow properties are deduced from the comparison between the measurement and the calculation. It is found from the study that the freestream Mach number of 16 and Knudsen number of 0.2 are achieved for the mass flow rate of 0.08g/s and the total temperature of 750K. The core flow diameter is estimated to be approximately 30mm.

  15. Periods found in heat measurements obtained by calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, K.C.

    1984-02-28

    During a span of 640 days, a periodicity of 1.5158 +- 0.0008 days was discovered in successive heater equilibria on Calorimeter No. 127. Measurements were taken at 12-h intervals, with occasional changes of exactly 3 or 6 h in the schedule of measurements. This schedule eliminated all other possible periods except a period of 0.150156 days. Periods of 1.519125 and 1.511283 days were discovered in data on the excess length of day as obtained by the US Naval Observatory over a period of 24 y. These two periods could equally well represent periods of 0.150189 and 0.150112 days, since measurements were obtained only once every 24 h. It is suggested that periods observed in sensitive calorimeters and in length of day data may be related. 1 reference, 6 figures, 5 tables.

  16. Interference-free measurements of the subsonic aerodynamics of slanted-base ogive cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P.; Alcorn, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    Drag, lift, pitching moment, and base-pressure measurements have been made, free of support interference, on a range of slanted-base ogive cylinders, using the NASA Langley Research Center 13-in magnetic suspension and balance system. Test Mach numbers were in the range 0.04-0.2. Two types of wake flow were observed, a quasi-symmetric turbulent closure or a longitudinal vortex flow. Aerodynamic characteristics differ dramatically between the two wake types. Drag measurements are shown to be in agreement with previous tests. A hysteretic behavior of the wake with varying Reynold's number has been discovered for the 45-deg base. An interaction between forebody boundary-layer state and wake flow and base pressures has been detected for higher slant angles.

  17. How to obtain traceability on optical radiation measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matamoros García, Carlos H.

    2006-02-01

    Traceability to national standards provides confidence in measurements results, granting a guaranty when carrying out governmental rules and when demonstrating conformity with quality requirements such as ISO 9000 or ISO/IEC 17025 (and the Mexican equivalent standards). The appropriate traceability contributes with confidence of the quality of products or services. This paper presents different ways to obtain traceability in Mexico for the optical radiation measurements, mentioning some applications, and highlighting the necessity of having traceability to the appropriate units of the SI. Additionally it present the national standards maintained by Centro Nacional de Metrologia (CENAM), the national metrology institute in Mexico, that give the technical support to Mexican measurements in this field and the international recognition that the personal of the Optics and Radiometry Division had gained in 10 years of development.

  18. Large carbon cluster thin film gauges for measuring aerodynamic heat transfer rates in hypersonic shock tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinath, S.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2015-02-01

    Different types of Large Carbon Cluster (LCC) layers are synthesized by a single-step pyrolysis technique at various ratios of precursor mixture. The aim is to develop a fast responsive and stable thermal gauge based on a LCC layer which has relatively good electrical conduction in order to use it in the hypersonic flow field. The thermoelectric property of the LCC layer has been studied. It is found that these carbon clusters are sensitive to temperature changes. Therefore suitable thermal gauges were developed for blunt cone bodies and were tested in hypersonic shock tunnels at a flow Mach number of 6.8 to measure aerodynamic heating. The LCC layer of this thermal gauge encounters high shear forces and a hostile environment for test duration in the range of a millisecond. The results are favorable to use large carbon clusters as a better sensor than a conventional platinum thin film gauge in view of fast responsiveness and stability.

  19. Comparison between Measurements Obtained with three Different Perineometers

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Patrícia Brentegani; Franco, Maíra Menezes; de Oliveira Souza, Flaviane; Antônio, Flávia Ignácio; Montezuma, Thaís; Ferreira, Cristine Homsi Jorge

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the results obtained in the evaluation of intra-vaginal pressure using three different brands of perineometers in nulliparous volunteers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty nulliparous women with no anatomical alterations and/or dysfunction of the pelvic floor were enrolled in our study. All the women had the ability to voluntarily contract their PFM (Pelvic Floor Muscles), as assessed by digital palpation. The intra-vaginal pressure was assessed using three different brands of perineometer (Neurodyn Evolution™, SensuPower™ and Peritron™). Each volunteer was evaluated on three alternate days by a single examiner using a single brand of perineometer on each day. In the assessment, the volunteers were required to pull (contract) their PFM in and up as strongly as possible 3 times and to sustain the contraction for 5 seconds, with an interval of 30 seconds between each pull. For the statistical analysis, a concordance correlation coefficient was used to compare the values that were obtained with each brand of perineometer. RESULTS: A moderate concordance (0.51) was found between the results from the Peritron™ and Neurodyn™ perineometers, a fair concordance (0.21) between the Peritron™ and SensuPower™ brands and a poor concordance (0.19) between the Neurodyn™ and SensuPower™ brands. CONCLUSION: The concordance of the measurements of the intra-vaginal pressure ranged from poor to moderate, suggesting that perineometers of different brands generate different results. PMID:19578656

  20. Field comparison of an eddy accumulation and an aerodynamic-gradient system for measuring pesticide volatilization fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, M.; Desjardina, R.; Rochette, P.; Pattey, E.; Selber, J.; Glotfelty, D.

    1993-01-01

    The field experiment reported here applied the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) technique to the measurement of triallate (TA) and trifluralin (TF) volatilization from fallow soil. A critical analysis of the REA system used in this experiment is done, and the fluxes are compared to those obtained by the aerodynamic-gradient (AG) technique. The measured cumulative volatilization losses, corrected for the effective upwind source area (footprint), for the AG system were higher than with the REA system. The differences between the methods over the first 5 days of the experiment were 27 and 13% for TA and TF, respectively. A mass balance based on the amount of parent compounds volatilized from soil during the first 5 days of the experiment showed a 110 and 70% and a 79 and 61% accountability for triallate and trifluralin by the AG and REA methods, respectively. These results also show that the non-footprint-corrected AG flux values underestimated the volatilization flux by approximately 16%. The footprint correction model used in this experiment does not presently have the capability of accounting for changes in atmospheric stability. However, these values still provide an indication of the most likely upwind area affecting the evaporative flux estimations. The soil half-lives for triallate and trifluralin were 9.8 and 7.0 days, respectively. ?? 1992 American Chemical Society.

  1. Aerodynamic drag on intermodal railcars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinghorn, Philip; Maynes, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The aerodynamic drag associated with transport of commodities by rail is becoming increasingly important as the cost of diesel fuel increases. This study aims to increase the efficiency of intermodal cargo trains by reducing the aerodynamic drag on the load carrying cars. For intermodal railcars a significant amount of aerodynamic drag is a result of the large distance between loads that often occurs and the resulting pressure drag resulting from the separated flow. In the present study aerodynamic drag data have been obtained through wind tunnel testing on 1/29 scale models to understand the savings that may be realized by judicious modification to the size of the intermodal containers. The experiments were performed in the BYU low speed wind tunnel and the test track utilizes two leading locomotives followed by a set of five articulated well cars with double stacked containers. The drag on a representative mid-train car is measured using an isolated load cell balance and the wind tunnel speed is varied from 20 to 100 mph. We characterize the effect that the gap distance between the containers and the container size has on the aerodynamic drag of this representative rail car and investigate methods to reduce the gap distance.

  2. Inflow Characterization and Aerodynamics Measurements on a SWT-2.3-101 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, P.; Singh, M.; Johansen, J.; Jove, A. R.; Fingersh, L.; Schreck, S.

    2012-01-01

    Post processing techniques for aerodynamic data acquired from a Siemens SWT-2.3101 turbine have been developed and applied in this paper. The turbine is installed at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as part of Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Siemens Wind Power and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship. The results indicate that the use of these corrections is essential for accurate analysis of the data. An example of local inflow angles, velocities, and inflow velocity over the rotor plane derived from measurements from a 5-hole probe is also presented. Finally, the pressure measurements are used to characterize unsteady phenomenon, namely, rotational augmentation and dynamic stall on an inboard station. The results show that the rotational augmentation can considerably increase the attached flow regime compared to the 2D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results. The dynamic stall event was seen to significantly delay the stall. Furthermore, the non-dimensionalized vortex convection derived from the dynamic stall event was found to agree well with results from others studies.

  3. Inflow Characterization and Aerodynamics Measurements on a SWT-2.3-101 Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, P.; Singh, M.; Johansen, J.; Jove, A.; Fingersh, L.; Schreck, S.

    2012-01-01

    Post processing techniques for aerodynamic data acquired from a Siemens SWT-2.3-101 turbine have been developed and applied in this paper. The turbine is installed at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as part of Cooperative Research And Development Agreement between Siemens Wind Power and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship. The results indicate that the use of these corrections is essential for accurate analysis of the data. An example of local inflow angles, velocities, and inflow velocity over the rotor plane derived from measurements from a 5-hole probe is also presented. Finally the pressure measurements are used to characterize unsteady phenomenon, namely, rotational augmentation and dynamic stall on an inboard station. The results show that the rotational augmentation can considerably increase the attached flow regime compared to the 2D CFD results. The dynamic stall event was seen to significantly delay the stall. Furthermore, the nondimensionalized vortex convection derived from the dynamic stall event was found to agree well with results from others studies.

  4. Measurement of Aerodynamic Shear Stress Using Side Chain Liquid Crystal Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    A novel concept was proposed exploiting the optical property response of liquid crystalline materials to various external effects. This study determined the feasibility of using side chain liquid crystal polymers as aerodynamic shear sensors. A method was developed to

  5. Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) During AMAZE-08

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2008-12-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the AMazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. The presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 μm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as 'viable aerosols' or 'fluorescent bioparticles' (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. First data analyses show a pronounced peak of FBAP at diameters around 2-3 μm. In this size range the biogenic particle fraction was

  6. Aerodynamic Measurements of a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade Section in a Transonic Turbine Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to document the impact of incidence angle and Reynolds number variations on the three-dimensional flow field and midspan loss and turning of a two-dimensional section of a variable-speed power-turbine (VSPT) rotor blade. Aerodynamic measurements were obtained in a transonic linear cascade at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Steady-state data were obtained for 10 incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. At each angle, data were acquired at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number (based on axial chord) varying over an order-of-magnitude from 2.12×105 to 2.12×106. Data were obtained at the design exit Mach number of 0.72 and at a reduced exit Mach number of 0.35 as required to achieve the lowest Reynolds number. Midspan tota lpressure and exit flow angle data were acquired using a five-hole pitch/yaw probe surveyed on a plane located 7.0 percent axial-chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane. The survey spanned three blade passages. Additionally, three-dimensional half-span flow fields were examined with additional probe survey data acquired at 26 span locations for two key incidence angles of +5.8deg and -36.7deg. Survey data near the endwall were acquired with a three-hole boundary-layer probe. The data were integrated to determine average exit total-pressure and flow angle as functions of incidence and flow conditions. The data set also includes blade static pressures measured on four spanwise planes and endwall static pressures.

  7. Wing-kinematics measurement and aerodynamics in a small insect in hovering flight.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xin; Sun, Mao

    2016-05-11

    Wing-motion of hovering small fly Liriomyza sativae was measured using high-speed video and flows of the wings calculated numerically. The fly used high wingbeat frequency (≈265 Hz) and large stroke amplitude (≈182°); therefore, even if its wing-length (R) was small (R ≈ 1.4 mm), the mean velocity of wing reached ≈1.5 m/s, the same as that of an average-size insect (R ≈ 3 mm). But the Reynolds number (Re) of wing was still low (≈40), owing to the small wing-size. In increasing the stroke amplitude, the outer parts of the wings had a "clap and fling" motion. The mean-lift coefficient was high, ≈1.85, several times larger than that of a cruising airplane. The partial "clap and fling" motion increased the lift by ≈7%, compared with the case of no aerodynamic interaction between the wings. The fly mainly used the delayed stall mechanism to generate the high-lift. The lift-to-drag ratio is only 0.7 (for larger insects, Re being about 100 or higher, the ratio is 1-1.2); that is, although the small fly can produce enough lift to support its weight, it needs to overcome a larger drag to do so.

  8. Wing-kinematics measurement and aerodynamics in a small insect in hovering flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xin; Sun, Mao

    2016-05-01

    Wing-motion of hovering small fly Liriomyza sativae was measured using high-speed video and flows of the wings calculated numerically. The fly used high wingbeat frequency (≈265 Hz) and large stroke amplitude (≈182°) therefore, even if its wing-length (R) was small (R ≈ 1.4 mm), the mean velocity of wing reached ≈1.5 m/s, the same as that of an average-size insect (R ≈ 3 mm). But the Reynolds number (Re) of wing was still low (≈40), owing to the small wing-size. In increasing the stroke amplitude, the outer parts of the wings had a “clap and fling” motion. The mean-lift coefficient was high, ≈1.85, several times larger than that of a cruising airplane. The partial “clap and fling” motion increased the lift by ≈7%, compared with the case of no aerodynamic interaction between the wings. The fly mainly used the delayed stall mechanism to generate the high-lift. The lift-to-drag ratio is only 0.7 (for larger insects, Re being about 100 or higher, the ratio is 1–1.2) that is, although the small fly can produce enough lift to support its weight, it needs to overcome a larger drag to do so.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of aerodynamic forces and kinematics in flapping wings of tethered locust.

    PubMed

    Shkarayev, Sergey; Kumar, Rajeev

    2015-10-23

    Aerodynamic and inertial forces and corresponding kinematics of flapping wings of locusts, Schistocerca americana, were investigated in a low-speed wind tunnel. The experimental setup included live locusts mounted on microbalance synchronized with a high-speed video system. Simultaneous measurements of wing kinematics and forces were carried out on three locusts at 7° angle of attack and velocities of 0 m s(-1) and 4 m s(-1). Time variations of flapping and pitching angles exhibit similar patterns in fore- and hindwings and among the animals. Significant tip to root variations in pitching angle are found in both wings. The locusts have much larger flapping and pitching amplitudes in still air causing larger oscillations in inertial forces. Inertial forces are added to the lift and thrust on one part of the stroke, resulting in higher reaction forces and subtracted on the other part. Plots of the lift demonstrate similar trends with and without the wind. The global maxima and peak-to-peak amplitudes in lift are about the same in both tests. However, local minima are significantly lower in still air, resulting in much smaller stroke-averaged lift. Amplitudes of thrust force oscillations are much higher in still air; consequently, the stroke-averaged thrust is higher compared to the non-zero freestream velocity case.

  10. Wing-kinematics measurement and aerodynamics in a small insect in hovering flight

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xin; Sun, Mao

    2016-01-01

    Wing-motion of hovering small fly Liriomyza sativae was measured using high-speed video and flows of the wings calculated numerically. The fly used high wingbeat frequency (≈265 Hz) and large stroke amplitude (≈182°); therefore, even if its wing-length (R) was small (R ≈ 1.4 mm), the mean velocity of wing reached ≈1.5 m/s, the same as that of an average-size insect (R ≈ 3 mm). But the Reynolds number (Re) of wing was still low (≈40), owing to the small wing-size. In increasing the stroke amplitude, the outer parts of the wings had a “clap and fling” motion. The mean-lift coefficient was high, ≈1.85, several times larger than that of a cruising airplane. The partial “clap and fling” motion increased the lift by ≈7%, compared with the case of no aerodynamic interaction between the wings. The fly mainly used the delayed stall mechanism to generate the high-lift. The lift-to-drag ratio is only 0.7 (for larger insects, Re being about 100 or higher, the ratio is 1–1.2); that is, although the small fly can produce enough lift to support its weight, it needs to overcome a larger drag to do so. PMID:27168523

  11. Aerodynamic and noise measurements on a quasi-two dimensional augmentor wing model with lobe-type nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was made of the static, wind-on aerodynamic and static noise characteristics of an augmentor wing having lobe type nozzles. The study was made in the Ames 7-by 10-Foot No. 1 Wind Tunnel using a small-scale, quasi-two-dimensional model. Several configurations of lobe nozzles as well as a normal slot nozzle were tested. Results indicate that lobe nozzles offer improved static and wind-on aerodynamics and reduced static noise relative to slot nozzles. Best wind-on performance was obtained when the tertiary gap was closed even though the static thrust augmentation was maximum with the gap open. Static thrust augmentation, wind-on lift and drag, and static noise directivity are presented as well as typical static and wind-on exit velocity profiles, surface pressure distributions and noise spectrums. The data are presented with limited discussion.

  12. Open Source Software Openfoam as a New Aerodynamical Simulation Tool for Rocket-Borne Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszak, T.; Brede, M.; Strelnikov, B.

    2015-09-01

    The only way to do in-situ measurements, which are very important experimental studies for atmospheric science, in the mesoshere/lower thermosphere (MLT) is to use sounding rockets. The drawback of using rockets is the shock wave appearing because of the very high speed of the rocket motion (typically about 1000 mIs). This shock wave disturbs the density, the temperature and the velocity fields in the vicinity of the rocket, compared to undisturbed values of the atmosphere. This effect, however, can be quantified and the measured data has to be corrected not just to make it more precise but simply usable. The commonly accepted and widely used tool for this calculations is the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique developed by GA. Bird which is available as stand-alone program limited to use a single processor. Apart from complications with simulations of flows around bodies related to different flow regimes in the altitude range of MLT, that rise due to exponential density change by several orders of magnitude, a particular hardware configuration introduces significant difficulty for aerodynamical calculations due to choice of the grid sizes mainly depending on the demands on adequate DSMCs and good resolution of geometries with scale differences of factor of iO~. This makes either the calculation time unreasonably long or even prevents the calculation algorithm from converging. In this paper we apply the free open source software OpenFOAM (licensed under GNU GPL) for a three-dimensional CFD-Simulation of a flow around a sounding rocket instrumentation. An advantage of this software package, among other things, is that it can run on high performance clusters, which are easily scalable. We present the first results and discuss the potential of the new tool in applications for sounding rockets.

  13. Interpreting measurements obtained with the cloud absorption radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The software developed for the analysis of data from the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) is discussed. The CAR is a multichannel radiometer designed to measure the radiation field in the middle of an optically thick cloud (the diffusion domain). It can also measure the surface albedo and escape function. The instrument currently flies on a C-131A aircraft operated by the University of Washington. Most of this data was collected during the First International satellite cloud climatology project Regional Experiment (FIRE) Marine Stratocumulus Intensive Field Observation program off San Diego during July 1987. Earlier flights of the CAR have also been studied.

  14. Aerodynamic Decelerators for Planetary Exploration: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juna R.; Lingard, J. Stephen

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, aerodynamic decelerators are defined as textile devices intended to be deployed at Mach numbers below five. Such aerodynamic decelerators include parachutes and inflatable aerodynamic decelerators (often known as ballutes). Aerodynamic decelerators play a key role in the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) of planetary exploration vehicles. Among the functions performed by aerodynamic decelerators for such vehicles are deceleration (often from supersonic to subsonic speeds), minimization of descent rate, providing specific descent rates (so that scientific measurements can be obtained), providing stability (drogue function - either to prevent aeroshell tumbling or to meet instrumentation requirements), effecting further aerodynamic decelerator system deployment (pilot function), providing differences in ballistic coefficients of components to enable separation events, and providing height and timeline to allow for completion of the EDL sequence. Challenging aspects in the development of aerodynamic decelerators for planetary exploration missions include: deployment in the unusual combination of high Mach numbers and low dynamic pressures, deployment in the wake behind a blunt-body entry vehicle, stringent mass and volume constraints, and the requirement for high drag and stability. Furthermore, these aerodynamic decelerators must be qualified for flight without access to the exotic operating environment where they are expected to operate. This paper is an introduction to the development and application of aerodynamic decelerators for robotic planetary exploration missions (including Earth sample return missions) from the earliest work in the 1960s to new ideas and technologies with possible application to future missions. An extensive list of references is provided for additional study.

  15. Challenges in obtaining reliable measurements of point rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieck, Lisa C.; Burges, Stephen J.; Steiner, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Extensive data recorded from storm systems passing over the well-instrumented 21.4 km2 Goodwin Creek watershed in northern Mississippi are used to highlight uncertainties associated with the measurement of surface rainfall, focusing on data quality control, gauge calibration, out-of-level gauge orifices, and wind effects on rain gauge catch. Assessment of the wind effect on gauge catch is central to the presented analyses, including an in-depth evaluation of a recent technique for estimating the rainfall undercatch by means of wind and raindrop size information. Our findings emphasize that quantification of the wind effect on rain gauge catch is difficult because of uncertainties associated with measuring rainfall, drop size distribution, and the wind at gauge rim height. On the basis of our evaluation the sophisticated wind effect correction technique that makes use of raindrop size and wind information is much less effective than traditional methods based on rainfall rate and wind observations alone.

  16. Measurement results obtained from air quality monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Turzanski, P.K.; Beres, R.

    1995-12-31

    An automatic system of air pollution monitoring operates in Cracow since 1991. The organization, assembling and start-up of the network is a result of joint efforts of the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Cracow environmental protection service. At present the automatic monitoring network is operated by the Provincial Inspection of Environmental Protection. There are in total seven stationary stations situated in Cracow to measure air pollution. These stations are supported continuously by one semi-mobile (transportable) station. It allows to modify periodically the area under investigation and therefore the 3-dimensional picture of creation and distribution of air pollutants within Cracow area could be more intelligible.

  17. Aerobot measurements successfully obtained during Solo Spirit Balloon Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avidson, Raymond E.; Bowman, Judd D.; Guinness, Edward A.; Johnson, Sarah S.; Slavney, S. H.; Stein, Thomas C.; Bachelder, Aaron D.; Cameron, Jonathan M.; Cutts, James A.; Ivlev, Robert V.; Kahn, Ralph A.

    Robotic balloons, also known as aerobots, have become candidates for collecting atmospheric data and detailed surface observations of Venus, Mars, and Titan. A mission to Venus over a decade ago used two of them. Their inclusion last year in attempts by a balloonist to circumnavigate the Earth aptly demonstrated their utility for remote sensing and in situ observations of planetary atmospheres.To simulate aspects of an aerobot mission, a small payload to measure local atmospheric conditions and balloon position and velocity was included on Solo Spirit “Round the World” flights during January and August of last year. These missions, flown in Roziere balloons, were attempts by Steve Fossett to become the first person to circumnavigate the globe in a balloon without stopping. Neither attempt was successful, but the aerobot came through with flying colors.

  18. Helium measurements of pore-fluids obtained from SAFOD drillcore

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S.; Stute, M.; Torgersen, T.; Winckler, G.; Kennedy, B.M.

    2010-04-15

    {sup 4}He accumulated in fluids is a well established geochemical tracer used to study crustal fluid dynamics. Direct fluid samples are not always collectable; therefore, a method to extract rare gases from matrix fluids of whole rocks by diffusion has been adapted. Helium was measured on matrix fluids extracted from sandstones and mudstones recovered during the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling in California, USA. Samples were typically collected as subcores or from drillcore fragments. Helium concentration and isotope ratios were measured 4-6 times on each sample, and indicate a bulk {sup 4}He diffusion coefficient of 3.5 {+-} 1.3 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} at 21 C, compared to previously published diffusion coefficients of 1.2 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) to 3.0 x 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (150 C) in the sands and clays. Correcting the diffusion coefficient of {sup 4}He{sub water} for matrix porosity ({approx}3%) and tortuosity ({approx}6-13) produces effective diffusion coefficients of 1 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) and 1 x 10{sup -7} (120 C), effectively isolating pore fluid {sup 4}He from the {sup 4}He contained in the rock matrix. Model calculations indicate that <6% of helium initially dissolved in pore fluids was lost during the sampling process. Complete and quantitative extraction of the pore fluids provide minimum in situ porosity values for sandstones 2.8 {+-} 0.4% (SD, n=4) and mudstones 3.1 {+-} 0.8% (SD, n=4).

  19. Measured and predicted aerodynamic coefficients and shock shapes for Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Two scaled models of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle were tested in two air wind tunnels and one CF4 tunnel. The tests were to determine the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics, and shock shapes for the configuration in hypersonic continuum flow. The tests were conducted with a range of angle of attack to evaluate the effects of Mach number, Reynolds numbers, and normal shock density ratio.

  20. Diagnostic techniques for measurement of aerodynamic noise in free field and reverberant environment of wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Sum, H. M. A.; Mawardi, O. K.

    1973-01-01

    Techniques for studying aerodynamic noise generating mechanisms without disturbing the flow in a free field, and in the reverberation environment of the ARC wind tunnel were investigated along with the design and testing of an acoustic antenna with an electronic steering control. The acoustic characteristics of turbojet as a noise source, detection of direct sound from a source in a reverberant background, optical diagnostic methods, and the design characteristics of a high directivity acoustic antenna. Recommendations for further studies are included.

  1. Aerodynamic Measurements of a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade Section in a Transonic Turbine Cascade at Low Inlet Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel-McVetta, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic measurements obtained in a transonic linear cascade were used to assess the impact of large incidence angle and Reynolds number variations on the 3-D flow field and midspan loss and turning of a 2-D section of a variable-speed power-turbine (VSPT) rotor blade. Steady-state data were obtained for ten incidence angles ranging from +15.8 deg to -51.0 deg. At each angle, data were acquired at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number (based on axial chord) varying over an order-of-magnitude from 2.12×10(exp 5) to 2.12×10(exp 6). Data were obtained at the design exit Mach number of 0.72 and at a reduced exit Mach number of 0.35 as required to achieve the lowest Reynolds number. Midspan total-pressure and exit flow angle data were acquired using a five-hole pitch/yaw probe surveyed on a plane located 7.0 percent axial chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane. The survey spanned three blade passages. Additionally, three-dimensional half-span flow fields were examined with additional probe survey data acquired at 26 span locations for two key incidence angles of +5.8 deg and -36.7 deg. Survey data near the endwall were acquired with a three-hole boundary-layer probe. The data were integrated to determine average exit total-pressure and flow angle as functions of incidence and flow conditions. The data set also includes blade static pressures measured on four spanwise planes and endwall static pressures. Tests were conducted in the NASA Glenn Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The measurements reflect strong secondary flows associated with the high aerodynamic loading levels at large positive incidence angles and an increase in loss levels with decreasing Reynolds number. The secondary flows decrease with negative incidence as the blade becomes unloaded. Transitional flow is admitted in this low inlet turbulence dataset, making it a challenging CFD test case. The dataset will be used to advance understanding of the aerodynamic

  2. The Aerodynamic Drag of Flying-boat Hull Model as Measured in the NACA 20-foot Wind Tunnel I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Edwin P

    1935-01-01

    Measurements of aerodynamic drag were made in the 20-foot wind tunnel on a representative group of 11 flying-boat hull models. Four of the models were modified to investigate the effect of variations in over-all height, contours of deck, depth of step, angle of afterbody keel, and the addition of spray strips and windshields. The results of these tests, which cover a pitch-angle range from -5 to 10 degrees, are presented in a form suitable for use in performance calculations and for design purposes.

  3. Evaluation of Rotor Structural and Aerodynamic Loads using Measured Blade Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Sung N.; You, Young-Hyun; Lau, Benton H.; Johnson, Wayne; Lim, Joon W.

    2012-01-01

    The structural properties of Higher harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART I) blades have been measured using the original set of blades tested in the wind tunnel in 1994. A comprehensive rotor dynamics analysis is performed to address the effect of the measured blade properties on airloads, blade motions, and structural loads of the rotor. The measurements include bending and torsion stiffness, geometric offsets, and mass and inertia properties of the blade. The measured properties are correlated against the estimated values obtained initially by the manufacturer of the blades. The previously estimated blade properties showed consistently higher stiffnesses, up to 30% for the flap bending in the blade inboard root section. The measured offset between the center of gravity and the elastic axis is larger by about 5% chord length, as compared with the estimated value. The comprehensive rotor dynamics analysis was carried out using the measured blade property set for HART I rotor with and without HHC (Higher Harmonic Control) pitch inputs. A significant improvement on blade motions and structural loads is obtained with the measured blade properties.

  4. Real-Gas Effects on the Aerodynamics of Blunt Cones as Measured in a Hypervelocity Range

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    and 0.3. The cones tested had nominal base diameters of either 1.0 or 1.5 in. and were fabricated of aluminum except for the nosetlps. All cones...high aerodynamic heating conditions. Sabots used were of a conventional four-component design and were fabricated o f Lexan ® . All cones were...whereas the test cones were fabricated with a nominal edge radius of 0.03 in. "Provided b.’, E. O. Marchand, formerly of ARO, Inc. 15 A E D C - T R

  5. The aerodynamic characteristics of a supersonic aircraft configuration with a 40 degree sweptback wing through a Mach number range from 0 to 2.4 obtained from various sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M Leroy; Robinson, Ross B

    1952-01-01

    A summary and analysis have been made of the results of various investigations to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a supersonic aircraft configuration. The configuration has a wing with 40 degree sweepback at the quarter-chord line, aspect ratio 4, taper ratio 0.5, and 10-percent-thick circular-arc sections normal to the quarter-chord line. Experimental data were available for a Mach number range from 0.16 to 2.32. Results obtained from wing-flow, rocket-model, transonic-bump, and tunnel tests are presented and, where possible, are supplemented by empirical and theoretical calculations.

  6. Flow Quality Measurements in an Aerodynamic Model of NASA Lewis' Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canacci, Victor A.; Gonsalez, Jose C.

    1999-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to improve the aerodynamic flow characteristics of the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT), a modular scale model of the facility was fabricated. This 1/10th-scale model was used to gain further understanding of the flow characteristics in the IRT. The model was outfitted with instrumentation and data acquisition systems to determine pressures, velocities, and flow angles in the settling chamber and test section. Parametric flow quality studies involving the insertion and removal of a model of the IRT's distinctive heat exchanger (cooler) and/or of a honeycomb in the settling chamber were performed. These experiments illustrate the resulting improvement or degradation in flow quality.

  7. The Experimental Measurement of Aerodynamic Heating About Complex Shapes at Supersonic Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Richard D.; Freeman, Delma C.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008 a wind tunnel test program was implemented to update the experimental data available for predicting protuberance heating at supersonic Mach numbers. For this test the Langley Unitary Wind Tunnel was also used. The significant differences for this current test were the advances in the state-of-the-art in model design, fabrication techniques, instrumentation and data acquisition capabilities. This current paper provides a focused discussion of the results of an in depth analysis of unique measurements of recovery temperature obtained during the test.

  8. Measured and predicted shock shapes and aerodynamic coefficients for blunted cones at incidence in helium at Mach 20.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calloway, R. L.; White, N. H.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental values of shock shapes (alpha = 0 degrees and 10 degrees) and static aerodynamic coefficients (alpha = -4 degrees to 12 degrees) for sharp and spherically blunted cones having cone half-angles of 30, 45, 60, and 70 degrees and nose bluntness ratios of 0, 0.25, and 0.50 are presented. Shock shapes were also measured at 0 degree angle of attack by using a flat-faced cylinder (90 degree cone) and a hemispherically blunted cylinder (sphere). All tests were conducted in helium (gamma = 5/3) at a free-stream Mach number of 20.3 and a unit free-stream Reynolds number of 22,400,000 per meter. Comparisons between measured values and predicted values were made by using several numerical and simple engineering methods.

  9. Measured and predicted shock shapes and aerodynamic coefficients for blunted cones at incidence in air at Mach 5.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calloway, R. L.; White, N. H.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental values of shock shapes (angles of attack of 0 deg and 10 deg) and static aerodynamic coefficients (angles of attack of -4 deg to 12 deg for sharp and spherically blunted cones having cone half angles of 30 deg, 45 deg, 60 deg, and 70 deg, and nose bluntness ratios of 0, 0.25, and 0.50 are presented. Shock shapes were measured at 0 deg angle of attack by using a flat faced cylinder (90 deg cone) and a hemispherically blunted cylinder (sphere). All tests were conducted in air at a free stream Mach number of 5.9 and a unit free stream Reynolds number of 2,800,000 per meter. Comparisons between measured values and predicted values were made by using several numerical and simple engineering methods.

  10. Aerodynamics of a Party Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that a party balloon can be made to fly erratically across a room, but it can also be used for quantitative measurements of other aspects of aerodynamics. Since a balloon is light and has a large surface area, even relatively weak aerodynamic forces can be readily demonstrated or measured in the classroom. Accurate measurements…

  11. Aerodynamics of a freely flying owl from PIV measurements in the wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Gida, Hadar; Gurka, Roi; Weihs, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of the silent flight of owls have been the subject of scientific interest for many decades and a source of inspiration in the context of reducing flight noise. Over millions of years of evolution, owls have produced many specialized configurations to reduce the aerodynamic noise, which is found to be essential for successful hunting of potential prey. Here, we study how the three-dimensional flow field formed over the wing affect the vortical structures develop in the wake of a freely flying owl. We study the unique flight patterns of the Boobook owl; a mid-sized owl, which has the feature of stealth flight during both gliding and flapping flight. The owl was flown in a hypobaric avian wind tunnel at its comfort speed for various flight modes. The wake velocity field was sampled using long duration high speed PIV whilst the wing's kinematics were imaged using high speed video simultaneously with the PIV. The time series velocity maps acquired during few consecutive wingbeat cycles enabled to describe the various flow features as formed at the owl's wake by reconstructing the wake patterns and associate them with the various phases of the wingbeat cycle. The stealthy flight mode, which is a result of noise reduction mechanisms, formed over the wings (presumably by the leading-edge serrations) results in a unique signature in the wake flow field, which is characterized using the present data.

  12. Effect of body aerodynamics on the dynamic flight stability of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Han, Jong-Seob; Han, Jae-Hung

    2016-12-14

    This study explores the effects of the body aerodynamics on the dynamic flight stability of an insect at various different forward flight speeds. The insect model, whose morphological parameters are based on measurement data from the hawkmoth Manduca sexta, is treated as an open-loop six-degree-of-freedom dynamic system. The aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the insect are computed by an aerodynamic model that combines the unsteady panel method and the extended unsteady vortex-lattice method. The aerodynamic model is then coupled to a multi-body dynamic code to solve the system of motion equations. First, the trimmed flight conditions of insect models with and without consideration of the body aerodynamics are obtained using a trim search algorithm. Subsequently, the effects of the body aerodynamics on the dynamic flight stability are analysed through modal structures, i.e., eigenvalues and eigenvectors in this case, which are based on linearized equations of motion. The solutions from the nonlinear and linearized equations of motion due to gust disturbances are obtained, and the effects of the body aerodynamics are also investigated through these solutions. The results showed the important effect of the body aerodynamics at high-speed forward flight (in this paper at 4.0 and 5.0 m s(-1)) and the movement trends of eigenvalues when the body aerodynamics is included.

  13. Comparative study of mandibular linear measurements obtained by cone beam computed tomography and digital calipers

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona-Álvarez, Pablo; Romero-Millán, Javier; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Fuster-Torres, María Á.; Tarazona, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an innovative dental of imaging system characterized by rapid volumetric imaging with patient exposure to a single dose of radiation. The present study was carried out to compare the linear measurements obtained with CBCT and digital caliper in 20 mandibles from human cadavers. Study design: A total of 4800 linear measurements were measured between different mandibular anatomical points with CBCT and digital caliper. The real measurements were defined as those obtained with the digital caliper. Posteriorly, the mandibles were scanned to obtain the CBCT images, with software-based measurements of the distances. Results: The measurements obtained with the digital caliper were greater. The CBCT technique underestimated distances greater than 100 mm. Conclusions: CBCT allows to obtain linear mandibular anatomical measurements equivalent to those obtained with digital caliper. The differences existing between both methods were clinically acceptable. Key words:Computed tomography, cone beam CT, accuracy, reliability, digital caliper. PMID:25136429

  14. Aerodynamic measurements of methyl bromide volatilization from tarped and nontarped fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, M.S.; McChesney, M.M.; Woodrow, J.E.; Prueger, J.H.; Seiber, J.N.

    1995-01-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) is used extensively in agriculture as a soil fumigant and there is growing concern over the role it may play in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Methyl bromide is applied using various techniques and very little is known about how much of the applied fumigant volatilizes into the atmosphere after the application. This held study was designed to estimate the post-application methyl bromide volatilization loss rates from two different application practices. The fields were approximately 6 km apart in Monterey County, California, and were treated in conformity with local practices as of 1992. The MeBr was injected at a depth of 25 to 30 cm. One field was covered simultaneously with a high-barrier plastic film tarp during the application, and the other was left uncovered, but the furrows made by the injection shanks were bedded over. Volatilization fluxes were estimated using an aerodynamic-gradient technique immediately following the completion of the application process and continued for 9 d for the tarped held and 6 d for the nontarped field. The cumulative volatilization losses from the tarped field were 22% of the nominal application within the first 5 d of the experiment and about 32% of the nominal application within 9 d including the one day after the tarp was removed on Day 8 after application. In contrast, the nontarped field lost 89% of the nominal application by volatilization in 5 d. The volatilization rate from the tarped field was shown to he significantly lower than the nontarped field at a 95% confidence level.

  15. Aerodynamic measurements of methyl bromide volatilization from tarped and nontarped fields

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, M.S.; McChesney, M.M.; Woodrow, J.E.; Seiber, J.N.

    1995-07-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) is used extensively in agriculture as a soil fumigant and there is growing concern over the role it may play in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Methyl bromide is applied using various techniques and very little is known about how much of the applied fumigant volatilizes into the atmosphere after the application. This field study was designed to estimate the post-application methyl bromide volatilization loss rates from two different application practices. The fields were approximately 6 km apart in Monterey County, California, and were treated in conformity with local practices as of 1992. The MeBr was injected at a depth of 25 to 30 cm. One field was covered simultaneously with a high-barrier plastic film tarp during the application, and the other was left uncovered, but the furrows made by the injection shanks were bedded over. Volatilization fluxes were estimated using an aerodynamic-gradient technique immediately following the completion of the application process and continued for 9 d for the tarped field and 6 d for the nontarped field. The cumulative volatilization losses from the tarped field were 22% of the nominal application within the first 5 d of the experiment and about 32% of the nominal application within 9 d including the one day after the tarp was removed on Day 8 after application. In contrast, the nontarped field lost 89% of the nominal application by volatilization in 5 d. The volatilization rate from the tarped field was shown to be significantly lower than the nontarped field at a 95% confidence level. 43 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particle Concentrations and Size Distributions Measured with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS) in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Treutlein, B.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-12-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany, we used an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) to measure fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs), which can be regarded as viable bioaerosol particles representing a lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (< 1 µm), but not for coarse particles (1 - 20 µm). Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August - December 2006), the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was ~3x10-2 cm-3, corresponding to ~4% of total coarse particle number [1]. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was ~1 µg m-3, corresponding to ~20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters. A pronounced peak at ~3 µm was essentially always observed and can be described by the following campaign-average lognormal fit parameters: geometric mean diameter 3.2 µm, geometric standard deviation 1.3, number concentration 1.6 x 10-2 cm-3. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around ~1.5 µm, ~5 µm, and ~13 µm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be explained by single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively. The observed number concentrations and characteristic sizes of FBAPs are consistent with microscopic, biological and chemical analyses of

  17. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Treutlein, B.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-08-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany, we used an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) to measure fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs), which can be regarded as viable bioaerosol particles representing a lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (<1 μm), but not for coarse particles (1-20 μm). Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August-December 2006), the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was ~3×10-2 cm-3, corresponding to ~4% of total coarse particle number. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was ~1 μg m-3, corresponding to ~20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters. A pronounced peak at ~3 μm was essentially always observed and can be described by the following campaign-average lognormal fit parameters: geometric mean diameter 3.2 μm, geometric standard deviation 1.3, number concentration 1.6×10-2 cm-3. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around ~1.5 μm, ~5 μm, and ~13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be explained by single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively. The observed number concentrations and characteristic sizes of FBAPs are consistent with microscopic, biological and chemical analyses of PBAPs in

  18. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS) in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Treutlein, B.; Pöschl, U.

    2010-04-01

    Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany we used an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS) to measure Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAPs), which provide an estimate of viable bioaerosol particles and can be regarded as an approximate lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (<1 μm), but not for coarse particles (1-20 μm). Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August-December 2006), the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was ~3×10-2 cm-3, corresponding to ~4% of total coarse particle number. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was ~1μg m-3, corresponding to ~20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters. A pronounced peak at ~3 μm was essentially always observed and can be described by the following campaign-average lognormal fit parameters: geometric mean diameter 3.2 μm, geometric standard deviation 1.3, number concentration 1.6×10-2 cm-3. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle (24-h) with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around ~1.5 μm, ~5 μm, and ~13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively. The observed number concentrations and characteristic sizes of FBAPs are consistent with microscopic, biological and chemical

  19. Deriving simple empirical relationships between aerodynamic and optical aerosol measurements and their application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different measurement techniques for aerosol characterization and quantification either directly or indirectly measure different aerosol properties (i.e. count, mass, speciation, etc.). Comparisons and combinations of multiple measurement techniques sampling the same aerosol can provide insight into...

  20. Strain measurement of objects subjected to aerodynamic heating using digital image correlation: Experimental design and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Bing; Jiang, Tianyun; Wu, Dafang

    2014-11-01

    In thermomechanical testing of hypersonic materials and structures, direct observation and quantitative strain measurement of the front surface of a test specimen directly exposed to severe aerodynamic heating has been considered as a very challenging task. In this work, a novel quartz infrared heating device with an observation window is designed to reproduce the transient thermal environment experienced by hypersonic vehicles. The specially designed experimental system allows the capture of test article's surface images at various temperatures using an optical system outfitted with a bandpass filter. The captured images are post-processed by digital image correlation to extract full-field thermal deformation. To verify the viability and accuracy of the established system, thermal strains of a chromiumnickel austenite stainless steel sample heated from room temperature up to 600 °C were determined. The preliminary results indicate that the air disturbance between the camera and the specimen due to heat haze induces apparent distortions in the recorded images and large errors in the measured strains, but the average values of the measured strains are accurate enough. Limitations and further improvements of the proposed technique are discussed.

  1. Strain measurement of objects subjected to aerodynamic heating using digital image correlation: experimental design and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Jiang, Tianyun; Wu, Dafang

    2014-11-01

    In thermomechanical testing of hypersonic materials and structures, direct observation and quantitative strain measurement of the front surface of a test specimen directly exposed to severe aerodynamic heating has been considered as a very challenging task. In this work, a novel quartz infrared heating device with an observation window is designed to reproduce the transient thermal environment experienced by hypersonic vehicles. The specially designed experimental system allows the capture of test article's surface images at various temperatures using an optical system outfitted with a bandpass filter. The captured images are post-processed by digital image correlation to extract full-field thermal deformation. To verify the viability and accuracy of the established system, thermal strains of a chromiumnickel austenite stainless steel sample heated from room temperature up to 600 °C were determined. The preliminary results indicate that the air disturbance between the camera and the specimen due to heat haze induces apparent distortions in the recorded images and large errors in the measured strains, but the average values of the measured strains are accurate enough. Limitations and further improvements of the proposed technique are discussed.

  2. Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. K. R.; Tamalonis, A.; Benmore, C. J.; Alderman, O. L. G.; Sendelbach, S.; Hebden, A.; Williamson, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    An aerodynamic levitator with carbon dioxide laser beam heating was integrated with a hermetically sealed controlled atmosphere chamber and sample handling mechanism. The system enabled containment of radioactive samples and control of the process atmosphere chemistry. The chamber was typically operated at a pressure of approximately 0.9 bars to ensure containment of the materials being processed. Samples 2.5-3 mm in diameter were levitated in flowing gas to achieve containerless conditions. Levitated samples were heated to temperatures of up to 3500 °C with a partially focused carbon dioxide laser beam. Sample temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer. The sample environment was integrated with a high energy (100 keV) x-ray synchrotron beamline to enable in situ structure measurements to be made on levitated samples as they were heated, melted, and supercooled. The system was controlled from outside the x-ray beamline hutch by using a LabVIEW program. Measurements have been made on hot solid and molten uranium dioxide and binary uranium dioxide-zirconium dioxide compositions.

  3. Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials.

    PubMed

    Weber, J K R; Tamalonis, A; Benmore, C J; Alderman, O L G; Sendelbach, S; Hebden, A; Williamson, M A

    2016-07-01

    An aerodynamic levitator with carbon dioxide laser beam heating was integrated with a hermetically sealed controlled atmosphere chamber and sample handling mechanism. The system enabled containment of radioactive samples and control of the process atmosphere chemistry. The chamber was typically operated at a pressure of approximately 0.9 bars to ensure containment of the materials being processed. Samples 2.5-3 mm in diameter were levitated in flowing gas to achieve containerless conditions. Levitated samples were heated to temperatures of up to 3500 °C with a partially focused carbon dioxide laser beam. Sample temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer. The sample environment was integrated with a high energy (100 keV) x-ray synchrotron beamline to enable in situ structure measurements to be made on levitated samples as they were heated, melted, and supercooled. The system was controlled from outside the x-ray beamline hutch by using a LabVIEW program. Measurements have been made on hot solid and molten uranium dioxide and binary uranium dioxide-zirconium dioxide compositions.

  4. Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials

    DOE PAGES

    Weber, J. K. R.; Tamalonis, A.; Benmore, C. J.; ...

    2016-07-01

    We integrated an aerodynamic levitator with carbon dioxide laser beam heating with a hermetically sealed controlled atmosphere chamber and sample handling mechanism. The system enabled containment of radioactive samples and control of the process atmosphere chemistry. Furthermore, the chamber was typically operated at a pressure of approximately 0.9 bars to ensure containment of the materials being processed. Samples 2.5-3 mm in diameter were levitated in flowing gas to achieve containerless conditions. Levitated samples were heated to temperatures of up to 3500 °C with a partially focused carbon dioxide laser beam. Sample temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer. The samplemore » environment was integrated with a high energy (100 keV) x-ray synchrotron beamline to enable in situ structure measurements to be made on levitated samples as they were heated, melted, and supercooled. Our system was controlled from outside the x-ray beamline hutch by using a LabVIEW program. Measurements have been made on hot solid and molten uranium dioxide and binary uranium dioxide-zirconium dioxide compositions.« less

  5. Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J. K. R.; Tamalonis, A.; Benmore, C. J.; Alderman, O. L. G.; Sendelbach, S.; Hebden, A.; Williamson, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    We integrated an aerodynamic levitator with carbon dioxide laser beam heating with a hermetically sealed controlled atmosphere chamber and sample handling mechanism. The system enabled containment of radioactive samples and control of the process atmosphere chemistry. Furthermore, the chamber was typically operated at a pressure of approximately 0.9 bars to ensure containment of the materials being processed. Samples 2.5-3 mm in diameter were levitated in flowing gas to achieve containerless conditions. Levitated samples were heated to temperatures of up to 3500 °C with a partially focused carbon dioxide laser beam. Sample temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer. The sample environment was integrated with a high energy (100 keV) x-ray synchrotron beamline to enable in situ structure measurements to be made on levitated samples as they were heated, melted, and supercooled. Our system was controlled from outside the x-ray beamline hutch by using a LabVIEW program. Measurements have been made on hot solid and molten uranium dioxide and binary uranium dioxide-zirconium dioxide compositions.

  6. Measured pressure distributions, aerodynamic coefficients and shock shapes on blunt bodies at incidence in hypersonic air and CF4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1982-01-01

    Pressure distributions, aerodynamic coefficients, and shock shapes were measured on blunt bodies of revolution in Mach 6 CF4 and in Mach 6 and Mach 10 air. The angle of attack was varied from 0 deg to 20 deg in 4 deg increments. Configurations tested were a hyperboloid with an asymptotic angle of 45 deg, a sonic-corner paraboloid, a paraboloid with an angle of 27.6 deg at the base, a Viking aeroshell generated in a generalized orthogonal coordinate system, and a family of cones having a 45 deg half-angle with spherical, flattened, concave, and cusp nose shapes. Real-gas effects were simulated for the hperboloid and paraboloid models at Mach 6 by testing at a normal-shock density ratio of 5.3 in air and 12 CF4. Predictions from simple theories and numerical flow field programs are compared with measurement. It is anticipated that the data presented in this report will be useful for verification of analytical methods for predicting hypersonic flow fields about blunt bodies at incidence.

  7. Final Results from Mexnext-I: Analysis of detailed aerodynamic measurements on a 4.5 m diameter rotor placed in the large German Dutch Wind Tunnel DNW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepers, J. G.; Boorsma, K.; Munduate, X.

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the final results from the first phase of IEA Task 29 'Mexnext'. Mexnext was a joint project in which 20 parties from 11 different countries cooperated. The main aim of Mexnext was to analyse the wind tunnel measurements which have been taken in the EU project 'MEXICO'. In the MEXICO project 10 institutes from 6 countries cooperated in doing experiments on an instrumented, 3 bladed wind turbine of 4.5 m diameter placed in the 9.5 by 9.5 m2 open section of the Large Low-speed Facility (LLF) of DNW in the Netherlands. Pressure distributions on the blades were obtained from 148 Kulite pressure sensors, distributed over 5 sections at 25, 35, 60, 82 and 92 % radial position respectively. Blade loads were monitored through two strain-gauge bridges at each blade root. Most interesting however are the extensive PIV flow field measurements, which have been taken simultaneously with the pressure and load measurements. As a result of the international collaboration within this task a very thorough analysis of the data could be carried out and a large number of codes were validated not only in terms of loads but also in terms of underlying flow field. The paper will present several results from Mexnext-I, i.e. validation results and conclusion on modelling deficiencies and directions for model improvement. The future plans of the Mexnext consortium are also briefly discussed. Amongst these are Mexnext-II, a project in which also aerodynamic measurements other than MEXICO are included, and 'New MEXICO' in which additional measurement on the MEXICO model are performed.

  8. Chaff Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    further improve the contrast all of the interior surfaces of the test chamber are painted flat black and the bac!-,ground walls in view of the cameras...to be adequate to eliminate wall effects on the chaff aerodynamics. Secondly, the chamber air mass had to be sufficiently small that it would damp out...independently- supported special rotating-shutter system to "strobe" the dipole images. The integral shutter in each lens assembly is also retained for

  9. Derivation and use of simple relationships between aerodynamic and optical particle measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple relationship, referred to as a mass conversion factor (MCF), is presented to convert optically based particle measurements to mass concentration. It is calculated from filter-based samples and optical particle counter (OPC) data on a daily or sample period basis. The MCF allows for greater ...

  10. Computer Tomography and Hybrid Optical/Digital Methods for Aerodynamic Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-28

    Industrial Applications of Corn- on Axisymnnietric Flame ’Iempnlw res Measured by Holo- puted Tornographv arid NMI? Imiaging (Optical Society of graphic...Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. Escuela de Ingenieria . Santiago, equal. The optical path length difference (OPD) be- Chile. tween the two rays

  11. A Magnetic-Fluid Seal for Measurement of Aerodynamic Surface Pressure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-04-01

    A magnetic - fluid sliding seal was designed, fabricated, and tested for application in a special instrumentation arrangement to measure the...spin rates. The effects of certain seal parameters were investigated including: gap distance between stationary and moving components, magnetic ... fluid properties (i.e., magnetization strength and viscosity), and ferrous versus nonferrous moving component material. These tests demonstrated that the

  12. Aerodynamics of the knuckleball pitch: Experimental measurements on slowly rotating baseballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, John P.; Morrissey, Michael P.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we characterize the lift and lateral forces on a two-seam versus four-seam knuckleball and measure the viscous shear stress. We believe these measurements to be the first reported for slowly rotating baseballs. Our findings indicate the seam acts to either delay or advance separation depending upon the ball angle; these results are supported with flow visualization. The combined effect produces significant lift and lateral forces that can rapidly change as the ball rotates. Furthermore, we found the shear stress to be asymmetric which can result in significant in-flight torque. Together, asymmetries in force and shear stress produce the complicated flight trajectories that can confound the hapless batter.

  13. Wind Tunnel Measurements and Calculations of Aerodynamic Interactions Between Tiltrotor Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    the wake of the upwind aircraft. The aircraft were in helicopter configuration ( nacelle angle 90 deg), with the rotor shafts vertical and the wing at...indicating downward convection of the wake (so the upwind aircraft was higher at the maximum interaction). Similar wake behavior was observed in lidar ...Libby, J.; "Wake Vortex Measurements of the XV-15 Tiltrotor Using a Mobile Ground-Based Lidar System." AHS International 57th Annual Forum Proceedings

  14. In-flight measurements of the GA/W/-2 aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregorek, G. M.; Hoffmann, M. J.; Weislogel, G. S.; Vogel, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    Flight tests of a new 13% General Aviation Airfoil - the GA(W)-2 - gloved full span onto the existing wing of a Beech Sundowner have generated chordwise pressure distributions and wake surveys. Section lift, drag and moment coefficients derived from these measurements verify wind tunnel data and theory predicting the performance of this airfoil. The effect of steps, rivets and surface coatings upon the drag of the GA(W)-2 was also evaluated.

  15. Aerodynamically induced radial forces in a centrifugal gas compressor. Part 1: Experimental measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.J.; Flathers, M.B.

    1998-04-01

    Net radial loading arising from asymmetric pressure fields in the volutes of centrifugal pumps during off-design operation is well known and has been studied extensively. In order to achieve a marked improvement in overall efficiency in centrifugal gas compressors, vaneless volute diffusers are matched to specific impellers to yield improved performance over a wide application envelope. As observed in centrifugal pumps, nonuniform pressure distributions that develop during operation above and below the design flow create static radial loads on the rotor. In order to characterize these radial forces, a novel experimental measurement and post-processing technique is employed that yields both the magnitude and direction of the load by measuring the shaft centerline locus in the tilt-pad bearings. The method is applicable to any turbomachinery operating on fluid film radial bearings equipped with proximity probes. The forces are found to be a maximum near surge and increase with higher pressures and speeds. The results are nondimensionalized, allowing the radial loading for different operating conditions to be predicted.

  16. Laryngeal Aerodynamics Associated with Oral Contraceptive Use: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham-Rowan, Mary; Fowler, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in laryngeal aerodynamic measures during connected speech associated with oral contraceptive (OC) use. Eight women taking an OC, and eight others not taking an OC, participated in the study. Three trials of syllable /p[subscript alpha] /repetitions were obtained using a…

  17. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    The modern theory of aerodynamic sound originates from Lighthill's two papers in 1952 and 1954, as is well known. I have heard that Lighthill was motivated in writing the papers by the jet-noise emitted by the newly commercialized jet-engined airplanes at that time. The technology of aerodynamic sound is destined for environmental problems. Therefore the theory should always be applied to newly emerged public nuisances. This issue of Fluid Dynamics Research (FDR) reflects problems of environmental sound in present Japanese technology. The Japanese community studying aerodynamic sound has held an annual symposium since 29 years ago when the late Professor S Kotake and Professor S Kaji of Teikyo University organized the symposium. Most of the Japanese authors in this issue are members of the annual symposium. I should note the contribution of the two professors cited above in establishing the Japanese community of aerodynamic sound research. It is my pleasure to present the publication in this issue of ten papers discussed at the annual symposium. I would like to express many thanks to the Editorial Board of FDR for giving us the chance to contribute these papers. We have a review paper by T Suzuki on the study of jet noise, which continues to be important nowadays, and is expected to reform the theoretical model of generating mechanisms. Professor M S Howe and R S McGowan contribute an analytical paper, a valuable study in today's fluid dynamics research. They apply hydrodynamics to solve the compressible flow generated in the vocal cords of the human body. Experimental study continues to be the main methodology in aerodynamic sound, and it is expected to explore new horizons. H Fujita's study on the Aeolian tone provides a new viewpoint on major, longstanding sound problems. The paper by M Nishimura and T Goto on textile fabrics describes new technology for the effective reduction of bluff-body noise. The paper by T Sueki et al also reports new technology for the

  18. Recovering Aerodynamic Side Loads on Rocket Nozzles using Quasi-Static Strain-Gage Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew; Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David M.

    2009-01-01

    During over-expanded operation of rocket nozzles, which is defined to be when the exit pressure is greater than internal pressure over some part of the nozzle, the nozzle will experience a transverse forcing function due to the pressure differential across the nozzle wall. Over-expansion occurs during the nozzle start-up and shutdown transient, even in high-altitude engines, because most test facilities cannot completely reproduce the near-vacuum pressures at those altitudes. During this transient, the pressure differential moves axially down the nozzle as it becomes pressurized, but this differential is never perfectly symmetric circumferentially. The character of the forcing function is highly complex and defined by a series of restricted and free shock separations. The subject of this paper is the determination of the magnitude of this loading during sub-scale testing via measurement of the structural dynamic response of the nozzle and its support structure. An initial attempt at back-calculating this load using the inverse of the transfer function was performed, but this attempt was shown to be highly susceptible to numerical error. The final method chosen was to use statically calibrated strain data and to filter out the system fundamental frequency such that the measured response yields close to the correct dynamic loading function. This method was shown to capture 93% of the pressure spectral energy using controlled load shaker testing. This method is one of the only practical ways for the inverse determination of the forcing function for non-stationary excitations, and, to the authors' knowledge, has not been described in the literature to date.

  19. Aerodynamic diameter measurement of cellulose acetate fibers from cigarette filters: what is the potential for human exposure?

    PubMed

    Collazo, Humberto; Crow, W Andrew; Gardner, Lonnie; Phillips, Brenda L; Dyer, W Mills; Marple, Virgil A; Utell, Mark J

    2002-03-01

    Aerodynamic diameter is a major determinant of particle and fiber deposition and toxicity in the respiratory tract. To characterize cellulose acetate fibers released from the filter end of cigarettes puffed under conditions approximating smoking, we designed multistage impactors to determine the aerodynamic diameters of large fibers with circumscribed diameters between 20 and 35 microm and aspect ratios ranging from subfiber ratios up to 40. This range of diameters encompasses all of the cellulose acetate fiber sizes that are commercially manufactured. When commercially available cigarettes with filters made from acetate fibers in this circumscribed diameter range were puffed directly into the impactor, on average 10 fibers/cigarette were released and their aerodynamic diameters were determined. In our studies, we found that the aerodynamic diameters of the cellulose acetate fibers were always greater than 23 microm. Using standard lung deposition models, we concluded that the fibers are nonrespirable with a very low probability of penetration to the distal lung. Our findings, which demonstrate release of only a small number of these large fibers with an extremely low likelihood of reaching the distal lung, indicate that these fibers are not a risk for human lung disease.

  20. Aerodynamics of the hovering hummingbird.

    PubMed

    Warrick, Douglas R; Tobalske, Bret W; Powers, Donald R

    2005-06-23

    Despite profound musculoskeletal differences, hummingbirds (Trochilidae) are widely thought to employ aerodynamic mechanisms similar to those used by insects. The kinematic symmetry of the hummingbird upstroke and downstroke has led to the assumption that these halves of the wingbeat cycle contribute equally to weight support during hovering, as exhibited by insects of similar size. This assumption has been applied, either explicitly or implicitly, in widely used aerodynamic models and in a variety of empirical tests. Here we provide measurements of the wake of hovering rufous hummingbirds (Selasphorus rufus) obtained with digital particle image velocimetry that show force asymmetry: hummingbirds produce 75% of their weight support during the downstroke and only 25% during the upstroke. Some of this asymmetry is probably due to inversion of their cambered wings during upstroke. The wake of hummingbird wings also reveals evidence of leading-edge vortices created during the downstroke, indicating that they may operate at Reynolds numbers sufficiently low to exploit a key mechanism typical of insect hovering. Hummingbird hovering approaches that of insects, yet remains distinct because of effects resulting from an inherently dissimilar-avian-body plan.

  1. Cruise aerodynamics of USB nacelle/wing geometric variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braden, J. A.; Hancock, J. P.; Burdges, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on aerodynamic effects of geometric variations in upper surface blown nacelle configurations at high speed cruise conditions. Test data include both force and pressure measurements on two and three dimensional models powered by upper surface blowing nacelles of varying geometries. Experimental results are provided on variations in nozzle aspect ratio, nozzle boattail angle, and multiple nacelle installations. The nacelles are ranked according to aerodynamic drag penalties as well as overall installed drag penalties. Sample effects and correlations are shown for data obtained with the pressure model.

  2. [Absorbed dose conversion factors obtained from X-ray spectra measured at water phantom surface].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kiyoshi; Koyama, Masaki

    2005-03-20

    The absorbed dose conversion factor for X-rays at the water phantom surface has been obtained from the measured spectra. These measurements have been made at tube voltages of 60 kV to 120 kV and field sizes ranging from 5 x 5 cm(2) to 30 x 30 cm(2) with and without additional 2 mm aluminium filtration. A small silicon diode detector with little angular dependence was used for this measurement. The absorbed dose conversion factor obtained was 0.03-0.43% smaller than that obtained from the primary X-ray spectrum. The difference was large for high-voltage and heavily filtered X-rays. As field size increases, the conversion factor decreases, but the decrease is slight when field size exceeds 20 x 20 cm(2). The absorbed dose conversion factor obtained from the primary or surface X-ray spectrum is 0.4-1.8% larger than that obtained from the effective energy of primary X-rays. The difference is large in high-voltage X-rays and decreases slightly with increases in field size.

  3. Obtaining Heat Stress Measurements. Module 15. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on obtaining heat stress measurements. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) naming and describing the…

  4. Rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith

    1992-01-01

    Means for relatively simple and quick procedures are examined for estimating aerodynamic coefficients of lifting reentry vehicles. The methods developed allow aerospace designers not only to evaluate the aerodynamics of specific shapes but also to optimize shapes under given constraints. The analysis was also studied of the effect of thermomolecular flow on pressures measured by an orifice near the nose of a Space Shuttle Orbiter at altitudes above 75 km. It was shown that pressures corrected for thermomolecular flow effect are in good agreement with values predicted by independent theoretical methods. An incidental product was the insight gained about the free molecular thermal accommodation coefficient applicable under 'real' conditions of high speed flow in the Earth's atmosphere. The results are presented as abstracts of referenced papers. One reference paper is presented in its entirety.

  5. Aerodynamic characteristics of a vane flow angularity sensor system capable of measuring flight path accelerations for the Mach number range from 0.40 to 2.54

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the angle of attack vane and the angle of sideslip vane are summarized. The test conditions ranged in free stream Mach number from 0.40 to 2.54, in angle of attack from -2 deg to 22 deg, in angle of sideslip from -2 deg to 12 deg, and in Reynolds number from 590,000 per meter to 1.8 million per meter. The results of the wind tunnel investigation are compared with results obtained with similar vane configurations. Comparisons with a NACA vane configuration are also made. In addition, wind tunnel-derived upwash for the test installation is compared with analytical predictions.

  6. 3D flame topography obtained by tomographic chemiluminescence with direct comparison to planar Mie scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenjiang; Wickersham, A J; Wu, Yue; He, Fan; Ma, Lin

    2015-03-20

    This work reports the measurements of 3D flame topography using tomographic chemiluminescence and its validation by direct comparison against planar Mie scattering measurements. Tomographic measurements of the 3D topography of various well-controlled laboratory flames were performed using projections measured by seven cameras, and a simultaneous Mie scattering measurement was performed to measure a 2D cross section of the 3D flame topography. The tomographic measurements were based on chemiluminescence emissions from the flame, and the Mie scattering measurements were based on micrometer-size oil droplets seeded into the flow. The flame topography derived from the 3D tomographic and the Mie scattering measurement was then directly compared. The results show that the flame topography obtained from tomographic chemiluminescence and the Mie measurement agreed qualitatively (i.e., both methods yielded the same profile of the flame fronts), but a quantitative difference on the order of millimeters was observed between these two methods. These results are expected to be useful for understanding the capabilities and limitations of the 3D tomographic and Mie scattering techniques in combustion diagnostics.

  7. Aerodynamic lift effect on satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R.; Cleland, J. G.; Devries, L. L.

    1975-01-01

    Numerical quadrature is employed to obtain orbit perturbation results from the general perturbation equations. Both aerodynamic lift and drag forces are included in the analysis of the satellite orbit. An exponential atmosphere with and without atmospheric rotation is used. A comparison is made of the perturbations which are caused by atmospheric rotation with those caused by satellite aerodynamic effects. Results indicate that aerodynamic lift effects on the semi-major axis and orbit inclination can be of the same order as the effects of atmosphere rotation depending upon the orientation of the lift vector. The results reveal the importance of including aerodynamic lift effects in orbit perturbation analysis.

  8. Using the Time-Lagged Function of Dual-Aperture Scintillometer Measurements to Obtain the Crosswind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dinther, D.; Hartogensis, O.

    2013-12-01

    In this study the so-called crosswind (U⊥), the wind component perpendicular on a path, is determined from scintillometer measurements. A scintillometer is a device consisting of a transmitter and receiver, typically spaced a few hundred meters to a few kilometers apart. The dual-aperture scintillometer used in this study consists of two transmitters and two receivers installed next to each other. The transmitters emit light with a certain intensity which is refracted by the eddies in the atmosphere. The eddy field in between the transmitters and receivers constantly changes leading to intensity fluctuations of the light at the receivers side, which gives the scintillometer signal. The driving phenomenon of the changing eddy field is wind. The scintillometer path is ~ 100 m and the spacing in between the apertures is ~ 10 cm therefore the eddy field is mainly changed due to U⊥. A scintillometer obtains a path averaged U⊥, which for some applications (e.g. at airports) is an advantage compared to other wind measurement devices. Applying Taylor's frozen turbulence assumption the signals of the two scintillometers should be the same except for a small time shift between the two signals, from which U⊥ can be determined. This time shift can be obtained from the time-lagged-correlation function of the two signals (r12 (τ)). Four methods were used to obtain U⊥; the peak method, the Briggs method, the zero-slope method, and the correlation method. The last one is a new method introduced in this study, which obtains U⊥ by comparing r12 (τ) of a measurement to r12 (τ) of Lawrence et al. (1972) theoretical model. U⊥ values obtained from the scintillometer were validated against sonic anemometer measurements. The best results were obtained by the zero-slope method and the correlation method. The zero-slope method gave the best results for low U⊥ values (< 2 m s-1), while the correlation method gave the best results for high U⊥ values (> 2 m s-1). The

  9. Exploratory study on a statistical method to analyse time resolved data obtained during nanomaterial exposure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, F.; Njiki-Menga, G.-H.; Witschger, O.

    2013-04-01

    Most of the measurement strategies that are suggested at the international level to assess workplace exposure to nanomaterials rely on devices measuring, in real time, airborne particles concentrations (according different metrics). Since none of the instruments to measure aerosols can distinguish a particle of interest to the background aerosol, the statistical analysis of time resolved data requires special attention. So far, very few approaches have been used for statistical analysis in the literature. This ranges from simple qualitative analysis of graphs to the implementation of more complex statistical models. To date, there is still no consensus on a particular approach and the current period is always looking for an appropriate and robust method. In this context, this exploratory study investigates a statistical method to analyse time resolved data based on a Bayesian probabilistic approach. To investigate and illustrate the use of the this statistical method, particle number concentration data from a workplace study that investigated the potential for exposure via inhalation from cleanout operations by sandpapering of a reactor producing nanocomposite thin films have been used. In this workplace study, the background issue has been addressed through the near-field and far-field approaches and several size integrated and time resolved devices have been used. The analysis of the results presented here focuses only on data obtained with two handheld condensation particle counters. While one was measuring at the source of the released particles, the other one was measuring in parallel far-field. The Bayesian probabilistic approach allows a probabilistic modelling of data series, and the observed task is modelled in the form of probability distributions. The probability distributions issuing from time resolved data obtained at the source can be compared with the probability distributions issuing from the time resolved data obtained far-field, leading in a

  10. From Agglomerates of Spheres to Irregularly Shaped Particles: Determination of Dynamic Shape Factors from Measurements of Mobility and Vacuum Aerodynamic Diameters

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Cai, Yong; Imre, Dan G.

    2006-03-01

    With the advert of aerosol instrumentation it has become possible to simultaneously measure individual particle mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameters. For spherical particles these two diameters yield individual particle density. In contrast, assigning a physical meaning to the mobility or aerodynamic diameter of aspherical particles is not straightforward. This paper presents an experimental exploration of the effect of particle shape on the relationship between mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameters. We make measurements on systems of three types: 1) Agglomerates of spheres, for which the density and the volume are known; 2) Ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, succinic acid and lauric acid irregularly shaped particles of known density; and 3) Internally mixed particles, containing organics and ammonium sulfate, of unknown density and shape. For agglomerates of spheres we observed alignment effects in the DMA and report the first measurements of the dynamic shape factors (DSFs) in free molecular regime. We present here the first experimental determination of the DSF of ammonium sulfate particles. We find for ammonium sulfate particles a DSF that increases from 1.03 to 1.07 as particle mobility diameter increases from 160 nm to 500 nm. Three types of NaC1 particles were generated and characterized: nearly spherical particles with DSF of ~1.02; cubic with DSF that increases from 1.065 to 1.17 as particle mobility diameter increases from 200 nm to 900 nm; and compact agglomerates with DSF 1.3-1.4. Organic particles were found very nearly spherical. The data suggest that particles composed of binary mixtures of ammonium sulfate and succinic acid have lower dynamic shape factors than pure ammonium sulfate particles. However, for internally mixed ammonium sulfate and lauric acid particles we cannot distinguish between nearly spherical particles with low density and particles with DSF of 1.17.

  11. Comparison of Anterior Segment Measurements Obtained by Aladdin Optical Biometer and Sirius Corneal Topography

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Onur; Baysal, Zeki; Özcan, Serkan; İnan, Sibel; İnan, Ümit Übeyt

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the agreement of anterior segment parameter measurements derived from Aladdin optical biometer using optical low coherence interferometer and Sirius corneal topography using combined Scheimpflug-Placido disk. Materials and Methods: Data obtained using the Aladdin and Sirius systems from 110 eyes of 59 subjects who had no health problems other than refractive errors were retrospectively evaluated. Anterior chamber depth (ACD), flat (K1) and steep (K2) keratometry readings, and white-to-white distance (WTW) measurements taken with both devices were noted. Results: The mean age of the patients was 47.31±18.57 years (range, 25 to 79 years). Mean ACD was 3.35±0.4 mm using Aladdin and 3.42±0.44 mm using Sirius. Mean difference in ACD was 0.075 mm greater with Sirius than Aladdin (p<0.001). K1 measurement obtained by Aladdin was an average of 0.409 D higher (p<0.001). No statistically significant differences were detected between the two devices in respect to K2 and WTW measurements (p=0.18, p=0.85 respectively). Pearson correlation analysis showed high correlation between the two devices for all measurements (r=0.985, 0.895, 0.961 and 0.766 for ACD, K1, K2 and WTW respectively; p<0.001). Conclusion: Anterior segment parameters obtained by Aladdin optical biometer and Sirius anterior segment analysis system correlated well with each other and measurement differences between the devices were clinically negligible except for K1 values. PMID:28050321

  12. An Optimal Estimation Method to Obtain Surface Layer Turbulent Fluxes from Profile Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D.

    2015-12-01

    In the absence of direct turbulence measurements, the turbulence characteristics of the atmospheric surface layer are often derived from measurements of the surface layer mean properties based on Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST). This approach requires two levels of the ensemble mean wind, temperature, and water vapor, from which the fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, and water vapor can be obtained. When only one measurement level is available, the roughness heights and the assumed properties of the corresponding variables at the respective roughness heights are used. In practice, the temporal mean with large number of samples are used in place of the ensemble mean. However, in many situations the samples of data are taken from multiple levels. It is thus desirable to derive the boundary layer flux properties using all measurements. In this study, we used an optimal estimation approach to derive surface layer properties based on all available measurements. This approach assumes that the samples are taken from a population whose ensemble mean profile follows the MOST. An optimized estimate is obtained when the results yield a minimum cost function defined as a weighted summation of all error variance at each sample altitude. The weights are based one sample data variance and the altitude of the measurements. This method was applied to measurements in the marine atmospheric surface layer from a small boat using radiosonde on a tethered balloon where temperature and relative humidity profiles in the lowest 50 m were made repeatedly in about 30 minutes. We will present the resultant fluxes and the derived MOST mean profiles using different sets of measurements. The advantage of this method over the 'traditional' methods will be illustrated. Some limitations of this optimization method will also be discussed. Its application to quantify the effects of marine surface layer environment on radar and communication signal propagation will be shown as well.

  13. Comparison between body fat measurements obtained by portable ultrasound and caliper in young adults.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, L; Neves, E B; Ripka, W L; Romaneli, E F R

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare and correlate the Portable Ultra Sound (US) measuring technique to the skinfold measuring technique (SF) to estimate body fat percentage (%F) in young adults. Sixty military were evaluated, all males, divided in two groups: Group 1 (normal) composed by 30 military with Body Mass Index (BMI) until 24.99 kg/m(2) and Group 2 (overweight) composed by 30 military with BMI > 25 kg/m(2). Weight, height, skinfolds and ultrasound were measured in 9 points (triceps, subscapular, biceps, chest, medium axillary, abdominal, suprailiac, thigh and calf). Body fat average values obtained by skinfold thickness and ultrasound measurements were 13.25 ± 6.32 % and 12.73 ± 5.95 % respectively. Despite significant differences in measurements of each anatomical site, it was possible to verify that the total final body fat percentage calculated by both techniques did not present significant differences and that overweight group presented greater similarity between the values obtained using caliper and ultrasound equipment.

  14. Ram-wake measurements obtained from the ionospheric sounding rocket MAIMIK

    SciTech Connect

    Svenes, K.R.; Troim, J.; Maehlum, B.N.; Friedrich, M.; Torkar, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    Results of plasma measurements from the ionospheric sounding rocket MAIMIK are reported. Data obtained by high-resolution plasma probes show distinct classical wake signatures during the entire flight. That is, the electron temperature was enhanced behind the rocket in a region where both the electron and ion density were well below the ambient values. In addition, electron temperature enhancements were also detected in the ram (forward) direction on the downleg. The measurements are presented and discussed in relation to the prevailing ionospheric conditions.

  15. Measurements of Aerodynamic Heat Transfer and Boundary-Layer Transition on a 10 deg Cone in Free Flight at Supersonic Mach Numbers up to 5.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Charles B.; Lee, Dorothy B.

    1961-01-01

    Measurements of aerodynamic heat transfer have been made at six stations on the 40-inch-long 10 deg. total-angle conical nose of a rocket- propelled model which was flight tested at Mach numbers up to 5.9. are presented for a range of local Mach number just outside the bound- ary layer on the cone from 1.57 to 5.50, and a range of local Reynolds number from 6.6 x 10(exp 6) to 55.2 x 10(exp 6) based on length from the nose tip.

  16. Visualization of through-plane blood flow measurements obtained from phase-contrast MRI.

    PubMed

    Thunberg, Per; Kähäri, Anders

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a visualization method for concurrent observation of both velocity and magnitude data obtained from through-plane velocity measurements using phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. Magnitude and velocity images were combined using an opacity transfer function (OTF) where the opacity was a function of a velocity range defined by the velocity encoding (v (enc)) parameter. Measured velocities were color-coded according to a predefined color scale and then combined into one image with the gray-scale magnitude image according to the OTF. In the combined images, simultaneous information of velocity and anatomy was presented. The proposed visualization method facilitated the understanding of how the measured blood flow was related to the underlying anatomy. Results are shown where the method is used to visualize blood flow measurements in the ascending aorta and the aortic valve. Adjustments of the OTF render possible identification of the peak velocities and their localization. Forward and backward blood flow is easily shown when applying appropriate OTF and color-coding. An advantage when using the proposed method is the ability of developing standardized protocol settings since the velocity information is quantitative and not relative as is the case for data obtained from the magnitude images. The intended application of the visualization method is the analysis of common flow studies used in the diagnosis of different cardiovascular diseases.

  17. A comparison of systolic blood pressure measurement obtained using a pulse oximeter, and direct systolic pressure measurement in anesthetized sows.

    PubMed Central

    Caulkett, N A; Duke, T; Bailey, J V

    1994-01-01

    Systolic blood pressure measurement obtained with a pulse oximeter has been compared to values obtained by other indirect methods in man. Direct pressure measurement is subject to less error than indirect techniques. This study was designed to compare systolic pressure values obtained using a pulse oximeter, with values obtained by direct arterial pressure measurement. The pulse oximeter waveform was used as an indication of perfusion. A blood pressure cuff was applied proximal to the pulse oximeter probe. The cuff was inflated until the oximeter waveform disappeared, this value was recorded as the systolic pressure at the disappearance of the waveform (SPD). The cuff was inflated to a pressure > 200 mmHg, then gradually deflated until the waveform reappeared, this value was recorded as the systolic pressure at reappearance of the waveform (SPR). The average of the two values, SPD and SPR, was calculated and recorded as SPA. The study was performed in sows (n = 21) undergoing cesarean section under epidural anesthesia and IV sedation. A total of 280 measurements were made of SPD, SPR and SPA. Regression analysis of SPA and direct measurement revealed a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.81. Calculation of mean difference (bias) and standard deviation of the bias (precision) for direct pressure--SPA revealed a value of 1.3 +/- 12.1. When compared with direct measurement, the correlation of this technique was similar to that recorded for other indirect techniques used in small animals. This indicates that this technique would be useful for following systolic pressure trends.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8004540

  18. Comparison of ozone profiles obtained with NIES DIAL and SAGE II measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakane, Hideaki; Sasano, Yasuhiro; Hayashida-Amano, Sachiko; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Matsui, Ichiro; Minato, Atsushi; Mccormick, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    Ozone profiles obtained with the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) (Tsukuba, Japan) were compared with data provided by the satellite sensor SAGE II. The SAGE II data were selected based on criteria of spatial and temporal differences between the DIAL and the SAGE II measurements: five degrees in latitude and 15 degrees in longitude, within a latitudinal band from 31 deg to 41 deg N, and within one, three and five days after or before the DIAL measurements. Results show very good agreement for the individual and the zonal-mean profiles. The average mean difference between the DIAL and the SAGE II measurements over the altitudes 15-50 km was about 10 percent.

  19. Aerodynamics Via Acoustics: Application of Acoustic Formulas for Aerodynamic Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    Prediction of aerodynamic loads on bodies in arbitrary motion is considered from an acoustic point of view, i.e., in a frame of reference fixed in the undisturbed medium. An inhomogeneous wave equation which governs the disturbance pressure is constructed and solved formally using generalized function theory. When the observer is located on the moving body surface there results a singular linear integral equation for surface pressure. Two different methods for obtaining such equations are discussed. Both steady and unsteady aerodynamic calculations are considered. Two examples are presented, the more important being an application to propeller aerodynamics. Of particular interest for numerical applications is the analytical behavior of the kernel functions in the various integral equations.

  20. Tropospheric Wind Measurements Obtained with the Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds (GLOW): Validation and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds (GLOW) is a mobile Doppler lidar system which uses direct detection Doppler lidar techniques to measure wind profiles from the surface into the lower stratosphere. GLOW is intended to be used as a field deployable system for studying atmospheric dynamics and transport and can also serve as a testbed to evaluate candidate technologies developed for use in future spaceborne systems. In September of 2000 GLOW participated in a three week intercomparison experiment at the GroundWinds facility in North Glen, NE. More than 50 hours of line-of-sight wind profile data was obtained in a wide variety of conditions including both day and night operation. Typical clear air lidar wind profiles extended to altitudes of 20 km with a 1 Ian vertical resolution and I minute averaging. A description of the mobile system is presented along with the examples of lidar wind profiles obtained with the Goddard system during the New Hampshire experiment.

  1. Tropospheric Wind Measurements Obtained with the Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds (GLOW): Validation and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Chen, Huai-Lin; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds (GLOW) is a mobile Doppler lidar system which uses direct detection Doppler lidar techniques to measure wind profiles from the surface into the lower stratosphere. GLOW is intended to be used as a field deployable system for studying atmospheric dynamics and transport and can also serve as a testbed to evaluate candidate technologies developed for use in future spaceborne systems. In September of 2000 GLOW participated in a three week intercomparison experiment at the GroundWinds facility in North Glen, NH. More than 50 hours of line-of-sight wind profile data were obtained in a wide variety of conditions including both day and night operation. Typical clear air lidar wind profiles extended to altitudes of 20 kin with a 1 km vertical resolution and 1 minute averaging. A description of the mobile system is presented along with the examples of lidar wind profiles obtained with the Goddard system during the New Hampshire experiment.

  2. Entanglement in bipartite pure states of an interacting boson gas obtained by local projective measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Paraan, Francis N. C.; Korepin, Vladimir E.; Molina-Vilaplana, Javier; Bose, Sougato

    2011-09-15

    We quantify the extractable entanglement of excited states of a Lieb-Liniger gas that are obtained from coarse-grained measurements on the ground state in which the boson number in one of two complementary contiguous partitions of the gas is determined. Numerically exact results obtained from the coordinate Bethe ansatz show that the von Neumann entropy of the resulting bipartite pure state increases monotonically with the strength of repulsive interactions and saturates to the impenetrable-boson limiting value. We also present evidence indicating that the largest amount of entanglement can be extracted from the most probable projected state having half the number of bosons in a given partition. Our study points to a fundamental difference between the nature of the entanglement in free-bosonic and free-fermionic systems, with the entanglement in the former being zero after projection, while that in the latter (corresponding to the impenetrable-boson limit) being nonzero.

  3. Direct Detection Doppler Lidar Wind Measurements Obtained During the 2002 International H2O Project (IHOP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce; Li, Steven; Chen, Huai-Lin; Comer, Joseph; Mathur, Savyasachee; Bobler, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    The Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds (GLOW) is a mobile Doppler lidar system that uses direct detection techniques for profiling winds in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. In May and June of 2002 GLOW was deployed to the Southern Great Plains of the US to participate in the International H2O Project (IHOP). GLOW was located at the Homestead profiling site in the Oklahoma panhandle about 15 km east of the SPOL radar. Several other Goddard lidars, the Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) and HARLIE, as well as radars and passive instruments were permanently operated from the Homestead site during the IHOP campaign providing a unique cluster of observations. During the IHOP observation period (May 14, 2002 to June 25, 2002) over 240 hours of wind profile measurements were obtained with GLOW. In this paper we will describe the GLOW instrument as it was configured for the IHOP campaign and we will present examples of wind profiles obtained.

  4. Range difference multilateration for obtaining precision geodetic and trajectory measurements. [by radio interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escobal, P. R.; Ong, K. M.; Von Roos, O. H.

    1975-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of a new multilateration technique suitable for precision geodesy and orbit determination applications are examined. The multilateration technique considered herein makes use of the differential time of arrival of signals at an ensemble of ground stations from a spacecraft or aircraft as the fundamental data type. It is demonstrated that simultaneous measurements give rise to a system of equations which upon solution permits the determination of the three-dimensional vehicle coordinates plus the three-dimensional coordinates of the station net relative to an arbitrarily adopted origin (which may be taken to be one of the stations). A solution to these equations can be obtained without any a priori knowledge of the locations of the stations and vehicle. The necessary conditions for obtaining all of these coordinates in the same solution are discussed, and it is indicated that at least five stations are required in the station ensemble.

  5. Concordance among Measurements Obtained by Three Pulse Oximeters Currently Used by Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    De La Rosa Hormiga, Milagros; MaríA Ramal LóPez, Josefa; DéNiz Rivero, Yasmina; Sandra Marrero Morales, MaríA

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Oxygen saturation is considered as the 5th vital sign. Presently, there exist fixed and wireless pulse oximeters, being the latter most widely used in the last years. Some of them have no possibility of calibration. This situation leads the health staff to adopt therapeutic attitudes which can be wrong. Therefore, it is extremely important to know if these wireless oximeters show a right concordance as regards measurements, since it is of great interest in daily clinical practice. Objective: To evaluate concordance among measurements obtained by three different pulse oximeters currently used by health professionals. Materials and Methods: This is an observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study related to the concordance of the results obtained in measurements collected by three different pulse oximeters (one monitor and two wireless oximeters) which are available and in use in this hospital unit. The sample size calculation was performed for a concordance above 0.81 and an estimation error which did not exceed 0.20. The intraclass correlation index (ICI) was used to establish the concordance whereas the Landis-Koch criteria were used to interpret the results. Systematic errors were analyzed using the Bland-Altman plot. Results: The overall concordance among the three pulse oximeters analyzed resulted in 0.88, a value considered as “good” according to the Landis-Koch criteria. Conclusion: The results obtained show that in daily clinical practice both wireless pulse oximeters analyzed can be used with a certain reliability, taking into account the limitations of this research. PMID:25302228

  6. The aerodynamics of small Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics of wing model gliders and bird wings in particular are discussed. Wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamics of small Reynolds numbers are enumerated. Airfoil behavior in the critical transition from laminar to turbulent boundary layer, which is more important to bird wing models than to large airplanes, was observed. Experimental results are provided, and an artificial bird wing is described.

  7. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Feathered Dinosaur Measured Using Physical Models. Effects of Form on Static Stability and Control Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Dennis; Cardona, Griselda; Guenther-Gleason, Eric; Huynh, Tony; Kwong, Austin; Marks, Dylan; Ray, Neil; Tisbe, Adrian; Tse, Kyle; Koehl, Mimi

    2014-01-01

    We report the effects of posture and morphology on the static aerodynamic stability and control effectiveness of physical models based on the feathered dinosaur, Microraptor gui, from the Cretaceous of China. Postures had similar lift and drag coefficients and were broadly similar when simplified metrics of gliding were considered, but they exhibited different stability characteristics depending on the position of the legs and the presence of feathers on the legs and the tail. Both stability and the function of appendages in generating maneuvering forces and torques changed as the glide angle or angle of attack were changed. These are significant because they represent an aerial environment that may have shifted during the evolution of directed aerial descent and other aerial behaviors. Certain movements were particularly effective (symmetric movements of the wings and tail in pitch, asymmetric wing movements, some tail movements). Other appendages altered their function from creating yaws at high angle of attack to rolls at low angle of attack, or reversed their function entirely. While M. gui lived after Archaeopteryx and likely represents a side experiment with feathered morphology, the general patterns of stability and control effectiveness suggested from the manipulations of forelimb, hindlimb and tail morphology here may help understand the evolution of flight control aerodynamics in vertebrates. Though these results rest on a single specimen, as further fossils with different morphologies are tested, the findings here could be applied in a phylogenetic context to reveal biomechanical constraints on extinct flyers arising from the need to maneuver. PMID:24454820

  8. Spectral induced polarization of disseminated electronic conductors: laboratory data obtained through time domain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurin, G.; Ilyin, Yu.; Tarasov, A.; Titov, K.

    2012-04-01

    With a time domain (TD) technique, we measured Spectral Induced Polarization responses of 19 models of ore. The models were mixtures of calibrated sand (0.2 - 0.3 mm) with calibrated electron-conductive grains (average radii: 0.045, 0.055, 0.13, 0.20, 0.38 and 0.50 mm). The grains represent a mixture of pyrrhotite (30 %), pyrite (30 %), magnetite (30 %) and chalcopyrite (10 %). In the models the grain concentration varied from 0.6 to 30 % by volume. We measured IP decay with a conventional TD measuring setup and a lab low-current transmitter in the time range from 0.3 ms to 64 s. The IP decays obtained with various current wavelength forms were inverted on the basis of the Debye decomposition, which allowed obtaining the relaxation time distribution. The following results were obtained: The total chargeability, m, was found to be independent of the grain size; it is related to the grain fraction, χ, according to the power law, m=6.28.10-2.χ0.78(m is dimensionless, and χ is in per cents; R2=0.98); The grain size, r, was found to be closely related to the mean IP relaxation time, τ, according to the square law, r2=10-5.τ (r is in meters, and τ is in seconds; R2=0.74); the square law corresponds to the diffusion kinetics, but contains the unrealistically large value of the diffusion coefficient; The maximum values of the relaxation time distributions, Zmax, was found to be closely related to the specific surface of the grains, Sv, according to the power law, Zmax=1.82 10-2 Sv0.65 (Zmax is dimensionless, and Sv is in cm-1; R2=0.94); The relaxation time distribution for disseminated ores can be safely recovered on the basis of TD measurements with relatively short pulse lengths (or using frequency domain measurements with relatively high frequency values).

  9. Corneal Topographic and Aberrometric Measurements Obtained with a Multidiagnostic Device in Healthy Eyes: Intrasession Repeatability

    PubMed Central

    López-Navarro, Alberto; Cabezos, Inmaculada; de Fez, Dolores; Caballero, María T.; Camps, Vicent J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the intrasession repeatability of corneal curvature, eccentricity, and aberrometric measurements obtained with a multidiagnostic device in healthy eyes. Methods. This study enrolled 107 eyes of 107 patients ranging in age from 23 to 65 years. All of them underwent a complete anterior segment examination with the VX120 system (Visionix-Luneau Technologies, Chartres, France). Three consecutive measurements were obtained. The within-subject standard deviation (Sw), intrasubject precision (1.96 × Sw), and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated. Results. All Sw for corneal power measurements were below 0.26 D, with ICC above 0.982. The Sw for corneal astigmatism at different areas (3, 5, and 7 mm) was below 0.21 D, with ICC above 0.913. Concerning the axis of astigmatism, its Sw was below 11.27°, with ICC above 0.975. The Sw and ICC for corneal eccentricity were 0.067 and 0.957, respectively. The Sw and ICC for high-order aberration root mean square (RMS) were 0.048 µm and 0.901, respectively. For 3rd- and 4th-order aberrometric parameters, all Sw were below 0.037 µm and all ICC were higher than 0.84, except for quadrafoil RMS (ICC: 0.689). Conclusions. The multidiagnostic device evaluated is able to provide consistent measurements of corneal power, eccentricity, and third- and fourth-order aberrations in healthy eyes. PMID:28133542

  10. Classical Aerodynamic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A collection of papers on modern theoretical aerodynamics is presented. Included are theories of incompressible potential flow and research on the aerodynamic forces on wing and wing sections of aircraft and on airship hulls.

  11. Aerodynamics at NASA JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicker, Darby

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing aerodynamics at NASA Johnson Space Center is shown. The topics include: 1) Personal Background; 2) Aerodynamic Tools; 3) The Overset Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Process; and 4) Recent Applicatoins.

  12. COMPARISON OF RADIOGRAPHIC MEASUREMENTS OBTAINED WITH CONVENTIONAL AND INDIRECT DIGITAL IMAGING DURING ENDODONTIC TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Schmitd, Ligia Buloto; Lima, Tatiana de Castro; Chinellato, Luiz Eduardo Montenegro; Bramante, Clóvis Monteiro; Garcia, Roberto Brandão; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes; Bernardineli, Norberti

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the quality of indirect digitized radiographic images taken during endodontic procedures and to compare the measurements recorded with this technique to those obtained from conventional radiographs. Two-hundred conventional periapical radiographs taken at the undergraduate Endodontics Clinic of the Dental School of Bauru were digitized. The conventional and indirect digitized images were compared by three examiners as to the quality and accuracy of the measurements recorded during endodontic treatment, in canal length determination, gutta-percha adaptation, lateral condensation and final obturation. The conventional radiographs were observed on a film viewer, surrounded by a dark card, and measured with magnifying glass and a millimeter ruler; the indirect digitized images were evaluated on the Digora® for Windows software, with free utilization of the bright/contrast tool. Unlike the conventional radiographic images, all indirect digitized images were considered as having a high quality. The distance between the filling material and the root apex was 0.117 mm larger, on average, for the Digora® system (p<0.01). The measurements achieved by the investigated radiographic methods were clinically similar and they are thus equivalent. Changes in brightness and contrast of the images using Digora® software improved the diagnosis. PMID:19089211

  13. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J.; Hessenius, Kristin A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Hicks, Gary; Richardson, Pamela F.; Unger, George; Neumann, Benjamin; Moss, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The annual accomplishments is reviewed for the Aerodynamics Division during FY 1991. The program includes both fundamental and applied research directed at the full spectrum of aerospace vehicles, from rotorcraft to planetary entry probes. A comprehensive review is presented of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications; CFD validation; transition and turbulence physics; numerical aerodynamic simulation; test techniques and instrumentation; configuration aerodynamics; aeroacoustics; aerothermodynamics; hypersonics; subsonics; fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  14. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Schairer, Edward; Hicks, Gary; Wander, Stephen; Blankson, Isiaiah; Rose, Raymond; Olson, Lawrence; Unger, George

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a comprehensive review of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation, transition and turbulence physics, numerical aerodynamic simulation, drag reduction, test techniques and instrumentation, configuration aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, aerothermodynamics, hypersonics, subsonic transport/commuter aviation, fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  15. A method for obtaining distributed surface flux measurements in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, M. H.; Pardyjak, E.; Nadeau, D. F.; Barrenetxea, G.; Brutsaert, W. H.; Parlange, M. B.

    2011-12-01

    Sonic anemometers and gas analyzers can be used to measure fluxes of momentum, heat, and moisture over flat terrain, and with the proper corrections, over sloping terrain as well. While this method of obtaining fluxes is currently the most accurate available, the instruments themselves are costly, making installation of many stations impossible for most campaign budgets. Small, commercial automatic weather stations (Sensorscope) are available at a fraction of the cost of sonic anemometers or gas analyzers. Sensorscope stations use slow-response instruments to measure standard meteorological variables, including wind speed and direction, air temperature, humidity, surface skin temperature, and incoming solar radiation. The method presented here makes use of one sonic anemometer and one gas analyzer along with a dozen Sensorscope stations installed throughout the Val Ferret catchment in southern Switzerland in the summers of 2009, 2010 and 2011. Daytime fluxes are calculated using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory in conjunction with the surface energy balance at each Sensorscope station as well as at the location of the sonic anemometer and gas analyzer, where a suite of additional slow-response instruments were co-located. Corrections related to slope angle were made for wind speeds and incoming shortwave radiation measured by the horizontally-mounted cup anemometers and incoming solar radiation sensors respectively. A temperature correction was also applied to account for daytime heating inside the radiation shield on the slow-response temperature/humidity sensors. With these corrections, we find a correlation coefficient of 0.77 between u* derived using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory and that of the sonic anemometer. Calculated versus measured heat fluxes also compare well and local patterns of latent heat flux and measured surface soil moisture are correlated.

  16. The Aerodynamic Plane Table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    This report gives the description and the use of a specially designed aerodynamic plane table. For the accurate and expeditious geometrical measurement of models in an aerodynamic laboratory, and for miscellaneous truing operations, there is frequent need for a specially equipped plan table. For example, one may have to measure truly to 0.001 inch the offsets of an airfoil at many parts of its surface. Or the offsets of a strut, airship hull, or other carefully formed figure may require exact calipering. Again, a complete airplane model may have to be adjusted for correct incidence at all parts of its surfaces or verified in those parts for conformance to specifications. Such work, if but occasional, may be done on a planing or milling machine; but if frequent, justifies the provision of a special table. For this reason it was found desirable in 1918 to make the table described in this report and to equip it with such gauges and measures as the work should require.

  17. Morphological and Functional Measurements of the Heart Obtained by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Robson; Fernandes, Juliano Lara; Andrade, Solange Souza; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Lima, Kênio Costa; Maciel, Álvaro Campos Cavalcanti; Maciel, Fernanda Cunha; Alves, Geraldo Souza Pinho; Coelho, Otávio Rizzi; Diniz, Rosiane Viana Zuza

    2013-01-01

    Background Still today, measurements used as a reference in the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging have been obtained mainly from studies carried out in North-American and European populations. Objective To obtain measurements of the diastolic diameter, systolic diameter, end diastolic volume, end systolic volume, ejection fraction, and myocardial mass of the left and right ventricles in Brazilians. Methods 54 men and 53 women, with mean age of 43.4 ± 13.1 years, asymptomatic, with no cardiomyopathies, have been subjected to the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, using a balanced steady state free precession technique. Results The averages and the standard deviations of the parameters for the left ventricle have been: diastolic diameter =4.8 ± 0.5 cm; systolic diameter = 3.0 ± 0.6 cm; end diastolic volume = 128.4 ± 29.6 mL; end systolic volume = 45.2 ± 16.6 mL; ejection fraction = 65.5 ± 6.3%; mass = 95.2 ± 30.8 g. For the right ventricle, they have been: diastolic diameter = 3.9 ± 1.3 cm; systolic diameter = 2.5 ± 0.5 cm; end diastolic volume = 126.5 ± 30.7 mL; end systolic volume = 53.6 ± 18.4 mL; ejection fraction = 58.3 ± 8.0%, and mass = 26.1 ± 6.1 g. The masses and the volumes were significantly greater in the men, except for the end systolic volume of the left ventricle. The ejection fraction of the right ventricle has been significantly greater in the women. There has been a significant and inverted correlation of the systolic volume of the right volume with the progression of the age. Conclusion This study has described, for the first time, cardiac measurements obtained through the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in Brazilians, asymptomatic, with no cardiomyopathies, showing differences in accordance with gender and age. PMID:23752338

  18. Aerodynamic characteristics of a feathered dinosaur measured using physical models. Effects of form on static stability and control effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Dennis; Cardona, Griselda; Guenther-Gleason, Eric; Huynh, Tony; Kwong, Austin; Marks, Dylan; Ray, Neil; Tisbe, Adrian; Tse, Kyle; Koehl, Mimi

    2014-01-01

    We report the effects of posture and morphology on the static aerodynamic stability and control effectiveness of physical models based on the feathered dinosaur, [Formula: see text]Microraptor gui, from the Cretaceous of China. Postures had similar lift and drag coefficients and were broadly similar when simplified metrics of gliding were considered, but they exhibited different stability characteristics depending on the position of the legs and the presence of feathers on the legs and the tail. Both stability and the function of appendages in generating maneuvering forces and torques changed as the glide angle or angle of attack were changed. These are significant because they represent an aerial environment that may have shifted during the evolution of directed aerial descent and other aerial behaviors. Certain movements were particularly effective (symmetric movements of the wings and tail in pitch, asymmetric wing movements, some tail movements). Other appendages altered their function from creating yaws at high angle of attack to rolls at low angle of attack, or reversed their function entirely. While [Formula: see text]M. gui lived after [Formula: see text]Archaeopteryx and likely represents a side experiment with feathered morphology, the general patterns of stability and control effectiveness suggested from the manipulations of forelimb, hindlimb and tail morphology here may help understand the evolution of flight control aerodynamics in vertebrates. Though these results rest on a single specimen, as further fossils with different morphologies are tested, the findings here could be applied in a phylogenetic context to reveal biomechanical constraints on extinct flyers arising from the need to maneuver.

  19. Intercomparison among tropospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide data obtained by satellite- and ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, K.; Urita, N.; Ohta, E.; Hayashida, S.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Ziemke, J. R.

    2005-12-01

    Rapid economical growth and industrial development in East Asian regions are causing serious air pollution. The influence of such air pollution is not limited to a local scale but reaches an intercontinental or hemispheric scale. Satellite-borne observations can monitor the behaviors of air pollutants in a global scale for long periods with a single instrument. In particular, ozone and nitrogen dioxide in the troposphere have a crucial role in air pollution, and many studies have tried to derive those species. Recently, instrumentations and retrieval techniques have made a lot of progress in measurements of tropospheric constituents. However, tropospheric observations from space need careful validation because of difficulties in detecting signals from the lower atmosphere through the middle atmosphere. In the present study, we intercompare the tropospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide data obtained by satellite- and ground-based measurements in order to validate the satellite measurements. For the validation of tropospheric ozone, we utilize ozonesonde data provided by WOUDC, and three satellite-borne data (Tropospheric Ozone Residual (TOR), Cloud Slicing, and GOME) are intercompared. For nitrogen dioxide, we compare GOME observations with ground-based air monitoring measurements in Japan which are operationally conducted by the Ministry of the Environment Japan. This study demonstrates the validity and potential of those satellite datasets to apply for quantitative analysis of dispersion of air pollutants and their chemical lifetime. Acknowledgments. TOR data is provided by J. Fishman via http://asd-www.larc.nasa.gov/TOR/data.html. The ground observation data of nitrogen dioxide over Japan is provided by National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) under the collaboration study with NIES and Nara Women's University.

  20. The influence of radioactive decay on actinide magnetic susceptibility measurements obtained using the Evans method.

    PubMed

    Autillo, Matthieu; Kaden, Peter; Geist, Andreas; Guerin, Laetitia; Moisy, Philippe; Berthon, Claude

    2014-05-14

    In order to explain the higher magnetic susceptibility of some aquo actinide ions than predicted by Hund's rules, the molar magnetic susceptibilities of two americium isotopes ((241)Am and (243)Am) were measured using the Evans method. The results obtained show a growing change in the magnetic susceptibility with α and also a β(-) activity increase in solution. β(-) particle effects appear to be stronger than radicals formed by α particles on the experimental values. The temperature dependence of Am(iii) magnetic susceptibility has been observed but from experiments carried out here, it appears to be difficult to prove whether this effect arises from radicals or β(-). Finally, magnetic susceptibilities of americium recorded in different media (HClO4, HCl, and HNO3) have been compared to alpha and beta emissions' impact.

  1. Impact of lens distortions on strain measurements obtained with 2D digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lava, P.; Van Paepegem, W.; Coppieters, S.; De Baere, I.; Wang, Y.; Debruyne, D.

    2013-05-01

    The determination of strain fields based on displacements obtained via digital image correlation (DIC) at the micro-strain level (≤1000 μm/m) is still a cumbersome task. In particular when high-strain gradients are involved, e.g. in composite materials with multidirectional fibre reinforcement, uncertainties in the experimental setup and errors in the derivation of the displacement fields can substantially hamper the strain identification process. In this contribution, the aim is to investigate the impact of lens distortions on strain measurements. To this purpose, we first perform pure rigid body motion experiments, revealing the importance of precise correction of lens distortions. Next, a uni-axial tensile test on a textile composite with spatially varying high strain gradients is performed, resulting in very accurately determined strains along the fibers of the material.

  2. Parachute Aerodynamics From Video Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenenberger, Mark; Queen, Eric M.; Cruz, Juan R.

    2005-01-01

    A new data analysis technique for the identification of static and dynamic aerodynamic stability coefficients from wind tunnel test video data is presented. This new technique was applied to video data obtained during a parachute wind tunnel test program conducted in support of the Mars Exploration Rover Mission. Total angle-of-attack data obtained from video images were used to determine the static pitching moment curve of the parachute. During the original wind tunnel test program the static pitching moment curve had been determined by forcing the parachute to a specific total angle-of -attack and measuring the forces generated. It is shown with the new technique that this parachute, when free to rotate, trims at an angle-of-attack two degrees lower than was measured during the forced-angle tests. An attempt was also made to extract pitch damping information from the video data. Results suggest that the parachute is dynamically unstable at the static trim point and tends to become dynamically stable away from the trim point. These trends are in agreement with limit-cycle-like behavior observed in the video. However, the chaotic motion of the parachute produced results with large uncertainty bands.

  3. Tree architecture and forest canopy structure obtained from terrestrial LiDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Reiner; Bittner, Sebastian; Ritter, Daniel; Priesack, Eckart

    2013-04-01

    The modelling of the water transfer in vegetation on a small scale is important when the interaction of single plants and the competition of species are in focus of interest. Explicit geometrical functional-structural models that simulate the water flow in the single plant components such as roots, stem, and branches have been developed recently. These models need an explicit geometrical model of the plant hydrology, more precisely the possible pathway of the xylem and phloem water flow. Roots, stem, and branches are represented by connected porous cylinder elements that are divided into the inner heartwood cylinders surrounded by xylem and phloem. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has been successfully applied to assess the structure of the aboveground vegetation in situ in the last years. Based on the technique of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) this method provides a set of three dimensional points that are located on the surface of objects such as vegetation. A further data processing of this three dimensional point cloud (typically consistent of some million points) enables to obtain structural properties like the spatial leaf distribution or large scale characteristics such as the stand height or plant density. Whereas the resolution and detection rate of the laser scanners have increased in the last years, there is still a need for a data handling especially in the field of ecology. We present the results of a skeleton extraction algorithm that is able to obtain the position and size of branch and stem cylinder elements from a three-dimensional point cloud obtained by TLS field measurements. No manual data processing is necessary to apply the algorithm allowing the analysis of a high number of individual plants. The resulting hydraulic architecture determines the possible pathway of water through the stem and the branches. It can consist of several thousands of connected cylinders depending on the plants that are observed. Examples are given and discussed

  4. Accuracy of cyclosporin measurements made in capillary blood samples obtained by skin puncture.

    PubMed

    Merton, G; Jones, K; Lee, M; Johnston, A; Holt, D W

    2000-10-01

    International consensus guidelines suggest that cyclosporin should be measured in whole blood. In some instances it may be advantageous to collect capillary blood, by a finger or ear prick method. However, drug concentrations in skin-puncture blood may not necessarily correlate with those measured in venous blood. This study compared cyclosporin concentrations in blood collected from the fingertip or earlobe with blood collected by standard venipuncture. Patient preference for each of the blood collection methods was also assessed. Specimens were obtained from organ transplant patients receiving cyclosporin, using each of the three methods: venipuncture, finger prick, and earlobe prick. The samples were assayed using a specific radioimmunoassay and the results were compared. In the 102 sets of samples collected, the mean difference (+/- standard deviation) in cyclosporin concentration between finger prick and venipuncture and ear prick and venipuncture was 2.6% (+/- 9.5%) and 2.7% (+/- 12.1%), respectively, while the comparable median (IQR) differences were 1.9% (-3.4% to +6.6%) and -1.1% (-2.8% to +7.2%), respectively. A high degree of correlation was observed between finger prick and venipuncture or ear prick and venipuncture or ear prick and finger prick (r2 > 0.86). Of the three methods of blood collection, finger prick was the patients' preferred method (P < 0.01). These data suggest that capillary blood collected by skin puncture is suitable for use in cyclosporin blood monitoring and acceptable to patients.

  5. Southern Hemispheric nitrous oxide measurements obtained during 1987 airborne Antarctic ozone experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podolske, J. R.; Loewenstein, M.; Strahan, S. E.; Chan, K. Roland

    1988-01-01

    The chemical lifetime of N2O is about 150 years, which makes it an excellent dynamical tracer of air motion on the time scale of the ozone depletion event. For these reasons it was chosen to help test whether dynamical theories of ozone loss over Antarctica were plausible, particularly the theory that upwelling ozone-poor air from the troposphere was replacing ozone-rich stratospheric air. The N2O measurements were made with the Airborne Tunable Laser Absorption Spectrometer (ATLAS) aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. The detection technique involves measuring the diffential absorption of the IR laser radiation as it is rapidly scanned over an N2O absorption feature. For the AAOE mission, the instrument was capable of making measurements with a 1 ppb sensitivity, 1 second response time, over an altitude range of 10 to 20 kilometers. The AAOE mission consisted of a series of 12 flights from Punta Arenas (53S) into the polar vortex (approximately 72S) at which time a vertical profile from 65 to 45 km and back was performed. Comparison of the observed profiles inside the vortex with N2O profiles obtained by balloon flights during the austral summer showed that an overall subsidence had occurred during the winter of about 5 to 6 km. Also, over the course of the mission (mid-August to late September), no trend in the N2O vertical profile, either upward or downward, was discernible, eliminating the possibility that upwelling was the cause of the observed ozone decrease.

  6. Tidal harmonics obtained from Dynasonde measurements in the bottom F-Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrea, C.; Bullett, T. W.; Zabotin, N. A.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    It is now well accepted that atmospheric tidal waves have a dramatic influence on thermospheric and ionospheric structure and variability. Considerable effort goes into understanding the characteristics of tidal modes, their interactions with planetary and gravity waves and other tidal modes, as well as their influence on the background state of the thermosphere-ionosphere system. For the altitude interval between roughly 120 and 400 km, this effort is somewhat hindered by the lack of global observations. We propose a new method of determining tidal variability by making use of Dynasonde measurements. The NeXtYZ inversion procedure (a part of the Dynasonde software package) produces altitude profiles of the ionospheric parameters with a vertical resolution typically below 1 km. This, together with the 2 minute cadence of the instrument results in extensive datasets with wide temporal and altitude coverage. Because of the natural ionospheric variability, at any given altitude we have non-uniform sampling over extended time intervals. A Lomb-Scargle implementation is used to mitigate this issue, allowing us to obtain both amplitude and phase information in an equivalent manner at all altitudes and locations. In this poster, we provide altitude profiles of the first 3 diurnal harmonics derived from dynasonde measurements. The data analyzed include the truly vertical electron density profiles, the ionospheric X (East-West) "tilt" measurement and the derived zonal plasma density gradient. Both the tilt and the gradient can be shown to be sensitive tracers of atmospheric waves, in some cases more so than the raw electron density. We use data from Wallops Island, VA and San Juan, PR for May and September 2013, thus capturing seasonal, latitudinal and altitude variations of tidal amplitude and phase. This can be used for comparisons with existing theoretical work and also to test propagation of tidal waves in coupled ionosphere-thermosphere models.

  7. Reliability of measurements of hip abduction strength obtained with a hand-held dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Ieiri, Akira; Tushima, Eiki; Ishida, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Masahiro; Kanno, Taiki; Masuda, Takeshi

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate intrarater and interrater reliability when measuring hip abductor strength in the supine position using a hand-held dynamometer (HHD) (Study 1), and to elucidate the relationships between measured values and examiners' physical characteristics (Study 2). Three healthy examiners (1 female, 24 y.o. and 2 males 23 and 27 y.o) and 12 subjects (6 females, 24.5 ± 2.8 years and 6 males, 27.7 ± 3.5 years) participated in Study 1, and 20 healthy examiners (7 females, 22.3 ± 1.3 years and 13 males, 29.4 ± 8.2 years) and 2 subjects (1 female, 24 y.o. and 1 male 27 y.o) participated in Study 2. All healthy examiners were hospital employees. Hip abductor strength was measured by HHD with hand fixation and with belt fixation, and examiner age, sex, height, weight, BMI, and dominant hand grip strength were evaluated. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (1,1), a measure of intrarater reliability, was 0.89-0.95 with hand fixation and 0.96-0.97 with belt fixation. ICC (2,1), a measure of interrater reliability, was 0.76-0.79 and 0.90-0.93, respectively. In subjects with high muscle strength (the examiner's hand was moved), the examiner's dominant hand grip strength affected muscle strength values with hand fixation (standardized partial regression coefficient = 0.78, determination coefficient R(2 )= 0.61, p < 0.01). In subjects with low muscle strength (the examiner's hand was not moved), no variables had effect. When the muscle strength of the subject is weak, both methods can be used. When the muscle strength of the subject is strong, it is necessary to adjust the value obtained by the examiner's dominant hand grip strength in the hand fixation method.

  8. Comparison of Lagrangian and Steady State Box Model Runs With Measurement Data Obtained During GABRIEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickler, A.; Fischer, H.; Gurk, C.; Bozem, H.; Schiller, C.; Parchatka, U.; Martinez-Harder, M.; Kubistin, D.; Harder, H.; Williams, J.; Königstedt, R.; Ganzeveld, L.; Lelieveld, J.

    2006-12-01

    Results of a comparison of different Lagrangian and steady state box model runs with measurement data obtained during the GABRIEL campaign over the tropical rainforest in October 2005 (Suriname) are presented and discussed. Lagrangian modelling of boundary layer (BL) CO (0-1 km a.s.l.) constrained by measured O3, methanol, acetone, isoprene, the sum of methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone, NO, HCHO, H2O2, organic peroxide, OH, HO2, H2O and radiation was used to derive the horizontal gradient (~ 8 pptv/km) of this compound from the ocean to the rainforest (east to west). It is significantly smaller than those derived from the measurements (16-48 pptv/km), indicating that photochemical production from organic precursors alone cannot explain the observed strong gradient. The results were cross- checked with a steady state and a Lagrangian box model study for HCHO. It appears that HCHO is significantly overestimated by the models, which include dry deposition, but not exchange with the free troposphere (FT). Sensitivity runs show that only an unlikely combination of several modified parameters (OH minus 25%, NO minus 5 pptv, Cl minus 75%, vdep = vdep(HNO3)) comes close to the observed values. The relatively short calculated lifetime of HCHO (50-100 min) implies significant BL-FT exchange even on small timescales if heterogeneous loss of HCHO on aerosol particles is considered to be unimportant. The mixing-in from above of FT air affected by biomass burning would increase the CO and lower the HCHO mixing ratios, leading to a better agreement of models and measurements. The deposition velocity for H2O2 over ocean and rainforest is deduced from box model results constrained by HOx and radiation measurements and assuming BL-FT exchange adequate to the results for CO. The Lagrangian model is used to check if the horizontal gradient observed for organic peroxides can be reproduced assuming that their deposition velocity is smaller than that of H2O2. Finally O3 formation

  9. Block distributions on the lunar surface: A comparison between measurements obtained from surface and orbital photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Mcbride, Kathleen M.

    1995-01-01

    Among the hazards that must be negotiated by lunar-landing spacecraft are blocks on the surface of the Moon. Unfortunately, few data exist that can be used to evaluate the threat posed by such blocks to landing spacecraft. Perhaps the best information is that obtained from Surveyor photographs, but those data do not extend to the dimensions of the large blocks that would pose the greatest hazards. Block distributions in the vicinities of the Surveyor 1, 3, 6, and 7 sites have been determined from Lunar Orbiter photography and are presented here. Only large (i.e., greater than or equal to 2.5 m) blocks are measurable in these pictures, resulting in a size gap between the Surveyor and Lunar Orbiter distributions. Nevertheless, the orbital data are self-consistent, a claim supported by the similarity in behavior between the subsets of data from the Surveyor 1, 3, and 6 sites and by the good agreement in position (if not slopes) between the data obtained from the Surveyor 3 photography and those derived from the Lunar Orbiter photographs. Confidence in the results is also justified by the well-behaved distribution of large blocks at the surveyor site. Comparisons between the Surveyor distributions and those derived from the orbital photography permit these observations: (1) in all cases but that for Surveyor 3, the density of large blocks is overestimated by extrapolation of the Surveyor-derived trends; (2) the slopes of the Surveyor-derived distributions are consistently lower than those determined for the large blocks; and (3) these apparent disagreements could be mitigated if the overall shapes of the cumulative lunar block populations were nonlinear, allowing for different slopes over different size intervals. The relatively large gaps between the Surveyor-derived and Orbiter-derived data sets, however, do not permit a determination of those shapes.

  10. Hand-Held Dynamometer Measurements Obtained in a Home Environment Are Reliable but Not Correlated Strongly with Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohannon, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    This research report describes the reliability and validity of hand-held dynamometer measurements of knee extension force obtained from 13 patients referred for physical therapy. Results found that hand-held dynamometry can be used to obtain reliable measures of muscle strength; however, correlation between strength measures and function was not…

  11. Effect of image resolution manipulation in rearfoot angle measurements obtained with photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Sacco, I C N; Picon, A P; Ribeiro, A P; Sartor, C D; Camargo-Junior, F; Macedo, D O; Mori, E T T; Monte, F; Yamate, G Y; Neves, J G; Kondo, V E; Aliberti, S

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of image resolution manipulation on the photogrammetric measurement of the rearfoot static angle. The study design was that of a reliability study. We evaluated 19 healthy young adults (11 females and 8 males). The photographs were taken at 1536 pixels in the greatest dimension, resized into four different resolutions (1200, 768, 600, 384 pixels) and analyzed by three equally trained examiners on a 96-pixels per inch (ppi) screen. An experienced physiotherapist marked the anatomic landmarks of rearfoot static angles on two occasions within a 1-week interval. Three different examiners had marked angles on digital pictures. The systematic error and the smallest detectable difference were calculated from the angle values between the image resolutions and times of evaluation. Different resolutions were compared by analysis of variance. Inter- and intra-examiner reliability was calculated by intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). The rearfoot static angles obtained by the examiners in each resolution were not different (P > 0.05); however, the higher the image resolution the better the inter-examiner reliability. The intra-examiner reliability (within a 1-week interval) was considered to be unacceptable for all image resolutions (ICC range: 0.08-0.52). The whole body image of an adult with a minimum size of 768 pixels analyzed on a 96-ppi screen can provide very good inter-examiner reliability for photogrammetric measurements of rearfoot static angles (ICC range: 0.85-0.92), although the intra-examiner reliability within each resolution was not acceptable. Therefore, this method is not a proper tool for follow-up evaluations of patients within a therapeutic protocol.

  12. Effect of image resolution manipulation in rearfoot angle measurements obtained with photogrammetry

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, I.C.N.; Picon, A.P.; Ribeiro, A.P.; Sartor, C.D.; Camargo-Junior, F.; Macedo, D.O.; Mori, E.T.T.; Monte, F.; Yamate, G.Y.; Neves, J.G.; Kondo, V.E.; Aliberti, S.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of image resolution manipulation on the photogrammetric measurement of the rearfoot static angle. The study design was that of a reliability study. We evaluated 19 healthy young adults (11 females and 8 males). The photographs were taken at 1536 pixels in the greatest dimension, resized into four different resolutions (1200, 768, 600, 384 pixels) and analyzed by three equally trained examiners on a 96-pixels per inch (ppi) screen. An experienced physiotherapist marked the anatomic landmarks of rearfoot static angles on two occasions within a 1-week interval. Three different examiners had marked angles on digital pictures. The systematic error and the smallest detectable difference were calculated from the angle values between the image resolutions and times of evaluation. Different resolutions were compared by analysis of variance. Inter- and intra-examiner reliability was calculated by intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). The rearfoot static angles obtained by the examiners in each resolution were not different (P > 0.05); however, the higher the image resolution the better the inter-examiner reliability. The intra-examiner reliability (within a 1-week interval) was considered to be unacceptable for all image resolutions (ICC range: 0.08-0.52). The whole body image of an adult with a minimum size of 768 pixels analyzed on a 96-ppi screen can provide very good inter-examiner reliability for photogrammetric measurements of rearfoot static angles (ICC range: 0.85-0.92), although the intra-examiner reliability within each resolution was not acceptable. Therefore, this method is not a proper tool for follow-up evaluations of patients within a therapeutic protocol. PMID:22911379

  13. Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Characteristics of a Tension Cone Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ian G.; Cruz, Juan R.; Hughes, Monica F.; Ware, Joanne S.; Madlangbayan, Albert; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    The supersonic aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of a tension cone inflatable aerodynamic decelerator were investigated by wind tunnel testing. Two sets of tests were conducted: one using rigid models and another using textile models. Tests using rigid models were conducted over a Mach number range from 1.65 to 4.5 at angles of attack from -12 to 20 degrees. The axial, normal, and pitching moment coefficients were found to be insensitive to Mach number over the tested range. The axial force coefficient was nearly constant (C(sub A) = 1.45 +/- 0.05) with respect to angle of attack. Both the normal and pitching moment coefficients were nearly linear with respect to angle of attack. The pitching moment coefficient showed the model to be statically stable about the reference point. Schlieren images and video showed a detached bow shock with no evidence of large regions of separated flow and/or embedded shocks at all Mach numbers investigated. Qualitatively similar static aerodynamic coefficient and flow visualization results were obtained using textile models at a Mach number of 2.5. Using inflatable textile models the torus pressure required to maintain the model in the fully-inflated configuration was determined. This pressure was found to be sensitive to details in the structural configuration of the inflatable models. Additional tests included surface pressure measurements on rigid models and deployment and inflation tests with inflatable models.

  14. Block distributions on the lunar surface: A comparison between measurements obtained from surface and orbital photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Mcbride, Kathleen M.

    1994-01-01

    Enlargements of Lunar-Orbiter photography were used in conjunction with a digitizing tablet to collect the locations and dimensions of blocks surrounding the Surveyor 1, 3, 6, and 7 landing sites. Data were reduced to the location and the major axis of the visible portion of each block. Shadows sometimes made it difficult to assess whether the visible major axis corresponded with the actual principal dimension. These data were then correlated with the locations of major craters in the study areas, thus subdividing the data set into blocks obviously associated with craters and those in intercrater areas. A block was arbitrarily defined to be associated with a crater when its location was within 1.1 crater radii of the crater's center. Since this study was commissioned for the ultimate purpose of determining hazards to landing spacecraft, such a definition was deemed appropriate in defining block-related hazards associated with craters. Size distributions of smaller fragments as determined from Surveyor photography were obtained as measurements from graphical data. Basic comparisons were performed through use of cumulative frequency distributions identical to those applied to studies of crater-count data.

  15. A tomographic technique for aerodynamics at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G.

    1985-01-01

    Computer aided tomography (CAT) provides a means of noninvasively measuring the air density distribution around an aerodynamic model. This technique is global in that a large portion of the flow field can be measured. A test of the applicability of CAT to transonic velocities was studied. A hemispherical-nose cylinder afterbody model was tested at a Mach number of 0.8 with a new laser holographic interferometer at the 2- by 2-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. Holograms of the flow field were taken and were reconstructed into interferograms. The fringe distribution (a measure of the local densities) was digitized for subsequent data reduction. A computer program based on the Fourier-transform technique was developed to convert the fringe distribution into three-dimensional densities around the model. Theoretical aerodynamic densities were calculated for evaluating and assessing the accuracy of the data obtained from the tomographic method.

  16. Missile Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-02-01

    desired properties. To this end, we shall make use of ex- perimental evidence, as obtained in wind or water tunnels by various flow visualization...based on the results of number of tests carried out in a water and various wind tunnels, as reported by H. Werl6 in Ref. 3. Vortex breakdown is found...of a triangular wing Rogachev, G.V. moving close to the earth ’ s surface. AD 785154, FTD-HC-23-1802-74. 25 Fox, C.H. Prediction of lift and drag for

  17. Validation of keratometric measurements obtained with a new integrated aberrometry-topography system

    PubMed Central

    Shneor, Einat; Millodot, Michel; Zyroff, Meira; Gordon-Shaag, Ariela

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A clinical evaluation of the L80 videokeratographer (Visionix Luneau, Chartres, France) was performed to assess its validity and repeatability compared with a traditional Bausch and Lomb (B & L) keratometer. Methods 87 right eyes of 87 subjects, (mean age 23.72 ± 3.62 years old, 70 women and 17 men), participated in this study. Corneal curvature was measured using the L80 instrument by one practitioner and the manual B & L keratometer by a different practitioner. Intratest and intertest repeatability were assessed. Results Corneal curvature was found to be statistically different between the two instruments (p < 0.001), with the L80 providing a slightly steeper bias of 0.05 mm and 0.07 mm for the horizontal and vertical meridians, respectively than the B & L keratometer. 78.2% and 86.2% of the L80 results were within ±0.1 mm (±0.06 D) and 95.4% and 97.7% within ±0.2 mm (±0.11 D) of the readings obtained with the B & L keratometer along the horizontal and the vertical meridians, respectively. The agreement between the L80 and B & L keratometers axes was 31.0% within ±5°, 54.0% within ±10°, 60.9% within ±15°, 71.3% within ±20° and 87.4% within ±40°. Intratest repeatability was the same for both instruments. Intertest repeatability was better for the L80 videokeratographer compared to the B & L keratometer and showed no significant difference between the two sessions. Conclusion The L80 videokeratographer is a reliable objective instrument comparable to other autokeratometers which, in addition, combines many other useful clinical features. It provides steeper radii of curvature measurements than the B & L keratometer. An offset incorporated into the instrument could mitigate the difference between the two instruments and make them interchangeable.

  18. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2010-03-06

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re approximately 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small

  19. Process for using surface strain measurements to obtain operational loads for complex structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, William Lance (Inventor); Ko, William L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The invention is an improved process for using surface strain data to obtain real-time, operational loads data for complex structures that significantly reduces the time and cost versus current methods.

  20. Detailed plasma potential measurements in a radio-frequency expanding plasma obtained from various electrostatic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.

    2009-04-15

    On-axis plasma potential measurements have been made with an emissive probe in a low pressure (0.044 Pa) rf expanding plasma containing an ion beam. The beam is detected with a retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA), and is seen to disappear at high pressure (0.39 Pa). The emissive probe measurements are in very good agreement with corresponding measurements made with two separate RFEAs, and the results indicate that the floating potential of the strongly emitting probe gives an accurate measure of the plasma potential under the present conditions.

  1. Aerodynamic characteristics of French consonants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demolin, Didier; Hassid, Sergio; Soquet, Alain

    2004-05-01

    This paper reports some aerodynamic measurements made on French consonants with a group of ten speakers. Speakers were recorded while saying nonsense words in phrases such as papa, dis papa encore. The nonsense words in the study combined each of the French consonants with three vowels /i, a, u/ to from two syllables words with the first syllable being the same as the second. In addition to the audio signal, recordings were made of the oral airflow, the pressure of the air in the pharynx above the vocal folds and the pressure of the air in the trachea just below the vocal folds. The pharyngeal pressure was recorded via a catheter (i.d. 5 mm) passed through the nose so that its open end could be seen in the pharynx below the uvula. The subglottal pressure was recorded via a tracheal puncture between the first and the second rings of the trachea or between the cricoid cartilage and the first tracheal ring. Results compare subglottal presssure, pharyngeal pressure, and airflow values. Comparisons are made between values obtained with male and female subjects and various types of consonants (voiced versus voiceless at the same place of articulation, stops, fricatives, and nasals).

  2. Aerodynamics of a rolling airframe missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisserand, L. E.

    1981-05-01

    For guidance-related reasons, there is considerable interest in rolling missiles having single-plane steering capability. To aid the aerodynamic design of these airframes, a unique investigation into the aerodynamics of a rolling, steering missile has been carried out. It represents the first known attempt to measure in a wind tunnel the aerodynamic forces and moments that act on a spinning body-canard-tail configuration that exercises canard steering in phase with body roll position. Measurements were made with the model spinning at steady-state roll rates ranging from 15 to 40 Hz over an angle-of-attack range up to about 16 deg. This short, exploratory investigation has demonstrated that a better understanding and a more complete definition of the aerodynamics of rolling, steering vehicles can be developed by way of simulative wind-tunnel testing.

  3. Comparison of results obtained with various sensors used to measure fluctuating quantities in jets.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Massier, P. F.; Cuffel, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to compare the results obtained with six different instruments that sense fluctuating quantities in free jets. These sensors are typical of those that have recently been used by various investigators who are engaged in experimental studies of jet noise. Intensity distributions and two-point correlations with space separation and time delay were obtained. The static pressure, density, and velocity fluctuations are well correlated over the entire cross section of the jet and the cross-correlations persist for several jet diameters along the flow direction. The eddies appear to be flattened in the flow direction by a ratio of 0.4.

  4. Effect of Head Position on Facial Soft Tissue Depth Measurements Obtained Using Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Caple, Jodi M; Stephan, Carl N; Gregory, Laura S; MacGregor, Donna M

    2016-01-01

    Facial soft tissue depth (FSTD) studies employing clinical computed tomography (CT) data frequently rely on depth measurements from raw 2D orthoslices. However, the position of each patient's head was not standardized in this method, potentially decreasing measurement reliability and accuracy. This study measured FSTDs along the original orthoslice plane and compared these measurements to those standardized by the Frankfurt horizontal (FH). Subadult cranial CT scans (n = 115) were used to measure FSTDs at 18 landmarks. Significant differences were observed between the methods at eight of these landmarks (p < 0.05), demonstrating that high-quality data are not generated simply by employing modern imaging modalities such as CT. Proper technique is crucial to useful results, and maintaining control over head position during FSTD data collection is important. This is easily and most readily achieved in CT techniques by rotating the head to the FH plane after constructing a 3D rendering of the data.

  5. Unsteady transonic aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, D.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on unsteady transonic aerodynamics are presented. The topics addressed include: physical phenomena associated with unsteady transonic flows, basic equations for unsteady transonic flow, practical problems concerning aircraft, basic numerical methods, computational methods for unsteady transonic flows, application of transonic flow analysis to helicopter rotor problems, unsteady aerodynamics for turbomachinery aeroelastic applications, alternative methods for modeling unsteady transonic flows.

  6. Uncertainty in Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Hemsch, M. J.; Morrison, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    An approach is presented to treat computational aerodynamics as a process, subject to the fundamental quality assurance principles of process control and process improvement. We consider several aspects affecting uncertainty for the computational aerodynamic process and present a set of stages to determine the level of management required to meet risk assumptions desired by the customer of the predictions.

  7. Steady incompressible variable thickness shear layer aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    A shear flow aerodynamic theory for steady incompressible flows is presented for both the lifting and non lifting problems. The slow variation of the boundary layer thickness is considered. The slowly varying behavior is treated by using multitime scales. The analysis begins with the elementary wavy wall problem and, through Fourier superpositions over the wave number space, the shear flow equivalents to the aerodynamic transfer functions of classical potential flow are obtained. The aerodynamic transfer functions provide integral equations which relate the wall pressure and the upwash. Computational results are presented for the pressure distribution, the lift coefficient, and the center of pressure travel along a two dimensional flat plate in a shear flow. The aerodynamic load is decreased by the shear layer, compared to the potential flow. The variable thickness shear layer decreases it less than the uniform thickness shear layer based upon equal maximum shear layer thicknesses.

  8. Temperature Variability in the Stratosphere Obtained from 7 years of Vibrational-Raman- lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iserhienrhien, B.; Sica, R. J.; Argall, P. S.

    2009-05-01

    The Purple Crow Lidar (PCL) is a large power-aperture product monostatic laser radar located at the Delaware Observatory (42° 52' N, 81° 23' W, 225 m elevation above sea level) near the campus of The University of Western Ontario. It is capable of measuring temperature and wave parameters from 10 to 110 km altitude, as well as water vapor in the troposphere and stratosphere. We use upper tropospheric and stratospheric vibrational Raman N2 backscatter-derived temperatures to form a climatology for the years 1999 to 2007 from 10 to 30 km altitude. The lidar temperatures are validated using coincident radiosondes measurements from Detroit and Buffalo. The measured temperatures show good agreement with the radiosonde soundings. An agreement of ±1 K is found during summer months and ±2.5 K during the winter months, validating the calibration of the lidar to within the geophysical variability of the measurements. Comparison between the PCL measurements and atmospheric models shows the PCL measurements are 5 K or less colder than CIRA-86 below 25 km and 2.5 K warmer above during the summer months. Below 16 km the PCL measurements are 5 K or less colder than the MSIS-90 model, while above this region, the PCL agrees to about ±3.5 K or less. The temperature differences between the PCL measurements and the models are consistent with the differences between the atmospheric models and the Detroit and Buffalo radiosonde measurements. The temperature differences compared to the models are consistent with previous comparisons between other radiosondes and satellite data sets, confirming that these differences with the models are real. We will highlight nights which show significant variations from the long-term averages, and when possible, the evolution of the variations.

  9. A Tool and a Method for Obtaining Hydrologic Flow Velocity Measurements in Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C.R.; Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.

    1986-01-21

    Downhole instruments based on a thermal perturbation principle are being developed to measure heat flow in permeable formations where convective transport of heat is important. To make heat flow measurements in these regions, the ground water velocity vector must be determined. A downhole probe has been designed to measure the local ground water velocity vector. The probe is a cylindrical heat source operated at a constant heat flux. In a convecting environment, surface temperatures on the probe are perturbed from those values of a purely conductive environment. With the aid of analytical and numerical models, these temperature differences can be related to the local velocity vector.

  10. Tool and a method for obtaining hydrologic flow velocity measurements in geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C.R.; Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    Downhole instruments based on a thermal perturbation principle are being developed to measure heat flow in permeable formations where convective transport of heat is important. To make heat flow measurements in these regions, the ground water velocity vector must be determined. A downhole probe has been designed to measure the local ground water velocity vector. The probe is a cylindrical heat source operated at a constant heat flux. In a convecting environment, surface temperatures on the probe are perturbed from those values of a purely conductive environment. With the aid of analytical and numerical models, these temperature differences can be related to the local velocity vector. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Iced-airfoil aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, M. B.; Broeren, A. P.; Blumenthal, L. A.

    2005-07-01

    Past research on airfoil aerodynamics in icing are reviewed. This review emphasizes the time period after the 1978 NASA Lewis workshop that initiated the modern icing research program at NASA and the current period after the 1994 ATR accident where aerodynamics research has been more aircraft safety focused. Research pre-1978 is also briefly reviewed. Following this review, our current knowledge of iced airfoil aerodynamics is presented from a flowfield-physics perspective. This article identifies four classes of ice accretions: roughness, horn ice, streamwise ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. For each class, the key flowfield features such as flowfield separation and reattachment are discussed and how these contribute to the known aerodynamic effects of these ice shapes. Finally Reynolds number and Mach number effects on iced-airfoil aerodynamics are summarized.

  12. Measurements of dust on Mars to be obtained from upcoming missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of dust on the Mars surface and in its atmosphere will be made from several upcoming missions. The best defined missions are Mars Observer, the Soviet Mars 94 mission, and the Mars Environment Survey (MESUR) mission. A discussion is presented of what measurements pertaining to airborne or surface dust will be made and what properties can be inferred from them. The payloads for the latter two missions are not yet determined. In all cases, only that information which pertains to dust is included; each mission contains additional instruments that provide no information on this topic. Following the discussion of individual instruments is a summary of the types of measurements and observations that will be made from the ensemble collection of instruments and missions, and a brief discussion of the types of measurements of dust which will not be made.

  13. Obtaining Reliable Predictions of Terrestrial Energy Coupling From Real-Time Solar Wind Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weimer, Daniel R.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) from the ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer), Wind, IMP-8 (Interplanetary Monitoring Platform), and Geotail spacecraft have revealed that the IMF variations are contained in phase planes that are tilted with respect to the propagation direction, resulting in continuously variable changes in propagation times between spacecraft, and therefore, to the Earth. Techniques for using 'minimum variance analysis' have been developed in order to be able to measure the phase front tilt angles, and better predict the actual propagation times from the L1 orbit to the Earth, using only the real-time IMF measurements from one spacecraft. The use of empirical models with the IMF measurements at L1 from ACE (or future satellites) for predicting 'space weather' effects has also been demonstrated.

  14. Use of aluminum nitride to obtain temperature measurements in a high temperature and high radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, Bernard R.; Blasi, Raymond J.; Tittman, Bernhard R.; Parks, David A.

    2016-04-26

    An aluminum nitride piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer successfully operates at temperatures of up to 1000.degree. C. and fast (>1 MeV) neutron fluencies of more than 10.sup.18 n/cm.sup.2. The transducer comprises a transparent, nitrogen rich aluminum nitride (AlN) crystal wafer that is coupled to an aluminum cylinder for pulse-echo measurements. The transducer has the capability to measure in situ gamma heating within the core of a nuclear reactor.

  15. High precision 7Be solar neutrinos measurement and day night effect obtained with Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testera, G.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonetti, S.; Bonfini, G.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Carraro, C.; Chavarria, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Derbin, A.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Göger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, E.; Hardy, S.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Korablev, D.; Kobychev, V.; Korga, G.; Koshio, Y.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Leung, M.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, P.; Lombardi, F.; Ludhova, L.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Manuzio, G.; Meindl, Q.; Meroni, E.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Pena-Garay, C.; Perasso, L.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Raghavan, R. S.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Romani, A.; Sabelnikov, A.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuzel, G.

    2012-11-01

    We report the direct measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino signal rate performed with the Borexino detector at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and the search for a day-night asymmetry of this interaction rate. The interaction rate of the 0.862 MeV 7Be neutrinos is 46±1.6(stat)-1.6+1.5(syst) counts/(day · 100 ton). The hypothesis of no oscillation for this solar neutrinos is inconsistent with our measurement at the 5.8σ C.L. Our result is the first direct measurement of solar neutrinos with an accuracy better than 5%. We report the survival probability for solar νe in the transition region between matter-enhanced and vacuum-driven oscillations. The measured day night asymmetry is Adn=0.001±0.012 (stat)±0.007 (syst), in agreement with the predicition of MSW-LMA neutrino [13] oscillations. This result discourages MSW oscillations with mixing parameters in the LOW region at more than 8.5σ, meaning that this region is, for the first time, strongly rejected without the assumption of CPT symmetry. The result can also be used to constrain some neutrino oscillation scenarios involving new physics.

  16. The Effects of Survey Timing on Student Evaluation of Teaching Measures Obtained Using Online Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estelami, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Teaching evaluations are an important measurement tool used by business schools in gauging the level of student satisfaction with the educational services delivered by faculty. The growing use of online teaching evaluations has enabled educational administrators to expand the time period during which student evaluation of teaching (SET) surveys…

  17. Methods for obtaining true particle size distributions from cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, Kristina Alyse

    2013-01-01

    Sectioning methods are frequently used to measure grain sizes in materials. These methods do not provide accurate grain sizes for two reasons. First, the sizes of features observed on random sections are always smaller than the true sizes of solid spherical shaped objects, as noted by Wicksell [1]. This is the case because the section very rarely passes through the center of solid spherical shaped objects randomly dispersed throughout a material. The sizes of features observed on random sections are inversely related to the distance of the center of the solid object from the section [1]. Second, on a plane section through the solid material, larger sized features are more frequently observed than smaller ones due to the larger probability for a section to come into contact with the larger sized portion of the spheres than the smaller sized portion. As a result, it is necessary to find a method that takes into account these reasons for inaccurate particle size measurements, while providing a correction factor for accurately determining true particle size measurements. I present a method for deducing true grain size distributions from those determined from specimen cross sections, either by measurement of equivalent grain diameters or linear intercepts.

  18. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry: practical considerations for obtaining accurate measurements of blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2014-03-01

    An assessment has been made of various experimental factors affecting the accuracy of flow velocities measured using a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique. In this method, Doppler time shifts are quantified via crosscorrelation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves are detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. This enables penetration depths of several millimetres or centimetres, unlike methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1 mm. In the acoustic resolution mode, it is difficult to detect time shifts in highly concentrated suspensions of flowing absorbers, such as red blood cell suspensions and whole blood, and this challenge supposedly arises because of the lack of spatial heterogeneity. However, by assessing the effect of different absorption coefficients and tube diameters, we offer an alternative explanation relating to light attenuation and parabolic flow. We also demonstrate a new signal processing method that surmounts the previous problem of measurement under-reading. This method is a form of signal range gating and enables mapping of the flow velocity profile across the tube as well as measurement of the average flow velocity. We show that, using our signal processing scheme, it is possible to measure the flow of whole blood using a relatively low frequency detector. This important finding paves the way for application of the technique to measurements of blood flow several centimetres deep in living tissue.

  19. Aerodynamics of bird flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Unlike airplanes birds must have either flapping or oscillating wings (the hummingbird). Only such wings can produce both lift and thrust - two sine qua non attributes of flying.The bird wings have several possibilities how to obtain the same functions as airplane wings. All are realized by the system of flight feathers. Birds have also the capabilities of adjusting the shape of the wing according to what the immediate flight situation demands, as well as of responding almost immediately to conditions the flow environment dictates, such as wind gusts, object avoidance, target tracking, etc. In bird aerodynamics also the tail plays an important role. To fly, wings impart downward momentum to the surrounding air and obtain lift by reaction. How this is achieved under various flight situations (cruise flight, hovering, landing, etc.), and what the role is of the wing-generated vortices in producing lift and thrust is discussed.The issue of studying bird flight experimentally from in vivo or in vitro experiments is also briefly discussed.

  20. Vertical Landing Aerodynamics of Reusable Rocket Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Satoshi; Nishida, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Inatani, Yoshifumi

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a vertical landing rocket are affected by its engine plume in the landing phase. The influences of interaction of the engine plume with the freestream around the vehicle on the aerodynamic characteristics are studied experimentally aiming to realize safe landing of the vertical landing rocket. The aerodynamic forces and surface pressure distributions are measured using a scaled model of a reusable rocket vehicle in low-speed wind tunnels. The flow field around the vehicle model is visualized using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) method. Results show that the aerodynamic characteristics, such as the drag force and pitching moment, are strongly affected by the change in the base pressure distributions and reattachment of a separation flow around the vehicle.

  1. A CLOSURE STUDY OF AEROSOL MASS CONCENTRATION MEASUREMENTS: COMPARISON OF VALUES OBTAINED WITH FILTERS AND BY DIRECT MEASUREMENTS OF MASS DISTRIBUTIONS. (R826372)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compare measurements of aerosol mass concentrations obtained gravimetrically using Teflon coated glass fiber filters and by integrating mass distributions measured with the differential mobility analyzer–aerosol particle mass analyzer (DMA–APM) technique (Aero...

  2. Perturbation Centrality and Turbine: A Novel Centrality Measure Obtained Using a Versatile Network Dynamics Tool

    PubMed Central

    Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Csermely, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of network dynamics became a focal point to understand and predict changes of complex systems. Here we introduce Turbine, a generic framework enabling fast simulation of any algorithmically definable dynamics on very large networks. Using a perturbation transmission model inspired by communicating vessels, we define a novel centrality measure: perturbation centrality. Hubs and inter-modular nodes proved to be highly efficient in perturbation propagation. High perturbation centrality nodes of the Met-tRNA synthetase protein structure network were identified as amino acids involved in intra-protein communication by earlier studies. Changes in perturbation centralities of yeast interactome nodes upon various stresses well recapitulated the functional changes of stressed yeast cells. The novelty and usefulness of perturbation centrality was validated in several other model, biological and social networks. The Turbine software and the perturbation centrality measure may provide a large variety of novel options to assess signaling, drug action, environmental and social interventions. PMID:24205090

  3. Obtaining Reliable Predictions of Terrestrial Energy Coupling From Real-Time Solar Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weimer, Daniel R.

    2001-01-01

    The first draft of a manuscript titled "Variable time delays in the propagation of the interplanetary magnetic field" has been completed, for submission to the Journal of Geophysical Research. In the preparation of this manuscript all data and analysis programs had been updated to the highest temporal resolution possible, at 16 seconds or better. The program which computes the "measured" IMF propagation time delays from these data has also undergone another improvement. In another significant development, a technique has been developed in order to predict IMF phase plane orientations, and the resulting time delays, using only measurements from a single satellite at L1. The "minimum variance" method is used for this computation. Further work will be done on optimizing the choice of several parameters for the minimum variance calculation.

  4. Comparison of in situ stratospheric ozone measurements obtained during the MAP/GLOBUS 1983 campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aimedieu, P.; Matthews, W. A.; Attmannspacher, W.; Hartmannsgruber, R.; Cisneros, J.; Komhyr, W.; Robbins, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    Data from five types of in situ ozone sensors flown aboard ballons during the MAP/GLOBUS 1983 campaign were found to agree to within 5 percent uncertainty throughout the middle atmosphere. A description of the individual techniques and the error budget is given in addition to explanations for the discrepancies found at higher and lower altitudes. In comparison to UV photometry values, results from two electrochemical techniques were found to be greater in the lower atmosphere and to be lower in the upper atmosphere. In general, olefin chemiluminescence results were within 8 percent of the UV photometry results. Ozone column contents measured by the indigo colorization technique for two altitude regions of about 6 km height were greater than measurements from other techniques by 52 and 17 percent, respectively.

  5. Pilot model expansion tunnel test flow properties obtained from velocity, pressure, and probe measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesen, W. J.; Moore, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Velocity-profile, pitot-pressure, and supplemental probe measurements were made at the nozzle exist of an expansion tunnel (a modification to the Langley pilot model expansion tube) for a nozzle net condition of a nitrogen test sample with a velocity of 4.5 km/sec and a density 0.005 times the density of nitrogen at standard conditions, both with the nozzle initially immersed in a helium atmosphere and with the nozzle initially evacuated. The purpose of the report is to present the results of these measurements and some of the physical properties of the nitrogen test sample which can be inferred from the measured results. The main conclusions reached are that: the velocity profiles differ for two nozzle conditions; regions of the flow field can be found where the velocity is uniform to within 5 percent and constant for several hundred microseconds; the velocity of the nitrogen test sample is reduced due to passage through the nozzle; and the velocity profiles do not significantly reflect the large variations which occur in the inferred density profiles.

  6. Predicted aerodynamic characteristics for HL-20 lifting-body using the aerodynamic preliminary analysis system (APAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Christopher I.; Ware, George M.

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the HL-20 lifting body configuraiton obtained through the APAS and from wind-tunnel tests have been compared. The APAS is considered to be an easy-to-use, relatively simple tool for quick preliminary estimation of vehicle aerodynamics. The APAS estimates are found to be in good agreement with experimental results to be used for preliminary evaluation of the HL-20. The APAS accuracy in predicting aerodynamics of the HL-20 varied over the Mach range. The speed ranges of best agreement were subsonic and hypersonic, while least agreement was in the Mach range from 1.2 to about 2,5.

  7. Drude's Model Optical Parameters and the Color of TiNx Films Obtained Through Reflectivity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, L. A.; Sagás, J. C.; Damião, A. J.; Fontana, L. C.

    2015-02-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) has been applied as decorative coating due to its high reflectivity and goldish color, having high hardness and wear resistance. In the present work, TiNx films were deposited by grid-assisted magnetron sputtering. The color and reflectivity were investigated by spectrophotometry as a function of the working gas ratio N2/Ar used during films deposition. The crystalline phases were identified by X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD). The TiNx plasma frequency ( ω p) and the relaxation time ( τ) were determined by fitting the experimental reflectivity curves, according to the Drude model. The color parameters obtained by the CieLab method were used to compare TiNx films with gold film.

  8. Physical properties of core-concrete systems: Al2O3-ZrO2 molten materials measured by aerodynamic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohishi, Yuji; Kargl, F.; Nakamori, F.; Muta, Hiroaki; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2017-04-01

    During a molten core-concrete interaction, molten oxides consisting of molten core materials (UO2 and ZrO2) and concrete (Al2O3, SiO2, CaO) are formed. Reliable data on the physical properties of the molten oxides will allow us to accurately predict the progression of a nuclear reactor core meltdown accident. In this study, the viscosities and densities of molten (ZrO2)x(Al2O3)1-x (x = 0.356 and 0.172) were measured using an aerodynamic levitation technique. The densities of two small samples were estimated from their masses and their volumes (calculated from recorded images of the molten samples). The droplets were forced to oscillate using speakers, and their viscosities were evaluated from the damping behaviors of their oscillations. The results showed that the viscosity of molten (ZrO2)x(Al2O3)1-x compared to that of pure molten Al2O3 is 25% lower for x = 0.172, while it is unexpectedly 20% higher for x = 0.356.

  9. Precision of dosimetry-related measurements obtained on current multidetector computed tomography scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Zhang, Di; Kim, Hyun J.; Cody, Dianna D.

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) intrascanner and interscanner variability has not been well characterized. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision of physical dosimetry-related measurements collected over the course of 1 yr on three different makes and models of multidetector row CT (MDCT) scanners. Methods: Physical measurements were collected using nine CT scanners (three scanners each of GE VCT, GE LightSpeed 16, and Siemens Sensation 64 CT). Measurements were made using various combinations of technical factors, including kVp, type of bowtie filter, and x-ray beam collimation, for several dosimetry-related quantities, including (a) free-in-air CT dose index (CTDI{sub 100,air}); (b) calculated half-value layers and quarter-value layers; and (c) weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub w}) calculated from exposure measurements collected in both a 16 and 32 cm diameter CTDI phantom. Data collection was repeated at several different time intervals, ranging from seconds (for CTDI{sub 100,air} values) to weekly for 3 weeks and then quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Precision of the data was quantified by the percent coefficient of variation (%CV). Results: The maximum relative precision error (maximum %CV value) across all dosimetry metrics, time periods, and scanners included in this study was 4.33%. The median observed %CV values for CTDI{sub 100,air} ranged from 0.05% to 0.19% over several seconds, 0.12%-0.52% over 1 week, and 0.58%-2.31% over 3-4 months. For CTDI{sub w} for a 16 and 32 cm CTDI phantom, respectively, the range of median %CVs was 0.38%-1.14% and 0.62%-1.23% in data gathered weekly for 3 weeks and 1.32%-2.79% and 0.84%-2.47% in data gathered quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Conclusions: From a dosimetry perspective, the MDCT scanners tested in this study demonstrated a high degree of within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision (with relative precision errors typically well

  10. Polarization measurement and vertical aperture optimization for obtaining circularly polarized bend-magnet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.; Hussain, Z.

    1997-04-01

    Growing interest in utilizing circular polarization prompted the design of bend-magnet beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, covering the 30-1500 eV spectral region, to include vertical aperturing capabilities for optimizing the collection of circular polarization above and below the orbit plane. After commissioning and early use of the beamline, a multilayer polarimeter was used to characterize the polarization state of the beam as a function of vertical aperture position. This report partially summarizes the polarimetry measurements and compares results with theoretical calculations intended to simulate experimental conditions.

  11. Transport Property Measurements in Doped Bi2Te3 Single Crystals Obtained via Zone Melting Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jariwala, Bhakti; Shah, Dimple; Ravindra, N. M.

    2015-06-01

    Single crystals of Se- and Fe-doped Bi2Te3 have been synthesized via the zone melting method. Energy-dispersive x-ray and x-ray powder diffraction analyses have been carried out to identify the constituent elements and determine the lattice parameters of the grown crystals. Surface topological features of the as-grown single crystals have been studied. The transport properties of doped stoichiometric Bi2Te3 single crystals have been studied by measuring the thermoelectric power and electrical conductivity in the temperature range from 303 K to 473 K. The thermoelectric power, S, effective mass, scattering parameter, and Fermi energy have been calculated from thermoelectric power measurements. The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity, σ, shows that the dopants in the crystals are thermally activated. All the crystals exhibit semiconducting behavior as confirmed by the temperature dependence of σ and S. The effective mass of electrons and the effective density of states have been determined and are reported for Bi2Te3- x Se x (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) and Bi2- y Fe y Te3 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.3).

  12. Fourier functional analysis for unsteady aerodynamic modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward; Chin, Suei

    1991-01-01

    A method based on Fourier analysis is developed to analyze the force and moment data obtained in large amplitude forced oscillation tests at high angles of attack. The aerodynamic models for normal force, lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients are built up from a set of aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions at different frequencies. Based on the aerodynamic models of harmonic data, the indicial responses are formed. The final expressions for the models involve time integrals of the indicial type advocated by Tobak and Schiff. Results from linear two- and three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic theories as well as test data for a 70-degree delta wing are used to verify the models. It is shown that the present modeling method is accurate in producing the aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions and the ramp type motions. The model also produces correct trend for a 70-degree delta wing in harmonic motion with different mean angles-of-attack. However, the current model cannot be used to extrapolate data to higher angles-of-attack than that of the harmonic motions which form the aerodynamic model. For linear ramp motions, a special method is used to calculate the corresponding frequency and phase angle at a given time. The calculated results from modeling show a higher lift peak for linear ramp motion than for harmonic ramp motion. The current model also shows reasonably good results for the lift responses at different angles of attack.

  13. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-03-06

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing.

  14. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds

    PubMed Central

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F.; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-01-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier–Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing. PMID:25589565

  15. Event generator tunes obtained from underlying event and multiparton scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Yonamine, R.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Awad, A.; Mahrous, A.; Mohammed, Y.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Lomidze, D.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Miniello, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Primavera, F.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Mattia, A. Di; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D’Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall’Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fantinel, S.; Fanzago, F.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell’Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. 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G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-03-17

    Here, new sets of parameters (“tunes”) for the underlying-event (UE) modelling of the pythia8, pythia6 and herwig++ Monte Carlo event generators are constructed using different parton distribution functions. Combined fits to CMS UE proton–proton ( $\\mathrm {p}\\mathrm {p}$ ) data at $\\sqrt{s} = 7\\,\\text {TeV} $ and to UE proton–antiproton ( $\\mathrm {p}\\overline{\\mathrm{p}} $ ) data from the CDF experiment at lower $\\sqrt{s}$ , are used to study the UE models and constrain their parameters, providing thereby improved predictions for proton–proton collisions at 13 $\\,\\text {TeV}$ . In addition, it is investigated whether the values of the parameters obtained from fits to UE observables are consistent with the values determined from fitting observables sensitive to double-parton scattering processes. Finally, comparisons are presented of the UE tunes to “minimum bias” (MB) events, multijet, and Drell–Yan ( $ \\mathrm{q} \\overline{\\mathrm{q}} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{Z}/ \\gamma ^* \\rightarrow $ lepton-antilepton+jets) observables at 7 and 8 $\\,\\text {TeV}$ , as well as predictions for MB and UE observables at 13 $\\,\\text {TeV}$ .

  16. Event generator tunes obtained from underlying event and multiparton scattering measurements.

    PubMed

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Dev, N; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Marinelli, N; Meng, F; Mueller, C; Musienko, Y; Planer, M; Reinsvold, A; Ruchti, R; Smith, G; Taroni, S; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Antonelli, L; Brinson, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hart, A; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Ji, W; Ling, T Y; Liu, B; Luo, W; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Winer, B L; Wulsin, H W; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Palmer, C; Piroué, P; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Zuranski, A; Malik, S; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bortoletto, D; Gutay, L; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, K; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Primavera, F; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shi, X; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Sun, J; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Chen, Z; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Guilbaud, M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Northup, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Rorie, J; Tu, Z; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Galanti, M; Galanti, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Han, J; Harel, A; Hindrichs, O; Hindrichs, O; Khukhunaishvili, A; Petrillo, G; Tan, P; Verzetti, M; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Hughes, E; Kaplan, S; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R; Lath, A; Nash, K; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Sheffield, D; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Foerster, M; Riley, G; Rose, K; Spanier, S; York, A; Bouhali, O; Castaneda Hernandez, A; Celik, A; Dalchenko, M; De Mattia, M; Delgado, A; Dildick, S; Dildick, S; Eusebi, R; Gilmore, J; Huang, T; Kamon, T; Krutelyov, V; Krutelyov, V; Mueller, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Patel, R; Patel, R; Perloff, A; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Tatarinov, A; Ulmer, K A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kunori, S; Lamichhane, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Undleeb, S; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Janjam, R; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Ni, H; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Xu, Q; Arenton, M W; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Sinthuprasith, T; Sun, X; Wang, Y; Wolfe, E; Wood, J; Xia, F; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Gomber, B; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ruggles, T; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Sharma, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Woods, N

    New sets of parameters ("tunes") for the underlying-event (UE) modelling of the pythia8, pythia6 and herwig++ Monte Carlo event generators are constructed using different parton distribution functions. Combined fits to CMS UE proton-proton ([Formula: see text]) data at [Formula: see text] and to UE proton-antiproton ([Formula: see text]) data from the CDF experiment at lower [Formula: see text], are used to study the UE models and constrain their parameters, providing thereby improved predictions for proton-proton collisions at 13[Formula: see text]. In addition, it is investigated whether the values of the parameters obtained from fits to UE observables are consistent with the values determined from fitting observables sensitive to double-parton scattering processes. Finally, comparisons are presented of the UE tunes to "minimum bias" (MB) events, multijet, and Drell-Yan ([Formula: see text] lepton-antilepton+jets) observables at 7 and 8[Formula: see text], as well as predictions for MB and UE observables at 13[Formula: see text].

  17. Event generator tunes obtained from underlying event and multiparton scattering measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2016-03-17

    Here, new sets of parameters (“tunes”) for the underlying-event (UE) modelling of the pythia8, pythia6 and herwig++ Monte Carlo event generators are constructed using different parton distribution functions. Combined fits to CMS UE proton–proton (more » $$\\mathrm {p}\\mathrm {p}$$ ) data at $$\\sqrt{s} = 7\\,\\text {TeV} $$ and to UE proton–antiproton ( $$\\mathrm {p}\\overline{\\mathrm{p}} $$ ) data from the CDF experiment at lower $$\\sqrt{s}$$ , are used to study the UE models and constrain their parameters, providing thereby improved predictions for proton–proton collisions at 13 $$\\,\\text {TeV}$$ . In addition, it is investigated whether the values of the parameters obtained from fits to UE observables are consistent with the values determined from fitting observables sensitive to double-parton scattering processes. Finally, comparisons are presented of the UE tunes to “minimum bias” (MB) events, multijet, and Drell–Yan ( $$ \\mathrm{q} \\overline{\\mathrm{q}} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{Z}/ \\gamma ^* \\rightarrow $$ lepton-antilepton+jets) observables at 7 and 8 $$\\,\\text {TeV}$$ , as well as predictions for MB and UE observables at 13 $$\\,\\text {TeV}$$ .« less

  18. Experimental investigation of hypersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intrieri, Peter F.

    1988-01-01

    An extensive series of ballistic range tests were conducted at the Ames Research Center to determine precisely the aerodynamic characteristics of the Galileo entry probe vehicle. Figures and tables are presented which summarize the results of these ballistic range tests. Drag data were obtained for both a nonablated and a hypothesized ablated Galileo configuration at Mach numbers from about 0.7 to 14 and at Reynolds numbers from 1000 to 4 million. The tests were conducted in air and the experimental results were compared with available Pioneer Venus data since these two configurations are similar in geometry. The nonablated Galileo configuration was also tested with two different center-of-gravity positions to obtain values of pitching-moment-curve slope which could be used in determining values of lift and center-of-pressure location for this configuration. The results indicate that the drag characteristics of the Galileo probe are qualitatively similar to that of Pioneer Venus, however, the drag of the nonablated Galileo is about 3 percent lower at the higher Mach numbers and as much as 5 percent greater at transonic Mach numbers of about 1.0 to 1.5. Also, the drag of the hypothesized ablated configuration is about 3 percent lower than that of the nonablated configuration at the higher Mach numbers but about the same at the lower Mach numbers. Additional tests are required at Reynolds numbers of 1000, 500, and 250 to determine if the dramatic rise in drag coefficient measured for Pioneer Venus at these low Reynolds numbers also occurs for Galileo, as might be expected.

  19. Measurements of Aerodynamic Heat Transfer and Boundary-Layer Transition on a 15 deg. Cone in Free Flight at Supersonic Mach Numbers up to 5.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Charles B.; Lee, Dorothy B.

    1961-01-01

    Measurements of aerodynamic heat transfer have been made at several stations on the 15 deg total-angle conical nose of a rocket-propelled model in free flight at Mach numbers up to 5.2. Data are presented for a range of local Mach number just outside the boundary layer from 1.40 to 4.65 and a range of local Reynolds number from 3.8 x 10(exp 6) to 46.5 x 10(exp 6), based on length from the nose tip to a measurement station. Laminar, transitional, and turbulent heat-transfer coefficients were measured. The laminar data were in agreement with laminar theory for cones, and the turbulent data agreed well with turbulent theory for cones using Reynolds number based on length from the nose tip. At a nearly constant ratio of wall to local static temperature of 1.2 the Reynolds number of transition increased from 14 x 10(exp 6) to 30 x 10(exp 6) as Mach number increased from 1.4 to 2.9 and then decreased to 17 x 10(exp 6) as Mach number increased to 3.7. At Mach numbers near 3.5, transition Reynolds numbers appeared to be independent of skin temperature at skin temperatures very cold with respect to adiabatic wall temperature. The transition Reynolds number was 17.7 x 10(exp 6) at a condition of Mach number and ratio of wall to local static temperature near that for which three-dimensional disturbance theory has been evaluated and has predicted laminar boundary-layer stability to very high Reynolds numbers (approximately 10(exp 12)).

  20. Aerodynamic Design Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan; Madavan, Nateri K.

    2003-01-01

    The design of aerodynamic components of aircraft, such as wings or engines, involves a process of obtaining the most optimal component shape that can deliver the desired level of component performance, subject to various constraints, e.g., total weight or cost, that the component must satisfy. Aerodynamic design can thus be formulated as an optimization problem that involves the minimization of an objective function subject to constraints. A new aerodynamic design optimization procedure based on neural networks and response surface methodology (RSM) incorporates the advantages of both traditional RSM and neural networks. The procedure uses a strategy, denoted parameter-based partitioning of the design space, to construct a sequence of response surfaces based on both neural networks and polynomial fits to traverse the design space in search of the optimal solution. Some desirable characteristics of the new design optimization procedure include the ability to handle a variety of design objectives, easily impose constraints, and incorporate design guidelines and rules of thumb. It provides an infrastructure for variable fidelity analysis and reduces the cost of computation by using less-expensive, lower fidelity simulations in the early stages of the design evolution. The initial or starting design can be far from optimal. The procedure is easy and economical to use in large-dimensional design space and can be used to perform design tradeoff studies rapidly. Designs involving multiple disciplines can also be optimized. Some practical applications of the design procedure that have demonstrated some of its capabilities include the inverse design of an optimal turbine airfoil starting from a generic shape and the redesign of transonic turbines to improve their unsteady aerodynamic characteristics.

  1. Elastic Distribution of Microshutters, Measurements Obtainable on James Web Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kletetschka, Gunther; King, Todd; Mikula, Vilem

    2008-01-01

    Spectrographic astronomy measurements in the near-infrared region will be done by functional two-dimensional microshutter arrays that are being fabricated at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). These micro-shutter arrays will represent the first mission-critical MEMS devices to be flown in space. JWST will use microshutter arrays to select focal plane object. 2-D programmable aperture masks of more than 200,000 elements select such space object. The use of silicon wafer material promises high efficiency and high contrast. Microshutter operation temperature is around 35K. Microshutter arrays are fabricated as close-packed silicon nitride membranes with a unit cell size of 105 x 204 micrometers. A layer of magnetic material is deposited onto each shutter. Individual shutters are equipped with a torsion flexure. Reactive ion etching (RIE) releases the shutters so they can open up to 90 degrees using the torsion flexure. Shutter rotation is initiated into a silicon support structure via an external magnetic field. Two electrically independent aluminum electrodes are deposited, one onto each shutter and another onto the support structure side-wall, permitting electrostatic latching and 2-D addressing to hold specific shutters open via external electronics.

  2. Measurement and calculation of end wall heat transfer and aerodynamics on a nozzle guide vane in annular cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, N. W.; Jones, T. V.

    1990-06-01

    Detailed measurements of surface static pressures and heat transfer rates on the aerofoil and hub end wall of an annular nozzle guide vane (in the absence of a downstream rotor) are presented. Heat transfer rates have been measured using thin film gages in an annular cascade in the Pyestock Isentropic Light Piston Casccade. Test Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers and cascade geometry are fully representative of engine conditions. The results of 3D calculations of surface Mach number and 2D calculations of aerofoil heat transfer are presented and compared with the measurements. A new method of calculating end wall heat transfer using the axisymmetric analogue for three-dimensional boundary layers is described in detail. The method uses a 3D Euler solver to calculate the inviscid surface streamlines along which heat transfer coefficients are calculated. The metric coefficient which describes the lateral convergence or divergence of the streamlines is used to include three-dimensional effects in the calculation. The calculated heat transfer rates compare well with the measured values. Reference is made to surface flow visualization in the interpretation of the results.

  3. System Identification of a Vortex Lattice Aerodynamic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Kholodar, Denis; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The state-space presentation of an aerodynamic vortex model is considered from a classical and system identification perspective. Using an aerodynamic vortex model as a numerical simulator of a wing tunnel experiment, both full state and limited state data or measurements are considered. Two possible approaches for system identification are presented and modal controllability and observability are also considered. The theory then is applied to the system identification of a flow over an aerodynamic delta wing and typical results are presented.

  4. Introduction. Computational aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Paul G

    2007-10-15

    The wide range of uses of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aircraft design is discussed along with its role in dealing with the environmental impact of flight. Enabling technologies, such as grid generation and turbulence models, are also considered along with flow/turbulence control. The large eddy simulation, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and hybrid turbulence modelling approaches are contrasted. The CFD prediction of numerous jet configurations occurring in aerospace are discussed along with aeroelasticity for aeroengine and external aerodynamics, design optimization, unsteady flow modelling and aeroengine internal and external flows. It is concluded that there is a lack of detailed measurements (for both canonical and complex geometry flows) to provide validation and even, in some cases, basic understanding of flow physics. Not surprisingly, turbulence modelling is still the weak link along with, as ever, a pressing need for improved (in terms of robustness, speed and accuracy) solver technology, grid generation and geometry handling. Hence, CFD, as a truly predictive and creative design tool, seems a long way off. Meanwhile, extreme practitioner expertise is still required and the triad of computation, measurement and analytic solution must be judiciously used.

  5. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  6. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  7. Effect of wind tunnel acoustic modes on linear oscillating cascade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, D. H.; Fleeter, S.

    1994-01-01

    The aerodynamics of a biconvex airfoil cascade oscillating in torsion is investigated using the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. For subsonic flow and reduced frequencies as large as 0.9, airfoil surface unsteady pressures resulting from oscillation of one of the airfoils are measured using flush-mounted high-frequency-response pressure transducers. The influence coefficient data are examined in detail and then used to predict the unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade oscillating at various interblade phase angles. These results are correlated with experimental data obtained in the traveling-wave mode of oscillation and linearized analysis predictions. It is found that the unsteady pressure disturbances created by an oscillating airfoil excite wind tunnel acoustic modes, which have detrimental effects on the experimental results. Acoustic treatment is proposed to rectify this problem.

  8. Effect of wind tunnel acoustic modes on linear oscillating cascade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, Daniel H.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamics of a biconvex airfoil cascade oscillating in torsion is investigated using the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. For subsonic flow and reduced frequencies as large as 0.9, airfoil surface unsteady pressures resulting from oscillation of one of the airfoils are measured using flush-mounted high-frequency-response pressure transducers. The influence coefficient data are examined in detail and then used to predict the unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade oscillating at various interblade phase angles. These results are correlated with experimental data obtained in the traveling-wave mode of oscillation and linearized analysis predictions. It is found that the unsteady pressure disturbances created by an oscillating airfoil excite wind tunnel acoustic modes which have detrimental effects on the experimental data. Acoustic treatment is proposed to rectify this problem.

  9. Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility in linear measurements on axial images obtained by cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Nathália Cristine; Barriviera, Maurício; Junqueira, José Luiz Cintra; Panzarella, Francine Kühl

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to investigate the intra- and inter-observer variability in linear measurements with axial images obtained by PreXion (PreXion Inc., San Mateo, USA) and i-CAT (Imaging Sciences International, Xoran Technologies Inc., Hatfield, USA) CBCT scanners, with different voxel sizes. Materials and Methods A cylindrical object made from nylon with radiopaque markers (phantom) was scanned by i-CAT and PreXion 3D devices. For each axial image, measurements were taken twice in the horizontal (distance A-B) and vertical (distance C-D) directions, randomly, with a one-week interval between measurements, by four oral radiologists with five years or more experience in the use of these measuring tools. Results All of the obtained linear measurements had lower values than those of the phantom. The statistical analysis showed high intra- and inter-observer reliability (p=0.297). Compared to the real measurements, the measurements obtained using the i-CAT device and PreXion tomography, on average, revealed absolute errors ranging from 0.22 to 0.59 mm and from 0.23 to 0.63 mm, respectively. Conclusion It can be concluded that both scanners are accurate, although the linear measurements are underestimations, with no significant differences between the evaluators. PMID:28361024

  10. SU-E-I-53: Variation in Measurements of Breast Skin Thickness Obtained Using Different Imaging Modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, U; Kumaraswamy, N; Markey, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate variation in measurements of breast skin thickness obtained using different imaging modalities, including mammography, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Breast skin thicknesses as measured by mammography, CT, ultrasound, and MRI were compared. Mammographic measurements of skin thickness were obtained from published studies that utilized standard positioning (upright) and compression. CT measurements of skin thickness were obtained from a published study of a prototype breast CT scanner in which the women were in the prone position and the breast was uncompressed. Dermatological ultrasound exams of the breast skin were conducted at our institution, with the subjects in the upright position and the breast uncompressed. Breast skin thickness was calculated from breast MRI exams at our institution, with the patient in the prone position and the breast uncompressed. Results: T tests for independent samples demonstrated significant differences in the mean breast skin thickness as measured by different imaging modalities. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant differences in breast skin thickness across different quadrants of the breast for some modalities. Conclusion: The measurement of breast skin thickness is significantly different across different imaging modalities. Differences in the amount of compression and differences in patient positioning are possible reasons why measurements of breast skin thickness vary by modality.

  11. Obtaining biophysical measurements of woody vegetation from high resolution digital aerial photography in tropical and arid environments: Northern Territory, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staben, G. W.; Lucieer, A.; Evans, K. G.; Scarth, P.; Cook, G. D.

    2016-10-01

    Biophysical parameters obtained from woody vegetation are commonly measured using field based techniques which require significant investment in resources. Quantitative measurements of woody vegetation provide important information for ecological studies investigating landscape change. The fine spatial resolution of aerial photography enables identification of features such as trees and shrubs. Improvements in spatial and spectral resolution of digital aerial photographic sensors have increased the possibility of using these data in quantitative remote sensing. Obtaining biophysical measurements from aerial photography has the potential to enable it to be used as a surrogate for the collection of field data. In this study quantitative measurements obtained from digital aerial photography captured at ground sampling distance (GSD) of 15 cm (n = 50) and 30 cm (n = 52) were compared to woody biophysical parameters measured from 1 ha field plots. Supervised classification of the aerial photography using object based image analysis was used to quantify woody and non-woody vegetation components in the imagery. There was a high correlation (r ≥ 0.92) between all field measured woody canopy parameters and aerial derived green woody cover measurements, however only foliage projective cover (FPC) was found to be statistically significant (paired t-test; α = 0.01). There was no significant difference between measurements derived from imagery captured at either GSD of 15 cm and 30 cm over the same field site (n = 20). Live stand basal area (SBA) (m2 ha-1) was predicted from the aerial photographs by applying an allometric equation developed between field-measured live SBA and woody FPC. The results show that there was very little difference between live SBA predicted from FPC measured in the field or from aerial photography. The results of this study show that accurate woody biophysical parameters can be obtained from aerial photography from a range of woody vegetation

  12. A comparison of the acoustic and aerodynamic measurements of a model rotor tested in two anechoic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Lewy, S.; Caplot, M.

    1986-01-01

    Two aeroacoustic facilities--the CEPRA 19 in France and the DNW in the Netherlands--are compared. The two facilities have unique acoustic characteristics that make them appropriate for acoustic testing of model-scale helicopter rotors. An identical pressure-instrumented model-scale rotor was tested in each facility and acoustic test results are compared with full-scale-rotor test results. Blade surface pressures measured in both tunnels were used to correlated nominal rotor operating conditions in each tunnel, and also used to assess the steadiness of the rotor in each tunnel's flow. In-the-flow rotor acoustic signatures at moderate forward speeds (35-50 m/sec) are presented for each facility and discussed in relation to the differences in tunnel geometries and aeroacoustic characteristics. Both reports are presented in appendices to this paper. ;.);

  13. Application of standard and advanced open source GIS software functionality for analysis of coordinates obtained by GNSS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, Tamara

    2016-04-01

    Currently there is wide variety of GNSS measurements used in the geodetic practice. The coordinates obtained by static, kinematic or precise point positioning GNSS measurements could be analyzed by using the standard functionality of any GIS software, but the open source ones give to the users an opportunity to make themselves advanced functionality. There is an option the coordinates obtained by measurements to be stored in spatial geodatabase and information for the precision and time of measurement to be added. The data could be visualized in different coordinate systems and projections and analyzed by applying different types of spatial analysis. The process also could be automated in high degree. An example with test data is prepared. It includes automated loading of files with coordinates obtained by GNSS measurements and additional information for the precision and the time of measurements. Standard and advanced open source GIS software functionality is used for automation of the analysis process. Also, graph theory is implemented for making time series of the data stored in the spatial geodatabase.

  14. Supersonic tests of an 0.015 scale space shuttle mated vehicle model (67-OTS) in the LaRC UPWT to obtain aerodynamic force data (IA42A/B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, R.; Burrows, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted of the NASA/Rockwell 0.015 scale configuration 4 mated space shuttle vehicle. Data were obtained for a range of Mach numbers from 1.60 to 4.63 and angles of attack from minus 10 degrees to plus 10 degrees. A complete model build-up was performed. Longitudinal and lateral directional stability and control data were obtained for the tank alone, tank plus solid rocket boosters, and mated configuration of tank plus orbiter plus solid rocket boosters. Single component rudder hinge moment data were obtained at rudder deflections of zero degrees and minus 20 degrees for each Mach number tested.

  15. Photogrammetry of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushner, Laura Kathryn; Littell, Justin D.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, two large-scale models of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic decelerator were tested in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center. One of the objectives of this test was to measure model deflections under aerodynamic loading that approximated expected flight conditions. The measurements were acquired using stereo photogrammetry. Four pairs of stereo cameras were mounted inside the NFAC test section, each imaging a particular section of the HIAD. The views were then stitched together post-test to create a surface deformation profile. The data from the photogram- metry system will largely be used for comparisons to and refinement of Fluid Structure Interaction models. This paper describes how a commercial photogrammetry system was adapted to make the measurements and presents some preliminary results.

  16. Agreement of measures obtained radiographically and by the OSI CA-6000 Spine Motion Analyzer for cervical spinal motion.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Cheryl M; Schuit, Dale; Johnson, Robert D; Knecht, H; Levine, Phyllis

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the agreement between angular measures of cervical spinal motion obtained from radiographs and from measures recorded by the OSI CA 6000 Spine Motion Analyzer (OSI SMA) in asymptomatic subjects. Fourteen subjects performed each of the following motions two times while wearing the OSI SMA: cervical flexion, extension, side bending to the right and left. Each motion was performed once for the cervical radiograph. The difference between the values obtained by the two methods was plotted against the average of those values for each subject to illustrate the level of agreement of the two methods. The plotted points were widely scattered, with a large range between the limits of agreement. Range of motion values taken from the OSI SMA were not similar to those obtained from radiographs for the motions of the cervical spine.

  17. Aerodynamics of two-dimensional flapping wings in tandem configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lua, K. B.; Lu, H.; Zhang, X. H.; Lim, T. T.; Yeo, K. S.

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports a fundamental investigation on the aerodynamics of two-dimensional flapping wings in tandem configuration in forward flight. Of particular interest are the effects of phase angle (φ) and center-to-center distance (L) between the front wing and the rear wing on the aerodynamic force generation at a Reynolds number of 5000. Both experimental and numerical methods were employed. A force sensor was used to measure the time-history aerodynamic forces experienced by the two wings and digital particle image velocimetry was utilized to obtain the corresponding flow structures. Both the front wing and the rear wing executed the same simple harmonic motions with φ ranging from -180° to 180° and four values of L, i.e., 1.5c, 2c, 3c, and 4c (c is the wing chord length). Results show that at fixed L = 2c, tandem wings perform better than the sum of two single wings that flap independently in terms of thrust for phase angle approximately from -90° to 90°. The maximum thrust on the rear wing occurs during in-phase flapping (φ = 0°). Correlation of transient thrust and flow structure indicates that there are generally two types of wing-wake interactions, depending on whether the rear wing crosses the shear layer shed from the front wing. Finally, increasing wing spacing has similar effect as reducing the phase angle, and an approximate mathematical model is derived to describe the relationship between these two parameters.

  18. Subsonic/supersonic aerodynamic characteristics for a tactical supercruiser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.; Bare, E. A.; Hollenback, D.; Hutchison, R.

    1984-01-01

    A series of cooperative NASA-Langley/Boeing experimental investigations have been conducted to determine the aeropropulsive characteristics of an advanced tactical fighter designed for supersonic cruise. These investigations were conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic and Lewis 10 x 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnels at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 2.47. This fighter is a Mach 2.0, 49,000 pound class vehicle that features a close-coupled canard and underwing propulsion units that utilize multifunction two-dimensional exhaust nozzles. Tests were conducted to determine the basic aerodynamic characteristics of the configuration with flow-through nacelles in which the spillage effects of representative inlets were measured. The effects of thrust-induced forces on overall aerodynamic performance were evaluated with a series of multifunction nozzles installed on air-powered nacelles. An axisymmetric nozzle configuration was also tested to obtain comparative aeropropulsive performance. Trim aerodynamic characteristics for the flow-through and powered configurations and the effect of thrust vectoring at subsonic speeds are presented.

  19. Analysis of aerodynamic noise generated from inclined circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haramoto, Yasutake; Yasuda, Shouji; Matsuzaki, Kazuyoshi; Munekata, Mizue; Ohba, Hideki

    2000-06-01

    Making clear the generation mechanism of fluid dynamic noise is essential to reduce noise deriving from turbomachinery. The analysis of the aerodynamic noise generated from circular cylinder is carried out numerically and experimentally in a low noise wind tunnel. In this study, aerodynamic sound radiated from a circular cylinder in uniform flow is predicted numerically by the following two step method. First, the three-dimensional unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is solved using the high order accurate upwind scheme. Next, the sound pressure level at the observed point is calculated from the fluctuating surface pressure on the cylinder, based on modified Lighthill-Curl’s equation. It is worth to note that the noise generated from the model is reduced rapidly when it is inclined against the mean flow. In other words, the peak level of the radiated noise decreases rapidly with inclination of the circular cylinder. The simulated SPL for the inclined circular cylinder is compared with the measured value, and good agreement is obtained for the peak spectrum frequency of the sound pressure level and tendency of noise reduction. So we expect that the change of flow structures makes reduction of the aerodynamic noise from the inclined models.

  20. Concordance of macular pigment measurements obtained using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry, dual-wavelength autofluorescence, and single-wavelength reflectance.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Jessica L; Stack, Jim; Beatty, Stephen; Nolan, John M

    2013-11-01

    This study compares in vivo measurements of macular pigment (MP) obtained using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP; Macular Metrics Densitometer(™)), dual-wavelength fundus autofluorescence (Heidelberg Spectralis(®) HRA + OCT MultiColor) and single-wavelength fundus reflectance (Zeiss Visucam(®) 200). MP was measured in one eye of 62 subjects on each device. Data from 49 subjects (79%) was suitable for analysis. Agreement between the Densitometer and Spectralis was investigated at various eccentricities using a variety of quantitative and graphical methods, including: Pearson correlation coefficient to measure degree of scatter (precision), accuracy coefficient, concordance correlation coefficient (ccc), paired t-test, scatter and Bland-Altman plots. The relationship between max MP from the Visucam and central MP from the Spectralis and Densitometer was investigated using regression methods. Agreement was strong between the Densitometer and Spectralis at all central eccentricities (e.g. at 0.25° eccentricity: accuracy = 0.97, precision = 0.90, ccc = 0.87). Regression analysis showed a very weak relationship between the Visucam and Densitometer (e.g. Visucam max on Densitometer central MP: R(2) = 0.008, p = 0.843). Regression analysis also demonstrated a weak relationship between MP measured by the Spectralis and Visucam (e.g. Visucam max on Spectralis central MP: R(2) = 0.047, p = 0.348). MP values obtained using the Heidelberg Spectralis are comparable to MP values obtained using the Densitometer. In contrast, MP values obtained using the Zeiss Visucam are not comparable with either the Densitometer or the Spectralis MP measuring devices. Taking cHFP as the current standard to which other MP measuring devices should be compared, the Spectralis is suitable for use in a clinical and research setting, whereas the Visucam is not.

  1. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  2. Experimental Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of the 2001 Mars Surveyor Precision Lander with Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; OConnell, Tod F.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Prabhu, Ramadas K.; Alter, Stephen J.

    2002-01-01

    Aerodynamic wind-tunnel screening tests were conducted on a 0.029 scale model of a proposed Mars Surveyor 2001 Precision Lander (70 deg half angle spherically blunted cone with a conical afterbody). The primary experimental objective was to determine the effectiveness of a single flap to trim the vehicle at incidence during a lifting hypersonic planetary entry. The laminar force and moment data, presented in the form of coefficients, and shock patterns from schlieren photography were obtained in the NASA Langley Aerothermodynamic Laboratory for post-normal shock Reynolds numbers (based on forebody diameter) ranging from 2,637 to 92,350, angles of attack ranging from 0 tip to 23 degrees at 0 and 2 degree sideslip, and normal-shock density ratios of 5 and 12. Based upon the proposed entry trajectory of the 2001 Lander, the blunt body heavy gas tests in CF, simulate a Mach number of approximately 12 based upon a normal shock density ratio of 12 in flight at Mars. The results from this experimental study suggest that when traditional means of providing aerodynamic trim for this class of planetary entry vehicle are not possible (e.g. offset c.g.), a single flap can provide similar aerodynamic performance. An assessment of blunt body aerodynamic effects attributed to a real gas were obtained by synergistic testing in Mach 6 ideal-air at a comparable Reynolds number. From an aerodynamic perspective, an appropriately sized flap was found to provide sufficient trim capability at the desired L/D for precision landing. Inviscid hypersonic flow computations using an unstructured grid were made to provide a quick assessment of the Lander aerodynamics. Navier-Stokes computational predictions were found to be in very good agreement with experimental measurement.

  3. Aerodynamic Tests of the Space Launch System for Database Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Victor E.; Mayle, Melody N.; Blevins, John A.; Crosby, William A.; Purinton, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The Aerosciences Branch (EV33) at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been responsible for a series of wind tunnel tests on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Launch System (SLS) vehicles. The primary purpose of these tests was to obtain aerodynamic data during the ascent phase and establish databases that can be used by the Guidance, Navigation, and Mission Analysis Branch (EV42) for trajectory simulations. The paper describes the test particulars regarding models and measurements and the facilities used, as well as database preparations.

  4. Applied computational aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The present volume discusses the original development of the panel method, the mapping solutions and singularity distributions of linear potential schemes, the capabilities of full-potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes schemes, the use of the grid-generation methodology in applied aerodynamics, subsonic airfoil design, inverse airfoil design for transonic applications, the divergent trailing-edge airfoil innovation in CFD, Euler and potential computational results for selected aerodynamic configurations, and the application of CFD to wing high-lift systems. Also discussed are high-lift wing modifications for an advanced-capability EA-6B aircraft, Navier-Stokes methods for internal and integrated propulsion system flow predictions, the use of zonal techniques for analysis of rotor-stator interaction, CFD applications to complex configurations, CFD applications in component aerodynamic design of the V-22, Navier-Stokes computations of a complete F-16, CFD at supersonic/hypersonic speeds, and future CFD developments.

  5. Transpiration effects in perforated plate aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwaba, R.; Ochrymiuk, T.

    2016-10-01

    Perforated walls find a wide use as a method of flow control and effusive cooling. Experimental investigations of the gas flow past perforated plate with microholes (110μm) were carried out. The wide range of pressure at the inlet were investigated. Two distinguishable flow regimes were obtained: laminar and turbulent regime.The results are in good agreement with theory, simulations and experiments on large scale perforated plates and compressible flows in microtubules. Formulation of the transpiration law was associated with the porous plate aerodynamics properties. Using a model of transpiration flow the “aerodynamic porosity” could be determined for microholes.

  6. Compendium of Unsteady Aerodynamic Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    Configurations 1 NACA 64A006. Oscillating flap 1-1 by R.J. Zwaan, NLR 2 NACA 64A010 (NASA Amos model). Oscillatory pitching 2-1 by Sanford S. Nivis, NASA...Nexrint NACA 64A006 Flap oscillation NLR Data Set 1.CT Cases 1,2,3,5,6,7,.8*,l0*,ll NACA 64A010 Data Set 2. NASA Ames model CT Cases 1,2,3,4,5,6...1.9 Oiloek diagra of ma.iuuring equipbent 2-1 DATA SET 2 NACA 64A010 (NASA AMES MODEL) OSCILLATORY PITCHING by Sanford S. Davis, NASA Ames

  7. Status of Nozzle Aerodynamic Technology at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David M.; Smith, Bud; Owens, Zachary

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the status of nozzle aerodynamic technology at MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center). The objectives of this presentation were to provide insight into MSFC in-house nozzle aerodynamic technology, design, analysis, and testing. Under CDDF (Center Director's Discretionary Fund), 'Altitude Compensating Nozzle Technology', are the following tasks: Development of in-house ACN (Altitude Compensating Nozzle) aerodynamic design capability; Building in-house experience for all aspects of ACN via End-to-End Nozzle Test Program; Obtaining Experimental Data for Annular Aerospike: Thrust eta, TVC (thrust vector control) capability and surface pressures. To support selection/optimization of future Launch Vehicle propulsion we needed a parametric design and performance tool for ACN. We chose to start with the ACN Aerospike Nozzles.

  8. Results of an investigation of the space shuttle integrated vehicle aerodynamic heating characteristics obtained using the 0.0175-scale model 60-OTS in AEDC tunnel A during tests IH41 and IH41A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, J. W.; Dye, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    A thin skin thermocouple test was conducted to obtain heat-transfer data on the space shuttle integrated vehicle during the ascent phase of the flight profile. The test model was the 0.0175-scale thin skin thermocouple model (60-OTS) of the Rockwell International vehicle 5 configuration. The test was conducted at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, and 5.5, and a free stream unit Reynolds number of 5 million per ft. Heat transfer data were obtained for angles of attack of 0, + or - 5, and 10 deg and yaw angles of 0, 3, and 6 deg. The integrated vehicle model was tested with the external tank configured with both a smooth ogive nose and an ogive nose with a spherical nose tip (nipple nose). The remainder of the test was conducted with the external tank installed alone in the tunnel.

  9. Detailed pressure distribution measurements obtained on several configurations of an aspect-ratio-7 variable twist wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holbrook, G. T.; Dunham, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed pressure distribution measurements were made for 11 twist configurations of a unique, multisegmented wing model having an aspect ratio of 7 and a taper ratio of 1. These configurations encompassed span loads ranging from that of an untwisted wing to simple flapped wings both with and without upper-surface spoilers attached. For each of the wing twist configurations, electronic scanning pressure transducers were used to obtain 580 surface pressure measurements over the wing in about 0.1 sec. Integrated pressure distribution measurements compared favorably with force-balance measurements of lift on the model when the model centerbody lift was included. Complete plots and tabulations of the pressure distribution data for each wing twist configuration are provided.

  10. A comparison of vertical velocity in cirrus obtained from aircraft and lidar divergence measurements during FIRE. [First ISCCP Regional Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gultepe, Ismail; Heymsfield, A. J.; Lenschow, D. H.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques are presented to obtain vertical velocity in cirrus clouds from in situ aircraft lateral wind measurements and from ground-based remote Doppler lidar measurements. The approach used is to calculate w from the integral of the divergence of the horizontal velocity around a closed path. Divergence measurements from both aircraft and Doppler lidar are discussed. The principal errors in the calculation of w from aircraft lateral wind measurements are bias in the lateral wind, ground speed errors, and error due to vertical shear of the horizontal wind. For Doppler lidar measurements the principal errors are in the estimate of mean terminal velocity and the zeroth order coefficients of the Fourier series that is fitted to the data. The technique is applied to a cirrus cloud investigated during the FIRE (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Regional Experiment) Cirrus Intensive Field Observation Program. The results indicate that the error in w is about + or - 14 cm/s from the aircraft technique; this can be reduced to about + or - 2 to 3 cm/s with technical improvements in both ground speed and lateral velocity measurements. The error in w from Doppler lidar measurements, which is about + or - 8 cm/s, can be reduced to about + or - 5 cm/s by improvements in the Doppler velocity measurements with technology that is currently available.

  11. Computational aerodynamics and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The role of computational aerodynamics in design is reviewed with attention given to the design process; the proper role of computations; the importance of calibration, interpretation, and verification; the usefulness of a given computational capability; and the marketing of new codes. Examples of computational aerodynamics in design are given with particular emphasis on the Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology. Finally, future prospects are noted, with consideration given to the role of advanced computers, advances in numerical solution techniques, turbulence models, complex geometries, and computational design procedures. Previously announced in STAR as N82-33348

  12. Nonlinear aerodynamic wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, Ellwood

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of new nonlinear theoretical techniques is demonstrated for supersonic wing design. The new technology was utilized to define outboard panels for an existing advanced tactical fighter model. Mach 1.6 maneuver point design and multi-operating point compromise surfaces were developed and tested. High aerodynamic efficiency was achieved at the design conditions. A corollary result was that only modest supersonic penalties were incurred to meet multiple aerodynamic requirements. The nonlinear potential analysis of a practical configuration arrangement correlated well with experimental data.

  13. Determination of corrections to flow direction measurements obtained with a wing-tip mounted sensor. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moul, T. M.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of corrections for flow direction measurements obtained with a wing-tip mounted sensor was investigated. Corrections for the angle of attack and sideslip, measured by sensors mounted in front of each wing tip of a general aviation airplane, were determined. These flow corrections were obtained from both wind-tunnel and flight tests over a large angle-of-attack range. Both the angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip flow corrections were found to be substantial. The corrections were a function of the angle of attack and angle of sideslip. The effects of wing configuration changes, small changes in Reynolds number, and spinning rotation on the angle-of-attack flow correction were found to be small. The angle-of-attack flow correction determined from the static wind-tunnel tests agreed reasonably well with the correction determined from flight tests.

  14. Measuring internal energy deposition in collisional activation using hydrated ion nanocalorimetry to obtain peptide dissociation energies and entropies.

    PubMed

    Demireva, Maria; Williams, Evan R

    2010-07-01

    The internal energy deposited in both on- and off-resonance collisional activation in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is measured with ion nanocalorimetry and is used to obtain information about the dissociation energy and entropy of a protonated peptide. Activation of Na(+)(H(2)O)(30) results in sequential loss of water molecules, and the internal energy of the activated ion can be obtained from the abundances of the product ions. Information about internal energy deposition in on-resonance collisional activation of protonated peptides is inferred from dissociation data obtained under identical conditions for hydrated ions that have similar m/z and degrees-of-freedom. From experimental internal energy deposition curves and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theory, dissociation data as a function of collision energy for protonated leucine enkephalin, which has a comparable m/z and degrees-of-freedom as Na(+)(H(2)O)(30), are modeled. The threshold dissociation energies and entropies are correlated for data acquired at a single time point, resulting in a relatively wide range of threshold dissociation energies (1.1 to 1.7 eV) that can fit these data. However, this range of values could be significantly reduced by fitting data acquired at different dissociation times. By measuring the internal energy of an activated ion, the number of fitting parameters necessary to obtain information about the dissociation parameters by modeling these data is reduced and could result in improved accuracy for such methods.

  15. Computer graphics in aerodynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cozzolongo, J. V.

    1984-01-01

    The use of computer graphics and its application to aerodynamic analyses on a routine basis is outlined. The mathematical modelling of the aircraft geometries and the shading technique implemented are discussed. Examples of computer graphics used to display aerodynamic flow field data and aircraft geometries are shown. A future need in computer graphics for aerodynamic analyses is addressed.

  16. Inlet noise on 0.5-meter-diameter NASA QF-1 fan as measured in an unmodified compressor aerodynamic test facility and in an anechoic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelder, T. F.; Soltis, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Narrowband analysis revealed grossly similar sound pressure level spectra in each facility. Blade passing frequency (BPF) noise and multiple pure tone (MPT) noise were superimposed on a broadband (BB) base noise. From one-third octave bandwidth sound power analyses the BPF noise (harmonics combined), and the MPT noise (harmonics combined, excepting BPF's) agreed between facilities within 1.5 db or less over the range of speeds and flows tested. Detailed noise and aerodynamic performance is also presented.

  17. The crossmodal congruency task as a means to obtain an objective behavioral measure in the rubber hand illusion paradigm.

    PubMed

    Zopf, Regine; Savage, Greg; Williams, Mark A

    2013-07-26

    The rubber hand illusion (RHI) is a popular experimental paradigm. Participants view touch on an artificial rubber hand while the participants' own hidden hand is touched. If the viewed and felt touches are given at the same time then this is sufficient to induce the compelling experience that the rubber hand is one's own hand. The RHI can be used to investigate exactly how the brain constructs distinct body representations for one's own body. Such representations are crucial for successful interactions with the external world. To obtain a subjective measure of the RHI, researchers typically ask participants to rate statements such as "I felt as if the rubber hand were my hand". Here we demonstrate how the crossmodal congruency task can be used to obtain an objective behavioral measure within this paradigm. The variant of the crossmodal congruency task we employ involves the presentation of tactile targets and visual distractors. Targets and distractors are spatially congruent (i.e. same finger) on some trials and incongruent (i.e. different finger) on others. The difference in performance between incongruent and congruent trials - the crossmodal congruency effect (CCE) - indexes multisensory interactions. Importantly, the CCE is modulated both by viewing a hand as well as the synchrony of viewed and felt touch which are both crucial factors for the RHI. The use of the crossmodal congruency task within the RHI paradigm has several advantages. It is a simple behavioral measure which can be repeated many times and which can be obtained during the illusion while participants view the artificial hand. Furthermore, this measure is not susceptible to observer and experimenter biases. The combination of the RHI paradigm with the crossmodal congruency task allows in particular for the investigation of multisensory processes which are critical for modulations of body representations as in the RHI.

  18. An examination of the equivalency of self-report measures obtained from crowdsourced versus undergraduate student samples.

    PubMed

    Briones, Elizabeth M; Benham, Grant

    2016-02-23

    Increasingly, researchers have begun to explore the potential of the Internet to reach beyond the traditional undergraduate sample. In the present study, we sought to compare the data obtained from a conventional undergraduate college-student sample to data collected via two online survey recruitment platforms. In order to examine whether the data sampled from the three populations were equivalent, we conducted a test of equivalency using inferential confidence intervals-an approach that differs from the more traditional null hypothesis significance testing. The results showed that the data obtained via the two online recruitment platforms, the Amazon Mechanical Turk crowdsourcing site and the virtual environment of Second Life, were statistically equivalent to the data obtained from the college sample, on the basis of means of standardized measures of psychological stress and sleep quality. Additionally, correlations between the sleep and stress measures were not statistically different between the groups. These results, along with practical considerations for the use of these recruitment platforms, are discussed, and recommendations for other researchers who may be considering the use of these platforms are provided.

  19. System Dynamic Analysis of a Wind Tunnel Model with Applications to Improve Aerodynamic Data Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph David

    1997-01-01

    The research investigates the effect of wind tunnel model system dynamics on measured aerodynamic data. During wind tunnel tests designed to obtain lift and drag data, the required aerodynamic measurements are the steady-state balance forces and moments, pressures, and model attitude. However, the wind tunnel model system can be subjected to unsteady aerodynamic and inertial loads which result in oscillatory translations and angular rotations. The steady-state force balance and inertial model attitude measurements are obtained by filtering and averaging data taken during conditions of high model vibrations. The main goals of this research are to characterize the effects of model system dynamics on the measured steady-state aerodynamic data and develop a correction technique to compensate for dynamically induced errors. Equations of motion are formulated for the dynamic response of the model system subjected to arbitrary aerodynamic and inertial inputs. The resulting modal model is examined to study the effects of the model system dynamic response on the aerodynamic data. In particular, the equations of motion are used to describe the effect of dynamics on the inertial model attitude, or angle of attack, measurement system that is used routinely at the NASA Langley Research Center and other wind tunnel facilities throughout the world. This activity was prompted by the inertial model attitude sensor response observed during high levels of model vibration while testing in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The inertial attitude sensor cannot distinguish between the gravitational acceleration and centrifugal accelerations associated with wind tunnel model system vibration, which results in a model attitude measurement bias error. Bias errors over an order of magnitude greater than the required device accuracy were found in the inertial model attitude measurements during dynamic testing of two model systems. Based on a theoretical modal

  20. Position control optimization of aerodynamic brake device for high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Jianyong; Luo, Zhuojun; Chen, Zhongkai

    2014-03-01

    The aerodynamic braking is a clean and non-adhesion braking, and can be used to provide extra braking force during high-speed emergency braking. The research of aerodynamic braking has attracted more and more attentions in recent years. However, most researchers in this field focus on aerodynamic effects and seldom on issues of position control of the aerodynamic braking board. The purpose of this paper is to explore position control optimization of the braking board in an aerodynamic braking prototype. The mathematical models of the hydraulic drive unit in the aerodynamic braking system are analyzed in detail, and the simulation models are established. Three control functions—constant, linear, and quadratic—are explored. Two kinds of criteria, including the position steady-state error and the acceleration of the piston rod, are used to evaluate system performance. Simulation results show that the position steady state-error is reduced from around 12-2 mm by applying a linear instead of a constant function, while the acceleration is reduced from 25.71-3.70 m/s2 with a quadratic control function. Use of the quadratic control function is shown to improve system performance. Experimental results obtained by measuring the position response of the piston rod on a test-bench also suggest a reduced position error and smooth movement of the piston rod. This implies that the acceleration is smaller when using the quadratic function, thus verifying the effectiveness of control schemes to improve to system performance. This paper proposes an effective and easily implemented control scheme that improves the position response of hydraulic cylinders during position control.

  1. Aeroacoustics and aerodynamic performance of a rotor with flatback airfoils.

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, Joshua A.; Barone, Matthew Franklin; Christiansen, Monica; Simley, Eric

    2010-06-01

    The aerodynamic performance and aeroacoustic noise sources of a rotor employing flatback airfoils have been studied in field test campaign and companion modeling effort. The field test measurements of a sub-scale rotor employing nine meter blades include both performance measurements and acoustic measurements. The acoustic measurements are obtained using a 45 microphone beamforming array, enabling identification of both noise source amplitude and position. Semi-empirical models of flatback airfoil blunt trailing edge noise are developed and calibrated using available aeroacoustic wind tunnel test data. The model results and measurements indicate that flatback airfoil noise is less than drive train noise for the current test turbine. It is also demonstrated that the commonly used Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model for blunt trailing edge noise may be over-conservative in predicting flatback airfoil noise for wind turbine applications.

  2. Study on corrections of dose images obtained with Gafchromic EBT3 films for measurements in phantoms irradiated with proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gambarini, Grazia; Regazzoni, Veronica; Massari, Eleonora; Mirandola, Alfredo; Ciocca, Mario

    2015-07-01

    The response of Gafchromic EBT3 films depends on the LET of radiation. Some EBT3 films were exposed, in a solid-water phantom, to proton beams of various energies and the obtained depth-dose profiles were compared with the calculated profiles. As expected, a consistent reduction of the response in the Bragg peak region was observed. The ratio of measured and calculated values was evaluated, along dose profiles, for some energies of the incident proton beam. A method for correcting the dose images obtained with EBT3 films has been proposed and tested. The results confirm that the proposed method can be advantageous for achieving spatial distribution of the absorbed dose in proton therapy and deserves to be exhaustively developed. (authors)

  3. Remote measurement of water color in coastal waters. [spectral radiance data used to obtain quantitative values for chlorophyll and turbidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weldon, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to develop procedure to obtain quantitative values for chlorophyll and turbidity in coastal waters by observing the changes in spectral radiance of the backscattered spectrum. The technique under consideration consists of Examining Exotech model 20-D spectral radiometer data and determining which radiance ratios best correlated with chlorophyll and turbidity measurements as obtained from analyses of water samples and sechi visibility readings. Preliminary results indicate that there is a correlation between backscattered light and chlorophyll concentration and secchi visibility. The tests were conducted with the spectrometer mounted in a light aircraft over the Mississippi Sound at altitudes of 2.5K, 2.8K and 10K feet.

  4. Low Speed Aerodynamics of the X-38 CRV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komerath, N. M.; Funk, R.; Ames, R. G.; Mahalingam, R.; Matos, C.

    1998-01-01

    This project was performed in support of the engineering development of the NASA X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV)system. Wind tunnel experiments were used to visualize various aerodynamic phenomena encountered by the CRV during the final stages of descent and landing. Scale models of the CRV were used to visualize vortex structures above and below the vehicle, and in its wake, and to quantify their trajectories. The effect of flaperon deflection on these structures was studied. The structure and dynamics of the CRV's wake during the drag parachute deployment stage were measured. Regions of high vorticity were identified using surveys conducted in several planes using a vortex meter. Periodic shedding of the vortex sheets from the sides of the CRV was observed using laser sheet videography as the CRV reached high angles of attack during the quasi-steady pitch-up prior to parafoil deployment. Using spectral analysis of hot-film anemometer data, the Strouhal number of these wake fluctuations was found to be 0.14 based on the model span. Phenomena encountered in flight test during parafoil operation were captured in scale-model tests, and a video photogrammetry technique was implemented to obtain parafoil surface shapes during flight in the tunnel. Forces on the parafoil were resolved using tension gages on individual lines. The temporal evolution of the phenomenon of leading edge collapse was captured. Laser velocimetry was used to demonstrate measurement of the porosity of the parafoil surface. From these measurements, several physical explanations have been developed for phenomena observed at various stages of the X-38 development program. Quantitative measurement capabilities have also been demonstrated for continued refinement of the aerodynamic technologies employed in the X-38 project. Detailed results from these studies are given in an AIAA Paper, two slide presentations, and other material which are given on a Web-based archival resource. This is the Digital

  5. Airfoil Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, E.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, ONERA, and the University of Illinois are conducting a major research program whose goal is to improve our understanding of the aerodynamic scaling of ice accretions on airfoils. The program when it is completed will result in validated scaled simulation methods that produce the essential aerodynamic features of the full-scale iced-airfoil. This research will provide some of the first, high-fidelity, full-scale, iced-airfoil aerodynamic data. An initial study classified ice accretions based on their aerodynamics into four types: roughness, streamwise ice, horn ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. Subscale testing using a NACA 23012 airfoil was performed in the NASA IRT and University of Illinois wind tunnel to better understand the aerodynamics of these ice types and to test various levels of ice simulation fidelity. These studies are briefly reviewed here and have been presented in more detail in other papers. Based on these results, full-scale testing at the ONERA F1 tunnel using cast ice shapes obtained from molds taken in the IRT will provide full-scale iced airfoil data from full-scale ice accretions. Using these data as a baseline, the final step is to validate the simulation methods in scale in the Illinois wind tunnel. Computational ice accretion methods including LEWICE and ONICE have been used to guide the experiments and are briefly described and results shown. When full-scale and simulation aerodynamic results are available, these data will be used to further develop computational tools. Thus the purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the program and key results to date.

  6. Wind-tunnel/flight correlation study of aerodynamic characteristics of a large flexible supersonic cruise airplane (XB-70-1). 3: A comparison between characteristics predicted from wind-tunnel measurements and those measured in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaiz, H. H.; Peterson, J. B., Jr.; Daugherty, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A program was undertaken by NASA to evaluate the accuracy of a method for predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of large supersonic cruise airplanes. This program compared predicted and flight-measured lift, drag, angle of attack, and control surface deflection for the XB-70-1 airplane for 14 flight conditions with a Mach number range from 0.76 to 2.56. The predictions were derived from the wind-tunnel test data of a 0.03-scale model of the XB-70-1 airplane fabricated to represent the aeroelastically deformed shape at a 2.5 Mach number cruise condition. Corrections for shape variations at the other Mach numbers were included in the prediction. For most cases, differences between predicted and measured values were within the accuracy of the comparison. However, there were significant differences at transonic Mach numbers. At a Mach number of 1.06 differences were as large as 27 percent in the drag coefficients and 20 deg in the elevator deflections. A brief analysis indicated that a significant part of the difference between drag coefficients was due to the incorrect prediction of the control surface deflection required to trim the airplane.

  7. New aspects of subsonic aerodynamic noise theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Howes, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    A theory of aerodynamic noise is presented which differs from Lighthill's theory primarily in the way in which convection of the noise sources is treated. The sound directivity pattern obtained from the present theory agrees better with jet-noise directivity data than does that obtained from Lighthill's theory. The results imply that the shear-noise contribution to jet noise is smaller than previously expected.

  8. Subsonic and supersonic indicial aerodynamics and aerodynamic transfer function for complex configurations. [aerodynamic configurations for subsonic and supersonic speeds using the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morino, L.

    1974-01-01

    A general theory for indicial-potential-compressible aerodynamics around complex configurations is presented. The motion is assumed to consist of constant subsonic or supersonic speed (steady state) and small perturbations around the steady state. Using the finite-element method to discretize the space problem, a set of differential-difference equations in time relating the potential to its normal derivative on the surface of the body was obtained. The aerodynamics transfer function was derived by using standard method of operational calculus.

  9. D-region electron densities obtained by differential absorption and phase measurements with a 3-MHz-Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, W.; Latteck, R.; Friedrich, M.; Dalin, P.; Kirkwood, S.; Engler, N.; Holdsworth, D.

    2005-08-01

    A Doppler radar at 3.17 MHz has been installed close to the Andøya Rocket Range as part of the ALOMAR observatory at Andenes, Norway (69.3°N, 16.0°E) in summer 2002 to improve the ground based capabilities for measurements of small scale features and electron number densities in the mesosphere. The main feature of the new radar is the transmitting/receiving antenna which is arranged as a Mills Cross of 29 crossed half-wave dipoles with a minimum beam width of about 7°. The modular transceiver system provides high flexibility in beam forming and pointing as well as in switching of the polarisation between ordinary and extraordinary mode on transmission and reception. Doppler winds and electron number densities can be measured between about 55 km and 90 km with a time resolution of 9 minutes. The electron number density profiles derived with differential absorption (DAE) and differential phase (DPE) measurements are in remarkable good agreement. We discuss the diurnal and seasonal variability of electron densities obtained at Andenes in 2004/2005, the response of D-region electron densities to geomagnetic disturbances and solar proton events. The results are compared with rocket measurements from Andenes and with observations from EISCAT VHF radar at Tromsø.

  10. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  11. Compendium of NASA Langley reports on hypersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabo, Frances E.; Cary, Aubrey M.; Lawson, Shirley W.

    1987-01-01

    Reference is made to papers published by the Langley Research Center in various areas of hypersonic aerodynamics for the period 1950 to 1986. The research work was performed either in-house by the Center staff or by other personnel supported entirely or in part by grants or contracts. Abstracts have been included with the references when available. The references are listed chronologically and are grouped under the following general headings: (1) Aerodynamic Measurements - Single Shapes; (2) Aerodynamic Measurements - Configurations; (3) Aero-Heating; (4) Configuration Studies; (5) Propulsion Integration Experiment; (6) Propulsion Integration - Study; (7) Analysis Methods; (8) Test Techniques; and (9) Airframe Active Cooling Systems.

  12. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  13. Aerodynamic Leidenfrost effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Anaïs; Bird, James C.; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2016-12-01

    When deposited on a plate moving quickly enough, any liquid can levitate as it does when it is volatile on a very hot solid (Leidenfrost effect). In the aerodynamic Leidenfrost situation, air gets inserted between the liquid and the moving solid, a situation that we analyze. We observe two types of entrainment. (i) The thickness of the air gap is found to increase with the plate speed, which is interpreted in the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin frame: Air is dynamically dragged along the surface and its thickness results from a balance between capillary and viscous effects. (ii) Air set in motion by the plate exerts a force on the levitating liquid. We discuss the magnitude of this aerodynamic force and show that it can be exploited to control the liquid and even to drive it against gravity.

  14. Microphysical and optical properties of precipitating drizzle and ice particles obtained from alternated lidar and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayet, J.-F.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Jourdan, O.; Shcherbakov, V.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Neuber, R.

    2007-07-01

    During the international ASTAR experiment (Arctic Study of Aerosols, Clouds and Radiation) carried out from Longyearbyen (Spitsbergen) from 10 May to 11 June 2004, the AWI (Alfred Wegener Institute) Polar 2 aircraft was equipped with a unique combination of remote and in situ instruments. The airborne AMALi lidar provided downward backscatter and Depolarisation ratio profiles at 532 nm wavelength. The in situ instrumental setup comprised a Polar Nephelometer, a Cloud Particle Imager (CPI) as well as a Nevzorov and standard PMS probes to measure cloud particle properties in terms of scattering characteristics, particle morphology and size, and in-cloud partitioning of ice/water content. The objective of the paper is to present the results of a case study related to observations with ice crystals precipitating down to supercooled boundary-layer stratocumulus. The flight pattern was predefined in a way that firstly the AMALi lidar probed the cloud tops to guide the in situ measurements into a particular cloud formation. Three kinds of clouds with different microphysical and optical properties have therefore been quasi-simultaneously observed: (i) water droplets stratiform-layer, (ii) drizzle-drops fallstreak and (iii) precipitating ice-crystals from a cirrus cloud above. The signatures of these clouds are clearly evidenced from the in situ measurements and from the lidar profiles in term of backscatter and Depolarisation ratio. Accordingly, typical lidar ratios, i.e., extinction-to-backscatter ratios, are derived from the measured scattering phase function combined with subsequent particle shapes and size distributions. The backscatter profiles can therefore be retrieved under favourable conditions of low optical density. From these profiles extinction values in different cloud types can be obtained and compared with the direct in situ measurements.

  15. Aerodynamics: The Wright Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Jennifer Hansen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the basic principles of aerodynamics. Included in the presentation are: a few demonstrations of the principles, an explanation of the concepts of lift, drag, thrust and weight, a description of Bernoulli's principle, the concept of the airfoil (i.e., the shape of the wing) and how that effects lift, and the method of controlling an aircraft by manipulating the four forces using control surfaces.

  16. Compensation method for obtaining accurate, sub-micrometer displacement measurements of immersed specimens using electronic speckle interferometry.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Massimo A; Bruno, Luigi; Reynaud, Juan F; Poggialini, Andrea; Downs, J Crawford

    2012-03-01

    We proposed and validated a compensation method that accounts for the optical distortion inherent in measuring displacements on specimens immersed in aqueous solution. A spherically-shaped rubber specimen was mounted and pressurized on a custom apparatus, with the resulting surface displacements recorded using electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI). Point-to-point light direction computation is achieved by a ray-tracing strategy coupled with customized B-spline-based analytical representation of the specimen shape. The compensation method reduced the mean magnitude of the displacement error induced by the optical distortion from 35% to 3%, and ESPI displacement measurement repeatability showed a mean variance of 16 nm at the 95% confidence level for immersed specimens. The ESPI interferometer and numerical data analysis procedure presented herein provide reliable, accurate, and repeatable measurement of sub-micrometer deformations obtained from pressurization tests of spherically-shaped specimens immersed in aqueous salt solution. This method can be used to quantify small deformations in biological tissue samples under load, while maintaining the hydration necessary to ensure accurate material property assessment.

  17. High speed propeller acoustics and aerodynamics - A boundary element approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.; Dunn, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is applied in this paper to the problems of acoustics and aerodynamics of high speed propellers. The underlying theory is described based on the linearized Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation. The surface pressure on the blade is assumed unknown in the aerodynamic problem. It is obtained by solving a singular integral equation. The acoustic problem is then solved by moving the field point inside the fluid medium and evaluating some surface and line integrals. Thus the BEM provides a powerful technique in calculation of high speed propeller aerodynamics and acoustics.

  18. Rarefield-Flow Shuttle Aerodynamics Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moats, Christina D.

    1994-01-01

    A model of the Shuttle Orbiter rarefied-flow aerodynamic force coefficients has been derived from the ratio of flight acceleration measurements. The in-situ, low-frequency (less than 1Hz), low-level (approximately 1 x 10(exp -6) g) acceleration measurements are made during atmospheric re-entry. The experiment equipment designed and used for this task is the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), one of the sensor packages in the Orbiter Experiments Program. To date, 12 HiRAP re-entry mission data sets spanning a period of about 10 years have been processed. The HiRAP-derived aerodynamics model is described in detail. The model includes normal and axial hypersonic continuum coefficient equations as function of angle of attack, body-flap deflection, and elevon deflection. Normal and axial free molecule flow coefficient equations as a function of angle of attack are also presented, along with flight-derived rarefied-flow transition bridging formulae. Comparisons are made between the aerodynamics model, data from the latest Orbiter Operational Aerodynamic Design Data Book, applicable computer simulations, and wind-tunnel data.

  19. Generic UAV Modeling to Obtain Its Aerodynamic and Control Derivatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Xref Yref Zref 0.0000 0.0000 2.5775 # CDp 0.0000...SURFACE Wing #Nchord Cspace Nspan Sspace 12 2.0000 64 0.0000 SCALE # sX sY sZ...Horizontal SURFACE RHorizontal #Nchord Cspace Nspan Sspace 12 2.0000 32 0.0000 SCALE # sX sY sZ

  20. Study of Dual-Wavelength PIA Estimates: Ratio of Ka- and Ku-band Attenuations Obtained from Measured DSD Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, L.; Meneghini, R.; Tokay, A.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate attenuation corrections to the measurements of the Ku- and Ka-band dual-wavelength precipitation radar (DPR) aboard the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) satellite is crucial for estimates of precipitation rate and microphysical properties of hydrometeors. Surface reference technique (SRT) provides a means to infer path-integrated attenuation (PIA) by comparing differences of normalized surface cross sections (σ0) between rain and rain-free areas. Although single-wavelength SRT has been widely used in attenuation correction for airborne/spaceborne radar applications, its accuracy relies on the variance of σ0 in rain-free region. Dual-wavelength surface reference technique (DSRT) has shown promising ways to improve accuracy in PIA estimates over single-wavelength as a result of that the variance of the difference of PIA between two wavelengths (δPIA) is much smaller than the variance of σ0 at single wavelength arising from high correlation of σ0 between Ku- and Ka-bands. However, derivation of PIA at either wavelength from DSRT requires an assumption of the ratio of Ka- and Ku-band PIAs (p). Inappropriate assumption of this ratio will lead to the bias of PIA estimates. In this study the ratio p will be investigated through measured DSD data. The attenuation coefficients at Ku and Ka bands are first computed directly from measured DSD spectra, and then regression analysis is performed to the data points (Ku- and Ka-band attenuation coefficients) in obtaining p values for rain. Taking an advantage of large collection of the DSD measurements from various GPM Ground Validation (GPM GV) programs, the results of the ratio p will be examined from different climatological regimes. Because PIA is affected by all types of hydrometeors contained in the columns of radar measurements, the synthetic profiles composed of different types of hydrometeors are constructed using measured DSD to look into impacts of different phase hydrometeors on the p values. To

  1. Characteristics of ionospheric plasma drifts as obtained from Doppler ionosonde measurements at magnetic equator over Indian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samireddipalle, Sripathi; Banola, Sridhar; Singh, Ram

    2016-07-01

    We present equatorial plasma drifts over Tirunelveli (8.73°N, 77.70°E; Dip 0.5°N), an equatorial site over Indian region using Doppler interferometry technique of Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI) system. In the Doppler interferometry technique, it is possible to infer three dimensional bulk motion of the scatterers as reflected from the ionosphere at selected frequencies using spaced receivers arranged in mag. east-west, north-south directions. Spectral phases and amplitudes are calculated using FFT to identify the Doppler frequencies and their drifts. This technique produces reliable drifts when sharp refractive index gradients exists which produces higher scattering sources. The vertical drifts so obtained are compared with same drifts from Digisonde at Trivandrum. After having compared with Digisonde drifts, we studied the temporal and seasonal variability of these drifts during quiet periods for the year 2012. It is seen that vertical drifts exhibited equinoctial maximum in the Pre-Reversal-Enhancement (PRE) followed by winter and summer respectively. A comparison of these vertical drifts is made with drifts obtained from (a) virtual height measured at 4 MHz and (b) Fejer drift model. The comparison suggests that Doppler vertical drifts are relatively higher as compared to the drifts obtained from model and virtual height. However, the correlation seems to be good around evening PRE times. The zonal drifts, on the other hand, showed westward drifts during daytime with mean drifts of ~250 m/s, while they are eastward during nighttime with mean drifts of ~150 m/s. These drifts seems to be higher as compared to zonal drifts obtained in the South American sector. However, the zonal drifts so obtained showed good correlation with Equatorial Electrojet (EEJ) strength suggesting zonal drifts are influenced by E region drifts during daytime in agreement with Woodman et al., 2013 paper. The magnitude of these drifts are comparable to other independent

  2. Transonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 45 deg Swept Wing Fuselage Model with a Finned and Unfinned Body Pylon Mounted Beneath the Fuselage or Wing, Including Measurements of Body Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, Dewey E.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation of a model of a standard size body in combination with a representative 45 deg swept-wing-fuselage model has been conducted in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel over a Mach number range from 0.80 to 1.43. The body, with a fineness ratio of 8.5, was tested with and without fins, and was pylon-mounted beneath the fuselage or wing. Force measurements were obtained on the wing-fuselage model with and without the body, for an angle-of-attack range from -2 deg to approximately 12 deg and an angle-of-sideslip range from -8 deg to 8 deg. In addition, body loads were measured over the same angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip range. The Reynolds number for the investigation, based on the wing mean aerodynamic chord, varied from 1.85 x 10(exp 6) to 2.85 x 10(exp 6). The addition of the body beneath the fuselage or the wing increased the drag coefficient of the complete model over the Mach number range tested. On the basis of the drag increase per body, the under-fuselage position was the more favorable. Furthermore, the bodies tended to increase the lateral stability of the complete model. The variation of body loads with angle of attack for the unfinned bodies was generally small and linear over the Mach number range tested with the addition of fins causing large increases in the rates of change of normal-force coefficient and nose-down pitching-moment coefficient. The variation of body side-force coefficient with sideslip for the unfinned body beneath the fuselage was at least twice as large as the variation of this load for the unfinned body beneath the wing. The addition of fins to the body beneath either the fuselage or the wing approximately doubled the rate of change of body side-force coefficient with sideslip. Furthermore, the variation of body side-force coefficient with sideslip for the body beneath the wing was at least twice as large as the variation of this load with angle of attack.

  3. Rarefaction Effects in Hypersonic Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    2011-05-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) technique is used for numerical analysis of rarefied-gas hypersonic flows near a blunt plate, wedge, two side-by-side plates, disk, torus, and rotating cylinder. The role of various similarity parameters (Knudsen and Mach numbers, geometrical and temperature factors, specific heat ratios, and others) in aerodynamics of the probes is studied. Important kinetic effects that are specific for the transition flow regime have been found: non-monotonic lift and drag of plates, strong repulsive force between side-by-side plates and cylinders, dependence of drag on torus radii ratio, and the reverse Magnus effect on the lift of a rotating cylinder. The numerical results are in a good agreement with experimental data, which were obtained in a vacuum chamber at low and moderate Knudsen numbers from 0.01 to 10.

  4. Efficient Global Aerodynamic Modeling from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for identifying global aerodynamic models from flight data in an efficient manner is explained and demonstrated. A novel experiment design technique was used to obtain dynamic flight data over a range of flight conditions with a single flight maneuver. Multivariate polynomials and polynomial splines were used with orthogonalization techniques and statistical modeling metrics to synthesize global nonlinear aerodynamic models directly and completely from flight data alone. Simulation data and flight data from a subscale twin-engine jet transport aircraft were used to demonstrate the techniques. Results showed that global multivariate nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies could be accurately identified using flight data from a single maneuver. Flight-derived global aerodynamic model structures, model parameter estimates, and associated uncertainties were provided for all six nondimensional force and moment coefficients for the test aircraft. These models were combined with a propulsion model identified from engine ground test data to produce a high-fidelity nonlinear flight simulation very efficiently. Prediction testing using a multi-axis maneuver showed that the identified global model accurately predicted aircraft responses.

  5. Optic Disc, Macula, and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Measurements Obtained by OCT in Thyroid-Associated Ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sayın, Osman; Arıtürk, Nurşen

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To compare the measurements of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), macula and optic disc parameters obtained by optical coherence tomography (OCT), and intraocular pressure (IOP) between the patients with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO) and healthy controls. Methods. One hundred and thirty-two eyes of 66 patients with TAO and 72 eyes of 36 healthy controls were included in the study. Proptosis level was determined by Hertel exophthalmometer. Optic disc, peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer, and macula parameters were measured by OCT. All measurements of the patients were compared with those of age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Results. No statistically significant difference was found between the patients with TAO and control group in terms of demographic characteristics (P > 0.05). Exophthalmometer measurements and IOP were higher in TAO group (P < 0.05). Mean macula thicknesses in TAO and control groups were 239.3 ± 29.8 μm and 246.6 ± 31.8 μm, respectively, and the difference between the groups was statistically significant (P = 0.000). TAO group had thinner inferior RNFL thickness and macular thicknesses (superior, inferior, temporal, and nasal) and higher disc area and C/D ratio when compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. IOP, disc area, and C/D area ratio were higher in the patients with TAO and the thicknesses of macula and inferior RNFL were thinner when compared with healthy controls. This trial is registered with registration number at clinicaltrials.gov NCT02766660. PMID:27493796

  6. Ice crystal habits from cloud chamber studies obtained by in-line holographic microscopy related to depolarization measurements.

    PubMed

    Amsler, Peter; Stetzer, Olaf; Schnaiter, Martin; Hesse, Evelyn; Benz, Stefan; Moehler, Ottmar; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2009-10-20

    We investigate hydrometeor habits at the AIDA chamber with a newly developed in-line holographic microscope HOLographic Imager for Microscopic Objects (HOLIMO). Sizes and habits of ice crystals and droplets in a mixed-phase cloud experiment are related to relative humidity with respect to ice (RH(ice)), temperature (T), and experiment time. This experiment is initiated with supercooled water drops. As a result, ice crystals within a maximum particle diameter size range of 2 to 118 microm (average size of 19 microm) are detected and 63% of them reveal regular habits. The observed particle habits match those predicted for a given RH(ice) and T. Two different growth modes emerge from this cloud. The first one appears during water injection and reveals mainly optical particle sizes in the range of 5 to 250 microm. The second mode grows to sizes of 5 to 63 microm, just after the particles of the first one fall out. It is found that an increasing aspect ratio chi of maximum length over thickness from 2 to 20 as obtained by HOLIMO corresponds to a decreasing linear depolarization ratio from 0.1 to 0.04, as independently obtained by depolarization measurements.

  7. Effects of agri-environmental schemes on farmland birds: do food availability measurements improve patterns obtained from simple habitat models?

    PubMed

    Ponce, Carlos; Bravo, Carolina; Alonso, Juan Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Studies evaluating agri-environmental schemes (AES) usually focus on responses of single species or functional groups. Analyses are generally based on simple habitat measurements but ignore food availability and other important factors. This can limit our understanding of the ultimate causes determining the reactions of birds to AES. We investigated these issues in detail and throughout the main seasons of a bird's annual cycle (mating, postfledging and wintering) in a dry cereal farmland in a Special Protection Area for farmland birds in central Spain. First, we modeled four bird response parameters (abundance, species richness, diversity and "Species of European Conservation Concern" [SPEC]-score), using detailed food availability and vegetation structure measurements (food models). Second, we fitted new models, built using only substrate composition variables (habitat models). Whereas habitat models revealed that both, fields included and not included in the AES benefited birds, food models went a step further and included seed and arthropod biomass as important predictors, respectively, in winter and during the postfledging season. The validation process showed that food models were on average 13% better (up to 20% in some variables) in predicting bird responses. However, the cost of obtaining data for food models was five times higher than for habitat models. This novel approach highlighted the importance of food availability-related causal processes involved in bird responses to AES, which remained undetected when using conventional substrate composition assessment models. Despite their higher costs, measurements of food availability add important details to interpret the reactions of the bird community to AES interventions and thus facilitate evaluating the real efficiency of AES programs.

  8. Effects of agri-environmental schemes on farmland birds: do food availability measurements improve patterns obtained from simple habitat models?

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Carlos; Bravo, Carolina; Alonso, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Studies evaluating agri-environmental schemes (AES) usually focus on responses of single species or functional groups. Analyses are generally based on simple habitat measurements but ignore food availability and other important factors. This can limit our understanding of the ultimate causes determining the reactions of birds to AES. We investigated these issues in detail and throughout the main seasons of a bird's annual cycle (mating, postfledging and wintering) in a dry cereal farmland in a Special Protection Area for farmland birds in central Spain. First, we modeled four bird response parameters (abundance, species richness, diversity and “Species of European Conservation Concern” [SPEC]-score), using detailed food availability and vegetation structure measurements (food models). Second, we fitted new models, built using only substrate composition variables (habitat models). Whereas habitat models revealed that both, fields included and not included in the AES benefited birds, food models went a step further and included seed and arthropod biomass as important predictors, respectively, in winter and during the postfledging season. The validation process showed that food models were on average 13% better (up to 20% in some variables) in predicting bird responses. However, the cost of obtaining data for food models was five times higher than for habitat models. This novel approach highlighted the importance of food availability-related causal processes involved in bird responses to AES, which remained undetected when using conventional substrate composition assessment models. Despite their higher costs, measurements of food availability add important details to interpret the reactions of the bird community to AES interventions and thus facilitate evaluating the real efficiency of AES programs. PMID:25165523

  9. Aerodynamics and thermal physics of helicopter ice accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yiqiang

    developed based on a set of 82 experimental measurements and also compared to existing predictions tools. Two reference predictions found in the literature yielded 76% and 54% discrepancy with respect to experimental testing, whereas the proposed ice roughness prediction model resulted in a 31% minimum accuracy in prediction. It must be noted that the accuracy of the proposed model is within the ice shape reproduction uncertainty of icing facilities. Based on the new ice roughness prediction model and the CSR heat transfer scaling method, an icing heat transfer model was developed. The approach achieved high accuracy in heat transfer prediction compared to experiments conducted at the AERTS facility. The discrepancy between predictions and experimental results was within +/-15%, which was within the measurement uncertainty range of the facility. By combining both the ice roughness and heat transfer predictions, and incorporating the modules into an existing ice prediction tool (LEWICE), improved prediction capability was obtained, especially for the glaze regime. With the available ice shapes accreted at the AERTS facility and additional experiments found in the literature, 490 sets of experimental ice shapes and corresponding aerodynamics testing data were available. A physics-based performance degradation empirical tool was developed and achieved a mean absolute deviation of 33% when compared to the entire experimental dataset, whereas 60% to 243% discrepancies were observed using legacy drag penalty prediction tools. Rotor torque predictions coupling Blade Element Momentum Theory and the proposed drag performance degradation tool was conducted on a total of 17 validation cases. The coupled prediction tool achieved a 10% predicting error for clean rotor conditions, and 16% error for iced rotor conditions. It was shown that additional roughness element could affect the measured drag by up to 25% during experimental testing, emphasizing the need of realistic ice structures

  10. Aerodynamic characteristics of reentry vehicles at supersonic velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamov, N. P.; Kharitonov, A. M.; Chasovnikov, E. A.; Dyad'kin, A. A.; Kazakov, M. I.; Krylov, A. N.; Skorovarov, A. Yu.

    2015-09-01

    Models of promising reentry vehicles, experimental equipment, and test program are described. The method used to determine the total aerodynamic characteristics of these models on the AB-313 mechanical balance in the T-313 supersonic wind tunnel and the method used for simulations are presented. The aerodynamic coefficients of the examined objects in wide ranges of Mach numbers and angles of attack are obtained. The experimental data are compared with the results of simulations.

  11. Future requirements and roles of computers in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    While faster computers will be needed to make solution of the Navier-Stokes equations practical and useful, most all of the other aerodynamic solution techniques can benefit from faster computers. There is a wide variety of computational and measurement techniques, the prospect of more powerful computers permits extension and an enhancement across all aerodynamic methods, including wind-tunnel measurement. It is expected that, as in the past, a blend of methods will be used to predict aircraft aerodynamics in the future. These will include methods based on solution of the Navier-Stokes equations and the potential flow equations as well as those based on empirical and measured results. The primary flows of interest in aircraft aerodynamics are identified, the predictive methods currently in use and/or under development are reviewed and two of these methods are analyzed in terms of the computational resources needed to improve their usefulness and practicality.

  12. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using Hybridized Differential Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2003-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses an evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution (DE) in conjunction with various hybridization strategies is described. DE is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Various hybridization strategies for DE are explored, including the use of neural networks as well as traditional local search methods. A Navier-Stokes solver is used to evaluate the various intermediate designs and provide inputs to the hybrid DE optimizer. The method is implemented on distributed parallel computers so that new designs can be obtained within reasonable turnaround times. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine. (The final paper will include at least one other aerodynamic design application). The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated.

  13. Potential for obtaining optimal snow states estimation by assimilating space-borne passive microwave measurements into surface snow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Durand, M. T.; Margulis, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    's sensitivity to snow. Experiments have shown Tb processed through the new method is 3 times more sensitive to snow water equivalent than the traditionally- used EASE-Grid Tb, thus in the assimilation process the newly-processed Tb is expected to provide more information in updating the snow states. The study period was water years (WY) 2003-2009. SSiB3 was firstly calibrated by adjusting meteorological data to make sure its outputs were consistent with SWE measured at CDEC gages. The calibrated SSiB3 was then integrated with MEMLS, the Tb modeled by the joint models were corrected by atmospheric effects, and then were compared with the PM Tb. We analyzed differences in modeled and measured Tb values. Future work includes utilizing the ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) to assimilate space-borne PM Tb measurement in surface snow evolution and emission modeling, using the PM measurements to update the snow states in order to obtain optimal estimates of snow states.

  14. Fourier analysis of the aerodynamic behavior of cup anemometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Imanol; Aguado, Maite

    2013-06-01

    The calibration results (the transfer function) of an anemometer equipped with several cup rotors were analyzed and correlated with the aerodynamic forces measured on the isolated cups in a wind tunnel. The correlation was based on a Fourier analysis of the normal-to-the-cup aerodynamic force. Three different cup shapes were studied: typical conical cups, elliptical cups and porous cups (conical-truncated shape). Results indicated a good correlation between the anemometer factor, K, and the ratio between the first two coefficients in the Fourier series decomposition of the normal-to-the-cup aerodynamic force.

  15. Aerodynamics of Drag Reduction Devices for Semi-Trucks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jason; Salari, Kambiz

    2014-11-01

    An increasing number of semi-trucks throughout the United States are being retrofitted with aerodynamic drag reduction devices to improve the vehicle fuel economy. Such devices typically include both trailer skirts and boattails to mitigate trailer underbody drag and base drag, respectively. Since full-scale measurements of the device performance are especially prone to experimental noise due to the effects of the driver, route, payload, or atmospheric conditions, more precise data must be obtained within a wind tunnel. In this experimental study, the wind-averaged drag coefficient is measured for a detailed 1/8th scale semi-truck model. The Reynolds number based upon the vehicle width is 1.7e6. A number of trailer skirt and boattail device configurations are considered, as well as the effects of the boattail deflection angle. The results of this study demonstrate that a combination of a trailer skirt and boattail reduces the aerodynamic drag of a semi-truck by as much as 25%. If such a combination were applied to each of the semi-trucks throughout the United States, several billion dollars in fuel savings could be achieved each year. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-657810.

  16. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Sean; Bigatel, Patrick

    2004-10-17

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

  17. TAD- THEORETICAL AERODYNAMICS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, J.

    1994-01-01

    This theoretical aerodynamics program, TAD, was developed to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles with sounding rocket configurations. These slender, axisymmetric finned vehicle configurations have a wide range of aeronautical applications from rockets to high speed armament. Over a given range of Mach numbers, TAD will compute the normal force coefficient derivative, the center-of-pressure, the roll forcing moment coefficient derivative, the roll damping moment coefficient derivative, and the pitch damping moment coefficient derivative of a sounding rocket configured vehicle. The vehicle may consist of a sharp pointed nose of cone or tangent ogive shape, up to nine other body divisions of conical shoulder, conical boattail, or circular cylinder shape, and fins of trapezoid planform shape with constant cross section and either three or four fins per fin set. The characteristics computed by TAD have been shown to be accurate to within ten percent of experimental data in the supersonic region. The TAD program calculates the characteristics of separate portions of the vehicle, calculates the interference between separate portions of the vehicle, and then combines the results to form a total vehicle solution. Also, TAD can be used to calculate the characteristics of the body or fins separately as an aid in the design process. Input to the TAD program consists of simple descriptions of the body and fin geometries and the Mach range of interest. Output includes the aerodynamic characteristics of the total vehicle, or user-selected portions, at specified points over the mach range. The TAD program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 360 computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 123K of 8 bit bytes. The TAD program was originally developed in 1967 and last updated in 1972.

  18. Wind tunnel investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of symmetrically deflected ailerons of the F-8C airplane. [conducted in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gera, J.

    1977-01-01

    A .042-scale model of the F-8C airplane was investigated in a transonic wind tunnel at high subsonic Mach numbers and a range of angles of attack between-3 and 20 degrees. The effect of symmetrically deflected ailerons on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics was measured. Some data were also obtained on the lateral control effectiveness of asymmetrically deflected horizontal tail surfaces.

  19. Improvement in AOD retrieval from geostationary measurement over the ASIA with obtained AOP from DRAGON-2012 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M.; KIM, M.; Kim, J.; Lee, J.

    2013-12-01

    The long-term aerosol monitoring from ground-based sun photometer such as AERONET has variously used to obtain optimized aerosol optical properties (AOPs) for assumed aerosol type and to validate aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from satellite. Additionally, the meso-scale network campaign such as DRAGON ASIA-2012 is suitable to monitor the aerosol characteristic over localized area. Thus, this study focused on the improvement of AOPs over the East Asia by using the DRAGON ASIA-2012 campaign dataset for two geostationary AOD retrieval algorithms. The algorithms were developed for Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) and Meteorological Imager (MI) onboarding the Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS), which was launched in June, 2010. GOCI has 8 channels in visible and near IR. Using these multi-spectral bands, we retrieved aerosol optical properties such as AOD, fine-mode fraction (FMF), single scattering albedo (SSA) and aerosol type. In this study, we consider dynamic aerosol models categorized by FMF and SSA from East Asia AERONET data including DRAGON campaign data. Using these aerosol data, AOPs are upgraded for LUT calculation and re-retrieved from GOCI. The validation with AERONET shows the improved results after AOP upgrade. On the other hand, a single channel algorithm developed for MI assumed seasonal aerosol property variation due the algorithm has limitation in select aerosol type. The seasonally analyzed SSAs at 675 nm from the AERONET measurement over the East Asia including the campaign data are 0.92, 0.94, 0.92, and 0.91 for spring (MAM), summer (JJA), autumn (SON), and winter (DJF), respectively, and slightly higher then the originally used values. By using those newly analyzed AOP, the comparison result between retrieved AOD and measured value from AERONET shows the increase of correlation coefficient from 0.551 to 0.702 and the increase of regression slope from 0.538 to 0.615 during months from May to Dec. in 2011.

  20. Prediction of Aerodynamic Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    predictable even with knowledge of the motion and the quasi- steady aerodynamic coefficients . It sems likely that the unsteady boundary-layer...build up, which are explainable 41 terams of the stability coefficients . More research is needed on the former type of undemanded manoeuvre. In some...drag 81, 82... B5 body sections I. kg lift St strdke 1M kg m pitching moment N kg normal force T kg axial force a 0 angle of attack Coefficie its: CD, cD

  1. Space Shuttle Plume Simulation Effect on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Technology for simulating plumes in wind tunnel tests was not adequate to provide the required confidence in test data where plume induced aerodynamic effects might be significant. A broad research program was undertaken to correct the deficiency. Four tasks within the program are reported. Three of these tasks involve conducting experiments, related to three different aspects of the plume simulation problem: (1) base pressures; (2) lateral jet pressures; and (3) plume parameters. The fourth task involves collecting all of the base pressure test data generated during the program. Base pressures were measured on a classic cone ogive cylinder body as affected by the coaxial, high temperature exhaust plumes of a variety of solid propellant rockets. Valid data were obtained at supersonic freestream conditions but not at transonic. Pressure data related to lateral (separation) jets at M infinity = 4.5, for multiple clustered nozzles canted to the freestream and operating at high dynamic pressure ratios. All program goals were met although the model hardware was found to be large relative to the wind tunnel size so that operation was limited for some nozzle configurations.

  2. Predicting Accumulations of Ice on Aerodynamic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin; Potapczuk, Mark; Addy, Gene; Wright, William

    2003-01-01

    LEWICE is a computer program that predicts the accumulation of ice on two-dimensional aerodynamic surfaces under conditions representative of the flight of an aircraft through an icing cloud. The software first calculates the airflow surrounding the body of interest, then uses the airflow to compute the trajectories of water droplets that impinge on the surface of the body. The droplet trajectories are also used to compute impingement limits and local collection efficiencies, which are used in subsequent ice-growth calculations and are also useful for designing systems to protect against icing. Next, the software predicts the shape of accumulating ice by modeling transfers of mass and energy in small control volumes. The foregoing computations are repeated over several computational time steps until the total icing exposure time is reached. Results of computations by LEWICE have been compared with an extensive database of measured ice shapes obtained from experiments, and have been shown to closely approximate those shapes under most conditions of interest to the aviation community.

  3. On Wings: Aerodynamics of Eagles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millson, David

    2000-01-01

    The Aerodynamics Wing Curriculum is a high school program that combines basic physics, aerodynamics, pre-engineering, 3D visualization, computer-assisted drafting, computer-assisted manufacturing, production, reengineering, and success in a 15-hour, 3-week classroom module. (JOW)

  4. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  5. Aerodynamic challenges of ALT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, I.; Homan, D.; Romere, P. O.

    1985-01-01

    The approach and landing test (ALT) of the Space Shuttle Orbiter presented a number of unique challenges in the area of aerodynamics. The purpose of the ALT program was both to confirm the use of the Boeing 747 as a transport vehicle for ferrying the Orbiter across the country and to demonstrate the flight characteristics of the Orbiter in its approach and landing phase. Concerns for structural fatigue and performance dictated a tailcone be attached to the Orbiter for ferry and for the initial landing tests. The Orbiter with a tailcone attached presented additional challenges to the normal aft sting concept of wind tunnel testing. The landing tests required that the Orbiter be separated from the 747 at approximately 20,000 feet using aerodynamic forces to fly the vehicles apart. The concept required a complex test program to determine the relative effects of the two vehicles on each other. Also of concern, and tested, was the vortex wake created by the 747 and the means for the Orbiter to avoid it following separation.

  6. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  7. The aerodynamics of hovering flight in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fry, Steven N; Sayaman, Rosalyn; Dickinson, Michael H

    2005-06-01

    Using 3D infrared high-speed video, we captured the continuous wing and body kinematics of free-flying fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, during hovering and slow forward flight. We then 'replayed' the wing kinematics on a dynamically scaled robotic model to measure the aerodynamic forces produced by the wings. Hovering animals generate a U-shaped wing trajectory, in which large drag forces during a downward plunge at the start of each stroke create peak vertical forces. Quasi-steady mechanisms could account for nearly all of the mean measured force required to hover, although temporal discrepancies between instantaneous measured forces and model predictions indicate that unsteady mechanisms also play a significant role. We analyzed the requirements for hovering from an analysis of the time history of forces and moments in all six degrees of freedom. The wing kinematics necessary to generate sufficient lift are highly constrained by the requirement to balance thrust and pitch torque over the stroke cycle. We also compare the wing motion and aerodynamic forces of free and tethered flies. Tethering causes a strong distortion of the stroke pattern that results in a reduction of translational forces and a prominent nose-down pitch moment. The stereotyped distortion under tethered conditions is most likely due to a disruption of sensory feedback. Finally, we calculated flight power based directly on the measurements of wing motion and aerodynamic forces, which yielded a higher estimate of muscle power during free hovering flight than prior estimates based on time-averaged parameters. This discrepancy is mostly due to a two- to threefold underestimate of the mean profile drag coefficient in prior studies. We also compared our values with the predictions of the same time-averaged models using more accurate kinematic and aerodynamic input parameters based on our high-speed videography measurements. In this case, the time-averaged models tended to overestimate flight

  8. Unsteady aerodynamics of blade rows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.

    1989-01-01

    The requirements placed on an unsteady aerodynamic theory intended for turbomachinery aeroelastic or aeroacoustic applications are discussed along with a brief description of the various theoretical models that are available to address these requirements. The major emphasis is placed on the description of a linearized inviscid theory which fully accounts for the affects of a nonuniform mean or steady flow on unsteady aerodynamic response. Although this linearization was developed primarily for blade flutter prediction, more general equations are presented which account for unsteady excitations due to incident external aerodynamic disturbances as well as those due to prescribed blade motions. The motivation for this linearized unsteady aerodynamic theory is focused on, its physical and mathematical formulation is outlined and examples are presented to illustrate the status of numerical solution procedures and several effects of mean flow nonuniformity on unsteady aerodynamic response.

  9. Sampling efficiency of the TSI aerodynamic particle sizer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Barber, E.M.; Zhang, Y.

    1998-09-01

    The Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) has been tested and used in a variety of laboratory and field situations for indoor air quality research of both industrial and livestock buildings. The APS is capable of providing rapid, real-time measurement of particle size distribution. However, no literature was found in which the sampling efficiency of the APS was addressed. This paper presents a method to evaluate the sampling efficiency of the APS, considering both the aspiration efficiency and the penetration efficiency. Six tests were conducted and measurements were taken by a cascade impact sampler and the APS simultaneously. The results obtained by the APS were compared with the results of the cascade impact sampler.

  10. Collaborating with the local community of Kullorsuaq, Greenland to obtain high-quality hydrographic measurements near Alison Glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. F.; Turrin, M.; Tinto, K. J.; Giulivi, C. F.; Cochran, J. R.; Bell, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Warming ocean waters around Greenland have been implicated, along with warmer air temperatures, in the rapid increase of melt of the tidewater glaciers that drain the ice sheet. Most available regional oceanographic measurements have been collected during the summer seasons and are concentrated near the largest and most accessible glaciers. In order to gain a more comprehensive picture of the changing environment around the entirety of Greenland, more fjords, especially in the north, must be sampled. In July 2014, we travelled to Kullorsuaq in Northwest Greenland in order to foster a partnership with the local community to obtain new hydrographic data from CTD casts near Alison Glacier (74.6N, 57W). The terminus of this glacier abruptly retreated 10 km between 2000 and 2006. Although adequate observations from that time period are unavailable, our recently collected temperature and salinity data suggests that the deep water near Alison is similar to the waters further south, where near-synchronous ocean warming and glacial acceleration has been documented. Over the course of two sampling days, a hand-operated winch from a small boat was used to make standard CTD casts in front of Alison Glacier. We find evidence of glacial and mélange melt and the signature of both Polar and Atlantic Water masses at depth. Along-fjord casts illustrate how the ocean waters are modified as they circulate in and out of the fjord and the interaction of this water with the melting glacial front. At 500m depths, ocean temperatures are about 3°C above the in-situ freezing point of seawater, suggesting a possible influence of warm ocean waters on the mass loss of Alison Glacier. Using NASA Operation IceBridge and satellite altimetry data, we relate our new hydrographic data to the observed recent changes in Alison Glacier. An additional important result is that this short field campaign uncovered the possibility of working with local Greenlandic communities to aid scientists in both

  11. Rarefaction effects on Galileo probe aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; LeBeau, Gerald J.; Blanchard, Robert C.; Price, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    Solutions of aerodynamic characteristics are presented for the Galileo Probe entering Jupiter's hydrogen-helium atmosphere at a nominal relative velocity of 47.4 km/s. Focus is on predicting the aerodynamic drag coefficient during the transitional flow regime using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Accuracy of the probe's drag coefficient directly impacts the inferred atmospheric properties that are being extracted from the deceleration measurements made by onboard accelerometers as part of the Atmospheric Structure Experiment. The range of rarefaction considered in the present study extends from the free molecular limit to continuum conditions. Comparisons made with previous calculations and experimental measurements show the present results for drag to merge well with Navier-Stokes and experimental results for the least rarefied conditions considered.

  12. Flight Test Maneuvers for Efficient Aerodynamic Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    Novel flight test maneuvers for efficient aerodynamic modeling were developed and demonstrated in flight. Orthogonal optimized multi-sine inputs were applied to aircraft control surfaces to excite aircraft dynamic response in all six degrees of freedom simultaneously while keeping the aircraft close to chosen reference flight conditions. Each maneuver was designed for a specific modeling task that cannot be adequately or efficiently accomplished using conventional flight test maneuvers. All of the new maneuvers were first described and explained, then demonstrated on a subscale jet transport aircraft in flight. Real-time and post-flight modeling results obtained using equation-error parameter estimation in the frequency domain were used to show the effectiveness and efficiency of the new maneuvers, as well as the quality of the aerodynamic models that can be identified from the resultant flight data.

  13. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling for arbitrary motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.; Ashley, H.; Breakwell, J. V.

    1977-01-01

    A study is presented on the unsteady aerodynamic loads due to arbitrary motions of a thin wing and their adaptation for the calculation of response and true stability of aeroelastic modes. In an Appendix, the use of Laplace transform techniques and the generalized Theodorsen function for two-dimensional incompressible flow is reviewed. New applications of the same approach are shown also to yield airloads valid for quite general small motions. Numerical results are given for the two-dimensional supersonic case. Previously proposed approximate methods, starting from simple harmonic unsteady theory, are evaluated by comparison with exact results obtained by the present approach. The Laplace inversion integral is employed to separate the loads into 'rational' and 'nonrational' parts, of which only the former are involved in aeroelastic stability of the wing. Among other suggestions for further work, it is explained how existing aerodynamic computer programs may be adapted in a fairly straightforward fashion to deal with arbitrary transients.

  14. Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) Noise and Airload Prediction Using Loose Aerodynamic/Structural Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, B. W.; Lim, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    Predictions of blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise, using blade airloads obtained from a coupled aerodynamic and structural methodology, are presented. This methodology uses an iterative, loosely-coupled trim strategy to cycle information between the OVERFLOW-2 (CFD) and CAMRAD-II (CSD) codes. Results are compared to the HART-II baseline, minimum noise and minimum vibration conditions. It is shown that this CFD/CSD state-of-the-art approach is able to capture blade airload and noise radiation characteristics associated with BVI. With the exception of the HART-II minimum noise condition, predicted advancing and retreating side BVI for the baseline and minimum vibration conditions agrees favorably with measured data. Although the BVI airloads and noise amplitudes are generally under-predicted, this CFD/CSD methodology provides an overall noteworthy improvement over the lifting line aerodynamics and free-wake models typically used in CSD comprehensive analysis codes.

  15. Statistical Analysis of the Uncertainty in Pre-Flight Aerodynamic Database of a Hypersonic Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Lynn

    The objective of the present research was to develop a new method to derive the aerodynamic coefficients and the associated uncertainties for flight vehicles via post- flight inertial navigation analysis using data from the inertial measurement unit. Statistical estimates of vehicle state and aerodynamic coefficients are derived using Monte Carlo simulation. Trajectory reconstruction using the inertial navigation system (INS) is a simple and well used method. However, deriving realistic uncertainties in the reconstructed state and any associated parameters is not so straight forward. Extended Kalman filters, batch minimum variance estimation and other approaches have been used. However, these methods generally depend on assumed physical models, assumed statistical distributions (usually Gaussian) or have convergence issues for non-linear problems. The approach here assumes no physical models, is applicable to any statistical distribution, and does not have any convergence issues. The new approach obtains the statistics directly from a sufficient number of Monte Carlo samples using only the generally well known gyro and accelerometer specifications and could be applied to the systems of non-linear form and non-Gaussian distribution. When redundant data are available, the set of Monte Carlo simulations are constrained to satisfy the redundant data within the uncertainties specified for the additional data. The proposed method was applied to validate the uncertainty in the pre-flight aerodynamic database of the X-43A Hyper-X research vehicle. In addition to gyro and acceleration data, the actual flight data include redundant measurements of position and velocity from the global positioning system (GPS). The criteria derived from the blend of the GPS and INS accuracy was used to select valid trajectories for statistical analysis. The aerodynamic coefficients were derived from the selected trajectories by either direct extraction method based on the equations in

  16. Aerodynamic Effects and Modeling of Damage to Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Gautam H.

    2008-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to measure the aerodynamic effects of damage to lifting and stability/control surfaces of a commercial transport aircraft configuration. The modeling of such effects is necessary for the development of flight control systems to recover aircraft from adverse, damage-related loss-of-control events, as well as for the estimation of aerodynamic characteristics from flight data under such conditions. Damage in the form of partial or total loss of area was applied to the wing, horizontal tail, and vertical tail. Aerodynamic stability and control implications of damage to each surface are presented, to aid in the identification of potential boundaries in recoverable stability or control degradation. The aerodynamic modeling issues raised by the wind tunnel results are discussed, particularly the additional modeling requirements necessitated by asymmetries due to damage, and the potential benefits of such expanded modeling.

  17. Comparison of the accuracy of disk diffusion zone diameters obtained by manual zone measurements to that by automated zone measurements to determine antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Lestari, Endang Sri; Severin, Juliëtte A; Filius, P Margreet G; Kuntaman, Kuntaman; Offra Duerink, D; Hadi, Usman; Wahjono, Hendro; Verbrugh, Henri A

    2008-10-01

    Although a variety of techniques are available for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, disk diffusion methods remain the most widely used. We compared the accuracy of disk diffusion zone diameters as obtained by manual zone measurements in a low resource country (Indonesia) to that by automated zone measurements (Oxoid aura image system) in a high resource setting (the Netherlands) to determine susceptibility categories (sensitive, intermediate susceptible or resistant). A total of 683 isolates were studied, including 294 Staphylococcus aureus, 195 Escherichia coli and 194 other Enterobacteriaceae. Antimicrobial agents included tetracycline, oxacillin, gentamicin, erythromycin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and chloramphenicol for S. aureus and ampicillin, gentamicin, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and chloramphenicol for E. coli and other Enterobacteriaceae. Of the 4098 drug-organism combinations, overall category agreement (CA), major discrepancy (MD) and minor discrepancy (mD) between the two methods were 82.4% (3379/4098), 6.0% (244/4098) and 11.6% (475/4098), respectively. One hundred and sixty three of 244 MDs were resolved using reference broth microdilution method. Overall very major error (VME), major error (ME) and minor error (mE) of manual zone measurement were 28.8%, 45.4% and 4.9%, respectively and for the aura image system 4.9%, 16.0% and 4.9%, respectively. The results of this study indicate that the disk diffusion method with manual zone measurement in Indonesia is reliable for susceptibility testing. The use of an automated zone reader, such as the aura image system, will reduce the number of errors, and thus improve the accuracy of susceptibility test results for medically relevant bacteria.

  18. Vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H. B.; Campbell, J. F.; Young, A. D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The principal emphasis of the meeting was to be on the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads. This report shows that a substantial amount of the papers covering this area were received from a wide range of countries, together with an attendance that was even more diverse. In itself, this testifies to the current interest in the subject and to the appropriateness of the Panel's choice of topic and approach. An attempt is made to summarize each paper delivered, and to relate the contributions made in the papers and in the discussions to some of the important aspects of vortex flow aerodynamics. This reveals significant progress and important clarifications, but also brings out remaining weaknesses in predictive capability and gaps in understanding. Where possible, conclusions are drawn and areas of continuing concern are identified.

  19. A Visual Technique for Determining Qualitative Aerodynamic Heating Rates on Complex Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. Calvin

    1960-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted at a test-section Mach number of 4.95 and a stagnation temperature of 400 F to evaluate a visual technique for obtaining qualitative aerodynamic heat-transfer data on complex configurations.This technique utilized a temperature-sensetive paint indicated that this technique was satisfactory for determining qualitative heat-transfer rates on various bodies, some of which exhibited complex flow patterns. The results obtained have been found useful to guide the instrumentation of quantitative heat-transfer models, to supplement quantitative heat-transfer measurements, and to make preliminary heat-transfer studies for new configurations.

  20. Aerodynamic Reconstruction Applied to Parachute Test Vehicle Flight Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassady, Leonard D.; Ray, Eric S.; Truong, Tuan H.

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamics, both static and dynamic, of a test vehicle are critical to determining the performance of the parachute cluster in a drop test and for conducting a successful test. The Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is conducting tests of NASA's Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) parachutes at the Army Yuma Proving Ground utilizing the Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV). The PTV shape is based on the MPCV, but the height has been reduced in order to fit within the C-17 aircraft for extraction. Therefore, the aerodynamics of the PTV are similar, but not the same as, the MPCV. A small series of wind tunnel tests and computational fluid dynamics cases were run to modify the MPCV aerodynamic database for the PTV, but aerodynamic reconstruction of the flights has proven an effective source for further improvements to the database. The acceleration and rotational rates measured during free flight, before parachute inflation but during deployment, were used to con rm vehicle static aerodynamics. A multibody simulation is utilized to reconstruct the parachute portions of the flight. Aerodynamic or parachute parameters are adjusted in the simulation until the prediction reasonably matches the flight trajectory. Knowledge of the static aerodynamics is critical in the CPAS project because the parachute riser load measurements are scaled based on forebody drag. PTV dynamic damping is critical because the vehicle has no reaction control system to maintain attitude - the vehicle dynamics must be understood and modeled correctly before flight. It will be shown here that aerodynamic reconstruction has successfully contributed to the CPAS project.

  1. Payload vehicle aerodynamic reentry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Donald

    An approach for analyzing the dynamic behavior of a cone-cylinder payload vehicle during reentry to insure proper deployment of the parachute system and recovery of the payload is presented. This analysis includes the study of an aerodynamic device that is useful in extending vehicle axial rotation through the maximum dynamic pressure region. Attention is given to vehicle configuration and reentry trajectory, the derivation of pitch static aerodynamics, the derivation of the pitch damping coefficient, pitching moment modeling, aerodynamic roll device modeling, and payload vehicle reentry dynamics. It is shown that the vehicle dynamics at parachute deployment are well within the design limit of the recovery system, thus ensuring successful payload recovery.

  2. Performance of an aerodynamic particle separator

    SciTech Connect

    Ragland, K.; Han, J.; Aerts, D.

    1996-12-31

    This compact, high-flow device aerodynamically separates small particles from a gas stream by a series of annular truncated airfoils. The operating concept, design and performance of this novel particle separator are described. Tests results using corn starch and post-cyclone coal fly ash are presented. Particle collection efficiencies of 90% for corn starch and 70% for coal fly ash were measured at inlet velocities of 80 ft s{sup {minus}1} (2,700 cfm) and (6 inches) water pressure drop with particle loading up to 4 gr ft{sup {minus}3} in air at standard conditions. Results from computer modeling using FLUENT are presented and compared to the tests. The aerodynamic particle separator is an attractive alternative to a cyclone collector.

  3. Parameter identification and modeling of longitudinal aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aksteter, J. W.; Parks, E. K.; Bach, R. E., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Using a comprehensive flight test database and a parameter identification software program produced at NASA Ames Research Center, a math model of the longitudinal aerodynamics of the Harrier aircraft was formulated. The identification program employed the equation error method using multiple linear regression to estimate the nonlinear parameters. The formulated math model structure adhered closely to aerodynamic and stability/control theory, particularly with regard to compressibility and dynamic manoeuvring. Validation was accomplished by using a three degree-of-freedom nonlinear flight simulator with pilot inputs from flight test data. The simulation models agreed quite well with the measured states. It is important to note that the flight test data used for the validation of the model was not used in the model identification.

  4. Supersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of Blunt Body Trim Tab Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korzun, Ashley M.; Murphy, Kelly J.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Trim tabs are aerodynamic control surfaces that can allow an entry vehicle to meet aerodynamic performance requirements while reducing or eliminating the use of ballast mass and providing a capability to modulate the lift-to-drag ratio during entry. Force and moment data were obtained on 38 unique, blunt body trim tab configurations in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The data were used to parametrically assess the supersonic aerodynamic performance of trim tabs and to understand the influence of tab area, cant angle, and aspect ratio. Across the range of conditions tested (Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5; angles of attack from -4deg to +20deg; angles of sideslip from 0deg to +8deg), the effects of varying tab area and tab cant angle were found to be much more significant than effects from varying tab aspect ratio. Aerodynamic characteristics exhibited variation with Mach number and forebody geometry over the range of conditions tested. Overall, the results demonstrate that trim tabs are a viable approach to satisfy aerodynamic performance requirements of blunt body entry vehicles with minimal ballast mass. For a 70deg sphere-cone, a tab with 3% area of the forebody and canted approximately 35deg with no ballast mass was found to give the same trim aerodynamics as a baseline model with ballast mass that was 5% of the total entry mass.

  5. Real-Time Unsteady Loads Measurements Using Hot-Film Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalam, Arun S.; Moes, Timothy R.

    2004-01-01

    Several flight-critical aerodynamic problems such as buffet, flutter, stall, and wing rock are strongly affected or caused by abrupt changes in unsteady aerodynamic loads and moments. Advanced sensing and flow diagnostic techniques have made possible simultaneous identification and tracking, in real-time, of the critical surface, viscosity-related aerodynamic phenomena under both steady and unsteady flight conditions. The wind tunnel study reported here correlates surface hot-film measurements of leading edge stagnation point and separation point, with unsteady aerodynamic loads on a NACA 0015 airfoil. Lift predicted from the correlation model matches lift obtained from pressure sensors for an airfoil undergoing harmonic pitchup and pitchdown motions. An analytical model was developed that demonstrates expected stall trends for pitchup and pitchdown motions. This report demonstrates an ability to obtain unsteady aerodynamic loads in real-time, which could lead to advances in air vehicle safety, performance, ride-quality, control, and health management.

  6. Real-Time Unsteady Loads Measurements Using Hot-Film Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalam, Arun S.; Moes, Timothy R.

    2004-01-01

    Several flight-critical aerodynamic problems such as buffet, flutter, stall, and wing rock are strongly affected or caused by abrupt changes in unsteady aerodynamic loads and moments. Advanced sensing and flow diagnostic techniques have made possible simultaneous identification and tracking, in realtime, of the critical surface, viscosity-related aerodynamic phenomena under both steady and unsteady flight conditions. The wind tunnel study reported here correlates surface hot-film measurements of leading edge stagnation point and separation point, with unsteady aerodynamic loads on a NACA 0015 airfoil. Lift predicted from the correlation model matches lift obtained from pressure sensors for an airfoil undergoing harmonic pitchup and pitchdown motions. An analytical model was developed that demonstrates expected stall trends for pitchup and pitchdown motions. This report demonstrates an ability to obtain unsteady aerodynamic loads in real time, which could lead to advances in air vehicle safety, performance, ride-quality, control, and health management.

  7. Component-based model to predict aerodynamic noise from high-speed train pantographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre Iglesias, E.; Thompson, D. J.; Smith, M. G.

    2017-04-01

    At typical speeds of modern high-speed trains the aerodynamic noise produced by the airflow over the pantograph is a significant source of noise. Although numerical models can be used to predict this they are still very computationally intensive. A semi-empirical component-based prediction model is proposed to predict the aerodynamic noise from train pantographs. The pantograph is approximated as an assembly of cylinders and bars with particular cross-sections. An empirical database is used to obtain the coefficients of the model to account for various factors: incident flow speed, diameter, cross-sectional shape, yaw angle, rounded edges, length-to-width ratio, incoming turbulence and directivity. The overall noise from the pantograph is obtained as the incoherent sum of the predicted noise from the different pantograph struts. The model is validated using available wind tunnel noise measurements of two full-size pantographs. The results show the potential of the semi-empirical model to be used as a rapid tool to predict aerodynamic noise from train pantographs.

  8. Aerodynamic analysis of a helicopter fuselage with rotating rotor head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reß, R.; Grawunder, M.; Breitsamter, Ch.

    2015-06-01

    The present paper describes results of wind tunnel experiments obtained during a research programme aimed at drag reduction of the fuselage of a twin engine light helicopter configuration. A 1 : 5 scale model of a helicopter fuselage including a rotating rotor head and landing gear was investigated in the low-speed wind tunnel A of Technische Universität a München (TUM). The modelled parts of the helicopter induce approxiu mately 80% of the total parasite drag thus forming a major potential for shape optimizations. The present paper compares results of force and moment measurements of a baseline configuration and modified variants with an emphasis on the aerodynamic drag, lift, and yawing moment coefficients.

  9. Effects of vortex generator on cylindrical protrusion aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignesh Ram, P. S.; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2016-02-01

    Experimental and numerical studies were carried out to evaluate the effect of vortex generator on a small cylindrical protrusion at Mach number 2.0. The experiments were performed using the supersonic blow down wind tunnel on different heights of cylindrical protrusion with vortex generator placed ahead of them. The upstream and downstream flow around the cylindrical protrusion is influenced by vortex generator as is observed using both visualization and pressure measurement techniques. Numerical studies using three dimensional steady implicit formulations with standard k-ω turbulence model was performed. Results obtained through the present computation are compared with the experimental results at Mach 2.0. Good agreements between computation and experimental results have been achieved. The results indicate that the aerodynamic drag acting on cylindrical protrusion can be reduced by adopting vortex generator.

  10. Laser velocimetry applied to transonic and supersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. A.; Bachalo, W. D.; Moddaress, D.

    1976-01-01

    As a further demonstration of the capabilities of laser velocity in compressible aerodynamics, measurements obtained in a Mach 2.9 separated turbulent boundary layer and in the transonic flow past a two-dimensional airfoil section are presented and compared to data realized by conventional techniques. In the separated-flow study, the comparisons were made against pitot-static pressure data. Agreement in mean velocities was realized where the pressure measurements could be considered reliable; however, in regions of instantaneous reverse velocities, the laser results were found to be consistent with the physics of the flow whereas the pressure data were not. The laser data obtained in regions of extremely high turbulence suggest that velocity biasing does not occur if the particle occurrence rate is low relative to the turbulent fluctuation rate. Streamwise turbulence intensities are also presented. In the transonic airfoil study, velocity measurements obtained immediately outside the upper surface boundary layer of a 6-inch chord MACA 64A010 airfoil are compared to edge velocities inferred from surface pressure measurements. For free-stream Mach numbers of 0.6 and 0.8, the agreement in results was very good. Dual scatter optical arrangements in conjunction with a single particle, counter-type signal processor were employed in these investigations. Half-micron-diameter polystyrene spheres and naturally occurring condensed oil vapor acted as light scatterers in the two respective flows. Bragg-cell frequency shifting was utilized in the separated flow study.

  11. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The general principles of artificial intelligence are reviewed and speculations are made concerning how knowledge based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use expert systems, and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. In addition, the anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics are examined. Three main conclusions are presented. First, there are two related aspects of computational aerodynamics: reasoning and calculating. Second, a substantial portion of reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence. It offers the opportunity of using computers as reasoning machines to set the stage for efficient calculating. Third, expert systems are likely to be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  12. An evaluation of deep-sea benthic megafauna length measurements obtained with laser and stereo camera methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, Katherine M.; Kuhnz, Linda A.; Ruhl, Henry A.; Huffard, Christine L.; Caress, David W.; Henthorn, Richard G.; Hobson, Brett W.; McGill, Paul; Smith, Kenneth L.

    2015-02-01

    The 25 year time-series collected at Station M, ~4000 m on the Monterey Deep-sea Fan, has substantially improved understanding of the role of the deep-ocean benthic environment in the global carbon cycle. However, the role of deep-ocean benthic megafauna in carbon bioturbation, remineralization and sequestration is relatively unknown. It is important to gather both accurate and precise measurements of megafaunal community abundance, size distribution and biomass to further define their role in deep-sea carbon cycling and possible sequestration. This study describes initial results from a stereo camera system attached to a remotely operated vehicle and analyzed using the EventMeasure photogrammetric measurement software to estimate the density, length and biomass of 10 species of mobile epibenthic megafauna. Stereo length estimates were compared to those from a single video camera system equipped with sizing lasers and analyzed using the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's Video Annotation and Reference System. Both camera systems and software were capable of high measurement accuracy and precision (<±1 mm measurement error and precision). However, the oblique angle of the single video camera caused the spatial scale of the image perspective to change with distance from the camera, resulting in error when measurements were not parallel or vertical to two horizontal-oriented scaling lasers. Analysis showed that the stereo system recorded longer lengths and higher biomass estimates than the single video camera system for the majority of the 10 megafauna species studied. The stereo image analysis process took substantially longer than the video analysis and the value of the EventMeasure software tool would be improved with developments in analysis automation. The stereo system is less influenced by object orientation and height, and is potentially a useful tool to be mounted on an autonomous underwater vehicle and for measuring deep-sea pelagic animals where

  13. Using time separation of signals to obtain independent proton and antiproton beam position measurements around the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Independent position measurement of the counter-circulating proton and antiproton beams in the Tevatron, never supported by the original Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system, presents a challenge to upgrading that system. This paper discusses the possibilities and complications of using time separation of proton and antiproton signals at the numerous BPM locations and for the dynamic Tevatron operating conditions. Results of measurements using one such method are presented.

  14. Dynamic soaring: aerodynamics for albatrosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Albatrosses have evolved to soar and glide efficiently. By maximizing their lift-to-drag ratio L/D, albatrosses can gain energy from the wind and can travel long distances with little effort. We simplify the difficult aerodynamic equations of motion by assuming that albatrosses maintain a constant L/D. Analytic solutions to the simplified equations provide an instructive and appealing example of fixed-wing aerodynamics suitable for undergraduate demonstration.

  15. Supersonic aerodynamics of delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    Through the empirical correlation of experimental data and theoretical analysis, a set of graphs has been developed which summarize the inviscid aerodynamics of delta wings at supersonic speeds. The various graphs which detail the aerodynamic performance of delta wings at both zero-lift and lifting conditions were then employed to define a preliminary wing design approach in which both the low-lift and high-lift design criteria were combined to define a feasible design space.

  16. Vortex flap flow reattachment line and subsonic longitudinal aerodynamic data on 50 deg to 74 deg Delta wings on common fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, N. T.; Huffman, J. K.; Johnson, T. D., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Positions of the primary vortex flow reattachment line and longitudinal aerodynamic data were obtained at Mach number 0.3 for a systematic series of vortex flaps on delta wing body configurations with leading edge sweeps of 50, 58, 66, and 74 deg. The investigation was performed to study the parametric effects of wing sweep, vortex flap geometry and deflection, canards, and trailing edge flaps on the location of the primary vortex reattachment line relative to the flap hinge line. The vortex reattachment line was located via surface oil flow photographs taken at selected angles of attack. Force and moment measurements were taken over an angle of attack range of -1 deg to 22 deg at zero sideslip angle for many configurations to further establish the data base and to assess the aforementioned parametric effects on longitudinal aerodynamics. Both the flow reattachment and aerodynamic data are presented.

  17. Proliferative effect of whey from cows' milk obtained at two different stages of pregnancy measured in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Tina S; Andersen, Charlotte; Sejrsen, Kris; Purup, Stig

    2012-02-01

    Dietary estrogens may play a role in the etiology of hormone-dependent cancers like breast cancer. Cow's milk contains various endogenous estrogens and feed derived phytoestrogens that potentially contribute to an estrogenic effect of milk in consumers, and therefore we evaluated the effect of milk (whey) in a proliferation assay with estrogen-sensitive MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Milk samples were obtained from 22 cows representing different stages of pregnancy (first and second half) and whey was produced from the milk. 0·1, 0·25 or 0·5% whey was included in the cell culture medium and after 6 days of treatment cell proliferation was assessed by a colorimetric method with a fluorometer. Whey induced significant (P<0·05) proliferative effects compared with control cells with no added whey at all concentrations tested. There was no difference in the proliferative effect of whey depending on the stage of pregnancy from which the milk was obtained. We did not observe anti-proliferative effects when whey was tested in the presence of 10 pm estradiol in the medium. In conclusion, these results indicate that whey, irrespective of the pregnancy stage from which the milk was obtained induced a significant proliferative response in MCF-7 cells and no anti-proliferative effect, which may be caused, at least in part, by estrogens present in milk. The implications of our findings in relation to for example breast cancer will have to be studied further in other model systems preferentially in vivo.

  18. Asymmetric Uncertainty Expression for High Gradient Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T

    2012-01-01

    When the physics of the flow around an aircraft changes very abruptly either in time or space (e.g., flow separation/reattachment, boundary layer transition, unsteadiness, shocks, etc), the measurements that are performed in a simulated environment like a wind tunnel test or a computational simulation will most likely incorrectly predict the exact location of where (or when) the change in physics happens. There are many reasons for this, includ- ing the error introduced by simulating a real system at a smaller scale and at non-ideal conditions, or the error due to turbulence models in a computational simulation. The un- certainty analysis principles that have been developed and are being implemented today do not fully account for uncertainty in the knowledge of the location of abrupt physics changes or sharp gradients, leading to a potentially underestimated uncertainty in those areas. To address this problem, a new asymmetric aerodynamic uncertainty expression containing an extra term to account for a phase-uncertainty, the magnitude of which is emphasized in the high-gradient aerodynamic regions is proposed in this paper. Additionally, based on previous work, a method for dispersing aerodynamic data within asymmetric uncer- tainty bounds in a more realistic way has been developed for use within Monte Carlo-type analyses.

  19. Rarefied-flow Shuttle aerodynamics model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moats, Christina D.

    1993-01-01

    A rarefied-flow shuttle aerodynamic model spanning the hypersonic continuum to the free molecule-flow regime was formulated. The model development has evolved from the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP) experiment conducted on the Orbiter since 1983. The complete model is described in detail. The model includes normal and axial hypersonic continuum coefficient equations as functions of angle-of-attack, body flap deflection, and elevon deflection. Normal and axial free molecule flow coefficient equations as a function of angle-of-attack are presented, along with flight derived rarefied-flow transition bridging formulae. Comparisons are made with data from the Operational Aerodynamic Design Data Book (OADDB), applicable wind-tunnel data, and recent flight data from STS-35 and STS-40. The flight-derived model aerodynamic force coefficient ratio is in good agreement with the wind-tunnel data and predicts the flight measured force coefficient ratios on STS-35 and STS-40. The model is not, however, in good agreement with the OADDB. But, the current OADDB does not predict the flight data force coefficient ratios of either STS-35 or STS-40 as accurately as the flight-derived model. Also, the OADDB differs with the wind-tunnel force coefficient ratio data.

  20. Measurements of chlorofluorocarbons and their replacement compounds at Monte Cimone: results obtained after eighteen months of observations.

    PubMed

    Maione, Michela; Mangani, Filippo; Lattanzi, Luciano; Arduini, Jgor; Bonasoni, Paolo

    2002-04-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons and their substitutes are anthropogenic compounds strongly involved in global change phenomena. Therefore, their atmospheric mixing-ratios are monitored on a worldwide scale. In order to evaluate source strength of these compounds in Southern Europe, in 1999 a research activity, monitoring these compounds in the atmosphere of the Monte Cimone (MO, Italy) was started. Air samples, collected on a weekly base, were analyzed using a GC-MS methodology recently devised by our group. The reported results, obtained after eighteen months of observation, are relative to four fully halogenated halocarbons and four hydrogenated halocarbons.

  1. Precision of Corneal Thickness Measurements Obtained Using the Scheimpflug-Placido Imaging and Agreement with Ultrasound Pachymetry

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinhai; Wang, Chengfang; Lu, Weicong; Gao, Rongrong; Li, Yuanguang; Wang, Qinmei; Zhao, Yune

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the reliability and comparability of measuring central corneal thickness (CCT) and thinnest corneal thickness (TCT) using a new Scheimpflug-Placido analyzer (TMS-5, Japan) and ultrasound (US) pachymetry. Methods. Seventy-six healthy subjects were prospectively measured 3 times by 1 operator using the TMS-5, 3 additional consecutive scans were performed by a second operator, and ultrasound (US) pachymetry measurements were taken. The test-retest repeatability (TRT), coefficient of variation (CoV), and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated to evaluate intraoperator repeatability and interoperator reproducibility. Agreement among the devices was assessed using Bland-Altman plots and 95% limits of agreement (LoA). Results. The intraoperators TRT and CoV were <19 μm and 2.0%, respectively. The interoperators TRT and CoV were <12 μm and 1.0%, respectively, and ICC was >0.90. The mean CCT and TCT measurements using the TMS-5 were 15.97 μm (95% LoA from −26.42 to −5.52 μm) and 20.32 μm (95% LoA from −30.67 to −9.97 μm) smaller, respectively, than those using US pachymetry. Conclusions. The TMS-5 shows good repeatability and reproducibility for measuring CCT and TCT in normal subjects but only moderate agreement with US pachymetry results. Caution is warranted before using these techniques interchangeably. PMID:25810919

  2. Measuring surface topography with scanning electron microscopy. I. EZEImage: a program to obtain 3D surface data.

    PubMed

    Ponz, Ezequiel; Ladaga, Juan Luis; Bonetto, Rita Dominga

    2006-04-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is widely used in the science of materials and different parameters were developed to characterize the surface roughness. In a previous work, we studied the surface topography with fractal dimension at low scale and two parameters at high scale by using the variogram, that is, variance vs. step log-log graph, of a SEM image. Those studies were carried out with the FERImage program, previously developed by us. To verify the previously accepted hypothesis by working with only an image, it is indispensable to have reliable three-dimensional (3D) surface data. In this work, a new program (EZEImage) to characterize 3D surface topography in SEM has been developed. It uses fast cross correlation and dynamic programming to obtain reliable dense height maps in a few seconds which can be displayed as an image where each gray level represents a height value. This image can be used for the FERImage program or any other software to obtain surface topography characteristics. EZEImage also generates anaglyph images as well as characterizes 3D surface topography by means of a parameter set to describe amplitude properties and three functional indices for characterizing bearing and fluid properties.

  3. Aerodynamics of Unsteady Sailing Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Colin; Schutt, Riley; Borshoff, Jennifer; Alley, Philip; de Zegher, Maximilien; Williamson, Chk

    2015-11-01

    In small sailboats, the bodyweight of the sailor is proportionately large enough to induce significant unsteady motion of the boat and sail. Sailors use a variety of kinetic techniques to create sail dynamics which can provide an increment in thrust, thereby increasing the boatspeed. In this study, we experimentally investigate the unsteady aerodynamics associated with two techniques, ``upwind leech flicking'' and ``downwind S-turns''. We explore the dynamics of an Olympic class Laser sailboat equipped with a GPS, IMU, wind sensor, and camera array, sailed expertly by a member of the US Olympic team. The velocity heading of a sailing boat is oriented at an apparent wind angle to the flow. In contrast to classic flapping propulsion, the heaving of the sail section is not perpendicular to the sail's motion through the air. This leads to heave with components parallel and perpendicular to the incident flow. The characteristic motion is recreated in a towing tank where the vortex structures generated by a representative 2-D sail section are observed using Particle Image Velocimetry and the measurement of thrust and lift forces. Amongst other results, we show that the increase in driving force, generated due to heave, is larger for greater apparent wind angles.

  4. Supersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of Proposed Mars '07 Smart Lander Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Erickson, Gary E.; Green, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    Supersonic aerodynamic data were obtained for proposed Mars '07 Smart Lander configurations in NASA Langley Research Center's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The primary objective of this test program was to assess the supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of the baseline Smart Lander configuration with and without fixed shelf/tab control surfaces. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 2.3 to 4.5, at a free stream Reynolds Number of 1 x 10(exp 6) based on body diameter. All configurations were run at angles of attack from -5 to 20 degrees and angles of sideslip of -5 to 5 degrees. These results were complemented with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) predictions to enhance the understanding of experimentally observed aerodynamic trends. Inviscid and viscous full model CFD solutions compared well with experimental results for the baseline and 3 shelf/tab configurations. Over the range tested, Mach number effects were shown to be small on vehicle aerodynamic characteristics. Based on the results from 3 different shelf/tab configurations, a fixed control surface appears to be a feasible concept for meeting aerodynamic performance metrics necessary to satisfy mission requirements.

  5. Mass spectrometric analysis and aerodynamic properties of various types of combustion-related aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J.; Weimer, S.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Helas, G.; Gwaze, P.; Schmid, O.; Andreae, M. O.; Kirchner, U.

    2006-12-01

    Various types of combustion-related particles in the size range between 100 and 850 nm were analyzed with an aerosol mass spectrometer and a differential mobility analyzer. The measurements were performed with particles originating from biomass burning, diesel engine exhaust, laboratory combustion of diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as from spark soot generation. Physical and morphological parameters like fractal dimension, effective density, bulk density and dynamic shape factor were derived or at least approximated from the measurements of electrical mobility diameter and vacuum aerodynamic diameter. The relative intensities of the mass peaks in the mass spectra obtained from particles generated by a commercial diesel passenger car, by diesel combustion in a laboratory burner, and by evaporating and re-condensing lubrication oil were found to be very similar. The mass spectra from biomass burning particles show signatures identified as organic compounds like levoglucosan but also others which are yet unidentified. The aerodynamic behavior yielded a fractal dimension (Df) of 2.09 +/- 0.06 for biomass burning particles from the combustion of dry beech sticks, but showed values around three, and hence more compact particle morphologies, for particles from combustion of more natural oak. Scanning electron microscope images confirmed the finding that the beech combustion particles were fractal-like aggregates, while the oak combustion particles displayed a much more compact shape. For particles from laboratory combusted diesel fuel, a Df value of 2.35 was found, for spark soot particles, Df [approximate] 2.10. The aerodynamic properties of fractal-like particles from dry beech wood combustion indicate an aerodynamic shape factor [chi] that increases with electrical mobility diameter, and a bulk density of 1.92 g cm-3. An upper limit of [chi] [approximate] 1.2 was inferred for the shape factor of the more compact particles from oak combustion.

  6. Experimental Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of the Space Shuttle Orbiter for a Range of Damage Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckman, Gregory J.; Scallion, William I.

    2003-01-01

    Aerodynamic tests in support of the Columbia accident investigation were conducted in two hypersonic wind tunnels at the NASA Langley Research Center, the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel and the 20-Inch Mach 6 CF4 Tunnel. The primary purpose of these tests was to measure the forces and moments generated by a variety of outer mold line alterations (damage scenarios) using 0.0075-scale models of the Space Shuttle Orbiter (approximately 10 inches in length). Simultaneously acquired global heat transfer mappings were obtained for a majority of the configurations tested. Test parameters include angles of attack from 38 to 42 deg, unit Reynolds numbers from 0.26 to 3.0 x10^6 per foot, and normal shock density ratios of 5 (Mach 6 air) and 12 (Mach 6 CF4). The damage scenarios evaluated included asymmetric boundary layer transition, gouges in the windward surface acreage thermal protection system tiles, wing leading edge damage (partially and fully missing reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels), holes through the wing from the windward surface to the leeside, deformation of the wing windward surface, and main landing gear door and/or gear deployment. The aerodynamic data were compared to the magnitudes and directions observed in flight, and the heating images were evaluated in terms of the location of the generated disturbances and how these disturbance might relate to the response of discrete gages on the Columbia Orbiter vehicle during entry. The measured aerodynamic increments were generally small in magnitude, as were the flight-derived values during most of the entry. Asymmetric boundary layer transition (ABLT) results were consistent with the flight-derived Shuttle ABLT model, but not with the observed flight trends for STS-107. The partially missing leading edge panel results best matched both the early aerodynamic and heating trends observed in flight. A progressive damage scenario is presented that qualitatively matches the flight observations for the full entry.

  7. Differences in Blood Pressure Measurements Obtained Using an Automatic Oscillometric Sphygmomanometer Depending on Clothes-Wearing Status

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Ji Hoon; Lee, Soo Hee

    2013-01-01

    Background According to the current guidelines for blood pressure monitoring, clinicians are recommended to measure blood pressure by completely exposing the upper arm. However, it is a common practice that blood pressure is measured with the cuff placed over the sleeve or with the sleeve rolled up. We therefore conducted this study to examine whether there are any differences in blood pressure measurements among the three different settings: the sleeve group, the rolled sleeve group, and the bare arm group. Methods We conducted the current study in 141 male and female adult patients who visited our clinical department. In these patients, we took repeatedly blood pressure measurements using the same automatic oscillometric device on three different settings. Then, we analyzed the results with the use of randomized block design analysis of variance. Results The mean values of systolic blood pressure (SBP) between the first reading and those of the second reading were 128.5 ± 10.6 mm Hg in the sleeve group, 128.3 ± 10.8 mm Hg in the rolled sleeve group, and 128.3 ± 10.7 mm Hg in the bare arm group. These results indicate that there were no significant differences among the three groups (P = 0.32). In addition, the mean values of diastolic blood pressure (DBP) between the first reading and those of the second reading were 80.7 ± 6.1 mm Hg in the sleeve group, 80.7 ± 6.1 mm Hg in the rolled sleeve group, and 80.6 ± 5.9 mm Hg in the bare arm group. These results indicate that there were no significant differences among the three groups (P = 0.77). In addition, based on the age, sex, past or current history of hypertension or diabetes mellitus, the thickness of sleeve, weight, a drinking history, and a smoking history, there were no significant differences in SBP and DBP among the three groups. Conclusion There were no significant differences in blood pressure measurements between the three different settings (the sleeve group, the rolled sleeve group, and the bare

  8. Improving the sampling technique of arterialized capillary samples to obtain more accurate PaO2 measurements.

    PubMed

    Wimpress, S; Vara, D D; Brightling, C E

    2005-01-01

    Arterialized earlobe capillary blood samples (ELCS) have been used as a measurement of blood gas status for over 20 years. There is general acceptance that there is a strong correlation and limits of agreement between arterial and arterialized blood samples with respect to pH and PaCO2. Although the correlation between the arterial and arterialized PaO2 is good, the limits of agreement poor. Our aim was to improve the accuracy of this technique in the measurement of PaO2 by simultaneously monitoring the oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry whilst taking an ELCS. We hypothesize that significant discrepancies between the SaO2 and SpO2 highlight either a poorly arterialized sample or an over aerated sample from air bubbles. We compared the SpO2 with the SaO2 of an arterial sample from 27 inpatients. We used the limits of agreement between these samples to define the degree of discordance we would accept between SaO2 and SpO2 before repeat ELCS. Subsequently, 252 consecutive patients attending our respiratory physiology unit over a six-month period had an ELCS and simultaneous SpO2. If there was a discrepancy between SaO2 and SpO2 of > 2% the ELCS was repeated. There was a good correlation and limits of agreement between the SpO2 and arterial SaO2 (r = 0.97, mean difference +/- 95% limits of agreement: 0.34 +/- 2.68). A difference of more than 2% between arterialized SaO2 and SpO2 was identified in 21 patients out of 252 (8.3%) with SaO2 higher in two and lower in 19 (r = 0.96, mean difference +/- 95% limits of agreement: 0.66 +/- 3.1). Repeat ELCS of these 21 samples reduced this discrepancy improving the concordance of the measurements (r = 0.98, mean difference +/- 95% limits of agreement: 0.47 +/- 1.0). In one case a difference of 3% remained between the saturations. We conclude that the addition of simultaneous pulse oximetry with ELCS will identify rogue measurements in about 8% of cases highlighting the need for repeat samples and thus increasing the accuracy of

  9. Analysis of Earthquake Recordings Obtained from the Seafloor Earthquake Measurement System (SEMS) Instruments Deployed off the Coast of Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.; Smith, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    For more than 20 years, a program has been underway to obtain records of earthquake shaking on the seafloor at sites offshore of southern California, near oil platforms. The primary goal of the program is to obtain data that can help determine if ground motions at offshore sites are significantly different than those at onshore sites; if so, caution may be necessary in using onshore motions as the basis for the seismic design of oil platforms. We analyze data from eight earthquakes recorded at six offshore sites; these are the most important data recorded on these stations to date. Seven of the earthquakes were recorded at only one offshore station; the eighth event was recorded at two sites. The earthquakes range in magnitude from 4.7 to 6.1. Because of the scarcity of multiple recordings from any one event, most of the analysis is based on the ratio of spectra from vertical and horizontal components of motion. The results clearly show that the offshore motions have very low vertical motions compared to those from an average onshore site, particularly at short periods. Theoretical calculations find that the water layer has little effect on the horizontal components of motion but that it produces a strong spectral null on the vertical component at the resonant frequency of P waves in the water layer. The vertical-to-horizontal ratios for a few selected onshore sites underlain by relatively low shear-wave velocities are similar to the ratios from offshore sites for frequencies less than about one-half the water layer P-wave resonant frequency, suggesting that the shear-wave velocities beneath a site are more important than the water layer in determining the character of the ground motions at lower frequencies.

  10. Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. Subba

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic space vehicles is an important factor to be considered in their design. Therefore the designers of such vehicles need reliable heat transfer data in this respect for a successful design. Such data is usually produced by testing the models of hypersonic surfaces in wind tunnels. Most of the hypersonic test facilities at present are conventional blow-down tunnels whose run times are of the order of several seconds. The surface temperatures on such models are obtained using standard techniques such as thin-film resistance gages, thin-skin transient calorimeter gages and coaxial thermocouple or video acquisition systems such as phosphor thermography and infrared thermography. The data are usually reduced assuming that the model behaves like a semi-infinite solid (SIS) with constant properties and that heat transfer is by one-dimensional conduction only. This simplifying assumption may be valid in cases where models are thick, run-times short, and thermal diffusivities small. In many instances, however, when these conditions are not met, the assumption may lead to significant errors in the heat transfer results. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this aspect. Specifically, the objectives are as follows: (1) to determine the limiting conditions under which a model can be considered a semi-infinite body; (2) to estimate the extent of errors involved in the reduction of the data if the models violate the assumption; and (3) to come up with correlation factors which when multiplied by the results obtained under the SIS assumption will provide the results under the actual conditions.

  11. Geometrical Measures Obtained from Pretreatment Postcontrast T1 Weighted MRIs Predict Survival Benefits from Bevacizumab in Glioblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Juan M.; Peralta, Sergi; Gil-Gil, Miguel J.; Reynes, Gaspar; Herrero, Ana; De Las Peñas, Ramón; Luque, Raquel; Capellades, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Background Antiangiogenic therapies for glioblastoma (GBM) such as bevacizumab (BVZ), have been unable to extend survival in large patient cohorts. However, a subset of patients having angiogenesis-dependent tumors might benefit from these therapies. Currently, there are no biomarkers allowing to discriminate responders from non-responders before the start of the therapy. Methods 40 patients from the randomized GENOM009 study complied the inclusion criteria (quality of images, clinical data available). Of those, 23 patients received first line temozolomide (TMZ) for eight weeks and then concomitant radiotherapy and TMZ. 17 patients received BVZ+TMZ for seven weeks and then added radiotherapy to the treatment. Clinical variables were collected, tumors segmented and several geometrical measures computed including: Contrast enhancing (CE), necrotic, and total volumes; equivalent spherical CE width; several geometric measures of the CE ‘rim’ geometry and a set of image texture measures. The significance of the results was studied using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards analysis. Correlations were assessed using Spearman correlation coefficients. Results Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards analysis showed that total, CE and inner volume (p = 0.019, HR = 4.258) and geometric heterogeneity of the CE areas (p = 0.011, HR = 3.931) were significant parameters identifying response to BVZ. The group of patients with either regular CE areas (small geometric heterogeneity, median difference survival 15.88 months, p = 0.011) or those with small necrotic volume (median survival difference 14.50 months, p = 0.047) benefited substantially from BVZ. Conclusion Imaging biomarkers related to the irregularity of contrast enhancing areas and the necrotic volume were able to discriminate GBM patients with a substantial survival benefit from BVZ. A prospective study is needed to validate our results. PMID:27557121

  12. Optimal impulsive manoeuvres and aerodynamic braking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezewski, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    A method developed for obtaining solutions to the aerodynamic braking problem, using impulses in the exoatmospheric phases is discussed. The solution combines primer vector theory and the results of a suboptimal atmospheric guidance program. For a specified initial and final orbit, the solution determines: (1) the minimum impulsive cost using a maximum of four impulses, (2) the optimal atmospheric entry and exit-state vectors subject to equality and inequality constraints, and (3) the optimal coast times. Numerical solutions which illustrate the characteristics of the solution are presented.

  13. Generic Wing-Body Aerodynamics Data Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Olsen, Thomas H.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The wing-body aerodynamics data base consists of a series of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations about a generic wing body configuration consisting of a ogive-circular-cylinder fuselage and a simple symmetric wing mid-mounted on the fuselage. Solutions have been obtained for Nonlinear Potential (P), Euler (E) and Navier-Stokes (N) solvers over a range of subsonic and transonic Mach numbers and angles of attack. In addition, each solution has been computed on a series of grids, coarse, medium and fine to permit an assessment of grid refinement errors.

  14. Measurements and analysis of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrum obtained in NANOGAN electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T. S.; Rodrigues, G.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2008-02-15

    From the ECR plasma, hot electrons leak across the magnetic lines of force and by striking the plasma chamber produce bremsstrahlung x-rays. The wall bremsstrahlung gives information on the confinement status of hot electron. In our studies, experimental measurements are carried out in NANOGAN electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for the wall bremsstrahlung x-rays and the results are presented. While optimizing a particular charge state in ECR ion source, experimental parameters are adjusted to get a maximum current. The wall bremsstrahlung components are studied in these cases for understanding the hot electron confinement conditions.

  15. Skin friction drag measurements by LDV.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, M K; Wanchoo, S; McLeod, P C; Ballard, G S; Mozumdar, S; Caraballo, N

    1981-08-15

    A laser Doppler velocimeter employing a microscope objective as the receiving lens has been developed for measuring fluid velocity inside the boundary layer flow field with a spatial resolution of 40 microm. The method was applied for direct measurement of aerodynamic skin friction drag from the measured velocity gradient at the wall. Experimental results obtained on skin friction and on velocity components in a turbulent boundary layer on a low speed wind tunnel showed good agreement with previously reported data using conventional instruments such as hot-wire anemometers and Preston tubes. The method thus provides a tool for measurement and control of skin friction on aerodynamic bodies without perturbing the flow field.

  16. Application of CAD/CAE class systems to aerodynamic analysis of electric race cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, L.; Baier, A.; Buchacz, A.; Majzner, M.; Sobek, M.

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamics is one of the most important factors which influence on every aspect of a design of a car and car driving parameters. The biggest influence aerodynamics has on design of a shape of a race car body, especially when the main objective of the race is the longest distance driven in period of time, which can not be achieved without low energy consumption and low drag of a car. Designing shape of the vehicle body that must generate the lowest possible drag force, without compromising the other parameters of the drive. In the article entitled „Application of CAD/CAE class systems to aerodynamic analysis of electric race cars” are being presented problems solved by computer analysis of cars aerodynamics and free form modelling. Analysis have been subjected to existing race car of a Silesian Greenpower Race Team. On a basis of results of analysis of existence of Kammback aerodynamic effect innovative car body were modeled. Afterwards aerodynamic analysis were performed to verify existence of aerodynamic effect for innovative shape and to recognize aerodynamics parameters of the shape. Analysis results in the values of coefficients and aerodynamic drag forces. The resulting drag forces Fx, drag coefficients Cx(Cd) and aerodynamic factors Cx*A allowed to compare all of the shapes to each other. Pressure distribution, air velocities and streams courses were useful in determining aerodynamic features of analyzed shape. For aerodynamic tests was used Ansys Fluent CFD software. In a paper the ways of surface modeling with usage of Realize Shape module and classic surface modeling were presented. For shapes modeling Siemens NX 9.0 software was used. Obtained results were used to estimation of existing shapes and to make appropriate conclusions.

  17. Comparison between two different methods to obtain the proportions of myoglobin redox forms on fresh meat from reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Hernández, B; Sáenz, C; Alberdi, C; Diñeiro, J M

    2015-12-01

    Two procedures based on reflectance (R) measurements to calculate the proportions of deoxymyoglobin (DMb), oxymyoglobin (OMb) and metmyoglobin (MMb) in meat are recommended by the American Meat Science Association (AMSA). One uses the K/S ratios (K and S are the absorption and scattering coefficients) and the other method (Krzywicki 1979) uses the reflex attenuance A = log (1/R). Both methods were compared in: a) synthetic sets of two pigment mixtures and b) 15 samples of beef Longissimus Lumborum measured after 24 h, 4 and 7 days of exposure to air. It was found that K/S and Krzywicki methods gave different values of pigment proportions. However both methods exhibited a high linear correlation (R(2) = 0.8733 in DMb, R(2) = 0.9771 in OMb and R(2) = 0.9390 in MMb, p < 0.0001). This makes them equivalent for statistical analysis based on differences in pigment proportions.

  18. Road grade quantification based on global positioning system data obtained from real-world vehicle fuel use and emissions measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani Boroujeni, Behdad; Frey, H. Christopher

    2014-03-01

    Real-world vehicle fuel use and emission rates depend on engine load, which is quantified in terms of Vehicle Specific Power (VSP). VSP depends on vehicle speed, acceleration, and road grade. There is not a standard method for measuring road grade from a moving vehicle. A method for quantifying grade is evaluated based on statistical analysis of multiple runs using low cost consumer grade Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers with in-built Barometric Altimeter (GPS/BA). The average grade precision is ±0.71, ±0.46, and ±0.31 percentage points, for sample sizes of 9, 18, and 36 GPS/BA runs, respectively, among 2213 individual 0.08 km road segments. In addition, 4 sets of repeated measurements were performed on the same routes using a high cost, high accuracy Differential GPS (DGPS). Both sets of GPS-based grade estimates compared well with those derived from LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) data. GPS/BA and DGPS grade estimates were similar, except for high magnitude grades of 8-10 percent for which DGPS estimates are more accurate. DGPS is more sensitive to loss of signal; thus, a hybrid approach for substituting GPS/BA data for missing DGPS data at specific locations along a route is demonstrated. The local and overall effects of road grade on fuel use and emission rates are investigated for an example light duty gasoline vehicle.

  19. Aerodynamic Investigation of Incidence Angle Effects in a Large Scale Transonic Turbine Cascade. Revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McVetta, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    Aerodynamic measurements showing the effects of large incidence angle variations on an HPT turbine blade set are presented. Measurements were made in NASA's Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility which has been used in previous studies to acquire detailed aerodynamic and heat transfer measurements for CFD code validation. The current study supports the development of variable-speed power turbine (VSPT) speed-change technology for the NASA Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR) vehicle. In order to maintain acceptable main rotor propulsive efficiency, the VSPT operates over a nearly 50 percent speed range from takeoff to altitude cruise. This results in 50 deg or more variations in VSPT blade incidence angles. The cascade facility has the ability to operate over a wide range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers, but had to be modified in order to accommodate the negative incidence angle variation required by the LCTR VSPT operation. Using existing blade geometry with previously acquired aerodynamic data, the tunnel was re-baselined and the new incidence angle range was exercised. Midspan exit total pressure and flow angle measurements were obtained at seven inlet flow angles. For each inlet angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with inlet Reynolds numbers varying from 6.83×10 (exp 5) to 0.85×10(exp 5) and two isentropic exit Mach numbers of 0.74 and 0.34. The midspan flowfield measurements were acquired using a three-hole pneumatic probe located in a survey plane 8.6 percent axial chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressure distributions were also acquired for each flow condition.

  20. Aerodynamic Investigation of Incidence Angle Effects in a Large Scale Transonic Turbine Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McVetta, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic measurements showing the effects of large incidence angle variations on an HPT turbine blade set are presented. Measurements were made in NASA's Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility which has been used in previous studies to acquire detailed aerodynamic and heat transfer measurements for CFD code validation. The current study supports the development of variable-speed power turbine (VSPT) speed-change technology for the NASA Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR) vehicle. In order to maintain acceptable main rotor propulsive efficiency, the VSPT operates over a nearly 50 percent speed range from takeoff to altitude cruise. This results in 50deg or more variations in VSPT blade incidence angles. The cascade facility has the ability to operate over a wide range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers, but had to be modified in order to accommodate the negative incidence angle variation required by the LCTR VSPT operation. Using existing blade geometry with previously acquired aerodynamic data, the tunnel was re-baselined and the new incidence angle range was exercised. Midspan exit total pressure and flow angle measurements were obtained at seven inlet flow angles. For each inlet angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with inlet Reynolds numbers varying from 6.83×10(exp 5) to 0.85×10(exp 5) and two isentropic exit Mach numbers of 0.74 and 0.34. The midspan flowfield measurements were acquired using a three-hole pneumatic probe located in a survey plane 8.6 percent axial chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressure distributions were also acquired for each flow condition.

  1. Aerodynamic Investigation of Incidence Angle Effects in a Large Scale Transonic Turbine Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McVetta, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic measurements showing the effects of large incidence angle variations on an HPT turbine blade set are presented. Measurements were made in NASA's Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility which has been used in previous studies to acquire detailed aerodynamic and heat transfer measurements for CFD code validation. The current study supports the development of variable-speed power turbine (VSPT) speed-change technology for the NASA Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR) vehicle. In order to maintain acceptable main rotor propulsive efficiency, the VSPT operates over a nearly 50% speed range from takeoff to altitude cruise. This results in 50 degrees or more variations in VSPT blade incidence angles. The cascade facility has the ability to operate over a wide range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers, but had to be modified in order to accommodate the negative incidence angle variation required by the LCTR VSPT operation. Using existing blade geometry with previously acquired aerodynamic data, the tunnel was re-baselined and the new incidence angle range was exercised. Midspan exit total pressure and flow angle measurements were obtained at seven inlet flow angles. For each inlet angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with inlet Reynolds numbers varying from 6.83 × 10(exp 5) to 0.85 ×10(exp 5) and two isentropic exit Mach numbers of 0.74 and 0.34. The midspan flowfield measurements were acquired using a three-hole pneumatic probe located in a survey plane 8.6% axial chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressure distributions were also acquired for each flow condition

  2. How Long Should a System Be Observed to Obtain Reliable Concentration Estimates from the Measurement of Fluctuations?

    PubMed Central

    Ipiña, Emiliano Pérez; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2014-01-01

    The interior of cells is a highly fluctuating environment. Fluctuations set limits to the accuracy with which endogenous processes can occur. The physical principles that rule these limits also affect the experimental quantification of biophysical parameters in situ. The characterization of fluctuations, on the other hand, provides a way to quantify biophysical parameters. But as with any random process, enough data has to be collected to achieve a reliable quantitative description. In this article we study the accuracy with which intracellular concentrations can be estimated using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We show that, when the observed molecules interact with immobile species or experience other restrictions to their movement, the hypotheses commonly used to estimate concentrations are no longer valid. The interactions with immobile sites reduce the fluorescence variance by a finite amount. The time that is necessary to obtain an accurate concentration estimate, on the other hand, is hundreds of times larger than the slowest correlation time and is much larger when the sites move slowly than when they are immobile. Our analysis is applicable to other related techniques and it also sheds light on the way in which effector concentrations are read by target molecules in cells. PMID:25468346

  3. Transient platoon aerodynamics and bluff body flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuei, Lun

    There are two components of this experimental work: transient vehicle platoon aerodynamics and bluff-body flows. The transient aerodynamic effects in a four-vehicle platoon during passing maneuvers and in-line oscillations are investigated. A vehicle model is moved longitudinally parallel to a four-car platoon to simulate passing maneuvers. The drag and side forces experienced by each platoon member are measured using strain gauge balances. The resulting data are presented as dimensionless coefficients. It is shown that each car in the platoon experiences a repulsive side force when the passing vehicle is in the neighborhood of its rear half. The side force reverses its direction and becomes an attractive force when the passing vehicle moves to the neighborhood of its front half. The drag force experienced by each platoon member is increased when the passing vehicle is in its proximity. The effects of the lateral spacing and relative velocity between the platoon and the passing vehicle, as well as the shape of the passing vehicle, are also investigated. Similar trends are observed in simulations of both a vehicle passing a platoon and a platoon overtaking a vehicle. During the in-line oscillation experiments, one of the four platoon members is forced to undergo longitudinal periodic motions. The drag force experienced by each platoon member is determined simultaneously during the oscillations. The effects of the location of the oscillating vehicle, the shape of the vehicles and the displacement and velocity amplitudes of the oscillation are examined. The results from the transient conditions are compared to those from the steady tests in the same setup. In the case of a four-car platoon, the drag variations experienced by the vehicles adjacent to the oscillating vehicle are discussed using a cavity model. It is found that when the oscillating car moves forward and approaches its upstream neighbor, itself and its downstream neighbor experiences an increased drag

  4. Soil water content and evaporation determined by thermal parameters obtained from ground-based and remote measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Vedder, J. F.; Blanchard, M. B.; Goettelman, R.

    1976-01-01

    Soil water contents from both smooth and rough bare soil were estimated from remotely sensed surface soil and air temperatures. An inverse relationship between two thermal parameters and gravimetric soil water content was found for Avondale loam when its water content was between air-dry and field capacity. These parameters, daily maximum minus minimum surface soil temperature and daily maximum soil minus air temperature, appear to describe the relationship reasonably well. These two parameters also describe relative soil water evaporation (actual/potential). Surface soil temperatures showed good agreement among three measurement techniques: in situ thermocouples, a ground-based infrared radiation thermometer, and the thermal infrared band of an airborne multispectral scanner.

  5. Optimum Duty Cycle of Unsteady Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation for NACA0015 Airfoil Stall Separation Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Min; Yang, Bo; Peng, Tianxiang; Lei, Mingkai

    2016-06-01

    Unsteady dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma aerodynamic actuation technology is employed to suppress airfoil stall separation and the technical parameters are explored with wind tunnel experiments on an NACA0015 airfoil by measuring the surface pressure distribution of the airfoil. The performance of the DBD aerodynamic actuation for airfoil stall separation suppression is evaluated under DBD voltages from 2000 V to 4000 V and the duty cycles varied in the range of 0.1 to 1.0. It is found that higher lift coefficients and lower threshold voltages are achieved under the unsteady DBD aerodynamic actuation with the duty cycles less than 0.5 as compared to that of the steady plasma actuation at the same free-stream speeds and attack angles, indicating a better flow control performance. By comparing the lift coefficients and the threshold voltages, an optimum duty cycle is determined as 0.25 by which the maximum lift coefficient and the minimum threshold voltage are obtained at the same free-stream speed and attack angle. The non-uniform DBD discharge with stronger discharge in the positive half cycle due to electrons deposition on the dielectric slabs and the suppression of opposite momentum transfer due to the intermittent discharge with cutoff of the negative half cycle are responsible for the observed optimum duty cycle. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21276036), Liaoning Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 2015020123) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. 3132015154)

  6. Estimation of Vegetation Aerodynamic Roughness of Natural Regions Using Frontal Area Density Determined from Satellite Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Michael F.; Crago, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Parameterizations of the frontal area index and canopy area index of natural or randomly distributed plants are developed, and applied to the estimation of local aerodynamic roughness using satellite imagery. The formulas are expressed in terms of the subpixel fractional vegetation cover and one non-dimensional geometric parameter that characterizes the plant's shape. Geometrically similar plants and Poisson distributed plant centers are assumed. An appropriate averaging technique to extend satellite pixel-scale estimates to larger scales is provided. ne parameterization is applied to the estimation of aerodynamic roughness using satellite imagery for a 2.3 sq km coniferous portion of the Landes Forest near Lubbon, France, during the 1986 HAPEX-Mobilhy Experiment. The canopy area index is estimated first for each pixel in the scene based on previous estimates of fractional cover obtained using Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery. Next, the results are incorporated into Raupach's (1992, 1994) analytical formulas for momentum roughness and zero-plane displacement height. The estimates compare reasonably well to reference values determined from measurements taken during the experiment and to published literature values. The approach offers the potential for estimating regionally variable, vegetation aerodynamic roughness lengths over natural regions using satellite imagery when there exists only limited knowledge of the vegetated surface.

  7. A new and practical method to obtain grain size measurements in sandy shores based on digital image acquisition and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, P.; Cunha, T. R.; Gama, C.; Bernardes, C.

    2012-12-01

    Modern methods for the automated evaluation of sediment size in sandy shores relay on digital image processing algorithms as an alternative to time-consuming traditional sieving methodologies. However, the requirements necessary to guarantee that the considered image processing algorithm has a good grain identification success rate impose the need for dedicated hardware setups to capture the sand surface images. Examples are specially designed camera housings that maintain a constant distance between the camera lens and the sand surface, tripods to fix and maintain the camera angle orthogonal to the sand surface, external illumination systems that guarantee the light level necessary for the image processing algorithms, and special lenses and focusing systems for close proximity image capturing. In some cases, controlled image-capturing conditions can make the fieldwork more laborious which incurs in significant costs for monitoring campaigns considering large areas. To circumvent this problem, it is proposed a new automated image-processing algorithm that identifies sand grains in digital images acquired with a standard digital camera without any extra hardware attached to it. The accuracy and robustness of the proposed algorithm are evaluated in this work by means of a laboratory test on previously controlled grain samples, field tests where 64 samples (spread over a beach stretch of 65 km and with grain size ranging from 0.5 mm to 1.9 mm) were processed by both the proposed method and by sieving and finally by manual point count on all acquired images. The calculated root-mean-square (RMS) error between mean grain sizes obtained from the proposed image processing method and the sieve method (for the 64 samples) was 0.33 mm, and for the image processing method versus manual point counts comparison, with the same images, was 0.12 mm. The achieved correlation coefficients (r) were 0.91 and 0.96, respectively.

  8. Ozone columns obtained by ground-based remote sensing in Kiev for Aura Ozone Measuring Instrument validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavrina, A. V.; Pavlenko, Y. V.; Veles, A.; Syniavskyi, I.; Kroon, M.

    2007-12-01

    Ground-based observations with a Fourier transform spectrometer in the infrared region (FTIR) were performed in Kiev (Ukraine) during the time frames August-October 2005 and June-October 2006 within the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) validation project 2907 entitled "OMI validation by ground based remote sensing: ozone columns and profiles" in the frame of the international European Space Agency/Netherlands Agency for Aerospace Programmes/Royal Dutch Meteorological Institute OMI Announcement of Opportunity effort. Ozone column data for 2005 were obtained by modeling the ozone spectral band at 9.6 μm with the radiative transfer code MODTRAN3.5. Our total ozone column values were found to be lower than OMI Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) total ozone column data by 8-10 Dobson units (DU, 1 DU = 0.001 atm cm) on average, while our observations have a relatively small standard error of about 2 DU. Improved modeling of the ozone spectral band, now based on HITRAN-2004 spectral data as calculated by us, moves our results toward better agreement with the OMI DOAS total ozone column data. The observations made during 2006 with a modernized FTIR spectrometer and higher signal-to-noise ratio were simulated by the MODTRAN4 model computations. For ozone column estimates the Aqua Atmospheric Infrared Sounder satellite water vapor and temperature profiles were combined with the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder stratospheric ozone profiles and Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service-Koninklijk Nederlands Meteorologisch Instituut climatological profiles to create a priori input files for spectral modeling. The MODTRAN4 estimates of ozone columns from the 2006 observations compare rather well with the OMI total ozone column data: standard errors are of 1.11 DU and 0.68 DU, standard deviation are of 8.77 DU and 5.37 DU for OMI DOAS and OMI Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, respectively.

  9. Configuration Aerodynamics: Past - Present - Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Bencze, Daniel P.; Kulfan, Robert M.; Wilson, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    The Configuration Aerodynamics (CA) element of the High Speed Research (HSR) program is managed by a joint NASA and Industry team, referred to as the Technology Integration Development (ITD) team. This team is responsible for the development of a broad range of technologies for improved aerodynamic performance and stability and control characteristics at subsonic to supersonic flight conditions. These objectives are pursued through the aggressive use of advanced experimental test techniques and state of the art computational methods. As the HSR program matures and transitions into the next phase the objectives of the Configuration Aerodynamics ITD are being refined to address the drag reduction needs and stability and control requirements of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. In addition, the experimental and computational tools are being refined and improved to meet these challenges. The presentation will review the work performed within the Configuration Aerodynamics element in 1994 and 1995 and then discuss the plans for the 1996-1998 time period. The final portion of the presentation will review several observations of the HSR program and the design activity within Configuration Aerodynamics.

  10. Evaluating the catching performance of aerodynamic rain gauges through field comparisons and CFD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Michael; Colli, Matteo; Stagnaro, Mattia; Lanza, Luca; Quinn, Paul; Dutton, Mark; O'Donnell, Greg; Wilkinson, Mark; Black, Andrew; O'Connell, Enda

    2016-04-01

    Accurate rainfall measurement is a fundamental requirement in a broad range of applications including flood risk and water resource management. The most widely used method of measuring rainfall is the rain gauge, which is often also considered to be the most accurate. In the context of hydrological modelling, measurements from rain gauges are interpolated to produce an areal representation, which forms an important input to drive hydrological models and calibrate rainfall radars. In each stage of this process another layer of uncertainty is introduced. The initial measurement errors are propagated through the chain, compounding the overall uncertainty. This study looks at the fundamental source of error, in the rainfall measurement itself; and specifically addresses the largest of these, the systematic 'wind-induced' error. Snowfall is outside the scope. The shape of a precipitation gauge significantly affects its collection efficiency (CE), with respect to a reference measurement. This is due to the airflow around the gauge, which causes a deflection in the trajectories of the raindrops near the gauge orifice. Computational Fluid-Dynamic (CFD) simulations are used to evaluate the time-averaged airflows realized around the EML ARG100, EML SBS500 and EML Kalyx-RG rain gauges, when impacted by wind. These gauges have a similar aerodynamic profile - a shape comparable to that of a champagne flute - and they are used globally. The funnel diameter of each gauge, respectively, is 252mm, 254mm and 127mm. The SBS500 is used by the UK Met Office and the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency. Terms of comparison are provided by the results obtained for standard rain gauge shapes manufactured by Casella and OTT which, respectively, have a uniform and a tapered cylindrical shape. The simulations were executed for five different wind speeds; 2, 5, 7, 10 and 18 ms-1. Results indicate that aerodynamic gauges have a different impact on the time-averaged airflow patterns

  11. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B.

    1995-10-01

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. This requires experiments in appropriate research facilities in which complete flow field data, not only point measurements, are obtained and analyzed. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows.

  12. Aerosol Optical Properties in the Iranian Region Obtained by Ground-Based Solar Radiation Measurements in the Summer Of 1991.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Teruyuki; Hayasaka, Tadahiro; Higurashi, Akiko; Hashida, Gen; Moharram-Nejad, Naser; Najafi, Yahya; Valavi, Hamzeh

    1996-08-01

    Solar radiation measurements were made using sun photometers and pyranometers during 31 May-7 June 1991 at several places in Iran and during 12 June-17 September 1991 at a fixed place, Bushehr, Iran. In the first period the aerosol optical thickness had values about 0.4 at the wavelength of 0.5 m in the coastal area and about 0.2 in the plateau area. The Ångström's exponent, which is the slope of optical thickness spectrum, had values around 1 for large city areas and less than 0.5 for inland arid areas. Chemical analyses of sampled air indicate an effect of fossil fuel burning from local sources. Such optical and chemical characteristics of atmospheres suggest that soil-derived coarse particles contributed considerably to the atmospheric turbidity in arid areas, whereas an active generation of aerosols was dominant near large cities.Significant rises in atmospheric turbidity were observed in the earlier part of the second period at Bushehr about once a week with a duration of about one day, which may have been caused by smoke from oil-well fires in Kuwait. The aerosol optical thickness in these events had values of about 1.5, which is equivalent to a columnar aerosol volume of 4.4 × 104 cm3 cm2. The absorption index ranged from 0.005 to 0.02 with several peaks reaching 0.1 in the second period. These peaks can be attributed to prevailing smoke particles. In spite of the large variety of optical thicknesses and absorption indices, there existed stable power-law size distributions with an exponent about 3.7.

  13. Monitoring vigabatrin in head injury patients by cerebral microdialysis: obtaining pharmacokinetic measurements in a neurocritical care setting

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Richard J; Timofeev, Ivan; Nortje, Jürgens; Hutchinson, Peter J; Carpenter, Keri L H

    2014-01-01

    Aims The aims were to determine blood–brain barrier penetration and brain extracellular pharmacokinetics for the anticonvulsant vigabatrin (VGB; γ-vinyl-γ-aminobutyric acid) in brain extracellular fluid and plasma from severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients, and to measure the response of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration in brain extracellular fluid. Methods Severe TBI patients (n = 10) received VGB (0.5 g enterally, every 12 h). Each patient had a cerebral microdialysis catheter; two patients had a second catheter in a different region of the brain. Plasma samples were collected 0.5 h before and 2, 4 and 11.5 h after the first VGB dose. Cerebral microdialysis commenced before the first VGB dose and continued through at least three doses of VGB. Controls were seven severe TBI patients with microdialysis, without VGB. Results After the first VGB dose, the maximum concentration of VGB (Cmax) was 31.7 (26.9–42.6) μmol l−1 (median and interquartile range for eight patients) in plasma and 2.41 (2.03–5.94) μmol l−1 in brain microdialysates (nine patients, 11 catheters), without significant plasma–brain correlation. After three doses, median Cmax in microdialysates increased to 5.22 (4.24–7.14) μmol l−1 (eight patients, 10 catheters). Microdialysate VGB concentrations were higher close to focal lesions than in distant sites. Microdialysate GABA concentrations increased modestly in some of the patients after VGB administration. Conclusions Vigabatrin, given enterally to severe TBI patients, crosses the blood–brain barrier into the brain extracellular fluid, where it accumulates with multiple dosing. Pharmacokinetics suggest delayed uptake from the blood. PMID:24802902

  14. Absorption, scattering and single scattering albedo of aerosols obtained from in situ measurements in the subarctic coastal region of Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, E.; Mogo, S.; Cachorro, V.; Lopez, J.; de Frutos, A.

    2011-01-01

    In situ measurements of aerosol optical properties were made in summer 2008 at the ALOMAR station facility (69°16 N, 16°00 E), located at a rural site in the North of the island of Andøya (Vesterålen archipelago), about 300 km north of the Arctic Circle. The extended three months campaign was part of the POLAR-CAT Project of the International Polar Year (IPY-2007-2008), and its goal was to characterize the aerosols of this sub-Arctic area which frequently transporte to the Arctic region. The ambient light-scattering coefficient, σs(550 nm), at ALOMAR had a hourly mean value of 5.412 Mm-1 (StD = 3.545 Mm-1) and the light-absorption coefficient, σa(550 nm), had an hourly mean value of 0.400 Mm-1 (StD = 0.273 Mm-1). The scattering/absorption Ångström exponents, αs,a, are used for detailed analysis of the variations of the spectral shape of σs,a. The single scattering albedo, &omega0, ranges from 0.622 to 0.985 (mean = 0.913, StD = 0.052) and the relation of this property to the absorption/scattering coefficients and the Ångström exponents is presented. The relationships between all the parameters analyzed, mainly those related to the single scattering albedo, allow us to describe the local atmosphere as extremely clean.

  15. Reliability of ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion measurements obtained using a hand-held goniometer and Biodex dynamometer in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, In-Gui; Yu, Il-Young; Kim, Soo-Yong; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the reliability of ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion (DF-PROM) measurements obtained using a goniometer and Biodex dynamometer in stroke patients. [Subjects] Fifteen stroke patients participated in this study. [Methods] Ankle DF-PROM was assessed using a goniometer and Biodex dynamometer. Ankle DF-PROM was measured during two sessions with 7 days between tests. Intraclass correlation coefficient, standard error of measurement, and minimal detectable change values were used to assess the reliability of measurements obtained using both instruments. [Results] The intra-rater reliability for ankle DF-PROM using the goniometer was moderate and good for the two raters, while using the Biodex dynamometer, it was good for both raters. Inter-rater reliability using the goniometer was moderate; using the Biodex, it was good. [Conclusion] Both intra- and inter-reliability measurements of ankle DF-PROM were higher using a Biodex dynamometer than with a goniometer.

  16. Fuel Savings and Aerodynamic Drag Reduction from Rail Car Covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storms, Bruce; Salari, Kambiz; Babb, Alex

    2008-01-01

    The potential for energy savings by reducing the aerodynamic drag of rail cars is significant. A previous study of aerodynamic drag of coal cars suggests that a 25% reduction in drag of empty cars would correspond to a 5% fuel savings for a round trip [1]. Rail statistics for the United States [2] report that approximately 5.7 billion liters of diesel fuel were consumed for coal transportation in 2002, so a 5% fuel savings would total 284 million liters. This corresponds to 2% of Class I railroad fuel consumption nationwide. As part of a DOE-sponsored study, the aerodynamic drag of scale rail cars was measured in a wind tunnel. The goal of the study was to measure the drag reduction of various rail-car cover designs. The cover designs tested yielded an average drag reduction of 43% relative to empty cars corresponding to an estimated round-trip fuel savings of 9%.

  17. Motion transitions of falling plates via quasisteady aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruifeng; Wang, Lifeng

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of freely falling plates based on the Kirchhoff equation and the quasisteady aerodynamic model. Motion transitions among fluttering, tumbling along a cusp-like trajectory, irregular, and tumbling along a straight trajectory are obtained by solving the dynamical equations. Phase diagrams spanning between the nondimensional moment of inertia and aerodynamic coefficients or aspect ratio are built to identify regimes for these falling styles. We also investigate the stability of fixed points and bifurcation scenarios. It is found that the transitions are all heteroclinic bifurcations and the influence of the fixed-point stability is local.

  18. Aerodynamic performances of cruise missile flying above local terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A.; Saad, M. R.; Che Idris, A.; Rahman, M. R. A.; Sujipto, S.

    2016-10-01

    Cruise missile can be classified as a smart bomb and also Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) due to its ability to move and manoeuvre by itself without a pilot. Cruise missile flies in constant velocity in cruising stage. Malaysia is one of the consumers of cruise missiles that are imported from other nations, which can have distinct geographic factors including their local terrains compared to Malaysia. Some of the aerodynamic performances of missile such as drag and lift coefficients can be affected by the local geographic conditions in Malaysia, which is different from the origin nation. Therefore, a detailed study must be done to get aerodynamic performance of cruise missiles that operate in Malaysia. The effect of aerodynamic angles such as angle of attack and side slip can be used to investigate the aerodynamic performances of cruise missile. Hence, subsonic wind tunnel testings were conducted to obtain the aerodynamic performances of the missile at various angle of attack and sideslip angles. Smoke visualization was also performed to visualize the behaviour of flow separation. The optimum angle of attack found was at α=21° and side slip, β=10° for optimum pitching and yawing motion of cruise missile.

  19. System Identification and POD Method Applied to Unsteady Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Deman; Kholodar, Denis; Juang, Jer-Nan; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The representation of unsteady aerodynamic flow fields in terms of global aerodynamic modes has proven to be a useful method for reducing the size of the aerodynamic model over those representations that use local variables at discrete grid points in the flow field. Eigenmodes and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) modes have been used for this purpose with good effect. This suggests that system identification models may also be used to represent the aerodynamic flow field. Implicit in the use of a systems identification technique is the notion that a relative small state space model can be useful in describing a dynamical system. The POD model is first used to show that indeed a reduced order model can be obtained from a much larger numerical aerodynamical model (the vortex lattice method is used for illustrative purposes) and the results from the POD and the system identification methods are then compared. For the example considered, the two methods are shown to give comparable results in terms of accuracy and reduced model size. The advantages and limitations of each approach are briefly discussed. Both appear promising and complementary in their characteristics.

  20. Computations of Aerodynamic Performance Databases Using Output-Based Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Handle complex geometry problems; Control discretization errors via solution-adaptive mesh refinement; Focus on aerodynamic databases of parametric and optimization studies: 1. Accuracy: satisfy prescribed error bounds 2. Robustness and speed: may require over 105 mesh generations 3. Automation: avoid user supervision Obtain "expert meshes" independent of user skill; and Run every case adaptively in production settings.

  1. Resampling soil profiles can constrain large-scale changes in the C cycle: obtaining robust information from radiocarbon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisden, W. T.; Prior, C.; Lambie, S.; Tate, K.; Bruhn, F.; Parfitt, R.; Schipper, L.; Wilde, R. H.; Ross, C.

    2006-12-01

    , 1 kg C m-2 or more may be reactive on decadal timescales, supporting evidence of soil C losses from throughout the soil profiles. Information from resampled soil profiles can be combined with additional contemporary measurements to test hypotheses about mechanisms for soil C changes. For example, Δ14C in excess of 200‰ in water extractable dissolved organic C (DOC) from surface soil horizons supports the hypothesis that decadal movement of DOC represents an important translocation of soil C. These preliminary results demonstrate that resampling whole soil profiles can support substantial progress in C cycle science, ranging from updating operational C accounting systems to the frontiers of research. Resampling can be complementary or superior to fixed-depth interval sampling of surface soil layers. Resampling must however be undertaken with relative urgency to maximize the potential interpretive power of bomb-derived radiocarbon.

  2. Sensor Systems Collect Critical Aerodynamics Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    With the support of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Dryden Flight Research Center, Tao of Systems Integration Inc. developed sensors and other components that will ultimately form a first-of-its-kind, closed-loop system for detecting, measuring, and controlling aerodynamic forces and moments in flight. The Hampton, Virginia-based company commercialized three of the four planned components, which provide sensing solutions for customers such as Boeing, General Electric, and BMW and are used for applications such as improving wind turbine operation and optimizing air flow from air conditioning systems. The completed system may one day enable flexible-wing aircraft with flight capabilities like those of birds.

  3. Transonic Blunt Body Aerodynamic Coefficients Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Jorge; Vargas, M.; Gonzalez, Ezequiel; Rodriguez, Manuel

    2011-05-01

    In the framework of EXPERT (European Experimental Re-entry Test-bed) accurate transonic aerodynamic coefficients are of paramount importance for the correct trajectory assessment and parachute deployment. A combined CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) modelling and experimental campaign strategy was selected to obtain accurate coefficients. A preliminary set of coefficients were obtained by CFD Euler inviscid computation. Then experimental campaign was performed at DNW facilities at NLR. A profound review of the CFD modelling was done lighten up by WTT results, aimed to obtain reliable values of the coefficients in the future (specially the pitching moment). Study includes different turbulence modelling and mesh sensitivity analysis. Comparison with the WTT results is explored, and lessons learnt are collected.

  4. Special opportunities in helicopter aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccroskey, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Aerodynamic research relating to modern helicopters includes the study of three dimensional, unsteady, nonlinear flow fields. A selective review is made of some of the phenomenon that hamper the development of satisfactory engineering prediction techniques, but which provides a rich source of research opportunities: flow separations, compressibility effects, complex vortical wakes, and aerodynamic interference between components. Several examples of work in progress are given, including dynamic stall alleviation, the development of computational methods for transonic flow, rotor-wake predictions, and blade-vortex interactions.

  5. Aerodynamics Research Revolutionizes Truck Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center conducted numerous tests to refine the shape of trucks to reduce aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the 1980s and 1990s, a team based at Langley Research Center explored controlling drag and the flow of air around a moving body. Aeroserve Technologies Ltd., of Ottawa, Canada, with its subsidiary, Airtab LLC, in Loveland, Colorado, applied the research from Dryden and Langley to the development of the Airtab vortex generator. Airtabs create two counter-rotating vortices to reduce wind resistance and aerodynamic drag of trucks, trailers, recreational vehicles, and many other vehicles.

  6. Development of a Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Time-Resolved Gas Flow Velocity, Temperature, and Density Measurements in Aerodynamic Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2007-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultiplier tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. An acoustically driven nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements, and an asymmetric oscillating counterflow with unequal enthalpies is studied to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations. Velocity fluctuations are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements and temperature fluctuations are compared with constant current anemometry measurements at the same locations. Time-series and power spectra of the temperature and velocity measurements are presented. A numerical simulation of the light scattering and detection process was developed and compared with experimental data for future use as an experiment design tool.

  7. Cascade flutter analysis with transient response aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Stefko, George L.

    1991-01-01

    Two methods for calculating linear frequency domain aerodynamic coefficients from a time marching Full Potential cascade solver are developed and verified. In the first method, the Influence Coefficient, solutions to elemental problems are superposed to obtain the solutions for a cascade in which all blades are vibrating with a constant interblade phase angle. The elemental problem consists of a single blade in the cascade oscillating while the other blades remain stationary. In the second method, the Pulse Response, the response to the transient motion of a blade is used to calculate influence coefficients. This is done by calculating the Fourier Transforms of the blade motion and the response. Both methods are validated by comparison with the Harmonic Oscillation method and give accurate results. The aerodynamic coefficients obtained from these methods are used for frequency domain flutter calculations involving a typical section blade structural model. An eigenvalue problem is solved for each interblade phase angle mode and the eigenvalues are used to determine aeroelastic stability. Flutter calculations are performed for two examples over a range of subsonic Mach numbers.

  8. Effects of ice accretions on aircraft aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Frank T.; Khodadoust, Abdollah

    2001-11-01

    This article is a systematic and comprehensive review, correlation, and assessment of test results available in the public domain which address the aerodynamic performance and control degradations caused by various types of ice accretions on the lifting surfaces of fixed wing aircraft. To help put the various test results in perspective, overviews are provided first of the important factors and limitations involved in computational and experimental icing simulation techniques, as well as key aerodynamic testing simulation variables and governing flow physics issues. Following these are the actual reviews, assessments, and correlations of a large number of experimental measurements of various forms of mostly simulated in-flight and ground ice accretions, augmented where appropriate by similar measurements for other analogous forms of surface contamination and/or disruptions. In-flight icing categories reviewed include the initial and inter-cycle ice accretions inherent in the use of de-icing systems which are of particular concern because of widespread misconceptions about the thickness of such accretions which can be allowed before any serious consequences occur, and the runback/ridge ice accretions typically associated with larger-than-normal water droplet encounters which are of major concern because of the possible potential for catastrophic reductions in aerodynamic effectiveness. The other in-flight ice accretion category considered includes the more familiar large rime and glaze ice accretions, including ice shapes with rather grotesque features, where the concern is that, in spite of all the research conducted to date, the upper limit of penalties possible has probably not been defined. Lastly, the effects of various possible ground frost/ice accretions are considered. The concern with some of these is that for some types of configurations, all of the normally available operating margins to stall at takeoff may be erased if these accretions are not

  9. Langley Symposium on Aerodynamics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, Sharon H. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to present current work and results of the Langley Aeronautics Directorate covering the areas of computational fluid dynamics, viscous flows, airfoil aerodynamics, propulsion integration, test techniques, and low-speed, high-speed, and transonic aerodynamics. The following sessions are included in this volume: theoretical aerodynamics, test techniques, fluid physics, and viscous drag reduction.

  10. Flight loads measurements obtained from calibrated strain-gage bridges mounted externally on the skin of a low-aspect-ratio wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, C. V.

    1976-01-01

    Flight-test measurements of wingloads (shear, bending moment, and torque) were obtained by means of strain-gage bridges mounted on the exterior surface of a low-aspect-ratio, thin, swept wing which had a structural skin, full-depth honeycomb core, sandwich construction. Details concerning the strain-gage bridges, the calibration procedures used, and the flight-test results are presented along with some pressure measurements and theoretical calculations for comparison purposes.

  11. The aerodynamics of insect flight.

    PubMed

    Sane, Sanjay P

    2003-12-01

    The flight of insects has fascinated physicists and biologists for more than a century. Yet, until recently, researchers were unable to rigorously quantify the complex wing motions of flapping insects or measure the forces and flows around their wings. However, recent developments in high-speed videography and tools for computational and mechanical modeling have allowed researchers to make rapid progress in advancing our understanding of insect flight. These mechanical and computational fluid dynamic models, combined with modern flow visualization techniques, have revealed that the fluid dynamic phenomena underlying flapping flight are different from those of non-flapping, 2-D wings on which most previous models were based. In particular, even at high angles of attack, a prominent leading edge vortex remains stably attached on the insect wing and does not shed into an unsteady wake, as would be expected from non-flapping 2-D wings. Its presence greatly enhances the forces generated by the wing, thus enabling insects to hover or maneuver. In addition, flight forces are further enhanced by other mechanisms acting during changes in angle of attack, especially at stroke reversal, the mutual interaction of the two wings at dorsal stroke reversal or wing-wake interactions following stroke reversal. This progress has enabled the development of simple analytical and empirical models that allow us to calculate the instantaneous forces on flapping insect wings more accurately than was previously possible. It also promises to foster new and exciting multi-disciplinary collaborations between physicists who seek to explain the phenomenology, biologists who seek to understand its relevance to insect physiology and evolution, and engineers who are inspired to build micro-robotic insects using these principles. This review covers the basic physical principles underlying flapping flight in insects, results of recent experiments concerning the aerodynamics of insect flight, as well

  12. Aerodynamic Simulation of the MEXICO Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herraez, I.; Medjroubi, W.; Stoevesandt, B.; Peinke, J.

    2014-12-01

    CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations are a very promising method for predicting the aerodynamic behavior of wind turbines in an inexpensive and accurate way. One of the major drawbacks of this method is the lack of validated models. As a consequence, the reliability of numerical results is often difficult to assess. The MEXICO project aimed at solving this problem by providing the project partners with high quality measurements of a 4.5 meters rotor diameter wind turbine operating under controlled conditions. The large measurement data-set allows the validation of all kind of aerodynamic models. This work summarizes our efforts for validating a CFD model based on the open source software OpenFoam. Both steady- state and time-accurate simulations have been performed with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for several operating conditions. In this paper we will concentrate on axisymmetric inflow for 3 different wind speeds. The numerical results are compared with pressure distributions from several blade sections and PIV-flow data from the near wake region. In general, a reasonable agreement between measurements the and our simulations exists. Some discrepancies, which require further research, are also discussed.

  13. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Effects of Ventricular Gap

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Fariborz; Karnell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Supraglottic compression is frequently observed in individuals with dysphonia. It is commonly interpreted as an indication of excessive circumlaryngeal muscular tension and ventricular medialization. The purpose of this study was to describe the aerodynamic and acoustic impact of varying ventricular medialization in a canine model. Methods Subglottal air pressure, glottal airflow, electroglottograph, acoustic signals and high-speed video images were recorded in seven excised canine larynges mounted in vitro for laryngeal vibratory experimentation. The degree of gap between the ventricular folds was adjusted and measured using sutures and weights. Data was recorded during phonation when the ventricular gap was narrow, neutral, and large. Glottal resistance was estimated by measures of subglottal pressure and glottal flow. Results Glottal resistance increased systematically as ventricular gap became smaller. Wide ventricular gaps were associated with increases in fundamental frequency and decreases in glottal resistance. Sound pressure level did not appear to be impacted by the adjustments in ventricular gap used in this research. Conclusions Increases in supraglottic compression and associated reduced ventricular width may be observed in a variety of disorders that affect voice quality. Ventricular compression may interact with true vocal fold posture and vibration resulting in predictable changes in aerodynamic, physiologic, acoustic, and perceptual measures of phonation. The data from this report supports the theory that narrow ventricular gaps may be associated with disordered phonation. In vitro and in vivo human data are needed to further test this association. PMID:24321590

  14. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Tabulated aerodynamic data book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Tabulated aerodynamic data from coannular nozzle performance tests are given for test runs 26 through 37. The data include nozzle thrust coefficient parameters, nozzle discharge coefficients, and static pressure tap measurements.

  15. Aerodynamic and Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing of the Orion Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C.

    2011-01-01

    The Orion aerodynamic testing team has completed more than 40 tests as part of developing the aerodynamic and loads databases for the vehicle. These databases are key to achieving good mechanical design for the vehicle and to ensure controllable flight during all potential atmospheric phases of a mission, including launch aborts. A wide variety of wind tunnels have been used by the team to document not only the aerodynamics but the aeroacoustic environment that the Orion might experience both during nominal ascents and launch aborts. During potential abort scenarios the effects of the various rocket motor plumes on the vehicle must be accurately understood. The Abort Motor (AM) is a high-thrust, short duration motor that rapidly separates Orion from its launch vehicle. The Attitude Control Motor (ACM), located in the nose of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle, is used for control during a potential abort. The 8 plumes from the ACM interact in a nonlinear manner with the four AM plumes which required a carefully controlled test to define the interactions and their effect on the control authority provided by the ACM. Techniques for measuring dynamic stability and for simulating rocket plume aerodynamics and acoustics were improved or developed in the course of building the aerodynamic and loads databases for Orion.

  16. Evaluation of agreement in corneal thickness measurements obtained using optical coherence tomography and ultrasound technique and determination of its specificity in keratoconus screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunvant, P.; Darner, R.

    2011-03-01

    The aims of the present study are 1) to evaluate inter and intra observer repeatability of optical coherence tomography corneal thickness measurements 2) to investigate the agreement in corneal thickness obtained using an ultrasound pachymeter and the non-contact high resolution optical coherence tomography 3) to evaluate the false positive rate of identifying keratoconic suspects on the basis of standard machine protocol. Measurements were performed on 51 eyes of 51 individuals without any known corneal pathology. Altman and Bland plots were analyzed to determine agreement of corneal thickness measurements obtained using optical coherence tomography and ultrasound pachymeter; linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate its interchangeability. The agreement between the optical coherence tomography and ultrasonic pachymeter measurements was best for the central corneal thickness with a mean bias of 13.4 microns, with optical coherence tomography values being lower than the ultrasound pachymeter. The agreement of measurements in the mid-peripheral cornea was poor, with bias in measurements ranging from 33 to 55 microns. The optical coherence tomography measurements were repeatable with no differences in values between intra and inter observer repeat measurements. Using standard machine protocol for keratoconus screening, utilizing 1 out of 4 criteria gave a specificity of 86% and using 2 of the 4 criteria gave a specificity of 98%.

  17. Aerodynamic Indicial Functions and Their Use in Aeroelastic Formulation of Lifting Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu; Silva, Walter A.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation related to the use of linear indicial functions in the time and frequency domains, enabling one to derive the proper aerodynamic loads as to study the subcritical response and flutter of swept lifting surfaces, respectively, of the open/closed loop aeroelastic system is presented. The expressions of the lift and aerodynamic moment in the frequency domain are given in terms of the Theodorsen's function, while, in the time domain, these are obtained directly with the help of the Wagner's function. Closed form solutions of aerodynamic derivatives are obtained, graphical representations are supplied and conclusions and prospects for further developments are outlined.

  18. Aerodynamic effects of trees on pollutant concentration in street canyons.

    PubMed

    Buccolieri, Riccardo; Gromke, Christof; Di Sabatino, Silvana; Ruck, Bodo

    2009-09-15

    This paper deals with aerodynamic effects of avenue-like tree planting on flow and traffic-originated pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons by means of wind tunnel experiments and numerical simulations. Several parameters affecting pedestrian level concentration are investigated, namely plant morphology, positioning and arrangement. We extend our previous work in this novel aspect of research to new configurations which comprise tree planting of different crown porosity and stand density, planted in two rows within a canyon of street width to building height ratio W/H=2 with perpendicular approaching wind. Sulfur hexafluoride was used as tracer gas to model the traffic emissions. Complementary to wind tunnel experiments, 3D numerical simulations were performed with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT using a Reynolds Stress turbulence closure for flow and the advection-diffusion method for concentration calculations. In the presence of trees, both measurements and simulations showed considerable larger pollutant concentrations near the leeward wall and slightly lower concentrations near the windward wall in comparison with the tree-less case. Tree stand density and crown porosity were found to be of minor importance in affecting pollutant concentration. On the other hand, the analysis indicated that W/H is a more crucial parameter. The larger the value of W/H the smaller is the effect of trees on pedestrian level concentration regardless of tree morphology and arrangement. A preliminary analysis of approaching flow velocities showed that at low wind speed the effect of trees on concentrations is worst than at higher speed. The investigations carried out in this work allowed us to set up an appropriate CFD modelling methodology for the study of the aerodynamic effects of tree planting in street canyons. The results obtained can be used by city planners for the design of tree planting in the urban environment with regard to air quality issues.

  19. POEMS in Newton's Aerodynamic Frustum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampedro, Jaime Cruz; Tetlalmatzi-Montiel, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The golden mean is often naively seen as a sign of optimal beauty but rarely does it arise as the solution of a true optimization problem. In this article we present such a problem, demonstrating a close relationship between the golden mean and a special case of Newton's aerodynamical problem for the frustum of a cone. Then, we exhibit a parallel…

  20. Aerodynamic laboratory at Cuatro Vientos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    JUBERA

    1922-01-01

    This report presents a listing of the many experiments in aerodynamics taking place at Cuatro Vientos. Some of the studies include: testing spheres, in order to determine coefficients; mechanical and chemical tests of materials; and various tests of propeller strength and flexibility.

  1. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1988-01-01

    The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

  2. Dynamic Soaring: Aerodynamics for Albatrosses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Albatrosses have evolved to soar and glide efficiently. By maximizing their lift-to-drag ratio "L/D", albatrosses can gain energy from the wind and can travel long distances with little effort. We simplify the difficult aerodynamic equations of motion by assuming that albatrosses maintain a constant "L/D". Analytic solutions to the simplified…

  3. Feedback Control for Aerodynamics (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    AFRL-VA-WP-TP-2006-348 FEEDBACK CONTROL FOR AERODYNAMICS (PREPRINT) R. Chris Camphouse, Seddik M. Djouadi, and James H. Myatt...CONSTRUCTION FOR THE DESIGN OF BOUNDARY FEEDBACK CONTROLS FROM REDUCED ORDER MODELS (PREPRINT) 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 0601102F 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...

  4. Tabulation of data from the tip aerodynamics and acoustics test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Jeffrey L.; Tu, Wilson

    1990-01-01

    In a continuing effort to understand helicopter rotor tip aerodynamics and acoustics, researchers at Ames Research Center conducted a flight test. The test was performed using the NASA White Cobra and a set of highly instrumented blades. Tabular and graphic summaries of two data subsets from the Tip Aerodynamics and Acoustics Test are given. The data presented are for airloads, blade structural loads, blade vibrations, with summary tables of the aircraft states for each test point. The tabular data consist of the first 15 harmonics only, whereas the plots contain the entire measured frequency content.

  5. Aerodynamic calculations related to tethered sub-satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith; Rockaway, J. Kent

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of four aerodynamic studies that were in support of a broader, preliminary inquiry concerning the potential use of downward-deployed tethered sub-satellites for in-flight aerothermodynamic research. There are a multitude of questions regarding the general tethered satellite concept and the present report addresses only a few of these. A method for estimating drag and local surface pressure and shear on orbiting or re-entereing bodies is described, and examples based on the planned TSS-2 (Tethered Satellite System) are given. The problem of pressure measurement are explored, taking into account thermal transpiration, lag time, and the disturbed flow field created by the satellite body. The performance of an aerodynamic stabilizer, a ring-tail design, is calculated and its influence on satellite motion is illustrated. A method for optimizing future satellite shapes for desired aerodynamic properties is transitional rarefied flow with given geometric constraints is proposed and examples are shown.

  6. Fluidic Control of Aerodynamic Forces on an Axisymmetric Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Philip; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2007-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a wind tunnel model of an axisymmetric bluff body are modified by induced local vectoring of the separated base flow. Control is effected by an array of four integrated aft-facing synthetic jets that emanate from narrow, azimuthally-segmented slots, equally distributed around the perimeter of the circular tail end within a small backward facing step that extends into a Coanda surface. The model is suspended in the wind tunnel by eight thin wires for minimal support interference with the wake. Fluidic actuation results in a localized, segmented vectoring of the separated base flow along the rear Coanda surface and induces asymmetric aerodynamic forces and moments to effect maneuvering during flight. The aerodynamic effects associated with quasi-steady and transitory differential, asymmetric activation of the Coanda effect are characterized using direct force and PIV measurements.

  7. Atmospheric testing of wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.S.; Migliore, P.G.; Quandt, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    An experimental investigation was conducted using an instrumented horizontal-axis wind turbine that incorporated variable span trailing-edge aerodynamic brakes. A primary goal was to directly compare study results with (infinite-span) wind tunnel data and to provide information on how to account for device span effects during turbine design or analysis. Comprehensive measurements were utilized to define effective changes in the aerodynamic coefficients, as a function of angle of attack and control deflection, for three device spans and configurations. Differences in the lift and drag behavior are most pronounced near stall and for device spans of less than 15%. Drag performance is affected only minimally (<70%) for 15% or larger span devices. Interestingly, aerodynamic controls with characteristic vents or openings appear most affected by span reductions and three-dimensional flow.

  8. The Aeroacoustics and Aerodynamics of High-Speed Coanda Devices, Part 1: Conventional Arrangement of Exit Nozzle and Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, P. W.; Green, P. N.

    1997-12-01

    The literature on high-speed Coanda flows and its applications is reviewed. The lack of basic information for design engineers is noted. The present paper is based on an investigation of the aeroacoustics and aerodynamics of the high-speed Coanda flow that is formed when a supersonic jet issues from a radial nozzle and adheres to a tulip-shaped body of revolution. Schlieren and other flow visualization techniques together with theoretical methods are used to reveal the various features of this complex flow field. The acoustic characteristics were obtained from measurements with an array of microphones in an anechoic chamber. The emphasis is placed on those features of the aerodynamics and aeroacoustics which may be of general interest.

  9. Reliability of the measures of weight-bearing distribution obtained during quiet stance by digital scales in subjects with and without hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    de Araujo-Barbosa, Paulo Henrique Ferreira; de Menezes, Lidiane Teles; Costa, Abraão Souza; Couto Paz, Clarissa Cardoso Dos Santos; Fachin-Martins, Emerson

    2015-05-01

    Described as an alternative way of assessing weight-bearing asymmetries, the measures obtained from digital scales have been used as an index to classify weight-bearing distribution. This study aimed to describe the intra-test and the test/retest reliability of measures in subjects with and without hemiparesis during quiet stance. The percentage of body weight borne by one limb was calculated for a sample of subjects with hemiparesis and for a control group that was matched by gender and age. A two-way analysis of variance was used to verify the intra-test reliability. This analysis was calculated using the differences between the averages of the measures obtained during single, double or triple trials. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was utilized and data plotted using the Bland-Altman method. The intra-test analysis showed significant differences, only observed in the hemiparesis group, between the measures obtained by single and triple trials. Excellent and moderate ICC values (0.69-0.84) between test and retest were observed in the hemiparesis group, while for control groups ICC values (0.41-0.74) were classified as moderate, progressing from almost poor for measures obtained by a single trial to almost excellent for those obtained by triple trials. In conclusion, good reliability ranging from moderate to excellent classifications was found for participants with and without hemiparesis. Moreover, an improvement of the repeatability was observed with fewer trials for participants with hemiparesis, and with more trials for participants without hemiparesis.

  10. A Sample of NASA Langley Unsteady Pressure Experiments for Computational Aerodynamics Code Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Scott, Robert C.; Bartels, Robert E.; Edwards, John W.; Bennett, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    As computational fluid dynamics methods mature, code development is rapidly transitioning from prediction of steady flowfields to unsteady flows. This change in emphasis offers a number of new challenges to the research community, not the least of which is obtaining detailed, accurate unsteady experimental data with which to evaluate new methods. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have been actively measuring unsteady pressure distributions for nearly 40 years. Over the last 20 years, these measurements have focused on developing high-quality datasets for use in code evaluation. This paper provides a sample of unsteady pressure measurements obtained by LaRC and available for government, university, and industry researchers to evaluate new and existing unsteady aerodynamic analysis methods. A number of cases are highlighted and discussed with attention focused on the unique character of the individual datasets and their perceived usefulness for code evaluation. Ongoing LaRC research in this area is also presented.

  11. Results of in vivo measurements of strontium-90 body-burden in Urals residents: analyses of data obtained 2006-2012

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstykh, E. I.; Bougrov, N. G.; Krivoshchapov, Victor A.; Shishkina, Elena A.; Shagina, N. B.; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2012-06-01

    A part of the Urals territory was contaminated with 90Sr and 137Cs in the 1950s as a result of accidents at the "Mayak" Production Association. The paper describes the analysis of in vivo 90Sr measurements in Urals residents. The measurements were performed with the use of whole-body-counter SICH-9.1M in 2006-2012. Totally 5840 measurements for 4876 persons were performed from 2006 to 2012; maximal measured value was 24 kBq. Earlier, similar measurements were performed with SICH-9.1 (1974-1997). Comparison of the results obtained with SICH-9.1 and SICH-9.1M has shown a good agreement of the two data sets.

  12. Effect of sampling volume on dry powder inhaler (DPI)-emitted aerosol aerodynamic particle size distributions (APSDs) measured by the Next-Generation Pharmaceutical Impactor (NGI) and the Andersen eight-stage cascade impactor (ACI).

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Hlack; Roberts, Daryl L; Copley, Mark; Hammond, Mark; Nichols, Steven C; Mitchell, Jolyon P

    2012-09-01

    Current pharmacopeial methods for testing dry powder inhalers (DPIs) require that 4.0 L be drawn through the inhaler to quantify aerodynamic particle size distribution of "inhaled" particles. This volume comfortably exceeds the internal dead volume of the Andersen eight-stage cascade impactor (ACI) and Next Generation pharmaceutical Impactor (NGI) as designated multistage cascade impactors. Two DPIs, the second (DPI-B) having similar resistance than the first (DPI-A) were used to evaluate ACI and NGI performance at 60 L/min following the methodology described in the European and United States Pharmacopeias. At sampling times ≥2 s (equivalent to volumes ≥2.0 L), both impactors provided consistent measures of therapeutically important fine particle mass (FPM) from both DPIs, independent of sample duration. At shorter sample times, FPM decreased substantially with the NGI, indicative of incomplete aerosol bolus transfer through the system whose dead space was 2.025 L. However, the ACI provided consistent measures of both variables across the range of sampled volumes evaluated, even when this volume was less than 50% of its internal dead space of 1.155 L. Such behavior may be indicative of maldistribution of the flow profile from the relatively narrow exit of the induction port to the uppermost stage of the impactor at start-up. An explanation of the ACI anomalous behavior from first principles requires resolution of the rapidly changing unsteady flow and pressure conditions at start up, and is the subject of ongoing research by the European Pharmaceutical Aerosol Group. Meanwhile, these experimental findings are provided to advocate a prudent approach by retaining the current pharmacopeial methodology.

  13. Characterization of physical and aerodynamic properties of walnuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to study the physical and aerodynamic properties of freshly harvested walnuts. Measurements were carried out for three walnut varieties, Tulare, Howard and Chandler cultivated in California, USA. The nuts treated with and without Ethephon were collected from mechan...

  14. Screening for osteoporosis using easily obtainable biometrical data: diagnostic accuracy of measured, self-reported and recalled BMI, and related costs of bone mineral density measurements.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, D J; Brandon, S; Dinant, G J; van Wersch, J W

    2000-01-01

    The aims of the present study were: to determine the diagnostic accuracy of objectively measured, self-reported and recalled body mass index (BMI) for osteoporosis and osteopenia; to determine the diagnostic costs, in terms of bone mineral density (BMD) measurements, per osteoporotic or osteopenic patient detected, using different BMI tests; and to determine the extent to which the results can be used within the framework of the current screening program for breast cancer in The Netherlands. Within the framework of a cross-sectional study on the prevalence of osteoporosis in the south of The Netherlands, 1155 postmenopausal women aged 50-80 years were asked for their present height and their weight at age 20-30 years. Subsequently their actual weight, height and BMD of the lumbar spine (DXA) were measured. The BMD cutoff was 0.800 g/cm2 for osteoporosis and 0.970 g/cm2 for low BMD (osteoporosis + osteopenia). After receiver operating characteristic analysis, age was cut off at 60 years and BMI at 27 kg/m2. Diagnostic accuracies of objectively measured, self-reported and recalled BMI were evaluated using predictive values (PV) and odds ratios. The resulting 'true positive' and 'false positive' rates were used to calculate diagnostic costs (i.e., DXA) for each osteoporotic patient or low-BMD patient detected. The prevalence of osteoporosis in the study population was 25%, that of low BMD 65%. Only the age-BMI tests 'age > or = 60, BMI < or = 27' showed PVs for osteoporosis (31-41%) and for low BMD (71-81%) that were higher than the prior probabilities for these conditions. Related odds ratios were 2.14-3.18 (osteoporosis) and 1.87-3.04 (low BMD). The objective BMI test detected 50% of the osteoporotic patients. Using the self-reported BMI test and the recalled BMI test, detection rates increased to 55% and 69%, respectively. Concomitant costs per osteoporotic patient detected rose by 24%. Detection of patients with a low BMD increased from 38% for objective BMI and

  15. Effect of Trailing Edge Flow Injection on Fan Noise and Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian; Woodward, Richard P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental investigation using trailing edge blowing for reducing fan rotor/guide vane wake interaction noise was completed in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Data were acquired to measure noise, aerodynamic performance, and flow features for a 22" tip diameter fan representative of modern turbofan technology. The fan was designed to use trailing edge blowing to reduce the fan blade wake momentum deficit. The test objective was to quantify noise reductions, measure impacts on fan aerodynamic performance, and document the flow field using hot-film anemometry. Measurements concentrated on approach, cutback, and takeoff rotational speeds as those are the primary conditions of acoustic interest. Data are presented for a 2% (relative to overall fan flow) trailing edge injection rate and show a 2 dB reduction in Overall Sound Power Level (OAPWL) at all fan test speeds. The reduction in broadband noise is nearly constant and is approximately 1.5 dB up to 20 kHz at all fan speeds. Measurements of tone noise show significant variation, as evidenced by reductions of up to 6 dB in the 2 BPF tone at 6700 rpm.: and increases of nearly 2 dB for the 4 BPF tone at approach speed. Aerodynamic performance measurements show the fan with 2 % injection has an overall efficiency that is comparable to the baseline fan and operates, as intended, with nearly the same pressure ratio and mass flow parameters. Hot-film measurements obtained at the approach operating condition indicate that mean blade wake filling in the tip region was not as significant as expected. This suggests that additional acoustic benefits could be realized if the trailing edge blowing could be modified to provide better filling of the wake momentum deficit. Nevertheless, the hot-film measurements indicate that the trailing edge blowing provided significant reductions in blade wake turbulence. Overall, these results indicate that further work may be required to fully understand the proper

  16. Whispering--a single-subject study of glottal configuration and aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Johan; Scherer, Ronald; Hess, Markus; Müller, Frank

    2010-09-01

    Whisper productions were produced by a single adult male subject over a wide range of subglottal pressures, glottal areas, and glottal flows. Dimensional measurements were made of these three variables, including glottal perimeter. Subglottal pressure was directly obtained by a pressure transducer in a tracheal catheter, and wide-band flow with a pneumotach mask. Four types of whispers were used-hyperfunctional, hypofunctional, neutral, and postphonation-in addition to three levels of loudness (soft, medium, loud). Sequences of the /pae/ syllable were used. Video recordings of the larynx were made. The glottis was outlined by hand with extrapolation for unseen parts, and area and perimeter were obtained through image analysis software. The whisper tokens resulted in the following wide ranges: subglottal pressure: 1.3-17 cm H2O; glottal flow: 0.9-1.71 L/s; glottal area: 0.065-1.76 m2; and glottal perimeter: 1.09-6.55 cm. Hyperfunctional whisper tended to have higher subglottal pressures and lower areas and flows than hypofunctional whisper, with neutral and postphonation whisper values in between. An important finding is that glottal flow changed more for small changes of area when the area was already small, and did not create much flow change when area was changed for already larger areas; that is, whisper is "more sensitive" to airflow changes for smaller glottal areas. A general equation for whisper aerodynamics was obtained, namely, P (subglottal pressure [cm H2O])=C X F (glottal flow [cm(3)/s]), where C = 0.052 x A(4) - 0.1913 x A(3) + 0.2577 x A(2) - 0.1523 x A+0.0388, where A is the glottal area (cm(2)). Another general equation for nondimensional terms (pressure coefficient vs Reynolds number) also is offered. Implications for whisper flow resistance and aerodynamic power are given. These results give insight into whisper aerodynamics and offer equations relevant to speech synthesis.

  17. Aerodynamic levitation : an approach to microgravity.

    SciTech Connect

    Glorieux, B.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Millot, F.; Enderby, J.; Rifflet, J.-C.

    2000-12-05

    Measurements of the thermophysical and structural properties of liquid materials at high temperature have undergone considerable development in the past few years. Following improvements in electromagnetic levitation, aerodynamic levitation associated with laser heating has shown promise for assessing properties of different molten materials (metals, oxides, and semiconductors), preserving sample purity over a wide range of temperatures and under different gas environments. The density, surface tension and viscosity are measured with a high-speed video camera and an image analysis system. Results on nickel and alumina show that small droplets can be considered in the first approximation to be under microgravity conditions. Using a non-invasive contactless technique recently developed to measure electrical conductivity, results have been extended to variety of materials ranging from liquid metals and liquid semiconductors to ionically conducting materials. The advantage of this technique is the feasibility of monitoring changes in transport occurring during phase transitions and in deeply undercooled states.

  18. Aerodynamic Size Classification of Glass Fibers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laosmaa, Pekka J. J.

    The objective of this research was to examine a technique by which fibers may be aerodynamically classified by diameter and/or length. In this study a system for fiber preparation and generation as well as an in situ fiber classifier were constructed and evaluated. A recently developed technique, the size classification of particles by opposing jets, was modified. The research set-up consisted of (1) a vibrating bed fiber generator, which also functioned as a preselector, (2) an opposing-jet classifier equipped with electrodes and high voltage power supplies to create fiber-aligning electric fields inside the classifier and (3) an optoelectric fiber sensor to measure the concentration and length of fibers. The classified fibers were also collected on filters for the counting and dimensional analysis of the fibers. Some flow instability problems were found during the initial tests of the classifier. They were attributed to random flow fluctuations in the nozzles caused by very small perturbations upstream of the nozzles. Within a critical range of flow Reynolds numbers the flow becomes "intermittent", i.e. it alternates in time between being laminar and turbulent in a random sequence. Small disturbances upstream of the point of consideration can "trigger" the changes from laminar to turbulent flow and the initial disturbance may be "amplified", sending a turbulent flash through the flow system. The classifier performed well with test aerosols after the nozzle flowrate had been decreased to correspond to a lower and less critical Reynolds number and after some modifications had been made to smooth the flow inside the classifier inlet chambers. The cut-off of test aerosols was sharp, but the loss of particles greater than 2.5 (mu)m in aerodynamic diameter was unsatisfactorily high. The classifier was able to classify fibers by aerodynamic diameter, but not as predicted through calculations. The results were difficult to interpret because of the high loss of fibers

  19. The DELTA MONSTER: An RPV designed to investigate the aerodynamics of a delta wing platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Kristen; Flynn, Mike; Gallagher, Randy; Greek, Chris; Kozlowski, Marc; Mcdonald, Brian; Mckenna, Matt; Sellar, Rich; Shearon, Andy

    1989-01-01

    The mission requirements for the performance of aerodynamic tests on a delta wind planform posed some problems, these include aerodynamic interference; structural support; data acquisition and transmission instrumentation; aircraft stability and control; and propulsion implementation. To eliminate the problems of wall interference, free stream turbulence, and the difficulty of achieving dynamic similarity between the test and actual flight aircraft that are associated with aerodynamic testing in wind tunnels, the concept of the remotely piloted vehicle which can perform a basic aerodynamic study on a delta wing was the main objective for the Green Mission - the Delta Monster. The basic aerodynamic studies were performed on a delta wing with a sweep angle greater than 45 degrees. These tests were performed at various angles of attack and Reynolds numbers. The delta wing was instrumented to determine the primary leading edge vortex formation and location, using pressure measurements and/or flow visualization. A data acquisition system was provided to collect all necessary data.

  20. Modeling the High Speed Research Cycle 2B Longitudinal Aerodynamic Database Using Multivariate Orthogonal Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, E. A.; Proffitt, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    The data for longitudinal non-dimensional, aerodynamic coefficients in the High Speed Research Cycle 2B aerodynamic database were modeled using polynomial expressions identified with an orthogonal function modeling technique. The discrepancy between the tabular aerodynamic data and the polynomial models was tested and shown to be less than 15 percent for drag, lift, and pitching moment coefficients over the entire flight envelope. Most of this discrepancy was traced to smoothing local measurement noise and to the omission of mass case 5 data in the modeling process. A simulation check case showed that the polynomial models provided a compact and accurate representation of the nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies contained in the HSR Cycle 2B tabular aerodynamic database.

  1. An improved quasi-steady aerodynamic model for insect wings that considers movement of the center of pressure.

    PubMed

    Han, Jong-Seob; Kim, Joong-Kwan; Chang, Jo Won; Han, Jae-Hung

    2015-07-30

    A quasi-steady aerodynamic model in consideration of the center of pressure (C.P.) was developed for insect flight. A dynamically scaled-up robotic hawkmoth wing was used to obtain the translational lift, drag, moment and rotational force coefficients. The translational force coefficients were curve-fitted with respect to the angles of attack such that two coefficients in the Polhamus leading-edge suction analogy model were obtained. The rotational force coefficient was also compared to that derived by the standard Kutta-Joukowski theory. In order to build the accurate pitching moment model, the locations of the C.Ps. and its movements depending on the pitching velocity were investigated in detail. We found that the aerodynamic moment model became suitable when the rotational force component was assumed to act on the half-chord. This implies that the approximation borrowed from the conventional airfoil concept, i.e., the 'C.P. at the quarter-chord' may lead to an incorrect moment prediction. In the validation process, the model showed excellent time-course force and moment estimations in comparison with the robotic wing measurement results. A fully nonlinear multibody flight dynamic simulation was conducted to check the effect of the traveling C.P. on the overall flight dynamics. This clearly showed the importance of an accurate aerodynamic moment model.

  2. Comparison of Measurements of the Uterus and Cervix Obtained by Magnetic Resonance and Transabdominal Ultrasound Imaging to Identify the Brachytherapy Target in Patients With Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dyk, Sylvia van; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Schneider, Michal; Bernshaw, David; Narayan, Kailash

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare measurements of the uterus and cervix obtained with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transabdominal ultrasound to determine whether ultrasound can identify the brachytherapy target and be used to guide conformal brachytherapy planning and treatment for cervix cancer. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients undergoing curative treatment with radiation therapy between January 2007 and March 2012 were included in the study. Intrauterine applicators were inserted into the uterine canal while patients were anesthetized. Images were obtained by MRI and transabdominal ultrasound in the longitudinal axis of the uterus with the applicator in treatment position. Measurements were taken at the anterior and posterior surface of the uterus at 2.0-cm intervals along the applicator, from the external os to the tip of the applicator. Data were analyzed using Bland Altman plots examining bias and 95% limits of agreement. Results: A total of 192 patients contributed 1668 measurements of the cervix and uterus. Mean (±SD) differences of measurements between imaging modalities at the anterior and posterior uterine surface ranged from 1.5 (±3.353) mm to 3.7 (±3.856) mm, and −1.46 (±3.308) mm to 0.47 (±3.502) mm, respectively. The mean differences were less than 3 mm in the cervix. The mean differences were less than 1.5 mm at all measurement points on the posterior surface. Conclusion: Differences in the measurements of the cervix and uterus obtained by MRI and ultrasound were within clinically acceptable limits. Transabdominal ultrasound can be substituted for MRI in defining the target volume for conformal brachytherapy treatment of cervix cancer.

  3. Passive flow control by membrane wings for aerodynamic benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timpe, Amory; Zhang, Zheng; Hubner, James; Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    The coupling of passive structural response of flexible membranes with the flow over them can significantly alter the aerodynamic characteristic of simple flat-plate wings. The use of flexible wings is common throughout biological flying systems inspiring many engineers to incorporate them into small engineering flying systems. In many of these systems, the motion of the membrane serves to passively alter the flow over the wing potentially resulting in an aerodynamic benefit. In this study, the aerodynamic loads and the flow field for a rigid flat-plate wing are compared to free trailing-edge membrane wings with two different pre-tensions at a chord-based Reynolds number of approximately 50,000. The membrane was silicon rubber with a scalloped free trailing edge. The analysis presented includes load measurements from a sting balance along with velocity fields and membrane deflections from synchronized, time-resolved particle image velocimetry and digital image correlation. The load measurements demonstrate increased aerodynamic efficiency and lift, while the synchronized flow and membrane measurements show how the membrane motion serves to force the flow. This passive flow control introduced by the membranes motion alters the flows development over the wing and into the wake region demonstrating how, at least for lower angles of attack, the membranes motion drives the flow as opposed to the flow driving the membrane motion.

  4. Unsteady Aerodynamic Model Tuning for Precise Flutter Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2011-01-01

    A simple method for an unsteady aerodynamic model tuning is proposed in this study. This method is based on the direct modification of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices. The aerostructures test wing 2 flight-test data is used to demonstrate the proposed model tuning method. The flutter speed margin computed using only the test validated structural dynamic model can be improved using the additional unsteady aerodynamic model tuning, and then the flutter speed margin requirement of 15 % in military specifications can apply towards the test validated aeroelastic model. In this study, unsteady aerodynamic model tunings are performed at two time invariant flight conditions, at Mach numbers of 0.390 and 0.456. When the Mach number for the unsteady model tuning approaches to the measured fluttering Mach number, 0.502, at the flight altitude of 9,837 ft, the estimated flutter speed is approached to the measured flutter speed at this altitude. The minimum flutter speed difference between the estimated and measured flutter speed is -.14 %.

  5. Evaluation of thermographic phosphor technology for aerodynamic model testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cates, M.R.; Tobin, K.W.; Smith, D.B.

    1990-08-01

    The goal for this project was to perform technology evaluations applicable to the development of higher-precision, higher-temperature aerodynamic model testing at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) in Tullahmoa, Tennessee. With the advent of new programs for design of aerospace craft that fly at higher speeds and altitudes, requirements for detailed understanding of high-temperature materials become very important. Model testing is a natural and critical part of the development of these new initiatives. The well-established thermographic phosphor techniques of the Applied Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are highly desirable for diagnostic evaluation of materials and aerodynamic shapes as studied in model tests. Combining this state-of-the-art thermographic technique with modern, higher-temperature models will greatly improve the practicability of tests for the advanced aerospace vehicles and will provide higher precision diagnostic information for quantitative evaluation of these tests. The wavelength ratio method for measuring surface temperatures of aerodynamic models was demonstrated in measurements made for this project. In particular, it was shown that the appropriate phosphors could be selected for the temperature range up to {approximately}700 {degree}F or higher and emission line ratios of sufficient sensitivity to measure temperature with 1% precision or better. Further, it was demonstrated that two-dimensional image- processing methods, using standard hardware, can be successfully applied to surface thermography of aerodynamic models for AEDC applications.

  6. Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Transport-type Airfoil in a Simulated Heavy Rain Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos, Gaudy M.; Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Melson, W. Edward, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of simulated heavy rain on the aerodynamic characteristics of an NACA 64-210 airfoil section equipped with leading-and trailing-edge high-lift devices were investigated in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The model had a chord of 2.5 ft, a span of 8 ft, and was mounted on the tunnel centerline between two large endplates. Aerodynamic measurements in and out of the simulated rain environment were obtained for dynamic pressures of 30 and 50 psf and an angle-of-attack range of 0 to 20 degrees for the cruise configuration. The rain intensity was varied to produce liquid water contents ranging from 16 to 46 gm/cu m. The results obtained for various rain intensity levels and tunnel speeds showed significant losses in maximum lift capability and increases in drag for a given lift as the liquid water content was increased. The results obtained on the landing configuration also indicate a progressive decrease in the angle of attack at which maximum lift occurred and an increase in the slope of the pitching-moment curve as the liquid water content was increased. The sensitivity of test results to the effects of the water surface tension was also investigated. A chemical was introduced into the rain environment that reduced the surface tension of water by a factor of 2. The reduction in the surface tension of water did not significantly alter the level of performance losses for the landing configuration.

  7. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Slender Cone-cylinder Body of Revolution at a Mach Number of 3.85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, John R

    1951-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the aerodynamics of a slender cone-cylinder body of revolution was conducted at a Mach number of 3.85 for angles of attack of 0 degree to 10 degrees and a Reynolds number of 3.85x10(exp 6). Boundary-layer measurements at zero angle of attack are compared with the compressible-flow formulations for predicting laminar boundary-layer characteristics. Comparison of experimental pressure and force values with theoretical values showed relatively good agreement for small angles of attack. The measured mean skin-friction coefficients agreed well with theoretical values obtained for laminar flow over cones.

  8. Improved Aerodynamic Influence Coefficients for Dynamic Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Patrice

    2011-12-01

    Currently at Bombardier Aerospace, aeroelastic analyses are performed using the Doublet Lattice Method (DLM) incorporated in the NASTRAN solver. This method proves to be very reliable and fast in preliminary design stages where wind tunnel experimental results are often not available. Unfortunately, the geometric simplifications and limitations of the DLM, based on the lifting surfaces theory, reduce the ability of this method to give reliable results for all flow conditions, particularly in transonic flow. Therefore, a new method has been developed involving aerodynamic data from high-fidelity CFD codes which solve the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations. These new aerodynamic loads are transmitted to the NASTRAN aeroelastic module through improved aerodynamic influence coefficients (AIC). A cantilevered wing model is created from the Global Express structural model and a set of natural modes is calculated for a baseline configuration of the structure. The baseline mode shapes are then combined with an interpolation scheme to deform the 3-D CFD mesh necessary for Euler and Navier-Stokes analyses. An uncoupled approach is preferred to allow aerodynamic information from different CFD codes. Following the steady state CFD analyses, pressure differences ( DeltaCp), calculated between the deformed models and the original geometry, lead to aerodynamic loads which are transferred to the DLM model. A modal-based AIC method is applied to the aerodynamic matrices of NASTRAN based on a least-square approximation to evaluate aerodynamic loads of a different wing configuration which displays similar types of mode shapes. The methodology developed in this research creates weighting factors based on steady CFD analyses which have an equivalent reduced frequency of zero. These factors are applied to both the real and imaginary part of the aerodynamic matrices as well as all reduced frequencies used in the PK-Method which solves flutter problems. The modal-based AIC method

  9. Fellowships in Hypersonic Aerodynamics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    the radial (r) direction, n is the grid and y is the ratio of specific heats, point index in the axial direction, and j is the grid point index in the... radial direction. To A2. General 4xisymmetric Flow Field obtain a stable solution, the downstream marching * is limited by the CFL criterion For an...In this technique, the flow C. Streamline Tracing field of interest is discretized into a network of grid points in the axial (z) and radial (r

  10. Prediction of Aerodynamic Drag.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    prediction method for reasonable estimates of the drag of afterbodies for military airlifters has recently been published by Kolesar and May72 to...method predicts the drag due to lift reasonably well for quite general, assumed limit shock positions, as shown in Fig. 25. The drag at zero lift is not...investigators, a reasonable estimate for the drag polar could be obtained by numerically averaging the zero and full leading- edge suction drag polars. Drag

  11. Intercomparison of 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS 3321): uncertainties in particle sizing and number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, S.; Müller, T.; Weinhold, K.; Zikova, N.; Santos, S.; Marinoni, A.; Bischof, O. F.; Kykal, C.; Ries, L.; Meinhardt, F.; Aalto, P.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamic particle size spectrometers are a well-established method to measure number size distributions of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere. Quality assurance is essential for atmospheric observational aerosol networks to obtain comparable results with known uncertainties. In a laboratory study within the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network), 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS model 3321, TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) were compared with a focus on flow rates accuracy, particle sizing, and unit-to-unit variability of the particle number size distribution. Flow rate deviations were relatively small (within a few percent), while the sizing accuracy was found to be within 10 % compared to polystyrene latex (PSL) reference particles. The unit-to-unit variability in terms of the particle number size distribution during this study was within 10-20 % for particles in the range of 0.9 up to 3 μm, which is acceptable for atmospheric measurements. For particles smaller than that, the variability increased up to 60 %, probably caused by differences in the counting efficiencies of individual units. Number size distribution data for particles smaller than 0.9 μm in aerodynamic diameter should be only used with caution. For particles larger than 3 μm, the unit-to-unit variability increased as well. A possible reason is an insufficient sizing accuracy in combination with a steeply sloping particle number size distribution and the increasing uncertainty due to decreasing counting. This uncertainty of the particle number size distribution has especially to be considered if higher moments of the size distribution such as the particle volume or mass are calculated, which require the conversion of the aerodynamic diameter measured to a volume equivalent diameter. In order to perform a quantitative quality assurance, a traceable reference method for the particle number concentration in the size range 0.5-3

  12. Intercomparison of 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS 3321): uncertainties in particle sizing and number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Sascha; Müller, Thomas; Weinhold, Kay; Zikova, Nadezda; Martins dos Santos, Sebastiao; Marinoni, Angela; Bischof, Oliver F.; Kykal, Carsten; Ries, Ludwig; Meinhardt, Frank; Aalto, Pasi; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic particle size spectrometers are a well-established method to measure number size distributions of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere. Quality assurance is essential for atmospheric observational aerosol networks to obtain comparable results with known uncertainties. In a laboratory study within the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network), 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS model 3321, TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) were compared with a focus on flow rates, particle sizing, and the unit-to-unit variability of the particle number size distribution. Flow rate deviations were relatively small (within a few percent), while the sizing accuracy was found to be within 10 % compared to polystyrene latex (PSL) reference particles. The unit-to-unit variability in terms of the particle number size distribution during this study was within 10 % to 20 % for particles in the range of 0.9 up to 3 µm, which is acceptable for atmospheric measurements. For particles smaller than that, the variability increased up to 60 %, probably caused by differences in the counting efficiencies of individual units. Number size distribution data for particles smaller than 0.9 µm in aerodynamic diameter should only be used with caution. For particles larger than 3 µm, the unit-to-unit variability increased as well. A possible reason is an insufficient sizing accuracy in combination with a steeply sloping particle number size distribution and the increasing uncertainty due to decreasing counting. Particularly this uncertainty of the particle number size distribution must be considered if higher moments of the size distribution such as the particle volume or mass are calculated, which require the conversion of the aerodynamic diameter measured to a volume equivalent diameter. In order to perform a quantitative quality assurance, a traceable reference method for the particle number concentration in the size range 0.5-3 µm

  13. Grid Sensitivity and Aerodynamic Optimization of Generic Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadrehaghighi, Ideen; Smith, Robert E.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to obtain the grid sensitivity with respect to design parameters for aerodynamic optimization. The procedure is advocating a novel (geometrical) parameterization using spline functions such as NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B- Splines) for defining the airfoil geometry. An interactive algebraic grid generation technique is employed to generate C-type grids around airfoils. The grid sensitivity of the domain with respect to geometric design parameters has been obtained by direct differentiation of the grid equations. A hybrid approach is proposed for more geometrically complex configurations such as a wing or fuselage. The aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients are obtained by direct differentiation of the compressible two-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. An optimization package has been introduced into the algorithm in order to optimize the airfoil surface. Results demonstrate a substantially improved design due to maximized lift/drag ratio of the airfoil.

  14. Control of helicopter rotorblade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabunmi, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study of a method for controlling the aerodynamics of helicopter rotorblades using stacks of piezoelectric ceramic plates are presented. A resonant mechanism is proposed for the amplification of the displacements produced by the stack. This motion is then converted into linear displacement for the actuation of the servoflap of the blades. A design which emulates the actuation of the servoflap on the Kaman SH-2F is used to demonstrate the fact that such a system can be designed to produce the necessary forces and velocities needed to control the aerodynamics of the rotorblades of such a helicopter. Estimates of the electrical power requirements are also presented. A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 Program is suggested, whereby a bench-top prototype of the device can be built and tested. A collaborative effort between AEDAR Corporation and Kaman Aerospace Corporation is anticipated for future effort on this project.

  15. Simulating Magneto-Aerodynamic Actuator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-20

    2005. 19. Boeuf, J.P., Lagmich, Y., Callegari, Th., and Pitchford , L.C., Electro- hydrodynamic Force and Acceleration in Surface Discharge, AIAA 2006...Plasmadynamics and Laser Award, 2004 AFRL Point of Contact Dr. Donald B. Paul , AFRL/VA WPAFB, OH 937-255-7329, met weekly. Dr. Alan Garscadden, AFRL/PR...validating database for numerical simulation of magneto-aerodynamic actuator for hypersonic flow control. Points of contact at the AFRL/VA are Dr. D. Paul

  16. Nonaxisymmetric Body Supersonic, Aerodynamic Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    wing - tail configuration are compared in Figure 27. CN comparisons are good. C. is a sensitive computation for xcp close to x’. 7.2...Analytical and Experimental Supersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Forward Control Missile , AIAA Paper No. 81-0398, AIAA 19th Aerospace Sciences...body diameter. The next computational example is for a body- wing - tail configuration from Reference 32 A body-alone comparison has been made earlier in

  17. Aerodynamics of Supersonic Lifting Bodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    verso of front cover. 19 Y WOROS (Continue on rt.’,;erso side i recessary and identily by block number) Theoretical Aerodynamics Lifting Bodies Wind ...waverider solution, developed from the supersonic wedge flow solution, is then i Fused to fashion vertLcal stabilizer-likh control surfaces. Wind ...served as Project Engineers ror thE wind tunnel work. Important contributions were also made bv: Mr. iis±ung Miin; Lee, -M. Beom-Soo Kim, Mtr. Martin Weeks

  18. Unsteady Aerodynamic Phenomena in Turbomachines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    The first part of a systematic variation of important parameters shows their influence on the aerodynamic forces and moments coefficients . 2-2...real physical phenomena. Besides, for reasons of stability it in necessary to introduce an additional damping coefficient , which depends on the... coefficients for the "Fourth Standard Configu- ration No. 4" /10/, using a mesh with 51 x 17 points (Fig. I). This grid represents a typical section of

  19. Applied Computational Transonic Aerodynamics,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    compressible adiabatic flow at high Reynolds number only, the flow, to lowest order, is described by the (reduced) set of conservation laws for inviscid...2.1) to (2.3) are described by the Rankine-Hugoniot relations’. In terms of normal Mach number the jump relation is depicted in figure 2.1. It is...equation A significant reduction in the number of dependent variables is obtained if the flow is assumed to be irrotational. It is then possible to

  20. X-34 Vehicle Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.

    1998-01-01

    The X-34, being designed and built by the Orbital Sciences Corporation, is an unmanned sub-orbital vehicle designed to be used as a flying test bed to demonstrate key vehicle and operational technologies applicable to future reusable launch vehicles. The X-34 will be air-launched from an L-1011 carrier aircraft at approximately Mach 0.7 and 38,000 feet altitude, where an onboard engine will accelerate the vehicle to speeds above Mach 7 and altitudes to 250,000 feet. An unpowered entry will follow, including an autonomous landing. The X-34 will demonstrate the ability to fly through inclement weather, land horizontally at a designated site, and have a rapid turn-around capability. A series of wind tunnel tests on scaled models was conducted in four facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the X-34. Analysis of these test results revealed that longitudinal trim could be achieved throughout the design trajectory. The maximum elevon deflection required to trim was only half of that available, leaving a margin for gust alleviation and aerodynamic coefficient uncertainty. Directional control can be achieved aerodynamically except at combined high Mach numbers and high angles of attack, where reaction control jets must be used. The X-34 landing speed, between 184 and 206 knots, is within the capabilities of the gear and tires, and the vehicle has sufficient rudder authority to control the required 30-knot crosswind.

  1. Applied aerodynamics: Challenges and expectations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Victor L.; Smith, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Aerospace is the leading positive contributor to this country's balance of trade, derived largely from the sale of U.S. commercial aircraft around the world. This powerfully favorable economic situation is being threatened in two ways: (1) the U.S. portion of the commercial transport market is decreasing, even though the worldwide market is projected to increase substantially; and (2) expenditures are decreasing for military aircraft, which often serve as proving grounds for advanced aircraft technology. To retain a major share of the world market for commercial aircraft and continue to provide military aircraft with unsurpassed performance, the U.S. aerospace industry faces many technological challenges. The field of applied aerodynamics is necessarily a major contributor to efforts aimed at meeting these technological challenges. A number of emerging research results that will provide new opportunities for applied aerodynamicists are discussed. Some of these have great potential for maintaining the high value of contributions from applied aerodynamics in the relatively near future. Over time, however, the value of these contributions will diminish greatly unless substantial investments continue to be made in basic and applied research efforts. The focus: to increase understanding of fluid dynamic phenomena, identify new aerodynamic concepts, and provide validated advanced technology for future aircraft.

  2. An analysis of aerodynamic requirements for coordinated bank-to-turn autopilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrow, A.

    1982-01-01

    Two planar missile airframes were compared having the potential for improved bank-to-turn control but having different aerodynamic properties. The comparison was made with advanced level autopilots using both linear and nonlinear 3-D aerodynamic models to obtain realistic missile body angular rates and control surface incidence. Cortical cross-coupling effects are identified and desirable aerodynamics are recommended for improved coordinated (BTT) (CBTT) performance. In addition, recommendations are made for autopilot control law analyses and design techniques for improving CBTT performance.

  3. Finding optimum airfoil shape to get maximum aerodynamic efficiency for a wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogukpinar, Haci; Bozkurt, Ismail

    2017-02-01

    In this study, aerodynamic performances of S-series wind turbine airfoil of S 825 are investigated to find optimum angle of attack. Aerodynamic performances calculations are carried out by utilization of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method withstand finite capacity approximation by using Reynolds-Averaged-Navier Stokes (RANS) theorem. The lift and pressure coefficients, lift to drag ratio of airfoil S 825 are analyzed with SST turbulence model then obtained results crosscheck with wind tunnel data to verify the precision of computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approximation. The comparison indicates that SST turbulence model used in this study can predict aerodynamics properties of wind blade.

  4. Study of aerodynamic technology for VSTOL fighter/attack aircraft: Horizontal attitude concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    A horizontal attitude VSTOL (HAVSTOL) supersonic fighter attack aircraft powered by RALS turbofan propulsion system is analyzed. Reaction control for subaerodynamic flight is obtained in pitch and yaw from the RALS and roll from wingtip jets powered by bleed air from the RALS duct. Emphasis is placed on the development of aerodynamic characteristics and the identification of aerodynamic uncertainties. A wind tunnel program is shown to resolve some of the uncertainties. Aerodynamic data developed are static characteristics about all axes, control effectiveness, drag, propulsion induced effects and reaction control characteristics.

  5. Experimental Investigation on Airfoil Shock Control by Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Quan; Cheng, Bangqin; Li, Yinghong; Cui, Wei; Jin, Di; Li, Jun

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation on airfoil (NACA64—215) shock control is performed by plasma aerodynamic actuation in a supersonic tunnel (Ma = 2). The results of schlieren and pressure measurement show that when plasma aerodynamic actuation is applied, the position moves forward and the intensity of shock at the head of the airfoil weakens. With the increase in actuating voltage, the total pressure measured at the head of the airfoil increases, which means that the shock intensity decreases and the control effect increases. The best actuation effect is caused by upwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, and then downwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, while the control effect of aerodynamic actuation without a magnetic field is the most inconspicuous. The mean intensity of the normal shock at the head of the airfoil is relatively decreased by 16.33%, and the normal shock intensity is relatively reduced by 27.5% when 1000 V actuating voltage and upwind-direction actuation are applied with a magnetic field. This paper theoretically analyzes the Joule heating effect generated by DC discharge and the Lorentz force effect caused by the magnetic field. The discharge characteristics are compared for all kinds of actuation conditions to reveal the mechanism of shock control by plasma aerodynamic actuation.

  6. Multidisciplinary Computational Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    rectangular and elliptical wing planforms subjected to a rapid pitch - up maneuver. They found that despite differences in the initial separation process...flow visualizations and force measurements for low- aspect-ratio wings undergoing either pitch - up or pitch -hold-and-return high-rate motions and for...a quasi-steady condition. Subsequently, the wing is pitched up about its quarter-chord axis while simultaneously decelerating to rest (Fig. 4). The

  7. Improving the efficiency of aerodynamic shape optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Greg W.; Baysal, Oktay; Eleshaky, Mohamed E.

    1994-01-01

    The computational efficiency of an aerodynamic shape optimization procedure that is based on discrete sensitivity analysis is increased through the implementation of two improvements. The first improvement involves replacing a grid-point-based approach for surface representation with a Bezier-Bernstein polynomial parameterization of the surface. Explicit analytical expressions for the grid sensitivity terms are developed for both approaches. The second improvement proposes the use of Newton's method in lieu of an alternating direction implicit methodology to calculate the highly converged flow solutions that are required to compute the sensitivity coefficients. The modified design procedure is demonstrated by optimizing the shape of an internal-external nozzle configuration. Practically identical optimization results are obtained that are independent of the method used to represent the surface. A substantial factor of 8 decrease in computational time for the optimization process is achieved by implementing both of the design procedure improvements.

  8. Aerodynamics of seeing on large transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Data were obtained in the full scale flight environment of the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) on the nature of turbulent shear layer over the open cavity. These data were used to verify proposed aerodynamic scaling relationships to describe the behavior of the turbulent layers and to estimate the optical performance of systems of various wavelengths operating within the KAO environment. These data and wind tunnel data are used to scale the expected optical effects for a potential stratospheric observatory for infrared astronomy (SOFIA) in which a telescope approximately 3.5 times larger than that on the KAO is envisioned. It appears that the use of combinations of active and passive aeromechanical flow control techniques can improve the optical behavior of systems in the SOFIA environment. Experiments to verify these potential improvements can be performed on the KAO with sufficient modifications to the cavity and aero-mechanical technique installations.

  9. Upper surface blowing aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryle, D. M., Jr.; Braden, J. A.; Gibson, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance at cruise, and noise effects due to variations in nacelle and wing geometry and mode of operation are studied using small aircraft models that simulate upper surface blowing (USB). At cruise speeds ranging from Mach .50 to Mach .82, the key determinants of drag/thrust penalties are found to be nozzle aspect ratio, boattailing angle, and chordwise position; number of nacelles; and streamlined versus symmetric configuration. Recommendations are made for obtaining favorable cruise configurations. The acoustic studies, which concentrate on the noise created by the jet exhaust flow and its interaction with wing and flap surfaces, isolate several important sources of USB noise, including nozzle shape, exit velocity, and impingement angle; flow pathlength; and flap angle and radius of curvature. Suggestions for lessening noise due to trailing edge flow velocity, flow pathlength, and flow spreading are given, though compromises between some design options may be necessary.

  10. Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Allan E.

    1990-01-01

    Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems is examined. It is presumed that the underlying model can be arranged into an input/output (I/O) differential operator equation of a generic form. The algorithm estimation is especially efficient since the equation error can be integrated exactly given any I/O pair to obtain an algebraic function of the parameters. The algorithm for parameter identification was extended to the order determination problem for linear differential system. The degeneracy in a least squares estimate caused by feedback was addressed. A method of frequency analysis for determining the transfer function G(j omega) from transient I/O data was formulated using complex valued Fourier based modulating functions in contrast with the trigonometric modulating functions for the parameter estimation problem. A simulation result of applying the algorithm is given under noise-free conditions for a system with a low pass transfer function.

  11. Development of a morphing flap using shape memory alloy actuators: the aerodynamic characteristics of a morphing flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seung-Hee; Bae, Jae-Sung; Rho, Jin-Ho

    2014-07-01

    The discontinuous contour of a wing with conventional flaps diminishes the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft. A wing with a continuous contour does not experience extreme flow stream fluctuations during flight, and consequently has good aerodynamic characteristics. In this study, a morphing flap using shape memory alloy actuators is proposed, designed and fabricated, and its aerodynamic characteristics are investigated using aerodynamic analyses and wind tunnel tests. The ribs of the morphing flap are designed and fabricated with multiple elements joined together in a way that allows relative rotations of adjacent elements and forms a smooth contour of the morphing flap. The aerodynamic analyses of this multiple-element morphing-flap wing are performed using XFLR pro; its aerodynamic performance is compared with that of a mechanical-flap wing, and is measured through wind-tunnel tests.

  12. Aerodynamically landing reentry vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widjaja, I.

    This article represents a continuation of a paper in the preceding edition of this journal. The longitudinal stability of the reentry vehicle configuration 24B is discussed, taking into account an evaluation of the possibilities for lateral control, aileron effectiveness, and rudder effectiveness. It is pointed out that regarding the selection of the characteristics of the descent trajectory, there are apparently no constraints related to stability or controllability limits. In the hypersonic range, large reciprocal lift drag ratios can also be obtained without positive flap displacement. Attention is given to angle of sideslip relations, a cylindrical body with flat nose and trim tabs, the flow characteristics in the case of a cylinder with a flat nose, graphical relations describing longitudinal stability and controllability in the hypersonic range, and relations involving lift, drag, and the lift drag ratio.

  13. 40 CFR 1037.521 - Aerodynamic measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provisions of this section and good engineering judgment, based on wind tunnel testing, computational fluid... testing results in a drag area of 6.430, but your wind tunnel method results in a drag area of 6.200, Falt... wind tunnel. (iii) Wind tunnel design details: corner turning vane type and material, air...

  14. 40 CFR 1037.521 - Aerodynamic measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... distance, manufacturer name, test vehicle/model type, model year, applicable model engine family, tire type...) Background/history. (ii) The layout (with diagram), type, and construction (structural and material) of the wind tunnel. (iii) Wind tunnel design details: corner turning vane type and material, air...

  15. 40 CFR 1037.521 - Aerodynamic measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... distance, manufacturer name, test vehicle/model type, model year, applicable model engine family, tire type...) Background/history. (ii) The layout (with diagram), type, and construction (structural and material) of the wind tunnel. (iii) Wind tunnel design details: corner turning vane type and material, air...

  16. Comparison of the bedrock depth from array measurements of Rayleigh waves associated with microtremor and seismic profile obtained the Seismic Reflection Data, Eskisehir Basin, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tün, Muammer; Karabulut, Savaş; Özel, Oğuz

    2015-04-01

    Ground motion estimation for future earthquakes is one of the most challenging problems in seismology and earthquake engineering. The bedrock depth has a considerable seismic risk for the urban area of Eskişehir. In this study, multiple station microtremor measurement methods which are more practical, non-distructive, fast and economical compared to seismic reflection method were implemented. These method using microtremor recordings have become a very useful data for microzonation studies because of their simple acquisition and analysis. Extensive ambient noise measurements were performed in the basin of Eskisehir from June 2010 to spring 2012. We use data recorded by a broadband seismometer and digitizer CMG-6TD, Guralp seismometer. Some of the measurement locations, the CMG-6TD sensor was located into 30 cm-deep holes in the ground to avoid strongly wind-generated, long-period noise. Dominant frequency (f), bed-rock depth (h) and shear-wave velocity (Vs) were determined from Spatial Autocorrelation (SPAC) methods. With the SPAC Method, it is possible to constrain the velocity structure underlying the site using microtremor array measurements. The results obtained were compared to the 96-channel seismic reflection data with explosive energy source. Several seismic reflection surveys with P-Gun seismic source have been performed on the same place with array measurements. We used two types of seismic sources: 36 cartridge Gun. Shot interval was 10 meters, group interval (one geophone per group, 48 geophones in total) was 10 meters, near offset was 10 meters, far offset was 480 meters, CDP interval was 5 meters. We adapted the 'Off-End Spread' technique while using the Gun. Reflection images within the sedimentary section correlate well with the velocity structure obtained from SPAC.

  17. Comparing data obtained from ground-based measurements of the total contents of O3, HNO3,HCl, and NO2 and from their numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virolainen, Ya. A.; Timofeyev, Yu. M.; Polyakov, A. V.; Ionov, D. V.; Kirner, O.; Poberovskii, A. V.; Imhasin, H. Kh.

    2016-01-01

    Chemistry climate models of the gas composition of the atmosphere make it possible to simulate both space and time variations in atmospheric trace-gas components (TGCs) and predict their changes. Both verification and improvement of such models on the basis of a comparison with experimental data are of great importance. Data obtained from the 2009-2012 ground-based spectrometric measurements of the total contents (TCs) of a number of TGCs (ozone, HNO3, HCl, and NO2) in the atmosphere over the St. Petersburg region (Petergof station, St. Petersburg State University) have been compared to analogous EMAC model data. Both daily and monthly means of their TCs for this period have been analyzed in detail. The seasonal dependences of the TCs of the gases under study are shown to be adequately reproduced by the EMAC model. At the same time, a number of disagreements (including systematic ones) have been revealed between model and measurement data. Thus, for example, the EMAC model underestimates the TCs of NO2, HCl, and HNO3, when compared to measurement data, on average, by 14, 22, and 35%, respectively. However, the TC of ozone is overestimated by the EMAC model (on average, by 12%) when compared to measurement data. In order to reveal the reasons for such disagreements between simulated and measured data on the TCs of TGCs, it is necessary to continue studies on comparisons of the contents of TGCs in different atmospheric layers.

  18. Nacelle aerodynamic performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obara, Clifford J.; Dodbele, S. S.

    1987-01-01

    The boundary layer transition location was measured on a nacelle shape using the sublimating chemical flow visualization technique. This technique involves coating the surface with a thin film of volatile chemical solid, which, during exposure to a free stream airflow, rapidly sublimates in the turbulent boundary layer as a result of high shear stress and high mass transfer near the surface. Transition is indicated because the chemical coating remains relatively unaffected in the laminar region due to lower shear and low mass transfer. The slow response time of the chemical in a laminar boundary allowed for two test conditions during the same flight. The aircraft was first flown at the desired airspeed and altitude with the noise source off. Once a pattern had developed, the noise source was turned on to the desired setting and a new chemical pattern was sought. In this fashion a direct comparison of the effect of the noise could be determined.

  19. Aerodynamics of vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Robert E., Jr.; Russell, David A.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was undertaken of the separation delay and dramatic boundary-layer thinning that can occur in vortex-generator installations. Wind tunnel measurements of the dynamic-pressure profile downstream of a vortex generator were found to compare under certain conditions with that downstream of a suction slit, while water-tunnel visualization studies of vortex-generator height and geometry suggested optimum configurations, and only a minor effect of base porosity. A series of progressively more complex inviscid flow models was developed to be applied to a 3-D integral boundary-layer code. This code predicted layer thinning downstream of the suction site of the vortex models, and other observed features. Thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are now being used with the ultimate goal of clarifying the physical processes involved in vortex generator performance and developing calculational procedures capable of predicting it.

  20. HIAD-2 (Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) project is a disruptive technology that will accommodate the atmospheric entry of heavy payloads to planetary bodies such as Mars. HIAD over...

  1. Conversion of the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System (APAS) to an IBM PC Compatible Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruep, John M.

    1995-01-01

    The conversion of the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System (APAS) software from a Silicon Graphics UNIX-based platform to a DOS-based IBM PC compatible is discussed. Relevant background information is given, followed by a discussion of the steps taken to accomplish the conversion and a discussion of the type of problems encountered during the conversion. A brief comparison of aerodynamic data obtained using APAS with data from another source is also made.

  2. Reliability of manual measurements of corneal thickness obtained from healthy canine eyes using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT).

    PubMed

    Alario, Anthony F; Pirie, Christopher G

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to manually measure corneal thickness in canine eyes using a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) device and to assess intra- and inter-observer reliability of this technique. Twenty healthy dogs with a mean age of 4.7 y were examined. A 6-mm corneal pachymetry protocol was carried out by 1 operator using 1 SD-OCT device in both eyes of each animal. Measurements were obtained manually and in duplicate by 2 independent investigators (> 24 h apart), using the built-in caliper function. Measurements included epithelial thickness (ET), non-epithelial thickness (NET), and central corneal thickness (CCT). The overall mean ET, NET, and CCT for all eyes examined were 72.3 ± 4.6 μm, 538.9 ± 42.5 μm, and 611.2 ± 40.3 μm, respectively. There was no significant difference in ET, NET, or CCT based on the eye examined [oculus dexter (OD) versus oculus sinister (OS)], age, or gender of the animal. There was no significant difference in replicate measurements of ET, NET, or CCT done by the same operator, although a small but significant difference was noted between operators for ET measurements only. The mean difference in ET between operators was 0.6 μm (P = 0.03). The coefficient of variation ranged from 0.5% to 9.27% and intraclass correlation coefficient ranged from 0.35 to 0.97. Based on these results, manual measurements of corneal thickness in canine eyes using a portable SD-OCT device provided ET, NET, and CCT measurements with clinically acceptable intra- and inter-observer reliability.

  3. Iterative optimal subcritical aerodynamic design code including profile drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A subcritical aerodynamic design computer code has been developed, which uses linearized aerodynamics along with sweep theory and airfoil data to obtain minimum total drag preliminary designs for multiple planform configurations. These optimum designs consist of incidence distributions yielding minimum total drag at design values of Mach number and lift and pitching moment coefficients. Linear lofting is used between airfoil stations. Solutions for isolated transport wings have shown that the solution is unique, and that including profile drag effects decreases tip loading and incidence relative to values obtained for minimum induced drag solutions. Further, including effects of variation of profile drag with Reynolds number can cause appreciable changes in the optimal design for tapered wings. Example solutions are also discussed for multiple planform configurations.

  4. An experimental study of nanoparticle focusing with aerodynamic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; McMurry, Peter H.

    2006-12-01

    High sampling efficiencies of analyte ions, molecules or particles are needed to maximize the sensitivity of mass spectrometers. "Ion funnels", which utilize electrodynamic focusing, have been shown to effectively focus ions with mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) ranging from ~100 to 5000. Focusing efficiencies of ion funnels drop for higher m/z values because very high voltages are needed to overcome the particle inertia. Conventional "aerodynamic lenses" utilize inertia to focus down to 25 nm in diameter (~5 MDa); to date, Brownian diffusion has prevented the effective focusing of particles smaller than this. We recently reported a design procedure that should, in principle, extend focusing with aerodynamic lenses to particles as small as 3 nm (~10 kDa), thereby bridging the gap between the ion funnel and the conventional aerodynamic lenses. In this paper, we report for the first time experimental results for the performance of these new "nanolenses". Measurements were done using spherical oil droplets, proteins, and sodium chloride particles ranging in size from 3 to 30 nm diameter. We found that particle transport efficiencies from atmospheric pressure to vacuum through the aerodynamic lens system were greater than 80% for 10-30 nm particles, and greater than 50% for a ~3.8 nm protein (Lysozyme from chicken egg white, molecular weight 14.3 kDa). Particle beam diameters were about a factor of two greater than predicted by our numerical simulations, but provide clear evidence that the nanolenses effectively focus all three particle types.

  5. Unsteady Aerodynamic Flow Control of a Suspended Axisymmetric Moving Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Thomas; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2011-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces on an axisymmetric wind tunnel model are altered by fluidic interaction of an azimuthal array of integrated synthetic jet actuators with the cross flow. Four-quadrant actuators are integrated into a Coanda surface on the aft section of the body, and the jets emanate from narrow, azimuthally segmented slots equally distributed around the model's perimeter. The model is suspended in the tunnel using eight wires each comprising miniature in-line force sensors and shape-memory-alloy (SMA) strands that are used to control the instantaneous forces and moments on the model and its orientation. The interaction of the actuation jets with the flow over the moving model is investigated using PIV and time-resolved force measurements to assess the transitory aerodynamic loading effected by coupling between the induced motion of the aerodynamic surface and the fluid dynamics that is driven by the actuation. It is shown that these interactions can lead to effective control of the aerodynamic forces and moments, and thereby of the model's motion. Supported by ARO.

  6. Innovation in Aerodynamic Design Features of Soviet Missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    2006-01-01

    Wind tunnel investigations of some tactical and strategic missile systems developed by the former Soviet Union have been included in the basic missile research programs of the NACA/NASA. Studies of the Soviet missiles sometimes revealed innovative design features that resulted in unusual or unexpected aerodynamic characteristics. In some cases these characteristics have been such that the measured performance of the missile exceeds what might have been predicted. In other cases some unusual design features have been found that would alleviate what might otherwise have been a serious aerodynamic problem. In some designs, what has appeared to be a lack of refinement has proven to be a matter of expediency. It is a purpose of this paper to describe some examples of unusual design features of some Soviet missiles and to illustrate the effectiveness of the design features on the aerodynamic behavior of the missile. The paper draws on the experience of the author who for over 60 years was involved in the aerodynamic wind tunnel testing of aircraft and missiles with the NACA/NASA.

  7. Technical evaluation report, AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel Symposium on Effects of Adverse Weather on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting on Effects of Adverse Weather on Aerodynamics was to provide an update of the stae-of-the-art with respect to the prediction, simulation, and measurement of the effects of icing, anti-icing fluids, and various precipitation on the aerodynamic characteristics of flight vehicles. Sessions were devoted to introductory and survey papers and icing certification issues, to analytical and experimental simulation of ice frost contamination and its effects of aerodynamics, and to the effects of heavy rain and deicing/anti-icing fluids.

  8. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  9. Application of a one-strip integral method to the unsteady supersonic aerodynamics of an inclined flat surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    The method of integral relations is applied in a one-strip approximation to the perturbation equations governing small motions of an inclined, sharp-edged, flat surface about the mean supersonic steady flow. Algebraic expressions for low reduced-frequency aerodynamics are obtained and a set of ordinary differential equations are obtained for general oscillatory motion. Results are presented for low reduced-frequency aerodynamics and for the variation of the unsteady forces with frequency. The method gives accurate results for the aerodynamic forces at low reduced frequency which are in good agreement with available experimental data. However, for cases in which the aerodynamic forces vary rapidly with frequency, the results are qualitatively correct, but of limited accuracy. Calculations indicate that for a range of inclination angles near shock detachment such that the flow in the shock layer is low supersonic, the aerodynamic forces vary rapidly both with inclination angle and with reduced frequency.

  10. Computations of Viking Lander Capsule Hypersonic Aerodynamics with Comparisons to Ground and Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.

    2006-01