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Sample records for aerodynamic noise generation

  1. Analysis of aerodynamic noise generated from inclined circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haramoto, Yasutake; Yasuda, Shouji; Matsuzaki, Kazuyoshi; Munekata, Mizue; Ohba, Hideki

    2000-06-01

    Making clear the generation mechanism of fluid dynamic noise is essential to reduce noise deriving from turbomachinery. The analysis of the aerodynamic noise generated from circular cylinder is carried out numerically and experimentally in a low noise wind tunnel. In this study, aerodynamic sound radiated from a circular cylinder in uniform flow is predicted numerically by the following two step method. First, the three-dimensional unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is solved using the high order accurate upwind scheme. Next, the sound pressure level at the observed point is calculated from the fluctuating surface pressure on the cylinder, based on modified Lighthill-Curl’s equation. It is worth to note that the noise generated from the model is reduced rapidly when it is inclined against the mean flow. In other words, the peak level of the radiated noise decreases rapidly with inclination of the circular cylinder. The simulated SPL for the inclined circular cylinder is compared with the measured value, and good agreement is obtained for the peak spectrum frequency of the sound pressure level and tendency of noise reduction. So we expect that the change of flow structures makes reduction of the aerodynamic noise from the inclined models.

  2. On aerodynamic noise generation from vortex shedding in rotating blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, B. T.; Bies, D. A.

    1992-06-01

    The interaction of the shed wakes of plates in a cascade with each following plate is investigated in a water tunnel and shown to provide an explanation for an observed very powerful aerodynamic noise source. In particular, the noise generation of an idling circular saw may be explained as due to the interaction of the wake shed by an upstream tooth with the leading edge of the following downstream tooth. When a vortex travelling downstream in the gullet between teeth encounters the leading edge of the downstream tooth it is deflected out of the gullet into the main stream. The associated impulses which the teeth encounter give rise to the radiated noise.

  3. Modelling Aerodynamically Generated Sound: Recent Advances in Rotor Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the modeling of aerodynamically generated sound for rotors over the past decade. The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H ) equation has been the foundation for much of the development. Both subsonic and supersonic quadrupole noise formulations have been developed for the prediction of high-speed impulsive noise. In an effort to eliminate the need to compute the quadrupole contribution, the FW-H has also been utilized on permeable surfaces surrounding all physical noise sources. Comparison of the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces with the FW-H equation have shown that the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces can give erroneous results for aeroacoustic problems.

  4. Estimation of aerodynamic noise generated by forced compressible round jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidi, Mohamed

    2006-05-01

    An acoustic numerical code based on Ligthill's analogy is combined with large-eddy simulations techniques in order to evaluate the noise emitted by subsonic (M=0.7) and supersonic (M=1.4) round jets. We show first that, for centerline Mach number M=0.9 and Reynolds number Re=3.6×10, acoustic intensities compare satisfactorily with experimental data of the literature in terms of levels and directivity. Afterwards, high Reynolds number (Re=3.6×10) free and forced jets at Mach 0.7 and 1.4 are studied. Numerical results show that the jet noise intensity depends on the nature of the upstream mixing layer. Indeed, the subsonic jet is 4 dB quieter than the free jet when acting on this shear layer by superposing inlet varicose and flapping perturbations at preferred and first subharmonic frequency, respectively. The maximal acoustic level of the supersonic jet is, on the other hand, 3 dB lower than the free one with a flapping upstream perturbation at the second subharmonic. The results reported in this paper confirm previous works presented in the literature demonstrating that jet noise may be modified according to the inlet conditions. To cite this article: M. Maidi, C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  5. A new technique for aerodynamic noise calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Pope, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method for the numerical analysis of aerodynamic noise generation is presented. The method involves first solving for the time-dependent incompressible flow for the given geometry. This fully nonlinear method that is tailored to extract the relevant acoustic fluctuations seems to be an efficient approach to the numerical analysis of aerodynamic noise generation.

  6. Simulation of Turbine Tone Noise Generation Using a Turbomachinery Aerodynamics Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane

    2010-01-01

    As turbofan engine bypass ratios continue to increase, the contribution of the turbine to the engine noise signature is receiving more attention. Understanding the relative importance of the various turbine noise generation mechanisms and the characteristics of the turbine acoustic transmission loss are essential ingredients in developing robust reduced-order models for predicting the turbine noise signature. A computationally based investigation has been undertaken to help guide the development of a turbine noise prediction capability that does not rely on empiricism. As proof-of-concept for this approach, two highly detailed numerical simulations of the unsteady flow field inside the first stage of a modern high-pressure turbine were carried out. The simulations were computed using TURBO, which is an unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes code capable of multi-stage simulations. Spectral and modal analysis of the unsteady pressure data from the numerical simulation of the turbine stage show a circumferential modal distribution that is consistent with the Tyler-Sofrin rule. Within the high-pressure turbine, the interaction of velocity, pressure and temperature fluctuations with the downstream blade rows are all possible tone noise source mechanisms. We have taken the initial step in determining the source strength hierarchy by artificially reducing the level of temperature fluctuations in the turbine flowfield. This was accomplished by changing the vane cooling flow temperature in order to mitigate the vane thermal wake in the second of the two simulations. The results indicated that, despite a dramatic change in the vane cooling flow, the computed modal levels changed very little indicating that the contribution of temperature fluctuations to the overall pressure field is rather small compared with the viscous and potential field interaction mechanisms.

  7. Active Control of Aerodynamic Noise Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise sources become important when propulsion noise is relatively low, as during aircraft landing. Under these conditions, aerodynamic noise from high-lift systems can be significant. The research program and accomplishments described here are directed toward reduction of this aerodynamic noise. Progress toward this objective include correction of flow quality in the Low Turbulence Water Channel flow facility, development of a test model and traversing mechanism, and improvement of the data acquisition and flow visualization capabilities in the Aero. & Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. These developments are described in this report.

  8. New aspects of subsonic aerodynamic noise theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Howes, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    A theory of aerodynamic noise is presented which differs from Lighthill's theory primarily in the way in which convection of the noise sources is treated. The sound directivity pattern obtained from the present theory agrees better with jet-noise directivity data than does that obtained from Lighthill's theory. The results imply that the shear-noise contribution to jet noise is smaller than previously expected.

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of Aerodynamic Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-29

    Noise First Annual Progress Report ONR Grant N00014-88-K-0592 Principal Investigator : Parviz Main Sr. Research Associate: Sanjiva K. Lele Research...of Aerodynamic Noise ONR Grant N00014-88-K-0592 Principal Investigator : Parviz Moin Sr. Research Associate : Sanjiva K. Lele Research Assistant : Tim

  10. Non-propulsive aerodynamic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr.; Tracy, Maureen B.

    1992-04-01

    In the first part of the paper, the contribution of airframe noise to total aircraft noise on approach is assessed for a large current technology transport and for the same airframe powered with bypass ratio 10 engines with an additional 5 dB noise suppression applied to the fan and turbine noise sources. The airframe noise of the envisioned advanced subsonic transport is 2 EPNdB less than the largest contributor to the total aircraft noise, the fan inlet. The noise impact of the airframe noise, as measured by noise contour area, is 1/4 that of fan noise. Further fan noise reduction efforts should not view airframe noise as an absolute noise floor. In the second part of the paper, the results from one recent cavity noise wind tunnel experiment is reported. A cavity of dimensions 11.25 in. (28.58 cm) long, 2.5 in. (6.35 cm) wide, and variable depth was tested in the Mach number range of .20 through .90. Reynolds number varied from 5 to 100 million per foot (16 to 328 million per meter). The 1/d ratio was varied from 4.4 to 20.0. The model was tested at yaw angles from 0 to 15 degrees. In general, the deeper the cavity, the greater the amplitude of the acoustic tones. Reynolds number appeared to have little effect on acoustic tone amplitudes. Tone amplitude and bandwidth changed with Mach number. The effect of yaw on acoustic tones varied with Reynolds number, Mach number, 1/h, and mode number. At Mach number 0.90, increased yaw shifted the tone frequencies of the higher modal frequencies to lower frequencies. As cavity depth decreased, the effect of yaw decreased.

  11. Modeling Aerodynamically Generated Sound of Helicopter Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Farassat, F.

    2002-01-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the modeling of aerodynamically generated sound of rotors over the past decade. Although the modeling effort has focused on helicopter main rotors, the theory is generally valid for a wide range of rotor configurations. The Ffowcs Williams Hawkings (FW-H) equation has been the foundation for much of the development. The monopole and dipole source terms of the FW-H equation account for the thickness and loading noise, respectively. Bladevortex-interaction noise and broadband noise are important types of loading noise, hence much research has been directed toward the accurate modeling of these noise mechanisms. Both subsonic and supersonic quadrupole noise formulations have been developed for the prediction of high-speed impulsive noise. In an effort to eliminate the need to compute the quadrupole contribution, the FW-H equation has also been utilized on permeable surfaces surrounding all physical noise sources. Comparisons of the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces with the FW-H equation have shown that the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces can give erroneous results for aeroacoustic problems. Finally, significant progress has been made incorporating the rotor noise models into full vehicle noise prediction tools.

  12. Aerodynamic noise emission from turbulent shear layers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. P.

    1973-01-01

    The Phillips (1960) convected wave equation is employed in this paper to study aerodynamic noise emission processes in subsonic and supersonic shear layers. The wave equation in three spatial dimensions is first reduced to an ordinary differential equation by Fourier transformation and then solved via the WKBJ method. Three typical solutions are required for discussions in this paper. The current results are different from the classical conclusions. The effects of refraction, convection, Mach-number dependence and temperature dependence of turbulent noise emission are analyzed in the light of solutions to the Phillips equation.

  13. Aerodynamics of vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Robert E., Jr.; Russell, David A.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was undertaken of the separation delay and dramatic boundary-layer thinning that can occur in vortex-generator installations. Wind tunnel measurements of the dynamic-pressure profile downstream of a vortex generator were found to compare under certain conditions with that downstream of a suction slit, while water-tunnel visualization studies of vortex-generator height and geometry suggested optimum configurations, and only a minor effect of base porosity. A series of progressively more complex inviscid flow models was developed to be applied to a 3-D integral boundary-layer code. This code predicted layer thinning downstream of the suction site of the vortex models, and other observed features. Thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are now being used with the ultimate goal of clarifying the physical processes involved in vortex generator performance and developing calculational procedures capable of predicting it.

  14. Aircraft Noise Prediction Program theoretical manual: Propeller aerodynamics and noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, W. E. (Editor); Weir, D. S. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The prediction sequence used in the aircraft noise prediction program (ANOPP) is described. The elements of the sequence are called program modules. The first group of modules analyzes the propeller geometry, the aerodynamics, including both potential and boundary-layer flow, the propeller performance, and the surface loading distribution. This group of modules is based entirely on aerodynamic strip theory. The next group of modules deals with the first group. Predictions of periodic thickness and loading noise are determined with time-domain methods. Broadband noise is predicted by a semiempirical method. Near-field predictions of fuselage surface pressrues include the effects of boundary layer refraction and scattering. Far-field predictions include atmospheric and ground effects.

  15. Advanced Noise Control Fan Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Noise Control Fan at the NASA Glenn Research Center is used to experimentally analyze fan generated acoustics. In order to determine how a proposed noise reduction concept affects fan performance, flow measurements can be used to compute mass flow. Since tedious flow mapping is required to obtain an accurate mass flow, an equation was developed to correlate the mass flow to inlet lip wall static pressure measurements. Once this correlation is obtained, the mass flow for future configurations can be obtained from the nonintrusive wall static pressures. Once the mass flow is known, the thrust and fan performance can be evaluated. This correlation enables fan acoustics and performance to be obtained simultaneously without disturbing the flow.

  16. Aerodynamic beam generator for large particles

    DOEpatents

    Brockmann, John E.; Torczynski, John R.; Dykhuizen, Ronald C.; Neiser, Richard A.; Smith, Mark F.

    2002-01-01

    A new type of aerodynamic particle beam generator is disclosed. This generator produces a tightly focused beam of large material particles at velocities ranging from a few feet per second to supersonic speeds, depending on the exact configuration and operating conditions. Such generators are of particular interest for use in additive fabrication techniques.

  17. Bat flight generates complex aerodynamic tracks.

    PubMed

    Hedenström, A; Johansson, L C; Wolf, M; von Busse, R; Winter, Y; Spedding, G R

    2007-05-11

    The flapping flight of animals generates an aerodynamic footprint as a time-varying vortex wake in which the rate of momentum change represents the aerodynamic force. We showed that the wakes of a small bat species differ from those of birds in some important respects. In our bats, each wing generated its own vortex loop. Also, at moderate and high flight speeds, the circulation on the outer (hand) wing and the arm wing differed in sign during the upstroke, resulting in negative lift on the hand wing and positive lift on the arm wing. Our interpretations of the unsteady aerodynamic performance and function of membranous-winged, flapping flight should change modeling strategies for the study of equivalent natural and engineered flying devices.

  18. Diagnostic techniques for measurement of aerodynamic noise in free field and reverberant environment of wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Sum, H. M. A.; Mawardi, O. K.

    1973-01-01

    Techniques for studying aerodynamic noise generating mechanisms without disturbing the flow in a free field, and in the reverberation environment of the ARC wind tunnel were investigated along with the design and testing of an acoustic antenna with an electronic steering control. The acoustic characteristics of turbojet as a noise source, detection of direct sound from a source in a reverberant background, optical diagnostic methods, and the design characteristics of a high directivity acoustic antenna. Recommendations for further studies are included.

  19. Active aerodynamic control of wake-airfoil interaction noise - Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Lavrich, P. L.; Sofrin, T. G.; Topol, D. A.

    A proof of concept experiment is conducted that shows the potential for active aerodynamic control of rotor wake/stator interaction noise in a simplified manner. A single airfoil model representing the stator was fitted with a moveable trailing edge flap controlled by a servo motor. The control system moves the motor driven flap in the correct angular displacement phase and rate to reduce the unsteady load on the airfoil during the wake interaction.

  20. Aerodynamics and interaction noise of streamlined bodies in nonuniform flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atassi, H. M.; Logue, M. M.

    2011-08-01

    The unsteady aerodynamics and interaction noise of streamlined bodies are modeled in terms of the Euler equations linearized about a nonuniform flow. The validity of the inviscid approach is supported by recent LES simulations of an airfoil in a gust indicating that for not-too-small impinging excitations, the interaction process is dominated by inertia forces. Results in the present paper are focused on the aerodynamics and interaction noise of a turbofan modeled as an annular cascade. The model accounts for the inflow-fan-duct coupling and the high frequency of the interaction process. Two high-order numerical algorithms are developed with body-fitted coordinate system. One algorithm uses a primitive variable formulation, the other uses an efficient velocity splitting algorithm and is suitable for broadband computations. Analytical and numerical analysis of disturbances in rotational flows is developed and exact inflow/outflow boundary conditions are derived, yielding directly the radiated acoustics. The upstream disturbances evolve in rotational flows and as a result the aerodynamic-aeroacoustic response of the annular cascade depends on the initial conditions location. Computational results show that the three-dimensional geometry of the annular cascade, the mean flow swirl, and the blade geometry have strong influence on the blade sectional lift and the radiated sound. These results also show the inadequacy of using the popular linear cascade model particularly for realistic fan geometry and inflow conditions.

  1. Noise Generation in Hot Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Kenzakowski, Donald C.

    2007-01-01

    A prediction method based on the generalized acoustic analogy is presented, and used to evaluate aerodynamic noise radiated from high speed hot jets. The set of Euler equations are split into their respective non-radiating and residual components. Under certain conditions, the residual equations are rearranged to form a wave equation. This equation consists of a third-order wave operator, plus a number of nonlinear terms that are identified with the equivalent sources of sound and their statistical characteristics are modeled. A specialized RANS solver provides the base flow as well as turbulence quantities and temperature fluctuations that determine the source strength. The main objective here is to evaluate the relative contribution from various source elements to the far-field spectra and to show the significance of temperature fluctuations as a source of aerodynamic noise in hot jets.

  2. Aerodynamic sound generation caused by viscous processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermeier, F.

    1985-03-01

    A theoretical investigation of the effects of viscosity on aerodynamic sound generation by unheated low Mach-number flow is discussed. By means of the method of matched asymptotic expansions, which allows for a consistent estimation of the order of magnitude of each term in the hydrodynamic flow field as well as in the sound field, an analytical solution in terms of a multipole expansion is derived. The physical interpretation of the mathematical outcome of various theories by Morfey (1976), Kempton (1976), Hardin, and Kambe and Minota (1983) is compared and re-examined.

  3. Aerodynamic Performance of Scale-Model Turbofan Outlet Guide Vanes Designed for Low Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.

    2001-01-01

    The design of effective new technologies to reduce aircraft propulsion noise is dependent on an understanding of the noise sources and noise generation mechanisms in the modern turbofan engine. In order to more fully understand the physics of noise in a turbofan engine, a comprehensive aeroacoustic wind tunnel test programs was conducted called the 'Source Diagnostic Test.' The text was cooperative effort between NASA and General Electric Aircraft Engines, as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program. A 1/5-scale model simulator representing the bypass stage of a current technology high bypass ratio turbofan engine was used in the test. The test article consisted of the bypass fan and outlet guide vanes in a flight-type nacelle. The fan used was a medium pressure ratio design with 22 individual, wide chord blades. Three outlet guide vane design configurations were investigated, representing a 54-vane radial Baseline configuration, a 26-vane radial, wide chord Low Count configuration and a 26-vane, wide chord Low Noise configuration with 30 deg of aft sweep. The test was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9 by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at velocities simulating the takeoff and approach phases of the aircraft flight envelope. The Source Diagnostic Test had several acoustic and aerodynamic technical objectives: (1) establish the performance of a scale model fan selected to represent the current technology turbofan product; (2) assess the performance of the fan stage with each of the three distinct outlet guide vane designs; (3) determine the effect of the outlet guide vane configuration on the fan baseline performance; and (4) conduct detailed flowfield diagnostic surveys, both acoustic and aerodynamic, to characterize and understand the noise generation mechanisms in a turbofan engine. This paper addresses the fan and stage aerodynamic performance results from the Source Diagnostic Test.

  4. Aerodynamic Performance Measurements for a Forward Swept Low Noise Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian

    2006-01-01

    One source of noise in high tip speed turbofan engines, caused by shocks, is called multiple pure tone noise (MPT's). A new fan, called the Quiet High Speed Fan (QHSF), showed reduced noise over the part speed operating range, which includes MPT's. The QHSF showed improved performance in most respects relative to a baseline fan; however, a partspeed instability discovered during testing reduced the operating range below acceptable limits. The measured QHSF adiabatic efficiency on the fixed nozzle acoustic operating line was 85.1 percent and the baseline fan 82.9 percent, a 2.2 percent improvement. The operating line pressure rise at design point rotational speed and mass flow was 1.764 and 1.755 for the QHSF and baseline fan, respectively. Weight flow at design point speed was 98.28 lbm/sec for the QHSF and 97.97 lbm/sec for the baseline fan. The operability margin for the QHSF approached 0 percent at the 75 percent speed operating condition. The baseline fan maintained sufficient margin throughout the operating range as expected. Based on the stage aerodynamic measurements, this concept shows promise for improved performance over current technology if the operability limitations can be solved.

  5. Some useful hybrid approaches for predicting aerodynamic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailly, Christophe; Bogey, Christophe; Gloerfelt, Xavier

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, several numerical studies have shown the feasibility of Direct Noise Computation (DNC) where the turbulent flow and the radiated acoustic field are obtained simultaneously by solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The acoustic radiation obtained by DNC can be used as reference solution to investigate hybrid methods in which the sound field is usually calculated as a by-product of the flow field obtained by a more conventional Navier-Stokes solver. A hybrid approach is indeed of practical interest when only the non-acoustic part of the aerodynamic field is available. In this review, some acoustic analogies or hybrid approaches are revisited in the light of CAA. To cite this article: C. Bailly et al., C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  6. Two-stage, low noise advanced technology fan. Volume 2: Aerodynamic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harley, K. G.; Odegard, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    Aerodynamic data from static tests of a two-stage advanced technology fan designed to minimize noise are presented. Fan design conditions include delivery of 209.1kg/sec/sq m (42.85 lbm/sec/sq ft) specific corrected flow at an overall pressure ratio of 1.9 and an adiabatic efficiency of 85.3 percent. The 0.836m (2.74ft) diameter first stage rotor has a hub/tip ratio of 0.4 and 365.8m/sec (1200ft/sec) design tip speed. In addition to the moderate tip speed and pressure rise per stage, other noise control design features involve widely spaced blade rows and proper selection of blade-vane ratios. Aerodynamic data are presented for tests with unifrom and with hub and tip radially distorted inlet flow. Aerodynamic data are also presented for tests of this fan with acoustic treatments, including acoustically treated casing walls, a flowpath exit acoustic ring, and a translating centerbody sonic inlet device. A complete tabulation of the overall performance data, the blade element data, and the power spectral density information relating to turbulence levels generated by the sonic inlet obtained during these tests is included. For vol. 1, see N74-33789.

  7. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Rotor Alone Aerodynamic Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Jeracki, Robert J.; Woodward, Richard P.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of an isolated fan or rotor alone model was measured in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9- by 15- Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel as part of the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test conducted at NASA Glenn. The Source Diagnostic Test was conducted to identify the noise sources within a wind tunnel scale model of a turbofan engine and quantify their contribution to the overall system noise level. The fan was part of a 1/5th scale model representation of the bypass stage of a current technology turbofan engine. For the rotor alone testing, the fan and nacelle, including the inlet, external cowl, and fixed area fan exit nozzle, were modeled in the test hardware; the internal outlet guide vanes located behind the fan were removed. Without the outlet guide vanes, the velocity at the nozzle exit changes significantly, thereby affecting the fan performance. As part of the investigation, variations in the fan nozzle area were tested in order to match as closely as possible the rotor alone performance with the fan performance obtained with the outlet guide vanes installed. The fan operating performance was determined using fixed pressure/temperature combination rakes and the corrected weight flow. The performance results indicate that a suitable nozzle exit was achieved to be able to closely match the rotor alone and fan/outlet guide vane configuration performance on the sea level operating line. A small shift in the slope of the sea level operating line was measured, which resulted in a slightly higher rotor alone fan pressure ratio at take-off conditions, matched fan performance at cutback conditions, and a slightly lower rotor alone fan pressure ratio at approach conditions. However, the small differences in fan performance at all fan conditions were considered too small to affect the fan acoustic performance.

  8. Aeroacoustics. [analysis of properties of sound generated by aerodynamic forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M., E.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis was conducted to determine the properties of sound generated by aerodynamic forces or motions originating in a flow, such as the unsteady aerodynamic forces on propellers or by turbulent flows around an aircraft. The acoustics of moving media are reviewed and mathematical models are developed. Lighthill's acoustic analogy and the application to turbulent flows are analyzed. The effects of solid boundaries are calculated. Theories based on the solution of linearized vorticity and acoustic field equations are explained. The effects of nonuniform mean flow on the generation of sound are reported.

  9. Low-frequency broadband noise generated by a model rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aravamudan, K. S.; Harris, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    Low-frequency broadband noise generated by model rotors is attributed to the interaction of ingested turbulence with the rotor blades. The influence of free-stream turbulence in the low-frequency broadband noise radiation from model rotors has been experimentally investigated. The turbulence was generated in the M.I.T. anechoic wind tunnel facility with the aid of bipolar grids of various sizes. The spectra and the intensity of the low-frequency broadband noise have been studied as a function of parameters which characterize the turbulence and of helicopter performance parameters. The location of the peak intensity was observed to be strongly dependent on the rotor-tip velocity and on the longitudinal integral scale of turbulence. The size scale of turbulence had negligible effect on the intensity of low-frequency broadband noise. The experimental data show good agreement with an ad hoc model based on unsteady aerodynamics.

  10. Numerical investigation of tandem-cylinder aerodynamic noise and its control with application to airframe noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltaweel, Ahmed

    Prediction and reduction of airframe noise are critically important to the development of quieter civil transport aircraft. The key to noise reduction is a full understanding of the underlying noise source mechanisms. In this study, tandem cylinders in cross-flow as an idealization of a complex aircraft landing gear configuration are considered to investigate the noise generation and its reduction by flow control using single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators. The flow over tandem cylinders at ReD = 22, 000 with and without plasma actuation is computed using large-eddy simulation. The plasma effect is modeled as a body force obtained from a semi-empirical model. The flow statistics and surface pressure frequency spectra show excellent agreement with previous experimental measurements. For acoustic calculations, a boundary-element method is implemented to solve the convected Lighthill equation. The solution method is validated in a number of benchmark problems including flows over a cylinder, a rod-airfoil configuration, and a sphere. With validated flow field and acoustic solver, acoustic analysis is performed for the tandem-cylinder configuration to extend the experimental results and understand the mechanisms of noise generation and its control. Without flow control, the acoustic field is dominated by the interaction between the downstream cylinder and the upstream wake. Through suppression of vortex shedding from the upstream cylinder, the interaction noise is reduced drastically by the plasma flow control, and the vortex-shedding noise from the downstream cylinder becomes equally important. At a free-stream Mach number of 0.2, the peak sound pressure level is reduced by approximately 16 dB. This suggests the viability of plasma actuation for active control of airframe noise. The numerical investigation is extended to the noise from a realistic landing gear experimental model. Coarse-mesh computations are performed, and preliminary results are

  11. Numerical modeling of wind turbine aerodynamic noise in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghoon; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Soogab

    2013-02-01

    Aerodynamic noise from a wind turbine is numerically modeled in the time domain. An analytic trailing edge noise model is used to determine the unsteady pressure on the blade surface. The far-field noise due to the unsteady pressure is calculated using the acoustic analogy theory. By using a strip theory approach, the two-dimensional noise model is applied to rotating wind turbine blades. The numerical results indicate that, although the operating and atmospheric conditions are identical, the acoustical characteristics of wind turbine noise can be quite different with respect to the distance and direction from the wind turbine.

  12. Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) Noise and Airload Prediction Using Loose Aerodynamic/Structural Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, B. W.; Lim, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    Predictions of blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise, using blade airloads obtained from a coupled aerodynamic and structural methodology, are presented. This methodology uses an iterative, loosely-coupled trim strategy to cycle information between the OVERFLOW-2 (CFD) and CAMRAD-II (CSD) codes. Results are compared to the HART-II baseline, minimum noise and minimum vibration conditions. It is shown that this CFD/CSD state-of-the-art approach is able to capture blade airload and noise radiation characteristics associated with BVI. With the exception of the HART-II minimum noise condition, predicted advancing and retreating side BVI for the baseline and minimum vibration conditions agrees favorably with measured data. Although the BVI airloads and noise amplitudes are generally under-predicted, this CFD/CSD methodology provides an overall noteworthy improvement over the lifting line aerodynamics and free-wake models typically used in CSD comprehensive analysis codes.

  13. Effects of Nozzle Geometry and Intermittent Injection of Aerodynamic Tab on Supersonic Jet Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Mikiya; Sano, Takayuki; Fukuda, Masayuki; Kojima, Takayuki; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Shiga, Seiichi; Obokata, Tomio

    Effects of the nozzle geometry and intermittent injection of aerodynamic tabs on exhaust noise from a rectangular plug nozzle were investigated experimentally. In JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), a pre-cooled turbojet engine for an HST (Hypersonic transport) is planned. A 1/100-scaled model of the rectangular plug nozzle is manufactured, and the noise reduction performance of aerodynamic tabs, which is small air jet injection from the nozzle wall, was investigated. Compressed air is injected through the rectangular plug nozzle into the atmosphere at the nozzle pressure ratio of 2.7, which corresponds to the take-off condition of the vehicle. Aerodynamic tabs were installed at the sidewall ends, and 4 kinds of round nozzles and 2 kinds of wedge nozzles were applied. Using a high-frequency solenoid valve, intermittent gas injection is also applied. It is shown that, by use of wedge nozzles, the aerodynamic tab mass flow rate, necessary to gain 2.3dB reduction in OASPL (Overall sound pressure level), decreases by 29% when compared with round nozzles. It is also shown that, by use of intermittent injection, the aerodynamic tab mass flow rate, necessary to gain 2.3dB reduction in OASPL, decreases by about 40% when compared with steady injection. By combination of wedge nozzles and intermittent injection, the aerodynamic tab mass flow rate significantly decreases by 57% when compared with the conventional strategy.

  14. Component-based model to predict aerodynamic noise from high-speed train pantographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre Iglesias, E.; Thompson, D. J.; Smith, M. G.

    2017-04-01

    At typical speeds of modern high-speed trains the aerodynamic noise produced by the airflow over the pantograph is a significant source of noise. Although numerical models can be used to predict this they are still very computationally intensive. A semi-empirical component-based prediction model is proposed to predict the aerodynamic noise from train pantographs. The pantograph is approximated as an assembly of cylinders and bars with particular cross-sections. An empirical database is used to obtain the coefficients of the model to account for various factors: incident flow speed, diameter, cross-sectional shape, yaw angle, rounded edges, length-to-width ratio, incoming turbulence and directivity. The overall noise from the pantograph is obtained as the incoherent sum of the predicted noise from the different pantograph struts. The model is validated using available wind tunnel noise measurements of two full-size pantographs. The results show the potential of the semi-empirical model to be used as a rapid tool to predict aerodynamic noise from train pantographs.

  15. Sound Generation in the Presence of Moving Surfaces with Application to Internally Generated Aircraft Engine Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.; Envia, E.

    2002-01-01

    In many cases of technological interest solid boundaries play a direct role in the aerodynamic sound generation process and their presence often results in a large increase in the acoustic radiation. A generalized treatment of the emission of sound from moving boundaries is presented. The approach is similar to that of Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings (1969) but the effect of the surrounding mean flow is explicitly accounted for. The results are used to develop a rational framework for the prediction of internally generated aero-engine noise. The final formulas suggest some new noise sources that may be of practical significance.

  16. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 3: Application of theory for blade loading, wakes, noise, and wing shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D. B.; Mccolgan, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.; Klatte, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Results of the program for the generation of a computer prediction code for noise of advanced single rotation, turboprops (prop-fans) such as the SR3 model are presented. The code is based on a linearized theory developed at Hamilton Standard in which aerodynamics and acoustics are treated as a unified process. Both steady and unsteady blade loading are treated. Capabilities include prediction of steady airload distributions and associated aerodynamic performance, unsteady blade pressure response to gust interaction or blade vibration, noise fields associated with thickness and steady and unsteady loading, and wake velocity fields associated with steady loading. The code was developed on the Hamilton Standard IBM computer and has now been installed on the Cray XMP at NASA-Lewis. The work had its genesis in the frequency domain acoustic theory developed at Hamilton Standard in the late 1970s. It was found that the method used for near field noise predictions could be adapted as a lifting surface theory for aerodynamic work via the pressure potential technique that was used for both wings and ducted turbomachinery. In the first realization of the theory for propellers, the blade loading was represented in a quasi-vortex lattice form. This was upgraded to true lifting surface loading. Originally, it was believed that a purely linear approach for both aerodynamics and noise would be adequate. However, two sources of nonlinearity in the steady aerodynamics became apparent and were found to be a significant factor at takeoff conditions. The first is related to the fact that the steady axial induced velocity may be of the same order of magnitude as the flight speed and the second is the formation of leading edge vortices which increases lift and redistribute loading. Discovery and properties of prop-fan leading edge vortices were reported in two papers. The Unified AeroAcoustic Program (UAAP) capabilites are demonstrated and the theory verified by comparison with the

  17. Performance characteristics of aerodynamically optimum turbines for wind energy generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrbach, C.; Worobel, R.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents a brief discussion of the aerodynamic methodology for wind energy generator turbines, an approach to the design of aerodynamically optimum wind turbines covering a broad range of design parameters, some insight on the effect on performance of nonoptimum blade shapes which may represent lower fabrication costs, the annual wind turbine energy for a family of optimum wind turbines, and areas of needed research. On the basis of the investigation, it is concluded that optimum wind turbines show high performance over a wide range of design velocity ratios; that structural requirements impose constraints on blade geometry; that variable pitch wind turbines provide excellent power regulation and that annual energy output is insensitive to design rpm and solidity of optimum wind turbines.

  18. High level white noise generator

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  19. Effects of Aerodynamic Tabs onExhaust Noise from a Rectangular Plug Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Mikiya; Sano, Takayuki; Kojima, Takayuki; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Shiga, Seiichi; Obokata, Tomio

    Effects of aerodynamic tabs on exhaust noise from a rectangular plug nozzle were investigated experimentally. In JAXA (Japan Aerospace Explanation Agency), a pre-cooled turbojet engine for the 1st stage propulsion of a TSTO (Two stage to orbit) is planned. In the present study, a 1/100-scaled model of the rectangular plug nozzle for the pre-cooled turbojet engine is manufactured and the exhaust noise characteristics were investigated. Compressed air is injected through the rectangular plug nozzle into the atmosphere. The nozzle pressure ratio was set at 2.7, which corresponds to the take-off condition of the vehicle. Aerodynamic tabs were installed at the ramp end (Upper AT), the cowl end (Lower AT) and the sidewall end (Side AT). The SPL (Sound pressure level) was measured with a high-frequency microphone. Without AT, the sound spectrum has a broadband peak at which the SPL is around 105dB. For Lower and Side ATs, the OASPL (Overall SPL) of the exhaust noise decreases, especially around ramp end. At the maximum, the OASPL was reduced by 2.4dB with about 2% loss of the main jet total pressure at the cowl exit. It is shown that the aerodynamic tabs are effective in noise reduction in a rectangular plug nozzle.

  20. Farfield viscous effects in nonlinear noise propagation. [in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, W. L., Sr.

    1974-01-01

    Discussion of the method of parametric differentiation in application to predictions of farfield noise propagation in both lossless and dissipative media. It is shown that, in the lossless medium, the governing equation, transformed to parameter space, reduces to a wave equation in the farfield. In the dissipative medium, the system of nonlinear partial differential equations, transformed to parameter space, reduces to a linear partial differential equation of the propagating type which contains a third-order derivative as well as the wave operator.

  1. The Effect of Bypass Nozzle Exit Area on Fan Aerodynamic Performance and Noise in a Model Turbofan Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Podboy, Gary, G.; Woodward, Richard P.; Jeracki, Robert, J.

    2013-01-01

    The design of effective new technologies to reduce aircraft propulsion noise is dependent on identifying and understanding the noise sources and noise generation mechanisms in the modern turbofan engine, as well as determining their contribution to the overall aircraft noise signature. Therefore, a comprehensive aeroacoustic wind tunnel test program was conducted called the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test as part of the NASA Quiet Aircraft Technology program. The test was performed in the anechoic NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel using a 1/5 scale model turbofan simulator which represented a current generation, medium pressure ratio, high bypass turbofan aircraft engine. The investigation focused on simulating in model scale only the bypass section of the turbofan engine. The test objectives were to: identify the noise sources within the model and determine their noise level; investigate several component design technologies by determining their impact on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the fan stage; and conduct detailed flow diagnostics within the fan flow field to characterize the physics of the noise generation mechanisms in a turbofan model. This report discusses results obtained for one aspect of the Source Diagnostic Test that investigated the effect of the bypass or fan nozzle exit area on the bypass stage aerodynamic performance, specifically the fan and outlet guide vanes or stators, as well as the farfield acoustic noise level. The aerodynamic performance, farfield acoustics, and Laser Doppler Velocimeter flow diagnostic results are presented for the fan and four different fixed-area bypass nozzle configurations. The nozzles simulated fixed engine operating lines and encompassed the fan stage operating envelope from near stall to cruise. One nozzle was selected as a baseline reference, representing the nozzle area which would achieve the design point operating conditions and fan stage performance. The total area change from

  2. Effects of vortex generator on cylindrical protrusion aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignesh Ram, P. S.; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2016-02-01

    Experimental and numerical studies were carried out to evaluate the effect of vortex generator on a small cylindrical protrusion at Mach number 2.0. The experiments were performed using the supersonic blow down wind tunnel on different heights of cylindrical protrusion with vortex generator placed ahead of them. The upstream and downstream flow around the cylindrical protrusion is influenced by vortex generator as is observed using both visualization and pressure measurement techniques. Numerical studies using three dimensional steady implicit formulations with standard k-ω turbulence model was performed. Results obtained through the present computation are compared with the experimental results at Mach 2.0. Good agreements between computation and experimental results have been achieved. The results indicate that the aerodynamic drag acting on cylindrical protrusion can be reduced by adopting vortex generator.

  3. Numerical Analysis of Aerodynamic Noise Radiation from a High-Speed Train Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SASSA, T.; SATO, T.; YATSUI, S.

    2001-10-01

    The aerodynamic noise radiation from a vestibule side door on a high-speed train surface is calculated by the combination of unsteady incompressible fluid flow analysis and acoustic analysis. Pressure fluctuation on a vestibule side door surface is measured to verify the results of fluid flow analysis. Analysis results agree with measured data very well at low frequencies. For high-frequency components, the solvable frequency is limited by the analysis mesh size. Required mesh size is typically one eighth of the wavelength of the pressure fluctuation on the model surface. The aerodynamic noise is mainly radiated from around the following corner where the vortices that are shed from the leading corner strongly interact with the train surface.

  4. Aerodynamic Measurements of a Gulfstream Aircraft Model With and Without Noise Reduction Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Hannon, Judith A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2014-01-01

    Steady and unsteady aerodynamic measurements of a high-fidelity, semi-span 18% scale Gulfstream aircraft model are presented. The aerodynamic data were collected concurrently with acoustic measurements as part of a larger aeroacoustic study targeting airframe noise associated with main landing gear/flap components, gear-flap interaction noise, and the viability of related noise mitigation technologies. The aeroacoustic tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel with the facility in the acoustically treated open-wall (jet) mode. Most of the measurements were obtained with the model in landing configuration with the flap deflected at 39º and the main landing gear on and off. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24. Global forces (lift and drag) and extensive steady and unsteady surface pressure measurements were obtained. Comparison of the present results with those acquired during a previous test shows a significant reduction in the lift experienced by the model. The underlying cause was traced to the likely presence of a much thicker boundary layer on the tunnel floor, which was acoustically treated for the present test. The steady and unsteady pressure fields on the flap, particularly in the regions of predominant noise sources such as the inboard and outboard tips, remained unaffected. It is shown that the changes in lift and drag coefficients for model configurations fitted with gear/flap noise abatement technologies fall within the repeatability of the baseline configuration. Therefore, the noise abatement technologies evaluated in this experiment have no detrimental impact on the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft model.

  5. Follow-on Low Noise Fan Aerodynamic Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidegger, Nathan J.; Hall, Edward J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    The focus of the project was to investigate the effects of turbulence models on the prediction of rotor wake structures. The Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis (ADPAC) code was modified through the incorporation of the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. Suitable test cases were solved numerically using ADPAC employing the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model and another prediction code for comparison. A near-wall spacing study was also completed to determine the adequate spacing of the first computational cell off the wall. Solutions were also collected using two versions of the algebraic Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model in ADPAC. The effects of the turbulence model on the rotor wake definition was examined by obtaining ADPAC solutions for the Low Noise Fan rotor-only steady-flow case using the standard algebraic Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, a modified version of the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model and the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The results from the three different turbulence modeling techniques were compared with each other and the available experimental data. These results include overall rotor performance, spanwise exit profiles, and contours of axial velocity taken along constant axial locations and along blade-to-blade surfaces. Wake characterizations were also performed on the experimental and ADPAC predicted results including the definition of a wake correlation function. Correlations were evaluated for wake width and wake depth. Similarity profiles of the wake shape were also compared between all numerical solutions and experimental data.

  6. A smoke generator system for aerodynamic flight research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richwine, David M.; Curry, Robert E.; Tracy, Gene V.

    1989-01-01

    A smoke generator system was developed for in-flight vortex flow studies on the F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV). The development process included conceptual design, a survey of existing systems, component testing, detailed design, fabrication, and functional flight testing. Housed in the forebody of the aircraft, the final system consists of multiple pyrotechnic smoke cartridges which can be fired simultaneously or in sequence. The smoke produced is ducted to desired locations on the aircraft surface. The smoke generator system (SGS) has been used successfully to identify vortex core and core breakdown locations as functions of flight condition. Although developed for a specific vehicle, this concept may be useful for other aerodynamic flight research which requires the visualization of local flows.

  7. Effect of Trailing Edge Flow Injection on Fan Noise and Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian; Woodward, Richard P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental investigation using trailing edge blowing for reducing fan rotor/guide vane wake interaction noise was completed in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Data were acquired to measure noise, aerodynamic performance, and flow features for a 22" tip diameter fan representative of modern turbofan technology. The fan was designed to use trailing edge blowing to reduce the fan blade wake momentum deficit. The test objective was to quantify noise reductions, measure impacts on fan aerodynamic performance, and document the flow field using hot-film anemometry. Measurements concentrated on approach, cutback, and takeoff rotational speeds as those are the primary conditions of acoustic interest. Data are presented for a 2% (relative to overall fan flow) trailing edge injection rate and show a 2 dB reduction in Overall Sound Power Level (OAPWL) at all fan test speeds. The reduction in broadband noise is nearly constant and is approximately 1.5 dB up to 20 kHz at all fan speeds. Measurements of tone noise show significant variation, as evidenced by reductions of up to 6 dB in the 2 BPF tone at 6700 rpm.: and increases of nearly 2 dB for the 4 BPF tone at approach speed. Aerodynamic performance measurements show the fan with 2 % injection has an overall efficiency that is comparable to the baseline fan and operates, as intended, with nearly the same pressure ratio and mass flow parameters. Hot-film measurements obtained at the approach operating condition indicate that mean blade wake filling in the tip region was not as significant as expected. This suggests that additional acoustic benefits could be realized if the trailing edge blowing could be modified to provide better filling of the wake momentum deficit. Nevertheless, the hot-film measurements indicate that the trailing edge blowing provided significant reductions in blade wake turbulence. Overall, these results indicate that further work may be required to fully understand the proper

  8. Tip Fence for Reduction of Lift-Generated Airframe Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C. (Inventor); Storms, Bruce L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward a unique lift-generated noise reduction apparatus. This apparatus includes a plurality of tip fences that are secured to the trailing and leading assemblies of the high-lift system, as close as possible to the discontinuities where the vortices are most likely to form. In one embodiment, these tip fences are secured to some or all of the outboard and inboard tips of the wing slats and flaps. The tip fence includes a generally flat, or an aerodynamically shaped plate or device that could be formed of almost any rigid material, such as metal, wood, plastic, fiber glass, aluminum, etc. In a preferred embodiment, the tip fences extend below and perpendicularly to flaps and the slats to which they are attached, such that these tip fences are aligned with the nominal free stream velocity of the aircraft. In addition to reducing airframe noise, the tip fence tends to decrease drag and to increase lift, thus improving the overall aerodynamic performance of the aircraft. Another advantage presented by the tip fence lies in the simplicity of its design, its elegance, and its ready ability to fit on the wing components, such as the flaps and the slats. Furthermore, it does not require non-standard materials or fabrication techniques, and it can be readily, easily and inexpensively retrofited on most of the existing aircraft, with minimal design changes.

  9. Effect of anisotropic turbulence on aerodynamic noise. [Lighthill theory mathematical model for axisymmetric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M.; Rosenbaum, B.

    1973-01-01

    A model based on Lighthill's theory for predicting aerodynamic noise from a turbulent shear flow is developed. This model is a generalization of the one developed by Ribner. It does not require that the turbulent correlations factor into space and time-dependent parts. It replaces his assumption of isotropic turbulence by the more realistic one of axisymmetric turbulence. In the course of the analysis, a hierarchy of equations is developed wherein each succeeding equation involves more assumptions than the preceding equation but requires less experimental information for its use. The implications of the model for jet noise are discussed. It is shown that for the particular turbulence data considered anisotropy causes the high-frequency self-noise to be beamed downstream.

  10. Thermal lift generation and drag reduction in rarefied aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekardan, Cem; Alexeenko, Alina

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of the new technologies in low pressure environments such as Hyperloop and helicopters designed for Martian applications, understanding the aerodynamic behavior of airfoils in rarefied environments are becoming more crucial. In this paper, verification of rarefied ES-BGK solver and ideas such as prediction of the thermally induced lift and drag reduction in rarefied aerodynamics are investigated. Validation of the rarefied ES-BGK solver with Runge-Kutta discontinous Galerkin method with experiments in transonic regime with a Reynolds number of 73 showed that ES-BGK solver is the most suitable solver in near slip transonic regime. For the quantification of lift generation, A NACA 0012 airfoil is studied with a high temperature surface on the bottom for the lift creation for different Knudsen numbers. It was seen that for lower velocities, continuum solver under predicts the lift generation when the Knudsen number is 0.00129 due to local velocity gradients reaching slip regime although lift coefficient is higher with the Boltzmann ES-BGK solutions. In the second part, the feasibility of using thermal transpiration for drag reduction is studied. Initial study in drag reduction includes an application of a thermal gradient at the upper surface of a NACA 0012 airfoil near trailing edge at a 12-degree angle of attack and 5 Pa pressure. It was seen that drag is reduced by 4 percent and vortex shedding frequency is reduced due to asymmetry introduced in the flow due to temperature gradient causing reverse flow due to thermal transpiration phenomena.

  11. Generation mechanisms of tire-pavement noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dare, Tyler P.

    Tire-pavement noise is the dominant source of traffic noise at highway speeds. It is the result of a combination of several noise generation mechanisms, including tire carcass vibration and tread block vibration. Because multiple mechanisms are involved, it is difficult to predict the effects of changes in pavement parameters on tire-pavement noise. In this research, a set of experimental techniques were developed to decompose a measured tire-pavement noise spectrum into a set of constituent spectra relating to each generation mechanism. Three principal mechanisms were identified: treadband vibration, sidewall vibration, and tangential tread block vibration. By combining the constituent spectra associated with these mechanisms, it was possible to accurately predict the total tire-pavement noise spectrum. The constituent spectra were fit to tire-pavement noise data measured on asphalt and concrete pavements at highway speeds. It was found that the constituent spectra fit the measured data well, and a two-parameter model was developed to predict tire-pavement noise levels from pavement texture data.

  12. Study of aerodynamic noise in low supersonic operation of an axial flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldi, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A study of compressor noise is presented, based upon supersonic, part-speed operation of a high hub/tip ratio compressor designed for spanwise uniformity of aerodynamic conditions, having straight cylindrical inlet and exit passages for acoustic simplicity. Acoustic spectra taken in the acoustically-treated inlet plenum, are presented for five operating points at each of two speeds, corresponding to relative rotor tip Mach numbers of about 1.01 and 1.12 (60 and 67 percent design speed). These spectra are analyzed for low and high frequency broadband noise, blade passage frequency noise, combination tone noise and "haystack' noise (a very broad peak somewhat below blade passage frequency, which is occasionally observed in engines and fan test rigs). These types of noise are related to diffusion factor, total pressure ratio, and relative rotor tip Mach number. Auxiliary measurements of fluctuating wall static pressures and schlieren photographs of upstream shocks in the inlet are also presented and related to the acoustic and performance data.

  13. Cylinder wake influence on the tonal noise and aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA0018 airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Y.; Fujisawa, N.; Nakano, T.; Nashimoto, A.

    2006-11-01

    The influence of cylinder wake on discrete tonal noise and aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA0018 airfoil is studied experimentally in a uniform flow at a moderate Reynolds number. The experiments are carried out by measuring sound pressure levels and spectrum, separation and the reattachment points, pressure distribution, fluid forces, mean-flow and turbulence characteristics around the airfoil with and without the cylinder wake. Present results indicate that the tonal noise from the airfoil is suppressed by the influence of the cylinder wake and the aerodynamic characteristics are improved in comparison with the case without the cylinder wake. These are mainly due to the separation control of boundary layers over the airfoil caused by the wake-induced transition, which is observed by surface flow visualization with liquid- crystal coating. The PIV measurements of the flow field around the airfoil confirm that highly turbulent velocity fluctuation of the cylinder wake induces the transition of the boundary layers and produces an attached boundary layer over the airfoil. Then, the vortex shedding phenomenon near the trailing edge of pressure surface is removed by the influence of the wake and results in the suppression of tonal noise.

  14. Experimental investigation on the effect of slat geometrical configurations on aerodynamic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, Carlos C.; Souza, Daniel S.; Medeiros, Marcello A. F.

    2017-04-01

    Relatively few studies have addressed the slat noise dependence on gap, overlap and deflection angle, although slat noise level and spectral content are topics of increasing concern in the aeronautical industry. This paper presents new experimental data on the subject. An array of microphones placed in a closed-section wind tunnel was used in the experiments. Beamforming signal processing enhanced by DAMAS (Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources) was applied to the data. The experimental data covered a range of angles of attack and Mach numbers, for which the typical slat noise signature features high-level narrow-band peaks, broadband noise and a single broad tone. The narrow-band peaks often dominate the slat noise spectra and arise at Strouhal numbers up to approximately 5. The broadband noise is well characterized for Strouhal numbers between 5 and 20, whereas the broad tone arises for Strouhal above 20. A total of 10 different slat configurations, including variations in gap, overlap and deflection angle were tested. The slat noise dependence on gap, overlap and slat deflection angle was assessed by letting each of them vary separately. The slat configuration exerted a substantial effect on all slat noise components, with variations of up to 20 dB/Hz in the level of the narrow-band peaks. In general, the level of the narrow-band peaks reduced and the high frequency content increased as the gap, overlap, angle of attack and slat deflection increased separately or in combination. The aerodynamically optimized baseline configuration is very distinct from the lowest noise one.

  15. Advanced Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2008-01-01

    A new approach for distribution of grid points on the surface and in the volume has been developed and implemented in the NASA unstructured grid generation code VGRID. In addition to the point and line sources of prior work, the new approach utilizes surface and volume sources for automatic curvature-based grid sizing and convenient point distribution in the volume. A new exponential growth function produces smoother and more efficient grids and provides superior control over distribution of grid points in the field. All types of sources support anisotropic grid stretching which not only improves the grid economy but also provides more accurate solutions for certain aerodynamic applications. The new approach does not require a three-dimensional background grid as in the previous methods. Instead, it makes use of an efficient bounding-box auxiliary medium for storing grid parameters defined by surface sources. The new approach is less memory-intensive and more efficient computationally. The grids generated with the new method either eliminate the need for adaptive grid refinement for certain class of problems or provide high quality initial grids that would enhance the performance of many adaptation methods.

  16. Lobed Mixer Design for Noise Suppression: Plume, Aerodynamic and Acoustic Data. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Baker, V. David; Dalton, William N.; Bridges, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive database for the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several model-scale lobe mixers of bypass ratio 5 to 6 has been created for mixed jet speeds up to 1080 ft per s at typical take-off (TO) conditions of small-to-medium turbofan engines. The flight effect was simulated for Mach numbers up to 0.3. The static thrust performance and plume data were also obtained at typical TO and cruise conditions. The tests were done at NASA Lewis anechoic dome and ASE's FluiDyne Laboratories. The effect of several lobe mixer and nozzle parameters, such as, lobe scalloping, lobe count, lobe penetration and nozzle length was examined in terms of flyover noise at constant altitude and also noise in the reference frame of the nozzle. This volume is divided into three parts: in the first two parts, we collate the plume survey data in graphical form (line, contour and surface plots) and analyze it; in part 3, we tabulate the aerodynamic data for the acoustics tests and the acoustic data in one-third octave band levels.

  17. Lobed Mixer Design for Noise Suppression Acoustic and Aerodynamic Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Dalton, William N.; Boyd, Kathleen (Technical Monitor); Bridges, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive database for the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several model-scale lobe mixers of bypass ratio 5 to 6 has been created for mixed jet speeds up to 1080 ft/s at typical take-off (TO) conditions of small-to-medium turbofan engines. The flight effect was simulated for Mach numbers up to 0.3. The static thrust performance and plume data were also obtained at typical TO and cruise conditions. The tests were done at NASA Lewis anechoic dome and ASK's FluiDyne Laboratories. The effect of several lobe mixer and nozzle parameters, such as, lobe scalloping, lobe count, lobe penetration and nozzle length was examined in terms of flyover noise at constant altitude. Sound in the nozzle reference frame was analyzed to understand the source characteristics. Several new concepts, mechanisms and methods are reported for such lobed mixers, such as, "boomerang" scallops, "tongue" mixer, detection of "excess" internal noise sources, and extrapolation of flyover noise data from one flight speed to different flight speeds. Noise reduction of as much as 3 EPNdB was found with a deeply scalloped mixer compared to annular nozzle at net thrust levels of 9500 lb for a 29 in. diameter nozzle after optimizing the nozzle length.

  18. Advanced Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar

    2010-01-01

    A new approach for distribution of grid points on the surface and in the volume has been developed. In addition to the point and line sources of prior work, the new approach utilizes surface and volume sources for automatic curvature-based grid sizing and convenient point distribution in the volume. A new exponential growth function produces smoother and more efficient grids and provides superior control over distribution of grid points in the field. All types of sources support anisotropic grid stretching which not only improves the grid economy but also provides more accurate solutions for certain aerodynamic applications. The new approach does not require a three-dimensional background grid as in the previous methods. Instead, it makes use of an efficient bounding-box auxiliary medium for storing grid parameters defined by surface sources. The new approach is less memory-intensive and more efficient computationally. The grids generated with the new method either eliminate the need for adaptive grid refinement for certain class of problems or provide high quality initial grids that would enhance the performance of many adaptation methods.

  19. Turbofan noise generation. Volume 2: Computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventres, C. S.; Theobald, M. A.; Mark, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a package of computer programs developed to calculate the in duct acoustic mods excited by a fan/stator stage operating at subsonic tip speed is described. The following three noise source mechanisms are included: (1) sound generated by the rotor blades interacting with turbulence ingested into, or generated within, the inlet duct; (2) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the turbulent wakes of the rotor blades; and (3) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the velocity deficits in the mean wakes of the rotor blades. The computations for three different noise mechanisms are coded as three separate computer program packages. The computer codes are described by means of block diagrams, tables of data and variables, and example program executions; FORTRAN listings are included.

  20. Turbofan noise generation. Volume 2: Computer programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventres, C. S.; Theobald, M. A.; Mark, W. D.

    1982-07-01

    The use of a package of computer programs developed to calculate the in duct acoustic mods excited by a fan/stator stage operating at subsonic tip speed is described. The following three noise source mechanisms are included: (1) sound generated by the rotor blades interacting with turbulence ingested into, or generated within, the inlet duct; (2) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the turbulent wakes of the rotor blades; and (3) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the velocity deficits in the mean wakes of the rotor blades. The computations for three different noise mechanisms are coded as three separate computer program packages. The computer codes are described by means of block diagrams, tables of data and variables, and example program executions; FORTRAN listings are included.

  1. Unified Aeroacoustics Analysis for High Speed Turboprop Aerodynamics and Noise. Volume 1; Development of Theory for Blade Loading, Wakes, and Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    A unified theory for the aerodynamics and noise of advanced turboprops are presented. Aerodynamic topics include calculation of performance, blade load distribution, and non-uniform wake flow fields. Blade loading can be steady or unsteady due to fixed distortion, counter-rotating wakes, or blade vibration. The aerodynamic theory is based on the pressure potential method and is therefore basically linear. However, nonlinear effects associated with finite axial induction and blade vortex flow are included via approximate methods. Acoustic topics include radiation of noise caused by blade thickness, steady loading (including vortex lift), and unsteady loading. Shielding of the fuselage by its boundary layer and the wing are treated in separate analyses that are compatible but not integrated with the aeroacoustic theory for rotating blades.

  2. Aerodynamic and noise measurements on a quasi-two dimensional augmentor wing model with lobe-type nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was made of the static, wind-on aerodynamic and static noise characteristics of an augmentor wing having lobe type nozzles. The study was made in the Ames 7-by 10-Foot No. 1 Wind Tunnel using a small-scale, quasi-two-dimensional model. Several configurations of lobe nozzles as well as a normal slot nozzle were tested. Results indicate that lobe nozzles offer improved static and wind-on aerodynamics and reduced static noise relative to slot nozzles. Best wind-on performance was obtained when the tertiary gap was closed even though the static thrust augmentation was maximum with the gap open. Static thrust augmentation, wind-on lift and drag, and static noise directivity are presented as well as typical static and wind-on exit velocity profiles, surface pressure distributions and noise spectrums. The data are presented with limited discussion.

  3. Interaction of aerodynamic noise with laminar boundary layers in supersonic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schopper, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction between incoming aerodynamic noise and the supersonic laminar boundary layer is studied. The noise field is modeled as a Mach wave radiation field consisting of discrete waves emanating from coherent turbulent entities moving downstream within the supersonic turbulent boundary layer. The individual disturbances are likened to miniature sonic booms and the laminar boundary layer is staffed by the waves as the sources move downstream. The mean, autocorrelation, and power spectral density of the field are expressed in terms of the wave shapes and their average arrival rates. Some consideration is given to the possible appreciable thickness of the weak shock fronts. The emphasis in the interaction analysis is on the behavior of the shocklets in the noise field. The shocklets are shown to be focused by the laminar boundary layer in its outer region. Borrowing wave propagation terminology, this region is termed the caustic region. Using scaling laws from sonic boom work, focus factors at the caustic are estimated to vary from 2 to 6 for incoming shocklet strengths of 1 to .01 percent of the free stream pressure level. The situation regarding experimental evidence of the caustic region is reviewed.

  4. Effects of aerodynamic interaction between main and tail rotors on helicopter hover performance and noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menger, R. P.; Wood, T. L.; Brieger, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    A model test was conducted to determine the effects of aerodynamic interaction between main rotor, tail rotor, and vertical fin on helicopter performance and noise in hover out of ground effect. The experimental data were obtained from hover tests performed with a .151 scale Model 222 main rotor, tail rotor and vertical fin. Of primary interest was the effect of location of the tail rotor with respect to the main rotor. Penalties on main rotor power due to interaction with the tail rotor ranged up to 3% depending upon tail rotor location and orientation. Penalties on tail rotor power due to fin blockage alone ranged up to 10% for pusher tail rotors and up to 50% for tractor tail rotors. The main rotor wake had only a second order effect on these tail rotor/fin interactions. Design charts are presented showing the penalties on main rotor power as a function of the relative location of the tail rotor.

  5. Turbofan noise generation. Volume 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventres, C. S.; Theobald, M. A.; Mark, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    Computer programs were developed which calculate the in-duct acoustic modes excited by a fan/stator stae operating at subsonic tip speed. Three noise source mechanisms are included: (1) sound generated by the rotor blades interacting with turbulence ingested into, or generated within, the inlet duct; (2) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the turbulent wakes of the rotors blades; and (3) sound generated by the stator vanes interacting with the mean velocity deficit wakes of the rotor blades. The fan/stator stage is modeled as an ensemble of blades and vanes of zero camber and thickness enclosed within an infinite hard-walled annular duct. Turbulence drawn into or generated within the inlet duct is modeled as nonhomogeneous and anisotropic random fluid motion, superimposed upon a uniform axial mean flow, and convected with that flow. Equations for the duct mode amplitudes, or expected values of the amplitudes, are derived.

  6. Optimum design of structures of composite materials in response to aerodynamic noise and noise transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. C. S.; Tsui, C. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Elastic wave propagation and attenuation in a model fiber matrix was investigated. Damping characteristics in graphite epoxy composite materials were measured. A sound transmission test facility suitable to incorporate into NASA Ames wind tunnel for measurement of transmission loss due to sound generation in boundary layers was constructed. Measurement of transmission loss of graphite epoxy composite panels was also included.

  7. Inlet noise on 0.5-meter-diameter NASA QF-1 fan as measured in an unmodified compressor aerodynamic test facility and in an anechoic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelder, T. F.; Soltis, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Narrowband analysis revealed grossly similar sound pressure level spectra in each facility. Blade passing frequency (BPF) noise and multiple pure tone (MPT) noise were superimposed on a broadband (BB) base noise. From one-third octave bandwidth sound power analyses the BPF noise (harmonics combined), and the MPT noise (harmonics combined, excepting BPF's) agreed between facilities within 1.5 db or less over the range of speeds and flows tested. Detailed noise and aerodynamic performance is also presented.

  8. Modeling of Turbulence Generated Noise in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James

    2004-01-01

    A numerically calculated Green's function is used to predict jet noise spectrum and its far-field directivity. A linearized form of Lilley's equation governs the non-causal Green s function of interest, with the non-linear terms on the right hand side identified as the source. In this paper, contributions from the so-called self- and shear-noise source terms will be discussed. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solution yields the required mean flow as well as time- and length scales of a noise-generating turbulent eddy. A non-compact source, with exponential temporal and spatial functions, is used to describe the turbulence velocity correlation tensors. It is shown that while an exact non-causal Green's function accurately predicts the observed shift in the location of the spectrum peak with angle as well as the angularity of sound at moderate Mach numbers, at high subsonic and supersonic acoustic Mach numbers the polar directivity of radiated sound is not entirely captured by this Green's function. Results presented for Mach 0.5 and 0.9 isothermal jets, as well as a Mach 0.8 hot jet conclude that near the peak radiation angle a different source/Green's function convolution integral may be required in order to capture the peak observed directivity of jet noise.

  9. An Aerodynamic Assessment of Micro-Drag Generators (MDGs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1998-01-01

    Commercial transports as well as fighter aircraft of the future are being designed with very low drag (friction and pressure). Concurrently, commuter airports are being built or envisioned to be built in the centers of metropolitan areas where shorter runways and/or reduced noise footprints on takeoff and landing are required. These requirements and the fact that drag is lower on new vehicles than on older aircraft have resulted in vehicles that require a large amount of braking force (from landing-gear brakes, spoilers, high-lift flaps, thrust reversers, etc.). Micro-drag generators (MDGs) were envisioned to create a uniformly distributed drag force along a vehicle by forcing the flow to separate on the aft-facing surface of a series of deployable devices, thus, generating drag. The devices are intended to work at any speed and for any type of vehicle (aircraft, ground vehicles, sea-faring vehicles). MDGs were applied to a general aviation wing and a representative fuselage shape and tested in two subsonic wind tunnels. The results showed increases in drag of 2 to 6 times that of a "clean" configuration.

  10. Computation of interactional aerodynamics for noise prediction of heavy lift rotorcraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennes, Christopher C.

    Many computational tools are used when developing a modern helicopter. As the design space is narrowed, more accurate and time-intensive tools are brought to bear. These tools are used to determine the effect of a design decision on the performance, handling, stability and efficiency of the aircraft. One notable parameter left out of this process is acoustics. This is due in part to the difficulty in making useful acoustics calculations that reveal the differences between various design configurations. This thesis presents a new approach designed to bridge the gap in prediction capability between fast but low-fidelity Lagrangian particle methods, and slow but high-fidelity Eulerian computational fluid dynamics simulations. A multi-pronged approach is presented. First, a simple flow solver using well-understood and tested flow solution methodologies is developed specifically to handle bodies in arbitrary motion. To this basic flow solver two new technologies are added. The first is an Immersed Boundary technique designed to be tolerant of geometric degeneracies and low-resolution grids. This new technique allows easy inclusion of complex fuselage geometries at minimal computational cost, improving the ability of a solver to capture the complex interactional aerodynamic effects expected in modern rotorcraft design. The second new technique is an extension of a concept from flow visualization where the motion of tip vortices are tracked through the solution using massless particles convecting with the local flow. In this extension of that concept, the particles maintain knowledge of the expected and actual vortex strength. As a post-processing step, when the acoustic calculations are made, these particles are used to augment the loading noise calculation and reproduce the highly-impulsive character of blade-vortex interaction noise. In combination these new techniques yield a significant improvement to the state of the art in rotorcraft blade-vortex interaction noise

  11. Impulse noise generated by starter pistols

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, Deanna K.; Finan, Donald S.; Soendergaard, Jacob; Flamme, Gregory A.; Murphy, William J.; Lankford, James E.; Stewart, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study describes signals generated by .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols in the context of noise-induced hearing loss risk for sports officials and athletes. Design Acoustic comparison of impulses generated from typical .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols firing blanks were made to impulses generated from comparable firearms firing both blanks and live rounds. Acoustic characteristics are described in terms of directionality and distance from the shooter in a simulated outdoor running track. Metrics include peak sound pressure levels (SPL), A-weighted equivalent 8-hour level (LeqA8), and maximum permissible number of individual shots, or maximum permissible exposures (MPE) for the unprotected ear. Results Starter pistols produce peak SPLs above 140 dB. The numbers of MPEs are as few as five for the .22-caliber starter pistol, and somewhat higher (≤25) for the .32-caliber pistol. Conclusion The impulsive sounds produced by starter pistols correspond to MPE numbers that are unacceptably small for unprotected officials and others in the immediate vicinity of the shooter. At the distances included in this study, the risk to athletes appears to be low (when referencing exposure criteria for adults), but the sound associated with the starter pistol will contribute to the athlete’s overall noise exposure. PMID:23373743

  12. USB flow characteristics related to noise generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. H.; Reddy, N. N.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of nozzle and flap geometry on upper surface blown flow field characteristics related to noise generation were examined experimentally using static models. Flow attachment and spreading characteristics were observed using flow visualization techniques. Velocity and turbulence profiles in the trailing edge wake were measured using hot-wire anemometry, and the effects of the geometric variables on peak velocity and turbulence intensity were determined. It is shown that peak trailing edge velocity is a function of the ratio of flow length to modified hydraulic diameter.

  13. Aeroacoustic Analysis of Turbofan Noise Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.; Envia, Edmane

    1996-01-01

    This report provides an updated version of analytical documentation for the V072 Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Code. It presents the theoretical derivation of the equations used in the code and, where necessary, it documents the enhancements and changes made to the original code since its first release. V072 is a package of FORTRAN computer programs which calculate the in-duct acoustic modes excited by a fan/stator stage operating in a subsonic mean flow. Sound is generated by the stator vanes interacting with the mean wakes of the rotor blades. In this updated version, only the tonal noise produced at the blade passing frequency and its harmonics, is described. The broadband noise component analysis, which was part of the original report, is not included here. The code provides outputs of modal pressure and power amplitudes generated by the rotor-wake/stator interaction. The rotor/stator stage is modeled as an ensemble of blades and vanes of zero camber and thickness enclosed within an infinite hard-walled annular duct. The amplitude of each propagating mode is computed and summed to obtain the harmonics of sound power flux within the duct for both upstream and downstream propagating modes.

  14. Single stage, low noise, advanced technology fan. Volume 1: Aerodynamic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Younghans, J. L.; Little, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic design for a half-scale fan vehicle, which would have application on an advanced transport aircraft, is described. The single stage advanced technology fan was designed to a pressure ratio of 1.8 at a tip speed of 503 m/sec 11,650 ft/sec). The fan and booster components are designed in a scale model flow size convenient for testing with existing facility and vehicle hardware. The design corrected flow per unit annulus area at the fan face is 215 kg/sec sq m (44.0 lb m/sec sq ft) with a hub-tip ratio of 0.38 at the leading edge of the fan rotor. This results in an inlet corrected airflow of 117.9 kg/sec (259.9 lb m/sec) for the selected rotor tip diameter if 90.37 cm (35.58 in.). The variable geometry inlet is designed utilizing a combination of high throat Mach number and acoustic treatment in the inlet diffuser for noise suppression (hybrid inlet). A variable fan exhaust nozzle was assumed in conjunction with the variable inlet throat area to limit the required area change of the inlet throat at approach and hence limit the overall diffusion and inlet length. The fan exit duct design was primarily influenced by acoustic requirements, including length of suppressor wall treatment; length, thickness and position on a duct splitter for additional suppressor treatment; and duct surface Mach numbers.

  15. Numerical study on reduction of aerodynamic noise around an airfoil with biomimetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Chengchun; Wu, Zhengyang; Wharton, James; Ren, Luquan

    2017-04-01

    A biomimetic airfoil featuring leading edge waves, trailing edge serrations and surface ridges is proposed in this study, based on flow control with each section meeting the NACA 0012 airfoil profile. Numerical simulations have been conducted to compare aerodynamic and acoustic performances between the NACA 0012 and biomimetic airfoils. These simulations utilize the large eddy simulation (LES) method and aeroacoustic analogy at an angle of attack of 0° and a Reynolds number of 1.0×105, based on using the airfoil chord as the characteristic length. The simulation results reveal the overall sound pressure levels (OASPLs) for all frequencies and at the seven observer points around the biomimetic airfoil, and a decrease of 13.1-13.9 dB is observed, whereas the drag coefficient is almost unchanged. The biomimetic structures can transform the shedding vortices in laminar mode for the NACA 0012 airfoil to regular horseshoe-type vortices in the wake, and reduce the spanwise correlation of the large-scale vortices, thereby restrain the vortex shedding noise around the biomimetic airfoil.

  16. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    The modern theory of aerodynamic sound originates from Lighthill's two papers in 1952 and 1954, as is well known. I have heard that Lighthill was motivated in writing the papers by the jet-noise emitted by the newly commercialized jet-engined airplanes at that time. The technology of aerodynamic sound is destined for environmental problems. Therefore the theory should always be applied to newly emerged public nuisances. This issue of Fluid Dynamics Research (FDR) reflects problems of environmental sound in present Japanese technology. The Japanese community studying aerodynamic sound has held an annual symposium since 29 years ago when the late Professor S Kotake and Professor S Kaji of Teikyo University organized the symposium. Most of the Japanese authors in this issue are members of the annual symposium. I should note the contribution of the two professors cited above in establishing the Japanese community of aerodynamic sound research. It is my pleasure to present the publication in this issue of ten papers discussed at the annual symposium. I would like to express many thanks to the Editorial Board of FDR for giving us the chance to contribute these papers. We have a review paper by T Suzuki on the study of jet noise, which continues to be important nowadays, and is expected to reform the theoretical model of generating mechanisms. Professor M S Howe and R S McGowan contribute an analytical paper, a valuable study in today's fluid dynamics research. They apply hydrodynamics to solve the compressible flow generated in the vocal cords of the human body. Experimental study continues to be the main methodology in aerodynamic sound, and it is expected to explore new horizons. H Fujita's study on the Aeolian tone provides a new viewpoint on major, longstanding sound problems. The paper by M Nishimura and T Goto on textile fabrics describes new technology for the effective reduction of bluff-body noise. The paper by T Sueki et al also reports new technology for the

  17. Generation of short and long range temporal correlated noise

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, A.H.; Sancho, J.M.

    1999-11-20

    The authors present the implementation of an algorithm to generate Gaussian random noises with prescribed time correlations that can be either long or short ranged. Examples of Langevin dynamics with short and long range noises are presented and discussed.

  18. Effect of Two Advanced Noise Reduction Technologies on the Aerodynamic Performance of an Ultra High Bypass Ratio Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christoper E.; Gazzaniga, John A.

    2013-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center anechoic 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel to investigate two new advanced noise reduction technologies in support of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. The goal of the experiment was to demonstrate the noise reduction potential and effect on fan model performance of the two noise reduction technologies in a scale model Ultra-High Bypass turbofan at simulated takeoff and approach aircraft flight speeds. The two novel noise reduction technologies are called Over-the-Rotor acoustic treatment and Soft Vanes. Both technologies were aimed at modifying the local noise source mechanisms of the fan tip vortex/fan case interaction and the rotor wake-stator interaction. For the Over-the-Rotor acoustic treatment, two noise reduction configurations were investigated. The results showed that the two noise reduction technologies, Over-the-Rotor and Soft Vanes, were able to reduce the noise level of the fan model, but the Over-the-Rotor configurations had a significant negative impact on the fan aerodynamic performance; the loss in fan aerodynamic efficiency was between 2.75 to 8.75 percent, depending on configuration, compared to the conventional solid baseline fan case rubstrip also tested. Performance results with the Soft Vanes showed that there was no measurable change in the corrected fan thrust and a 1.8 percent loss in corrected stator vane thrust, which resulted in a total net thrust loss of approximately 0.5 percent compared with the baseline reference stator vane set.

  19. Noise generated by quiet engine fans. 3: Fan C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montegan, F. J.; Schaefer, J. W.; Schmiedlin, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    A family of fans designed with low noise features was acoustically evaluated, and noise results are documented for a 1.6-pressure-ratio, 472-m/sec (155-ft/sec) tip speed fan. The fan is described and some aerodynamic operating data are given. Far field noise around the fan was measured over a range of operating conditions for a variety of configurations having different arrangements of sound absorbing material in the flow ducts. Complete results of 1.3 octave band analysis of the data are presented in tabular form. Included also are acoustic power spectra and sideline perceived noise levels. Representative 1/3 octave band data are presented graphically, and sample graphs of continuous narrow band spectra are also provided.

  20. Small scale noise and wind tunnel tests of upper surface blowing nozzle flap concepts. Volume 1. Aerodynamic test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renselaer, D. J.; Nishida, R. S.; Wilkin, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    The results and analyses of aerodynamic and acoustic studies conducted on the small scale noise and wind tunnel tests of upper surface blowing nozzle flap concepts are presented. Various types of nozzle flap concepts were tested. These are an upper surface blowing concept with a multiple slot arrangement with seven slots (seven slotted nozzle), an upper surface blowing type with a large nozzle exit at approximately mid-chord location in conjunction with a powered trailing edge flap with multiple slots (split flow or partially slotted nozzle). In addition, aerodynamic tests were continued on a similar multi-slotted nozzle flap, but with 14 slots. All three types of nozzle flap concepts tested appear to be about equal in overall aerodynamic performance but with the split flow nozzle somewhat better than the other two nozzle flaps in the landing approach mode. All nozzle flaps can be deflected to a large angle to increase drag without significant loss in lift. The nozzle flap concepts appear to be viable aerodynamic drag modulation devices for landing.

  1. Experimental study of the aerodynamic noise radiated by cylinders with different cross-sections and yaw angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre Iglesias, E.; Thompson, D. J.; Smith, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Vortex shedding from cylinders has been extensively studied due to its occurrence in many engineering fields. Many experimental studies reported in the literature focus on the aerodynamics of the vortex shedding process but the literature about the radiated noise is more scarce. The aim of the work presented here is to extend the available noise data. Aero-acoustic wind tunnel tests were carried out using cylinders with different cross-sections: circular, square, rectangular and elliptical. Flow speeds between 20 and 50 m/s were used, corresponding to Reynolds numbers in the range from 1.6×104 to 1.2×105. The dependence of the noise on the yaw angle, flow speed, cross-sectional shape, angle of attack and radiation angle (directivity) is assessed. The results obtained are compared, where possible, with those found in the literature for similar cases. It is intended that the results can be used for the validation and calibration of numerical and empirical aerodynamic noise prediction models.

  2. NWTC Aerodynamics Studies Improve Energy Capture and Lower Costs of Wind-Generated Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have expanded wind turbine aerodynamic research from blade and rotor aerodynamics to wind plant and atmospheric inflow effects. The energy capture from wind plants is dependent on all of these aerodynamic interactions. Research at the NWTC is crucial to understanding how wind turbines function in large, multiple-row wind plants. These conditions impact the cumulative fatigue damage of turbine structural components that ultimately effect the useful lifetime of wind turbines. This work also is essential for understanding and maximizing turbine and wind plant energy production. Both turbine lifetime and wind plant energy production are key determinants of the cost of wind-generated electricity.

  3. High frequency green function for aerodynamic noise in moving media. I - General theory. II - Noise from a spreading jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown how a high frequency analysis can be made for general problems involving flow-generated noise. In the parallel shear flow problem treated by Balsa (1976) and Goldstein (1982), the equation governing sound propagation in the moving medium could be transformed into a wave equation for a stationary medium with an inhomogeneous index of refraction. It is noted that the procedure of Avila and Keller (1963) was then used to construct a high frequency Green function. This procedure involves matching a solution valid in an inner region around the point source to an outer, ray-acoustics solution. This same procedure is used here to construct the Green function for a source in an arbitrary mean flow. In view of the fact that there is no restriction to parallel flow, the governing equations cannot be transformed into a wave equation; the analysis therefore proceeds from the equations of motion themselves.

  4. Piloted Simulation Study of the Effects of High-Lift Aerodynamics on the Takeoff Noise of a Representative High-Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Riley, Donald R.; Brandon, Jay M.; Person, Lee H., Jr.; Glaab, Patricia C.

    1999-01-01

    As part of an effort between NASA and private industry to reduce airport-community noise for high-speed civil transport (HSCT) concepts, a piloted simulation study was initiated for the purpose of predicting the noise reduction benefits that could result from improved low-speed high-lift aerodynamic performance for a typical HSCT configuration during takeoff and initial climb. Flight profile and engine information from the piloted simulation were coupled with the NASA Langley Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) to estimate jet engine noise and to propagate the resulting source noise to ground observer stations. A baseline aircraft configuration, which also incorporated different levels of projected improvements in low-speed high-lift aerodynamic performance, was simulated to investigate effects of increased lift and lift-to-drag ratio on takeoff noise levels. Simulated takeoff flights were performed with the pilots following a specified procedure in which either a single thrust cutback was performed at selected altitudes ranging from 400 to 2000 ft, or a multiple-cutback procedure was performed where thrust was reduced by a two-step process. Results show that improved low-speed high-lift aerodynamic performance provides at least a 4 to 6 dB reduction in effective perceived noise level at the FAA downrange flyover measurement station for either cutback procedure. However, improved low-speed high-lift aerodynamic performance reduced maximum sideline noise levels only when using the multiple-cutback procedures.

  5. Jet Aeroacoustics: Noise Generation Mechanism and Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the third year research effort of the project. The research work focussed on the fine scale mixing noise of both subsonic and supersonic jets and the effects of nozzle geometry and tabs on subsonic jet noise. In publication 1, a new semi-empirical theory of jet mixing noise from fine scale turbulence is developed. By an analogy to gas kinetic theory, it is shown that the source of noise is related to the time fluctuations of the turbulence kinetic theory. On starting with the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations, a formula for the radiated noise is derived. An empirical model of the space-time correlation function of the turbulence kinetic energy is adopted. The form of the model is in good agreement with the space-time two-point velocity correlation function measured by Davies and coworkers. The parameters of the correlation are related to the parameters of the k-epsilon turbulence model. Thus the theory is self-contained. Extensive comparisons between the computed noise spectrum of the theory and experimental measured have been carried out. The parameters include jet Mach number from 0.3 to 2.0 and temperature ratio from 1.0 to 4.8. Excellent agreements are found in the spectrum shape, noise intensity and directivity. It is envisaged that the theory would supercede all semi-empirical and totally empirical jet noise prediction methods in current use.

  6. Generation of indirect combustion noise by compositional inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Luca; O'Brien, Jeff; Ihme, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    The generation of indirect combustion noise in nozzles and turbine stages is commonly attributed to temperature inhomogeneities and vorticity fluctuations. Here, compositional inhomogeneities in a multi-component gas mixture are shown to produce indirect noise both theoretically and numerically. The chemical potential function is introduced as an additional acoustic source mechanism. The contribution of the compositional noise is compared to the entropy noise and direct noise by considering subsonic, supersonic and shocked nozzles downstream of the combustor exit. It is shown that the compositional noise is dependent on the local mixture composition and can exceed entropy noise for fuel-lean conditions and supersonic/shocked nozzle flows. This suggests that compositional indirect combustion noise may require consideration with the implementation of advanced combustion concepts in gas turbines, including low-emissions combustors, high-power-density engine cores, or compact burners.

  7. Model/data comparison of typhoon-generated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Yan; Li, Feng-Hua

    2016-12-01

    Ocean noise recorded during a typhoon can be used to monitor the typhoon and investigate the mechanism of the wind-generated noise. An analytical expression for the typhoon-generated noise intensity is derived as a function of wind speed. A “bi-peak” structure was observed in an experiment during which typhoon-generated noise was recorded. Wind speed dependence and frequency dependence were also observed in the frequency range of 100 Hz-1000 Hz. The model/data comparison shows that results of the present model of 500 Hz and 1000 Hz are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, and the typhoon-generated noise intensity has a dependence on frequency and a power-law dependence on wind speed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11434012, 41561144006, and 11125420).

  8. The prediction of noise generated by the interaction of airflow and duct discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, David J.

    2002-11-01

    There is a paucity of data available relating to the noise generated by ventilation system elements. This paucity arises from the difficulty in obtaining such data as it requires the use of rare and expensive combined acoustic and aerodynamic measurement facilities. In this paper a prediction technique is proposed which overcomes the need for these expensive test facilities. Discontinuities in ducts result both in the generation of flow noise and a loss of static pressure. The greater the discontinuity the greater is the loss in static pressure and the greater is the sound power generated. Over a number of years there has been considerable research aimed at establishing the correlation between the drop in static pressure across a flow spoiler and the noise generated. In this paper it is shown that for a typical duct discontinuity it is possible to predict the sound power generated from knowledge of its pressure loss characteristics. A prediction method is proposed based upon a normalized sound-power level which is a function of the Strouhal number. Such a prediction technique has enormous potential value in the design of high-velocity air distribution systems.

  9. On the aerodynamics and performance of active vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Ron; Farokhi, Saeed

    1993-01-01

    As a building block in the development of smart lift-enhancement devices, a new concept for flow control using active vortex generators (AVGs) is presented. Ramp, wedge, and doublet wedge (Wheeler) VG configurations are investigated. The AVGs are designed to conform to the surface of the wing section at low alpha. As the section approaches the stall, they are deployed and accordingly, alpha(stall) and C(lmax) are increased. A qualitative analysis of the flow around the various VG configurations was conducted in a low speed wind tunnel at 1.6 ft/s and a Reynolds number of approximately 3400. The results demonstrate that ramp VGs produce vortices that have the longest distance at breakdown. The VGs were also applied to a 25-in. span, 8-in. chord NACA 4415 wing section. Optimization studies were conducted on the spanwise spacing, chordwise position, and size of statically deployed VGs. The test results demonstrate a 14-percent increase in C(lmax) while increasing alpha (stall) by up to 3.

  10. Preliminary analysis of the audible noise of constant-speed, horizontal-axis wind-turbine generators

    SciTech Connect

    Keast, D. N.; Potter, R. C.

    1980-07-01

    An analytical procedure has been developed for calculating certain aerodynamic sound levels produced by large, horizontal-axis wind-turbine generators (WTG's) such as the DOE/NASA Mods-0, -0A, -1, and -2. This preliminary procedure is based upon very limited field data from the Mod-0. It postulates a noise component due to the (constant) rotation of the blades of the WTG, plus a wake-noise component that increases with the square of the power produced by the WTG. Mechanical sound from machinery, and low-frequency impulsive sounds produced by blade interaction with the wake of the support tower are not considered.

  11. Generation of ultra-low-noise optical parametric combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ping P.; Radic, Stojan

    2016-03-01

    Generation of wideband optical frequency combs requires precise balance between nonlinear photon interaction and parasitic effects. While near-octave combs can be generated in both silica and silicon waveguides, it is not always possible to suppress the noise across the operational bandwidth. Principles and challenges of noiseinhibited, tunable frequency comb generation in cavity-free parametric mixers are described and discussed.

  12. The Aeroacoustics and Aerodynamics of High-Speed Coanda Devices, Part 2: Effects of Modifications for Flow Control and Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, P. W.; Smith, C.

    1997-12-01

    The paper describes two studies of the effects of flow control devices on the aerodynamics and aeroacoustics of a high-speed Coanda flow that is formed when a supersonic jet issues from a radial nozzle and adheres to a tulip-shaped body of revolution. Shadowgraphy and other flow-visualization techniques are used to reveal the various features of the complex flow fields. The acoustic characteristics are obtained from far- and near-field measurements with an array of microphones in an anechoic chamber. First the effects of incorporating a step between the annular exit slot and the Coanda surface are investigated. The step is incorporated to ensure that the breakaway pressure is raised to a level well above the maximum operating pressure. It substantially increases the complexity of the flow field and acoustic characteristics. In particular, it promotes the generation of two groups of discrete tones. A theoretical model based on a self-generated feedback loop is proposed to explain how these tones are generated. The second study investigates the effects of replacing the annular exit slot with a saw-toothed one with the aim of eliminating the discrete tones and thereby substantially reducing the level of noise generated.

  13. Ultra-wideband noise radar based on optical waveform generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodensky, Daniel; Kravitz, Daniel; Zadok, Avi

    2012-06-01

    A microwave-photonic, ultra-wideband (UWB) noise radar system is proposed and demonstrated. The system brings together photonic generation of UWB waveforms and fiber-optic distribution. The use of UWB noise provides high ranging resolution and better immunity to interception and jamming. Distribution over fibers allows for the separation the radar-operating personnel and equipment from the location of the front-end. The noise waveforms are generated using the amplified spontaneous emission that is associated with stimulated Brillouin scattering in a standard optical fiber, or with an erbium-doped fiber amplifier. Our experiments demonstrate a proof of concept for an integrated radar system, driven by optically generated UWB noise waveforms of more than 1 GHz bandwidth that are distributed over 10 km distance. The detection of concealed metallic object and the resolving of two targets with the anticipated ranging resolution are reported.

  14. Recent results about fan noise: Its generation, radiation and suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiler, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    Fan noise including its generation, radiation characteristics, and suppression by acoustic treatment is studied. In fan noise generation, results from engine and fan experiments, using inflow control measures to suppress noise sources related to inflow distortion and turbulence, are described. The suppression of sources related to inflow allows the experiments to focus on the fan or engine internal sources. Some of the experiments incorporated pressure sensors on the fan blades to sample the flow disturbances encountered by the blades. From these data some inferences can be drawn about the origins of the disturbances. Also, hot wire measurements of a fan rotor wake field are presented and related to the fan's noise signature. The radiation and the suppression of fan noise are dependent on the acoustic modes generated by the fan. Fan noise suppression and radiation is described by relating these phenomena to the mode cutoff ratio parameter. In addition to its utility in acoustic treatment design and performance prediction, cutoff ratio was useful in developing a simple description of the radiation pattern for broadband fan noise. Some of the findings using the cutoff ratio parameter are presented.

  15. A Novel Numerical Approach for Generation and Propagation of Rotor-Stator Interaction Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Krishna

    As turbofan engine designs move towards bypass ratios ≥12 and corresponding low pressure ratios, fan rotor blade tip Mach numbers are reduced, leading to rotor-stator interaction becoming an important contributor to tonal fan noise. For future aircraft configurations employing boundary layer ingestion, non-uniform flow enters the fan. The impact of such non-uniform flows on the generation and propagation of rotor-stator interaction tones has yet to be assessed. In this thesis, a novel approach is proposed to numerically predict the generation and propagation of rotor-stator interaction noise with distorted inflow. The approach enables a 42% reduction in computational cost compared to traditional approaches employing a sliding interface between the rotor and stator. Such an interface may distort rotor wakes and can cause non-physical acoustic wave reflections if time steps are not sufficiently small. Computational costs are reduced by modelling the rotor using distributed, volumetric body forces. This eliminates the need for a sliding interface and thus allows a larger time step size. The force model responds to local flow conditions and thus can capture the effects of long-wavelength flow distortions. Since interaction noise is generated by the incidence of the rotor wakes onto the stator vanes, the key challenge is to produce the wakes using a body force field since the rotor blades are not directly modelled. It is shown that such an approach can produce wakes by concentrating the viscous forces along streamtubes in the last 15% chord. The new approach to rotor wake generation is assessed on the GE R4 fan from NASA's Source Diagnostic Test, for which the computed overall aerodynamic performance matches the experiment to within 1%. The rotor blade wakes are generated with widths in excellent agreement and depths in fair agreement with the experiment. An assessment of modal sound power levels computed in the exhaust duct indicates that this approach can be used

  16. A comparative evaluation of three types of acoustic noise generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, L. L., Jr.; Johnson, H. B., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Assessment of the operation and performance characteristics of three acoustic noise generators (a siren, an electropneumatic modulator, and an electrohydraulic modulator) when used in conjunction with a progressive wave tube. Particularly, the spectrum shaping capabilities and efficiencies of the three generators are compared.

  17. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-08-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  18. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  19. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 2: Development of theory for wing shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amiet, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    A unified theory for aerodynamics and noise of advanced turboprops is presented. The theory and a computer code developed for evaluation at the shielding benefits that might be expected by an aircraft wing in a wing-mounted propeller installation are presented. Several computed directivity patterns are presented to demonstrate the theory. Recently with the advent of the concept of using the wing of an aircraft for noise shielding, the case of diffraction by a surface in a flow has been given attention. The present analysis is based on the case of diffraction of no flow. By combining a Galilean and a Lorentz transform, the wave equation with a mean flow can be reduced to the ordinary equation. Allowance is also made in the analysis for the case of a swept wing. The same combination of Galilean and Lorentz transforms lead to a problem with no flow but a different sweep. The solution procedures for the cases of leading and trailing edges are basically the same. Two normalizations of the solution are given by the computer program. FORTRAN computer programs are presented with detailed documentation. The output from these programs compares favorably with the results of other investigators.

  20. Combustion generated noise in gas turbine combustors. [engine noise/noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.; Shivashankara, B. N.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the noise power and spectra emitted from a gas turbine combustor can exhausting to the atmosphere. Limited hot wire measurements were made of the cold flow turbulence level and spectra within the can. The fuels used were JP-4, acetone and methyl alcohol burning with air at atmospheric pressure. The experimental results show that for a fixed fuel the noise output is dominated by the airflow rate and not the fuel/air ratio. The spectra are dominated by the spectra of the cold flow turbulence spectra which were invariant with airflow rate in the experiments. The effect of fuel type on the noise power output was primarily through the heat of combustion and not the reactivity. A theory of combustion noise based upon the flame radiating to open surroundings is able to reasonably explain the observed results. A thermoacoustic efficiency for noise radiation as high as .00003 was observed in this program for JP-4 fuel. Scaling rules are presented for installed configurations.

  1. Numerical Simulations for Landing Gear Noise Generation and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Philip J.; Long, Lyle N.

    2002-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise from a landing gear in a uniform flow is computed using the Ffowcs Williams -Hawkings (FW-H) equation. The time accurate flow data on the surface is obtained using a finite volume flow solver on an unstructured and. The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation is solved using surface integrals over the landing gear surface and over a permeable surface away from the landing gear. Two geometric configurations are tested in order to assess the impact of two lateral struts on the sound level and directivity in the far-field. Predictions from the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings code are compared with direct calculations by the flow solver at several observer locations inside the computational domain. The permeable Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings surface predictions match those of the flow solver in the near-field. Far-field noise calculations coincide for both integration surfaces. The increase in drag observed between the two landing gear configurations is reflected in the sound pressure level and directivity mainly in the streamwise direction.

  2. Wake generator control of inlet flow to cancel flow distortion noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, V.; Wright, M. C. M.

    2006-08-01

    If the inlet flow to a fan is non-uniform, as is often the case for aircraft engines, then undesirable tonal noise can be generated. A number of authors have suggested using active cancellation to reduce the noise. The secondary field can either be generated by loudspeakers or by the fan itself if secondary non-uniformities are deliberately introduced into the flow. In the research reported here rods inserted radially into the duct were used to generate the secondary field. The distance by which each rod protrudes into the duct was adaptively adjusted in response to an array of in-duct microphones so as to minimise the radiated sound power, whereas previously only fixed rods have been considered. The ability of the steepest-descent algorithm to minimise in-duct sound power under suitable conditions, and hence reduce radiated sound power is demonstrated in both simulations and low Mach number experiments. It is shown how the ability of such a system to control noise depends on the number and position of the controller rods, and the number of acoustic duct modes to be controlled. Thus at low fan speed, when only one mode was present just two controllers achieved an in-duct noise reduction of 25 dB at the blade passing frequency, whereas at a higher fan speed with three modes present six controllers only achieved 2 dB. To implement such a scheme in practice, where large numbers of modes are typically present, it would be necessary to develop controller arrays with many actuators, but with low aerodynamic penalty. Such a system might also be useful in HVAC applications, or in wind-tunnel testing.

  3. The White Noise Generator programed on the Raspberry Pi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, Ken; Ham, Katie; Schock, Kris; Dowling, Patrick; Kuzell, Chaz

    2014-03-01

    A Raspberry Pi computer, running a Linux based operating system, was programmed for use as a white noise generator. The program was written to output sine waves at a specific frequency with a randomly generated phase. This function generator was programmed specifically for an ongoing undergraduate research project. This research project involves the calculation of the speed of flow through a cylindrical pipe with 128 transducers equally spaced by 0.4 inches down the length of the pipe. The inputted white noise generated serves as an effective technique to induce multiple sine waves of a given frequency to the pipe, as the sine waves are generated at a random phase. Our research group would like to thank Dr. Ken McGill for all of his help, guidance, and time with this research project. We would also like to thank Georgia College and State University for providing the materials used in this experiment.

  4. Unsteady aerodynamic force generation by a model fruit fly wing in flapping motion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mao; Tang, Jian

    2002-01-01

    A computational fluid-dynamic analysis was conducted to study the unsteady aerodynamics of a model fruit fly wing. The wing performs an idealized flapping motion that emulates the wing motion of a fruit fly in normal hovering flight. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically. The solution provides the flow and pressure fields, from which the aerodynamic forces and vorticity wake structure are obtained. Insights into the unsteady aerodynamic force generation process are gained from the force and flow-structure information. Considerable lift can be produced when the majority of the wing rotation is conducted near the end of a stroke or wing rotation precedes stroke reversal (rotation advanced), and the mean lift coefficient can be more than twice the quasi-steady value. Three mechanisms are responsible for the large lift: the rapid acceleration of the wing at the beginning of a stroke, the absence of stall during the stroke and the fast pitching-up rotation of the wing near the end of the stroke. When half the wing rotation is conducted near the end of a stroke and half at the beginning of the next stroke (symmetrical rotation), the lift at the beginning and near the end of a stroke becomes smaller because the effects of the first and third mechanisms above are reduced. The mean lift coefficient is smaller than that of the rotation-advanced case, but is still 80 % larger than the quasi-steady value. When the majority of the rotation is delayed until the beginning of the next stroke (rotation delayed), the lift at the beginning and near the end of a stroke becomes very small or even negative because the effect of the first mechanism above is cancelled and the third mechanism does not apply in this case. The mean lift coefficient is much smaller than in the other two cases.

  5. Understanding and modeling seismic noise generation and propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, L.; Stutzmann, E.; Capdeville, Y.; Farra, V.; Ardhuin, F.; Morelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic noise is the continuous oscillation of the Earth recorded worldwide, in response to the interaction amongst the atmosphere, the ocean and the solid Earth. Seismic noise spectrum is typically dominated by two main peaks at about 7 s and 14 s of period, called secondary and primary microseisms, respectively. Secondary microseisms are generated by the non-linear interaction of ocean gravity waves (Longuet-Higgins, 1950; Hasselmann, 1963), whereas primary microseisms are generated by the direct interaction between the ocean gravity waves and the seafloor, in coastal regions (Hasselmann, 1963; Ardhuin et al., 2015). Noise source location and amplitude can be derived from a realistic ocean wave model and schematized as a pressure distribution along the ocean surface. We model the amplitude of the three-components of noise spectra using normal mode summation. The fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves is the dominant signal on land-records and allows us to well estimate the amplitude of the vertical component of noise spectrum in various environments. The discrepancy between real and synthetic spectra on the horizontal components enables instead to estimate the amount of noise Love waves, for which a different source mechanism is needed. The ocean plays an important role on the amplification of seismic noise. The effect of the ocean on seismic noise is computed on Rayleigh waves using normal modes and on body waves by defining the wavefield as the superposition of plane waves. The ocean site effect varies strongly with period and ocean depth, although in different ways for body waves and for Rayleigh waves, amplifying different source regions at different periods.

  6. Digital noise generators using one-dimensional chaotic maps

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Ñonthe, J. A; Palacios-Luengas, L.; Cruz-Irisson, M.; Vazquez Medina, R.; Díaz Méndez, J. A.

    2014-05-15

    This work shows how to improve the statistical distribution of signals produced by digital noise generators designed with one-dimensional (1-D) chaotic maps. It also shows that in a digital electronic design the piecewise linear chaotic maps (PWLCM) should be considered because they do not have stability islands in its chaotic behavior region, as it occurs in the case of the logistic map, which is commonly used to build noise generators. The design and implementation problems of the digital noise generators are analyzed and a solution is proposed. This solution relates the output of PWLCM, usually defined in the real numbers' domain, with a codebook of S elements, previously defined. The proposed solution scheme produces digital noise signals with a statistical distribution close to a uniform distribution. Finally, this work shows that it is possible to have control over the statistical distribution of the noise signal by selecting the control parameter of the PWLCM and using, as a design criterion, the bifurcation diagram.

  7. Two stage low noise advanced technology fan. 1: Aerodynamic, structural, and acoustic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, H. E.; Ruschak, J. T.; Sofrin, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    A two-stage fan was designed to reduce noise 20 db below current requirements. The first-stage rotor has a design tip speed of 365.8 m/sec and a hub/tip ratio of 0.4. The fan was designed to deliver a pressure ratio of 1.9 with an adiabatic efficiency of 85.3 percent at a specific inlet corrected flow of 209.2kg/sec/sq m. Noise reduction devices include acoustically treated casing walls, a flowpath exit acoustic splitter, a translating centerbody sonic inlet device, widely spaced blade rows, and the proper ratio of blades and vanes. Multiple-circular-arc rotor airfoils, resettable stators, split outer casings, and capability to go to close blade-row spacing are also included.

  8. Aerodynamic performance investigation of advanced mechanical suppressor and ejector nozzle concepts for jet noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagenknecht, C. D.; Bediako, E. D.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced Supersonic Transport jet noise may be reduced to Federal Air Regulation limits if recommended refinements to a recently developed ejector shroud exhaust system are successfully carried out. A two-part program consisting of a design study and a subscale model wind tunnel test effort conducted to define an acoustically treated ejector shroud exhaust system for supersonic transport application is described. Coannular, 20-chute, and ejector shroud exhaust systems were evaluated. Program results were used in a mission analysis study to determine aircraft takeoff gross weight to perform a nominal design mission, under Federal Aviation Regulation (1969), Part 36, Stage 3 noise constraints. Mission trade study results confirmed that the ejector shroud was the best of the three exhaust systems studied with a significant takeoff gross weight advantage over the 20-chute suppressor nozzle which was the second best.

  9. Generation of Fullspan Leading-Edge 3D Ice Shapes for Swept-Wing Aerodynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camello, Stephanie C.; Lee, Sam; Lum, Christopher; Bragg, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The deleterious effect of ice accretion on aircraft is often assessed through dry-air flight and wind tunnel testing with artificial ice shapes. This paper describes a method to create fullspan swept-wing artificial ice shapes from partial span ice segments acquired in the NASA Glenn Icing Reserch Tunnel for aerodynamic wind-tunnel testing. Full-scale ice accretion segments were laser scanned from the Inboard, Midspan, and Outboard wing station models of the 65% scale Common Research Model (CRM65) aircraft configuration. These were interpolated and extrapolated using a weighted averaging method to generate fullspan ice shapes from the root to the tip of the CRM65 wing. The results showed that this interpolation method was able to preserve many of the highly three dimensional features typically found on swept-wing ice accretions. The interpolated fullspan ice shapes were then scaled to fit the leading edge of a 8.9% scale version of the CRM65 wing for aerodynamic wind-tunnel testing. Reduced fidelity versions of the fullspan ice shapes were also created where most of the local three-dimensional features were removed. The fullspan artificial ice shapes and the reduced fidelity versions were manufactured using stereolithography.

  10. Sediment-generated noise (SGN): Laboratory determination of measurement volume

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Passive acoustic technology has the potential to allow continuous measurement of bedload moving through streams by recording Sediment-Generated Noise (SGN) from interactions between coarse bedload particles. The technology is relatively economical and is amenable to automated operation. While the ...

  11. Rotor-generated unsteady aerodynamic interactions in a 1½ stage compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papalia, John J.

    Because High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) remains the predominant surprise failure mode in gas turbine engines, HCF avoidance design systems are utilized to identify possible failures early in the engine development process. A key requirement of these analyses is accurate determination of the aerodynamic forcing function and corresponding airfoil unsteady response. The current study expands the limited experimental database of blade row interactions necessary for calibration of predictive HCF analyses, with transonic axial-flow compressors of particular interest due to the presence of rotor leading edge shocks. The majority of HCF failures in aircraft engines occur at off-design operating conditions. Therefore, experiments focused on rotor-IGV interactions at off-design are conducted in the Purdue Transonic Research Compressor. The rotor-generated IGV unsteady aerodynamics are quantified when the IGV reset angle causes the vane trailing edge to be nearly aligned with the rotor leading edge shocks. A significant vane response to the impulsive static pressure perturbation associated with a shock is evident in the point measurements at 90% span, with details of this complex interaction revealed in the corresponding time-variant vane-to-vane flow field data. Industry wide implementation of Controlled Diffusion Airfoils (CDA) in modern compressors motivated an investigation of upstream propagating CDA rotor-generated forcing functions. Whole field velocity measurements in the reconfigured Purdue Transonic Research Compressor along the design speedline reveal steady loading had a considerable effect on the rotor shock structure. A detached rotor leading edge shock exists at low loading, with an attached leading edge and mid-chord suction surface normal shock present at nominal loading. These CDA forcing functions are 3--4 times smaller than those generated by the baseline NACA 65 rotor at their respective operating points. However, the IGV unsteady aerodynamic response to the CDA

  12. Jet Engine Noise Generation, Prediction and Control. Chapter 86

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.; Envia, Edmane

    2004-01-01

    Aircraft noise has been a problem near airports for many years. It is a quality of life issue that impacts millions of people around the world. Solving this problem has been the principal goal of noise reduction research that began when commercial jet travel became a reality. While progress has been made in reducing both airframe and engine noise, historically, most of the aircraft noise reduction efforts have concentrated on the engines. This was most evident during the 1950 s and 1960 s when turbojet engines were in wide use. This type of engine produces high velocity hot exhaust jets during takeoff generating a great deal of noise. While there are fewer commercial aircraft flying today with turbojet engines, supersonic aircraft including high performance military aircraft use engines with similar exhaust flow characteristics. The Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-229, pictured in Figure la, is an example of an engine that powers the F-15 and F-16 fighter jets. The turbofan engine was developed for subsonic transports, which in addition to better fuel efficiency also helped mitigate engine noise by reducing the jet exhaust velocity. These engines were introduced in the late 1960 s and power most of the commercial fleet today. Over the years, the bypass ratio (that is the ratio of the mass flow through the fan bypass duct to the mass flow through the engine core) has increased to values approaching 9 for modern turbofans such as the General Electric s GE-90 engine (Figure lb). The benefits to noise reduction for high bypass ratio (HPBR) engines are derived from lowering the core jet velocity and temperature, and lowering the tip speed and pressure ratio of the fan, both of which are the consequences of the increase in bypass ratio. The HBPR engines are typically very large in diameter and can produce over 100,000 pounds of thrust for the largest engines. A third type of engine flying today is the turbo-shaft which is mainly used to power turboprop aircraft and helicopters

  13. Noise generated by a propeller in a wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, P. J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Propeller performance and noise were measured on two model scale propellers operating in an anechoic flow environment with and without a wake. Wake thickness of one and three propeller chords were generated by an airfoil which spanned the full diameter of the propeller. Noise measurements were made in the relative near field of the propeller at three streamwise and three azimuthal positions. The data show that as much as 10 dB increase in the OASPL results when a wake is introduced into an operating propeller. Performance data are also presented for completeness.

  14. Noise generated by quiet engine fans. 2: Fan A. [measurement of power spectra and sideline perceived noise levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montegani, F. J.; Schaefer, J. W.; Stakolich, E. G.

    1974-01-01

    A significant effort within the NASA Quiet Engine Program has been devoted to acoustical evaluation at the Lewis Research Center noise test facility of a family of full-scale fans. This report, documents the noise results obtained with fan A - a 1.5-pressure-ratio, 1160-ft/sec-tip-speed fan. The fan is described and some aerodynamic operating data are given. Far-field noise around the fan was measured for a variety of configurations pertaining to acoustical treatment and over a range of operating conditions. Complete results of 1/3-octave band analysis of the data are presented in tabular form. Included also are power spectra and sideline perceived noise levels. Some representative 1/3-octave band data are presented graphically, and sample graphs of continuous narrow-band spectra are also provided.

  15. Screech Noise Generation From Supersonic Underexpanded Jets Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; Seasholtz, Richard G.

    2000-01-01

    Many supersonic military aircraft and some of the modern civilian aircraft (such as the Boeing 777) produce shock-associated noise. This noise is generated from the jet engine plume when the engine nozzle is operated beyond the subsonic operation limit to gain additional thrust. At these underexpanded conditions, a series of shock waves appear in the plume. The turbulent vortices present in the jet interact with the shock waves and produce the additional shock-associated noise. Screech belongs to this noise category, where sound is generated in single or multiple pure tones. The high dynamic load associated with screech can damage the tailplane. One purpose of this study at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field was to provide an accurate data base for validating various computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. These codes will be used to predict the frequency and amplitude of screech tones. A second purpose was to advance the fundamental physical understanding of how shock-turbulence interactions generate sound. Previously, experiments on shock-turbulence interaction were impossible to perform because no suitable technique was available. As one part of this program, an optical Rayleigh-scattering measurement technique was devised to overcome this difficulty.

  16. Derivation of the fundamental equation of sound generated by moving aerodynamic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, H. R.

    1983-01-01

    Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings (1969) based their derivation of the fundamental equation of the sound generated by arbitrarily moving aerodynamic surfaces on the study of mass and momentum balance of a control volume imbedding a mathematical surface(s) exactly corresponding to real surface(s). These investigators also sketched an alternative method, employing generalized functions, for its derivation. This latter method, which was later developed by Farassat (1975), is purely mathematical and formal. Goldstein (1976) used the free-space Green function to produce an implicit derivation of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation. In the study presented here, Lowson's (1965) concept of moving point singularities is generalized to moving surface singularities, and a new derivation is given of the fundamental equation. The derivation is based on topological considerations of the underlying space, the fluid medium, and the integral properties of the Dirac delta function.

  17. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 4: Computer user's manual for UAAP turboprop aeroacoustic code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menthe, R. W.; Mccolgan, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    The Unified AeroAcoustic Program (UAAP) code calculates the airloads on a single rotation prop-fan, or propeller, and couples these airloads with an acoustic radiation theory, to provide estimates of near-field or far-field noise levels. The steady airloads can also be used to calculate the nonuniform velocity components in the propeller wake. The airloads are calculated using a three dimensional compressible panel method which considers the effects of thin, cambered, multiple blades which may be highly swept. These airloads may be either steady or unsteady. The acoustic model uses the blade thickness distribution and the steady or unsteady aerodynamic loads to calculate the acoustic radiation. The users manual for the UAAP code is divided into five sections: general code description; input description; output description; system description; and error codes. The user must have access to IMSL10 libraries (MATH and SFUN) for numerous calls made for Bessel functions and matrix inversion. For plotted output users must modify the dummy calls to plotting routines included in the code to system-specific calls appropriate to the user's installation.

  18. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 4: Computer user's manual for UAAP turboprop aeroacoustic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menthe, R. W.; McColgan, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.

    1991-05-01

    The Unified AeroAcoustic Program (UAAP) code calculates the airloads on a single rotation prop-fan, or propeller, and couples these airloads with an acoustic radiation theory, to provide estimates of near-field or far-field noise levels. The steady airloads can also be used to calculate the nonuniform velocity components in the propeller wake. The airloads are calculated using a three dimensional compressible panel method which considers the effects of thin, cambered, multiple blades which may be highly swept. These airloads may be either steady or unsteady. The acoustic model uses the blade thickness distribution and the steady or unsteady aerodynamic loads to calculate the acoustic radiation. The users manual for the UAAP code is divided into five sections: general code description; input description; output description; system description; and error codes. The user must have access to IMSL10 libraries (MATH and SFUN) for numerous calls made for Bessel functions and matrix inversion. For plotted output users must modify the dummy calls to plotting routines included in the code to system-specific calls appropriate to the user's installation.

  19. On the precise implications of acoustic analogies for aerodynamic noise at low Mach numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalart, Philippe R.

    2013-05-01

    We seek a clear statement of the scaling which may be expected with rigour for transportation or other noise at low Mach numbers M, based on Lighthill's and Curle's theories of 1952 and 1955. In the presence of compact solid bodies, the leading term in the acoustic intensity is of order M6. Contrary to the belief held since that time that it is of order M8, the contribution of quadrupoles, in the presence of dipoles, is of order only M7. Retarded-time-difference effects are also of order M7. Curle's widely used approximation based on unsteady forces neglects both effects. Its order of accuracy is thus lower than was thought, and the common estimates of the value of M below which it applies appear precarious. The M6 leading term is modified by powers up to the fourth of (1-Mr), where Mr is the relative Mach number between source and observer; at speeds of interest the effect is several dB. However, this is only one of the corrections of order M7, which makes its value debatable. The same applies to the difference between emission distance and reception distance. The scaling with M6 is theoretically correct to leading order, but this prediction may be so convincing, like the M8 scaling for jet noise, that some authors rush to confirm it when their measurements are in conflict with it. We survey experimental studies of landing-gear noise, and argue that the observed power of M is often well below 6. We also object to comparisons across Mach numbers at fixed frequency; they should be made at fixed Strouhal number St instead. Finally, the compact-source argument does not only require M≪1; it requires MSt≪1. This is more restrictive if the relevant St is well above 1, a situation which can be caused by interference with a boundary or by wake impingement, among other effects. The best length scales to define St for this purpose are discussed.

  20. Noise generated by flow through large butterfly valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Ronald G.

    1987-01-01

    A large butterfly valve (1.37 m diam) was acoustically tested to measure the noise generated and propagating in both the upstream and downstream directions. The experimental investigation used wall mounted pressure transducers to measure the fluctuating component of the pipe static pressure upstream and downstream of the valve. Microphones upstream of the pipe inlet and located in a plenum were used to measure the noise radiated from the valve in the upstream direction. Comparison of the wall pressure downstream of the valve to a prediction were made. Reasonable agreement was obtained with the valve operating at a choked condition. The noise upstream of the valve is 30 dB less than that measured downstream.

  1. A compact, multichannel, and low noise arbitrary waveform generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorkov, S.; Ivanov, B. I.; Il'ichev, E.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2014-05-01

    A new type of high functionality, fast, compact, and easy programmable arbitrary waveform generator for low noise physical measurements is presented. The generator provides 7 fast differential waveform channels with a maximum bandwidth up to 200 MHz frequency. There are 6 fast pulse generators on the generator board with 78 ps time resolution in both duration and delay, 3 of them with amplitude control. The arbitrary waveform generator is additionally equipped with two auxiliary slow 16 bit analog-to-digital converters and four 16 bit digital-to-analog converters for low frequency applications. Electromagnetic shields are introduced to the power supply, digital, and analog compartments and with a proper filter design perform more than 110 dB digital noise isolation to the output signals. All the output channels of the board have 50 Ω SubMiniature version A termination. The generator board is suitable for use as a part of a high sensitive physical equipment, e.g., fast read out and manipulation of nuclear magnetic resonance or superconducting quantum systems and any other application, which requires electromagnetic interference free fast pulse and arbitrary waveform generation.

  2. A compact, multichannel, and low noise arbitrary waveform generator.

    PubMed

    Govorkov, S; Ivanov, B I; Il'ichev, E; Meyer, H-G

    2014-05-01

    A new type of high functionality, fast, compact, and easy programmable arbitrary waveform generator for low noise physical measurements is presented. The generator provides 7 fast differential waveform channels with a maximum bandwidth up to 200 MHz frequency. There are 6 fast pulse generators on the generator board with 78 ps time resolution in both duration and delay, 3 of them with amplitude control. The arbitrary waveform generator is additionally equipped with two auxiliary slow 16 bit analog-to-digital converters and four 16 bit digital-to-analog converters for low frequency applications. Electromagnetic shields are introduced to the power supply, digital, and analog compartments and with a proper filter design perform more than 110 dB digital noise isolation to the output signals. All the output channels of the board have 50 Ω SubMiniature version A termination. The generator board is suitable for use as a part of a high sensitive physical equipment, e.g., fast read out and manipulation of nuclear magnetic resonance or superconducting quantum systems and any other application, which requires electromagnetic interference free fast pulse and arbitrary waveform generation.

  3. A compact, multichannel, and low noise arbitrary waveform generator

    SciTech Connect

    Govorkov, S.; Ivanov, B. I.; Il'ichev, E.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2014-05-15

    A new type of high functionality, fast, compact, and easy programmable arbitrary waveform generator for low noise physical measurements is presented. The generator provides 7 fast differential waveform channels with a maximum bandwidth up to 200 MHz frequency. There are 6 fast pulse generators on the generator board with 78 ps time resolution in both duration and delay, 3 of them with amplitude control. The arbitrary waveform generator is additionally equipped with two auxiliary slow 16 bit analog-to-digital converters and four 16 bit digital-to-analog converters for low frequency applications. Electromagnetic shields are introduced to the power supply, digital, and analog compartments and with a proper filter design perform more than 110 dB digital noise isolation to the output signals. All the output channels of the board have 50 Ω SubMiniature version A termination. The generator board is suitable for use as a part of a high sensitive physical equipment, e.g., fast read out and manipulation of nuclear magnetic resonance or superconducting quantum systems and any other application, which requires electromagnetic interference free fast pulse and arbitrary waveform generation.

  4. Aerodynamic Stability and Performance of Next-Generation Parachutes for Mars Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonyea, Keir C.; Tanner, Christopher L.; Clark, Ian G.; Kushner, Laura K.; Schairer, Edward T.; Braun, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Project is developing a next-generation supersonic parachute for use on future Mars missions. In order to determine the new parachute configuration, a wind tunnel test was conducted at the National Full-scale Aerodynamics Complex 80- by 120-foot Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center. The goal of the wind tunnel test was to quantitatively determine the aerodynamic stability and performance of various canopy configurations in order to help select the design to be flown on the Supersonic Flight Dynamics tests. Parachute configurations included the diskgap- band, ringsail, and ringsail-variant designs referred to as a disksail and starsail. During the wind tunnel test, digital cameras captured synchronized image streams of the parachute from three directions. Stereo hotogrammetric processing was performed on the image data to track the position of the vent of the canopy throughout each run. The position data were processed to determine the geometric angular history of the parachute, which were then used to calculate the total angle of attack and its derivatives at each instant in time. Static and dynamic moment coefficients were extracted from these data using a parameter estimation method involving the one-dimensional equation of motion for a rotation of parachute. The coefficients were calculated over all of the available canopy states to reconstruct moment coefficient curves as a function of total angle of attack. From the stability curves, useful metrics such as the trim total angle of attack and pitch stiffness at the trim angle could be determined. These stability metrics were assessed in the context of the parachute's drag load and geometric porosity. While there was generally an inverse relationship between the drag load and the stability of the canopy, the data showed that it was possible to obtain similar stability properties as the disk-gap-band with slightly higher drag loads by appropriately tailoring the

  5. Two-stage, low noise advanced technology fan. 4: Aerodynamic final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harley, K. G.; Keenan, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    A two-stage research fan was tested to provide technology for designing a turbofan engine for an advanced, long range commercial transport having a cruise Mach number of 0.85 -0.9 and a noise level 20 EPNdB below current requirements. The fan design tip speed was 365.8m/sec (1200ft/sec);the hub/tip ratio was 0.4; the design pressure ratio was 1.9; and the design specific flow was 209.2 kg/sec/sq m(42.85lbm/sec/sq ft). Two fan-versions were tested: a baseline configuration, and an acoustically treated configuration with a sonic inlet device. The baseline version was tested with uniform inlet flow and with tip-radial and hub-radial inlet flow distortions. The baseline fan with uniform inlet flow attained an efficiency of 86.4% at design speed, but the stall margin was low. Tip-radial distortion increased stall margin 4 percentage points at design speed and reduced peak efficiency one percentage point. Hub-radial distortion decreased stall margin 4 percentage points at all speeds and reduced peak efficiency at design speed 8 percentage points. At design speed, the sonic inlet in the cruise position reduced stall margin one percentage point and efficiency 1.5 to 4.5 percentage points. The sonic inlet in the approach position reduced stall margin 2 percentage points.

  6. 21 CFR 874.1120 - Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing... noise generator for audiometric testing. (a) Identification. An electronic noise generator for audiometric testing is a device that consists of a swept frequency generator, an amplifier, and an...

  7. 21 CFR 874.1120 - Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing... noise generator for audiometric testing. (a) Identification. An electronic noise generator for audiometric testing is a device that consists of a swept frequency generator, an amplifier, and an...

  8. 21 CFR 874.1120 - Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing... noise generator for audiometric testing. (a) Identification. An electronic noise generator for audiometric testing is a device that consists of a swept frequency generator, an amplifier, and an...

  9. 21 CFR 874.1120 - Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing... noise generator for audiometric testing. (a) Identification. An electronic noise generator for audiometric testing is a device that consists of a swept frequency generator, an amplifier, and an...

  10. 21 CFR 874.1120 - Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing... noise generator for audiometric testing. (a) Identification. An electronic noise generator for audiometric testing is a device that consists of a swept frequency generator, an amplifier, and an...

  11. Perceptual learning of acoustic noise generates memory-evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Andrillon, Thomas; Kouider, Sid; Agus, Trevor; Pressnitzer, Daniel

    2015-11-02

    Experience continuously imprints on the brain at all stages of life. The traces it leaves behind can produce perceptual learning [1], which drives adaptive behavior to previously encountered stimuli. Recently, it has been shown that even random noise, a type of sound devoid of acoustic structure, can trigger fast and robust perceptual learning after repeated exposure [2]. Here, by combining psychophysics, electroencephalography (EEG), and modeling, we show that the perceptual learning of noise is associated with evoked potentials, without any salient physical discontinuity or obvious acoustic landmark in the sound. Rather, the potentials appeared whenever a memory trace was observed behaviorally. Such memory-evoked potentials were characterized by early latencies and auditory topographies, consistent with a sensory origin. Furthermore, they were generated even on conditions of diverted attention. The EEG waveforms could be modeled as standard evoked responses to auditory events (N1-P2) [3], triggered by idiosyncratic perceptual features acquired through learning. Thus, we argue that the learning of noise is accompanied by the rapid formation of sharp neural selectivity to arbitrary and complex acoustic patterns, within sensory regions. Such a mechanism bridges the gap between the short-term and longer-term plasticity observed in the learning of noise [2, 4-6]. It could also be key to the processing of natural sounds within auditory cortices [7], suggesting that the neural code for sound source identification will be shaped by experience as well as by acoustics.

  12. Active Control of Fan-Generated Tone Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment to control the noise radiated from the inlet of a ducted fan using a time domain active adaptive system. The control ,sound source consists of loudspeakers arranged in a ring around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same, when the dominant wave in the duct is a plane wave. The presence of higher order modes in the duct reduces the noise reduction efficiency, particularly near the mode cut-on where the standing wave component is strong, but the control system converges stably. The control system is stable and converges when the first circumferential mode is generated in the duct. The control system is found to reduce the fan noise in the far field on an arc around the fan inlet by as much as 20 dB with none of the sound amplification associated with mode spillover.

  13. A Study of Trailing Edge Blowing as a Means of Reducing Noise Generated by the Interaction of Flow with a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, T. D.; Pinkel, B.; Wilby, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    A system for reducing the noise generated when a jet impinges against a flap is described. The eddies formed by the alternate zones of positive and negative pressure on the flap surface are identified as the sound source. In the proposed concept, a stream of low velocity secondary air is ejected from a slot near the trailing edge of the flap as a buffer between the flap and the primary air jet to reduce the intensity of the fluctuating surface pressure field near the flap edge and thus reduce the intensity of the aerodynamic noise.

  14. Statistical Analysis and Computer Generation of Spatially Correlated Acoustic Noise (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    this paper, we describe an approach for generating simulated acoustic noise with a spatial correlation coefficient distribution and maximum extreme... correlation coefficient and MEV distributions which drive the computer generation of a large number of simulated acoustic noise signals.

  15. Social Noise: Generating Random Numbers from Twitter Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Norberto; Quintas, Fernando; Sánchez, Luis; Arias, Jesús

    2015-12-01

    Due to the multiple applications of random numbers in computer systems (cryptography, online gambling, computer simulation, etc.) it is important to have mechanisms to generate these numbers. True Random Number Generators (TRNGs) are commonly used for this purpose. TRNGs rely on non-deterministic sources to generate randomness. Physical processes (like noise in semiconductors, quantum phenomenon, etc.) play this role in state of the art TRNGs. In this paper, we depart from previous work and explore the possibility of defining social TRNGs using the stream of public messages of the microblogging service Twitter as randomness source. Thus, we define two TRNGs based on Twitter stream information and evaluate them using the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) statistical test suite. The results of the evaluation confirm the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  16. Analytical Studies of Boundary Layer Generated Aircraft Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, M. S.; Shah, P. L.

    1997-01-01

    An analysis is made of the "interior noise" produced by high, subsonic turbulent flow over a thin elastic plate partitioned into "panels" by straight edges transverse to the mean flow direction. This configuration models a section of an aircraft fuselage that may be regarded as locally flat. The analytical problem can be solved in closed form to represent the acoustic radiation in terms of prescribed turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations. Two cases are considered: (i) the production of sound at an isolated panel edge (i.e., in the approximation in which the correlation between sound and vibrations generated at neighboring edges is neglected), and (ii) the sound generated by a periodic arrangement of identical panels. The latter problem is amenable to exact analytical treatment provided the panel edge conditions are the same for all panels. Detailed predictions of the interior noise depend on a knowledge of the turbulent boundary layer wall pressure spectrum, and are given here in terms of an empirical spectrum proposed by Laganelli and Wolfe. It is expected that these analytical representations of the sound generated by simplified models of fluid-structure interactions can used to validate more general numerical schemes.

  17. Computation of Tone Noises Generated in Viscous Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Three benchmark problems from the current and previous CAA workshops involving tone noise generated in viscous flows are investigated using the CE/SE finite volume method. The CE/SE method is first briefly reviewed. Then, the benchmark problems, namely, flow past a single cylinder (CAA Workshop II problem), flow past twin cylinders (from the current CAA Workshop IV, Category 5, Problem 1) and flow past a deep cavity with overhang (CAA Workshop III problem) are investigated. Generally good results are obtained in comparison with the experimental data.

  18. Effects of Geometric Details on Slat Noise Generation and Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Lockard, David P.

    2009-01-01

    The relevance of geometric details to the generation and propagation of noise from leading-edge slats is considered. Typically, such details are omitted in computational simulations and model-scale experiments thereby creating ambiguities in comparisons with acoustic results from flight tests. The current study uses two-dimensional, computational simulations in conjunction with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) solver to investigate the effects of previously neglected slat "bulb" and "blade" seals on the local flow field and the associated acoustic radiation. The computations show that the presence of the "blade" seal at the cusp in the simulated geometry significantly changes the slat cove flow dynamics, reduces the amplitudes of the radiated sound, and to a lesser extent, alters the directivity beneath the airfoil. Furthermore, the computations suggest that a modest extension of the baseline "blade" seal further enhances the suppression of slat noise. As a side issue, the utility and equivalence of FW-H methodology for calculating far-field noise as opposed to a more direct approach is examined and demonstrated.

  19. Effects of Geometric Details on Slat Noise Generation and Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Lockhard, David P.

    2006-01-01

    The relevance of geometric details to the generation and propagation of noise from leading-edge slats is considered. Typically, such details are omitted in computational simulations and model-scale experiments thereby creating ambiguities in comparisons with acoustic results from flight tests. The current study uses two-dimensional, computational simulations in conjunction with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) solver to investigate the effects of previously neglected slat "bulb" and "blade" seals on the local flow field and the associated acoustic radiation. The computations clearly show that the presence of the "blade" seal at the cusp significantly changes the slat cove flow dynamics, reduces the amplitudes of the radiated sound, and to a lesser extent, alters the directivity beneath the airfoil. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a modest extension of the baseline "blade" seal further enhances the suppression of slat noise. As a side issue, the utility and equivalence of FW-H methodology for calculating far-field noise as opposed to a more direct approach is examined and demonstrated.

  20. Aerodynamic Noise and Suppressors,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-29

    not only disturbs people, it also excites the chickens and dogs, causes milk cows to stop producing milk , and pigs, horses, and cows to be affected...Figure 3.34, when the distance between holes is greater than the diameter of the holes, the acoustic impedance per area a is ZA - r, + llaMA , (3. 1)9

  1. Effect of wing-wake interaction on aerodynamic force generation on a 2D flapping wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lua, K. B.; Lim, T. T.; Yeo, K. S.

    2011-07-01

    This paper is motivated by the works of Dickinson et al. (Science 284:1954-1960, 1999) and Sun and Tang (J Exp Biol 205:55-70, 2002) which provided two different perspectives on the influence of wing-wake interaction (or wake capture) on lift generation during flapping motion. Dickinson et al. (Science 284:1954-1960, 1999) hypothesize that wake capture is responsible for the additional lift generated at the early phase of each stroke, while Sun and Tang (J Exp Biol 205:55-70, 2002) believe otherwise. Here, we take a more fundamental approach to study the effect of wing-wake interaction on the aerodynamic force generation by carrying out simultaneous force and flow field measurements on a two-dimensional wing subjected to two different types of motion. In one of the motions, the wing at a fixed angle of attack was made to follow a motion profile described by "acceleration-constant velocity-deceleration". Here, the wing was first linearly accelerated from rest to a predetermined maximum velocity and remains at that speed for set duration before linearly decelerating to a stop. The acceleration and deceleration phase each accounted for only 10% of the stroke, and the stroke covered a total distance of three chord lengths. In another motion, the wing was subjected to the same above-mentioned movement, but in a back and forth manner over twenty strokes. Results show that there are two possible outcomes of wing-wake interaction. The first outcome occurs when the wing encounters a pair of counter-rotating wake vortices on the reverse stroke, and the induced velocity of these vortices impinges directly on the windward side of the wing, resulting in a higher oncoming flow to the wing, which translates into a higher lift. Another outcome is when the wing encounters one vortex on the reverse stroke, and the close proximity of this vortex to the windward surface of the wing, coupled with the vortex suction effect (caused by low pressure region at the center of the vortex

  2. Generation of the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle Aerodynamic Data Book and Comparison To Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Steven X.; Krist, Steven E.; Compton, William B.

    2011-01-01

    A 3.5-year effort to characterize the aerodynamic behavior of the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle (AIX FTV) is described in this paper. The AIX FTV was designed to be representative of the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV). While there are several differences in the outer mold line from the current revision of the CLV, the overall length, mass distribution, and flight systems of the two vehicles are very similar. This paper briefly touches on each of the aerodynamic databases developed in the program, describing the methodology employed, experimental and computational contributions to the generation of the databases, and how well the databases and underlying computations compare to actual flight test results.

  3. The development of technologies and devices for protection from noise generated by power equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, V. E.; Khomenok, L. A.; Yablonik, L. R.

    2010-01-01

    The main lines of currently conducted research and development activities on suppressing noise produced by power-generating equipment are presented. Matters related to preventing the occurrence of aeroacoustic self-excited vibrations, optimizing dissipative noise silencers, using structural methods for damping acoustic vibrations, suppressing low-frequency noise, and analyzing the effectiveness of soundproof coatings are considered. The process diagrams and parameters of devices for suppressing noise generated during discharge into the atmosphere of high-pressure gaseous media are discussed.

  4. An investigation of in-flight near-field propeller noise generation and transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneau, H.; Wilford, D. F.; Wood, L. K.

    1985-02-01

    In flight near field propeller noise measurements, made on a General Aviation turboprop aircraft, are reported for a range of propeller operating conditions, and are shown to be well defined and reproducible. Measurements have been made at 8 exterior microphones, 2 located on a wing mounted boom, and 6 embedded in, and flush with the aircraft fuselage. Interior noise levels are also presented. Measured propeller harmonic levels are compared to first principle calculations of near field noise, using a modified version of the Farassat computer program, in which the blade surface pressure is described using the known aerodynamic properties of the blade (NACA 16) airfoil sections. The first few; i.e., the dominant harmonic levels of propeller noise are shown to be well predicted, while higher harmonic levels are underpredicted. The transmission loss between exterior and interior noise levels is shown to be relatively constant for varying propeller operating conditions and at two different locations along the length of the fuselage. Interior noise levels are also shown for the aircraft in gliding flight at various forward velocities, with both engines at idle and propellers feathered. A method of interpolating these measurements is discussed, which allows the interior noise due only to the forward velocity of the aircraft, to be determined. The transmission loss for this component is also discussed. Finally, interior noise levels are presented for a series of ground static tests with engine mounts of various different stiffnessses.

  5. The generation of diesel exhaust particle aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric particles

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Daniel J; Hickey, Anthony J

    2008-01-01

    The influence of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the lungs and heart is currently a topic of great interest in inhalation toxicology. Epidemiological data and animal studies have implicated airborne particulate matter and DEP in increased morbidity and mortality due to a number of cardiopulmonary diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and lung cancer. The pathogeneses of these diseases are being studied using animal models and cell culture techniques. Real-time exposures to freshly combusted diesel fuel are complex and require significant infrastructure including engine operations, dilution air, and monitoring and control of gases. A method of generating DEP aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric DEP would be a desirable and useful alternative. Metered dose inhaler technology was adopted to generate aerosols from suspensions of DEP in the propellant hydrofluoroalkane 134a. Inertial impaction data indicated that the particle size distributions of the generated aerosols were trimodal, with count median aerodynamic diameters less than 100 nm. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited particles showed tightly aggregated particles, as would be expected from an evaporative process. Chemical analysis indicated that there were no major changes in the mass proportion of 2 specific aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[k]fluoranthene) in the particles resulting from the aerosolization process. PMID:19337412

  6. NASA powered lift facility internally generated noise and its transmission to the acoustic far field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Ronald G.

    1988-01-01

    Noise tests of NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility (PLF) were performed to determine the frequency content of the internally generated noise that reaches the far field. The sources of the internally generated noise are the burner, elbows, valves, and flow turbulence. Tests over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 1.2 to 3.5 using coherence analysis revealed that low frequency noise below 1200 Hz is transmitted through the nozzle. Broad banded peaks at 240 and 640 Hz were found in the transmitted noise. Aeroacoustic excitation effects are possible in this frequency range. The internal noise creates a noise floor that limits the amount of jet noise suppression that can be measured on the PLF and similar facilities.

  7. Measurement of aeroacoustic noise generated on wind turbine blades modified by trailing edge brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asheim, Michael J.

    As wind technology becomes a larger portion of the energy production picture, the problematic interactions between the machines and society will continue to become more pronounced. Of these problems, wind turbine noise is one of the most important to the future of wind turbine development. This study looks at the effect trailing edge brushes mounted on the 2 bladed Controls Advance Research Turbine (CART 2), located at the National Wind Technology Center, have on the overall acoustic and aerodynamic performance of the blades. The use of trailing edge brushes reduced the aeroacoustic noise by 1.0 to 5.0 dB over the baseline blade, depending on wind speed. This acoustic performance comes at a cost to the aerodynamic performance of the blades. The aerodynamic performance indicators, such as turbine power and root bending moments show that increased drag due to the brushes is the main contributor to the reduction in power production. An economic analysis also investigated how to best use noise mitigation devices to optimize acoustic, power performance and loads of a 600 kW baseline turbine, such as the CART 2. The analysis shows that the use of up a noise mitigation device of 4 dB is best used by increasing the rotor diameter and the power rating of the machine, from a 43.3 m diameter, 600 kW machine to a 68.8 m diameter, 886.7 kW machine. This increase resulted in an annual energy production increase of 414% when using a Rayleigh wind distribution with at a mean annual wind speed of 8.5 m/s. This is a reduction of cost of energy from 0.0463 per kWh to 0.0422 kWh. This reduction in energy production costs helps to explain the continuing trend of turbine machine growth in both rotor diameter and power rating.

  8. Background noise measurements on prototype of SNR 300 steam generator at Hengelo

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.A.; Meyer, G.J.A.M.; Ahlgren, F.F.; Van Westerbrugge, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic noise amplitudes were measured in a 50 MW helical coil prototype of a steam generator mounted in the Hengelo test facility in a joint technical program betwen GE/DOE and TNO/NERATOOM. Background noise measurements were completed with test conditions ranging from quiescent (with no sodium or water flow) to high thermal power transfer from the sodium circuit to the water circuit. The acoustic noise pressure on the vessel wall was measured using externally mounted accelerometers. Data were obtained for the effect of sodium flow rate on the acoustic noise amplitude. A preliminary correlation was derived for the acoustic noise generated by nucleate boiling. Leak detection and location were demonstrated.

  9. The way to decrease efficiently the noises generated by the jets of passenger aircrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. M.

    2010-01-01

    The modern state of the problem of how to decrease aviation noise is examined. It is pointed out that in order to meet the tightened standards on noise for passenger aircrafts it is necessary to use efficient ways to decrease the noise generated by turbojet engines. The experimental results permitting us to decrease the noise generated by the jets are presented. The results have been obtained at the TsAGI dead chamber. The acoustic efficiency of the ways decreasing the noise generated by the jets is determined. The noise is decreased by using the nozzles with chevron cuts made in the lateral walls by varying parameters of the bypass nozzle via varying the nozzle’s disposition of primary and outer flows, by placing the ejector’s noise-suppressing nozzle and by organizing the gas “thermal-acoustical” screen near the jet exhaust.

  10. Hot and cold body reference noise generators from 0 to 40 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornbostel, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    This article describes the design, development, and analysis of exceptionally accurate radiometric noise generators from 0-40 GHz to serve as standard references. Size, weight, power, and reliability are optimized to meet the requirements of NASA air- and space-borne radiometers. The radiometric noise temperature of these noise generators is, unavoidably, calculated from measured values rather than measured directly. The absolute accuracy and stability are equal to or better than those of reliable standards available for comparison. A noise generator has been developed whose measurable properties (VSWR, line loss, thermometric temperatures) have been optimized in order to minimize the effects of the uncertainty in the calculated radiometric noise temperatures. Each measurable property is evaluated and analyzed to determine the effects of the uncertainty of the measured value. Unmeasurable properties (primarily temperature gradients) are analyzed, and reasonable precautions are designed into the noise generator to guarantee that the uncertainty of the value remains within tolerable limits.

  11. Noise generated by impingement of a jet upon a large flat board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W. A.; Miles, J. H.; Dorsch, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Data were obtained on the noise generated by an air jet impinging on a large flat board. The board was large enough so that the flow leaving the edges of the board generated no significant noise. The impingement angle, nozzle shape and size, jet velocity, and the distance from the nozzle to the board were varied in the experiment. Far-field noise data are presented. The nozzle-alone noise contribution to the total noise was generally small and was subtracted from the total, leaving the impingement-only noise. The impingement-only noise was adequately correlated by eighth power of the peak impingement velocity and first power of the impingement area. The spectral data were correlated by a Strouhal number based on the peak impingement velocity and a characteristic impingement diameter.

  12. Modelling of noise-like pulses generated in fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Sergey; Kobtsev, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    The present paper for the first time proposes and studies a relatively simple model of noise-like pulses that matches the experimental data well and suggests that there is a correlation between phases of adjacent spectral components of noiselike pulses. Comparison of a relatively basic model of `random' pulses with the results of noise-like pulse modelling in mode-locked fibre lasers based on coupled non-linear Schrödinger equations demonstrates that it adequately reproduces temporal and spectral properties of noise-like pulses as well as correlation between adjacent modes so that it's possible to use the proposed model for highly efficient simulations of promising applications of noise-like pulses, such as material processing, non-linear frequency conversion, microscopy, and others.

  13. Broadband Fan Noise Generated by Small Scale Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glegg, Stewart A. L.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the development of prediction methods for broadband fan noise from aircraft engines. First, experimental evidence of the most important source mechanisms is reviewed. It is found that there are a number of competing source mechanism involved and that there is no single dominant source to which noise control procedures can be applied. Theoretical models are then developed for: (1) ducted rotors and stator vanes interacting with duct wall boundary layers, (2) ducted rotor self noise, and (3) stator vanes operating in the wakes of rotors. All the turbulence parameters required for these models are based on measured quantities. Finally the theoretical models are used to predict measured fan noise levels with some success.

  14. Multiple pure tone noise generated by fans at supersonic tip speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofrin, T. G.; Pickett, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    The existence of clusters of pure tones at integral multiples of shaft speed has been noted for supersonic-tip-speed operation of fans and compressors. A continuing program to explore this phenomenon, often called combination-tone noise, has been in effect for several years. This paper reviews the research program, which involves a wide range of engines, compressor rigs, and special apparatus. Elements of the aerodynamics of the blade-associated shock waves are outlined and causes of blade-to-blade shock inequalities, responsible for the multiple tones, are described.

  15. Numerical generation of laser-resonance phase noise for optical communication simulators.

    PubMed

    Ó Dúill, Seán P; Anthur, Aravind P; Huynh, Tam N; Naimi, Sepideh T; Nguyen, Lim; Venkitesh, Deepa; Barry, Liam P

    2015-04-10

    We generate random numerical waveforms that mimic laser phase noise incorporating laser-resonance enhanced phase noise. The phase noise waveforms are employed in system simulators to estimate the resulting bit error rate penalties for differential quadrature phase shift keying signals. The results show that baudrate dependence of the bit error rate performance arises from laser-resonance phase noise. In addition, we show with supporting experimental results that the laser-resonance phase noise on the pumps in four-wave-mixing-based wavelength converters is responsible for large bit error rate floors.

  16. A comparative numerical analysis of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic sound generation by vortex disturbances in homentropic constant shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, Jan-Niklas Oberlack, Martin; Chagelishvili, George; Khujadze, George; Tevzadze, Alexander

    2015-12-15

    Aerodynamic sound generation in shear flows is investigated in the light of the breakthrough in hydrodynamics stability theory in the 1990s, where generic phenomena of non-normal shear flow systems were understood. By applying the thereby emerged short-time/non-modal approach, the sole linear mechanism of wave generation by vortices in shear flows was captured [G. D. Chagelishvili, A. Tevzadze, G. Bodo, and S. S. Moiseev, “Linear mechanism of wave emergence from vortices in smooth shear flows,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3178-3181 (1997); B. F. Farrell and P. J. Ioannou, “Transient and asymptotic growth of two-dimensional perturbations in viscous compressible shear flow,” Phys. Fluids 12, 3021-3028 (2000); N. A. Bakas, “Mechanism underlying transient growth of planar perturbations in unbounded compressible shear flow,” J. Fluid Mech. 639, 479-507 (2009); and G. Favraud and V. Pagneux, “Superadiabatic evolution of acoustic and vorticity perturbations in Couette flow,” Phys. Rev. E 89, 033012 (2014)]. Its source is the non-normality induced linear mode-coupling, which becomes efficient at moderate Mach numbers that is defined for each perturbation harmonic as the ratio of the shear rate to its characteristic frequency. Based on the results by the non-modal approach, we investigate a two-dimensional homentropic constant shear flow and focus on the dynamical characteristics in the wavenumber plane. This allows to separate from each other the participants of the dynamical processes — vortex and wave modes — and to estimate the efficacy of the process of linear wave-generation. This process is analyzed and visualized on the example of a packet of vortex modes, localized in both, spectral and physical, planes. Further, by employing direct numerical simulations, the wave generation by chaotically distributed vortex modes is analyzed and the involved linear and nonlinear processes are identified. The generated acoustic field is anisotropic in the wavenumber

  17. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Tests of a 1/15 Scale Model Dry Cooled Jet Aircraft Runup Noise Suppression System,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    Temperature Contours for the Obround Augmenter with the Jet Centered (Position a, yp = 1.0) and Deflected Downward 3.60 165 Figure 7.3- 16 . Maximum Mixed...Acoustic Tests -8- r7 FLUIDYNE ENGINEERING CORPORATION I 2.0.3 Aero-Thermal Testing (Test Series 13 through 16 ) I The aero-thermal testing, Figure...Excessive Augmenter Exit Flow Noise Noise One Engine at Two Engines at Criteria Max. RPM Max. RPM at 250 ft. AA/ANT a AA/A NT 95 dBA 18 16 85 dBA 24

  18. Auralization Architectures for NASA?s Next Generation Aircraft Noise Prediction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Lopes, Leonard V.; Burley, Casey L.; Aumann, Aric R.

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft community noise is a significant concern due to continued growth in air traffic, increasingly stringent environmental goals, and operational limitations imposed by airport authorities. The assessment of human response to noise from future aircraft can only be afforded through laboratory testing using simulated flyover noise. Recent work by the authors demonstrated the ability to auralize predicted flyover noise for a state-of-the-art reference aircraft and a future hybrid wing body aircraft concept. This auralization used source noise predictions from NASA's Aircraft NOise Prediction Program (ANOPP) as input. The results from this process demonstrated that auralization based upon system noise predictions is consistent with, and complementary to, system noise predictions alone. To further develop and validate the auralization process, improvements to the interfaces between the synthesis capability and the system noise tools are required. This paper describes the key elements required for accurate noise synthesis and introduces auralization architectures for use with the next-generation ANOPP (ANOPP2). The architectures are built around a new auralization library and its associated Application Programming Interface (API) that utilize ANOPP2 APIs to access data required for auralization. The architectures are designed to make the process of auralizing flyover noise a common element of system noise prediction.

  19. Practical quantum random number generator based on measuring the shot noise of vacuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yong; Tian, Liang; Zou, Hongxin

    2010-06-01

    The shot noise of vacuum states is a kind of quantum noise and is totally random. In this paper a nondeterministic random number generation scheme based on measuring the shot noise of vacuum states is presented and experimentally demonstrated. We use a homodyne detector to measure the shot noise of vacuum states. Considering that the frequency bandwidth of our detector is limited, we derive the optimal sampling rate so that sampling points have the least correlation with each other. We also choose a method to extract random numbers from sampling values, and prove that the influence of classical noise can be avoided with this method so that the detector does not have to be shot-noise limited. The random numbers generated with this scheme have passed ent and diehard tests.

  20. Teledyne H1RG, H2RG, and H4RG Noise Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes the near-infrared detector system noise generator (NG) that we wrote for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec). NG simulates many important noise components including; (1) white "read noise," (2) residual bias drifts, (3) pink $1/f$ noise, (4) alternating column noise, and (5) picture frame noise. By adjusting the input parameters, NG can simulate noise for Teledyne's H1RG, H2RG, and H4RG detectors with and without Teledyne's SIDECAR ASIC IR array controller. NG can be used as a starting point for simulating astronomical scenes by adding dark current, scattered light, and astronomical sources into the results from NG. NG is written in Python-3.4. The source code is freely available for download from http://jwst.nasa.gov/publications.html.

  1. Teledyne H1RG, H2RG, and H4RG Noise Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the near-infrared detector system noise generator (NG) that we wrote for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec). NG simulates many important noise components including; (1) white "read noise", (2) residual bias drifts, (3) pink 1/f noise, (4) alternating column noise, and (5) picture frame noise. By adjusting the input parameters, NG can simulate noise for Teledyne's H1RG, H2RG, and H4RG detectors with and without Teledyne's SIDECAR ASIC IR array controller. NG can be used as a starting point for simulating astronomical scenes by adding dark current, scattered light, and astronomical sources into the results from NG. NG is written in Python-3.4.

  2. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 5: Propagation of propeller tone noise through a fuselage boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magliozzi, B.; Hanson, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of tone noise propagation through a boundary layer and fuselage scattering effects was derived. This analysis is a three dimensional and the complete wave field is solved by matching analytical expressions for the incident and scattered waves in the outer flow to a numerical solution in the boundary layer flow. The outer wave field is constructed analytically from an incident wave appropriate to the source and a scattered wave in the standard Hankel function form. For the incident wave, an existing function - domain propeller noise radiation theory is used. In the boundary layer region, the wave equation is solved by numerical methods. The theoretical analysis is embodied in a computer program which allows the calculation of correction factors for the fuselage scattering and boundary layer refraction effects. The effects are dependent on boundary layer profile, flight speed, and frequency. Corrections can be derived for any point on the fuselage, including those on the opposite side from the source. The theory was verified using limited cases and by comparing calculations with available measurements from JetStar tests of model prop-fans. For the JetStar model scale, the boundary layer refraction effects produce moderate fuselage pressure reinforcements aft of and near the plane of rotation and significant attenuation forward of the plane of rotation at high flight speeds. At lower flight speeds, the calculated boundary layer effects result in moderate amplification over the fuselage area of interest. Apparent amplification forward of the plane of rotation is a result of effective changes in the source directivity due to boundary layer refraction effects. Full scale effects are calculated to be moderate, providing fuselage pressure amplification of about 5 dB at the peak noise location. Evaluation using available noise measurements was made under high-speed, high-altitude flight conditions. Comparisons of calculations made of free field noise, using a

  3. Effect of phase noise on the generation of stationary entanglement in cavity optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Abdi, M.; Barzanjeh, Sh.; Tombesi, P.; Vitali, D.

    2011-09-15

    We study the effect of laser phase noise on the generation of stationary entanglement between an intracavity optical mode and a mechanical resonator in a generic cavity optomechanical system. We show that one can realize robust stationary optomechanical entanglement even in the presence of non-negligible laser phase noise. We also show that the explicit form of the laser phase noise spectrum is relevant, and discuss its effect on both optomechanical entanglement and ground-state cooling of the mechanical resonator.

  4. Domain modeling and grid generation for multi-block structured grids with application to aerodynamic and hydrodynamic configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spekreijse, S. P.; Boerstoel, J. W.; Vitagliano, P. L.; Kuyvenhoven, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    About five years ago, a joint development was started of a flow simulation system for engine-airframe integration studies on propeller as well as jet aircraft. The initial system was based on the Euler equations and made operational for industrial aerodynamic design work. The system consists of three major components: a domain modeller, for the graphical interactive subdivision of flow domains into an unstructured collection of blocks; a grid generator, for the graphical interactive computation of structured grids in blocks; and a flow solver, for the computation of flows on multi-block grids. The industrial partners of the collaboration and NLR have demonstrated that the domain modeller, grid generator and flow solver can be applied to simulate Euler flows around complete aircraft, including propulsion system simulation. Extension to Navier-Stokes flows is in progress. Delft Hydraulics has shown that both the domain modeller and grid generator can also be applied successfully for hydrodynamic configurations. An overview is given about the main aspects of both domain modelling and grid generation.

  5. Detection of direct and indirect noise generated by synthetic hot spots in a duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Domenico, Francesca; Rolland, Erwan O.; Hochgreb, Simone

    2017-04-01

    Sound waves in a combustor are generated from fluctuations in the heat release rate (direct noise) or the acceleration of entropy, vorticity or compositional perturbations through nozzles or turbine guide vanes (indirect or entropy noise). These sound waves are transmitted downstream as well as reflected upstream of the acceleration point, contributing to the overall noise emissions, or triggering combustion instabilities. Previous experiments attempted to isolate indirect noise by generating thermoacoustic hot spots electrically and measuring the transmitted acoustic waves, yet there are no measurements on the backward propagating entropy and acoustic waves. This work presents the first measurements which clearly separate the direct and indirect noise contributions to pressure fluctuations upstream of the acceleration point. Synthetic entropy spots are produced by unsteady electrical heating of a grid of thin wires located in a tube. Compression waves (direct noise) are generated from this heating process. The hot spots are then advected with the mean flow and finally accelerated through an orifice plate located at the end of the tube, producing a strong acoustic signature which propagates upstream (indirect noise). The convective time is selected to be longer than the heating pulse length, in order to obtain a clear time separation between direct and indirect noise in the overall pressure trace. The contribution of indirect noise to the overall noise is shown to be non-negligible either in subsonic or sonic throat conditions. However, the absolute amplitude of direct noise is larger than the corresponding fraction of indirect noise, explaining the difficulty in clearly identifying the two contributions when they are merged. Further, the work shows the importance of using appropriate pressure transducer instrumentation and correcting for the respective transfer functions in order to account for low frequency effects in the determination of pressure fluctuations.

  6. A second generation of low thermal noise cryogenic silicon resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, D. G.; Legero, T.; Grebing, Ch; Häfner, S.; Lisdat, Ch; Weyrich, R.; Zhang, W.; Sonderhouse, L.; Robinson, J. M.; Riehle, F.; Ye, J.; Sterr, U.

    2016-06-01

    We have set up an improved vertically mounted silicon cavity operating at the zero-crossing temperature of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) near 123 K with estimated thermal noise limited instability of 4 x 10-17 in the modified Allan deviation. Owing to the anisotropic elasticity of single-crystal silicon, the vertical acceleration sensitivity was minimized in situ by axially rotating the resonator with respect to the mounting frame. The control of the resonator temperature is greatly improved by using a combination of two thermal shields, monitoring with several temperature sensors, and employing low-thermal conductivity materials. The instability of the resonator stabilized laser was characterized by comparing with another low-noise system based on a 48 cm long room temperature cavity of PTB's strontium lattice clock, resulting in a modified Allan deviation of 7 x 10-17 at 100 s.

  7. Combustion intensity and distribution relation to noise generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plett, E. G.; Leshner, M. D.; Summerfield, M.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments with several different flame holder geometries were conducted to investigate the degree to which combustion roughness can be altered by altering the flame intensity and flame distribution in a ducted combustion system. The effect of admitting primary air through a plane-slotted or a slotted-swirl vane flame holder was compared and the combustion roughness and noise was contrasted with that obtained with a closed front-end perforated can. The slotted front-end burners produced much smoother burning and less noise than the closed front-end can. No advantage was apparent with swirl vs nonswirl when approximately the same inlet flow distribution was maintained. Preheated inlet air provided somewhat smoother combustion as compared with ambient temperature air. The combustion roughness with methyl alcohol was briefly compared with that of isooctane; indications are that it burns more smoothly, but more detailed studies are needed to substantiate these indications.

  8. Generation of two-mode bright squeezed light using a noise-suppressed amplified diode laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Hayasaka, Kazuhiro; Kasai, Katsuyuki

    2006-12-25

    We present the generation of nonclassical state using an amplified diode laser as a light source. The intensity noise of an amplified diode laser was significantly suppressed and reached the shot noise limit at 15 MHz using both a filter cavity and resonant optical feedback. Frequency doubling efficiency of 66% and up to 120 mW output power of green has been achieved in cw second-harmonic generation from 1080 nm to 540 nm. Bright two-mode amplitude-squeezed state was generated from a type-II nondegenerate optical parametric amplifier pumped by generated green light. The measured noise reduction is 2.1+/-0.2 dB below the shot-noise level.

  9. Trailing edge wake flow characteristics of upper surface blown configurations. [noise generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, N. N.

    1978-01-01

    Mean and fluctuating flow characteristics in the wake of upper surface blown flap configurations are presented. Relative importance of the longitudinal and the transverse components of the wake flow turbulence for noise generation are evaluated using correlation between the near-field noise and the wake turbulence. Effects of the jet velocity, the initial turbulence in the jet, and the flap deflection angle on noise and wake flow characteristics are studied. The far-field noise data is compared with the existing empirical prediction method. The measured wake flow properties are compared with an analytical model used in the existing USB wake flow noise theory. The detailed wake flow profiles, wake flow turbulence space-time correlations, wake flow turbulence cross-power spectra, and near-field noise third octave band spectra are presented in the appendices.

  10. Unsteady Aerodynamic Force Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2016-01-01

    A simple approach for computing unsteady aerodynamic forces from simulated measured strain data is proposed in this study. First, the deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the unsteady strain using the two-step approach. Velocities and accelerations of the structure are computed using the autoregressive moving average model, on-line parameter estimator, low-pass filter, and a least-squares curve fitting method together with analytical derivatives with respect to time. Finally, aerodynamic forces over the wing are computed using modal aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices, a rational function approximation, and a time-marching algorithm. A cantilevered rectangular wing built and tested at the NASA Langley Research Center (Hampton, Virginia, USA) in 1959 is used to validate the simple approach. Unsteady aerodynamic forces as well as wing deflections, velocities, accelerations, and strains are computed using the CFL3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code and an MSC/NASTRAN code (MSC Software Corporation, Newport Beach, California, USA), and these CFL3D-based results are assumed as measured quantities. Based on the measured strains, wing deflections, velocities, accelerations, and aerodynamic forces are computed using the proposed approach. These computed deflections, velocities, accelerations, and unsteady aerodynamic forces are compared with the CFL3D/NASTRAN-based results. In general, computed aerodynamic forces based on the lifting surface theory in subsonic speeds are in good agreement with the target aerodynamic forces generated using CFL3D code with the Euler equation. Excellent aeroelastic responses are obtained even with unsteady strain data under the signal to noise ratio of -9.8dB. The deflections, velocities, and accelerations at each sensor location are independent of structural and aerodynamic models. Therefore, the distributed strain data together with the current proposed approaches can be used as distributed deflection

  11. Balanced noise control design: A case study for co-generation power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong; Hertil, Salem

    2002-11-01

    Power generation plant generally requires noise mitigation treatment to achieve the specified noise regulations. In this paper, a case study of the noise control design for a cogeneration power plant was presented. Major noise sources included two GE gas combustion turbines, two generators, two heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), one steam turbine and generator, one 12-cell cooling tower, and other accessory equipment. The acoustic modeling software Cadna/A was used to predict the noise contributions from sources. During the acoustic modeling, alternative noise mitigation measures underwent two specific investigations before they were chosen as a noise solution recommendation. The first was to determine the technical feasibility of attenuating the source equipment. The second was to perform a cost benefit analysis, necessary to find the most cost-effective solution. For example, several acoustic wall and roof assemblies were entered into the acoustic model and the acoustic performance of the ventilation system was varied until we were able to arrive at the most economical acoustic solution. This is the premise on which so called balanced design is based.

  12. Single-stage, low-noise, advanced technology fan. Volume 4: Fan aerodynamics. Section 1: Results and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Silverman, I.; Little, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Test results at design speed show fan total pressure ratio, weight flow, and adiabatic efficiency to be 2.2, 2.9, and 1.8% lower than design goal values. The hybrid acoustic inlet (which utilizes a high throat Mach number and acoustic wall treatment for noise suppression) demonstrated total pressure recoveries of 98.9% and 98.2% at takeoff and approach. Exhaust duct pressure losses differed between the hardwall duct and treated duct with splitter by about 0.6% to 2.0% in terms of fan exit average total pressure (depending on operating condition). When the measured results were used to estimate pressure losses, a cruise sfc penalty of 0.68%, due to the acoustically treated duct, was projected.

  13. Noise generator for tinnitus treatment based on look-up tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uriz, Alejandro J.; Agüero, Pablo; Tulli, Juan C.; Castiñeira Moreira, Jorge; González, Esteban; Hidalgo, Roberto; Casadei, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of tinnitus by means of masking sounds allows to obtain a significant improve of the quality of life of the individual that suffer that condition. In view of that, it is possible to develop noise synthesizers based on random number generators in digital signal processors (DSP), which are used in almost any digital hearing aid devices. DSP architecture have limitations to implement a pseudo random number generator, due to it, the noise statistics can be not as good as expectations. In this paper, a technique to generate additive white gaussian noise (AWGN) or other types of filtered noise using coefficients stored in program memory of the DSP is proposed. Also, an implementation of the technique is carried out on a dsPIC from Microchip®. Objective experiments and experimental measurements are performed to analyze the proposed technique.

  14. A Framework for Parallel Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex Aerodynamic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zagaris, George; Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.; Chrisochoides, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    A framework for parallel unstructured grid generation targeting both shared memory multi-processors and distributed memory architectures is presented. The two fundamental building-blocks of the framework consist of: (1) the Advancing-Partition (AP) method used for domain decomposition and (2) the Advancing Front (AF) method used for mesh generation. Starting from the surface mesh of the computational domain, the AP method is applied recursively to generate a set of sub-domains. Next, the sub-domains are meshed in parallel using the AF method. The recursive nature of domain decomposition naturally maps to a divide-and-conquer algorithm which exhibits inherent parallelism. For the parallel implementation, the Master/Worker pattern is employed to dynamically balance the varying workloads of each task on the set of available CPUs. Performance results by this approach are presented and discussed in detail as well as future work and improvements.

  15. Supercontinuum generation in highly nonlinear fibers using amplified noise-like optical pulses.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Shian; Hwang, Sheng-Kwang; Liu, Jia-Ming

    2014-02-24

    Supercontinuum generation in a highly nonlinear fiber pumped by noise-like pulses from an erbium-doped fiber ring laser is investigated. To generate ultrabroad spectra, a fiber amplifier is used to boost the power launched into the highly nonlinear fiber. After amplification, not only the average power of the noise-like pulses is enhanced but the spectrum of the pulses is also broadened due to nonlinear effects in the fiber amplifier. This leads to a reduction of the peak duration in their autocorrelation trace, suggesting a similar extent of pulse compression; by contrast, the pedestal duration increases only slightly, suggesting that the noise-like characteristic is maintained. By controlling the pump power of the fiber amplifier, the compression ratio of the noise-like pulse duration can be adjusted. Due to the pulse compression, supercontinuum generation with a broader spectrum is therefore feasible at a given average power level of the noise-like pulses launched into the highly nonlinear fiber. As a result, supercontinuum generation with an optical spectrum spanning from 1208 to 2111 nm is achieved using a 1-m nonlinear fiber pumped by amplified noise-like pulses of 15.5 MHz repetition rate at an average power of 202 mW.

  16. Computing Aerodynamic Performance of a 2D Iced Airfoil: Blocking Topology and Grid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, X.; Zhu, B.; Shih, T. I.-P.; Slater, J. W.; Addy, H. E.; Choo, Yung K.; Lee, Chi-Ming (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ice accrued on airfoils can have enormously complicated shapes with multiple protruded horns and feathers. In this paper, several blocking topologies are proposed and evaluated on their ability to produce high-quality structured multi-block grid systems. A transition layer grid is introduced to ensure that jaggedness on the ice-surface geometry do not to propagate into the domain. This is important for grid-generation methods based on hyperbolic PDEs (Partial Differential Equations) and algebraic transfinite interpolation. A 'thick' wrap-around grid is introduced to ensure that grid lines clustered next to solid walls do not propagate as streaks of tightly packed grid lines into the interior of the domain along block boundaries. For ice shapes that are not too complicated, a method is presented for generating high-quality single-block grids. To demonstrate the usefulness of the methods developed, grids and CFD solutions were generated for two iced airfoils: the NLF0414 airfoil with and without the 623-ice shape and the B575/767 airfoil with and without the 145m-ice shape. To validate the computations, the computed lift coefficients as a function of angle of attack were compared with available experimental data. The ice shapes and the blocking topologies were prepared by NASA Glenn's SmaggIce software. The grid systems were generated by using a four-boundary method based on Hermite interpolation with controls on clustering, orthogonality next to walls, and C continuity across block boundaries. The flow was modeled by the ensemble-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations, closed by the shear-stress transport turbulence model in which the integration is to the wall. All solutions were generated by using the NPARC WIND code.

  17. Preliminary experiments on the noise generated by target-type thrust reverser models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, O. A.; Stone, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments are reported on the noise generated by model V-gutter and semicylindrical target-type reversers with circular nozzles. Nozzles were 5.24 and 7.78 cm in diameter. Nozzle pressure ratio ranged from 1.25 to 1.72. The spacing between reversers and nozzle, as well as the reverser orientation, was also varied. More noise was generated with reversers than with the nozzle alone. The measured maximum overall sound pressure level varied with the sixth power of the nozzle exit velocity. Noise levels were more uniform in regard to directivity with reversers than with the nozzle alone. It is concluded that thrust reversers, can be a significant noise problem, especially for STOL aircraft using thrust reversers during approach.

  18. Can shock waves on helicopter rotors generate noise? - A study of the quadrupole source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Tadghighi, H.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis has previously established that local shock surfaces attached to helicopter rotor blades moving at high subsonic speeds are potent noise generators; in pursuit of this insight, a novel formulation is presented for the prediction of the noise of a deformable shock, whose area changes as a function of the azimuthal position of the blade. The derivation of this formulation has its basis in a mapping of the moving shock to a time-independent region. In virtue of this mapping, the implementation of the main result on a computer becomes straightforward enough for incorporation into the available rotor-noise prediction code. A problem illustrating the importance of rotor shocks in the generation of high-intensity noise is presented.

  19. Coupled 2-dimensional cascade theory for noise and unsteady aerodynamics of blade row interaction in turbofans. Volume 1: Theory development and parametric studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    Typical analytical models for interaction between rotor and stator in a turbofan analyze the effect of wakes from the rotor impinging on the stator, producing unsteady loading, and thereby generating noise. Reflection/transmission characteristics of the rotor are sometimes added in a separate calculation. In those models, there is a one-to-one relationship between wake harmonics and noise harmonics; that is, the BPF (blade passing frequency) wake harmonic causes only the BPF noise harmonic, etc. This report presents a more complete model in which flow tangency boundary conditions are satisfied on two cascades in relative motion for several harmonics simultaneously. By an extension of S.N. Smith's code for two dimensional flat plate cascades, the noise generation/frequency scattering/blade row reflection problem is solved in a single matrix inversion. It is found that the BPF harmonic excitation of the stator scatters considerable energy in the higher BPF harmonics due to relative motion between the blade rows. Furthermore, when swirl between the rotor and stator is modeled, a 'mode trapping' effect occurs which explains observations on fans operating at rotational speeds below BFP cuton: the BPF mode amplifies between blade rows by multiple reflections but cannot escape to the inlet and exit ducts. However, energy scattered into higher harmonics does propagate and dominates the spectrum at two and three times BPF. This report presents the complete derivation of the theory, comparison with a previous (more limited) coupled rotor/stator interaction theory due to Kaji and Okazaki, exploration of the mode trapping phenomenon, and parametric studies showing the effects of vane/blade ratio and rotor/stator interaction. For generality, the analysis applies to stages where the rotor is either upstream or downstream of the stator and to counter rotation stages. The theory has been coded in a FORTRAN program called CUP2D, documented in Volume 2 of this report. It is

  20. Gas Generators and Their Potential to Support Human-Scale HIADS (Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodkin, Richard J.; Cheatwood, F. M.; Dillman, Robert A; Dinonno, John M.; Hughes, Stephen J.; Lucy, Melvin H.

    2016-01-01

    As HIAD technology progresses from 3-m diameter experimental scale to as large as 20-m diameter for human Mars entry, the mass penalties of carrying compressed gas has led the HIAD team to research current state-of-the-art gas generator approaches. Summarized below are several technologies identified in this survey, along with some of the pros and cons with respect to supporting large-scale HIAD applications.

  1. Tuning third harmonic generation of impurity doped quantum dots in the presence of Gaussian white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Surajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-03-01

    We perform a broad exploration of profiles of third harmonic generation (THG) susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) in the presence and absence of noise. We have invoked Gaussian white noise in the present study. A Gaussian impurity has been introduced into the QD. Noise has been applied to the system additively and multiplicatively. A perpendicular magnetic field emerges out as a confinement source and a static external electric field has been applied. The THG profiles have been pursued as a function of incident photon energy when several important parameters such as electric field strength, magnetic field strength, confinement energy, dopant location, Al concentration, dopant potential, relaxation time and noise strength assume different values. Moreover, the role of the pathway through which noise is applied (additive/multiplicative) on the THG profiles has also been deciphered. The THG profiles are found to be decorated with interesting observations such as shift of THG peak position and maximization/minimization of THG peak intensity. Presence of noise alters the characteristics of THG profiles and sometimes enhances the THG peak intensity. Furthermore, the mode of application of noise (additive/multiplicative) also regulates the THG profiles in a few occasions in contrasting manners. The observations highlight the possible scope of tuning the THG coefficient of doped QD systems in the presence of noise and bears tremendous technological importance.

  2. Transduction of a bistable inductive generator driven by white and exponentially correlated Gaussian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daqaq, Mohammed F.

    2011-05-01

    In this theoretical study, the response of an inductive power generator with a bistable symmetric potential to stationary random environmental excitations is investigated. Both white and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck-type excitations are considered. In the white noise limit, the stationary Fokker-Plank-Kolmagorov equation is solved for the exact joint probability density function (PDF) of the response. The PDF is then used to obtain analytical expressions for the response statistics. It is shown that the expected value of the generator's output power is independent of the potential shape leading to the conclusion that under white noise excitations, bistabilities in the potential do not provide any enhancement over the traditional linear resonant generators which have a single-well potential. In the case of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (exponentially correlated) noise, an approximate expression for the mean power of the generator which depends on the potential shape, the generator's design parameters and the noise bandwidth and intensity is obtained. It is shown that there exists an optimal potential shape which maximizes the output power. This optimal shape guarantees an optimal escapement frequency between the potential wells which remains constant even as the noise intensity is varied.

  3. Aerodynamic stability analysis of NASA J85-13/planar pressure pulse generator installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, K.; Hosny, W. M.; Steenken, W. G.

    1980-01-01

    A digital computer simulation model for the J85-13/Planar Pressure Pulse Generator (P3 G) test installation was developed by modifying an existing General Electric compression system model. This modification included the incorporation of a novel method for describing the unsteady blade lift force. This approach significantly enhanced the capability of the model to handle unsteady flows. In addition, the frequency response characteristics of the J85-13/P3G test installation were analyzed in support of selecting instrumentation locations to avoid standing wave nodes within the test apparatus and thus, low signal levels. The feasibility of employing explicit analytical expression for surge prediction was also studied.

  4. Anechoic wind tunnel study of turbulence effects on wind turbine broadband noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyd, B.; Harris, W. L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes recent results obtained at MIT on the experimental and theoretical modelling of aerodynamic broadband noise generated by a downwind rotor horizontal axis wind turbine. The aerodynamic broadband noise generated by the wind turbine rotor is attributed to the interaction of ingested turbulence with the rotor blades. The turbulence was generated in the MIT anechoic wind tunnel facility with the aid of biplanar grids of various sizes. The spectra and the intensity of the aerodynamic broadband noise have been studied as a function of parameters which characterize the turbulence and of wind turbine performance parameters. Specifically, the longitudinal integral scale of turbulence, the size scale of turbulence, the number of turbine blades, and free stream velocity were varied. Simultaneous measurements of acoustic and turbulence signals were made. The sound pressure level was found to vary directly with the integral scale of the ingested turbulence but not with its intensity level. A theoretical model based on unsteady aerodynamics is proposed.

  5. Volterra dendritic stimulus processors and biophysical spike generators with intrinsic noise sources

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Aurel A.; Zhou, Yiyin

    2014-01-01

    We consider a class of neural circuit models with internal noise sources arising in sensory systems. The basic neuron model in these circuits consists of a dendritic stimulus processor (DSP) cascaded with a biophysical spike generator (BSG). The dendritic stimulus processor is modeled as a set of nonlinear operators that are assumed to have a Volterra series representation. Biophysical point neuron models, such as the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron, are used to model the spike generator. We address the question of how intrinsic noise sources affect the precision in encoding and decoding of sensory stimuli and the functional identification of its sensory circuits. We investigate two intrinsic noise sources arising (i) in the active dendritic trees underlying the DSPs, and (ii) in the ion channels of the BSGs. Noise in dendritic stimulus processing arises from a combined effect of variability in synaptic transmission and dendritic interactions. Channel noise arises in the BSGs due to the fluctuation of the number of the active ion channels. Using a stochastic differential equations formalism we show that encoding with a neuron model consisting of a nonlinear DSP cascaded with a BSG with intrinsic noise sources can be treated as generalized sampling with noisy measurements. For single-input multi-output neural circuit models with feedforward, feedback and cross-feedback DSPs cascaded with BSGs we theoretically analyze the effect of noise sources on stimulus decoding. Building on a key duality property, the effect of noise parameters on the precision of the functional identification of the complete neural circuit with DSP/BSG neuron models is given. We demonstrate through extensive simulations the effects of noise on encoding stimuli with circuits that include neuron models that are akin to those commonly seen in sensory systems, e.g., complex cells in V1. PMID:25225477

  6. Geometry Modeling and Grid Generation for Computational Aerodynamic Simulations Around Iced Airfoils and Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung K.; Slater, John W.; Vickerman, Mary B.; VanZante, Judith F.; Wadel, Mary F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Issues associated with analysis of 'icing effects' on airfoil and wing performances are discussed, along with accomplishments and efforts to overcome difficulties with ice. Because of infinite variations of ice shapes and their high degree of complexity, computational 'icing effects' studies using available software tools must address many difficulties in geometry acquisition and modeling, grid generation, and flow simulation. The value of each technology component needs to be weighed from the perspective of the entire analysis process, from geometry to flow simulation. Even though CFD codes are yet to be validated for flows over iced airfoils and wings, numerical simulation, when considered together with wind tunnel tests, can provide valuable insights into 'icing effects' and advance our understanding of the relationship between ice characteristics and their effects on performance degradation.

  7. The noise generated by a landing gear wheel with hub and rim cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Angland, David; Zhang, Xin

    2017-03-01

    Wheels are one of the major noise sources of landing gears. Accurate numerical predictions of wheel noise can provide an insight into the physical mechanism of landing gear noise generation and can aid in the design of noise control devices. The major noise sources of a 33% scaled isolated landing gear wheel are investigated by simulating three different wheel configurations using high-order numerical simulations to compute the flow field and the FW-H equation to obtain the far-field acoustic pressures. The baseline configuration is a wheel with a hub cavity and two rim cavities. Two additional simulations are performed; one with the hub cavity covered (NHC) and the other with both the hub cavity and rim cavities covered (NHCRC). These simulations isolate the effects of the hub cavity and rim cavities on the overall wheel noise. The surface flow patterns are visualised by shear stress lines and show that the flow separations and attachments on the side of the wheel, in both the baseline and the configuration with only the hub cavity covered, are significantly reduced by covering both the hub and rim cavities. A frequency-domain FW-H equation is used to identify the noise source regions on the surface of the wheel. The tyre is the main low frequency noise source and shows a lift dipole and side force dipole pattern depending on the frequency. The hub cavity is identified as the dominant middle frequency noise source and radiates in a frequency range centered around the first and second depth modes of the cylindrical hub cavity. The rim cavities are the main high-frequency noise sources. With the hub cavity and rim cavities covered, the largest reduction in Overall Sound Pressure Level (OASPL) is achieved in the hub side direction. In the other directivities, there is also a reduction in the radiated sound.

  8. Mimicking the humpback whale: An aerodynamic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftab, S. M. A.; Razak, N. A.; Mohd Rafie, A. S.; Ahmad, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    This comprehensive review aims to provide a critical overview of the work on tubercles in the past decade. The humpback whale is of interest to aerodynamic/hydrodynamic researchers, as it performs manoeuvres that baffle the imagination. Researchers have attributed these capabilities to the presence of lumps, known as tubercles, on the leading edge of the flipper. Tubercles generate a unique flow control mechanism, offering the humpback exceptional manoeuverability. Experimental and numerical studies have shown that the flow pattern over the tubercle wing is quite different from conventional wings. Research on the Tubercle Leading Edge (TLE) concept has helped to clarify aerodynamic issues such as flow separation, tonal noise and dynamic stall. TLE shows increased lift by delaying and restricting spanwise separation. A summary of studies on different airfoils and reported improvement in performance is outlined. The major contributions and limitations of previous work are also reported.

  9. Magnetic field enhancement of generation-recombination and shot noise in organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Djidjou, T. K.; Basel, Tek; Rogachev, A.; Chen, Ying; Shinar, J.

    2015-03-21

    We have studied the effect of magnetic field on noise in series of 2-methoxy-5-(2′-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene-based organic light emitting diodes with dominant hole injection, dominant electron injection, and balanced electron and hole injection. The noise spectra of the balanced devices revealed the generation-recombination (g-r) noise term, which we associated with bimolecular electron-hole recombination. The presence of the g-r noise term is correlated with the strong organic magnetoresistance (up to 25%) observed in the balanced devices. The noise spectra also have the shot noise contribution with the Fano factor 0.25–0.4. We found that time constant of the g-r term decreases and the magnitude of shot noise increases when magnetic field is applied. This behavior can be consistently explained within the polaron-polaron model of organic magnetoresistance. We have not found any evidence that the magnetoresistance in studied devices is affected by traps.

  10. Current noise generated by spin imbalance in presence of spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrapai, V. S.; Nagaev, K. E.

    2017-01-01

    We calculate current (shot) noise in a metallic diffusive conductor generated by spin imbalance in the absence of a net electric current. This situation is modeled in an idealized three-terminal setup with two biased ferromagnetic leads (F-leads) and one normal lead (N-lead). Parallel magnetization of the F-leads gives rise in spin-imbalance and finite shot noise at the N-lead. Finite spin relaxation results in an increase of the shot noise, which depends on the ratio of the length of the conductor (L) and the spin relaxation length (l s ). For L ≫ l s the shot noise increases by a factor of two and coincides with the case of the anti-parallel magnetization of the F-leads.

  11. The Airframe Noise Reduction Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhard, David P.; Lilley, Geoffrey M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA goal of reducing external aircraft noise by 10 dB in the near-term presents the acoustics community with an enormous challenge. This report identifies technologies with the greatest potential to reduce airframe noise. Acoustic and aerodynamic effects will be discussed, along with the likelihood of industry accepting and implementing the different technologies. We investigate the lower bound, defined as noise generated by an aircraft modified with a virtual retrofit capable of eliminating all noise associated with the high lift system and landing gear. However, the airframe noise of an aircraft in this 'clean' configuration would only be about 8 dB quieter on approach than current civil transports. To achieve the NASA goal of 10 dB noise reduction will require that additional noise sources be addressed. Research shows that energy in the turbulent boundary layer of a wing is scattered as it crosses trailing edge. Noise generated by scattering is the dominant noise mechanism on an aircraft flying in the clean configuration. Eliminating scattering would require changes to much of the aircraft, and practical reduction devices have yet to receive serious attention. Evidence suggests that to meet NASA goals in civil aviation noise reduction, we need to employ emerging technologies and improve landing procedures; modified landing patterns and zoning restrictions could help alleviate aircraft noise in communities close to airports.

  12. Aerodynamic sizing of metered dose inhalers: an evaluation of the Andersen and Next Generation pharmaceutical impactors and their USP methods.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Akihiko; Sakagami, Masahiro; Hindle, Michael; Byron, Peter R

    2004-07-01

    The particle sizing performance of a Next Generation Pharmaceutical Impactor (NGI) was compared to that of an Andersen cascade impactor (ACI). A single lot of Vanceril MDIs containing beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) was used throughout. MDIs were sampled into NGI and ACI in accordance with USP recommendations, at 30.0 and 28.3 L/min, respectively, following 1, 2, 6, and 30 actuations with or without a silicone cup or stage coating, to determine the apparent particle size distributions (PSD) of BDP. The mass balance and the statistical comparability of drug deposits were assured on a "per actuation basis" across all experiments, demonstrating "good cascade impactor practices." Interstage deposition or "wall losses" in NGI were found to be lower than those in ACI, although their determination was laborious in NGI. The PSD profiles for Vanceril from a single actuation were distinguishable between NGI and ACI, when uncoated collection surfaces were used, most specifically for drug mass <4-microm aerodynamic diameter (p < 0.05). Silicone coating of collection surfaces and an increased number of actuations were shown to result in PSD profile shifts for both NGI and ACI. Such effects were most pronounced for NGI, although coating the collection surfaces and/or increasing the number of actuations improved drug retention significantly on the upper stages of NGI, and thereby, minimized the effects of particle bounce of BDP from Vanceril MDIs. PSD profiles from a single actuation could be determined reliably in either of these impactors, provided that coated collection surfaces were employed; also, cumulative % mass undersize profiles were similar between instruments. However, small differences in PSD profiles still existed to support NGI's design claims for reduced "overlap" in its stage collection efficiency curves.

  13. Flow pattern similarities in the near wake of three bird species suggest a common role for unsteady aerodynamic effects in lift generation.

    PubMed

    Gurka, Roi; Krishnan, Krishnamoorthy; Ben-Gida, Hadar; Kirchhefer, Adam J; Kopp, Gregory A; Guglielmo, Christopher G

    2017-02-06

    Analysis of the aerodynamics of flapping wings has yielded a general understanding of how birds generate lift and thrust during flight. However, the role of unsteady aerodynamics in avian flight due to the flapping motion still holds open questions in respect to performance and efficiency. We studied the flight of three distinctive bird species: western sandpiper (Calidris mauri), European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) and American robin (Turdus migratorius) using long-duration, time-resolved particle image velocimetry, to better characterize and advance our understanding of how birds use unsteady flow features to enhance their aerodynamic performances during flapping flight. We show that during transitions between downstroke and upstroke phases of the wing cycle, the near wake-flow structures vary and generate unique sets of vortices. These structures appear as quadruple layers of concentrated vorticity aligned at an angle with respect to the horizon (named 'double branch'). They occur where the circulation gradient changes sign, which implies that the forces exerted by the flapping wings of birds are modified during the transition phases. The flow patterns are similar in (non-dimensional) size and magnitude for the different birds suggesting that there are common mechanisms operating during flapping flight across species. These flow patterns occur at the same phase where drag reduction of about 5% per cycle and lift enhancement were observed in our prior studies. We propose that these flow structures should be considered in wake flow models that seek to account for the contribution of unsteady flow to lift and drag.

  14. The effect of winglets on the static aerodynamic stability characteristics of a representative second generation jet transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. F.; Flechner, S. G.

    1976-01-01

    A baseline wing and a version of the same wing fitted with winglets were tested. The longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics were determined through an angle-of-attack range from -1 deg to 10 deg at an angle of sideslip of 0 deg for Mach numbers of 0.750, 0.800, and 0.825. The lateral aerodynamic characteristics were determined through the same angle-of-attack range at fixed sideslip angles of 2.5 deg and 5 deg. Both configurations were investigated at Reynolds numbers of 13,000,000, per meter (4,000,000 per foot) and approximately 20,000,000 per meter (6,000,000 per foot). The winglet configuration showed slight increases over the baseline wing in static longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic stability throughout the test Mach number range for a model design lift coefficient of 0.53. Reynolds number variation had very little effect on stability.

  15. Real time noise and wavelength correlations in octave-spanning supercontinuum generation.

    PubMed

    Godin, T; Wetzel, B; Sylvestre, T; Larger, L; Kudlinski, A; Mussot, A; Ben Salem, A; Zghal, M; Genty, G; Dias, F; Dudley, J M

    2013-07-29

    We use dispersive Fourier transformation to measure shot-to-shot spectral instabilities in femtosecond supercontinuum generation. We study both the onset phase of supercontinuum generation with distinct dispersive wave generation, as well as a highly-unstable supercontinuum regime spanning an octave in bandwidth. Wavelength correlation maps allow interactions between separated spectral components to be identified, even when such interactions are not apparent in shot-to-shot or average measurements. Experimental results are interpreted using numerical simulations. Our results show the clear advantages of dispersive Fourier transformation for studying spectral noise during supercontinuum generation.

  16. Design of the Next Generation Aircraft Noise Prediction Program: ANOPP2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes, Leonard V., Dr.; Burley, Casey L.

    2011-01-01

    The requirements, constraints, and design of NASA's next generation Aircraft NOise Prediction Program (ANOPP2) are introduced. Similar to its predecessor (ANOPP), ANOPP2 provides the U.S. Government with an independent aircraft system noise prediction capability that can be used as a stand-alone program or within larger trade studies that include performance, emissions, and fuel burn. The ANOPP2 framework is designed to facilitate the combination of acoustic approaches of varying fidelity for the analysis of noise from conventional and unconventional aircraft. ANOPP2 integrates noise prediction and propagation methods, including those found in ANOPP, into a unified system that is compatible for use within general aircraft analysis software. The design of the system is described in terms of its functionality and capability to perform predictions accounting for distributed sources, installation effects, and propagation through a non-uniform atmosphere including refraction and the influence of terrain. The philosophy of mixed fidelity noise prediction through the use of nested Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings surfaces is presented and specific issues associated with its implementation are identified. Demonstrations for a conventional twin-aisle and an unconventional hybrid wing body aircraft configuration are presented to show the feasibility and capabilities of the system. Isolated model-scale jet noise predictions are also presented using high-fidelity and reduced order models, further demonstrating ANOPP2's ability to provide predictions for model-scale test configurations.

  17. Low Noise Exhaust Nozzle Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Balan, C.; Mengle, V.; Brausch, J. F.; Shin, H.; Askew, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. aerospace industry have been assessing the economic viability and environmental acceptability of a second-generation supersonic civil transport, or High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Development of a propulsion system that satisfies strict airport noise regulations and provides high levels of cruise and transonic performance with adequate takeoff performance, at an acceptable weight, is critical to the success of any HSCT program. The principal objectives were to: 1. Develop a preliminary design of an innovative 2-D exhaust nozzle with the goal of meeting FAR36 Stage III noise levels and providing high levels of cruise performance with a high specific thrust for Mach 2.4 HSCT with a range of 5000 nmi and a payload of 51,900 lbm, 2. Employ advanced acoustic and aerodynamic codes during preliminary design, 3. Develop a comprehensive acoustic and aerodynamic database through scale-model testing of low-noise, high-performance, 2-D nozzle configurations, based on the preliminary design, and 4. Verify acoustic and aerodynamic predictions by means of scale-model testing. The results were: 1. The preliminary design of a 2-D, convergent/divergent suppressor ejector nozzle for a variable-cycle engine powered, Mach 2.4 HSCT was evolved, 2. Noise goals were predicted to be achievable for three takeoff scenarios, and 3. Impact of noise suppression, nozzle aerodynamic performance, and nozzle weight on HSCT takeoff gross weight were assessed.

  18. A Low-Power Low-Noise Clock Signal Generator for Next-Generation Mobile Wireless Terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai, Akihide; Kurose, Daisuke; Yamaji, Takafumi; Itakura, Tetsuro

    Sampling clock jitter degrades the dynamic range of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). In this letter, a low-power low-noise clock signal generator for ADCs is described. As a clock signal generator, a ring-VCO-based charge pump PLL is used to reduce power dissipation within a given jitter specification. The clock signal generator is fabricated on a CMOS chip with 200-MSPS 10-bit ADC. The measured results show that the ADC keeps a 60-MHz input bandwidth and 53-dB dynamic range and a next-generation mobile wireless terminal can be realized with the ADCs and the on-chip low-power clock generator.

  19. Large-Eddy Simulations of Noise Generation in Supersonic Jets at Realistic Engine Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junhui; Corrigan, Andrew; Kailasanath, K.; Taylor, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) have been carried out to investigate the noise generation in highly heated supersonic jets at temperatures similar to those observed in high-performance jet engine exhausts. It is found that the exhaust temperature of high-performance jet engines can range from 1000K at an intermediate power to above 2000K at a maximum afterburning power. In low-temperature jets, the effects of the variation of the specific heat ratio as well as the radial temperature profile near the nozzle exit are small and are ignored, but it is not clear whether those effects can be also ignored in highly heated jets. The impact of the variation of the specific heat ratio is assessed by comparing LES results using a variable specific heat ratio with those using a constant specific heat ratio. The impact on both the flow field and the noise distributions are investigated. Because the total temperature near the nozzle wall can be substantially lower than the nozzle total temperature either due to the heating loss through the nozzle wall or due to the cooling applied near the wall, this lower wall temperature may impact the temperature in the shear layer, and thus impact the noise generation. The impact of the radial temperature profile on the jet noise generation is investigated by comparing results of lower nozzle wall temperatures with those of the adiabatic wall condition.

  20. Reduction of noise generated by air conditioning and ventilation plants and transmitted to inhabited areas. [application of silencers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harastaseanu, E.; Cristescu, G.; Mercea, F.

    1974-01-01

    The fans with which the conditioning and ventilation plants of weaving and spinning mills are equipped and the conditioning devices used in certain confection and knit wear departments of the textile industry generate loud noise. Solutions are presented for reducing the noise generated by the fans of ventilation and conditioning plants and transmitted to inhabited regions down to the admissible level, as well as the results obtained by experimental application of some noise reduction solutions in the conditioning plants of a spinning mill.

  1. Non-linear generation of acoustic noise in the IAR spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westley, R.; Nguyen, K.; Westley, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    The requirement to produce high level acoustic noise fields with increasing accuracy in environmental test facilities dictates that a more precise understanding is required of the factors controlling nonlinear noise generation. Details are given of various nonlinear effects found in acoustic performance data taken from the IAR Spacecraft Acoustic Chamber. This type of data has enabled the IAR to test large spacecraft to relatively tight acoustic tolerances over a wide frequency range using manually set controls. An analog random noise automatic control system was available and modified to provide automatic selection of the chamber's spectral sound pressure levels. The automatic control system when used to complete a typical qualification test appeared to equal the accuracy of the manual system and had the added advantage that parallel spectra could be easily achieved during preset tests.

  2. Measurement and prediction of broadband noise from large horizontal axis wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, F. W.; Shepherd, K. P.; Hubbard, H. H.

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented for predicting the broadband noise spectra of large wind turbine generators. It includes contributions from such noise sources as the inflow turbulence to the rotor, the interactions between the turbulent boundary layers on the blade surfaces with their trailing edges and the wake due to a blunt trailing edge. The method is partly empirical and is based on acoustic measurements of large wind turbines and airfoil models. Spectra are predicted for several large machines including the proposed MOD-5B. Measured data are presented for the MOD-2, the WTS-4, the MOD-OA, and the U.S. Windpower Inc. machines. Good agreement is shown between the predicted and measured far field noise spectra.

  3. Supercontinuum generation by noise-like pulses transmitted through normally dispersive standard single-mode fibers.

    PubMed

    Zaytsev, Alexey; Lin, Chih-Hsuan; You, Yi-Jing; Chung, Chia-Chun; Wang, Chi-Luen; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2013-07-01

    We report generation of broadband supercontinuum (SC) by noise-like pulses (NLPs) with a central wavelength of 1070 nm propagating through a long piece of standard single-mode fibers (~100 meters) in normal dispersion region far from the zero-dispersion point. Theoretical simulations indicate that the physical mechanism of SC generation is due to nonlinear effects in fibers. The cascaded Raman scattering is responsible for significant spectral broadening in the longer wavelength regions whereas the Kerr effect results in smoothing of SC generated spectrum. The SC exhibits low threshold (43 nJ) and a flat spectrum over 1050-1250 nm.

  4. Transport noise arising from diffusion and bulk or surface generation recombination in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, H.

    The type of noise spectra in solids or solid state devices, which can arise from noise due to a combination of causes, such as diffusion of carriers, generation and recombination (g-r) processes of carriers in the bulk and at the surface was studied using techniques to be described apply equally well to the problem of heat diffusion, with heat transfer or reflection at the boundaries of the system, we have, however, mainly the carrier noise problem in mind. The physical noise sources, the diffusion source, g-r source and surface source, Clarke and Voss' P source are discussed as well as transport noise in symmetrical embedded bodies, in nonsymmetrical embedded bodies, in symmetrical nonembedded bodies and in nonsymmetrical nonembedded bodies. Results indicate that volume g-r and diffusion processes give rather smooth spectra, but, without a l/f range. The high frequency asymptote is always w-3/2 (embedded case) or omega to the minus 2 power (nonembedded case).

  5. Calibrating spectral estimation for the LISA Technology Package with multichannel synthetic noise generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraioli, Luigi; Hueller, Mauro; Vitale, Stefano; Heinzel, Gerhard; Hewitson, Martin; Monsky, Anneke; Nofrarias, Miquel

    2010-08-01

    The scientific objectives of the LISA Technology Package experiment on board of the LISA Pathfinder mission demand accurate calibration and validation of the data analysis tools in advance of the mission launch. The level of confidence required in the mission outcomes can be reached only by intensively testing the tools on synthetically generated data. A flexible procedure allowing the generation of a cross-correlated stationary noise time series was set up. A multichannel time series with the desired cross-correlation behavior can be generated once a model for a multichannel cross-spectral matrix is provided. The core of the procedure comprises a noise coloring, multichannel filter designed via a frequency-by-frequency eigendecomposition of the model cross-spectral matrix and a subsequent fit in the Z domain. The common problem of initial transients in a filtered time series is solved with a proper initialization of the filter recursion equations. The noise generator performance was tested in a two-dimensional case study of the closed-loop LISA Technology Package dynamics along the two principal degrees of freedom.

  6. Role of structural noise in aircraft pressure cockpit from vibration action of new-generation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baklanov, V. S.

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of new-generation aircraft engines is transitioning from a bypass ratio of 4-6 to an increased ratio of 8-12. This is leading to substantial broadening of the vibration spectrum of engines with a shift to the low-frequency range due to decreased rotation speed of the fan rotor, in turn requiring new solutions to decrease structural noise from engine vibrations to ensure comfort in the cockpits and cabins of aircraft.

  7. Applied computational aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The present volume discusses the original development of the panel method, the mapping solutions and singularity distributions of linear potential schemes, the capabilities of full-potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes schemes, the use of the grid-generation methodology in applied aerodynamics, subsonic airfoil design, inverse airfoil design for transonic applications, the divergent trailing-edge airfoil innovation in CFD, Euler and potential computational results for selected aerodynamic configurations, and the application of CFD to wing high-lift systems. Also discussed are high-lift wing modifications for an advanced-capability EA-6B aircraft, Navier-Stokes methods for internal and integrated propulsion system flow predictions, the use of zonal techniques for analysis of rotor-stator interaction, CFD applications to complex configurations, CFD applications in component aerodynamic design of the V-22, Navier-Stokes computations of a complete F-16, CFD at supersonic/hypersonic speeds, and future CFD developments.

  8. Computation and analysis of rotor-noise generation in grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junye; Wang, Kan; Wang, Meng

    2016-11-01

    The noise of a ten-bladed rotor interacting with a grid-generated turbulent flow at low Mach number is computed using large-eddy simulation and the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings extension to Lighthill's theory. The grid turbulence is approximated as convected homogeneous and isotropic turbulence generated by a separate simulation and provided as inflow boundary conditions. The sound pressure spectrum predicted by the simulation exhibits overall agreement with previous experimental measurements in terms of the spectral shape and level. The turbulence ingestion noise is broadband with small peaks at the blade passing frequency and its harmonics. It is significantly stronger than the rotor self-noise generated by blade trailing-edge vortex shedding. Consistent with experimental observations, decreasing the rotor advance ratio at fixed mean inflow velocity leads to an increase in the sound pressure level. Different levels of acoustic compactness assumptions are examined, and the results indicate that the blade chord is acoustically compact over the frequency range of interest. Blade to blade correlations of the acoustic dipole sources are shown to be small. Supported by ONR Grant N00014-14-1-0129.

  9. Magnetic noises generated by plants in microgravity: effect of external magnetic fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatina, N.; Sheykina, N.; Kordyum, E.

    Magnetic Noises Generated by Plants in Microgravity, Effect of External Magnetic Field. N. Bogatina(1), N. Sheykina(1), E. Kordyum(2). (1) B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics&Engineering of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkov, Ukraine (2) N.Cholodny Institute of Botany of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine. e-mail:bogatina@ilt.kharkov.ua/Fax: 38-0572-322370. The object of the work is to determine the correlation between the magnetic noises generated by plants and accelaration value during their development in microgravity. The amplitude of magnetic noise spectral density will be mesured. Its dependence on the magnitude of gravity accelaration and magnitudes of static and alternating magnetic fields is supposed to reflect the mechanisms of gravi- and magnitopercrption. We shall try to answer the guestion whether the same mechanism or different mechanisms are responsible for gravi- and magnitopercrption. The gravitropic reaction of plants is needed to be studied simultaneously with observation of magnetic noises. The measurements in microgravity have to be fulfilled by a flux-gate magnetometer connected with Philips spectroanalyser There are two directions of experiments. The first one is experiments that will be carried out on Earth under the conditions of weakening of gravitational force. The preliminary parameters of the required magnetic fields have to be determined in these experiments. The second one is the same experiment in the space. These experiments are supposed to allow us to define the mechanisms of a gravitropic reaction of plants because any motion of ions ( indolil-acetic ions, for instance) is accompanied by an increase of magnetic noise. The experimental results obtained under onGround conditions by using the superconducting technique wwithout weakening the weight force are disscussed. .

  10. Installation effects on the tonal noise generated by axial flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, Edward; Cattanei, Andrea; Mazzocut Zecchin, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents the results of experiments on a low-speed axial-flow fan flush mounted on flat panels typically employed in tests on automotive cooling fans. The experiments have been conducted in a hemi-anechoic chamber and were aimed at evaluating the installation effects of the whole test configuration, including chamber floor and size and shape of the mounting panel. The largest panels cause important SPL variations in a narrow, low frequency range. Their effect on the propagation function has been verified by means of parametric BEM computations. A regular wavy trend associated with reflections from the floor is also present. In both cases, the tonal noise is more strongly affected than the broadband one. The analysis is performed by means of an existing spectral decomposition technique and a new one, which allows to consider different noise generating mechanisms and also to separate the emitted tonal and broadband noise from the associated propagation effects. In order to better identify the features of the noise at the blade passing frequency (BPF) harmonics, the phase of the acoustic pressure is also analysed. Measurements are taken during speed ramps, which allow to obtain both constant-Strouhal number SPL data and constant-speed data. The former data set is employed in the new technique, while the latter may be employed in the standard spectral decomposition techniques. Based on both the similarity theory and the analysis of the Green's function of the problem, a theoretical description of the structure of the received SPL spectrum is given. Then, the possibility of discriminating between tonal and broadband noise generating mechanisms is analysed and a theoretical base for the new spectral decomposition technique is provided.

  11. Fast random number generation with spontaneous emission noise of a single-mode semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Zhang, Mingjiang; Liu, Yi; Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Zhang, Mingtao; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a 12.5 Gb s-1 random number generator based on measuring the spontaneous emission noise of a single-mode semiconductor laser. The spontaneous emission of light is quantum mechanical in nature and is an inborn physical entropy source of true randomness. By combining a high-speed analog-to-digital converter and off-line processing, random numbers are extracted from the spontaneous emission with the verified randomness. The generator is simple, robust, and with no need of accurately tuning the comparison threshold. The use of semiconductor lasers makes it particularly compatible with the delivery of random numbers in optical networks.

  12. On the rolling noise generation due to wheel/track parametric excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T. X.; Thompson, D. J.

    2006-06-01

    As a discretely supported railway track is essentially periodic, when a wheel rolls over the rail, it experiences the varying dynamic stiffness in a sleeper bay of the track, and thus the wheel and rail is periodically excited at the sleeper-passing frequency. The parametric excitation due to the varying track stiffness, in addition to the roughness or discontinuities on the wheel and rail rolling surfaces, also causes vibration and noise emission. A frequency-time domain methodology is applied for simulation of the wheel/rail interaction due to the parametric excitation. The wheel/rail interaction forces are calculated and Track-Wheel Interaction Noise Software (TWINS) is used to predict the noise radiation due to the parametric excitation at various train speeds. The results are compared with those from a moving irregularity model where no parametric excitation is generated. It is found that the components due to the parametric excitation are not significant at lower speeds compared with those due to the roughness excitation. Use of a moving irregularity model without considering the wheel/track parametric excitation may under-estimate the noise emission level at high speeds.

  13. Extremal Properties of an Intermittent Poisson Process Generating 1/f Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grüneis, Ferdinand

    2016-08-01

    It is well-known that the total power of a signal exhibiting a pure 1/f shape is divergent. This phenomenon is also called the infrared catastrophe. Mandelbrot claims that the infrared catastrophe can be overcome by stochastic processes which alternate between active and quiescent states. We investigate an intermittent Poisson process (IPP) which belongs to the family of stochastic processes suggested by Mandelbrot. During the intermission δ (quiescent period) the signal is zero. The active period is divided into random intervals of mean length τ0 consisting of a fluctuating number of events; this is giving rise to so-called clusters. The advantage of our treatment is that the spectral features of the IPP can be derived analytically. Our considerations are focused on the case that intermission is only a small disturbance of the Poisson process, i.e., to the case that δ ≤ τ0. This makes it difficult or even impossible to discriminate a spike train of such an IPP from that of a Poisson process. We investigate the conditions under which a 1/f spectrum can be observed. It is shown that 1/f noise generated by the IPP is accompanied with extreme variance. In agreement with the considerations of Mandelbrot, the IPP avoids the infrared catastrophe. Spectral analysis of the simulated IPP confirms our theoretical results. The IPP is a model for an almost random walk generating both white and 1/f noise and can be applied for an interpretation of 1/f noise in metallic resistors.

  14. Simulating Flying Insects Using Dynamics and Data-Driven Noise Modeling to Generate Diverse Collective Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiaping; Wang, Xinjie; Manocha, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    We present a biologically plausible dynamics model to simulate swarms of flying insects. Our formulation, which is based on biological conclusions and experimental observations, is designed to simulate large insect swarms of varying densities. We use a force-based model that captures different interactions between the insects and the environment and computes collision-free trajectories for each individual insect. Furthermore, we model the noise as a constructive force at the collective level and present a technique to generate noise-induced insect movements in a large swarm that are similar to those observed in real-world trajectories. We use a data-driven formulation that is based on pre-recorded insect trajectories. We also present a novel evaluation metric and a statistical validation approach that takes into account various characteristics of insect motions. In practice, the combination of Curl noise function with our dynamics model is used to generate realistic swarm simulations and emergent behaviors. We highlight its performance for simulating large flying swarms of midges, fruit fly, locusts and moths and demonstrate many collective behaviors, including aggregation, migration, phase transition, and escape responses. PMID:27187068

  15. Empirical Prediction of Aircraft Landing Gear Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Robert A. (Technical Monitor); Guo, Yue-Ping

    2005-01-01

    This report documents a semi-empirical/semi-analytical method for landing gear noise prediction. The method is based on scaling laws of the theory of aerodynamic noise generation and correlation of these scaling laws with current available test data. The former gives the method a sound theoretical foundation and the latter quantitatively determines the relations between the parameters of the landing gear assembly and the far field noise, enabling practical predictions of aircraft landing gear noise, both for parametric trends and for absolute noise levels. The prediction model is validated by wind tunnel test data for an isolated Boeing 737 landing gear and by flight data for the Boeing 777 airplane. In both cases, the predictions agree well with data, both in parametric trends and in absolute noise levels.

  16. Is noise-induced cochlear neuropathy key to the generation of hyperacusis or tinnitus?

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, M. Charles

    2013-01-01

    Perceptual abnormalities such as hyperacusis and tinnitus often occur after acoustic overexposure. Although such exposure can also result in permanent threshold elevation, some individuals with noise-induced hyperacusis or tinnitus show clinically normal thresholds. Recent work in animals has shown that a “neuropathic” noise exposure can cause immediate, permanent degeneration of the cochlear nerve despite complete threshold recovery and lack of hair cell damage (Kujawa SG, Liberman MC. J Neurosci 29: 14077–14085, 2009; Lin HW, Furman AC, Kujawa SG, Liberman MC. J Assoc Res Otolaryngol 12: 605–616, 2011). Here we ask whether this noise-induced primary neuronal degeneration results in abnormal auditory behavior, based on the acoustic startle response (ASR) and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle. Responses were measured in mice exposed either to a “neuropathic” noise or to a lower-intensity, “nonneuropathic” noise and in unexposed control mice. Mice with cochlear neuropathy displayed hyperresponsivity to sound, evidenced by enhanced ASR and PPI, while exposed mice without neuronal loss showed controllike responses. Gap PPI tests, often used to assess tinnitus, revealed limited gap detection deficits in mice with cochlear neuropathy only for certain gap-startle latencies, inconsistent with the presence of tinnitus “filling in the gap.” Despite significantly reduced wave 1 of the auditory brainstem response, representing cochlear nerve activity, later peaks were unchanged or enhanced, suggesting compensatory neural hyperactivity in the auditory brainstem. Considering the rapid postexposure onset of both cochlear neuropathy and exaggerated startle-based behavior, the results suggest a role for cochlear primary neuronal degeneration, per se, in the central neural excitability that could underlie the generation of hyperacusis. PMID:24198321

  17. Computerized Design and Generation of Low-noise Helical Gears with Modified Surface Topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Chen, N. X.; Lu, J.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    An approach for design and generation of low-noise helical gears with localized bearing contact is proposed. The approach is applied to double circular arc helical gears and modified involute helical gears. The reduction of noise and vibration is achieved by application of a predesigned parabolic function of transmission errors that is able to absorb a discontinuous linear function of transmission errors caused by misalignment. The localization of the bearing contact is achieved by the mismatch of pinion-gear tooth surfaces. Computerized simulation of meshing and contact of the designed gears demonstrated that the proposed approach will produce a pair of gears that has a parabolic transmission error function even when misalignment is present. Numerical examples for illustration of the developed approach are given.

  18. An experimental study of the noise generating mechanisms in supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    Flow fluctuation measurements with normal and X-wire hot-wire probes and acoustic measurements with a traversing condenser microphone were carried out in small air jets in the Mach number range from M = 0.9 to 2.5. One of the most successful studies involved a moderate Reynolds number M = 2.1 jet. The large scale turbulence properties in the jet, and the noise radiation were characterized. A parallel study involved similar measurements on a low Reynolds number M = 0.9 jet. These measurements show that there are important differences in the noise generation process of the M = 0.9 jet in comparison with low supersonic Mach number (M = 1.4) jets. Problems encounted while performing X-wire measurements in low Reynolds number jets of M = 2.1 and 2.5, and in installing a vacuum pump are discussed.

  19. Enhanced multiwavelength generation in Brillouin fiber laser with pump noise suppression technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Alimi, A. W.; Cholan, N. A.; Yaacob, M. H.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    A new multiwavelength Brillouin fiber laser (BFL) that provides a large number of Stokes lines with improved optical signal-to-noise ratio has been proposed and demonstrated. The BFL cavity is only formed by a nonlinear fiber loop mirror (NOLM) with 500 m long highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF). The BFL with improved performance is based on the suppression of the Brillouin pump noise floor utilizing a narrow tunable bandpass filter. The generation of Stokes lines covering up to a 33.67 nm wavelength range is achieved by setting the Brillouin pump signal within the HNLF’s zero dispersion wavelength and with power of 250 mW. This is owing to the combination of the stimulated Brillouin scattering and four-wave mixing effect in the NOLM structure.

  20. Noise of fan designed to reduce stator lift fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Woodward, R. P.; Stakolich, E. G.

    1977-01-01

    An existing fan stage was redesigned to reduce stator lift fluctuations and was acoustically tested at three nozzle sizes for reduced noise generation. The lift fluctuations on the stator were reduced by increasing the stator cord, adjusting incidence angles, and adjusting the rotor velocity diagrams. Broadband noise levels were signficantly reduced in the middle to high frequencies. Blade passage tone sound power was not lessened, but decreases in the harmonics were observed. Aerodynamic improvements in both performance and efficiency were obtained.

  1. Mechanism of tonal noise generation from circular cylinder with spiral fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Ryo; Hayashi, Hidechito; Okumura, Tetsuya; Hamakawa, Hiromitsu

    2014-12-01

    The pitch of the spiral finned tube influences seriously to the acoustic resonance in the heat exchanger. In this research, the flow characteristics in relating to the aeolian tone from the finned cylinder are studied by the numerical simulation. It is observed that the tonal noise generated from the finned tube at two pitch spaces. The ratio of the fin pitch to the cylinder diameter is changed at 0.11 and 0.27. The tone level increases and the frequency decreases with the pitch shorter. The separation flow from the cylinder generates the span-wise vortices, Karman vortices, and the separation flow from the fin generates the stream-wise vortices. When the fin pitch ratio is small, the stream-wise vortices line up to span-wise and become weak rapidly. Only the Karman vortices are remained and integrate in span. So the Karman vortex became large. This causes the low frequency and the large aeolian tone.

  2. The influence of stress on surface Barkhausen noise generation in pipeline steels

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadish, C.; Clapham, L.; Atherton, D.L. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-09-01

    Surface Barkhausen noise (SBN) generation has been monitored for two different sweep field orientations in a pipeline half-section which was subjected to circumferential tensile and compressive stresses. When the sweep field is oriented in the circumferential direction SBN increases with applied tension and decreases with compression. The SBN signal is more sensitive to tension than it is to compression; this has been explained in terms of a preferred axial domain orientation. Unlike the case of a circumferential magnetic sweep field, neither tension nor compression have a significant effect on the SBN signal when the field is oriented axially.

  3. Response measurements for two building structures excited by noise from a large horizontal axis wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, H. H.; Shepherd, K. P.

    1984-01-01

    Window and wall acceleration measurements and interior noise measurements ere made for two different building structures during excitation by noise from the WTS-4 horizontal axis wind turbine generator operating in a normal power generation mode. With turbine noise input pulses resulted in acceleration pulses for the wall and window elements of the two tests buildings. Response spectra suggest that natural vibration modes of the structures are excited. Responses of a house trailer were substantially greater than those for a building of sturdier construction. Peak acceleration values correlate well with similar data for houses excited by flyover noise from commercial and military airplanes and helicopters, and sonic booms from supersonic aircraft. Interior noise spectra have peaks at frequencies corresponding to structural vibration modes and room standing waves; and the levels for particular frequencies and locations can be higher than the outside levels.

  4. Response measurements for two building structures excited by noise from a large horizontal axis wind turbine generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, H. H.; Shepherd, K. P.

    1984-11-01

    Window and wall acceleration measurements and interior noise measurements ere made for two different building structures during excitation by noise from the WTS-4 horizontal axis wind turbine generator operating in a normal power generation mode. With turbine noise input pulses resulted in acceleration pulses for the wall and window elements of the two tests buildings. Response spectra suggest that natural vibration modes of the structures are excited. Responses of a house trailer were substantially greater than those for a building of sturdier construction. Peak acceleration values correlate well with similar data for houses excited by flyover noise from commercial and military airplanes and helicopters, and sonic booms from supersonic aircraft. Interior noise spectra have peaks at frequencies corresponding to structural vibration modes and room standing waves; and the levels for particular frequencies and locations can be higher than the outside levels.

  5. Modal content of noise generated by a coaxial jet in a pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerschen, E. J.; Johnston, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Noise generated by air flow through a coaxial obstruction in a long, straight pipe was investigated with concentration on the modal characteristics of the noise field inside the pipe and downstream of the restriction. Two measurement techniques were developed for separation of the noise into the acoustic duct modes. The instantaneous mode separation technique uses four microphones, equally spaced in the circumferential direction, at the same axial location. The time-averaged mode separation technique uses three microphones mounted at the same axial location. A matrix operation on time-averaged data produces the modal pressure levels. This technique requires the restrictive assumption that the acoustic modes are uncorrelated with each other. The measured modal pressure spectra were converted to modal power spectra and integrated over the frequency range 200-6000 Hz. The acoustic efficiency levels (acoustic power normalized by jet kinetic energy flow), when plotted vs. jet Mach number, showed a strong dependence on the ratio of restriction diameter to pipe diameter. The acoustic energy flow analyses based on the thermodynamic energy equation and on the results of Mohring both resulted in orthogonality properties for the eigenfunctions of the radial mode shape equation. These orthogonality relationships involve the eigenvalues and derivatives of the radial mode shape functions.

  6. Real-time full bandwidth measurement of spectral noise in supercontinuum generation

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, B.; Stefani, A.; Larger, L.; Lacourt, P. A.; Merolla, J. M.; Sylvestre, T.; Kudlinski, A.; Mussot, A.; Genty, G.; Dias, F.; Dudley, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to measure real-time fluctuations of ultrashort pulses propagating in optical fiber has provided significant insights into fundamental dynamical effects such as modulation instability and the formation of frequency-shifting rogue wave solitons. We report here a detailed study of real-time fluctuations across the full bandwidth of a fiber supercontinuum which directly reveals the significant variation in measured noise statistics across the spectrum, and which allows us to study correlations between widely separated spectral components. For two different propagation distances corresponding to the onset phase of spectral broadening and the fully-developed supercontinuum, we measure real time noise across the supercontinuum bandwidth, and we quantify the supercontinuum noise using statistical higher-order moments and a frequency-dependent intensity correlation map. We identify correlated spectral regions within the supercontinuum associated with simultaneous sideband generation, as well as signatures of pump depletion and soliton-like pump dynamics. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with simulations. PMID:23193436

  7. Chaff Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    further improve the contrast all of the interior surfaces of the test chamber are painted flat black and the bac!-,ground walls in view of the cameras...to be adequate to eliminate wall effects on the chaff aerodynamics. Secondly, the chamber air mass had to be sufficiently small that it would damp out...independently- supported special rotating-shutter system to "strobe" the dipole images. The integral shutter in each lens assembly is also retained for

  8. NASA Aerodynamics Program Annual Report 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    95 ROTONET Phase IV System Multirotor Source Noise Module ...................................................... 97 Acoustic Results...94 Figure 6-7. ROTONET Phase IV System Multirotor Source Noise Module .................................. 96 Figure 6-8. Effects of Reduced...focusing on the areas of hybrid laminar flow technology and the reduction of aerodynamic interference between major aircraft components. A hybrid

  9. Estimation of entropy rate in a fast physical random-bit generator using a chaotic semiconductor laser with intrinsic noise.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Takuya; Kanno, Kazutaka; Aoyama, Kota; Uchida, Atsushi; Ikeguchi, Tohru; Harayama, Takahisa; Sunada, Satoshi; Arai, Ken-ichi; Yoshimura, Kazuyuki; Davis, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the time for growth of bit entropy when generating nondeterministic bits using a chaotic semiconductor laser model. The mechanism for generating nondeterministic bits is modeled as a 1-bit sampling of the intensity of light output. Microscopic noise results in an ensemble of trajectories whose bit entropy increases with time. The time for the growth of bit entropy, called the memory time, depends on both noise strength and laser dynamics. It is shown that the average memory time decreases logarithmically with increase in noise strength. It is argued that the ratio of change in average memory time with change in logarithm of noise strength can be used to estimate the intrinsic dynamical entropy rate for this method of random bit generation. It is also shown that in this model the entropy rate corresponds to the maximum Lyapunov exponent.

  10. Potential of neuro-fuzzy methodology to estimate noise level of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Vlastimir; Petković, Dalibor; Por, Lip Yee; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Zamani, Mazdak; Ćojbašić, Žarko; Motamedi, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbines noise effect became large problem because of increasing of wind farms numbers since renewable energy becomes the most influential energy sources. However, wind turbine noise generation and propagation is not understandable in all aspects. Mechanical noise of wind turbines can be ignored since aerodynamic noise of wind turbine blades is the main source of the noise generation. Numerical simulations of the noise effects of the wind turbine can be very challenging task. Therefore in this article soft computing method is used to evaluate noise level of wind turbines. The main goal of the study is to estimate wind turbine noise in regard of wind speed at different heights and for different sound frequency. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is used to estimate the wind turbine noise levels.

  11. Wheel/rail noise generation due to nonlinear effects and parametric excitation.

    PubMed

    Nordborg, Anders

    2002-04-01

    Two models are developed, one in the time domain and another in the frequency domain, to explain when a wheel/rail noise generation model requires the inclusion of discrete supports, parametric excitation, and the nonlinear contact spring. Numerical simulations indicate the inclusion of discrete supports to describe low frequency response, and also at higher frequencies, especially where the rail is very smooth or has a corrugation/wavelength corresponding to the pinned-pinned frequency. With a corrugation, it may become essential to include the nonlinear contact spring, as contact loss occurs at high corrugation amplitudes. As nonlinearity causes force generation over a broad frequency range, some contributions excite wheel resonances, resulting in high radiation levels, that require the inclusion of wheel/rail nonlinear effects and parametric excitation for accurate prediction.

  12. Modular design and implementation of field-programmable-gate-array-based Gaussian noise generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan-Ping; Lee, Ta-Sung; Hwang, Jeng-Kuang

    2016-05-01

    The modular design of a Gaussian noise generator (GNG) based on field-programmable gate array (FPGA) technology was studied. A new range reduction architecture was included in a series of elementary function evaluation modules and was integrated into the GNG system. The approximation and quantisation errors for the square root module with a first polynomial approximation were high; therefore, we used the central limit theorem (CLT) to improve the noise quality. This resulted in an output rate of one sample per clock cycle. We subsequently applied Newton's method for the square root module, thus eliminating the need for the use of the CLT because applying the CLT resulted in an output rate of two samples per clock cycle (>200 million samples per second). Two statistical tests confirmed that our GNG is of high quality. Furthermore, the range reduction, which is used to solve a limited interval of the function approximation algorithms of the System Generator platform using Xilinx FPGAs, appeared to have a higher numerical accuracy, was operated at >350 MHz, and can be suitably applied for any function evaluation.

  13. Mode-hopping mechanism generating colored noise in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Raghav; Dürrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E.; Heinonen, O. G.; Åkerman, J.; Muduli, P. K.

    2014-09-29

    The frequency noise spectrum of a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator is examined where multiple modes and mode-hopping events are observed. The frequency noise spectrum is found to consist of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise. We find a systematic and similar dependence of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise on bias current and the relative angle between the reference and free layers, which changes the effective damping and hence the mode-hopping behavior in this system. The frequency at which the 1/f frequency noise changes to white noise increases as the free layer is aligned away from the anti-parallel orientation w.r.t the reference layer. These results indicate that the origin of 1/f frequency noise is related to mode-hopping, which produces both white noise as well as 1/f frequency noise similar to the case of ring lasers.

  14. The spatial relationship between traffic-generated air pollution and noise in 2 US cities.

    PubMed

    Allen, Ryan W; Davies, Hugh; Cohen, Martin A; Mallach, Gary; Kaufman, Joel D; Adar, Sara D

    2009-04-01

    Traffic-generated air pollution and noise have both been linked to cardiovascular morbidity. Since traffic is a shared source, there is potential for correlated exposures that may lead to confounding in epidemiologic studies. As part of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution (MESA Air), 2-week NO and NO(2) concentrations were measured at up to 105 locations, selected primarily to characterize gradients near major roads, in each of 9 US communities. We measured 5-min A-weighted equivalent continuous sound pressure levels (L(eq)) and ultrafine particle (UFP) counts at a subset of these NO/NO(2) monitoring locations in Chicago, IL (N=69 in December 2006; N=36 in April 2007) and Riverside County, CA (N=46 in April 2007). L(eq) and UFP were measured during non-"rush hour" periods (10:00-16:00) to maximize comparability between measurements. We evaluated roadway proximity exposure surrogates in relation to the measured levels, estimated noise-air pollution correlation coefficients, and evaluated the impact of regional-scale pollution gradients, wind direction, and roadway proximity on the correlations. Five-minute L(eq) measurements in December 2006 and April 2007 were highly correlated (r=0.84), and measurements made at different times of day were similar (coefficients of variation: 0.5-13%), indicating that 5-min measurements are representative of long-term L(eq). Binary and continuous roadway proximity metrics characterized L(eq) as well or better than NO or NO(2). We found strong regional-scale gradients in NO and NO(2), particularly in Chicago, but only weak regional-scale gradients in L(eq) and UFP. L(eq) was most consistently correlated with NO, but the correlations were moderate (0.20-0.60). After removing the influence of regional-scale gradients the correlations generally increased (L(eq)-NO: r=0.49-0.62), and correlations downwind of major roads (L(eq)-NO: r=0.53-0.74) were consistently higher than those upwind (0.35-0.65). There was not a

  15. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Methodology for Noise Assessment of Wind Turbine

    PubMed Central

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Petković, Dalibor; Hashim, Roslan; Motamedi, Shervin

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine noise is one of the major obstacles for the widespread use of wind energy. Noise tone can greatly increase the annoyance factor and the negative impact on human health. Noise annoyance caused by wind turbines has become an emerging problem in recent years, due to the rapid increase in number of wind turbines, triggered by sustainable energy goals set forward at the national and international level. Up to now, not all aspects of the generation, propagation and perception of wind turbine noise are well understood. For a modern large wind turbine, aerodynamic noise from the blades is generally considered to be the dominant noise source, provided that mechanical noise is adequately eliminated. The sources of aerodynamic noise can be divided into tonal noise, inflow turbulence noise, and airfoil self-noise. Many analytical and experimental acoustical studies performed the wind turbines. Since the wind turbine noise level analyzing by numerical methods or computational fluid dynamics (CFD) could be very challenging and time consuming, soft computing techniques are preferred. To estimate noise level of wind turbine, this paper constructed a process which simulates the wind turbine noise levels in regard to wind speed and sound frequency with adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). This intelligent estimator is implemented using Matlab/Simulink and the performances are investigated. The simulation results presented in this paper show the effectiveness of the developed method. PMID:25075621

  16. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy methodology for noise assessment of wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Petković, Dalibor; Hashim, Roslan; Motamedi, Shervin

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine noise is one of the major obstacles for the widespread use of wind energy. Noise tone can greatly increase the annoyance factor and the negative impact on human health. Noise annoyance caused by wind turbines has become an emerging problem in recent years, due to the rapid increase in number of wind turbines, triggered by sustainable energy goals set forward at the national and international level. Up to now, not all aspects of the generation, propagation and perception of wind turbine noise are well understood. For a modern large wind turbine, aerodynamic noise from the blades is generally considered to be the dominant noise source, provided that mechanical noise is adequately eliminated. The sources of aerodynamic noise can be divided into tonal noise, inflow turbulence noise, and airfoil self-noise. Many analytical and experimental acoustical studies performed the wind turbines. Since the wind turbine noise level analyzing by numerical methods or computational fluid dynamics (CFD) could be very challenging and time consuming, soft computing techniques are preferred. To estimate noise level of wind turbine, this paper constructed a process which simulates the wind turbine noise levels in regard to wind speed and sound frequency with adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). This intelligent estimator is implemented using Matlab/Simulink and the performances are investigated. The simulation results presented in this paper show the effectiveness of the developed method.

  17. Spectral, noise and correlation properties of intense squeezed light generated by a coupling in two laser fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kryuchkyan, Gagik YU.; Kheruntsyan, Karen V.

    1994-01-01

    Two schemes of four-wave mixing oscillators with nondegenerate pumps are proposed for above-threehold generation of squeezed light with nonzero mean-field amplitudes. Noise and correlation properties and optical spectra of squeezed-light beams generated in these schemes are discussed.

  18. Ultralow-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal generator assisted with an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb

    PubMed Central

    Ishizawa, A.; Nishikawa, T.; Goto, T.; Hitachi, K.; Sogawa, T.; Gotoh, H.

    2016-01-01

    Low-noise millimetre-wave signals are valuable for digital sampling systems, arbitrary waveform generation for ultra-wideband communications, and coherent radar systems. However, the phase noise of widely used conventional signal generators (SGs) will increase as the millimetre-wave frequency increases. Our goal has been to improve commercially available SGs so that they provide a low-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal with assistance from an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb (EOM-OFC). Here, we show that the phase noise can be greatly reduced by bridging the vast frequency difference between the gigahertz and terahertz ranges with an EOM-OFC. The EOM-OFC serves as a liaison that magnifies the phase noise of the SG. With the EOM-OFC used as a phase noise “booster” for a millimetre-wave signal, the phase noise of widely used SGs can be reduced at an arbitrary frequency f (6 ≦ f ≦ 72 GHz). PMID:27185040

  19. Ultralow-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal generator assisted with an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Ishizawa, A; Nishikawa, T; Goto, T; Hitachi, K; Sogawa, T; Gotoh, H

    2016-05-17

    Low-noise millimetre-wave signals are valuable for digital sampling systems, arbitrary waveform generation for ultra-wideband communications, and coherent radar systems. However, the phase noise of widely used conventional signal generators (SGs) will increase as the millimetre-wave frequency increases. Our goal has been to improve commercially available SGs so that they provide a low-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal with assistance from an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb (EOM-OFC). Here, we show that the phase noise can be greatly reduced by bridging the vast frequency difference between the gigahertz and terahertz ranges with an EOM-OFC. The EOM-OFC serves as a liaison that magnifies the phase noise of the SG. With the EOM-OFC used as a phase noise "booster" for a millimetre-wave signal, the phase noise of widely used SGs can be reduced at an arbitrary frequency f (6 ≦ f ≦ 72 GHz).

  20. Significance of shock structure on supersonic jet mixing noise of axisymmetric nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Chan M.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Khavaran, Abbas

    1994-01-01

    One of the key technical elements in NASA's high speed research program is reducing the noise level to meet the federal noise regulation. The dominant noise source is associated with the supersonic jet discharged from the engine exhaust system. Whereas the turbulence mixing is largely responsible for the generation of the jet noise, a broadband shock-associated noise is also generated when the nozzle operates at conditions other than its design. For both mixing and shock noise components, because the source of the noise is embedded in the jet plume, one can expect that jet noise can be predicted from the jet flowfield computation. Mani et al. developed a unified aerodynamic/acoustic prediction scheme by applying an extension of Reichardt's aerodynamic model to compute turbulent shear stresses which are utilized in estimating the strength of the noise source. Although this method produces a fast and practical estimate of the jet noise, a modification by Khavaran et al. has led to an improvement in aerodynamic solution. The most notable feature in this work is that Reichardt's model is replaced with the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solution of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The major advantage of this work is that the essential, noise-related flow quantities such as turbulence intensity and shock strength can be better predicted. The predictions were limited to a shock-free design condition and the effect of shock structure on the jet mixing noise was not addressed. The present work is aimed at investigating this issue. Under imperfectly expanded conditions the existence of the shock cell structure and its interaction with the convecting turbulence structure may not only generate a broadband shock-associated noise but also change the turbulence structure, and thus the strength of the mixing noise source. Failure in capturing shock structures properly could lead to incorrect aeroacoustic predictions.

  1. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  2. Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.

    2011-11-01

    This report details the acoustic noise test conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. The test turbine is a two- bladed, downwind wind turbine with a rated power of 11 kW. The test turbine was tested in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission standard, IEC 61400-11 Ed 2.1 2006-11 Wind Turbine Generator Systems -- Part 11 Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques.

  3. A numerical model for ocean ultra-low frequency noise: wave-generated acoustic-gravity and Rayleigh modes.

    PubMed

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Lavanant, Thibaut; Obrebski, Mathias; Marié, Louis; Royer, Jean-Yves; d'Eu, Jean-François; Howe, Bruce M; Lukas, Roger; Aucan, Jerome

    2013-10-01

    The generation of ultra-low frequency acoustic noise (0.1 to 1 Hz) by the nonlinear interaction of ocean surface gravity waves is well established. More controversial are the quantitative theories that attempt to predict the recorded noise levels and their variability. Here a single theoretical framework is used to predict the noise level associated with propagating pseudo-Rayleigh modes and evanescent acoustic-gravity modes. The latter are dominant only within 200 m from the sea surface, in shallow or deep water. At depths larger than 500 m, the comparison of a numerical noise model with hydrophone records from two open-ocean sites near Hawaii and the Kerguelen islands reveal: (a) Deep ocean acoustic noise at frequencies 0.1 to 1 Hz is consistent with the Rayleigh wave theory, in which the presence of the ocean bottom amplifies the noise by 10 to 20 dB; (b) in agreement with previous results, the local maxima in the noise spectrum support the theoretical prediction for the vertical structure of acoustic modes; and (c) noise level and variability are well predicted for frequencies up to 0.4 Hz. Above 0.6 Hz, the model results are less accurate, probably due to the poor estimation of the directional properties of wind-waves with frequencies higher than 0.3 Hz.

  4. Definitional Noise in Estimates of Water Use for Electrical Generation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    A key challenge in water-resources planning and policy is determining how much water is withdrawn and consumed to meet various needs. In the case of electrical power generation, quantifying water use is beset by differences and confusion in defining the basic terms relating water used in generating electricity to its hydrologic context, leading to wide disagreement on the amounts of withdrawal and consumption. Water withdrawals by plants with artificial cooling ponds, water consumption by plants with once-through cooling systems, and water diversion and consumption associated with hydroelectric power generation provide three examples of this 'definitional noise'. Plants that use cooling ponds withdraw water from other water bodies to make up for water lost from the pond, primarily as evaporation. Some of these plants report as withdrawal all flow from the pond to the condenser; others report only the much smaller flows needed to make up for water lost from the pond. Inconsistent assignment of plants to these two categories produces differences of several billion gallons per day in withdrawal estimates. Estimates of water consumption at plants with once-through cooling systems directly connected to natural surface water bodies vary substantially depending on whether 'consumption' is defined as being restricted to water loss within the plant or includes forced evaporation outside the plant caused by heat from the warmed cooling water returned to the source water body. Blurring of this distinction has produced wildly divergent consumption estimates. Differences in defining the processes that constitute water use for electrical generation produce dramatic differences in estimated water use. Historically, hydroelectric plants have been defined as having no water withdrawals or consumption. However, if flow through hydroelectric turbines were treated as withdrawal it would dwarf all other types of withdrawal, and if evaporation from reservoirs used for hydroelectric

  5. A method for characterizing aerodynamic sound sources in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongeau, L.; Thompson, D. E.; Mclaughlin, D. K.

    1995-03-01

    A method based on Weidemann's acoustic similarity laws [1] was used to investigate the aerodynamic sound generated by a partially ducted centrifugal pump rotor. The primary objective of the method was to determine the spectral characteristics of the sound source by isolating the effects of acoustic phenomena such as duct resonances or sound reflections. Pump-radiated sound pressure spectra were measured for different impeller rotational speeds, keeping the operating condition constant. The spectra, assumed to be expressed as the product of a source spectral distribution function and an acoustic frequency response function, were then decomposed into a product form following a computer-implemented algorithm. The method was successful in accurately determining the spectral distribution of the broadband aerodynamic noise generating mechanisms involved and that of the acoustic frequency response of the system. The absolute levels of the source function and the acoustic function were established by assuming that, over a limited low frequency range, the average gain of the frequency response function is unity so that comparisons between different pump operating conditions could be made. The source spectral distribution was found to be independent of the microphone location and the acoustic loading. When applicable, this method therefore allows the characterization of aerodynamic sound sources by measuring ordinary sound pressure spectra, at any one point around the source, without having to isolate the source from the system. The source characterization method was instrumental in the study of sound generation by rotating stall presented in a previous publication [2].

  6. Inclusion of sensor noise in radiometric models for generation of synthetic longwave infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, John R.; Salvaggio, Carl

    1987-01-01

    A radiometric model has been developed for modeling the effects of self emission, reflection of downwelled radiance, atmospheric transmission and path radiance on the radiance reaching an airborne or satellite sensing system. The model, which incorporates LOWTRAN 6, includes angular emissivity effects and will account for either specular or diffuse reflectance from targets and backgrounds. The model has been refined to facilitate its use in generating primitive synthetic images to study LWIR phenomena. In particular, various types of sensor related noise have been included in the imaging process. Images are presented simulating the effects of target-to-background contrast as a function of view angle, range, emissivity variation, and atmospheric effects. The potential for use of LWIR models in sensor and algorithm development is discussed.

  7. Tunable noise-like pulse generation in mode-locked Tm fiber laser with a SESAM.

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Yutaka; Fujita, Eisuke; Tokurakawa, Masaki

    2016-11-14

    We report on a tunable noise-like pulse (NLP) generation in a mode-locked Tm fiber laser with a SESAM. A tuning range of 1895-1942 nm, while keeping the spectral bandwidth of 10-19 nm under NLP mode-locked operation, was obtained by a tunable filter based on chromatic dispersion of telescope lenses. At the center wavelength of 1928 nm, the maximum output power of 195 mW with the spectral bandwidth of 18.9 nm was obtained. The repetition rate was 20.5 MHz and the corresponding pulse energy was 9.5 nJ. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a tunable NLP mode-locked laser based on chromatic dispersion of a lens system.

  8. Generation of broadband noise-like pulse from Yb-doped fiber laser ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Ganeev, Rashid A; Yoneya, Shin; Kuroda, Hiroto

    2015-03-01

    We have demonstrated a generation of the noise-like pulse (NLP) with broadband spectrum in a nonlinear polarized evolution-based passive mode-locked Yb-doped fiber (YDF) ring laser. At the cavity dispersion of near zero, the NLP with spectrum bandwidth up to 131 nm (FWHM) was obtained at a central wavelength of 1070 nm with output power of 136 mW and 80 MHz repetition rate. To our best knowledge, this spectrum bandwidth of NLP is the broadest among the reported YDF lasers. The autocorrelation function of pulse contained the short (30 fs) and long (4.6 ps) components. This short coherence light source is well suited for the optical coherent tomography used for ophthalmology at a wavelength of ∼1000  nm.

  9. Weak noise in neurons may powerfully inhibit the generation of repetitive spiking but not its propagation.

    PubMed

    Tuckwell, Henry C; Jost, Jürgen

    2010-05-27

    Many neurons have epochs in which they fire action potentials in an approximately periodic fashion. To see what effects noise of relatively small amplitude has on such repetitive activity we recently examined the response of the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) space-clamped system to such noise as the mean and variance of the applied current vary, near the bifurcation to periodic firing. This article is concerned with a more realistic neuron model which includes spatial extent. Employing the Hodgkin-Huxley partial differential equation system, the deterministic component of the input current is restricted to a small segment whereas the stochastic component extends over a region which may or may not overlap the deterministic component. For mean values below, near and above the critical values for repetitive spiking, the effects of weak noise of increasing strength is ascertained by simulation. As in the point model, small amplitude noise near the critical value dampens the spiking activity and leads to a minimum as noise level increases. This was the case for both additive noise and conductance-based noise. Uniform noise along the whole neuron is only marginally more effective in silencing the cell than noise which occurs near the region of excitation. In fact it is found that if signal and noise overlap in spatial extent, then weak noise may inhibit spiking. If, however, signal and noise are applied on disjoint intervals, then the noise has no effect on the spiking activity, no matter how large its region of application, though the trajectories are naturally altered slightly by noise. Such effects could not be discerned in a point model and are important for real neuron behavior. Interference with the spike train does nevertheless occur when the noise amplitude is larger, even when noise and signal do not overlap, being due to the instigation of secondary noise-induced wave phenomena rather than switching the system from one attractor (firing regularly) to another (a stable

  10. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2010-03-06

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re approximately 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small

  11. Combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  12. Evaluation and prediction of blade-passing frequency noise generated by a centrifugal blower

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Y.; Outa, E.; Tajima, K.

    1996-07-01

    The blade-passing frequency noise, abbreviated to BPF noise, of a low-specific-speed centrifugal blower is analyzed by separating the frequency response of the transmission passage and the intensity of the noise source. Frequency response has previously been evaluated by the authors using a one-dimensional linear wave model, and the results have agreed well with the experimental response in a practical range of the blower speed. In the present study, the intensity of the noise source is estimated by introducing the quasi-steady model of the blade wake impingement on the scroll surface. The effective location of the noise source is determined by analyzing the cross-correlation between measured data of the blower suction noise and pressure fluctuation on the scroll surface. Then, the surface density distribution of a dipole noise source is determined from pressure fluctuations expressed in terms of quasi-steady dynamic pressure of the traveling blade wake. Finally, the free-field noise level is predicted by integrating the density spectrum of the noise source over the effective source area. The sound pressure level of the blower suction noise is easily predicted by multiplying the free-field noise level by the frequency-response characteristics of the noise transmission passage.

  13. A connection between the Efferent Auditory System and Noise-Induced Tinnitus Generation. Reduced contralateral suppression of TEOAEs in patients with noise-induced tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Lalaki, Panagiota; Hatzopoulos, Stavros; Lorito, Guiscardo; Kochanek, Krzysztof; Sliwa, Lech; Skarzynski, Henryk

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Subjective tinnitus is an auditory perception that is not caused by external stimulation, its source being anywhere in the auditory system. Furthermore, evidence exists that exposure to noise alters cochlear micromechanics, either directly or through complex feed-back mechanisms, involving the medial olivocochlear efferent system. The aim of this study was to assess the role of the efferent auditory system in noise-induced tinnitus generation. Material/Methods Contralateral sound-activated suppression of TEOAEs was performed in a group of 28 subjects with noise-induced tinnitus (NIT) versus a group of 35 subjects with normal hearing and tinnitus, without any history of exposure to intense occupational or recreational noise (idiopathic tinnitus-IT). Thirty healthy, normally hearing volunteers were used as controls for the efferent suppression test. Results Suppression of the TEOAE amplitude less than 1 dB SPL was considered abnormal, giving a false positive rate of 6.7%. Eighteen out of 28 (64.3%) patients of the NIT group and 9 out of 35 (25.7%) patients of the IT group showed abnormal suppression values, which were significantly different from the controls’ (p<0.0001 and p<0.045, respectively). Conclusions The abnormal activity of the efferent auditory system in NIT cases might indicate that either the activity of the efferent fibers innervating the outer hair cells (OHCs) is impaired or that the damaged OHCs themselves respond abnormally to the efferent stimulation. PMID:21709642

  14. Simultaneous low noise radio frequency tone and narrow linewidth optical comb generation from a regeneratively mode-locked laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdur, Ibrahim; Ozharar, Sarper; Delfyett, Peter J.

    2014-10-01

    A regeneratively mode-locked laser with simultaneous low noise radio frequency (RF) tone and optical comb generation is presented. The laser does not need any external RF signal and emits a pulse train at ˜10 GHz repetition rate with a 1.5-ps optical pulse width after compression. The generated RF tone has a signal-to-noise ratio of 121 dB/Hz and an RF fluctuation of 10-9 over 0.1 s. The optical frequency comb spacing is also at ˜10 GHz and the optical comb tooth has a linewidth of <1 kHz.

  15. Modulating optical rectification, second and third harmonic generation of doped quantum dots: Interplay between hydrostatic pressure, temperature and noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Saha, Surajit; Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-10-01

    We examine the profiles of optical rectification (OR), second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) of impurity doped QDs under the combined influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) in presence and absence of Gaussian white noise. Noise has been incorporated to the system additively and multiplicatively. In order to study the above nonlinear optical (NLO) properties the doped dot has been subjected to a polarized monochromatic electromagnetic field. Effect of application of noise is nicely reflected through alteration of peak shift (blue/red) and variation of peak height (increase/decrease) of above NLO properties as temperature and pressure are varied. All such changes again sensitively depends on mode of application (additive/multiplicative) of noise. The remarkable influence of interplay between noise strength and its mode of application on the said profiles has also been addressed. The findings illuminate fascinating role played by noise in tuning above NLO properties of doped QD system under the active presence of both hydrostatic pressure and temperature.

  16. A hybrid fault diagnosis method based on second generation wavelet de-noising and local mean decomposition for rotating machinery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiwen; He, Zhengjia; Guo, Wei; Tang, Zhangchun

    2016-03-01

    In order to extract fault features of large-scale power equipment from strong background noise, a hybrid fault diagnosis method based on the second generation wavelet de-noising (SGWD) and the local mean decomposition (LMD) is proposed in this paper. In this method, a de-noising algorithm of second generation wavelet transform (SGWT) using neighboring coefficients was employed as the pretreatment to remove noise in rotating machinery vibration signals by virtue of its good effect in enhancing the signal-noise ratio (SNR). Then, the LMD method is used to decompose the de-noised signals into several product functions (PFs). The PF corresponding to the faulty feature signal is selected according to the correlation coefficients criterion. Finally, the frequency spectrum is analyzed by applying the FFT to the selected PF. The proposed method is applied to analyze the vibration signals collected from an experimental gearbox and a real locomotive rolling bearing. The results demonstrate that the proposed method has better performances such as high SNR and fast convergence speed than the normal LMD method.

  17. Contra-Rotating Open Rotor Tone Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2014-01-01

    Reliable prediction of contra-rotating open rotor (CROR) noise is an essential element of any strategy for the development of low-noise open rotor propulsion systems that can meet both the community noise regulations and the cabin noise limits. Since CROR noise spectra typically exhibits a preponderance of tones, significant efforts have been directed towards predicting their tone spectra. To that end, there has been an ongoing effort at NASA to assess various in-house open rotor tone noise prediction tools using a benchmark CROR blade set for which significant aerodynamic and acoustic data had been acquired in wind tunnel tests. In the work presented here, the focus is on the near-field noise of the benchmark open rotor blade set at the cruise condition. Using an analytical CROR tone noise model with input from high-fidelity aerodynamic simulations, detailed tone noise spectral predictions have been generated and compared with the experimental data. Comparisons indicate that the theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the data, especially for the dominant CROR tones and their overall sound pressure level. The results also indicate that, whereas individual rotor tones are well predicted by the linear sources (i.e., thickness and loading), for the interaction tones it is essential that the quadrupole sources be included in the analysis.

  18. "Ladder" structure in tonal noise generated by laminar flow around an airfoil.

    PubMed

    Chong, Tze Pei; Joseph, Phillip

    2012-06-01

    The presence of a "ladder" structure in the airfoil tonal noise was discovered in the 1970s, but its mechanism hitherto remains a subject of continual investigation in the research community. Based on the measured noise results and some numerical analysis presented in this letter, the variations of four types of airfoil tonal noise frequencies with the flow velocity were analyzed individually. The ladder structure is proposed to be caused by the acoustic/hydrodynamic frequency lag between the scattering of the boundary layer instability noise and the discrete noise produced by an aeroacoustic feedback loop.

  19. Hybrid Wing Body Shielding Studies Using an Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source Generating Simple Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel, L.; Brown, Clifford, A.; Walker, Bruce, E.

    2012-01-01

    An Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source (UCFANS) was designed, built, and tested in support of the Langley Research Center s 14- by 22-Foot wind tunnel test of the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) full three-dimensional 5.8 percent scale model. The UCFANS is a 5.8 percent rapid prototype scale model of a high-bypass turbofan engine that can generate the tonal signature of candidate engines using artificial sources (no flow). The purpose of the test was to provide an estimate of the acoustic shielding benefits possible from mounting the engine on the upper surface of an HWB aircraft and to provide a database for shielding code validation. A range of frequencies, and a parametric study of modes were generated from exhaust and inlet nacelle configurations. Radiated acoustic data were acquired from a traversing linear array of 13 microphones, spanning 36 in. Two planes perpendicular to the axis of the nacelle (in its 0 orientation) and three planes parallel were acquired from the array sweep. In each plane the linear array traversed five sweeps, for a total span of 160 in. acquired. The resolution of the sweep is variable, so that points closer to the model are taken at a higher resolution. Contour plots of Sound Pressure Level, and integrated Power Levels are presented in this paper; as well as the in-duct modal structure.

  20. Noise generated by impingement of turbulent flow on airfoils of varied chord, cylinders, and other flow obstructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Noise spectra were measured in three dimensions for several surfaces immersed in turbulent flow from a jet and over a range of flow conditions. The data are free field and were corrected to remove the small contributions of jet noise, atmospheric attenuation and feedback tones. These broadband data were compared with the results of available theories which are only strictly applicable to simple geometries over a limited range of conditions. The available theories proved to be accurate over the range of flow, chord length, thickness, angle of attack, and surface geometries defined by the experiments. These results apply to the noise generated by fixed surfaces in engine passages, the lifting surfaces of aircraft and also to fan noise.

  1. Investigation of Density Fluctuations in Supersonic Free Jets and Correlation with Generated Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Seasholtz, R. G.

    2000-01-01

    number. The experimental data point out eddy Mach waves as a strong source of sound generation in supersonic jets and fail to locate the primary noise mechanism in subsonic jets.

  2. Exposure to electric power generator noise among small scale business operators in selected communities in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ana, Godson R E E; Luqman, Yesufu A; Shendell, Derek G; Owoaje, Eme T

    2014-11-01

    Inadequate and erratic power supplies mean small businesses use electric generators for alternative power. The authors' goal in the study described here was to assess noise from electric generators and impacts in the commercial areas of Agbowo and Ajibode in Ibadan, Nigeria. Noise levels (A-weighted decibels [dBA]) were measured over 12 weeks, three times a day, during the 2010 dry season using a sound level meter. A questionnaire was administered (515 respondents; 304 in Agbowo, 211 in Ajibode) and audiometric measurements were conducted on 40% of respondents. Mean noise levels varied by source (104 ± 7.7 dBA [diesel], 94.0 ± 6.3 dBA [petrol]) and were highest midday (90.6 ± 5.3 dBA [Agbowo], 70.9 ± 6.2 dBA [Ajibode]). Mean noise levels in Agbowo (78.5 ± 3.9 dBA) and Ajibode (65.7 ± 4.4 dBA) exceeded World Health Organization guidelines (65 dBA) for outdoor commercial environments. Working and living in Agbowo was significantly associated with current evidence of hearing impairment (odds ratio: 6.8, 95% confidence interval: 3.4-13.7). Reducing exposure to noise from electric power generators serving urban small businesses and homes is warranted.

  3. Suppressing Short-term Polarization Noise and Related Spectral Decoherence in All-normal Dispersion Fiber Supercontinuum Generation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Zhao, Youbo; Lyngsø, Jens; You, Sixian; Wilson, William L.; Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    The supercontinuum generated exclusively in the normal dispersion regime of a nonlinear fiber is widely believed to possess low optical noise and high spectral coherence. The recent development of flattened all-normal dispersion fibers has been motivated by this belief to construct a general-purpose broadband coherent optical source. Somewhat surprisingly, we identify a large short-term polarization noise in this type of supercontinuum generation that has been masked by the total-intensity measurement in the past, but can be easily detected by filtering the supercontinuum with a linear polarizer. Fortunately, this hidden intrinsic noise and the accompanied spectral decoherence can be effectively suppressed by using a polarization-maintaining all-normal dispersion fiber. A polarization-maintaining coherent supercontinuum laser is thus built with a broad bandwidth (780–1300 nm) and high spectral power (~1 mW/nm). PMID:26166939

  4. Effect of Groundboard Height on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Lifting Circular Cylinder Using Tangential Blowing from Surface Slots for Lift Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, Vernard E.

    1961-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been made to determine the ground effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of a lifting circular cylinder using tangential blowing from surface slots to generate high lift coefficients. The tests were made on a semispan model having a length 4 times the cylinder diameter and an end plate of 2.5 diameters. The tests were made at low speeds at a Reynolds number of approximately 290,000, over a range of momentum coefficients from 0.14 to 4.60, and over a range of groundboard heights from 1.5 to 10 cylinder diameters. The investigation showed an earlier stall angle and a large loss of lift coefficient as the groundboard was brought close to the cylinder when large lift coefficients were being generated. For example, at a momentum coefficient of 4.60 the maximum lift coefficient was reduced from a value of 20.3 at a groundboard height of 10 cylinder diameters to a value of 8.7 at a groundboard height of 1.5 cylinder diameters. In contrast to this there was little effect on the lift characteristics of changes in groundboard height when lift coefficients of about 4.5 were being generated. At a height of 1.5 cylinder diameters the drag coefficients generally increased rapidly when the slot position angle for maximum lift was exceeded. Slightly below the slot position angle for maximum lift, the groundboard had a beneficial effect, that is, the drag for a given lift was less near the groundboard than away from the groundboard. The variation of maximum circulation lift coefficient (maximum lift coefficient minus momentum coefficient) obtained in this investigation is in general agreement with a theory developed for a jet-flap wing which assumes that the loss in circulation is the result of blockage of the main stream beneath the wing.

  5. Experimental determination of the tonal noise sources in a centrifugal fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde-Suárez, Sandra; Ballesteros-Tajadura, Rafael; Pablo Hurtado-Cruz, Juan; Santolaria-Morros, Carlos

    2006-08-01

    In this work, an experimental study about the aerodynamic tonal noise sources in a centrifugal fan with backward-curved blades has been carried out. Acoustic pressure measurements at the fan exit duct and pressure fluctuation measurements on the volute surface have been made for different flow rates. A correlation study of both pressure signals has been made in order to explain some of the features of the aerodynamic tonal noise generation. A strong source of noise caused by the interaction between the fluctuating flow leaving the impeller and the volute tongue is appreciated. The unsteady forces exerted on the fan blades constitute another noise generation mechanism, which affects the whole extension of the impeller, thus transmitting pressure fluctuations to the entire volute casing. The relative importance of this mechanism compared to the impeller-tongue interaction depends on the flow rate.

  6. Sediment-generated noise (SGN): Comparison with physical bedload measurements in a small semi-arid watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Passive acoustic techniques for the measurement of Sediment-Generated Noise (SGN) in gravel-bed rivers present a promising alternative to traditional bedload measurement techniques. Where traditional methods are often prohibitively costly, particularly in labor requirements, and produce point-scale ...

  7. The Generation and Radiation of Supersonic Jet Noise. Volume 1. Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-01

    will also form the basis of a design tool for new suppressor nozzle concepts. In this phase of the work, there were the major objectives stated in the...to large-scale noise radiating eddies and that this noise is accurately predicted by the large-scale turbulence noise theory devoped during this...these data. As a result of the difficulties in application as a source location tool , this method was not used further. Instead, it was determined that

  8. Noise-induced generation of saw-tooth type transitions between climate attractors and stochastic excitability of paleoclimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Dmitri V.; Bashkirtseva, Irina A.; Ryashko, Lev B.

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by important paleoclimate applications we study a three dimensional model of the Quaternary climatic variations in the presence of stochastic forcing. It is shown that the deterministic system exhibits a limit cycle and two stable system equilibria. We demonstrate that the closer paleoclimate system to its bifurcation points (lying either in its monostable or bistable zone) the smaller noise generates small or large amplitude stochastic oscillations, respectively. In the bistable zone with two stable equilibria, noise induces a complex multimodal stochastic regime with intermittency of small and large amplitude stochastic fluctuations. In the monostable zone, the small amplitude stochastic oscillations localized in the vicinity of unstable equilibrium appear along with the large amplitude oscillations near the stable limit cycle. For the analysis of these noise-induced effects, we develop the stochastic sensitivity technique and use the Mahalanobis metric in the three-dimensional case. To approximate the distribution of random trajectories in Poincare sections, we use a method of confidence ellipses. A spatial configuration of these ellipses is defined by the stochastic sensitivity and noise intensity. The glaciation/deglaciation transitions going between two polar Earth's states with the warm and cold climate become easier and quicker with increasing the noise intensity. Our stochastic analysis demonstrates a near 100 ky saw-tooth type climate self fluctuations known from paleoclimate records. In addition, the enhancement of noise intensity blurs the sharp climate cycles and reduces the glaciation-deglaciation periods of the Earth's paleoclimate.

  9. Investigation of the aerodynamic performance and noise characteristics of a 1/5th scale model of the Dowty Rotol R212 propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebble, W. J. G.

    1983-11-01

    The four-bladed Dowty Rotol R212 propeller (NACA 16 sections) was studied at 1/5th scale (0.7 m diameter) in 1.5 m acoustic tunnel. Propeller power absorption and thrust were measured over a range of rotational speeds up to 8000 rev/min at mainstream speeds from 15 to 60 m/sec for a range of blade settings. Slipstream wake surveys show outward movement of the position of the peak pressure as propeller loading is increased. Noise analysis demonstrates the predominance of multiple tones whose number and intensity increase with helical-tip Mach number. An empirical formula shows that the fundamental tone sound pressure level varies with tip speed and power loading in an identical manner to that observed on an ARA-D section propeller.

  10. Active Control of Multi-Tonal Noise with Reference Generator Based on On-Line Frequency Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, S.; PARK, Y.

    1999-10-01

    In this paper, a novel active noise control (ANC) structure with a frequency estimator is proposed for systems with multi-tonal noise. The conventional feedforward ANC algorithms need a measured reference signal to calculate the gradient of the squared error and filter coefficients. For ANC systems applied to aircraft or passenger ships, which reference signals are usually measured are so far from seats where engines from the main part of controllers is placed that the scheme might be difficult to implement or very costly. Feedback ANC algorithms which do not require a measure of reference signals, use error signals alone to update the filter and are usually sensitive to measurement noise and unexpected transient noise such as a sneeze, clapping of hands and so on.The proposed algorithm, which estimates frequencies of the multi-tonal noise in real time using adaptive notch filter (ANF), improves convergence rate, threshold SNR and computational efficiency compared with the conventional ones. The reference signal needed for the feedforward control is not measured directly, but is generated with the estimated frequencies. It has a strong similarity to the conventional IMC-based feedback control because the reference is generated from the error signal in both cases. The proposed ANC algorithm is compared with the conventional IMC-based feedback control algorithm.Cascade ANF, which has a low computational burden, is used to implement the ANC system in real time. Experiments for verifying efficacy of the proposed algorithm are carried out in the laboratory.

  11. Electrical flicker-noise generated by filling and emptying of impurity states in injectors of quantum-cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanishi, Masamichi Hirohata, Tooru; Hayashi, Syohei; Fujita, Kazuue; Tanaka, Kazunori

    2014-11-14

    Free running line-widths (>100 kHz), much broader than intrinsic line-widths ∼100 Hz, of existing quantum-cascade lasers are governed by strong flicker frequency-noise originating from electrical flicker noise. Understanding of microscopic origins of the electrical flicker noises in quantum-cascade lasers is crucially important for the reduction of strength of flicker frequency-noise without assistances of any type of feedback schemes. In this article, an ad hoc model that is based on fluctuating charge-dipoles induced by electron trappings and de-trappings at indispensable impurity states in injector super-lattices of a quantum-cascade laser is proposed, developing theoretical framework based on the model. The validity of the present model is evaluated by comparing theoretical voltage-noise power spectral densities based on the model with experimental ones obtained by using mid-infrared quantum-cascade lasers with designed impurity-positioning. The obtained experimental results on flicker noises, in comparison with the theoretical ones, shed light on physical mechanisms, such as the inherent one due to impurity states in their injectors and extrinsic ones due to surface states on the ridge-walls and due to residual deep traps, for electrical flicker-noise generation in existing mid-infrared quantum-cascade lasers. It is shown theoretically that quasi-delta doping of impurities in their injectors leads to strong suppression of electrical flicker noise by minimization of the dipole length at a certain temperature, for instance ∼300 K and, in turn, is expected to result in substantial narrowing of the free running line-width down below 10 kHz.

  12. Fluid dynamic aspects of jet noise generation. [noise measurement of jet blast effects from supersonic jet flow in convergent-divergent nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barra, V.; Panunzio, S.

    1976-01-01

    Jet engine noise generation and noise propagation was investigated by studying supersonic nozzle flow of various nozzle configurations in an experimental test facility. The experimental facility was constructed to provide a coaxial axisymmetric jet flow of unheated air. In the test setup, an inner primary flow exhausted from a 7 in. exit diameter convergent--divergent nozzle at Mach 2, while a secondary flow had a 10 in. outside diameter and was sonic at the exit. The large dimensions of the jets permitted probes to be placed inside the jet core without significantly disturbing the flow. Static pressure fluctuations were measured for the flows. The nozzles were designed for shock free (balanced) flow at Mach 2. Data processing techniques and experimental procedures were developed in order to study induced disturbances at the edge of the supersonic flows, and the propagation of those disturbances throughout the flows. Equipment used (specifications are given) to record acoustic levels (far field noise) is described. Results and conclusions are presented and discussed. Diagrams of the jet flow fields are included along with photographs of the test stand.

  13. Aerodynamics Research Revolutionizes Truck Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center conducted numerous tests to refine the shape of trucks to reduce aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the 1980s and 1990s, a team based at Langley Research Center explored controlling drag and the flow of air around a moving body. Aeroserve Technologies Ltd., of Ottawa, Canada, with its subsidiary, Airtab LLC, in Loveland, Colorado, applied the research from Dryden and Langley to the development of the Airtab vortex generator. Airtabs create two counter-rotating vortices to reduce wind resistance and aerodynamic drag of trucks, trailers, recreational vehicles, and many other vehicles.

  14. Raman-scattering-assistant broadband noise-like pulse generation in all-normal-dispersion fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daojing; Shen, Deyuan; Li, Lei; Chen, Hao; Tang, Dingyuan; Zhao, Luming

    2015-10-01

    We report on the observation of both stable dissipative solitons and noise-like pulses with the presence of strong Raman scattering in a relatively short all-normal-dispersion Yb-doped fiber laser. We show that Raman scattering can be filtered out by intracavity filter. Furthermore, by appropriate intracavity polarization control, the Raman effect can be utilized to generate broadband noise-like pulses (NLPs) with bandwidth up to 61.4 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the broadest NLP achieved in all-normal-dispersion fiber lasers

  15. Raman-scattering-assistant broadband noise-like pulse generation in all-normal-dispersion fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Daojing; Shen, Deyuan; Li, Lei; Chen, Hao; Tang, Dingyuan; Zhao, Luming

    2015-10-05

    We report on the observation of both stable dissipative solitons and noise-like pulses with the presence of strong Raman scattering in a relatively short all-normal-dispersion Yb-doped fiber laser. We show that Raman scattering can be filtered out by intracavity filter. Furthermore, by appropriate intracavity polarization control, the Raman effect can be utilized to generate broadband noise-like pulses (NLPs) with bandwidth up to 61.4 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the broadest NLP achieved in all-normal-dispersion fiber lasers.

  16. Generation of an octave-spanning supercontinuum in highly nonlinear fibers pumped by noise-like pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shih-Shian; Hwang, Sheng-Kwang; Liu, Jia-Ming

    2014-09-01

    A supercontinuum generation system is developed, which consists of an erbium-doped fiber ring laser, an erbium-doped fiber amplifier, and a 100-m highly nonlinear fiber. Through nonlinear polarization rotation, the fiber ring laser generates a train of noise-like pulses in the form of repetitive picosecond pulse packets consisting of femtosecond noise-like fine temporal structures. The noise-like pulses are amplified before being sent into the highly nonlinear fiber. As a result, an octave-spanning supercontinuum from 1177 nm to 2449 nm is obtained, which has a 20-dB spectral width of 980 nm. Because of the nonlinearity of the fiber amplifier, the duration of the noise-like pulses is shortened while their average power is enhanced. However, the enhanced pulse energy makes the key contribution to the spectral broadening of the resulting spuercontinuum in this study since the highly nonlinear fiber is so long that the effect of the pulse compression on supercontinuum generation is weak.

  17. Noise, transient dynamics, and the generation of realistic interspike interval variation in square-wave burster neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Bóris; Pinto, Reynaldo Daniel; Elson, Robert C.; Colli, Eduardo

    2014-10-01

    First return maps of interspike intervals for biological neurons that generate repetitive bursts of impulses can display stereotyped structures (neuronal signatures). Such structures have been linked to the possibility of multicoding and multifunctionality in neural networks that produce and control rhythmical motor patterns. In some cases, isolating the neurons from their synaptic network reveals irregular, complex signatures that have been regarded as evidence of intrinsic, chaotic behavior. We show that incorporation of dynamical noise into minimal neuron models of square-wave bursting (either conductance-based or abstract) produces signatures akin to those observed in biological examples, without the need for fine tuning of parameters or ad hoc constructions for inducing chaotic activity. The form of the stochastic term is not strongly constrained and can approximate several possible sources of noise, e.g., random channel gating or synaptic bombardment. The cornerstone of this signature generation mechanism is the rich, transient, but deterministic dynamics inherent in the square-wave (saddle-node and homoclinic) mode of neuronal bursting. We show that noise causes the dynamics to populate a complex transient scaffolding or skeleton in state space, even for models that (without added noise) generate only periodic activity (whether in bursting or tonic spiking mode).

  18. Aerodynamic characteristics of nebulized terbutaline sulphate using the Andersen Cascade Impactor compared to the Next Generation Impactor.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahim, Mohamed E

    2011-04-01

    Characterization of the aerosol emitted from nebulizers is determined using the Next Generation Impactor (NGI). The Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI) was previously used but the limitation of high flow rate used decreased its uses. We have investigated the use of ACI with different operational conditions compared to the NGI methodology. NGI was operated at a flow rate of 15 L min⁻¹ after cooling at 5°C for 90 min. ACI was operated using flow rates 15 and 28.3 L min⁻¹ at room (ROOM) temperature and after cooling at 5 °C for 60 min (COLD). ACI was also operated using a flow rate 15 L min⁻¹ through the nebulizer T-piece with a flow rate 28.3 L min⁻¹ through ACI (15 Mix) using the mixing valve at ROOM and COLD. Two nebulizer systems, the Sidestream (SIDE) and the Aeroneb Pro (AERO) were used to nebulize terbutaline sulphate respiratory solution. Overall there was a highly significant difference (P < 0.001) between different ACI operating conditions for FPF and MMAD of both nebulizer systems. The ACI at higher flow rate increased the evaporation effect whilst cooling minimized evaporation of both nebulizer systems. Hence cooling and using slow flow rate minimizes evaporation effects with ACI. The ACI 15COLD results were similar to that of NGI. That supports the use of ACI at inhalation flow rate 15 L min⁻¹ without fear of domination of gravity on ACI stages.

  19. Characterization of noise sources for two generations of computed radiography systems using powder and crystalline photostimulable phosphors.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Alistair; Honey, Ian D

    2007-08-01

    The performances of two generations of computed radiography (CR) were tested and compared in terms of resolution and noise characteristics. The main aim was to characterize and quantify the noise sources in the images. The systems tested were (1) Agfa CR 25.0, a flying spot reader with powder phosphor image plates (MD 40.0); and (2) the Agfa DX-S, a line-scanning CR reader with needle crystal phosphor image plates (HD 5.0). For both systems, the standard metrics of presampled modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectra (NNPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured using standard radiation quality RQA5 as defined by the International Electrotechnical Commission. The various noise sources contributing to the NNPS were separated by using knowledge of their relationship with air kerma, MTF, absorption efficiency and antialiasing filters. The DX-S MTF was superior compared with the CR 25.0. The maximum difference in MTF between the DX-S scan and CR 25.0 subscan directions was 0.13 at 1.3 mm(-1). For a nominal detector air kerma of 4 microGy, the peak DQE of the DX-S was 43 (+/-3)%, which was over double that of the CR 25.0 of 18 (+/-2)%. The additive electronic noise was negligible on the CR 25.0 but calculated to be constant 3.4 x 10(-7) (+/-0.4 x 10(-7)) mm2 at 3.9 microGy on the DX-S. The DX-S has improved image quality compared with a traditional flying spot reader. The separation of the noise sources indicates that the improvements in DQE of the DX-S are due not only to the higher quantum, efficiency and MTF, but also the lower structure, secondary quantum, and excess noise.

  20. Characterization of noise sources for two generations of computed radiography systems using powder and crystalline photostimulable phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, Alistair; Honey, Ian D.

    2007-08-15

    The performances of two generations of computed radiography (CR) were tested and compared in terms of resolution and noise characteristics. The main aim was to characterize and quantify the noise sources in the images. The systems tested were (1) Agfa CR 25.0, a flying spot reader with powder phosphor image plates (MD 40.0); and (2) the Agfa DX-S, a line-scanning CR reader with needle crystal phosphor image plates (HD 5.0). For both systems, the standard metrics of presampled modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectra (NNPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured using standard radiation quality RQA5 as defined by the International Electrotechnical Commission. The various noise sources contributing to the NNPS were separated by using knowledge of their relationship with air kerma, MTF, absorption efficiency and antialiasing filters. The DX-S MTF was superior compared with the CR 25.0. The maximum difference in MTF between the DX-S scan and CR 25.0 subscan directions was 0.13 at 1.3 mm{sup -1}. For a nominal detector air kerma of 4 {mu}Gy, the peak DQE of the DX-S was 43({+-}3)%, which was over double that of the CR 25.0 of 18({+-}2)%. The additive electronic noise was negligible on the CR 25.0 but calculated to be constant 3.4x10{sup -7} ({+-}0.4x10{sup -7}) mm{sup 2} at 3.9 {mu}Gy on the DX-S. The DX-S has improved image quality compared with a traditional flying spot reader. The separation of the noise sources indicates that the improvements in DQE of the DX-S are due not only to the higher quantum, efficiency and MTF, but also the lower structure, secondary quantum, and excess noise.

  1. Prediction of Turbulence-Generated Noise in Unheated Jets. Part 2; JeNo Users' Manual (Version 1.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Wolter, John D.; Koch, L. Danielle

    2009-01-01

    JeNo (Version 1.0) is a Fortran90 computer code that calculates the far-field sound spectral density produced by axisymmetric, unheated jets at a user specified observer location and frequency range. The user must provide a structured computational grid and a mean flow solution from a Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) code as input. Turbulence kinetic energy and its dissipation rate from a k-epsilon or k-omega turbulence model must also be provided. JeNo is a research code, and as such, its development is ongoing. The goal is to create a code that is able to accurately compute far-field sound pressure levels for jets at all observer angles and all operating conditions. In order to achieve this goal, current theories must be combined with the best practices in numerical modeling, all of which must be validated by experiment. Since the acoustic predictions from JeNo are based on the mean flow solutions from a RANS code, quality predictions depend on accurate aerodynamic input.This is why acoustic source modeling, turbulence modeling, together with the development of advanced measurement systems are the leading areas of research in jet noise research at NASA Glenn Research Center.

  2. Classical Aerodynamic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A collection of papers on modern theoretical aerodynamics is presented. Included are theories of incompressible potential flow and research on the aerodynamic forces on wing and wing sections of aircraft and on airship hulls.

  3. Aerodynamics at NASA JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicker, Darby

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing aerodynamics at NASA Johnson Space Center is shown. The topics include: 1) Personal Background; 2) Aerodynamic Tools; 3) The Overset Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Process; and 4) Recent Applicatoins.

  4. Study on direct sound reduction structure for reducing noise generated by vibrating solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, M.; Kim, Y. S.

    2013-05-01

    A direct sound reduction structure is proposed as a new method for reducing noise generated by vibrating solids. The proposed method involves directly attaching a hard sound absorbing material with a honeycomb structure to the surfaces of vibrating solids to provide a moderate amount of back air space. Using a one-dimensional acoustic-field model, the fundamental sound reduction characteristics are investigated theoretically and experimentally, and the effectiveness of the proposed concept is verified. In the theoretical analysis, an analytical model with a sinusoidally excited rigid-frame sound reduction structure is considered. In the experiments, a one-dimensional acoustic tube is used to determine the sound reduction ratios for both stationary excitation and non-stationary impulsive excitation as a function of frequency. Furthermore, in order to verify the practical usefulness of this approach, an experimental study on sound reduction in a three-dimensional acoustic field is carried out using either a rigid piston plate surrounded by a baffle or a flexible flat plate with different vibration modes as vibrating bases. The results indicate that the sound reduction ratio has a quasi-periodic form that depends on the thickness of the back air space and the sound frequency, and a sound pressure reduction of approximately 80 percent (-14 dB) is observed around the minima. In addition, the average reduction in the frequency range 0.5-5 kHz is approximately 40 percent (-4.4 dB). The results obtained in this study are expected to act as useful indices for designing a nearly optimum sound reduction structure if the target frequency is known in advance.

  5. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J.; Hessenius, Kristin A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Hicks, Gary; Richardson, Pamela F.; Unger, George; Neumann, Benjamin; Moss, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The annual accomplishments is reviewed for the Aerodynamics Division during FY 1991. The program includes both fundamental and applied research directed at the full spectrum of aerospace vehicles, from rotorcraft to planetary entry probes. A comprehensive review is presented of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications; CFD validation; transition and turbulence physics; numerical aerodynamic simulation; test techniques and instrumentation; configuration aerodynamics; aeroacoustics; aerothermodynamics; hypersonics; subsonics; fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  6. Effects of ion channel noise on neural circuits: an application to the respiratory pattern generator to investigate breathing variability.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitao; Dhingra, Rishi R; Dick, Thomas E; Galán, Roberto F

    2017-01-01

    Neural activity generally displays irregular firing patterns even in circuits with apparently regular outputs, such as motor pattern generators, in which the output frequency fluctuates randomly around a mean value. This "circuit noise" is inherited from the random firing of single neurons, which emerges from stochastic ion channel gating (channel noise), spontaneous neurotransmitter release, and its diffusion and binding to synaptic receptors. Here we demonstrate how to expand conductance-based network models that are originally deterministic to include realistic, physiological noise, focusing on stochastic ion channel gating. We illustrate this procedure with a well-established conductance-based model of the respiratory pattern generator, which allows us to investigate how channel noise affects neural dynamics at the circuit level and, in particular, to understand the relationship between the respiratory pattern and its breath-to-breath variability. We show that as the channel number increases, the duration of inspiration and expiration varies, and so does the coefficient of variation of the breath-to-breath interval, which attains a minimum when the mean duration of expiration slightly exceeds that of inspiration. For small channel numbers, the variability of the expiratory phase dominates over that of the inspiratory phase, and vice versa for large channel numbers. Among the four different cell types in the respiratory pattern generator, pacemaker cells exhibit the highest sensitivity to channel noise. The model shows that suppressing input from the pons leads to longer inspiratory phases, a reduction in breathing frequency, and larger breath-to-breath variability, whereas enhanced input from the raphe nucleus increases breathing frequency without changing its pattern.

  7. Evaluation of human exposure to the noise from large wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, K. P.; Grosveld, F. W.; Stephens, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    The human perception of a nuisance level of noise was quantified in tests and attempts were made to define criteria for acceptable sound levels from wind turbines. Comparisons were made between the sound necessary to cause building vibration, which occurred near the Mod-1 wind turbine, and human perception thresholds for building noise and building vibration. Thresholds were measured for both broadband and impulsive noise, with the finding that noise in the 500-2000 Hz region, and impulses with a 1 Hz fundamental, were most noticeable. Curves were developed for matching a receiver location with expected acoustic output from a machine to determine if the sound levels were offensive. In any case, further data from operating machines are required before definitive criteria can be established.

  8. Detector Noise Susceptibility Issues for the Future Generation of High Energy Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Arteche, F.; Esteban, C.; Iglesias, M.; Rivetta, C.; Arcega, F.J.; /Zaragoza U.

    2011-11-22

    The front-end electronics (FEE) noise characterization to electromagnetic interference and the compatibility of the different subsystems are important topics to consider for the LHC calorimeter upgrades. A new power distribution scheme based on switching power converters is under study and will define a noticeable noise source very close to the detector's FEE. Knowledge and experience with both FFE noise and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) issues from previous detectors are important conditions to guarantee the design goals and the good functionality of the upgraded LHC detectors. This paper shows an overview of the noise susceptibility studies performed in different CMS subdetectors. The impact of different FEE topologies in the final sensitivity to electromagnetic interference of the subsystem is analyzed and design recommendations are presented to increase the EMC of the detectors to the future challenging power distribution topologies.

  9. Workshop on Aircraft Surface Representation for Aerodynamic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J. (Editor); Ashbaugh, J. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Papers and discussions on surface representation and its integration with aerodynamics, computers, graphics, wind tunnel model fabrication, and flow field grid generation are presented. Surface definition is emphasized.

  10. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Schairer, Edward; Hicks, Gary; Wander, Stephen; Blankson, Isiaiah; Rose, Raymond; Olson, Lawrence; Unger, George

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a comprehensive review of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation, transition and turbulence physics, numerical aerodynamic simulation, drag reduction, test techniques and instrumentation, configuration aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, aerothermodynamics, hypersonics, subsonic transport/commuter aviation, fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  11. Acoustic evaluation of a novel swept-rotor fan. [noise reduction in turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. G.; Woodward, R. P.; Mackinnon, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Inlet noise and aerodynamic performance are presented for a high tip speed fan designed with rotor blade leading edge sweep that gives a subsonic component of inlet Mach number normal to the edge at all radii. The intent of the design was to minimize the generation of rotor leading edge shock waves thereby minimizing multiple pure tone noise. Sound power level and spectral comparisons are made with several high-speed fans of conventional design. Results show multiple pure tone noise at levels below those of some of the other fans and this noise was initiated at a higher tip speed. Aerodynamic performance of the fan did not meet design goals for this first build which applied conventional design procedures to the swept fan geometry.

  12. Amplification of noise-like pulses generated from a graphene-based Tm-doped all-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Sobon, Grzegorz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Przewolka, Aleksandra; Pasternak, Iwona; Strupinski, Wlodek; Abramski, Krzysztof

    2016-09-05

    We report on the generation of noise-like pulse (NLP) trains in a Tm-doped fiber laser mode-locked by multilayer graphene saturable absorber. The spectral bandwidth obtained directly from the oscillator exceeds 60 nm, centered at 1950 nm, with 23.5 MHz repetition rate. The pulses were also amplified in a fully fiberized amplifier based on a double-cladding Tm-doped fiber. The system was capable of delivering 1.21 W of average power, which corresponds to 51.5 nJ energy stored in the noise-like bundle. We believe that the presented source might serve as a pump for supercontinuum generation in highly nonlinear fibers.

  13. Tandem Cylinder Noise Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; CHoudhari, Meelan M.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to better understand landing-gear noise sources, we have been examining a simplified configuration that still maintains some of the salient features of landing-gear flow fields. In particular, tandem cylinders have been studied because they model a variety of component level interactions. The present effort is directed at the case of two identical cylinders spatially separated in the streamwise direction by 3.7 diameters. Experimental measurements from the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have provided steady surface pressures, detailed off-surface measurements of the flow field using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), hot-wire measurements in the wake of the rear cylinder, unsteady surface pressure data, and the radiated noise. The experiments were conducted at a Reynolds number of 166 105 based on the cylinder diameter. A trip was used on the upstream cylinder to insure a fully turbulent shedding process and simulate the effects of a high Reynolds number flow. The parallel computational effort uses the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver CFL3D with a hybrid, zonal turbulence model that turns off the turbulence production term everywhere except in a narrow ring surrounding solid surfaces. The current calculations further explore the influence of the grid resolution and spanwise extent on the flow and associated radiated noise. Extensive comparisons with the experimental data are used to assess the ability of the computations to simulate the details of the flow. The results show that the pressure fluctuations on the upstream cylinder, caused by vortex shedding, are smaller than those generated on the downstream cylinder by wake interaction. Consequently, the downstream cylinder dominates the noise radiation, producing an overall directivity pattern that is similar to that of an isolated cylinder. Only calculations based on the full length of the model span were able to

  14. Material and time dependence of the voltage noise generated bycathodic vacuum arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Johanna; Anders, Andre

    2005-07-15

    The high frequency fluctuations of the burning voltage of cathodic vacuum arcs have been investigated in order to extract information on cathode processes. Eight cathode materials (W, Ta, Hf, Ti, Ni, Au, Sn, Bi) were selected covering a wide range of cohesive energy. The voltage noise was recorded using both a broad-band voltage divider and an attenuator connected to a fast oscilloscope (limits 1 GHz analog and 5 GS/s digital). Fast Fourier transform revealed a power spectrum that is linear in log-log presentation, with a slope of 1/f{sup 2}, where f is the frequency (brown noise). The amplitude of the spectral power of the voltage noise was found to scale with the cohesive energy, in agreement with earlier measurements at lower resolution. These basic results do not depend on the time after arc initiation. However, lower arc current in the beginning of the pulse shows greater voltage noise, suggesting an inverse relation between the noise amplitude and number of emission sites (cathode spot fragments).

  15. Q-switched-like soliton bunches and noise-like pulses generation in a partially mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenhong; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Yan-Ge; Zhao, Wenjing; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Shangcheng; Yang, Guang; He, Ruijing

    2016-06-27

    We report an intermediate regime between c.w. emission and noise-like pulses (NLPs) regime in an Er-doped partially mode-locked fiber laser with nonlinear polarization rotation. In this regime, the soliton bunches stochastically turn up from a quasi-cw background in the Q-switched-like envelope. The soliton bunches normally last for tens or hundreds of intracavity round-trips. When the soliton bunches vanish, typical NLPs chains are generated sporadically at location where the soliton bunches collapses. These results would be helpful to understand the generation and property of the NLPs regime.

  16. Effect of blade wrap angle on efficiency and noise of small radial fan impellers—A computational and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheit, C.; Karic, B.; Becker, S.

    2012-02-01

    Radial impellers have several technical applications. Regarding their aerodynamic performance, they are well optimized nowadays, but this is in general not true regarding acoustics. This work was therefore concerned with analyzing the flow structures inside isolated radial impellers together with the far-field sound radiated from them in order to optimize the aerodynamic and acoustic performance. Both numerical and experimental techniques were applied in order to study the effect of varying wrap angle and otherwise identical geometric configuration on aerodynamics and acoustics of the radial impellers. The results give a detailed insight into the processes leading to sound generation in radial impellers. Measurements were performed using laser Doppler anemometry for the flow field and microphone measurements to analyze the radiated noise. In addition, unsteady aerodynamic simulations were carried out to calculate the compressible flow field. An acoustic analogy was employed to compute far-field noise. Finally, the phenomena responsible for tonal noise and the role of the wrap angle could be identified. Using this knowledge, design guidelines are given to optimize the impeller with respect to the radiated noise. This work shows that improved aerodynamic efficiency for isolated impellers does not automatically lead to a smaller flow-induced sound radiation.

  17. Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the ARE 442 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.; van Dam, J.

    2010-11-01

    This test was conducted on the ARE 442 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Acoustic noise testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including duration, safety and function, power performance, and power quality tests. The acoustic noise test was conducted to the IEC 61400-11 Edition 2.1.

  18. The role of amplitude-to-phase conversion in the generation of oscillator flicker phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    The role of amplitude-to-phase conversion as a factor in feedback oscillator flicker phase noise is examined. A limiting stage consisting of parallel-connected opposite polarity diodes operating in a circuit environment contining reactance is shown to exhibit amplitude-to-phase conversion. This mechanism coupled with resistive upconversion provides an indirect route for very low frequency flicker noise to be transferred into the phase of an oscillator signal. It is concluded that this effect is more significant in the lower frequency regimes where the onlinear reactances associated with active devices are overwhelmed by linear reactive elements.

  19. Generation and characterization of erbium-Raman noise-like pulses from a figure-eight fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Hernandez, H.; Pottiez, O.; Paez-Aguirre, R.; Ibarra-Villalon, H. E.; Tenorio-Torres, A.; Duran-Sanchez, M.; Ibarra-Escamilla, B.; Kuzin, E. A.; Hernandez-Garcia, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    We report an experimental study of the noise-like pulses generated by a ~300 m long passively mode-locked erbium-doped figure-eight fibre laser. Non-self-starting mode locking yields the formation of ns scale bunches of sub-ps pulses. Depending on birefringence adjustments, noise-like pulses with a variety of temporal profiles and optical spectra are obtained. In particular, for some adjustments the Raman-enhanced spectrum reaches a 10 dB bandwidth of ~130 nm. For the first time to our knowledge, we extract information on the inner structure of the noise-like pulses, using a birefringent Sagnac interferometer as a spectral filter and a nonlinear optical loop mirror as an intensity filter. In particular we show that the different spectral components of the bunch are homogeneously distributed within the temporal envelope of the bunch, whereas the amplitude and/or the density of the sub-pulses present substantial variations along the envelope. In some cases, the analysis reveals the existence of an intermediate level of organization in the structure of the noise-like pulse, between the ns bunch and the sub-ps inner pulses, suggesting that these objects may be even more complex than previously recognized.

  20. Computerized Design and Generation of Low-Noise Gears with Localized Bearing Contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Chen, Ningxin; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Lu, Jian; Handschuh, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    The results of research projects directed at the reduction of noise caused by misalignment of the following gear drives: double-circular arc helical gears, modified involute helical gears, face-milled spiral bevel gears, and face-milled formate cut hypoid gears are presented. Misalignment in these types of gear drives causes periodic, almost linear discontinuous functions of transmission errors. The period of such functions is the cycle of meshing when one pair of teeth is changed for the next. Due to the discontinuity of such functions of transmission errors high vibration and noise are inevitable. A predesigned parabolic function of transmission errors that is able to absorb linear discontinuous functions of transmission errors and change the resulting function of transmission errors into a continuous one is proposed. The proposed idea was successfully tested using spiral bevel gears and the noise was reduced a substantial amount in comparison with the existing design. The idea of a predesigned parabolic function is applied for the reduction of noise of helical and hypoid gears. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been investigated by developed TCA (tooth contact analysis) programs. The bearing contact for the mentioned gears is localized. Conditions that avoid edge contact for the gear drives have been determined. Manufacturing of helical gears with new topology by hobs and grinding worms has been investigated.

  1. A Standard Definition for Wind-Generated, Low-Frequency Ambient Noise Source Levels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-09

    FUNDING NUMBERS PROGR.AM PROJECT ITASK IWORK UNIT ELEMENT 14O. NO. NO. IACCESSION NO. I I ritLE (include Security Caiafaon) I7Ol A STANDARD DEFINITION...use of a specific propagation code (PE, RAYTRACE, ASTRAL , NORMAL MODE, etc). The specification of noise intensity per unit area with respect to/ /P

  2. High-power noise-like pulse generation using a 1.56-µm all-fiber laser system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Shian; Hwang, Sheng-Kwang; Liu, Jia-Ming

    2015-07-13

    We demonstrated an all-fiber, high-power noise-like pulse laser system at the 1.56-µm wavelength. A low-power noise-like pulse train generated by a ring oscillator was amplified using a two-stage amplifier, where the performance of the second-stage amplifier determined the final output power level. The optical intensity in the second-stage amplifier was managed well to avoid not only the excessive spectral broadening induced by nonlinearities but also any damage to the device. On the other hand, the power conversion efficiency of the amplifier was optimized through proper control of its pump wavelength. The pump wavelength determines the pump absorption and therefore the power conversion efficiency of the gain fiber. Through this approach, the average power of the noise-like pulse train was amplified considerably to an output of 13.1 W, resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 36.1% and a pulse energy of 0.85 µJ. To the best of our knowledge, these amplified pulses have the highest average power and pulse energy for noise-like pulses in the 1.56-µm wavelength region. As a result, the net gain in the cascaded amplifier reached 30 dB. With peak and pedestal widths of 168 fs and 61.3 ps, respectively, for the amplified pulses, the pedestal-to-peak intensity ratio of the autocorrelation trace remains at the value of 0.5 required for truly noise-like pulses.

  3. Flat supercontinuum generation by a F8L in high-energy harmonic noise-like pulsing regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Garcia, J. C.; Estudillo-Ayala, J. M.; Pottiez, O.; Filoteo-Razo, J. D.; Lauterio-Cruz, J. P.; Sierra-Hernandez, J. M.; Rojas-Laguna, R.

    2016-12-01

    We propose the use of a figure eight fiber laser cavity in fundamental and harmonic mode-locking noise-like pulsing regimes, with output pulse energies as high as 302.8 nJ, as an improved supercontinuum source. The absence of a polarizer in the laser setup, so that the state of polarization along the cavity is not restricted, allows enhanced performances compared to other similar schemes. Noise-like pulses with durations of a few tens of ns were generated and a coherence length in the order of ps. For proper adjustments, self-starting passive mode-locking is obtained and a supercontinuum spectrum is observed at the laser output. We observe that the spectrum flatness is significantly improved in the harmonic mode-locking regime of the fiber laser. These results were achieved without the need to insert any high-nonlinearity propagation medium in the setup or at the laser output.

  4. Feasibility of wing shielding of the airplane interior from the shock noise generated by supersonic tip speed propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    A high tip speed turboprop is being considered as a future energy conservative airplane. The high tip speed of the propeller, combined with the speed of the airplane, results in supersonic relative flow on the propeller tips. These supersonic blade sections could generate noise that is a cabin environment problem. The feasibility of using wing shielding to lessen the impact of this supersonic propeller noise was investigated. An analytical model is chosen which considers that shock waves are associated with the propeller tip flow and indicates how they would be prevented from impinging on the airplane fuselage. An example calculation is performed where a swept wing is used to shield the fuselage from significant portions of the propeller shock waves.

  5. Shot noise generated by graphene p-n junctions in the quantum Hall effect regime.

    PubMed

    Kumada, N; Parmentier, F D; Hibino, H; Glattli, D C; Roulleau, P

    2015-09-04

    Graphene offers a unique system to investigate transport of Dirac Fermions at p-n junctions. In a magnetic field, combination of quantum Hall physics and the characteristic transport across p-n junctions leads to a fractionally quantized conductance associated with the mixing of electron-like and hole-like modes and their subsequent partitioning. The mixing and partitioning suggest that a p-n junction could be used as an electronic beam splitter. Here we report the shot noise study of the mode-mixing process and demonstrate the crucial role of the p-n junction length. For short p-n junctions, the amplitude of the noise is consistent with an electronic beam-splitter behaviour, whereas, for longer p-n junctions, it is reduced by the energy relaxation. Remarkably, the relaxation length is much larger than typical size of mesoscopic devices, encouraging using graphene for electron quantum optics and quantum information processing.

  6. The role of coherent structures in the generation of noise for subsonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. L.; Whitaker, K. W.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were made in the 'near' (r/D 60, x/D 60) field for high Reynolds number (184,000 to 262,000) axisymmetric cold air jets exhausting at atmospheric pressure. These measurements were in conjunction with an investigation which characterized the large scale coherent structure in the flow field of Mach number 0.6 to 0.8 jets. Natural jets as well as artificially excited jets were studied. Directivity plots were made for both natural jets and jets excited at various frequencies. Overall noise radiated by the jets reached a maximum value around 30 deg from the jet axis. However, individual frequencies emitted maximum sound pressure level at different angles from the jet axis. As the angle from the jet axis increased, the spectra of the noise shifted to higher frequencies.

  7. An analytical study of noise generation by subsonic flows in the presence of rigid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooley, J. P.; Karamcheti, K.; Guenther, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    A general analytical method is developed for determination of the radiated noise field from highly sheared, subsonic flows in the presence of rigid surfaces. The method is specifically formulated to use measurable flow field properties as the basis input data for calculations. The governing equations of a viscous, incompressible fluid are employed to determine approximately the so-called shear noise source strength distribution in the flow. Mean rates of strain and fluctuating velocity covariances are the fundamental input data for calculations. The method is applied to the wall jet region of a circular jet impinging at 45 deg to an infinite plane surface. Velocity field measurements of Foss are used to describe the required flow properties. Comparisons of calculated results with measured surface pressures and sound pressure levels are given and discussed.

  8. Environmental noise characteristics of the MOD5-B (3.2 MW) wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Hubbard, Harvey H.

    1989-01-01

    Both narrow band and broad band acoustic data were obtained for the MOD5-B wind turbine for a range of wind speeds from 5.8 to 14.3 m/s; for a range of power outputs from 300 to 3100 kW; and for various azimuth angles and distances. Comparisons are made with those of other large machines and with predictions by available methods. The highest levels occur at the lower frequencies and generally decrease as the frequency increases. Low frequency rotational noise components were more intense than expected for an upwind machine and are believed to result from localized wind gradients across the rotor disk due to upwind terrain features. Predicted broad band spectra follow the general trends of the data but tend to underestimate the levels in the frequency range where the turbulent boundary layer-trailing edge interaction noise is expected to be significant.

  9. Shot noise generated by graphene p-n junctions in the quantum Hall effect regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumada, N.; Parmentier, F. D.; Hibino, H.; Glattli, D. C.; Roulleau, P.

    2015-09-01

    Graphene offers a unique system to investigate transport of Dirac Fermions at p-n junctions. In a magnetic field, combination of quantum Hall physics and the characteristic transport across p-n junctions leads to a fractionally quantized conductance associated with the mixing of electron-like and hole-like modes and their subsequent partitioning. The mixing and partitioning suggest that a p-n junction could be used as an electronic beam splitter. Here we report the shot noise study of the mode-mixing process and demonstrate the crucial role of the p-n junction length. For short p-n junctions, the amplitude of the noise is consistent with an electronic beam-splitter behaviour, whereas, for longer p-n junctions, it is reduced by the energy relaxation. Remarkably, the relaxation length is much larger than typical size of mesoscopic devices, encouraging using graphene for electron quantum optics and quantum information processing.

  10. Attenuation of upstream-generated low frequency noise by gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, V. L.; Matta, R. K.

    1977-01-01

    The acoustic transfer functions of low frequency (below 3500 Hz) noise through aircraft turbines were investigated. Model test results were compared with theoretical predictions in order to assess the validity of the theory. Component tests were conducted on both high pressure and low pressure model turbines. The influence of inlet temperature and turbine speed attenuation was evaluated, while the effects of turbine pressure ratio, blade-row choking, and additional downstream stages were determined. Preliminary identification of pertinent aeroacoustic correlating parameters was made.

  11. Two-mode correlation of microwave quantum noise generated by parametric down-conversion.

    PubMed

    Bergeal, N; Schackert, F; Frunzio, L; Devoret, M H

    2012-03-23

    In this Letter, we report the observation of the correlation between two modes of microwave radiation resulting from the amplification of quantum noise by the Josephson parametric converter. This process, seen from the pump, can be viewed as parametric down-conversion. The correlation is measured by an interference experiment displaying a contrast better than 99% with a number of photons per mode greater than 250,000. Dispersive measurements of mesoscopic systems and quantum encryption can benefit from this development.

  12. Effect of Heating on Turbulent Density Fluctuations and Noise Generation From High Speed Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Mielke, Amy F.; Eck, Dennis G.

    2004-01-01

    Heated jets in a wide range of temperature ratios (TR), and acoustic Mach numbers (Ma) were investigated experimentally using far field microphones and a molecular Rayleigh scattering technique. The latter provided density fluctuations measurements. Two sets of operating conditions were considered: (1) TR was varied between 0.84 and 2.7 while Ma was fixed at 0.9; (2) Ma was varied between 0.6 and 1.48, while TR was fixed at 2.27. The implementation of the molecular Rayleigh scattering technique required dust removal and usage of a hydrogen combustor to avoid soot particles. Time averaged density measurements in the first set of data showed differences in the peripheral density shear layers between the unheated and heated jets. The nozzle exit shear layer showed increased turbulence level with increased plume temperature. Nevertheless, further downstream the density fluctuations spectra are found to be nearly identical for all Mach number and temperature ratio conditions. To determine noise sources a correlation study between plume density fluctuations and far field sound pressure fluctuations was conducted. For all jets the core region beyond the end of the potential flow was found to be the strongest noise source. Except for an isothermal jet, the correlations did not differ significantly with increasing temperature ratio. The isothermal jet created little density fluctuations. Although the far field noise from this jet did not show any exceptional trend, the flow-sound correlations were very low. This indicated that the density fluctuations only acted as a "tracer parameter" for the noise sources.

  13. Measurements of the Low-Frequency Wind-Generated Ambient Noise in the Deep Ocean.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    from additional sites throughout the Tasman Sea -Fiji Basin region. Variation in measured level is compared to wind speed, sea state, and propagation...sponsorship of the Undersea Warfare Technology Office, Naval Sea Systems Command under NUSC Project No.t A65005, Ambient Noise Characteristics; NAVSEA...Systems CenterASAAWNUI NJES New London Laboratory A50 New London, CT 06320 I I. CONTUOLLING OFFICE NAME ANO AGONIES I WR S Naval Sea Systems Command

  14. Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, John S.; Wilby, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The generation and control of flight vehicle interior noise is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of transmission through airborne and structure-borne paths and the control of cabin noise by path modification. Techniques for identifying the relative contributions of the various source-path combinations are also discussed along with methods for the prediction of aircraft interior noise such as those based on the general modal theory and statistical energy analysis.

  15. The use of decay rates to analyse the performance of railway track in rolling noise generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. J. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Diehl, R. J.

    2006-06-01

    Through the development and testing of theoretical models for rolling noise in the past, it has been well demonstrated that the rate of decay of vibration along the rail is closely linked to the noise performance of the track, since it controls the effective radiating length of the rail. The decay rates of vibration along the rail have long been used by researchers as an intermediate, measurable parameter by which to test and improve the accuracy of prediction models. Recently, it has been suggested that the decay rates should be used as a criterion for the selection of track for noise measurements that are part of the acceptance testing of interoperable trains in Europe. In this context, a more detailed understanding of the factors that affect the measurement of decay rates and a consistent approach to the data processing have become important topics. Here, a method is suggested for the calculation of decay rates from frequency response measurements. Different effects are shown in the measured decay rates of a ballasted track with mono-bloc sleepers, a slab track and a ballasted track with bi-bloc sleepers. In the last case, a model for a periodically supported track is used to study the effects observed. It is shown that a peak in the decay rate just above the pinned-pinned frequency may be overestimated because of the measurement procedure that has been used.

  16. The role of coherent structures in the generation of noise for subsonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. L.

    1982-01-01

    The coherent structure in high Reynolds number (184,000 to 262,000), Mach number 0.6 to 0.8 axisymmetric cold air jets exhausting at atmospheric pressure was studied. The mean flow and the statistical time averaged turbulence properties were measured. Spectra showed a very broad frequency content which shifted towards the lower frequencies as the flow progressed downstream. Axial wave number measurements indicate that the axial wave number-frequency relationship was the same for a wide range of Mach (0.3 to 2.5) and Reynolds (3,700 to over 200,000) numbers. Measurements of the azimuthal mode numbers show that several modes from n = -3 to +3 exist simultaneously in various quantities that the different frequencies studied. Acoustic measurements were made in the near field of the Mach number 0.6 jet. Sound pressure level contours showed that noise appeared to be radiated from a location near the end of the potential core. Directivity plots revealed that the spectra of this noise shifted towards higher frequencies as the angle from the jet axis increased. It was also found that mid-band excitation frequencies produced an increase in full spectrum noise.

  17. Numerical Simulations of Noise Generated by Supersonic Rectangular Jets. Part One: Validation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanath, Kamal; Johnson, Ryan; Corrigan, Andrew; Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Sanchez, Pablo; Baier, Florian; Gutmark, Ephraim

    2015-11-01

    The noise from high performance jet engines of both civilian and military aircraft is an area of active concern. To date, much of the work on noise reduction techniques has focused on axisymmetric circular nozzles. Asymmetric exhaust nozzle configurations, in particular rectangular, are likely to become more important in the future. In this study we validate the far field noise for ideally and over expanded supersonic jets issuing from a low aspect ratio rectangular nozzle geometry. Validation of the acoustic data is performed against experimentally recorded sound pressure level (SPL) spectra for a host of observer locations around the asymmetric nozzle. Data is presented for the cold jet case and two heated jets for all nozzle pressure ratios. It is shown that elevated operating temperatures result in elevated sound levels across the frequency spectra at all locations. Screech tones, that are present for certain cases, diminish in amplitude or cease completely as the jet is heated. Supported by Office of Naval Research (ONR) through the Computational Physics Task Area under the NRL 6.1 Base Program.

  18. Compact noise-like pulse fiber laser and its application for supercontinuum generation in highly nonlinear fiber.

    PubMed

    Xia, Handing; Li, Heping; Deng, Guanglei; Li, Jianfeng; Zhang, Shangjian; Liu, Yong

    2015-11-10

    We report on supercontinuum generation in a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF) pumped by noise-like pulses (NLPs) emitted from a compact fiber ring laser. The compact erbium-doped fiber ring laser is constructed by using an optical integrated component and mode-locked by the nonlinear polarization rotation technique. The laser produces NLPs with a 3-dB spectral bandwidth of 60.2 nm, repetition rate of 9.36 MHz, and pulse energy of 2.8 nJ. Numerical simulations reproduce the generation of NLPs in the experiment. The NLPs are then launched into a 110-m-long HNLF and a supercontinuum with a 20-dB spectral width over 500 nm is obtained. Such a simple and inexpensive supercontinuum-generation system is a potential alternative for various practical applications.

  19. Effect of winglets on a first-generation jet transport wing. 1: Longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a semispan model at subsonic speeds. [in the Langley 8 ft transonic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. F.; Flechner, S. G.; Montoya, L. C.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of winglets and a simple wing-tip extension on the aerodynamic forces and moments and the flow-field cross flow velocity vectors behind the wing tip of a first generation jet transport wing were investigated in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel using a semi-span model. The test was conducted at Mach numbers of 0.30, 0.70, 0.75, 0.78, and 0.80. At a Mach number of 0.30, the configurations were tested with combinations of leading- and trailing-edge flaps.

  20. Aerodynamics of sounding rockets at supersonic speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vira, N. R.

    This dissertation presents a practical and low cost method of computing the aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles such as sounding rockets, high speed bombs, projectiles and guided missiles in supersonic flight. The vehicle configuration consists of a slender axisymmetric body with a conical or ogive noise, cylinders, shoulders and boattails, if any, and have sets of two, three or four fins. Geometry of the fin cross section can be single wedge, double wedge, modified single wedge or modified double wedge. First the aerodynamics of the fins and the body are analyzed separately; then fin body and fore and aft fin interferences are accounted for when they are combined to form the total vehicle. Results and formulas documented in this work are the basis of the supersonic portion of the Theoretical Aerodynamic Derivatives (TAD) computer program operating at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  1. Nonlinear phase noise separation method for on-off keying transmission system modeling with non-Gaussian noise generation in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Vanin, Evgeny; Jacobsen, Gunnar; Berntson, Anders

    2007-06-15

    We propose a novel method for effective simulation of optical fiber transmission system performance with nonlinear interaction between the amplified spontaneous emission noise and the modulated optical signal employing on-off keying. The method enables a standard analytical description of the receiver operation even when the detected optical field obeys non-Gaussian statistics with a substantial amount of nonlinear phase noise accumulated along the fiber link due to strong signal-noise interaction.

  2. Laser ultrasonics - Generation and detection considerations for improved signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, James W.; Deaton, John B., Jr.; McKie, Andrew D. W.; Spicer, James B.

    It is shown that improvement in the detection sensitivity of laser-ultrasonic systems may be obtained by generating narrowband acoustic signals using both temporal and spatial modulation of the generating laser. A laser-generated acoustic tone burst waveform will have lower peak amplitudes than a single acoustic pulse providing the same system SNR. Consequently, lower power density laser pulses may be used to avoid surface damage.

  3. Laser ultrasonics: generation and detection considerations for improved signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, James W.; Deaton, John B., Jr.; McKie, Andrew D. W.; Spicer, James B.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that improvement in the detection sensitivity of laser-ultrasonic systems may be obtained by generating narrowband acoustic signals using both temporal and spatial modulation of the generating laser. A laser-generated acoustic tone burst waveform will have lower peak amplitudes than a single acoustic pulse providing the same system SNR. Consequently, lower power density laser pulses may be used to avoid surface damage.

  4. Acoustic noise generation by the DOE/NASA MOD-1 wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, N. D.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a series of measurements taken over the past year of the acoustic emissions from the DOE/NASA MOD-1 Wind Turbine show the maximum acoustic energy is concentrated in the low frequency range, often below 100 Hz. The temporal as well as the frequency characteristics of the turbine sounds have been shown to be important since the MOD-1 is capable of radiating both coherent and incoherent noise. The coherent sounds are usually impulsive and are manifested in an averaged frequency domain plot as large numbers of discrete energy bands extending from the blade passage frequency to beyond 50 Hz on occasion. It is these impulsive sounds which are identified as the principal source of the annoyance to a dozen families living within 3 km of the turbine. The source of the coherent noise appears to be the rapid, unsteady blade loads encountered as the blade passes through the wake of the tower structure. Annoying levels are occasionally reached at nearby homes due to the interaction of the low frequency, high energy peaks in the acoustic impulses and the structural modes of the homes as well as by direct radiation outdoors. The peak levels of these impulses can be enhanced or subdued through complete propagation.

  5. Unsteady transonic aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, D.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on unsteady transonic aerodynamics are presented. The topics addressed include: physical phenomena associated with unsteady transonic flows, basic equations for unsteady transonic flow, practical problems concerning aircraft, basic numerical methods, computational methods for unsteady transonic flows, application of transonic flow analysis to helicopter rotor problems, unsteady aerodynamics for turbomachinery aeroelastic applications, alternative methods for modeling unsteady transonic flows.

  6. Uncertainty in Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Hemsch, M. J.; Morrison, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    An approach is presented to treat computational aerodynamics as a process, subject to the fundamental quality assurance principles of process control and process improvement. We consider several aspects affecting uncertainty for the computational aerodynamic process and present a set of stages to determine the level of management required to meet risk assumptions desired by the customer of the predictions.

  7. Noise generated by a flight weight, air flow control valve in a vertical takeoff and landing aircraft thrust vectoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility to experimentally evaluate the noise generated by a flight weight, 12 in. butterfly valve installed in a proposed vertical takeoff and landing thrust vectoring system. Fluctuating pressure measurements were made in the circular duct upstream and downstream of the valve. This data report presents the results of these tests. The maximum overall sound pressure level is generated in the duct downstream of the valve and reached a value of 180 dB at a valve pressure ratio of 2.8. At the higher valve pressure ratios the spectra downstream of the valve is broad banded with its maximum at 1000 Hz.

  8. Iced-airfoil aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, M. B.; Broeren, A. P.; Blumenthal, L. A.

    2005-07-01

    Past research on airfoil aerodynamics in icing are reviewed. This review emphasizes the time period after the 1978 NASA Lewis workshop that initiated the modern icing research program at NASA and the current period after the 1994 ATR accident where aerodynamics research has been more aircraft safety focused. Research pre-1978 is also briefly reviewed. Following this review, our current knowledge of iced airfoil aerodynamics is presented from a flowfield-physics perspective. This article identifies four classes of ice accretions: roughness, horn ice, streamwise ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. For each class, the key flowfield features such as flowfield separation and reattachment are discussed and how these contribute to the known aerodynamic effects of these ice shapes. Finally Reynolds number and Mach number effects on iced-airfoil aerodynamics are summarized.

  9. Introduction. Computational aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Paul G

    2007-10-15

    The wide range of uses of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aircraft design is discussed along with its role in dealing with the environmental impact of flight. Enabling technologies, such as grid generation and turbulence models, are also considered along with flow/turbulence control. The large eddy simulation, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and hybrid turbulence modelling approaches are contrasted. The CFD prediction of numerous jet configurations occurring in aerospace are discussed along with aeroelasticity for aeroengine and external aerodynamics, design optimization, unsteady flow modelling and aeroengine internal and external flows. It is concluded that there is a lack of detailed measurements (for both canonical and complex geometry flows) to provide validation and even, in some cases, basic understanding of flow physics. Not surprisingly, turbulence modelling is still the weak link along with, as ever, a pressing need for improved (in terms of robustness, speed and accuracy) solver technology, grid generation and geometry handling. Hence, CFD, as a truly predictive and creative design tool, seems a long way off. Meanwhile, extreme practitioner expertise is still required and the triad of computation, measurement and analytic solution must be judiciously used.

  10. Measured Noise from Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph; McSwain, Robert; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Proposed uses of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), including home package delivery, have the potential to expose large portions of communities to a new noise source. This paper discusses results of flyover noise measurements of four small UAVs, including an internal combustion-powered model airplane and three battery-powered multicopters. Basic noise characteristics of these vehicles are discussed, including spectral properties and sound level metrics such as sound pressure level, effective perceived noise level, and sound exposure level. The size and aerodynamic characteristics of the multicopters in particular make their flight path susceptible to atmospheric disturbances such as wind gusts. These gusts, coupled with a flight control system that varies rotor speed to maintain vehicle stability, create an unsteady acoustic signature. The spectral variations resulting from this unsteadiness are explored, in both hover and flyover conditions for the multicopters. The time varying noise, which differs from the relatively steady noise generated by large transport aircraft, may complicate the prediction of human annoyance using conventional sound level metrics.

  11. Noise radiation characteristics of the Westinghouse WWG-0600 (600kW) wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Hubbard, Harvey H.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic data are presented from five different WWG-0600 machines for the wind speed range 6.7 to 13.4 m/s, for a power output range of 51 to 600 kW and for upwind, downwind and crosswind locations. Both broadband and narrowband data are presented and are compared with calculations and with similar data from other machines. Predicted broadband spectra are in good agreement with measurements at high power and underestimate them at low power. Discrete frequency rotational noise components are present in all measurements and are believed due to terrain induced wind gradients. Predictions are in general agreement with measurements upwind and downwind but underestimate them in the crosswind direction.

  12. Large eddy simulation of flow development and noise generation of free and swirling jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Zhen-Hua; Zhou, Lin; Yang, Hai-Hua; Sun, De-Jun

    2013-12-01

    Large eddy simulation is performed for investigating the local and far-field behaviors of free and swirling jets at moderate Reynolds number. By solving compressible boundary layer equations, the inflow profiles with different swirl number are calculated, and then their stability characteristics are analyzed based on linear stability theory. The amplification rates of swirling jets are higher than the free one, particularly for higher or negative azimuthal wavenumber modes. Multiple unstable modes are superimposed to construct inflow forcing. The quantities of flow and acoustic are presented and compared against the results of existed experiments and other computations, besides, the comparisons are also made among themselves. For swirling jets, the spreadings of jet half-width and vorticity thickness at the initial and transition stage are enhanced, but they are surpassed by the free jet at turbulent mixing stage. In all cases, the development of mixing layer initially is greatly influenced by frequencies f0 and f0/2 associated with upstream forcing. As the swirl intensity is increased, the growth rates of fluctuation quantities on the centerline and the nozzle lip line are raised, but the peak levels on the centerline are reduced substantially. In swirling jets, the strength of vortex pairing is decreased, and the pairing noise is weakened correspondingly. The overall sound pressure levels are lower than that of the free jet at all observation angles (ϕ), and about 3 decibels (dB) is reduced at ϕ ≃ 30° in the strong swirling case at a distance of 60 radii. The Fourier analyses of pressure and acoustic sources show that the modes are varied greatly, which suggests that the noise reduction should be corresponding to the change of instability waves.

  13. HSCT high lift system aerodynamic requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, John A.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of high lift system aerodynamic requirements are provided. Low speed aerodynamics has been identified as critical to the successful development of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The airplane must takeoff and land at a sufficient number of existing or projected airports to be economically viable. At the same time, community noise must be acceptable. Improvements in cruise drag, engine fuel consumption, and structural weight tend to decrease the wing size and thrust required of engines. Decreasing wing size increases the requirements for effective and efficient low speed characteristics. Current design concepts have already been compromised away from better cruise wings for low speed performance. Flap systems have been added to achieve better lift-to-drag ratios for climb and approach and for lower pitch attitudes for liftoff and touchdown. Research to achieve improvements in low speed aerodynamics needs to be focused on areas most likely to have the largest effect on the wing and engine sizing process. It would be desirable to provide enough lift to avoid sizing the airplane for field performance and to still meet the noise requirements. The airworthiness standards developed in 1971 will be the basis for performance requirements for an airplane that will not be critical to the airplane wing and engine size. The lift and drag levels that were required to meet the performance requirements of tentative airworthiness standards established in 1971 and that were important to community noise are identified. Research to improve the low speed aerodynamic characteristics of the HSCT needs to be focused in the areas of performance deficiency and where noise can be reduced. Otherwise, the wing planform, engine cycle, or other parameters for a superior cruising airplane would have to be changed.

  14. Summary analysis of the Gemini entry aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitnah, A. M.; Howes, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic data that were derived in 1967 from the analysis of flight-generated data for the Gemini entry module are presented. These data represent the aerodynamic characteristics exhibited by the vehicle during the entry portion of Gemini 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12 missions. For the Gemini, 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12 missions, the flight-generated lift-to-drag ratios and corresponding angles of attack are compared with the wind tunnel data. These comparisons show that the flight generated lift-to-drag ratios are consistently lower than were anticipated from the tunnel data. Numerous data uncertainties are cited that provide an insight into the problems that are related to an analysis of flight data developed from instrumentation systems, the primary functions of which are other than the evaluation of flight aerodynamic performance.

  15. Shallow-water seismoacoustic noise generated by tropical storms Ernesto and Florence.

    PubMed

    Traer, James; Gerstoft, Peter; Bromirski, Peter D; Hodgkiss, William S; Brooks, Laura A

    2008-09-01

    Land-based seismic observations of double frequency (DF) microseisms generated during tropical storms Ernesto and Florence are dominated by signals in the 0.15-0.5 Hz band. In contrast, data from sea floor hydrophones in shallow water (70 m depth, 130 km off the New Jersey coast) show dominant signals in the ocean gravity-wave frequency band, 0.02-0.18 Hz, and low amplitudes from 0.18 to 0.3 Hz, suggesting significant opposing wave components necessary for DF microseism generation were negligible at the site. Florence produced large waves over deep water while Ernesto only generated waves in coastal regions, yet both storms produced similar spectra. This suggests near-coastal shallow water as the dominant region for observed microseism generation.

  16. A design of DDS single-frequency signal generator based on phrase jitter technology to reduce scattering noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhihui; Fan, Muwen; Zhou, Luchun

    2015-10-01

    In order to test the working status of adaptive optics systems, it is necessary to design a disturbance signal module. Disturbance signal module based on DDS (Direct Digital frequency Synthesis) is used to generate single-frequency disturbance signal to test the working conditions of deformable mirror and adaptive optics systems. But DDS is a periodic sampling sequence and will inevitably lead to the introduction of periodic noise which makes the disturbance signal scattering. This paper uses two methods to reduce the scattering of the single-frequency signal generated by DDS technology. The first method is the compression ROM table. In the case of the same ROM capacity, it is equivalent to extend the compressed ROM table with 256 points to ROM table with 1024 points. In this process, Oversampling is introduced to improve spectral purity to reduce the scattering of the single-frequency signal. The second method is the random phase jitter technology. It introduces m sequence as DDS sampling output random phase jitter unit. The purpose is to generate some random number added at the end of the phase accumulator. As a result, the output does not always push back than ideal, but randomly in advance, thus breaking its periodicity. This method changes the original uniform look-up sampling into a random non-uniform look-up sampling, making DDS output spectrum white. It can also improve spectral purity of the DDS output, thereby reducing the scatting of the single-frequency signal generated by DDS technology.

  17. Statistical characteristic in time-domain of direct current corona-generated audible noise from conductor in corona cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuebao; Cui, Xiang; Lu, Tiebing; Ma, Wenzuo; Bian, Xingming; Wang, Donglai; Hiziroglu, Huseyin

    2016-03-01

    The corona-generated audible noise (AN) has become one of decisive factors in the design of high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission lines. The AN from transmission lines can be attributed to sound pressure pulses which are generated by the multiple corona sources formed on the conductor, i.e., transmission lines. In this paper, a detailed time-domain characteristics of the sound pressure pulses, which are generated by the DC corona discharges formed over the surfaces of a stranded conductors, are investigated systematically in a laboratory settings using a corona cage structure. The amplitude of sound pressure pulse and its time intervals are extracted by observing a direct correlation between corona current pulses and corona-generated sound pressure pulses. Based on the statistical characteristics, a stochastic model is presented for simulating the sound pressure pulses due to DC corona discharges occurring on conductors. The proposed stochastic model is validated by comparing the calculated and measured A-weighted sound pressure level (SPL). The proposed model is then used to analyze the influence of the pulse amplitudes and pulse rate on the SPL. Furthermore, a mathematical relationship is found between the SPL and conductor diameter, electric field, and radial distance.

  18. Ultra-broadband dissipative soliton and noise-like pulse generation from a normal dispersion mode-locked Tm-doped all-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Sobon, Grzegorz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Martynkien, Tadeusz; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2016-03-21

    We report generation of ultra-broadband dissipative solitons and noise-like pulses from a simple, fully fiberized mode-locked Tm-doped fiber laser. The oscillator operates in the normal net dispersion regime and is mode-locked via nonlinear polarization evolution. Depending on the cavity dispersion, the laser was capable of generating 60 nm or 100 nm broad dissipative solitons. These are the broadest spectra generated from a normal dispersion mode-locked Tm-doped fiber laser so far. The same oscillator might also operate in the noise-like pulse regime with extremely broad emission spectra (over 300 nm), which also significantly outperforms the previous reports.

  19. Noise generated by cavitating single-hole and multi-hole orifices in a water pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testud, P.; Moussou, P.; Hirschberg, A.; Aurégan, Y.

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the acoustical effects of cavitation caused by a water flow through an orifice. A circular-centered single-hole orifice and a multi-hole orifice are tested. Experiments are performed under industrial conditions: the pressure drop across the orifice varies from 3 to 30 bar, corresponding to cavitation numbers from 0.74 to 0.03. Two regimes of cavitation are discerned. In each regime, the broadband noise spectra obtained far downstream of the orifice are presented. A nondimensional representation is proposed: in the intermediate ‘developed cavitation’ regime, spectra collapse reasonably well; in the more intense ‘super cavitation’ regime, spectra depend strongly on the quantity of air remaining in the water downstream of the orifice, which is revealed by the measure of the speed of sound at the downstream transducers. In the ‘developed cavitation’ regime, whistling associated with periodic vortex shedding is observed. The corresponding Strouhal number agrees reasonably well with literature for single-phase flows. In the 'super cavitation’ regime, the whistling disappears.

  20. Noise and Turbulence Generate 3D Zombie Vortices in Stably Stratified Rotating Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Suyang; Marcus, Philip S.; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Lecoanet, Daniel; Barranco, Joseph A.

    2013-11-01

    We showed previously that a linearly stable shearing, rotating, stably stratified flow has a finite-amplitude instability creating ``zombie vortices'' that self-replicate and fill the domain. Our flows were initialized with perturbations of one or two vortices. Our motivation was to determine whether ``dead zones'' in protoplanetary disks were stable, or whether they could be de-stabilized to produce vortices necessary for the final part of star formation and for planet formation. To be more relevant to astrophysics, we choose the initial conditions to be noise or turbulence with a Kolmogorov spectrum with small kinetic energy and Mach number. In a Kolmogorov spectrum, the largest eddies determine the kinetic energy and Mach number, while the smallest determine the vorticity and Rossby number Ro ≡ ω / f , where ω is the vertical vorticity and f is the Coriolis parameter. The protoplanetary disks (which have large inertial ranges due to their large Reynolds numbers), can have large Rossby numbers, but weak Mach numbers and kinetic energies. It is important to know whether the triggering of the finite-amplitude instability that creates zombie vortices depends on threshold values of Mach number, kinetic energy, or the Rossby number. Here, we show it is the latter.

  1. Simulation of generation of dissipative soliton, dissipative soliton resonance and noise-like pulse in Yb-doped mode-locked fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhaochen; Li, Huihui; Wang, Pu

    2015-03-09

    we report three types of pulse generation in Yb-doped nonlinear polarization rotation mode-locked fiber lasers in all-normal-dispersion regime through simulation, including dissipative soliton, dissipative soliton resonance and noise-like pulse. We distinguish the different conditions of generating such different pulses by analyzing the transmission curve of saturable absorber, which plays a key role in pulse shaping.

  2. Upper surface blowing aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryle, D. M., Jr.; Braden, J. A.; Gibson, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance at cruise, and noise effects due to variations in nacelle and wing geometry and mode of operation are studied using small aircraft models that simulate upper surface blowing (USB). At cruise speeds ranging from Mach .50 to Mach .82, the key determinants of drag/thrust penalties are found to be nozzle aspect ratio, boattailing angle, and chordwise position; number of nacelles; and streamlined versus symmetric configuration. Recommendations are made for obtaining favorable cruise configurations. The acoustic studies, which concentrate on the noise created by the jet exhaust flow and its interaction with wing and flap surfaces, isolate several important sources of USB noise, including nozzle shape, exit velocity, and impingement angle; flow pathlength; and flap angle and radius of curvature. Suggestions for lessening noise due to trailing edge flow velocity, flow pathlength, and flow spreading are given, though compromises between some design options may be necessary.

  3. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-03-06

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing.

  4. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds

    PubMed Central

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F.; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-01-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier–Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing. PMID:25589565

  5. Linear optical quantum metrology with single photons: exploiting spontaneously generated entanglement to beat the shot-noise limit.

    PubMed

    Motes, Keith R; Olson, Jonathan P; Rabeaux, Evan J; Dowling, Jonathan P; Olson, S Jay; Rohde, Peter P

    2015-05-01

    Quantum number-path entanglement is a resource for supersensitive quantum metrology and in particular provides for sub-shot-noise or even Heisenberg-limited sensitivity. However, such number-path entanglement has been thought to be resource intensive to create in the first place--typically requiring either very strong nonlinearities, or nondeterministic preparation schemes with feedforward, which are difficult to implement. Very recently, arising from the study of quantum random walks with multiphoton walkers, as well as the study of the computational complexity of passive linear optical interferometers fed with single-photon inputs, it has been shown that such passive linear optical devices generate a superexponentially large amount of number-path entanglement. A logical question to ask is whether this entanglement may be exploited for quantum metrology. We answer that question here in the affirmative by showing that a simple, passive, linear-optical interferometer--fed with only uncorrelated, single-photon inputs, coupled with simple, single-mode, disjoint photodetection--is capable of significantly beating the shot-noise limit. Our result implies a pathway forward to practical quantum metrology with readily available technology.

  6. Aerodynamics of bird flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Unlike airplanes birds must have either flapping or oscillating wings (the hummingbird). Only such wings can produce both lift and thrust - two sine qua non attributes of flying.The bird wings have several possibilities how to obtain the same functions as airplane wings. All are realized by the system of flight feathers. Birds have also the capabilities of adjusting the shape of the wing according to what the immediate flight situation demands, as well as of responding almost immediately to conditions the flow environment dictates, such as wind gusts, object avoidance, target tracking, etc. In bird aerodynamics also the tail plays an important role. To fly, wings impart downward momentum to the surrounding air and obtain lift by reaction. How this is achieved under various flight situations (cruise flight, hovering, landing, etc.), and what the role is of the wing-generated vortices in producing lift and thrust is discussed.The issue of studying bird flight experimentally from in vivo or in vitro experiments is also briefly discussed.

  7. Noise-Driven Heterogeneity in the Rate of Genetic-Variant Generation as a Basis for Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Capp, Jean-Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Molecular biologists have long searched for molecular mechanisms responsible for tuning the rate of genetic-variant generation (RGVG) in fluctuating environments. In spite of several bacterial examples, no regulated variation in the RGVG has been identified in eukaryotic systems. Based notably on the example of industrial and pathogenic yeasts, this article proposes a nonregulated molecular evolutionary mechanism for the appearance of the transient increase of the RGVG in eukaryotic cell populations facing challenging environments. The stochastic nature of gene expression allows a model in which the RGVG in the population can be rapidly tuned as a result of a simple Darwinian process acting on noise-driven heterogeneity in the RGVG from cell to cell. The high flexibility conferred through this model could resolve paradoxical situations, especially concerning the mutator phenotype in cancer cells. PMID:20606014

  8. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  9. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  10. Integrated quasi-phase-matched second-harmonic generator and electro-optic phase modulator for low-noise phase-sensitive amplification.

    PubMed

    Enbutsu, Koji; Umeki, Takeshi; Tadanaga, Osamu; Asobe, Masaki; Takenouchi, Hirokazu

    2015-07-15

    We propose a quasi-phase-matched second-harmonic generator integrated with an electro-optic phase modulator in a directly bonded LiNbO3 (DB-LN) waveguide to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) pump light for a phase-sensitive amplifier (PSA). This integrated device exhibits 1-MHz modulation and 1-W second-harmonic-generation properties sufficient for phase-locking between the signal and pump and for PSA gain, respectively. A novel PSA configuration based on the high-input-power tolerance of the device helps to suppress the noise from the erbium-doped fiber amplifier used for pump-light generation and leads to an improvement of the SNR of the pump light. The SNR improvement was confirmed by comparing the noise figure of a PSA employing the DB-LN waveguide with that of a PSA using a Ti-diffused LN waveguide modulator.

  11. Vortex shedding noise control in idling circular saws using air ejection at the teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagimoto, K.; Mote, C. D.; Ichimiya, R.

    1994-04-01

    Aerodynamically induced noise from an idling circular saw can be very intense. The purpose of the present investigation is noise reduction through vortex shedding control in idling circular saws. Reduction of aerodynamic noise in idling circular saws may be possible by controlling the shed vortices and flow structures in the space between teeth, based on the earlier observations.

  12. Potential impacts of advanced aerodynamic technology on air transportation system productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Summaries of a workshop held at NASA Langley Research Center in 1993 to explore the application of advanced aerodynamics to airport productivity improvement are discussed. Sessions included discussions of terminal area productivity problems and advanced aerodynamic technologies for enhanced high lift and reduced noise, emissions, and wake vortex hazard with emphasis upon advanced aircraft configurations and multidisciplinary solution options.

  13. The Effects of Surfaces on the Aerodynamics and Acoustics of Jet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew J.; Miller, Steven A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft noise mitigation is an ongoing challenge for the aeronautics research community. In response to this challenge, low-noise aircraft concepts have been developed that exhibit situations where the jet exhaust interacts with an airframe surface. Jet flows interacting with nearby surfaces manifest a complex behavior in which acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics are altered. In this paper, the variation of the aerodynamics, acoustic source, and far-field acoustic intensity are examined as a large at plate is positioned relative to the nozzle exit. Steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solutions are examined to study the aerodynamic changes in the field-variables and turbulence statistics. The mixing noise model of Tam and Auriault is used to predict the noise produced by the jet. To validate both the aerodynamic and the noise prediction models, results are compared with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and free-field acoustic data respectively. The variation of the aerodynamic quantities and noise source are examined by comparing predictions from various jet and at plate configurations with an isolated jet. To quantify the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic installation effects on the aerodynamic noise source, a non-dimensional number is formed that contains the flow-conditions and airframe installation parameters.

  14. Reduction of Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise by Active Rotor Control Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Brooks, Thomas F.; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. All-fibre photonic signal generator for attosecond timing and ultralow-noise microwave.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-11-04

    High-impact frequency comb applications that are critically dependent on precise pulse timing (i.e., repetition rate) have recently emerged and include the synchronization of X-ray free-electron lasers, photonic analogue-to-digital conversion and photonic radar systems. These applications have used attosecond-level timing jitter of free-running mode-locked lasers on a fast time scale within ~100 μs. Maintaining attosecond-level absolute jitter over a significantly longer time scale can dramatically improve many high-precision comb applications. To date, ultrahigh quality-factor (Q) optical resonators have been used to achieve the highest-level repetition-rate stabilization of mode-locked lasers. However, ultrahigh-Q optical-resonator-based methods are often fragile, alignment sensitive and complex, which limits their widespread use. Here we demonstrate a fibre-delay line-based repetition-rate stabilization method that enables the all-fibre photonic generation of optical pulse trains with 980-as (20-fs) absolute r.m.s. timing jitter accumulated over 0.01 s (1 s). This simple approach is based on standard off-the-shelf fibre components and can therefore be readily used in various comb applications that require ultra-stable microwave frequency and attosecond optical timing.

  16. All-fibre photonic signal generator for attosecond timing and ultralow-noise microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-11-01

    High-impact frequency comb applications that are critically dependent on precise pulse timing (i.e., repetition rate) have recently emerged and include the synchronization of X-ray free-electron lasers, photonic analogue-to-digital conversion and photonic radar systems. These applications have used attosecond-level timing jitter of free-running mode-locked lasers on a fast time scale within ~100 μs. Maintaining attosecond-level absolute jitter over a significantly longer time scale can dramatically improve many high-precision comb applications. To date, ultrahigh quality-factor (Q) optical resonators have been used to achieve the highest-level repetition-rate stabilization of mode-locked lasers. However, ultrahigh-Q optical-resonator-based methods are often fragile, alignment sensitive and complex, which limits their widespread use. Here we demonstrate a fibre-delay line-based repetition-rate stabilization method that enables the all-fibre photonic generation of optical pulse trains with 980-as (20-fs) absolute r.m.s. timing jitter accumulated over 0.01 s (1 s). This simple approach is based on standard off-the-shelf fibre components and can therefore be readily used in various comb applications that require ultra-stable microwave frequency and attosecond optical timing.

  17. All-fibre photonic signal generator for attosecond timing and ultralow-noise microwave

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    High-impact frequency comb applications that are critically dependent on precise pulse timing (i.e., repetition rate) have recently emerged and include the synchronization of X-ray free-electron lasers, photonic analogue-to-digital conversion and photonic radar systems. These applications have used attosecond-level timing jitter of free-running mode-locked lasers on a fast time scale within ~100 μs. Maintaining attosecond-level absolute jitter over a significantly longer time scale can dramatically improve many high-precision comb applications. To date, ultrahigh quality-factor (Q) optical resonators have been used to achieve the highest-level repetition-rate stabilization of mode-locked lasers. However, ultrahigh-Q optical-resonator-based methods are often fragile, alignment sensitive and complex, which limits their widespread use. Here we demonstrate a fibre-delay line-based repetition-rate stabilization method that enables the all-fibre photonic generation of optical pulse trains with 980-as (20-fs) absolute r.m.s. timing jitter accumulated over 0.01 s (1 s). This simple approach is based on standard off-the-shelf fibre components and can therefore be readily used in various comb applications that require ultra-stable microwave frequency and attosecond optical timing. PMID:26531777

  18. Future Challenges and Opportunities in Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Hefner, Jerry N.

    2000-01-01

    Investments in aeronautics research and technology have declined substantially over the last decade, in part due to the perception that technologies required in aircraft design are fairly mature and readily available. This perception is being driven by the fact that aircraft configurations, particularly the transport aircraft, have evolved only incrementally, over last several decades. If however, one considers that the growth in air travel is expected to triple in the next 20 years, it becomes quickly obvious that the evolutionary development of technologies is not going to meet the increased demands for safety, environmental compatibility, capacity, and economic viability. Instead, breakthrough technologies will he required both in traditional disciplines of aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, materials, controls, and avionics as well as in the multidisciplinary integration of these technologies into the design of future aerospace vehicles concepts. The paper discusses challenges and opportunities in the field of aerodynamics over the next decade. Future technology advancements in aerodynamics will hinge on our ability, to understand, model, and control complex, three-dimensional, unsteady viscous flow across the speed range. This understanding is critical for developing innovative flow and noise control technologies and advanced design tools that will revolutionize future aerospace vehicle systems and concepts. Specifically, the paper focuses on advanced vehicle concepts, flow and noise control technologies, and advanced design and analysis tools.

  19. Experimental Study of Airfoil Trailing Edge Noise: Instrumentation, Methodology and Initial Results. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manley, M. B.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanisms of aerodynamic noise generation at the trailing edge of an airfoil is investigated. Instrumentation was designed, a miniature semiconductor strain-gauge pressure transducer and associated electronic amplifier circuitry were designed and tested and digital signal analysis techniques applied to gain insight into the relationship between the dynamic pressure close to the trailing edge and the sound in the acoustic far-field. Attempts are made to verify some trailing-edge noise generation characteristics as theoretically predicted by several contemporary acousticians. It is found that the noise detected in the far-field is comprised of the sum of many uncorrelated emissions radiating from the vicinity of the trailing edge. These emissions appear to be the result of acoustic energy radiation which has been converted by the trailing-edge noise mechanism from the dynamic fluid energy of independent streamwise 'strips' of the turbulent boundary layer flow.

  20. Unstructured mesh algorithms for aerodynamic calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The use of unstructured mesh techniques for solving complex aerodynamic flows is discussed. The principle advantages of unstructured mesh strategies, as they relate to complex geometries, adaptive meshing capabilities, and parallel processing are emphasized. The various aspects required for the efficient and accurate solution of aerodynamic flows are addressed. These include mesh generation, mesh adaptivity, solution algorithms, convergence acceleration, and turbulence modeling. Computations of viscous turbulent two-dimensional flows and inviscid three-dimensional flows about complex configurations are demonstrated. Remaining obstacles and directions for future research are also outlined.

  1. A Survey of Challenges in Aerodynamic Exhaust Nozzle Technology for Aerospace Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyne, Rickey J.

    2002-01-01

    The current paper discusses aerodynamic exhaust nozzle technology challenges for aircraft and space propulsion systems. Technology advances in computational and experimental methods have led to more accurate design and analysis tools, but many major challenges continue to exist in nozzle performance, jet noise and weight reduction. New generations of aircraft and space vehicle concepts dictate that exhaust nozzles have optimum performance, low weight and acceptable noise signatures. Numerous innovative nozzle concepts have been proposed for advanced subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic vehicle configurations such as ejector, mixer-ejector, plug, single expansion ramp, altitude compensating, lobed and chevron nozzles. This paper will discuss the technology barriers that exist for exhaust nozzles as well as current research efforts in place to address the barriers.

  2. Improved Re-Configurable Sliding Mode Controller for Reusable Launch Vehicle of Second Generation Addressing Aerodynamic Surface Failures and Thrust Deficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtessel, Yuri B.

    2002-01-01

    In this report we present a time-varying sliding mode control (TV-SMC) technique for reusable launch vehicle (RLV) attitude control in ascent and entry flight phases. In ascent flight the guidance commands Euler roll, pitch and yaw angles, and in entry flight it commands the aerodynamic angles of bank, attack and sideslip. The controller employs a body rate inner loop and the attitude outer loop, which are separated in time-scale by the singular perturbation principle. The novelty of the TVSMC is that both the sliding surface and the boundary layer dynamics can be varied in real time using the PD-eigenvalue assignment technique. This salient feature is used to cope with control command saturation and integrator windup in the presence of severe disturbance or control effector failure, which enhances the robustness and fault tolerance of the controller. The TV-SMC is developed and tuned up for the X-33 sub-orbital technology demonstration vehicle in launch and re-entry modes. A variety of nominal, dispersion and failure scenarios have tested via high fidelity 6DOF simulations using MAVERIC/SLIM simulation software.

  3. Review of Integrated Noise Model (INM) Equations and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P. (Technical Monitor); Forsyth, David W.; Gulding, John; DiPardo, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    The FAA's Integrated Noise Model (INM) relies on the methods of the SAE AIR-1845 'Procedure for the Calculation of Airplane Noise in the Vicinity of Airports' issued in 1986. Simplifying assumptions for aerodynamics and noise calculation were made in the SAE standard and the INM based on the limited computing power commonly available then. The key objectives of this study are 1) to test some of those assumptions against Boeing source data, and 2) to automate the manufacturer's methods of data development to enable the maintenance of a consistent INM database over time. These new automated tools were used to generate INM database submissions for six airplane types :737-700 (CFM56-7 24K), 767-400ER (CF6-80C2BF), 777-300 (Trent 892), 717-200 (BR7 15), 757-300 (RR535E4B), and the 737-800 (CFM56-7 26K).

  4. Aerodynamic Simulation of Ice Accretion on Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Bragg, Michael B.; Busch, Greg T.; Montreuil, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    This report describes recent improvements in aerodynamic scaling and simulation of ice accretion on airfoils. Ice accretions were classified into four types on the basis of aerodynamic effects: roughness, horn, streamwise, and spanwise ridge. The NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to generate ice accretions within these four types using both subscale and full-scale models. Large-scale, pressurized windtunnel testing was performed using a 72-in.- (1.83-m-) chord, NACA 23012 airfoil model with high-fidelity, three-dimensional castings of the IRT ice accretions. Performance data were recorded over Reynolds numbers from 4.5 x 10(exp 6) to 15.9 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.28. Lower fidelity ice-accretion simulation methods were developed and tested on an 18-in.- (0.46-m-) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model in a small-scale wind tunnel at a lower Reynolds number. The aerodynamic accuracy of the lower fidelity, subscale ice simulations was validated against the full-scale results for a factor of 4 reduction in model scale and a factor of 8 reduction in Reynolds number. This research has defined the level of geometric fidelity required for artificial ice shapes to yield aerodynamic performance results to within a known level of uncertainty and has culminated in a proposed methodology for subscale iced-airfoil aerodynamic simulation.

  5. Bat flight: aerodynamics, kinematics and flight morphology.

    PubMed

    Hedenström, Anders; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-03-01

    Bats evolved the ability of powered flight more than 50 million years ago. The modern bat is an efficient flyer and recent research on bat flight has revealed many intriguing facts. By using particle image velocimetry to visualize wake vortices, both the magnitude and time-history of aerodynamic forces can be estimated. At most speeds the downstroke generates both lift and thrust, whereas the function of the upstroke changes with forward flight speed. At hovering and slow speed bats use a leading edge vortex to enhance the lift beyond that allowed by steady aerodynamics and an inverted wing during the upstroke to further aid weight support. The bat wing and its skeleton exhibit many features and control mechanisms that are presumed to improve flight performance. Whereas bats appear aerodynamically less efficient than birds when it comes to cruising flight, they have the edge over birds when it comes to manoeuvring. There is a direct relationship between kinematics and the aerodynamic performance, but there is still a lack of knowledge about how (and if) the bat controls the movements and shape (planform and camber) of the wing. Considering the relatively few bat species whose aerodynamic tracks have been characterized, there is scope for new discoveries and a need to study species representing more extreme positions in the bat morphospace.

  6. A new high-precision furnace for paleomagnetic and paleointensity studies: Minimizing magnetic noise generated by heater currents inside traditional thermal demagnetizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhong; Zhao, Xixi; Horng, Chorng-Shern

    2010-04-01

    Although magnetic noise fields generated by heater currents in thermal demagnetizers have been noticed for a long time, no satisfactory tests have been conducted to quantify their effects. Toward this end, we have developed a new high-precision thermal demagnetizer that greatly reduces the magnetic noise field. We show the data quality generated by the new oven and the comparative results on several real samples that demonstrate the effects of the magnetic noise field due to heater currents. The properties of the spurious magnetization emanating from the heater currents critically depend on the decay rate of amplitude and its waveform of electric power which is delivered to oven coils at the end of the heating stage of thermal demagnetization. These results also illustrate the potential applications of this new instrument in paleomagnetism and paleointensity studies.

  7. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  8. Advanced acoustic and aerodynamic 20-inch fan program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, J. R.; Heldenbrand, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic analyses, mechanical analyses, and stress tests of a 20-inch diameter advanced fan design intended for acoustic investigation by NASA-LeRC are discussed. A high tip speed transonic fan rotor was scaled directly to 20.0 inches (0.508 m) from a 28.74-inch (0.73-m) diameter rotor. A new stator was designed and fabricated for the fan and incorporated with a test rig housing and adapter hardware for installation in the NASA-LeRC Jet Noise Facility for acoustic evaluation. The stator was designed to allow mounting at three axial locations, and the fan, housing, and adapters are reversible so that either the inlet or the exhaust ends of the assembly face the open room of the test facility. Excellent aerodynamic performance is predicted, and a low noise signature is expected since the unique aerodynamic design features of this fan are directly conductive to producing minimum sound power.

  9. CFD research, parallel computation and aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1995-01-01

    Over five years of research in Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications are covered in this report. Using CFD as an established tool, aerodynamic optimization on parallel architectures is explored. The objective of this work is to provide better tools to vehicle designers. Submarine design requires accurate force and moment calculations in flow with thick boundary layers and large separated vortices. Low noise production is critical, so flow into the propulsor region must be predicted accurately. The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) has been the subject of recent work. This vehicle is to be a passenger vehicle with the capability of cutting overseas flight times by more than half. A successful design must surpass the performance of comparable planes. Fuel economy, other operational costs, environmental impact, and range must all be improved substantially. For all these reasons, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer and other disciplines.

  10. High speed civil transport aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report of work in support of the Computational Aerosciences (CAS) element of the Federal HPCC program. Specifically, CFD and aerodynamic optimization are being performed on parallel computers. The long-range goal of this work is to facilitate teraflops-rate multidisciplinary optimization of aerospace vehicles. This year's work is targeted for application to the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), one of four CAS grand challenges identified in the HPCC FY 1995 Blue Book. This vehicle is to be a passenger aircraft, with the promise of cutting overseas flight time by more than half. To meet fuel economy, operational costs, environmental impact, noise production, and range requirements, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer, controls, and perhaps other disciplines. The fundamental goal of this project is to contribute to improved design tools for U.S. industry, and thus to the nation's economic competitiveness.

  11. Linearized Unsteady Aerodynamic Analysis of the Acoustic Response to Wake/Blade-Row Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Huff, Dennis L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The three-dimensional, linearized Euler analysis, LINFLUX, is being developed to provide a comprehensive and efficient unsteady aerodynamic scheme for predicting the aeroacoustic and aeroelastic responses of axial-flow turbomachinery blading. LINFLUX couples a near-field, implicit, wave-split, finite-volume solution to far-field acoustic eigensolutions, to predict the aerodynamic responses of a blade row to prescribed structural and aerodynamic excitations. It is applied herein to predict the acoustic responses of a fan exit guide vane (FEGV) to rotor wake excitations. The intent is to demonstrate and assess the LINFLUX analysis via application to realistic wake/blade-row interactions. Numerical results are given for the unsteady pressure responses of the FEGV, including the modal pressure responses at inlet and exit. In addition, predictions for the modal and total acoustic power levels at the FEGV exit are compared with measurements. The present results indicate that the LINFLUX analysis should be useful in the aeroacoustic design process, and for understanding the three-dimensional flow physics relevant to blade-row noise generation and propagation.

  12. Slat Noise Predictions Using Higher-Order Finite-Difference Methods on Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housman, Jeffrey A.; Kiris, Cetin

    2016-01-01

    Computational aeroacoustic simulations using the structured overset grid approach and higher-order finite difference methods within the Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics (LAVA) solver framework are presented for slat noise predictions. The simulations are part of a collaborative study comparing noise generation mechanisms between a conventional slat and a Krueger leading edge flap. Simulation results are compared with experimental data acquired during an aeroacoustic test in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility. Details of the structured overset grid, numerical discretization, and turbulence model are provided.

  13. Aeroacoustics and aerodynamic performance of a rotor with flatback airfoils.

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, Joshua A.; Barone, Matthew Franklin; Christiansen, Monica; Simley, Eric

    2010-06-01

    The aerodynamic performance and aeroacoustic noise sources of a rotor employing flatback airfoils have been studied in field test campaign and companion modeling effort. The field test measurements of a sub-scale rotor employing nine meter blades include both performance measurements and acoustic measurements. The acoustic measurements are obtained using a 45 microphone beamforming array, enabling identification of both noise source amplitude and position. Semi-empirical models of flatback airfoil blunt trailing edge noise are developed and calibrated using available aeroacoustic wind tunnel test data. The model results and measurements indicate that flatback airfoil noise is less than drive train noise for the current test turbine. It is also demonstrated that the commonly used Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model for blunt trailing edge noise may be over-conservative in predicting flatback airfoil noise for wind turbine applications.

  14. Aerodynamic Characteristic of the Active Compliant Trailing Edge Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Rui; Qiu, Jinhao; Ji, Hongli; Li, Dawei

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel Morphing Wing structure known as the Active Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE). ACTE structures are designed using the concept of “distributed compliance” and wing skins of ACTE are fabricated from high-strength fiberglass composites laminates. Through the relative sliding between upper and lower wing skins which are connected by a linear guide pairs, the wing is able to achieve a large continuous deformation. In order to present an investigation about aerodynamics and noise characteristics of ACTE, a series of 2D airfoil analyses are established. The aerodynamic characteristics between ACTE and conventional deflection airfoil are analyzed and compared, and the impacts of different ACTE structure design parameters on aerodynamic characteristics are discussed. The airfoils mentioned above include two types (NACA0012 and NACA64A005.92). The computing results demonstrate that: compared with the conventional plane flap airfoil, the morphing wing using ACTE structures has the capability to improve aerodynamic characteristic and flow separation characteristic. In order to study the noise level of ACTE, flow field analysis using LES model is done to provide noise source data, and then the FW-H method is used to get the far field noise levels. The simulation results show that: compared with the conventional flap/aileron airfoil, the ACTE configuration is better to suppress the flow separation and lower the overall sound pressure level.

  15. Computational aerodynamics and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The role of computational aerodynamics in design is reviewed with attention given to the design process; the proper role of computations; the importance of calibration, interpretation, and verification; the usefulness of a given computational capability; and the marketing of new codes. Examples of computational aerodynamics in design are given with particular emphasis on the Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology. Finally, future prospects are noted, with consideration given to the role of advanced computers, advances in numerical solution techniques, turbulence models, complex geometries, and computational design procedures. Previously announced in STAR as N82-33348

  16. Nonlinear aerodynamic wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, Ellwood

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of new nonlinear theoretical techniques is demonstrated for supersonic wing design. The new technology was utilized to define outboard panels for an existing advanced tactical fighter model. Mach 1.6 maneuver point design and multi-operating point compromise surfaces were developed and tested. High aerodynamic efficiency was achieved at the design conditions. A corollary result was that only modest supersonic penalties were incurred to meet multiple aerodynamic requirements. The nonlinear potential analysis of a practical configuration arrangement correlated well with experimental data.

  17. Generation and evolution of mode-locked noise-like square-wave pulses in a large-anomalous-dispersion Er-doped ring fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Chen, Yu; Tang, Pinghua; Xu, Changwen; Zhao, Chujun; Zhang, Han; Wen, Shuangchun

    2015-03-09

    In a passively mode-locked Erbium-doped fiber laser with large anomalous-dispersion, we experimentally demonstrate the formation of noise-like square-wave pulse, which shows quite different features from conventional dissipative soliton resonance (DSR). The corresponding temporal and spectral characteristics of a variety of operation states, including Q-switched mode-locking, continuous-wave mode-locking and Raman-induced noise-like pulse near the lasing threshold, are also investigated. Stable noise-like square-wave mode-locked pulses can be obtained at a fundamental repetition frequency of 195 kHz, with pulse packet duration tunable from 15 ns to 306 ns and per-pulse energy up to 200 nJ. By reducing the linear cavity loss, stable higher-order harmonic mode-locking had also been observed, with pulse duration ranging from 37 ns at the 21st order harmonic wave to 320 ns at the fundamental order. After propagating along a piece of long telecom fiber, the generated square-wave pulses do not show any obvious change, indicating that the generated noise-like square-wave pulse can be considered as high-energy pulse packet for some promising applications. These experimental results should shed some light on the further understanding of the mechanism and characteristics of noise-like square-wave pulses.

  18. An analysis of blade vortex interaction aerodynamics and acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The impulsive noise associated with helicopter flight due to Blade-Vortex Interaction, sometimes called blade slap is analyzed especially for the case of a close encounter of the blade-tip vortex with a following blade. Three parts of the phenomena are considered: the tip-vortex structure generated by the rotating blade, the unsteady pressure produced on the following blade during the interaction, and the acoustic radiation due to the unsteady pressure field. To simplify the problem, the analysis was confined to the situation where the vortex is aligned parallel to the blade span in which case the maximum acoustic pressure results. Acoustic radiation due to the interaction is analyzed in space-fixed coordinates and in the time domain with the unsteady pressure on the blade surface as the source of chordwise compact, but spanwise non-compact radiation. Maximum acoustic pressure is related to the vortex core size and Reynolds number which are in turn functions of the blade-tip aerodynamic parameters. Finally noise reduction and performance are considered.

  19. Shielding Characteristics Using an Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source to Generate Modes - Experimental Measurements and Analytical Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    An Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source (UCFANS) was designed, built, and tested in support of the NASA Langley Research Center's 14x22 wind tunnel test of the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) full 3-D 5.8% scale model. The UCFANS is a 5.8% rapid prototype scale model of a high-bypass turbofan engine that can generate the tonal signature of proposed engines using artificial sources (no flow). The purpose of the program was to provide an estimate of the acoustic shielding benefits possible from mounting an engine on the upper surface of a wing; a flat plate model was used as the shielding surface. Simple analytical simulations were used to preview the radiation patterns - Fresnel knife-edge diffraction was coupled with a dense phased array of point sources to compute shielded and unshielded sound pressure distributions for potential test geometries and excitation modes. Contour plots of sound pressure levels, and integrated power levels, from nacelle alone and shielded configurations for both the experimental measurements and the analytical predictions are presented in this paper.

  20. Hybrid Wing Body Shielding Studies Using an Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source Generating Typical Turbofan Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Brown, Cliff; Walker, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    An Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source (UCFANS) was designed, built, and tested in support of the NASA Langley Research Center's 14x22 wind tunnel test of the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) full 3-D 5.8% scale model. The UCFANS is a 5.8% rapid prototype scale model of a high-bypass turbofan engine that can generate the tonal signature of proposed engines using artificial sources (no flow). The purpose of the test was to provide an estimate of the acoustic shielding benefits possible from mounting the engine on the upper surface of an HWB aircraft using the projected signature of the engine currently proposed for the HWB. The modal structures at the rating points were generated from inlet and exhaust nacelle configurations - a flat plate model was used as the shielding surface and vertical control surfaces with correct plan form shapes were also tested to determine their additional impact on shielding. Radiated acoustic data were acquired from a traversing linear array of 13 microphones, spanning 36 inches. Two planes perpendicular, and two planes parallel, to the axis of the nacelle were acquired from the array sweep. In each plane the linear array traversed 4 sweeps, for a total span of 168 inches acquired. The resolution of the sweep is variable, so that points closer to the model are taken at a higher resolution. Contour plots of Sound Pressure Levels, and integrated Power Levels, from nacelle alone and shielded configurations are presented in this paper; as well as the in-duct mode power levels.

  1. Hybrid Wing Body Shielding Studies Using an Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source Generating Typical Turbofan Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel l.; Brown, Clifford A.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    An Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source (UCFANS) was designed, built, and tested in support of the NASA Langley Research Center's 14- by 22-ft wind tunnel test of the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) full 3-D 5.8 percent scale model. The UCFANS is a 5.8 percent rapid prototype scale model of a high-bypass turbofan engine that can generate the tonal signature of proposed engines using artificial sources (no flow). The purpose of the test was to provide an estimate of the acoustic shielding benefits possible from mounting the engine on the upper surface of an HWB aircraft using the projected signature of the engine currently proposed for the HWB. The modal structures at the rating points were generated from inlet and exhaust nacelle configurations--a flat plate model was used as the shielding surface and vertical control surfaces with correct plan form shapes were also tested to determine their additional impact on shielding. Radiated acoustic data were acquired from a traversing linear array of 13 microphones, spanning 36 in. Two planes perpendicular, and two planes parallel, to the axis of the nacelle were acquired from the array sweep. In each plane the linear array traversed four sweeps, for a total span of 168 in. acquired. The resolution of the sweep is variable, so that points closer to the model are taken at a higher resolution. Contour plots of Sound Pressure Levels, and integrated Power Levels, from nacelle alone and shielded configurations are presented in this paper; as well as the in-duct mode power levels

  2. Experimental study of noise emitted by circular cylinders with large roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomar, Antoni; Angland, David; Zhang, Xin; Molin, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    The aerodynamic noise generated by high Reynolds number flow around a bluff body with large surface roughness was investigated. This is a relevant problem in many applications, in particular aircraft landing gear noise. A circular cylinder in cross-flow and a zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer with various types of roughness was tested in a series of wind tunnel experiments. It has been shown that distributed roughness covering a circular cylinder affects the spectra over the entire frequency range. Roughness noise is dominant at high frequencies, and the peak frequency is well described by Howe's roughness noise model when scaled with the maximum outer velocity. There are differences between hemispherical and cylindrical roughness elements for both the circular cylinder and the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer cases, indicating a dependence on roughness shape, not described by the considered roughness noise models. Cylindrical roughness generates higher noise levels at the highest frequencies, especially for the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer case. Cable-type roughness aligned with the mean flow does not generate roughness noise, and its spectrum has been found to collapse with the smooth cylinder at medium and high frequencies. At low and medium frequencies the noise spectra have the same features as the smooth cylinder, but with higher shedding peak levels and fall-off levels, despite the decrease in spanwise correlation length. Roughness induces early separation, and thus a shift of the spectra to lower frequencies.

  3. Suppression of tonal noise in a centrifugal fan using guide vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramasivam, Kishokanna; Rajoo, Srithar; Romagnoli, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the work aiming for tonal noise reduction in a centrifugal fan. In previous studies, it is well documented that tonal noise is the dominant noise source generated in centrifugal fans. Tonal noise is generated due to the aerodynamic interaction between the rotating impeller and stationary diffuser vanes. The generation of tonal noise is related to the pressure fluctuation at the leading edge of the stationary vane. The tonal noise is periodic in time which occurs at the blade passing frequency (BPF) and its harmonics. Much of previous studies, have shown that the stationary vane causes the tonal noise and generation of non-rotational turbulent noise. However, omitting stationary vanes will lead to the increase of non-rotational turbulent noise resulted from the high velocity of the flow leaving the impeller. Hence in order to reduce the tonal noise and the non-rotational noise, guide vanes were designed as part of this study to replace the diffuser vanes, which were originally used in the chosen centrifugal fan. The leading edge of the guide vane is tapered. This modification reduces the strength of pressure fluctuation resulting from the interaction between the impeller outflow and stationary vane. The sound pressure level at blade passing frequency (BPF) is reduced by 6.8 dB, the 2nd BPF is reduced by 4.1 dB and the 3rd BPF reduced by about 17.5 dB. The overall reduction was 0.9 dB. The centrifugal fan with tapered guide vanes radiates lower tonal noise compared to the existing diffuser vanes. These reductions are achieved without compromising the performance of the centrifugal fan. The behavior of the fluid flow was studied using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools and the acoustics characteristics were determined through experiments in an anechoic chamber.

  4. Computer graphics in aerodynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cozzolongo, J. V.

    1984-01-01

    The use of computer graphics and its application to aerodynamic analyses on a routine basis is outlined. The mathematical modelling of the aircraft geometries and the shading technique implemented are discussed. Examples of computer graphics used to display aerodynamic flow field data and aircraft geometries are shown. A future need in computer graphics for aerodynamic analyses is addressed.

  5. Perching aerodynamics and trajectory optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenheiser, Adam; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2007-04-01

    Advances in smart materials, actuators, and control architecture have enabled new flight capabilities for aircraft. Perching is one such capability, described as a vertical landing maneuver using in-flight shape reconfiguration in lieu of high thrust generation. A morphing, perching aircraft design is presented that is capable of post stall flight and very slow landing on a vertical platform. A comprehensive model of the aircraft's aerodynamics, with special regard to nonlinear affects such as flow separation and dynamic stall, is discussed. Trajectory optimization using nonlinear programming techniques is employed to show the effects that morphing and nonlinear aerodynamics have on the maneuver. These effects are shown to decrease the initial height and distance required to initiate the maneuver, reduce the bounds on the trajectory, and decrease the required thrust for the maneuver. Perching trajectories comparing morphing versus fixed-configuration and stalled versus un-stalled aircraft are presented. It is demonstrated that a vertical landing is possible in the absence of high thrust if post-stall flight capabilities and vehicle reconfiguration are utilized.

  6. The Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig: an Acoustic and Aerodynamic Free-jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    1994-01-01

    The nozzle acoustic test rig (NATR) was built at NASA Lewis Research Center to support the High Speed Research Program. The facility is capable of measuring the acoustic and aerodynamic performance of aircraft engine nozzle concepts. Trade-off studies are conducted to compare performance and noise during simulated low-speed flight and takeoff. Located inside an acoustically treated dome with a 62-ft radius, the NATR is a free-jet that has a 53-in. diameter and is driven by an air ejector. This ejector is operated with 125 lb/s of compressed air, at 125 psig, to achieve 375 lb/s at Mach 0.3. Acoustic and aerodynamic data are collected from test nozzles mounted in the free-jet flow. The dome serves to protect the surrounding community from high noise levels generated by the nozzles, and to provide an anechoic environment for acoustic measurements. Information presented in this report summarizes free-jet performance, fluid support systems, and data acquisition capabilities of the NATR.

  7. The radiated noise from isotropic turbulence and heated jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    Our understanding of aerodynamic noise has its foundations in the work of Sir James Lighthill (1952), which was the first major advance in acoustics since the pioneering work of Lord Rayleigh in the last century. The combination of Lighthill's theory of aerodynamic noise as applied to turbulent flows and the experimental growing database from the early 1950's was quickly exploited by various jet propulsion engine designers in reducing the noise of jet engines at takeoff and landing to levels marginally acceptable to communities living in the neighborhoods of airports. The success in this noise containment led to the rapid growth of fast economical subsonic civil transport aircraft worldwide throughout the 1960's and has continued to the present day. One important factor in this success story has been the improvements in the engine cycle that have led to both reductions in specific fuel consumption and noise. The second is the introduction of Noise Certification, which specifies the maximum noise levels at takeoff and landing that all aircraft must meet before they can be entered on the Civil Aircraft Register. The growing interest in the development of a new supersonic civil transport to replace 'Concorde' in the early years of the next century has led to a resurgence of interest in the more challenging problem of predicting the noise of hot supersonic jets and developing means of aircraft noise reduction at takeoff and landing to meet the standards now accepted for subsonic Noise Certification. The prediction of aircraft noise to the accuracy required to meet Noise Certification requirements has necessitated reliance upon experimental measurements and empirically derived laws based on the available experimental data bases. These laws have their foundation in the results from Lighthill's theory, but in the case of jet noise, where the noise is generated in the turbulent mixing region with the external ambient fluid, the complexity of the turbulent motion has

  8. Aircraft noise prediction program theoretical manual: Rotorcraft System Noise Prediction System (ROTONET), part 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, Donald S.; Jumper, Stephen J.; Burley, Casey L.; Golub, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the theoretical methods used in the rotorcraft noise prediction system (ROTONET), which is a part of the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP). The ANOPP code consists of an executive, database manager, and prediction modules for jet engine, propeller, and rotor noise. The ROTONET subsystem contains modules for the prediction of rotor airloads and performance with momentum theory and prescribed wake aerodynamics, rotor tone noise with compact chordwise and full-surface solutions to the Ffowcs-Williams-Hawkings equations, semiempirical airfoil broadband noise, and turbulence ingestion broadband noise. Flight dynamics, atmosphere propagation, and noise metric calculations are covered in NASA TM-83199, Parts 1, 2, and 3.

  9. Ultra-low phase-noise microwave generation using a diode-pumped solid-state laser based frequency comb and a polarization-maintaining pulse interleaver.

    PubMed

    Portuondo-Campa, Erwin; Buchs, Gilles; Kundermann, Stefan; Balet, Laurent; Lecomte, Steve

    2015-12-14

    We report ultra-low phase-noise microwave generation at a 9.6 GHz carrier frequency from optical frequency combs based on diode-pumped solid-state lasers emitting at telecom wavelength and referenced to a common cavity-stabilized continuous-wave laser. Using a novel fibered polarization-maintaining pulse interleaver, a single-oscillator phase-noise floor of -171 dBc/Hz at 10 MHz offset frequency has been measured with commercial PIN InGaAs photodiodes, constituting a record for this type of detector. Also, a direct optical measurement of the stabilized frequency combs' timing jitter was performed using a balanced optical cross correlator, allowing for an identification of the origin of the phase-noise limitations in the system.

  10. Noise characterization in double-heralded generation of two-photon-states by spontaneous four-wave-mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Roger A.; Reddy, Dileep V.; Vitullo, Dashiell L. P.; Raymer, Michael G.

    2016-09-01

    In quantum optics experiments, heralding, a form of conditional state preparation, is a useful tool for creating photon-number states from nonlinear optical sources for quantum-information science experiments. Heralding occurs when one photon from a correlated pair is detected to herald the presence of the other photon, labeled the signal photon. However, as heralding is extended to two or more photon pairs, the presence of noise photons in the herald channel quickly degrades the photon statistics of the signal photons. We create two-photon number states from a non-degenerate, third-order nonlinear optical fiber source with double heralding and present a method for verifying these photon-number states. The consequences of noisy heralding on the statistics of states created via third-order nonlinear processes are analyzed. We present a method for estimating the effects of noise photons on the signal photon statistics. Additionally, we prove the equivalence between noise in the herald channel and a loss in the signal channel. We utilize this equivalence to infer the photon statistics of the photon-number states in the signal channel that would be present in the absence of noise in the herald channel. By measuring the statistics of the signal channels with noise in the herald channel and comparing to the inferred, noise-free distribution, we can estimate the potential benefits of additional noise-reducing procedures on the experiment.

  11. Optoelectronic cross-injection locking of a dual-wavelength photonic integrated circuit for low-phase-noise millimeter-wave generation.

    PubMed

    Kervella, Gaël; Van Dijk, Frederic; Pillet, Grégoire; Lamponi, Marco; Chtioui, Mourad; Morvan, Loïc; Alouini, Mehdi

    2015-08-01

    We report on the stabilization of a 90-GHz millimeter-wave signal generated from a fully integrated photonic circuit. The chip consists of two DFB single-mode lasers whose optical signals are combined on a fast photodiode to generate a largely tunable heterodyne beat note. We generate an optical comb from each laser with a microwave synthesizer, and by self-injecting the resulting signal, we mutually correlate the phase noise of each DFB and stabilize the beatnote on a multiple of the frequency delivered by the synthesizer. The performances achieved beat note linewidth below 30 Hz.

  12. Low noise electro-optic comb generation by fully stabilizing to a mode-locked fiber comb.

    PubMed

    Kuse, Naoya; Schibli, Thomas R; Fermann, Martin E

    2016-07-25

    A fully stabilized EO comb is demonstrated by phase locking the two degrees of freedom of an EO comb to a low noise mode-locked fiber comb. Division/magnification of residual phase noise of locked beats is observed by measuring an out-of-loop beat. By phase locking the 200 th harmonics of the EO comb and a driving cw frequency to a fiber comb, a record low phase noise EO comb across +/- 200 harmonics (from 1544.8 nm to 1577.3 nm) is demonstrated.

  13. An Aerodynamic Analysis of a Spinning Missile with Dithering Canards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.; Nygaard, Tor A.

    2003-01-01

    A generic spinning missile with dithering canards is used to demonstrate the utility of an overset structured grid approach for simulating the aerodynamics of rolling airframe missile systems. The approach is used to generate a modest aerodynamic database for the generic missile. The database is populated with solutions to the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. It is used to evaluate grid resolution requirements for accurate prediction of instantaneous missile loads and the relative aerodynamic significance of angle-of-attack, canard pitching sequence, viscous effects, and roll-rate effects. A novel analytical method for inter- and extrapolation of database results is also given.

  14. Jet Surface Interaction-Scrubbing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Generation of sound due to scrubbing of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated within the framework of the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far-field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore- Brown equation. The propagation Green's function should be solved numerically starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. The equivalent sources of aerodynamic sound are associated with non-linear momentum flux and enthalpy flux terms that appear in the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. These multi-pole sources should be modeled and evaluated with input from a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver with an appropriate turbulence model.

  15. The Structure and Noise Reduction Capacity of Owl Down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, Justin; Clark, Ian; Alexander, Nathan; Devenport, William; Daly, Conor; Peake, Nigel; Glegg, Stewart

    2014-11-01

    Many species of owl rely on specialized plumage to reduce their self-noise levels and enable hunting in acoustic stealth. In contrast to the leading-edge comb and compliant trailing-edge fringe attributes of owls, the aeroacoustic impact of the fluffy down material on the upper wing surface remains largely speculative as a means to eliminate aerodynamic noise across a broad range of frequencies. Photographic analysis of the owl down reveals a unique forest-like structure, whereby the down fibers rise straight up from the wing surface and then bend into the flow direction to form a porous canopy, with an open area fraction of approximately 70%. Experimental measurements demonstrate that the canopy feature reduces dramatically the turbulent pressure levels on the wing surface by up to 30dB, which affects the roughness noise characteristic of the down in a manner consistent with the theory of flows over and through vegetation. Mathematical models developed for the turbulence noise generation by the down fibers and for the mixing-layer instability above the porous canopy furnish a theoretical basis to understand the influence of the down geometric structure on its self-noise signature and noise suppression characteristics.

  16. Rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith

    1992-01-01

    Means for relatively simple and quick procedures are examined for estimating aerodynamic coefficients of lifting reentry vehicles. The methods developed allow aerospace designers not only to evaluate the aerodynamics of specific shapes but also to optimize shapes under given constraints. The analysis was also studied of the effect of thermomolecular flow on pressures measured by an orifice near the nose of a Space Shuttle Orbiter at altitudes above 75 km. It was shown that pressures corrected for thermomolecular flow effect are in good agreement with values predicted by independent theoretical methods. An incidental product was the insight gained about the free molecular thermal accommodation coefficient applicable under 'real' conditions of high speed flow in the Earth's atmosphere. The results are presented as abstracts of referenced papers. One reference paper is presented in its entirety.

  17. HYSHOT-2 Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, T.; Owen, R.; Walton, C.

    2005-02-01

    The scramjet flight test Hyshot-2, flew on the 30 July 2002. The programme, led by the University of Queensland, had the primary objective of obtaining supersonic combustion data in flight for comparison with measurements made in shock tunnels. QinetiQ was one of the sponsors, and also provided aerodynamic data and trajectory predictions for the ballistic re-entry of the spinning sounding rocket. The unconventional missile geometry created by the nose-mounted asymmetric-scramjet in conjunction with the high angle of attack during re-entry makes the problem interesting. This paper presents the wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamic calculations used as input for the trajectory prediction. Indirect comparison is made with data obtained in the Hyshot-2 flight using a 6 degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation.

  18. Aerodynamic Leidenfrost effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Anaïs; Bird, James C.; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2016-12-01

    When deposited on a plate moving quickly enough, any liquid can levitate as it does when it is volatile on a very hot solid (Leidenfrost effect). In the aerodynamic Leidenfrost situation, air gets inserted between the liquid and the moving solid, a situation that we analyze. We observe two types of entrainment. (i) The thickness of the air gap is found to increase with the plate speed, which is interpreted in the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin frame: Air is dynamically dragged along the surface and its thickness results from a balance between capillary and viscous effects. (ii) Air set in motion by the plate exerts a force on the levitating liquid. We discuss the magnitude of this aerodynamic force and show that it can be exploited to control the liquid and even to drive it against gravity.

  19. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  20. Aerodynamics: The Wright Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Jennifer Hansen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the basic principles of aerodynamics. Included in the presentation are: a few demonstrations of the principles, an explanation of the concepts of lift, drag, thrust and weight, a description of Bernoulli's principle, the concept of the airfoil (i.e., the shape of the wing) and how that effects lift, and the method of controlling an aircraft by manipulating the four forces using control surfaces.

  1. Aerodynamic control with passively pitching wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Wood, Robert

    Flapping wings may pitch passively under aerodynamic and inertial loads. Such passive pitching is observed in flapping wing insect and robot flight. The effect of passive wing pitch on the control dynamics of flapping wing flight are unexplored. Here we demonstrate in simulation and experiment the critical role wing pitching plays in yaw control of a flapping wing robot. We study yaw torque generation by a flapping wing allowed to passively rotate in the pitch axis through a rotational spring. Yaw torque is generated through alternating fast and slow upstroke and and downstroke. Yaw torque sensitively depends on both the rotational spring force law and spring stiffness, and at a critical spring stiffness a bifurcation in the yaw torque control relationship occurs. Simulation and experiment reveal the dynamics of this bifurcation and demonstrate that anomalous yaw torque from passively pitching wings is the result of aerodynamic and inertial coupling between the pitching and stroke-plane dynamics.

  2. Under-ice noise generated from diamond exploration in a Canadian sub-arctic lake and potential impacts on fishes.

    PubMed

    Mann, D; Cott, P; Horne, B

    2009-11-01

    Mineral exploration is increasing in Canada, particularly in the north where extensive diamond mining and exploration are occurring. This study measured the under-ice noise produced by a variety of anthropogenic sources (drilling rigs, helicopters, aircraft landing and takeoff, ice-road traffic, augers, snowmobiles, and chisels) at a winter-based diamond exploration project on Kennady Lake in the Northwest Territories, Canada to infer the potential impact of noise on fishes in the lake. The root-mean-square noise level measured 5 m from a small diameter drill was approximately 46 dB greater (22 kHz bandwidth) than ambient noise, while the acoustic particle velocity was approximately 40 dB higher than ambient levels. The loudest sounds at the exploration site were produced by ice cracking, both natural and during landing and takeoff of a C130 Hercules aircraft. However, even walking on the snow above the ice raised ambient sound levels by approximately 30 dB. Most of the anthropogenic sounds are likely detectable by fishes with hearing specializations, such as chubs and suckers. Other species without specialized hearing adaptations will detect these sounds only close to the source. The greatest potential impact of noise from diamond exploration is likely to be the masking of sounds for fishes with sensitive hearing.

  3. Subsonic longitudinal and lateral-directional static aerodynamic characteristics of a general research fighter configuration employing a jet sheet vortex generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, J. K.; Fox, C. H., Jr.; Ziegler, H.

    1978-01-01

    A configuration concept for developing vortex lift, which replaces the physical wing strake with a jet sheet generated fluid strake, was investigated on a general research fighter model. The vertical and horizontal location of the jet sheet with respect to the wing leading edge was studied over a momentum coefficient range from 0 to 0.24 in the Langley 7- by 10-foot high speed tunnel over a Mach number range from 0.3 to 0.8. The angle of attack range studied was from -2 to 30 deg at sideslip angles of 0, -5, and 5 deg. Test data are presented without analysis.

  4. Incremental Aerodynamic Coefficient Database for the USA2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Annie Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In March through May of 2016, a wind tunnel test was conducted by the Aerosciences Branch (EV33) to visually study the unsteady aerodynamic behavior over multiple transition geometries for the Universal Stage Adapter 2 (USA2) in the MSFC Aerodynamic Research Facility's Trisonic Wind Tunnel (TWT). The purpose of the test was to make a qualitative comparison of the transonic flow field in order to provide a recommended minimum transition radius for manufacturing. Additionally, 6 Degree of Freedom force and moment data for each configuration tested was acquired in order to determine the geometric effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients (Normal Force, Axial Force, and Pitching Moment). In order to make a quantitative comparison of the aerodynamic effects of the USA2 transition geometry, the aerodynamic coefficient data collected during the test was parsed and incorporated into a database for each USA2 configuration tested. An incremental aerodynamic coefficient database was then developed using the generated databases for each USA2 geometry as a function of Mach number and angle of attack. The final USA2 coefficient increments will be applied to the aerodynamic coefficients of the baseline geometry to adjust the Space Launch System (SLS) integrated launch vehicle force and moment database based on the transition geometry of the USA2.

  5. An algorithm for the estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio in surface myoelectric signals generated during cyclic movements.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Valentina; Knaflitz, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In many applications requiring the study of the surface myoelectric signal (SMES) acquired in dynamic conditions, it is essential to have a quantitative evaluation of the quality of the collected signals. When the activation pattern of a muscle has to be obtained by means of single- or double-threshold statistical detectors, the background noise level e (noise) of the signal is a necessary input parameter. Moreover, the detection strategy of double-threshold detectors may be properly tuned when the SNR and the duty cycle (DC) of the signal are known. The aim of this paper is to present an algorithm for the estimation of e (noise), SNR, and DC of an SMES collected during cyclic movements. The algorithm is validated on synthetic signals with statistical properties similar to those of SMES, as well as on more than 100 real signals.

  6. Statistical threshold determination method through noise map generation for two dimensional amplitude and time-of-flight mapping of guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenn Chong, See; Lee, Jung-Ryul; Yik Park, Chan

    2013-03-01

    Conventional threshold crossing technique generally encounters the difficulty in setting a common threshold level in the extraction of the respective time-of-flights (ToFs) and amplitudes from the guided waves obtained at many different points by spatial scanning. Therefore, we propose a statistical threshold determination method through noise map generation to automatically process numerous guided waves having different propagation distances. First, a two-dimensional (2-D) noise map is generated using one-dimensional (1-D) WT magnitudes at time zero of the acquired waves. Then, the probability density functions (PDFs) of Gamma distribution, Weibull distribution and exponential distribution are used to model the measured 2-D noise map. Graphical goodness-of-fit measurements are used to find the best fit among the three theoretical distributions. Then, the threshold level is automatically determined by selecting the desired confidence level of the noise rejection in the cumulative distribution function of the best fit PDF. Based on this threshold level, the amplitudes and ToFs are extracted and mapped into a 2-D matrix array form. The threshold level determined by the noise statistics may cross the noise signal after time zero. These crossings are represented as salt-and-pepper noise in the ToF and amplitude maps but finally removed by the 1-D median filter. This proposed method was verified in a thick stainless steel hollow cylinder where guided waves were acquired in an area of 180 mm×126 mm of the cylinder by using a laser ultrasonic scanning system and an ultrasonic sensor. The Gamma distribution was estimated as the best fit to the verification experimental data by the proposed algorithm. The statistical parameters of the Gamma distribution were used to determine the threshold level appropriate for most of the guided waves. The ToFs and amplitudes of the first arrival mode were mapped into a 2-D matrix array form. Each map included 447 noisy points out of 90

  7. Soliton collapse and bunched noise-like pulse generation in a passively mode-locked fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Tang, D; Zhao, L; Zhao, B

    2005-04-04

    A passively mode-locked soliton fiber ring laser with dispersion managed cavity is reported. The laser emits intense bunched noise-like pulses including the transform limited pulses. The optical spectrum of the laser emission has a bandwidth as broad as 32.10 nm. It was found that purely depending on the linear cavity phase delay the laser could be switched between the soliton operation and the noise-like pulse emission. Numerical simulations showed that the laser emission was caused by the combined effect of soliton collapse and positive cavity feedback in the laser.

  8. Stochastic variability and noise-induced generation of chaos in a climate feedback system including the carbon dioxide dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, D. V.; Bashkirtseva, I. A.; Ryashko, L. B.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a non-linear dynamics of a simple three-dimensional climate model in the presence of stochastic forcing is studied. We demonstrate that a dynamic scenario of mixed-mode stochastic oscillations of the climate system near its equilibrium can be formed. As this takes place, a growth of noise intensity increases the frequency of interspike intervals responsible for the abrupt climate changes. In addition, a certain enhancement of stochastic forcing abruptly increases the atmospheric carbon dioxide and decreases the Earth's ice mass. A transition from order to chaos occurring at a critical noise is shown.

  9. The effects of temperature on supersonic jet noise emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M.; Ponton, Michael K.; Jansen, Bernard J.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the generation of sound produced by high temperature supersonic jets. In particular, the question of the importance of supersonic instability waves to noise emission is considered relative to the role of Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability waves. Here, these waves are taken to be synonymous with the Mach emission process. Jet total temperatures from 313 to 1534 K are investigated using an axisymmetric water cooled supersonic nozzle designed for Mach 2. The aerodynamic and acoustic results of this study indicate that the dominant noise contributors are the K-H waves over the entire temperature range. Good agreement between measured and numerically predicted plume properties are obtained and an elliptic nozzle is used to demonstrate reduction of the K-H waves.

  10. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a 1.5-pressure-ratio, 1.83-meter (6 ft) diameter fan stage for turbofan engines (QF-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.; Balombin, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The fan was externally driven by an electric motor. Design features for low-noise generation included the elimination of inlet guide vanes, long axial spacing between the rotor and stator blade rows, and the selection of blade-vane numbers to achieve duct-mode cutoff. The fan QF-2 results were compared with those of another full-scale fan having essentially identical aerodynamic design except for nozzle geometry and the direction of rotation. The fan QF-2 aerodynamic results were also compared with those obtained from a 50.8 cm rotor-tip-diameter model of the reverse rotation fan QF-2 design. Differences in nozzle geometry other than exit area significantly affected the comparison of the results of the full-scale fans.

  11. NASA progress in aircraft noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, J. P.; Padula, S. L.; Zorumski, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    Langley Research Center efforts to develop a methodology for predicting the effective perceived noise level (EPNL) produced by jet-powered CTOL aircraft to an accuracy of + or - 1.5 dB are summarized with emphasis on the aircraft noise prediction program (ANOPP) which contains a complete set of prediction methods for CTOL aircraft including propulsion system noise sources, aerodynamic or airframe noise sources, forward speed effects, a layered atmospheric model with molecular absorption, ground impedance effects including excess ground attenuation, and a received noise contouring capability. The present state of ANOPP is described and its accuracy and applicability to the preliminary aircraft design process is assessed. Areas are indicated where further theoretical and experimental research on noise prediction are needed. Topics covered include the elements of the noise prediction problem which are incorporated in ANOPP, results of comparisons of ANOPP calculations with measured noise levels, and progress toward treating noise as a design constraint in aircraft system studies.

  12. A general procedure to generate models for urban environmental-noise pollution using feature selection and machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Torija, Antonio J; Ruiz, Diego P

    2015-02-01

    The prediction of environmental noise in urban environments requires the solution of a complex and non-linear problem, since there are complex relationships among the multitude of variables involved in the characterization and modelling of environmental noise and environmental-noise magnitudes. Moreover, the inclusion of the great spatial heterogeneity characteristic of urban environments seems to be essential in order to achieve an accurate environmental-noise prediction in cities. This problem is addressed in this paper, where a procedure based on feature-selection techniques and machine-learning regression methods is proposed and applied to this environmental problem. Three machine-learning regression methods, which are considered very robust in solving non-linear problems, are used to estimate the energy-equivalent sound-pressure level descriptor (LAeq). These three methods are: (i) multilayer perceptron (MLP), (ii) sequential minimal optimisation (SMO), and (iii) Gaussian processes for regression (GPR). In addition, because of the high number of input variables involved in environmental-noise modelling and estimation in urban environments, which make LAeq prediction models quite complex and costly in terms of time and resources for application to real situations, three different techniques are used to approach feature selection or data reduction. The feature-selection techniques used are: (i) correlation-based feature-subset selection (CFS), (ii) wrapper for feature-subset selection (WFS), and the data reduction technique is principal-component analysis (PCA). The subsequent analysis leads to a proposal of different schemes, depending on the needs regarding data collection and accuracy. The use of WFS as the feature-selection technique with the implementation of SMO or GPR as regression algorithm provides the best LAeq estimation (R(2)=0.94 and mean absolute error (MAE)=1.14-1.16 dB(A)).

  13. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Sean; Bigatel, Patrick

    2004-10-17

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

  14. TAD- THEORETICAL AERODYNAMICS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, J.

    1994-01-01

    This theoretical aerodynamics program, TAD, was developed to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles with sounding rocket configurations. These slender, axisymmetric finned vehicle configurations have a wide range of aeronautical applications from rockets to high speed armament. Over a given range of Mach numbers, TAD will compute the normal force coefficient derivative, the center-of-pressure, the roll forcing moment coefficient derivative, the roll damping moment coefficient derivative, and the pitch damping moment coefficient derivative of a sounding rocket configured vehicle. The vehicle may consist of a sharp pointed nose of cone or tangent ogive shape, up to nine other body divisions of conical shoulder, conical boattail, or circular cylinder shape, and fins of trapezoid planform shape with constant cross section and either three or four fins per fin set. The characteristics computed by TAD have been shown to be accurate to within ten percent of experimental data in the supersonic region. The TAD program calculates the characteristics of separate portions of the vehicle, calculates the interference between separate portions of the vehicle, and then combines the results to form a total vehicle solution. Also, TAD can be used to calculate the characteristics of the body or fins separately as an aid in the design process. Input to the TAD program consists of simple descriptions of the body and fin geometries and the Mach range of interest. Output includes the aerodynamic characteristics of the total vehicle, or user-selected portions, at specified points over the mach range. The TAD program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 360 computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 123K of 8 bit bytes. The TAD program was originally developed in 1967 and last updated in 1972.

  15. Prediction of Aerodynamic Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    predictable even with knowledge of the motion and the quasi- steady aerodynamic coefficients . It sems likely that the unsteady boundary-layer...build up, which are explainable 41 terams of the stability coefficients . More research is needed on the former type of undemanded manoeuvre. In some...drag 81, 82... B5 body sections I. kg lift St strdke 1M kg m pitching moment N kg normal force T kg axial force a 0 angle of attack Coefficie its: CD, cD

  16. 0.4 μJ, 7 kW ultrabroadband noise-like pulse direct generation from an all-fiber dumbbell-shaped laser.

    PubMed

    Chen, He; Chen, Shengping; Jiang, Zongfu; Hou, Jing

    2015-12-01

    We report the direct generation of 0.4 μJ, 7 kW ultrabroadband picosecond noise-like pulses from an Yb-doped all-fiber oscillator based on dual nonlinear optical loop mirrors (NOLMs). Under the highest pump power, the average power of the main output port reached 1.4 W, and the 3 dB spectral bandwidths reached 76 nm and 165 nm from the two output ports, respectively. The design of dual-NOLMs shows both exceptional compactness in construction and distinct flexibility on the engineering of the mode-locking behaviors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a watt-level dual-NOLM-based fiber laser. Based on this laser, the pulse energy and peak power of picosecond noise-like pulse from an all-fiber oscillator have been elevated by an order of magnitude.

  17. Generation of Q-switched mode locking controlled rectangular noise-like soliton bunching in a Tm-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Tian; Chen, Weicheng; Lin, Wei; Yang, Zhongmin

    2016-08-08

    We report on an interesting phenomenon of the combination of Q-switched mode locked pulses (QSMLP) and rectangular noise-like pulses (RNLP) as a unit in a Tm-doped ring fiber laser which contains a Fabry-Perot (F-P) subcavity based on the nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE) technique. The RNLP and QSMLP are independently generated in the ring cavity and F-P subcavity, respectively. A notable characteristic is that the physical parameters of RNLP, e.g. repetition rate and pulse duration, are controlled by QSMLP. Thus, they form as a composite bunching, which is termed as "Q-switched mode locking controlled rectangular noise-like soliton bunching (QRNSB)". Further investigation shows that the existence of QRNSB only occurs in high pumping conditions, while both fundamental mode-locking pulses and the coexistence of QSMLP and solitons are achieved in low pumping ones. Our work can enrich the understanding of the nonlinear dynamics in fiber lasers.

  18. Modeling the High Speed Research Cycle 2B Longitudinal Aerodynamic Database Using Multivariate Orthogonal Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, E. A.; Proffitt, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    The data for longitudinal non-dimensional, aerodynamic coefficients in the High Speed Research Cycle 2B aerodynamic database were modeled using polynomial expressions identified with an orthogonal function modeling technique. The discrepancy between the tabular aerodynamic data and the polynomial models was tested and shown to be less than 15 percent for drag, lift, and pitching moment coefficients over the entire flight envelope. Most of this discrepancy was traced to smoothing local measurement noise and to the omission of mass case 5 data in the modeling process. A simulation check case showed that the polynomial models provided a compact and accurate representation of the nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies contained in the HSR Cycle 2B tabular aerodynamic database.

  19. Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors for Improved Wind Turbine Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mehul P. Patel; Srikanth Vasudevan; Robert C. Nelson; Thomas C. Corke

    2008-08-01

    Orbital Research Inc is developing an innovative Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors (PACE) technology for improved performance of wind turbines. The PACE system is aimed towards the design of "smart" rotor blades to enhance energy capture and reduce aerodynamic loading and noise using flow-control. The PACE system will provide ability to change aerodynamic loads and pitch distribution across the wind turbine blade without any moving surfaces. Additional benefits of the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that should translate into a substantially reduced initial cost. During the Phase I program, the ORI-UND Team demonstrated (proof-of-concept) performance improvements on select rotor blade designs using PACE concepts. Control of both 2-D and 3-D flows were demonstrated. An analytical study was conducted to estimate control requirements for the PACE system to maintain control during wind gusts. Finally, independent laboratory experiments were conducted to identify promising dielectric materials for the plasma actuator, and to examine environmental effects (water and dust) on the plasma actuator operation. The proposed PACE system will be capable of capturing additional energy, and reducing aerodynamic loading and noise on wind turbines. Supplementary benefits from the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that translates into reduced initial capital costs.

  20. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of a Spacecraft Cabin Ventilation Fan Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    Quieter working environments for astronauts are needed if future long-duration space exploration missions are to be safe and productive. Ventilation and payload cooling fans are known to be dominant sources of noise, with the International Space Station being a good case in point. To address this issue cost effectively, early attention to fan design, selection, and installation has been recommended, leading to an effort by NASA to examine the potential for small-fan noise reduction by improving fan aerodynamic design. As a preliminary part of that effort, the aerodynamics of a cabin ventilation fan designed by Hamilton Sundstrand has been simulated using computational fluid dynamics codes, and the computed solutions analyzed to quantify various aspects of the fan aerodynamics and performance. Four simulations were performed at the design rotational speed: two at the design flow rate and two at off-design flow rates. Following a brief discussion of the computational codes, various aerodynamic- and performance-related quantities derived from the computed flow fields are presented along with relevant flow field details. The results show that the computed fan performance is in generally good agreement with stated design goals.

  1. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sean Graham

    2007-10-31

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by a DOE category two Inventions and Innovations grant to commercialize and improve upon aerodynamic technology for semi-tuck trailers, capable of decreasing heavy vehicle fuel consumption, related environmental damage, and U.S. consumption of foreign oil. Major project goals included the demonstration of aerodynamic trailer technology in trucking fleet operations, and the development and testing of second generation products. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck’s fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Freight Wing utilized a 2003 category one Inventions and Innovations grant to develop practical solutions to trailer aerodynamics. Fairings developed for the front, rear, and bottom of standard semi-trailers together demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy in scientific tests conducted by the Transportation Research Center (TRC). Operational tests with major trucking fleets proved the functionality of the products, which were subsequently brought to market. This category two grant enabled Freight Wing to further develop, test and commercialize its products, resulting in greatly increased understanding and acceptance of aerodynamic trailer technology. Commercialization was stimulated by offering trucking fleets 50% cost sharing on trial implementations of Freight Wing products for testing and evaluation purposes. Over 230 fairings were implemented through the program with 35 trucking fleets including industry leaders such as Wal-Mart, Frito Lay and Whole Foods. The feedback from these testing partnerships was quite positive with product performance exceeding fleet expectations in many cases. Fleet feedback also was also valuable from a product development standpoint and assisted the design of several second generation products

  2. An Interactive Educational Tool for Compressible Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    A workstation-based interactive educational tool was developed to aid in the teaching of undergraduate compressible aerodynamics. The tool solves for the supersonic flow past a wedge using the equations found in NACA 1135. The student varies the geometry or flow conditions through a graphical user interface and the new conditions are calculated immediately. Various graphical formats present the variation of flow results to the student. One such format leads the student to the generation of some of the graphs found in NACA-1135. The tool includes interactive questions and answers to aid in both the use of the tool and to develop an understanding of some of the complexities of compressible aerodynamics. A series of help screens make the simulator easy to learn and use. This paper will detail the numerical methods used in the tool and describe how it can be used and modified.

  3. On Wings: Aerodynamics of Eagles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millson, David

    2000-01-01

    The Aerodynamics Wing Curriculum is a high school program that combines basic physics, aerodynamics, pre-engineering, 3D visualization, computer-assisted drafting, computer-assisted manufacturing, production, reengineering, and success in a 15-hour, 3-week classroom module. (JOW)

  4. Aerodynamics of a Party Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that a party balloon can be made to fly erratically across a room, but it can also be used for quantitative measurements of other aspects of aerodynamics. Since a balloon is light and has a large surface area, even relatively weak aerodynamic forces can be readily demonstrated or measured in the classroom. Accurate measurements…

  5. Effect of sampling volume on dry powder inhaler (DPI)-emitted aerosol aerodynamic particle size distributions (APSDs) measured by the Next-Generation Pharmaceutical Impactor (NGI) and the Andersen eight-stage cascade impactor (ACI).

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Hlack; Roberts, Daryl L; Copley, Mark; Hammond, Mark; Nichols, Steven C; Mitchell, Jolyon P

    2012-09-01

    Current pharmacopeial methods for testing dry powder inhalers (DPIs) require that 4.0 L be drawn through the inhaler to quantify aerodynamic particle size distribution of "inhaled" particles. This volume comfortably exceeds the internal dead volume of the Andersen eight-stage cascade impactor (ACI) and Next Generation pharmaceutical Impactor (NGI) as designated multistage cascade impactors. Two DPIs, the second (DPI-B) having similar resistance than the first (DPI-A) were used to evaluate ACI and NGI performance at 60 L/min following the methodology described in the European and United States Pharmacopeias. At sampling times ≥2 s (equivalent to volumes ≥2.0 L), both impactors provided consistent measures of therapeutically important fine particle mass (FPM) from both DPIs, independent of sample duration. At shorter sample times, FPM decreased substantially with the NGI, indicative of incomplete aerosol bolus transfer through the system whose dead space was 2.025 L. However, the ACI provided consistent measures of both variables across the range of sampled volumes evaluated, even when this volume was less than 50% of its internal dead space of 1.155 L. Such behavior may be indicative of maldistribution of the flow profile from the relatively narrow exit of the induction port to the uppermost stage of the impactor at start-up. An explanation of the ACI anomalous behavior from first principles requires resolution of the rapidly changing unsteady flow and pressure conditions at start up, and is the subject of ongoing research by the European Pharmaceutical Aerosol Group. Meanwhile, these experimental findings are provided to advocate a prudent approach by retaining the current pharmacopeial methodology.

  6. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  7. The Aerodynamic Plane Table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    This report gives the description and the use of a specially designed aerodynamic plane table. For the accurate and expeditious geometrical measurement of models in an aerodynamic laboratory, and for miscellaneous truing operations, there is frequent need for a specially equipped plan table. For example, one may have to measure truly to 0.001 inch the offsets of an airfoil at many parts of its surface. Or the offsets of a strut, airship hull, or other carefully formed figure may require exact calipering. Again, a complete airplane model may have to be adjusted for correct incidence at all parts of its surfaces or verified in those parts for conformance to specifications. Such work, if but occasional, may be done on a planing or milling machine; but if frequent, justifies the provision of a special table. For this reason it was found desirable in 1918 to make the table described in this report and to equip it with such gauges and measures as the work should require.

  8. Aerodynamic challenges of ALT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, I.; Homan, D.; Romere, P. O.

    1985-01-01

    The approach and landing test (ALT) of the Space Shuttle Orbiter presented a number of unique challenges in the area of aerodynamics. The purpose of the ALT program was both to confirm the use of the Boeing 747 as a transport vehicle for ferrying the Orbiter across the country and to demonstrate the flight characteristics of the Orbiter in its approach and landing phase. Concerns for structural fatigue and performance dictated a tailcone be attached to the Orbiter for ferry and for the initial landing tests. The Orbiter with a tailcone attached presented additional challenges to the normal aft sting concept of wind tunnel testing. The landing tests required that the Orbiter be separated from the 747 at approximately 20,000 feet using aerodynamic forces to fly the vehicles apart. The concept required a complex test program to determine the relative effects of the two vehicles on each other. Also of concern, and tested, was the vortex wake created by the 747 and the means for the Orbiter to avoid it following separation.

  9. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  10. The use of audibility analysis to minimize community noise impact of today's smaller generation facilities located near residential areas

    SciTech Connect

    Liebich, R.E. ); Cristoforo, M.P. )

    1988-01-01

    This paper demonstrates practical applications of the Fidell-Horonjeff audibility model to the analysis of power plant noise sources, such as cooling towers, transformers, pumps, ventilation fans, mobile diesel-powered yard equipment, loudspeaker systems, and even sodium-vapor-type outdoor lighting. Because plant-design engineers currently are relatively unfamiliar with the Fidell-Horonjeff model, the first part of this paper summarizes and reviews the model.

  11. Use of audibility analysis to minimize community noise impact of today's smaller generation facilities located near residential areas

    SciTech Connect

    Leibich, R.E.; Cristoforo, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is intended to demonstrate practical applications of the Fidell-Horonjeff audibility model (2) to the analysis of power plant noise sources, such as cooling towers, transformers, pumps, ventilation fans, mobile diesel-powered yard equipment, loudspeaker systems, and even sodium-vapor-type outdoor lighting. Because plant-design engineers currently are relatively unfamiliar with the Fidell-Horonjeff model, the first part of this paper summarizes and reviews the model.

  12. Unsteady aerodynamics of blade rows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.

    1989-01-01

    The requirements placed on an unsteady aerodynamic theory intended for turbomachinery aeroelastic or aeroacoustic applications are discussed along with a brief description of the various theoretical models that are available to address these requirements. The major emphasis is placed on the description of a linearized inviscid theory which fully accounts for the affects of a nonuniform mean or steady flow on unsteady aerodynamic response. Although this linearization was developed primarily for blade flutter prediction, more general equations are presented which account for unsteady excitations due to incident external aerodynamic disturbances as well as those due to prescribed blade motions. The motivation for this linearized unsteady aerodynamic theory is focused on, its physical and mathematical formulation is outlined and examples are presented to illustrate the status of numerical solution procedures and several effects of mean flow nonuniformity on unsteady aerodynamic response.

  13. The aerodynamics of hovering flight in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fry, Steven N; Sayaman, Rosalyn; Dickinson, Michael H

    2005-06-01

    Using 3D infrared high-speed video, we captured the continuous wing and body kinematics of free-flying fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, during hovering and slow forward flight. We then 'replayed' the wing kinematics on a dynamically scaled robotic model to measure the aerodynamic forces produced by the wings. Hovering animals generate a U-shaped wing trajectory, in which large drag forces during a downward plunge at the start of each stroke create peak vertical forces. Quasi-steady mechanisms could account for nearly all of the mean measured force required to hover, although temporal discrepancies between instantaneous measured forces and model predictions indicate that unsteady mechanisms also play a significant role. We analyzed the requirements for hovering from an analysis of the time history of forces and moments in all six degrees of freedom. The wing kinematics necessary to generate sufficient lift are highly constrained by the requirement to balance thrust and pitch torque over the stroke cycle. We also compare the wing motion and aerodynamic forces of free and tethered flies. Tethering causes a strong distortion of the stroke pattern that results in a reduction of translational forces and a prominent nose-down pitch moment. The stereotyped distortion under tethered conditions is most likely due to a disruption of sensory feedback. Finally, we calculated flight power based directly on the measurements of wing motion and aerodynamic forces, which yielded a higher estimate of muscle power during free hovering flight than prior estimates based on time-averaged parameters. This discrepancy is mostly due to a two- to threefold underestimate of the mean profile drag coefficient in prior studies. We also compared our values with the predictions of the same time-averaged models using more accurate kinematic and aerodynamic input parameters based on our high-speed videography measurements. In this case, the time-averaged models tended to overestimate flight

  14. Prediction of Turbulence-Generated Noise in Unheated Jets. Part 1; JeNo Technical Manual (Version 1.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James; Georgiadis, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    The model-based approach, used by the JeNo code to predict jet noise spectral directivity, is described. A linearized form of Lilley's equation governs the non-causal Green s function of interest, with the non-linear terms on the right hand side identified as the source. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solution yields the required mean flow for the solution of the propagation Green s function in a locally parallel flow. The RANS solution also produces time- and length-scales needed to model the non-compact source, the turbulent velocity correlation tensor, with exponential temporal and spatial functions. It is shown that while an exact non-causal Green s function accurately predicts the observed shift in the location of the spectrum peak with angle as well as the angularity of sound at low to moderate Mach numbers, the polar directivity of radiated sound is not entirely captured by this Green s function at high subsonic and supersonic acoustic Mach numbers. Results presented for unheated jets in the Mach number range of 0.51 to 1.8 suggest that near the peak radiation angle of high-speed jets, a different source/Green s function convolution integral may be required in order to capture the peak observed directivity of jet noise. A sample Mach 0.90 heated jet is also discussed that highlights the requirements for a comprehensive jet noise prediction model.

  15. Aerodynamics of Unsteady Sailing Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Colin; Schutt, Riley; Borshoff, Jennifer; Alley, Philip; de Zegher, Maximilien; Williamson, Chk

    2015-11-01

    In small sailboats, the bodyweight of the sailor is proportionately large enough to induce significant unsteady motion of the boat and sail. Sailors use a variety of kinetic techniques to create sail dynamics which can provide an increment in thrust, thereby increasing the boatspeed. In this study, we experimentally investigate the unsteady aerodynamics associated with two techniques, ``upwind leech flicking'' and ``downwind S-turns''. We explore the dynamics of an Olympic class Laser sailboat equipped with a GPS, IMU, wind sensor, and camera array, sailed expertly by a member of the US Olympic team. The velocity heading of a sailing boat is oriented at an apparent wind angle to the flow. In contrast to classic flapping propulsion, the heaving of the sail section is not perpendicular to the sail's motion through the air. This leads to heave with components parallel and perpendicular to the incident flow. The characteristic motion is recreated in a towing tank where the vortex structures generated by a representative 2-D sail section are observed using Particle Image Velocimetry and the measurement of thrust and lift forces. Amongst other results, we show that the increase in driving force, generated due to heave, is larger for greater apparent wind angles.

  16. A possible explanation for the present difference between linear noise theory and experimental data for supersonic helical tip speed propellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, J. H.

    1983-11-01

    High speed turboprops are attractive candidates for future aircraft because of their high propulsive efficiency. However, the noise of their propellers may create a cabin environment problem for the aircraft powered by these propellers. The noise of some propeller models was measured, and predictions of the noise using a method based on the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkins equation were made. The predictions and data agree well at lower helical tip Mach numbers but deviate above Mach 1.0. Some possible reasons why the theory does not predict the data and focuses on improvement of the aerodynamic inputs as the most likely remedy are investigated. In particular, it is proposed that an increase in the drag and a decrease in the lift near the tip of the blade where the majority of the noise is generated, is warranted in the input to the theory.

  17. A possible explanation for the present difference between linear noise theory and experimental data for supersonic helical tip speed propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    High speed turboprops are attractive candidates for future aircraft because of their high propulsive efficiency. However, the noise of their propellers may create a cabin environment problem for the aircraft powered by these propellers. The noise of some propeller models was measured, and predictions of the noise using a method based on the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkins equation were made. The predictions and data agree well at lower helical tip Mach numbers but deviate above Mach 1.0. Some possible reasons why the theory does not predict the data and focuses on improvement of the aerodynamic inputs as the most likely remedy are investigated. In particular, it is proposed that an increase in the drag and a decrease in the lift near the tip of the blade where the majority of the noise is generated, is warranted in the input to the theory.

  18. Helicopter tail rotor blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Albert R.; Chou, S.-T.

    1987-01-01

    A study is made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to the interactions with main rotor tip vortices. Summarized here are present analysis, the computer codes, and the results of several test cases. Amiet's unsteady thin airfoil theory is used to calculate the acoustics of blade-vortex interaction. The noise source is modelled as a force dipole resulting from an airfoil of infinite span chopping through a skewed line vortex. To analyze the interactions between helicopter tail rotor and main rotor tip vortices, we developed a two-step approach: (1) the main rotor tip vortex system is obtained through a free wake geometry calculation of the main rotor using CAMRAD code; (2) acoustic analysis takes the results from the aerodynamic interaction analysis and calculates the farfield pressure signatures for the interactions. It is found that under a wide range of helicopter flight conditions, acoustic pressure fluctuations of significant magnitude can be generated by tail rotors due to a series of interactions with main rotor tip vortices. This noise mechanism depends strongly on the helicopter flight conditions and the relative location and phasing of the main and tail rotors. fluctuations of significant magnitude can be generated by tail rotors due to a series of interactions with main rotor tip vortices. This noise mechanism depends strongly upon the helicopter flight conditions and the relative location and phasing of the main and tail rotors.

  19. Combat aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgarbozza, M.; Depitre, A.

    1992-04-01

    A discussion of the characteristics and the noise levels of combat aircraft and of a transport aircraft in taking off and landing are presented. Some methods of noise reduction are discussed, including the following: operational anti-noise procedures; and concepts of future engines (silent post-combustion and variable cycle). Some measurement results concerning the noise generated in flight at great speeds and low altitude will also be examined. Finally, the protection of the environment of French air bases against noise will be described and the possibilities of regulation examined.

  20. Active Noise Control for Dishwasher noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nokhaeng; Park, Youngjin

    2016-09-01

    The dishwasher is a useful home appliance and continually used for automatically washing dishes. It's commonly placed in the kitchen with built-in style for practicality and better use of space. In this environment, people are easily exposed to dishwasher noise, so it is an important issue for the consumers, especially for the people living in open and narrow space. Recently, the sound power levels of the noise are about 40 - 50 dBA. It could be achieved by removal of noise sources and passive means of insulating acoustical path. For more reduction, such a quiet mode with the lower speed of cycle has been introduced, but this deteriorates the washing capacity. Under this background, we propose active noise control for dishwasher noise. It is observed that the noise is propagating mainly from the lower part of the front side. Control speakers are placed in the part for the collocation. Observation part of estimating sound field distribution and control part of generating the anti-noise are designed for active noise control. Simulation result shows proposed active noise control scheme could have a potential application for dishwasher noise reduction.

  1. Tone Noise Predictions for a Spacecraft Cabin Ventilation Fan Ingesting Distorted Inflow and the Challenges of Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle; Shook, Tony D.; Astler, Douglas T.; Bittinger, Samantha A.

    2011-01-01

    A fan tone noise prediction code has been developed at NASA Glenn Research Center that is capable of estimating duct mode sound power levels for a fan ingesting distorted inflow. This code was used to predict the circumferential and radial mode sound power levels in the inlet and exhaust duct of an axial spacecraft cabin ventilation fan. Noise predictions at fan design rotational speed were generated. Three fan inflow conditions were studied: an undistorted inflow, a circumferentially symmetric inflow distortion pattern (cylindrical rods inserted radially into the flowpath at 15deg, 135deg, and 255deg), and a circumferentially asymmetric inflow distortion pattern (rods located at 15deg, 52deg and 173deg). Noise predictions indicate that tones are produced for the distorted inflow cases that are not present when the fan operates with an undistorted inflow. Experimental data are needed to validate these acoustic predictions, as well as the aerodynamic performance predictions. Given the aerodynamic design of the spacecraft cabin ventilation fan, a mechanical and electrical conceptual design study was conducted. Design features of a fan suitable for obtaining detailed acoustic and aerodynamic measurements needed to validate predictions are discussed.

  2. Tone Noise Predictions for a Spacecraft Cabin Ventilation Fan Ingesting Distorted Inflow and the Challenges of Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle; Shook, Tony D.; Astler, Douglas T.; Bittinger, Samantha A.

    2012-01-01

    A fan tone noise prediction code has been developed at NASA Glenn Research Center that is capable of estimating duct mode sound power levels for a fan ingesting distorted inflow. This code was used to predict the circumferential and radial mode sound power levels in the inlet and exhaust duct of an axial spacecraft cabin ventilation fan. Noise predictions at fan design rotational speed were generated. Three fan inflow conditions were studied: an undistorted inflow, a circumferentially symmetric inflow distortion pattern (cylindrical rods inserted radially into the flowpath at 15deg, 135deg, and 255deg), and a circumferentially asymmetric inflow distortion pattern (rods located at 15deg, 52deg and 173deg). Noise predictions indicate that tones are produced for the distorted inflow cases that are not present when the fan operates with an undistorted inflow. Experimental data are needed to validate these acoustic predictions, as well as the aerodynamic performance predictions. Given the aerodynamic design of the spacecraft cabin ventilation fan, a mechanical and electrical conceptual design study was conducted. Design features of a fan suitable for obtaining detailed acoustic and aerodynamic measurements needed to validate predictions are discussed.

  3. Forced response analysis of an aerodynamically detuned supersonic turbomachine rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyniak, D.; Fleeter, S.

    1985-01-01

    High performance aircraft-engine fan and compressor blades are vulnerable to aerodynamically forced vibrations generated by inlet flow distortions due to wakes from upstream blade and vane rows, atmospheric gusts, and maldistributions in inlet ducts. In this report, an analysis is developed to predict the flow-induced forced response of an aerodynamically detuned rotor operating in a supersonic flow with a subsonic axial component. The aerodynamic detuning is achieved by alternating the circumferential spacing of adjacent rotor blades. The total unsteady aerodynamic loading acting on the blading, as a result of the convection of the transverse gust past the airfoil cascade and the resulting motion of the cascade, is developed in terms of influence coefficients. This analysis is used to investigate the effect of aerodynamic detuning on the forced response of a 12-blade rotor, with Verdon's Cascade B flow geometry as a uniformly spaced baseline configuration. The results of this study indicate that, for forward traveling wave gust excitations, aerodynamic detuning is very beneficial, resulting in significantly decreased maximum-amplitude blade responses for many interblade phase angles.

  4. Improved Aerodynamic Analysis for Hybrid Wing Body Conceptual Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gern, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of ongoing efforts to develop, evaluate, and validate different tools for improved aerodynamic modeling and systems analysis of Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft configurations. Results are being presented for the evaluation of different aerodynamic tools including panel methods, enhanced panel methods with viscous drag prediction, and computational fluid dynamics. Emphasis is placed on proper prediction of aerodynamic loads for structural sizing as well as viscous drag prediction to develop drag polars for HWB conceptual design optimization. Data from transonic wind tunnel tests at the Arnold Engineering Development Center s 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel was used as a reference data set in order to evaluate the accuracy of the aerodynamic tools. Triangularized surface data and Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) models of an X-48B 2% scale wind tunnel model were used to generate input and model files for the different analysis tools. In support of ongoing HWB scaling studies within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program, an improved finite element based structural analysis and weight estimation tool for HWB center bodies is currently under development. Aerodynamic results from these analyses are used to provide additional aerodynamic validation data.

  5. Nacelle aerodynamic performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obara, Clifford J.; Dodbele, S. S.

    1987-01-01

    The boundary layer transition location was measured on a nacelle shape using the sublimating chemical flow visualization technique. This technique involves coating the surface with a thin film of volatile chemical solid, which, during exposure to a free stream airflow, rapidly sublimates in the turbulent boundary layer as a result of high shear stress and high mass transfer near the surface. Transition is indicated because the chemical coating remains relatively unaffected in the laminar region due to lower shear and low mass transfer. The slow response time of the chemical in a laminar boundary allowed for two test conditions during the same flight. The aircraft was first flown at the desired airspeed and altitude with the noise source off. Once a pattern had developed, the noise source was turned on to the desired setting and a new chemical pattern was sought. In this fashion a direct comparison of the effect of the noise could be determined.

  6. Vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H. B.; Campbell, J. F.; Young, A. D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The principal emphasis of the meeting was to be on the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads. This report shows that a substantial amount of the papers covering this area were received from a wide range of countries, together with an attendance that was even more diverse. In itself, this testifies to the current interest in the subject and to the appropriateness of the Panel's choice of topic and approach. An attempt is made to summarize each paper delivered, and to relate the contributions made in the papers and in the discussions to some of the important aspects of vortex flow aerodynamics. This reveals significant progress and important clarifications, but also brings out remaining weaknesses in predictive capability and gaps in understanding. Where possible, conclusions are drawn and areas of continuing concern are identified.

  7. Noise Reduction Through Circulation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munro, Scott E.; Ahuja, K. K.; Englar, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Circulation control technology uses tangential blowing around a rounded trailing edge or a leading edge to change the force and moment characteristics of an aerodynamic body. This technology has been applied to circular cylinders, wings, helicopter rotors, and even to automobiles for improved aerodynamic performance. Only limited research has been conducted on the acoustic of this technology. Since wing flaps contribute to the environmental noise of an aircraft, an alternate blown high lift system without complex mechanical flaps could prove beneficial in reducing the noise of an approaching aircraft. Thus, in this study, a direct comparison of the acoustic characteristics of high lift systems employing a circulation control wing configuration and a conventional wing flapped configuration has been made. These results indicate that acoustically, a circulation control wing high lift system could be considerably more acceptable than a wing with conventional mechanical flaps.

  8. Flapping wing aerodynamics: from insects to vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Chin, Diana D; Lentink, David

    2016-04-01

    More than a million insects and approximately 11,000 vertebrates utilize flapping wings to fly. However, flapping flight has only been studied in a few of these species, so many challenges remain in understanding this form of locomotion. Five key aerodynamic mechanisms have been identified for insect flight. Among these is the leading edge vortex, which is a convergent solution to avoid stall for insects, bats and birds. The roles of the other mechanisms - added mass, clap and fling, rotational circulation and wing-wake interactions - have not yet been thoroughly studied in the context of vertebrate flight. Further challenges to understanding bat and bird flight are posed by the complex, dynamic wing morphologies of these species and the more turbulent airflow generated by their wings compared with that observed during insect flight. Nevertheless, three dimensionless numbers that combine key flow, morphological and kinematic parameters - the Reynolds number, Rossby number and advance ratio - govern flapping wing aerodynamics for both insects and vertebrates. These numbers can thus be used to organize an integrative framework for studying and comparing animal flapping flight. Here, we provide a roadmap for developing such a framework, highlighting the aerodynamic mechanisms that remain to be quantified and compared across species. Ultimately, incorporating complex flight maneuvers, environmental effects and developmental stages into this framework will also be essential to advancing our understanding of the biomechanics, movement ecology and evolution of animal flight.

  9. Aerodynamics for the Mars Phoenix Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Desai, Prasun N.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Pre-flight aerodynamics data for the Mars Phoenix entry capsule are presented. The aerodynamic coefficients were generated as a function of total angle-of-attack and either Knudsen number, velocity, or Mach number, depending on the flight regime. The database was constructed using continuum flowfield computations and data from the Mars Exploration Rover and Viking programs. Hypersonic and supersonic static coefficients were derived from Navier-Stokes solutions on a pre-flight design trajectory. High-altitude data (free-molecular and transitional regimes) and dynamic pitch damping characteristics were taken from Mars Exploration Rover analysis and testing. Transonic static coefficients from Viking wind tunnel tests were used for capsule aerodynamics under the parachute. Static instabilities were predicted at two points along the reference trajectory and were verified by reconstructed flight data. During the hypersonic instability, the capsule was predicted to trim at angles as high as 2.5 deg with an on-axis center-of-gravity. Trim angles were predicted for off-nominal pitching moment (4.2 deg peak) and a 5 mm off-axis center-ofgravity (4.8 deg peak). Finally, hypersonic static coefficient sensitivities to atmospheric density were predicted to be within uncertainty bounds.

  10. Aerodynamic Analysis of the Truss-Braced Wing Aircraft Using Vortex-Lattice Superposition Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric Bi-Wen; Reynolds, Kevin Wayne; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Totah, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    The SUGAR Truss-BracedWing (TBW) aircraft concept is a Boeing-developed N+3 aircraft configuration funded by NASA ARMD FixedWing Project. This future generation transport aircraft concept is designed to be aerodynamically efficient by employing a high aspect ratio wing design. The aspect ratio of the TBW is on the order of 14 which is significantly greater than those of current generation transport aircraft. This paper presents a recent aerodynamic analysis of the TBW aircraft using a conceptual vortex-lattice aerodynamic tool VORLAX and an aerodynamic superposition approach. Based on the underlying linear potential flow theory, the principle of aerodynamic superposition is leveraged to deal with the complex aerodynamic configuration of the TBW. By decomposing the full configuration of the TBW into individual aerodynamic lifting components, the total aerodynamic characteristics of the full configuration can be estimated from the contributions of the individual components. The aerodynamic superposition approach shows excellent agreement with CFD results computed by FUN3D, USM3D, and STAR-CCM+.

  11. Payload vehicle aerodynamic reentry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Donald

    An approach for analyzing the dynamic behavior of a cone-cylinder payload vehicle during reentry to insure proper deployment of the parachute system and recovery of the payload is presented. This analysis includes the study of an aerodynamic device that is useful in extending vehicle axial rotation through the maximum dynamic pressure region. Attention is given to vehicle configuration and reentry trajectory, the derivation of pitch static aerodynamics, the derivation of the pitch damping coefficient, pitching moment modeling, aerodynamic roll device modeling, and payload vehicle reentry dynamics. It is shown that the vehicle dynamics at parachute deployment are well within the design limit of the recovery system, thus ensuring successful payload recovery.

  12. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  13. Underwater Flow Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, A. P.

    Lighthill's theory of aerodynamic sound provides an effective way of investigating underwater flow noise. When combined with a model of the coherent vortical structures in a turbulent boundary layer, it predicts the wave-number frequency pressure spectrum on a rigid surface and, in particular, highlights the rôle of surface viscous stresses as a source of low wave-number pressure fluctuations on a plane surface. The inclusion of surface curvature and flexibility enables the theory to be applied to acoustic streamers (sometimes known as towed arrays). The effect of the interior mechanical structure of the streamers on the flow noise is investigated. Simple algebraic forms are derived for the comparative performance of liquid and visco-elastic-filled streamers. The introduction of porous foam into a liquid streamer is found to be a particularly effective way of attenuating low wave-number disturbances, and theoretical predictions are compared with experiment.

  14. Rotorcraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of a realistic plan for NASA and the U.S. helicopter industry to develop a design-for-noise methodology, including plans for the identification and development of promising noise reduction technology was discussed. Topics included: noise reduction techniques, scaling laws, empirical noise prediction, psychoacoustics, and methods of developing and validing noise prediction methods.

  15. On the Connection Between Flap Side-Edge Noise and Tip Vortex Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casalino, D.; Hazir, A.; Fares, E.; Duda, B.; Khorrami, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present work is to investigate how the dynamics of the vortical flow about the flap side edge of an aircraft determine the acoustic radiation. A validated lattice- Boltzmann CFD solution of the unsteady flow about a detailed business jet configuration in approach conditions is used for the present analysis. Evidence of the connection between the noise generated by several segments of the inboard flap tip and the aerodynamic forces acting on the same segments is given, proving that the noise generation mechanism has a spatially coherent and acoustically compact character on the scale of the flap chord, and that the edge-scattering effects are of secondary importance. Subsequently, evidence of the connection between the kinematics of the tip vortex system and the aerodynamic force is provided. The kinematics of the dual vortex system are investigated via a core detection technique. Emphasis is placed on the mutual induction effects between the two main vortices rolling up from the pressure and suction sides of the flap edge. A simple heuristic formula that relates the far-field noise spectrum and the cross-spectrum of the unsteady vortical positions is developed.

  16. Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Allan E.

    1990-01-01

    Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems is examined. It is presumed that the underlying model can be arranged into an input/output (I/O) differential operator equation of a generic form. The algorithm estimation is especially efficient since the equation error can be integrated exactly given any I/O pair to obtain an algebraic function of the parameters. The algorithm for parameter identification was extended to the order determination problem for linear differential system. The degeneracy in a least squares estimate caused by feedback was addressed. A method of frequency analysis for determining the transfer function G(j omega) from transient I/O data was formulated using complex valued Fourier based modulating functions in contrast with the trigonometric modulating functions for the parameter estimation problem. A simulation result of applying the algorithm is given under noise-free conditions for a system with a low pass transfer function.

  17. Theoretical study on the generation of a low-noise plasmonic hotspot by means of a trench-assisted circular nano-slit.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyuntai; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Koo, Sukmo; Kim, Jinseob; Park, Kyoungyoon; Lee, Dongyeul; Vazquez-Zuniga, Luis Alonso; Park, Namkyoo; Lee, Byoungho; Jeong, Yoonchan

    2014-11-03

    We propose a novel trench-assisted circular metal nano-slit (CMNS) structure implementable on a fiber platform for the generation of a low-noise cylindrical surface plasmon (CSP) hotspot. We design trench structures based on a multi-pole cancellation method in order that a converging surface plasmon signal is well separated from co-propagating non-confined diffracted light (NCDL) at the hotspot location. In fact, the secondary radiation by the quasi-pole oscillation at the edge of the trench cancels the primary NCDL, thereby enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the CSP hotspot. In particular, we investigate two types of trench structures: a rectangular-trench (RT) structure and an asymmetric-parabolic-trench (APT) structure, which are considered for the sake of the simplicity of fabrication and of the maximal enhancement of the SNR, respectively. In comparison with a conventional CMNS having no trenches, we highlight that the mean SNR of the CSP hotspot is enhanced by 6.97 and 11.89 dB in case of the optimized RT and APT CMNSs, respectively. The proposed schemes are expected to be useful for increasing the SNR of plasmonic devices that are interfered by NCDL, such as various types of nano-slits for generating high-resolution plasmonic signals, for example.

  18. Parachute Aerodynamics From Video Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenenberger, Mark; Queen, Eric M.; Cruz, Juan R.

    2005-01-01

    A new data analysis technique for the identification of static and dynamic aerodynamic stability coefficients from wind tunnel test video data is presented. This new technique was applied to video data obtained during a parachute wind tunnel test program conducted in support of the Mars Exploration Rover Mission. Total angle-of-attack data obtained from video images were used to determine the static pitching moment curve of the parachute. During the original wind tunnel test program the static pitching moment curve had been determined by forcing the parachute to a specific total angle-of -attack and measuring the forces generated. It is shown with the new technique that this parachute, when free to rotate, trims at an angle-of-attack two degrees lower than was measured during the forced-angle tests. An attempt was also made to extract pitch damping information from the video data. Results suggest that the parachute is dynamically unstable at the static trim point and tends to become dynamically stable away from the trim point. These trends are in agreement with limit-cycle-like behavior observed in the video. However, the chaotic motion of the parachute produced results with large uncertainty bands.

  19. Aerodynamic Characteristics of Water Rocket and Stabilization of Flight Trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Rikio; Tomita, Nobuyuki; Takemae, Toshiaki

    The aerodynamic characteristics of water rockets are analyzed experimentally by wind tunnel testing. Aerodynamic devices such as vortex generators and dimples are tested and their effectiveness to the flight performance of water rocket is discussed. Attaching vortex generators suppresses the unsteady body fluttering. Dimpling the nose reduces the drag coefficient in high angles of attack. Robust design approach is applied to water rocket design for flight stability and optimum water rocket configuration is determined. Semi-sphere nose is found to be effective for flight stability and it is desirable for the safety of landing point. Stiffed fin attachment is required for fins to work properly as aerodynamic device and it enhances the flight stability of water rockets.

  20. Investigation of aerodynamic braking devices for wind turbine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the selection and preliminary design of a new aerodynamic braking system for use on the stall-regulated AWT-26/27 wind turbines. The goal was to identify and design a configuration that offered improvements over the existing tip brake used by Advanced Wind Turbines, Inc. (AWT). Although the design objectives and approach of this report are specific to aerodynamic braking of AWT-26/27 turbines, many of the issues addressed in this work are applicable to a wider class of turbines. The performance trends and design choices presented in this report should be of general use to wind turbine designers who are considering alternative aerodynamic braking methods. A literature search was combined with preliminary work on device sizing, loads and mechanical design. Candidate configurations were assessed on their potential for benefits in the areas of cost, weight, aerodynamic noise, reliability and performance under icing conditions. As a result, two configurations were identified for further study: the {open_quotes}spoiler-flap{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}flip-tip.{close_quotes} Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at Wichita State University to evaluate the performance of the candidate aerodynamic brakes on an airfoil section representative of the AWT-26/27 blades. The wind tunnel data were used to predict the braking effectiveness and deployment characteristics of the candidate devices for a wide range of design parameters. The evaluation was iterative, with mechanical design and structural analysis being conducted in parallel with the braking performance studies. The preliminary estimate of the spoiler-flap system cost was $150 less than the production AWT-26/27 tip vanes. This represents a reduction of approximately 5 % in the cost of the aerodynamic braking system. In view of the preliminary nature of the design, it would be prudent to plan for contingencies in both cost and weight.

  1. Single-polarization noise-like pulse generation from a hybrid mode-locked thulium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuo; Yan, Feng-Ping; Feng, Ting; Zhang, Lu-Na; Bai, Zhuo-Ya; Zhou, Hong; Hou, Yafei; Zhang, Ning

    2017-04-01

    A hybrid mode-locked thulium-doped fiber laser incorporating a nonlinear optical loop mirror and a nonlinear polarization rotation effect is proposed in the 2 μm band for the first time. By adjusting two polarization controllers, a stable single-polarization noise-like (SPNL) pulse operation is obtained. The SPNL pulse could work steadily for at least 400 min. At a launched pump power of 3.52 W, the hybrid mode-locked SPNL pulse centers at 2007 nm with an optical full width at half maximum of 20 nm, a polarization extinction ratio of 26.3 dB, a coherence spike width of 258 fs and a pulse energy of 42.11 nJ, respectively.

  2. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The general principles of artificial intelligence are reviewed and speculations are made concerning how knowledge based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use expert systems, and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. In addition, the anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics are examined. Three main conclusions are presented. First, there are two related aspects of computational aerodynamics: reasoning and calculating. Second, a substantial portion of reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence. It offers the opportunity of using computers as reasoning machines to set the stage for efficient calculating. Third, expert systems are likely to be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  3. Dynamic soaring: aerodynamics for albatrosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Albatrosses have evolved to soar and glide efficiently. By maximizing their lift-to-drag ratio L/D, albatrosses can gain energy from the wind and can travel long distances with little effort. We simplify the difficult aerodynamic equations of motion by assuming that albatrosses maintain a constant L/D. Analytic solutions to the simplified equations provide an instructive and appealing example of fixed-wing aerodynamics suitable for undergraduate demonstration.

  4. Supersonic aerodynamics of delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    Through the empirical correlation of experimental data and theoretical analysis, a set of graphs has been developed which summarize the inviscid aerodynamics of delta wings at supersonic speeds. The various graphs which detail the aerodynamic performance of delta wings at both zero-lift and lifting conditions were then employed to define a preliminary wing design approach in which both the low-lift and high-lift design criteria were combined to define a feasible design space.

  5. Reduction of propeller noise by active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bschorr, O.; Kubanke, D.

    1992-04-01

    Active noise control, a method of cancelling noise by means of interference with a secondary anti-noise source, is now in full development. The first commercial application of this technique is in the case of active electronically controlled head sets. The next step will be the active noise cancellation in air ducts and in passenger cabins. The aim of this paper is to assess the possibilities of the anti-noise technique for reducing propeller noise. First, by a mathematical simulation the theoretical noise reduction on the ground was calculated and found to be promising for further investigations. In the case of the periodic engine and propeller noise, for example, with only a single anti-noise source, the noise foot prints of the lower propeller harmonics can be reduced by up to 10 dB. In laboratory tests the theoretical values will be confirmed experimentally. For cancellation of the periodic noise one can use synchronous anti-noise generators. Compared with the engine and propeller noise the reduction of jet noise by the anti-noise technique is much more difficult. Therefore a sensor and controlling unit are necessary because of the stochastic nature of jet noise. Since aircraft noise is a severe problem, all methods are to be considered.

  6. Noise Considerations for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, David A.; Mayes, William H.; Hubbard, Harvey H.

    1960-01-01

    Noise measurements pertaining mainly to the static firing, launch, 0 and exit flight phases are presented for three rocket-powered vehicles 4 in the Project Mercury test program. Both internal and external data 4 from onboard recordings are presented for a range of Mach numbers and dynamic pressures and for different external vehicle shapes. The main sources of noise are noted to be the rocket engines during static firing and launch and the aerodynamic boundary layer during the high-dynamic-pressure portions of the flight. Rocket-engine noise measurements along the surface of the Mercury Big Joe vehicle were noted to correlate well with data from small models and available data for other large rockets. Measurements have indicated that the aerodynamic noise pressures increase approximately as the dynamic pressure increases and may vary according to the external shape of the vehicle, the highest noise levels being associated with conditions of flow separation. There is also a trend for the aerodynamic noise spectra to peak at higher frequencies as the flight Mach number increases.

  7. Theoretical prediction of nonlinear propagation effects on noise signatures generated by subsonic or supersonic propeller or rotor-blade tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The nonlinear propagation equations for sound generated by a constant speed blade tip are presented. Propagation from a subsonic tip is treated as well as the various cases that can occur at supersonic speeds. Some computed examples indicate that the nonlinear theory correlates with experimental results better than linear theory for large amplitude waves. For swept tips that generate a wave with large amplitude leading expansion, the nonlinear theory predicts a cancellation effect that results in a significant reduction of both amplitude and impulse.

  8. Application of CAD/CAE class systems to aerodynamic analysis of electric race cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, L.; Baier, A.; Buchacz, A.; Majzner, M.; Sobek, M.

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamics is one of the most important factors which influence on every aspect of a design of a car and car driving parameters. The biggest influence aerodynamics has on design of a shape of a race car body, especially when the main objective of the race is the longest distance driven in period of time, which can not be achieved without low energy consumption and low drag of a car. Designing shape of the vehicle body that must generate the lowest possible drag force, without compromising the other parameters of the drive. In the article entitled „Application of CAD/CAE class systems to aerodynamic analysis of electric race cars” are being presented problems solved by computer analysis of cars aerodynamics and free form modelling. Analysis have been subjected to existing race car of a Silesian Greenpower Race Team. On a basis of results of analysis of existence of Kammback aerodynamic effect innovative car body were modeled. Afterwards aerodynamic analysis were performed to verify existence of aerodynamic effect for innovative shape and to recognize aerodynamics parameters of the shape. Analysis results in the values of coefficients and aerodynamic drag forces. The resulting drag forces Fx, drag coefficients Cx(Cd) and aerodynamic factors Cx*A allowed to compare all of the shapes to each other. Pressure distribution, air velocities and streams courses were useful in determining aerodynamic features of analyzed shape. For aerodynamic tests was used Ansys Fluent CFD software. In a paper the ways of surface modeling with usage of Realize Shape module and classic surface modeling were presented. For shapes modeling Siemens NX 9.0 software was used. Obtained results were used to estimation of existing shapes and to make appropriate conclusions.

  9. Use of cross-correlation measurements to investigate noise generating regions of a real jet engine and a model jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meecham, W. C.; Hurdle, P. M.

    1974-01-01

    Cross-correlations are reported of the jet static pressure fluctuations (as measured with a B and K microphone fitted with a nose cone), with the far-field radiated sound pressure. These measurements were made for various probe positions and a large number of far-field positions (at various angles). In addition, the tests were run for a number of different jet exit velocities. The measured, normalized cross-correlation functions vary between 0.004 and 0.155. These values depend upon the angular position of the far-field microphone, the jet exit Mach number, and the position of the probe. In addition, the cross-correlation technique was employed to study the symmetry of the far-field radiated sound about the jet axis. Third-octave analyses of both the probe signal and the far-field radiated sound were made. This is the first time correlation measurements have been made on a jet engine. In addition, a report is given on an extensive noise survey of a model jet. The correlations are related to sound source functions and jet source regions are discussed.

  10. JET Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Leib, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise prediction has been an important and challenging research area since James Lighthill first introduced his Acoustic Analogy Approach over fifty years ago. This talk attempts to provide a unified framework for the subsequent theoretical developments in this field. It assumes that there is no single approach that is optimal in all situations and uses the framework as a basis for discussing the strengths weaknesses of the various approaches to this topic. But the emphasis here will be on the important problem of predicting the noise from high speed air jets. Specific results will presented for round jets in the 0.5 to 1.4 Mach number range and compared with experimental data taken on the Glenn SHAR rig. It is demonstrated that non-parallel mean flow effects play an important role in predicting the noise at the supersonic Mach numbers. The results explain the failure of previous attempts based on the parallel flow Lilley model (which has served as the foundation for most jet noise analyses during past two decades).

  11. An Assessment of NASA Glenn's Aeroacoustic Experimental and Predictive Capabilities for Installed Cooling Fans. Part 1; Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Koch, L. Danielle; Wernet, Mark P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    Driven by the need for low production costs, electronics cooling fans have evolved differently than the bladed components of gas turbine engines which incorporate multiple technologies to enhance performance and durability while reducing noise emissions. Drawing upon NASA Glenn's experience in the measurement and prediction of gas turbine engine aeroacoustic performance, tests have been conducted to determine if these tools and techniques can be extended for application to the aerodynamics and acoustics of electronics cooling fans. An automated fan plenum installed in NASA Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory was used to map the overall aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a spaceflight qualified 80 mm diameter axial cooling fan. In order to more accurately identify noise sources, diagnose performance limiting aerodynamic deficiencies, and validate noise prediction codes, additional aerodynamic measurements were recorded for two operating points: free delivery and a mild stall condition. Non-uniformities in the fan s inlet and exhaust regions captured by Particle Image Velocimetry measurements, and rotor blade wakes characterized by hot wire anemometry measurements provide some assessment of the fan aerodynamic performance. The data can be used to identify fan installation/design changes which could enlarge the stable operating region for the fan and improve its aerodynamic performance and reduce noise emissions.

  12. Optimal guidance and control for investigating aircraft noise-impact reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, E. C.; Carson, T. M.

    1978-01-01

    A methodology for investigating the reduction of community noise impact is reported. This report is concerned with the development of two models to provide data: a guidance generator and an aircraft control generator suitable for various current and advanced types of aircraft. The guidance generator produces the commanded path information from inputs chosen by an operator from a graphic scope display of a land-use map of the terminal area. The guidance generator also produces smoothing at the junctions of straight-line paths.The aircraft control generator determines the optimal set of the available controls such that the aircraft will follow the commanded path. The solutions for the control functions are given and shown to be dependent on the class of aircraft to be considered, that is, whether the thrust vector is rotatable and whether the thrust vector affects the aerodynamic forces. For the class of aircraft possessing a rotatable thrust vector, the solution is redundant; this redundancy is removed by the additional condition that the noise inpact be minimized. Information from both the guidance generator and the aircraft control generator is used by the footprint program to construct the noise footprint.

  13. Landing gear noise attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  14. Understanding jet noise.

    PubMed

    Karabasov, S A

    2010-08-13

    Jets are one of the most fascinating topics in fluid mechanics. For aeronautics, turbulent jet-noise modelling is particularly challenging, not only because of the poor understanding of high Reynolds number turbulence, but also because of the extremely low acoustic efficiency of high-speed jets. Turbulent jet-noise models starting from the classical Lighthill acoustic analogy to state-of-the art models were considered. No attempt was made to present any complete overview of jet-noise theories. Instead, the aim was to emphasize the importance of sound generation and mean-flow propagation effects, as well as their interference, for the understanding and prediction of jet noise.

  15. The effect of aerodynamic parameters on power output of windmills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesner, W.

    1973-01-01

    Aerodynamic results for a study on windpower generation are reported. Windmill power output is presented in terms that are commonly used in rotary wing analysis, namely, power output as a function of drag developed by the windmill. Effect of tip speed ratio, solidity, twist, wind angle, blade setting and airfoil characteristics are given.

  16. Computations of Aerodynamic Performance Databases Using Output-Based Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Handle complex geometry problems; Control discretization errors via solution-adaptive mesh refinement; Focus on aerodynamic databases of parametric and optimization studies: 1. Accuracy: satisfy prescribed error bounds 2. Robustness and speed: may require over 105 mesh generations 3. Automation: avoid user supervision Obtain "expert meshes" independent of user skill; and Run every case adaptively in production settings.

  17. Aerodynamic analysis of hypersonic waverider aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Pessin, David N.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate two existing codes used by the Systems Analysis Branch at NASA ARC, and to modify the codes so they can be used to generate and analyze waverider aircraft at on-design and off-design conditions. To generate waverider configurations and perform the on-design analysis, the appropriately named Waverider code is used. The Waverider code is based on the Taylor-Maccoll equations. Validation is accomplished via a comparison with previously published results. The Waverider code is modified to incorporate a fairing to close off the base area of the waverider configuration. This creates a more realistic waverider. The Hypersonic Aircraft Vehicle Optimization Code (HAVOC) is used to perform the off-design analysis of waverider configurations generated by the Waverider code. Various approximate analysis methods are used by HAVOC to predict the aerodynamic characteristics, which are validated via a comparison with experimental results from a hypersonic test model.

  18. Using Seismic Noise Generated by Ocean Waves to Monitor Seasonal and Secular Changes in Antarctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, R. E.; Aster, R. C.; Thompson, D. W. J.; Reusch, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's background seismic noise between ~1-30 seconds period is commonly dominated by microseisms that arise when oceanic wave energy and swell are converted to ground displacement as the waves crash and interact with the continental shelf. Peak power in the microseism bands at high-latitude stations typically coincides with large-scale extratropical cyclonic winter storm activity. However, due to the seasonal formation of sea ice around the continental shelves of polar regions, oceanic waves are impeded from efficiently exciting seismic energy, and annual peak microseism power thus occurs prior to the midwinter storm peak. We utilize recently collected seismic data from across the continent to show that power in three distinct microseism bands is found to be strongly anti-correlated with sea ice extent, with the shorter period signals being exceptionally sensitive to local conditions. Particular focus is given to the Antarctic Peninsula, the strongest source of microseism energy on the continent, where we note a significant increase in primary microseism power attributable to near coastal sources from 1993-2012. This increase correlates with regional sea ice loss driven by large-scale wind changes associated with strengthening of the Southern Annular Mode. Additionally, we use microseism analysis to explore changes in sea ice strength and extent relative to wave state and storminess in the Southern Oceans. Investigation of microseism seasonality, power, and decadal-scale trends in the Antarctic shows promise as a spatially integrated tool for monitoring and interpreting such sea ice strength and extent metrics through time.

  19. Experimental assessment of helicopter rotor turbulence ingestion noise in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to assess the accuracy of a theory for non-isotropic turbulence ingestion. In order to generate non-isotropic turbulence in a controlled environment, a scale model rotor in a closed chamber was used so that the turbulence generated by the rotor was reingested by the recirculating flow. Simultaneous measurements of turbulence inflow properties and far field acoustics were acquired. Measurements confirmed that the inflow turbulence was highly non-isotropic. The measured aerodynamic properties were used as inputs for the noise prediction procedure. The general agreement between the non-isotropic noise prediction procedure and the experiment was good, although the procedure generally overpredicts the quasi-tonal low to mid range frequencies and underpredicts the higher broadband signals. The predicted sound power level as a function of polar angle was in close agreement with measurements, except near the rotor plane, which is not modeled by the present analysis. It is determined that the most sensitive parameter influencing the predicted noise was the turbulence intensity.

  20. Aerodynamic preliminary analysis system 2. Part 2: User's manuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divan, P.

    1981-01-01

    An aerodynamic analysis system based on potential theory at subsonic/supersonic speeds and impact type finite element solutions at hypersonic conditions is described. Three dimensional configurations having multiple nonplanar surfaces of arbitrary planform and bodies of noncircular contour may be analyzed. Static, rotary, and control longitudinal and lateral directional chracteristics may be generated. The analysis has been implemented on a time sharing system in conjunction with an input tablet digitizer and an interactive graphics input/output display and editing terminal to maximize its responsiveness to the preliminary analysis problem. Typical simulation indicates that program provides an efficient analysis for systematically performing various aerodynamic configuration tradeoff and evaluation studies.

  1. Aerodynamic development of a lifting body launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaser, J. Scott

    1997-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) and X-33 demonstrator vehicle incorporate a lifting body aerodynamic design. This design originated from the X-24, HL-20 and ACRV lifting body database. It evolved rapidly through successive wind tunnel tests using stereolithography generated plastic models and rapid data acquisition and analysis. The culmination of this work is a configuration that is close to meeting a goal of at least neutral stability about all axes throughout the operating Mach spectrum. The development process and aerodynamic evolution are described.

  2. Aerodynamic preliminary analysis system 2. Part 1: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, E.; Clever, W.; Dunn, K.

    1991-01-01

    An aerodynamic analysis system based on potential theory at subsonic and/or supersonic speeds and impact type finite element solutions at hypersonic conditions is described. Three dimensional configurations having multiple nonplanar surfaces of arbitrary planform and bodies of noncircular contour may be analyzed. Static, rotary, and control longitudinal and lateral directional characteristics may be generated. The analysis was implemented on a time sharing system in conjunction with an input tablet digitizer and an interactive graphics input/output display and editing terminal to maximize its responsiveness to the preliminary analysis problem. The program provides an efficient analysis for systematically performing various aerodynamic configuration tradeoff and evaluation studies.

  3. Aerodynamic development of a lifting body launch vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Reaser, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) and X-33 demonstrator vehicle incorporate a lifting body aerodynamic design. This design originated from the X-24, HL-20 and ACRV lifting body database. It evolved rapidly through successive wind tunnel tests using stereolithography generated plastic models and rapid data acquisition and analysis. The culmination of this work is a configuration that is close to meeting a goal of at least neutral stability about all axes throughout the operating Mach spectrum. The development process and aerodynamic evolution are described. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. High frequency seismic noise generated from breaking swallow water ocean waves and the link to time-variable sea states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppeliers, C.; Mallinson, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Breaking waves in the near-shore are known to generate a significant amount of high frequency (f>5 Hz) energy. We investigate the correlation between the spectrum of seismic energy and the local sea states. We deployed a single three-component broadband seismometer approximately 50 m from the sea shore and recorded continuously for approximately 10 days. Our observations show that during elevated sea states, and presumably larger breaking waves in the surf zone, the power spectral density of the wave-generated seismic energy shifts to lower frequencies and higher spectral amplitudes. The correlation of the seismic spectral power to the height and period of ocean waves suggests that seismic observations can be used as a proxy for local sea states, which may have implications for sea shore sediment transport.

  5. Aerodynamics Via Acoustics: Application of Acoustic Formulas for Aerodynamic Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    Prediction of aerodynamic loads on bodies in arbitrary motion is considered from an acoustic point of view, i.e., in a frame of reference fixed in the undisturbed medium. An inhomogeneous wave equation which governs the disturbance pressure is constructed and solved formally using generalized function theory. When the observer is located on the moving body surface there results a singular linear integral equation for surface pressure. Two different methods for obtaining such equations are discussed. Both steady and unsteady aerodynamic calculations are considered. Two examples are presented, the more important being an application to propeller aerodynamics. Of particular interest for numerical applications is the analytical behavior of the kernel functions in the various integral equations.

  6. Commercial aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. J.

    The history of aircraft noise control development is traced with an eye to forecasting the future. Noise control became imperative with the advent of the first generation of commercial jet aircraft, which were extremely loud. The steady increases in the size of turbofans have nearly matched the progress in noise reduction capabilities in recent years. Only 5 dB of reduction in fleet noise has been achieved since early standards were met. Current engine design is concentrated on increasing fuel efficiency rather than lowering noise emissions. Further difficulties exist because of continued flights with older aircraft. Gains in noise reduction have been made mainly by decreasing exhaust velocities from 600-700 m/sec to 300-400 m/sec. New techniques being explored comprise mixing the core and bypass flows, interaction tone control, reduction of broadband sources, development of acoustic liner technology and alterations in the number of fan blades and stage spacing.

  7. Optimization and Modeling of Noise Reduction for Turbulent Jets with Induced Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostamimonjezi, Sara

    This project relates to the development of next-generation high-speed aircraft that are efficient and environmentally compliant. The emphasis of the research is on reducing noise from high-performance engines that will power these aircraft. A strong component of engine noise is jet mixing noise that comes from the turbulent mixing process between the high-speed exhaust flow of the engine and the atmosphere. The fan flow deflection method (FFD) suppresses jet noise by deflecting the fan stream downward, by a few degrees, with respect to the core stream. This reduces the convective Mach number of the primary shear layer and turbulent kinetic energy in the downward direction and therefore reduces the noise emitted towards the ground. The redistribution of the fan stream is achieved with inserting airfoil-shaped vanes inside the fan duct. Aerodynamic optimization of FFD has been done by Dr. Juntao Xiong using a computational fluid dynamics code to maximize reduction of noise perceived by the community while minimizing aerodynamic losses. The optimal vane airfoils are used in a parametric experimental study of 50 4-vane deflector configurations. The vane chord length, angle of attack, and azimuthal location are the parameters studied in acoustic optimization. The best vane configuration yields a reduction in cumulative (downward + sideline) effective perceived noise level (EPNL) of 5.3 dB. The optimization study underscores the sensitivity of FFD to deflector parameters and the need for careful design in the practical implementation of this noise reduction approach. An analytical model based on Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and acoustic analogy is developed to predict the spectral changes from a known baseline in the direction of peak emission. A generalized form for space-time correlation is introduced that allows shapes beyond the traditional exponential forms. Azimuthal directivity based on the wavepacket model of jet noise is integrated with the acoustic

  8. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  9. Configuration Aerodynamics: Past - Present - Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Bencze, Daniel P.; Kulfan, Robert M.; Wilson, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    The Configuration Aerodynamics (CA) element of the High Speed Research (HSR) program is managed by a joint NASA and Industry team, referred to as the Technology Integration Development (ITD) team. This team is responsible for the development of a broad range of technologies for improved aerodynamic performance and stability and control characteristics at subsonic to supersonic flight conditions. These objectives are pursued through the aggressive use of advanced experimental test techniques and state of the art computational methods. As the HSR program matures and transitions into the next phase the objectives of the Configuration Aerodynamics ITD are being refined to address the drag reduction needs and stability and control requirements of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. In addition, the experimental and computational tools are being refined and improved to meet these challenges. The presentation will review the work performed within the Configuration Aerodynamics element in 1994 and 1995 and then discuss the plans for the 1996-1998 time period. The final portion of the presentation will review several observations of the HSR program and the design activity within Configuration Aerodynamics.

  10. Aerodynamic drag on intermodal railcars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinghorn, Philip; Maynes, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The aerodynamic drag associated with transport of commodities by rail is becoming increasingly important as the cost of diesel fuel increases. This study aims to increase the efficiency of intermodal cargo trains by reducing the aerodynamic drag on the load carrying cars. For intermodal railcars a significant amount of aerodynamic drag is a result of the large distance between loads that often occurs and the resulting pressure drag resulting from the separated flow. In the present study aerodynamic drag data have been obtained through wind tunnel testing on 1/29 scale models to understand the savings that may be realized by judicious modification to the size of the intermodal containers. The experiments were performed in the BYU low speed wind tunnel and the test track utilizes two leading locomotives followed by a set of five articulated well cars with double stacked containers. The drag on a representative mid-train car is measured using an isolated load cell balance and the wind tunnel speed is varied from 20 to 100 mph. We characterize the effect that the gap distance between the containers and the container size has on the aerodynamic drag of this representative rail car and investigate methods to reduce the gap distance.

  11. Grid sensitivity for aerodynamic optimization and flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadrehaghighi, I.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    After reviewing relevant literature, it is apparent that one aspect of aerodynamic sensitivity analysis, namely grid sensitivity, has not been investigated extensively. The grid sensitivity algorithms in most of these studies are based on structural design models. Such models, although sufficient for preliminary or conceptional design, are not acceptable for detailed design analysis. Careless grid sensitivity evaluations, would introduce gradient errors within the sensitivity module, therefore, infecting the overall optimization process. Development of an efficient and reliable grid sensitivity module with special emphasis on aerodynamic applications appear essential. The organization of this study is as follows. The physical and geometric representations of a typical model are derived in chapter 2. The grid generation algorithm and boundary grid distribution are developed in chapter 3. Chapter 4 discusses the theoretical formulation and aerodynamic sensitivity equation. The method of solution is provided in chapter 5. The results are presented and discussed in chapter 6. Finally, some concluding remarks are provided in chapter 7.

  12. Aerodynamic levitator for large-sized glassy material production.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Shinichi; Cho, Won-Seung; Imai, Ryoji

    2015-09-01

    Containerless aerodynamic levitation processing is a unique technology for the fabrication of bulk non-crystalline materials. Using conventional aerodynamic levitation, a high reflective index (RI) material (BaTi2O5 and LaO3/2-TiO2-ZrO2 system) was developed with a RI greater than approximately 2.2, which is similar to that of diamond. However, the glass size was small, approximately 3 mm in diameter. Therefore, it is essential to produce large sized materials for future optical materials applications, such as camera lenses. In this study, a new aerodynamic levitator was designed to produce non-crystalline materials with diameters larger than 6 mm. The concept of this new levitator was to set up a reduced pressure at the top of the molten samples without generating turbulent flow. A numerical simulation was also performed to verify the concept.

  13. Study of aerodynamic technology for VSTOL fighter attack aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burhans, W., Jr.; Crafta, V. J., Jr.; Dannenhoffer, N.; Dellamura, F. A.; Krepski, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Vertical short takeoff aircraft capability, supersonic dash capability, and transonic agility were investigated for the development of Fighter/attack aircraft to be accommodated on ships smaller than present aircraft carriers. Topics covered include: (1) description of viable V/STOL fighter/attack configuration (a high wing, close-coupled canard, twin-engine, control configured aircraft) which meets or exceeds specified levels of vehicle performance; (2) estimates of vehicle aerodynamic characteristics and the methodology utilized to generate them; (3) description of propulsion system characteristics and vehicle mass properties; (4) identification of areas of aerodynamic uncertainty; and (5) a test program to investigate the areas of aerodynamic uncertainty in the conventional flight mode.

  14. Global Nonlinear Parametric Modeling with Application to F-16 Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1998-01-01

    A global nonlinear parametric modeling technique is described and demonstrated. The technique uses multivariate orthogonal modeling functions generated from the data to determine nonlinear model structure, then expands each retained modeling function into an ordinary multivariate polynomial. The final model form is a finite multivariate power series expansion for the dependent variable in terms of the independent variables. Partial derivatives of the identified models can be used to assemble globally valid linear parameter varying models. The technique is demonstrated by identifying global nonlinear parametric models for nondimensional aerodynamic force and moment coefficients from a subsonic wind tunnel database for the F-16 fighter aircraft. Results show less than 10% difference between wind tunnel aerodynamic data and the nonlinear parameterized model for a simulated doublet maneuver at moderate angle of attack. Analysis indicated that the global nonlinear parametric models adequately captured the multivariate nonlinear aerodynamic functional dependence.

  15. An overview of NASA's role in maneuvering missile aerodynamic technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, W. C.; Jackson, C. M., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the role NASA has had and continues to pursue in providing missile aerodynamic technology. In the past, NASA has provided considerable support to the missile industry and the military. The support has generally taken the form of theoretical aerodynamic analyses, experimental studies to provide solutions for specific problems, and the documentation of existing foreign missile systems and domestic missiles. In 1975, NASA shifted its missile-related efforts in aerodynamics from this largely service role to one of conducting more basic research. The areas of research include: innovative methods for roll control of cruciform missiles, airbreathing missiles with maneuver requirements, and an advanced generation of monoplanar missiles for efficient supersonic carriage and delivery.

  16. The aerodynamics of insect flight.

    PubMed

    Sane, Sanjay P

    2003-12-01

    The flight of insects has fascinated physicists and biologists for more than a century. Yet, until recently, researchers were unable to rigorously quantify the complex wing motions of flapping insects or measure the forces and flows around their wings. However, recent developments in high-speed videography and tools for computational and mechanical modeling have allowed researchers to make rapid progress in advancing our understanding of insect flight. These mechanical and computational fluid dynamic models, combined with modern flow visualization techniques, have revealed that the fluid dynamic phenomena underlying flapping flight are different from those of non-flapping, 2-D wings on which most previous models were based. In particular, even at high angles of attack, a prominent leading edge vortex remains stably attached on the insect wing and does not shed into an unsteady wake, as would be expected from non-flapping 2-D wings. Its presence greatly enhances the forces generated by the wing, thus enabling insects to hover or maneuver. In addition, flight forces are further enhanced by other mechanisms acting during changes in angle of attack, especially at stroke reversal, the mutual interaction of the two wings at dorsal stroke reversal or wing-wake interactions following stroke reversal. This progress has enabled the development of simple analytical and empirical models that allow us to calculate the instantaneous forces on flapping insect wings more accurately than was previously possible. It also promises to foster new and exciting multi-disciplinary collaborations between physicists who seek to explain the phenomenology, biologists who seek to understand its relevance to insect physiology and evolution, and engineers who are inspired to build micro-robotic insects using these principles. This review covers the basic physical principles underlying flapping flight in insects, results of recent experiments concerning the aerodynamics of insect flight, as well

  17. A Novel Approach for Reducing Rotor Tip-Clearance Induced Noise in Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan

    2001-01-01

    Rotor tip-clearance induced noise, both in the form of rotor self noise and rotor-stator interaction noise , constitutes a significant component of total fan noise. Innovative yet cost effective techniques to suppress rotor-generated noise are, therefore, of foremost importance for improving the noise signature of turbofan engines. To that end, the feasibility of a passive porous treatment strategy to positively modify the tip-clearance flow field is addressed. The present study is focused on accurate viscous flow calculations of the baseline and the treated rotor flow fields. Detailed comparison between the computed baseline solution and experimental measurements shows excellent agreement. Tip-vortex structure, trajectory, strength, and other relevant aerodynamic quantities are extracted from the computed database. Extensive comparison between the untreated and treated tip-clearance flow fields is performed. The effectiveness of the porous treatment for altering the rotor-tip vortex flow field in general and reducing the intensity of the tip vortex, in particular, is demonstrated. In addition, the simulated flow field for the treated tip clearly shows that substantial reduction in the intensity of both the shear layer roll-up and boundary layer separation on the wall is achieved.

  18. Blade-mounted trailing edge flap control for BVI noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, A. A.; Charles, B. D.; Tadghighi, H.; Sankar, L. N.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical procedures based on the 2-D and 3-D full potential equations and the 2-D Navier-Stokes equations were developed to study the effects of leading and trailing edge flap motions on the aerodynamics of parallel airfoil-vortex interactions and on the aerodynamics and acoustics of the more general self-generated rotor blade vortex interactions (BVI). For subcritical interactions, the 2-D results indicate that the trailing edge flap can be used to alleviate the impulsive loads experienced by the airfoil. For supercritical interactions, the results show the necessity of using a leading edge flap, rather than a trailing edge flap, to alleviate the interaction. Results for various time dependent flap motions and their effect on the predicted temporal sectional loads, differential pressures, and the free vortex trajectories are presented. For the OLS model rotor, contours of a BVI noise metric were used to quantify the effects of the trailing edge flap on the size and directivity of the high/low intensity noise region(s). Average reductions in the BVI noise levels on the order of 5 dB with moderate power penalties on the order of 18 pct. for a four bladed rotor and 58 pct. for a two bladed rotor were obtained.

  19. Measured wavenumber: frequency spectrum associated with acoustic and aerodynamic wall pressure fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Arguillat, Blandine; Ricot, Denis; Bailly, Christophe; Robert, Gilles

    2010-10-01

    Direct measurements of the wavenumber-frequency spectrum of wall pressure fluctuations beneath a turbulent plane channel flow have been performed in an anechoic wind tunnel. A rotative array has been designed that allows the measurement of a complete map, 63×63 measuring points, of cross-power spectral densities over a large area. An original post-processing has been developed to separate the acoustic and the aerodynamic exciting loadings by transforming space-frequency data into wavenumber-frequency spectra. The acoustic part has also been estimated from a simple Corcos-like model including the contribution of a diffuse sound field. The measured acoustic contribution to the surface pressure fluctuations is 5% of the measured aerodynamic surface pressure fluctuations for a velocity and boundary layer thickness relevant for automotive interior noise applications. This shows that for aerodynamically induced car interior noise, both contributions to the surface pressure fluctuations on car windows have to be taken into account.

  20. Aerodynamic Design and Computational Analysis of a Spacecraft Cabin Ventilation Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    Quieter working environments for astronauts are needed if future long-duration space exploration missions are to be safe and productive. Ventilation and payload cooling fans are known to be dominant sources of noise, with the International Space Station being a good case in point. To address this issue in a cost-effective way, early attention to fan design, selection, and installation has been recommended. Toward that end, NASA has begun to investigate the potential for small-fan noise reduction through improvements in fan aerodynamic design. Using tools and methodologies similar to those employed by the aircraft engine industry, most notably computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, the aerodynamic design of a new cabin ventilation fan has been developed, and its aerodynamic performance has been predicted and analyzed. The design, intended to serve as a baseline for future work, is discussed along with selected CFD results