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Sample records for aerodynamic performance degradation

  1. Correlation Between Geometric Similarity of Ice Shapes and the Resulting Aerodynamic Performance Degradation: A Preliminary Investigation Using WIND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Chung, James

    1999-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance calculations were performed using WIND on ten experimental ice shapes and the corresponding ten ice shapes predicted by LEWICE 2.0. The resulting data for lift coefficient and drag coefficient are presented. The difference in aerodynamic results between the experimental ice shapes and the LEWICE ice shapes were compared to the quantitative difference in ice shape geometry presented in an earlier report. Correlations were generated to determine the geometric features which have the most effect on performance degradation. Results show that maximum lift and stall angle can be correlated to the upper horn angle and the leading edge minimum thickness. Drag coefficient can be correlated to the upper horn angle and the frequency-weighted average of the Fourier coefficients. Pitching moment correlated with the upper horn angle and to a much lesser extent to the upper and lower horn thicknesses.

  2. HSR Aerodynamic Performance Status and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, William P.; Antani, Tony; Ball, Doug; Calloway, Robert L.; Snyder, Phil

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes HSR (High Speed Research) Aerodynamic Performance Status and Challenges. The topics include: 1) Aero impact on HSR; 2) Goals and Targets; 3) Progress and Status; and 4) Remaining Challenges. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  3. Flipperons for Improved Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mabe, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Lightweight, piezoelectrically actuated bending flight-control surfaces have shown promise as means of actively controlling airflows to improve the performances of transport airplanes. These bending flight-control surfaces are called flipperons because they look somewhat like small ailerons, but, unlike ailerons, are operated in an oscillatory mode reminiscent of the actions of biological flippers. The underlying concept of using flipperons and other flipperlike actuators to impart desired characteristics to flows is not new. Moreover, elements of flipperon-based active flow-control (AFC) systems for aircraft had been developed previously, but it was not until the development reported here that the elements have been integrated into a complete, controllable prototype AFC system for wind-tunnel testing to enable evaluation of the benefits of AFC for aircraft. The piezoelectric actuator materials chosen for use in the flipperons are single- crystal solid solutions of lead zinc niobate and lead titanate, denoted generically by the empirical formula (1-x)[Pb(Zn(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3]:x[PbTiO3] (where x<1) and popularly denoted by the abbreviation PZN-PT. These are relatively newly recognized piezoelectric materials that are capable of strain levels exceeding 1 percent and strain-energy densities 5 times greater than those of previously commercially available piezoelectric materials. Despite their high performance levels, (1-x)[Pb(Zn(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3]:x[PbTiO3] materials have found limited use until now because, relative to previously commercially available piezoelectric materials, they tend to be much more fragile.

  4. Design of an optical system for a 5th generation multi-spectral air-to-air missile considering the imaging performance degradation due to the aerodynamic heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, Paulo R., Jr.; da Silva, Maurício; Paoli, Eduardo T.

    2009-05-01

    An air-to-air missile is always submitted to extremes conditions of temperature, such as a hot runway in the desert dropping down to very cold conditions at high altitudes. It is evident that the optical system must be able to provide satisfactory image quality under any circumstances without causing any major degradation to the image. Under this perspective, two different designs of optical systems will be considered for this missile: one catadioptric, using a modified Cassegrain telescope and another one purely dioptric. Both optical systems must be able to focus energy in two different arrays of detectors, one for the near infrared radiation and the other one for the medium infrared. Due to the special missile flight profile, the temperature operational range will be determined and considered in order to design and athermalize the optical systems. Due to the large temperatures range, the missile optical system will experience deformation effects that will cause defocus and image degradation. A correct choice of materials, including the telescope body and dome shroud must be determined to minimize the defocus effect. Also a thermal compensator ought to be strategically placed on both designs to provide focus correction for all the temperatures range. Following that, the optical designs will be analyzed for effects of stray light and ghost image to find out what are the most suitable absorbing paint and anti-reflective coatings to be used. In the last step, both systems will be classified accordingly to their characteristics of performance, weight, size, viability and price and the best will integrate the missile optical system.

  5. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  6. Performance of an aerodynamic particle separator

    SciTech Connect

    Ragland, K.; Han, J.; Aerts, D.

    1996-12-31

    This compact, high-flow device aerodynamically separates small particles from a gas stream by a series of annular truncated airfoils. The operating concept, design and performance of this novel particle separator are described. Tests results using corn starch and post-cyclone coal fly ash are presented. Particle collection efficiencies of 90% for corn starch and 70% for coal fly ash were measured at inlet velocities of 80 ft s{sup {minus}1} (2,700 cfm) and (6 inches) water pressure drop with particle loading up to 4 gr ft{sup {minus}3} in air at standard conditions. Results from computer modeling using FLUENT are presented and compared to the tests. The aerodynamic particle separator is an attractive alternative to a cyclone collector.

  7. Joint influences of aerodynamic flow field and aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of airborne optical systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Haosu; Zuo, Baojun; Tian, Yi; Zhang, Wang; Hao, Chenglong; Liu, Chaofeng; Li, Qi; Li, Fan; Zhang, Li; Fan, Zhigang

    2012-12-20

    We investigated the joint influences exerted by the nonuniform aerodynamic flow field surrounding the optical dome and the aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of an airborne optical system. The Spalart-Allmaras model provided by FLUENT was used for flow computations. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm based ray tracing program was used to simulate optical transmission through the aerodynamic flow field and the dome. Four kinds of imaging quality evaluation parameters were presented: wave aberration of the exit pupil, point spread function, encircled energy, and modulation transfer function. The results show that the aero-optical disturbance of the aerodynamic flow field and the aerodynamic heating of the dome significantly affect the imaging quality of an airborne optical system. PMID:23262604

  8. The aerodynamic effect of heavy rain on airplane performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D.

    1990-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been conducting a series of tests to determine the effect of heavy rain on airfoil aerodynamics. The results of these tests have shown that heavy rain can significantly increase drag as well as decrease lift and stall angle of attack. This paper describes a recent effort to use the heavy rain airfoil data to determine the aerodynamic effect on a conventional twin-jet transport. The paper reports on the method used to model the heavy rain aerodynamic effect and the resulting performance degradation. The heavy rain performance effect is presented in terms of the diminished climb performance associated with increasing rain rates. The effect of heavy rain on the airplane's ability to escape a performance-limiting wind shear is illustrated through a numerical simulation of a wet microburst encounter. The results of this paper accentuate the need for further testing to determine scaling relationships and flow mechanics, and the full configuration three-dimensional effects of heavy rain.

  9. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to: (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 1/Part 1 publication covers configuration aerodynamics.

  10. 1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

  11. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 1/Part 2 publication covers the design optimization and testing sessions.

  12. 1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry HighSpeed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of. Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to: (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

  13. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in area of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodyamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  14. CFD Assessment of Aerodynamic Degradation of a Subsonic Transport Due to Airframe Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.; Atkins, Harold L.; Viken, Sally A.; Morrison, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    A computational study is presented to assess the utility of two NASA unstructured Navier-Stokes flow solvers for capturing the degradation in static stability and aerodynamic performance of a NASA General Transport Model (GTM) due to airframe damage. The approach is to correlate computational results with a substantial subset of experimental data for the GTM undergoing progressive losses to the wing, vertical tail, and horizontal tail components. The ultimate goal is to advance the probability of inserting computational data into the creation of advanced flight simulation models of damaged subsonic aircraft in order to improve pilot training. Results presented in this paper demonstrate good correlations with slope-derived quantities, such as pitch static margin and static directional stability, and incremental rolling moment due to wing damage. This study further demonstrates that high fidelity Navier-Stokes flow solvers could augment flight simulation models with additional aerodynamic data for various airframe damage scenarios.

  15. Steam generator performance degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Lovett, J.T.; Dow, B.L. )

    1991-09-01

    A survey was conducted to determine the range and severity of steam generator performance degradation effects experienced by PWRs in the United States. The survey results were tabulated and correlated with steam generator age and design. Operating experience at several PWRs was examined in detail. The operating experience at US PWRs was compared to that of PWRs in Japan and Germany. Possible causes for the performance degradation were postulated and evaluated. The sensitivity of steam generator output pressure to changes in various parameters (such as fouling factor, average reactor coolant temperature, and percentage of steam generator tubes plugged) was calculated. These calculations were used in the evaluation of possible causes of steam generator performance degradation. Several deposit exfoliation scenarios were evaluated in terms of the calculated effect on fouling factor trends and associated steam generator output pressure trends. 15 refs., 32 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Aerodynamics and performance testing of the VAWT

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    Early investigations suggest that reductions in cost of energy (COE) and increases in reliability for VAWT systems may be brought about through relatively inexpensive changes to the current aerodynamic design. This design uses blades of symmetrical cross-section mounted such that the radius from the rotating tower centerline is normal to the blade chord at roughly the 40% chord point. The envisioned changes to this existing design are intended to: (1) lower cut-in windspeed; (2) increase maximum efficiency; (3) limit maximum aerodynamic power; and (4) limit peak aerodynamic torques. This paper describes certain experiments designed to both better understand the aerodynamics of a section operating in an unsteady, curvilinear flowfield and achieve some of the desired changes in section properties. The common goal of all of these experiments is to lower VAWT COE and increase system reliability.

  17. Influence of hinge point on flexible flap aerodynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Zhao, H.; Ye, Z.; Wu, P.; Li, C.

    2013-12-01

    Large scale wind turbines lead to increasing blade lengths and weights, which presents new challenges for blade design. This paper selects NREL S809 airfoil, uses the parameterized technology to realize the flexible trailing edge deformation, researches the static aerodynamic characteristics of wind turbine blade airfoil with flexible deformation, and the dynamic aerodynamic characteristics in the process of continuous deformation, analyses the influence of hinge point position on flexible flap aerodynamic performance, in order to further realize the flexible wind turbine blade design and provides some references for the active control scheme. The results show that compared with the original airfoil, proper trailing edge deformation can improve the lift coefficient, reduce the drag coefficient, and thereby more efficiently realize flow field active control. With hinge point moving forward, total aerodynamic performance of flexible flap improves. Positive swing angle can push the transition point backward, thus postpones the occurrence of the transition phenomenon.

  18. Aerodynamic Performances of Corrugated Dragonfly Wings at Low Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamai, Masatoshi; He, Guowei; Hu, Hui

    2006-11-01

    The cross-sections of dragonfly wings have well-defined corrugated configurations, which seem to be not very suitable for flight according to traditional airfoil design principles. However, previous studies have led to surprising conclusions of that corrugated dragonfly wings would have better aerodynamic performances compared with traditional technical airfoils in the low Reynolds number regime where dragonflies usually fly. Unlike most of the previous studies of either measuring total aerodynamics forces (lift and drag) or conducting qualitative flow visualization, a series of wind tunnel experiments will be conducted in the present study to investigate the aerodynamic performances of corrugated dragonfly wings at low Reynolds numbers quantitatively. In addition to aerodynamics force measurements, detailed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements will be conducted to quantify of the flow field around a two-dimensional corrugated dragonfly wing model to elucidate the fundamental physics associated with the flight features and aerodynamic performances of corrugated dragonfly wings. The aerodynamic performances of the dragonfly wing model will be compared with those of a simple flat plate and a NASA low-speed airfoil at low Reynolds numbers.

  19. Aerodynamic performance measurements at moderate Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, M.; McArthur, J.; Spedding, G. R.

    2004-11-01

    There has been renewed interest in the aerodynamics of lifting wings at Reynolds numbers from 10^4 to 10^5, partly due to engineering requirements of small-scale, remotely piloted aircraft, and partly because birds and bats operate in this regime. Even when the wings do not flap or pitch or plunge, the flow over the small aspect ratio wings is likely to be three-dimensional and unsteady. Wind tunnel test results are described where force measurements are combined with DPIV studies. Some problems and principles of such measurement programs will also be discussed.

  20. Scaling of Lift Degradation Due to Anti-Icing Fluids Based Upon the Aerodynamic Acceptance Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy; Riley, Jim

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the FAA has worked with Transport Canada, National Research Council Canada (NRC) and APS Aviation, Inc. to develop allowance times for aircraft operations in ice-pellet precipitation. These allowance times are critical to ensure safety and efficient operation of commercial and cargo flights. Wind-tunnel testing with uncontaminated anti-icing fluids and fluids contaminated with simulated ice pellets had been carried out at the NRC Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel (PIWT) to better understand the flow-off characteristics and resulting aerodynamic effects. The percent lift loss on the thin, high-performance wing model tested in the PIWT was determined at 8 deg. angle of attack and used as one of the evaluation criteria in determining the allowance times. Because it was unclear as to how performance degradations measured on this model were relevant to an actual airplane configuration, some means of interpreting the wing model lift loss was deemed necessary. This paper describes how the lift loss was related to the loss in maximum lift of a Boeing 737-200ADV airplane through the Aerodynamic Acceptance Test (AAT) performed for fluids qualification. A loss in maximum lift coefficient of 5.24% on the B737-200ADV airplane (which was adopted as the threshold in the AAT) corresponds to a lift loss of 7.3% on the PIWT model at 8 deg. angle of attack. There is significant scatter in the data used to develop the correlation related to varying effects of the anti-icing fluids that were tested and other factors. A statistical analysis indicated the upper limit of lift loss on the PIWT model was 9.2%. Therefore, for cases resulting in PIWT model lift loss from 7.3% to 9.2%, extra scrutiny of the visual observations is required in evaluating fluid performance with contamination.

  1. Scaling of Lift Degradation Due to Anti-Icing Fluids Based Upon the Aerodynamic Acceptance Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Riley, James T.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the FAA has worked with Transport Canada, National Research Council Canada (NRC) and APS Aviation, Inc. to develop allowance times for aircraft operations in ice-pellet precipitation. These allowance times are critical to ensure safety and efficient operation of commercial and cargo flights. Wind-tunnel testing with uncontaminated anti-icing fluids and fluids contaminated with simulated ice pellets had been carried out at the NRC Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel (PIWT) to better understand the flowoff characteristics and resulting aerodynamic effects. The percent lift loss on the thin, high-performance wing model tested in the PIWT was determined at 8 angle of attack and used as one of the evaluation criteria in determining the allowance times. Because it was unclear as to how performance degradations measured on this model were relevant to an actual airplane configuration, some means of interpreting the wing model lift loss was deemed necessary. This paper describes how the lift loss was related to the loss in maximum lift of a Boeing 737-200ADV airplane through the Aerodynamic Acceptance Test (AAT) performed for fluids qualification. A loss in maximum lift coefficient of 5.24 percent on the B737-200ADV airplane (which was adopted as the threshold in the AAT) corresponds to a lift loss of 7.3 percent on the PIWT model at 8 angle of attack. There is significant scatter in the data used to develop the correlation related to varying effects of the anti-icing fluids that were tested and other factors. A statistical analysis indicated the upper limit of lift loss on the PIWT model was 9.2 percent. Therefore, for cases resulting in PIWT model lift loss from 7.3 to 9.2 percent, extra scrutiny of the visual observations is required in evaluating fluid performance with contamination.

  2. Static Aerodynamic Performance Investigation of a Fluid Shield Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balan, C.; Askew, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    In pursuit of an acoustically acceptable, high performance exhaust system capable of meeting Federal Aviation Regulation 36 Stage 3 noise goals for the High Speed Civil Transport application, General Electric Aircraft Engines conducted a design study to incorporate a fluid shield into a 36-chute suppressor exhaust-nozzle system. After a full scale preliminary mechanical design of the resulting fluid shield exhaust system, scale model aerodynamic performance tests and acoustic tests were conducted to establish both aerodynamic performance and acoustic characteristics. Data are presented as thrust coefficients, discharge coefficients, chute-base pressure drags, and plug static pressure distributions.

  3. Aerodynamic Performance of Two Variable-Pitch Fan Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Kovich, G.

    1976-01-01

    The NASA-Lewis Research Center is investigating a variety of fan stages applicable for short haul aircraft. These low-pressure-ratio low-speed fan stages may require variable-pitch rotor blades to provide optimum performance for the varied flight demands and for thrust reversal on landing. A number of the aerodynamic and structural compromises relating to the variable-pitch rotor blades are discussed. The aerodynamic performance of two variable-pitch fan stages operated at several rotor blade setting angles for both forward and reverse flow application are presented. Detailed radial surveys are presented for both forward and reverse flow.

  4. Aerodynamic performance of vertical and horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maydew, R. C.; Klimas, P. C.

    1981-06-01

    The aerodynamic performance of vertical and horizontal axis wind turbines is investigated, and comparison of data of the 17-m Darrieus VAWT with the 60.7-m Mod-1 HAWT and 37.8-m Mod-0A HAWT is discussed. It is concluded that the maximum average measured power coefficients of the VAWT are about 0%-15% higher than those of the HAWTs. It is suggested that vertical wind shear may have lowered the Mod-1 HAWT aerodynamic performance, but, the magnitude of this effect could not be evaluated. It is included that generalizations which refer to the Darrieus VAWT as aerodynamically less efficient than the HAWT should be used carefully.

  5. Performance Degradation of LSCF Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Alinger, Matthew

    2013-09-30

    This final report summarizes the progress made during the October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2013 period under Cooperative Agreement DE-NT0004109 for the U. S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE/NETL) entitled “Performance Degradation of LSCF Cathodes”. The primary objective of this program is to develop a performance degradation mitigation path for high performing, cost-effective solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Strategies to mitigate performance degradation are developed and implemented. In addition, thermal spray manufacturing of SOFCs is explored. Combined, this work establishes a basis for cost-effective SOFC cells.

  6. Aerodynamic performance of flared fan nozzles used as inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. A.; Keith, T. G.; Kelm, G. G.

    1976-01-01

    Tests were conducted in a low speed wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic performance of several flared fan nozzles. Each of the flared nozzles was a downstream-facing inlet to a model fan that was used to simulate a variable pitch fan during reverse thrust operation. The total pressure recovery of each of the flared nozzles as well as that of an unflared nozzle and a serrated flare nozzle was obtained for comparison. The aerodynamic performance of a selected flared nozzle was considered in further detail. The nozzle surface pressures for a flared nozzle were also determined. Results indicated that the differences in aerodynamic performance among the nozzles were most apparent at the wind-tunnel-off condition. A nonzero free stream velocity significantly reduced the perforamnce of all the nozzles, and crosswind flow (free stream flow perpendicular to the model axis) further reduced the performance of the nozzles. The unflared nozzle and the serrated flare nozzle had reduced aerodynamic performance compared to a solid surface flared nozzle.

  7. Performance and Design Investigation of Heavy Lift Tiltrotor with Aerodynamic Interference Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeo, Yyeonsoo; Johnson, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    The aerodynamic interference effects on tiltrotor performance in cruise are investigated using comprehensive calculations, to better understand the physics and to quantify the effects on the aircraft design. Performance calculations were conducted for 146,600-lb conventional and quad tiltrotors, which are to cruise at 300 knots at 4000 ft/95 deg F condition. A parametric study was conducted to understand the effects of design parameters on the performance of the aircraft. Aerodynamic interference improves the aircraft lift-to-drag ratio of the baseline conventional tiltrotor. However, interference degrades the aircraft performance of the baseline quad tiltrotor, due mostly to the unfavorable effects from the front wing to the rear wing. A reduction of rotor tip speed increased the aircraft lift-to-drag ratio the most among the design parameters investigated.

  8. Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors for Improved Wind Turbine Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mehul P. Patel; Srikanth Vasudevan; Robert C. Nelson; Thomas C. Corke

    2008-08-01

    Orbital Research Inc is developing an innovative Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors (PACE) technology for improved performance of wind turbines. The PACE system is aimed towards the design of "smart" rotor blades to enhance energy capture and reduce aerodynamic loading and noise using flow-control. The PACE system will provide ability to change aerodynamic loads and pitch distribution across the wind turbine blade without any moving surfaces. Additional benefits of the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that should translate into a substantially reduced initial cost. During the Phase I program, the ORI-UND Team demonstrated (proof-of-concept) performance improvements on select rotor blade designs using PACE concepts. Control of both 2-D and 3-D flows were demonstrated. An analytical study was conducted to estimate control requirements for the PACE system to maintain control during wind gusts. Finally, independent laboratory experiments were conducted to identify promising dielectric materials for the plasma actuator, and to examine environmental effects (water and dust) on the plasma actuator operation. The proposed PACE system will be capable of capturing additional energy, and reducing aerodynamic loading and noise on wind turbines. Supplementary benefits from the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that translates into reduced initial capital costs.

  9. Aerodynamic performance of a Wells air turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, S.; Tan, C. P.

    1983-06-01

    Experiments were performed in a unidirectional flow rig to assess the performance of the Wells self-rectifying air turbine. Results indicated that the efficiency of the turbine was very sensitive to the Reynolds number based on blade chord. Increase in Reynolds number by a factor of three resulted in an increase in peak efficiency from 37 to 60 percent. Increases in the solidity of the blade produced increases in pressure drop and power output but decreases in efficiency. The hub-to-tip ratio had only a weak influence on the turbine performance but is critical for starting conditions. It is concluded that a hub-to-tip ratio of 0.6 and a solidity of 0.6 are the most favorable values, taking into consideration both the starting and running performances.

  10. Advanced Noise Control Fan Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Noise Control Fan at the NASA Glenn Research Center is used to experimentally analyze fan generated acoustics. In order to determine how a proposed noise reduction concept affects fan performance, flow measurements can be used to compute mass flow. Since tedious flow mapping is required to obtain an accurate mass flow, an equation was developed to correlate the mass flow to inlet lip wall static pressure measurements. Once this correlation is obtained, the mass flow for future configurations can be obtained from the nonintrusive wall static pressures. Once the mass flow is known, the thrust and fan performance can be evaluated. This correlation enables fan acoustics and performance to be obtained simultaneously without disturbing the flow.

  11. Aerodynamic and acoustic performance of high Mach number inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumsdaine, E.; Clark, L. R.; Cherng, J. C.; Tag, I.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental results were obtained for two types of high Mach number inlets, one with a translating centerbody and one with a fixed geometry (collapsing cowl) without centerbody. The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of these inlets was examined. The effects of several parameters such as area ratio and length-diameter ratio were investigated. The translating centerbody inlet was found to be superior to the collapsing cowl inlet both acoustically and aerodynamically, particularly for area ratios greater than 1.5. Comparison of length-diameter ratio and area ratio effects on performance near choked flow showed the latter parameter to be more significant. Also, greater high frequency noise attenuation was achieved by increasing Mach number from low to high subsonic values.

  12. Aerodynamic performance of an annular classical airfoil cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergsten, D. E.; Stauter, R. C.; Fleeter, S.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented for a series of experiments that were performed in a large-scale subsonic annular cascade facility that was specifically designed to provide three-dimensional aerodynamic data for the verification of numerical-calculation codes. In particular, the detailed three-dimensional aerodynamic performance of a classical flat-plate airfoil cascade is determined for angles of incidence of 0, 5, and 10 deg. The resulting data are analyzed and are correlated with predictions obtained from NASA's MERIDL and TSONIC numerical programs. It is found that: (1) at 0 and 5 deg, the airfoil surface data show a good correlation with the predictions; (2) at 10 deg, the data are in fair agreement with the numerical predictions; and (3) the two-dimensional Gaussian similarity relationship is appropriate for the wake velocity profiles in the mid-span region of the airfoil.

  13. Performance characteristics of aerodynamically optimum turbines for wind energy generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrbach, C.; Worobel, R.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents a brief discussion of the aerodynamic methodology for wind energy generator turbines, an approach to the design of aerodynamically optimum wind turbines covering a broad range of design parameters, some insight on the effect on performance of nonoptimum blade shapes which may represent lower fabrication costs, the annual wind turbine energy for a family of optimum wind turbines, and areas of needed research. On the basis of the investigation, it is concluded that optimum wind turbines show high performance over a wide range of design velocity ratios; that structural requirements impose constraints on blade geometry; that variable pitch wind turbines provide excellent power regulation and that annual energy output is insensitive to design rpm and solidity of optimum wind turbines.

  14. Wing Flexion and Aerodynamics Performance of Insect Free Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Haibo; Liang, Zongxian; Ren, Yan

    2010-11-01

    Wing flexion in flapping flight is a hallmark of insect flight. It is widely thought that wing flexibility and wing deformation would potentially provide new aerodynamic mechanisms of aerodynamic force productions over completely rigid wings. However, there are lack of literatures on studying fluid dynamics of freely flying insects due to the presence of complex shaped moving boundaries in the flow domain. In this work, a computational study of freely flying insects is being conducted. High resolution, high speed videos of freely flying dragonflies and damselflies is obtained and used as a basis for developing high fidelity geometrical models of the dragonfly body and wings. 3D surface reconstruction technologies are used to obtain wing topologies and kinematics. The wing motions are highly complex and a number of different strategies including singular vector decomposition of the wing kinematics are used to examine the various kinematical features and their impact on the wing performance. Simulations are carried out to examine the aerodynamic performance of all four wings and understand the wake structures of such wings.

  15. Aerodynamic Performance of Wind Turbine with Horizontal Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P. Q.; Zhu, J. Y.; Zhao, W. L.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, the blade arodynamic outline of a 100 kW horizontal axis wind turbine is designed based on the strip theory using low Reynolds number and high lift airfoils. A 1/34 scale model is used to investigate the aerodynamic performance of the prototype by means of wind tunnel test. Based on some similitude criterion and reasonable correction of arodynamic coefficient, the data of prototype can be deduced from the experimente data. Comparared with the theory analysis, the power output can reach the design performance.

  16. Effect of Moving Surface on NACA 63218 Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahiaoui, Tayeb; Belhenniche, Mohamed; Imine, Bachir

    2015-05-01

    The main subject of this work is the numerical study control of flow separation on a NACA 63218 airfoil by using moving surface. Different numerical cases are considered: the first one is the numerical simulation of non-modified airfoil NACA 63218 according at different angle of attack and the second one a set of moving cylinder is placed on leading edge of the airfoil. The rotational velocity of the cylinder is varied to establish the effect of momentum injection on modified airfoil aerodynamic performances. The turbulence is modeled by two equations k-epsilon model.

  17. Influence of inflow angle on flexible flap aerodynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Zhao, H.; Ye, Z.; Li, Z. M.; Li, C.

    2013-12-01

    Large scale wind turbines have larger blade lengths and weights, which creates new challenges for blade design. This paper selects NREL S809 airfoil, and uses the parameterized technology to realize the flexible trailing edge deformation, researches the dynamic aerodynamic characteristics in the process of continuous flexible deformation, analyses the influence of inflow angle on flexible flap aerodynamic performance, in order to further realize the flexible wind turbine blade design and provides some references for the active control scheme. The results show that compared with the original airfoil, proper trailing edge deformation can improve the lift coefficient, reduce the drag coefficient, and thereby more efficiently realize flow field active control. With inflow angle increases, dynamic lift-drag coefficient hysteresis loop shape deviation occurs, even turns into different shapes. Appropriate swing angle can improve the flap lift coefficient, but may cause early separation of flow. To improve the overall performance of wind turbine blades, different angular control should be used at different cross sections, in order to achieve the best performance.

  18. Forward flight of birds revisited. Part 1: aerodynamics and performance.

    PubMed

    Iosilevskii, G

    2014-10-01

    This paper is the first part of the two-part exposition, addressing performance and dynamic stability of birds. The aerodynamic model underlying the entire study is presented in this part. It exploits the simplicity of the lifting line approximation to furnish the forces and moments acting on a single wing in closed analytical forms. The accuracy of the model is corroborated by comparison with numerical simulations based on the vortex lattice method. Performance is studied both in tethered (as on a sting in a wind tunnel) and in free flights. Wing twist is identified as the main parameter affecting the flight performance-at high speeds, it improves efficiency, the rate of climb and the maximal level speed; at low speeds, it allows flying slower. It is demonstrated that, under most circumstances, the difference in performance between tethered and free flights is small. PMID:26064548

  19. Mean streamline aerodynamic performance analysis of centrifugal compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Aungier, R.H.

    1995-07-01

    Aerodynamic performance prediction models for centrifugal compressor impellers are presented. In combination with similar procedures for stationary components, previously published in the open literature, a comprehensive mean streamline performance analysis for centrifugal compressor stages is provided. The accuracy and versatility of the overall analysis is demonstrated for several centrifugal compressor stages of various types, including comparison with intrastage component performance data. Detailed validation of the analysis against experimental data has been accomplished for over a hundred stages, including stage flow coefficients from 0.009 to 0.15 and pressure ratios up to about 3.5. Its application to turbocharger stages includes pressure ratios up to 4.2, but with test uncertainty much greater than for the data used in the detailed validation studies.

  20. Forward flight of birds revisited. Part 1: aerodynamics and performance

    PubMed Central

    Iosilevskii, G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the first part of the two-part exposition, addressing performance and dynamic stability of birds. The aerodynamic model underlying the entire study is presented in this part. It exploits the simplicity of the lifting line approximation to furnish the forces and moments acting on a single wing in closed analytical forms. The accuracy of the model is corroborated by comparison with numerical simulations based on the vortex lattice method. Performance is studied both in tethered (as on a sting in a wind tunnel) and in free flights. Wing twist is identified as the main parameter affecting the flight performance—at high speeds, it improves efficiency, the rate of climb and the maximal level speed; at low speeds, it allows flying slower. It is demonstrated that, under most circumstances, the difference in performance between tethered and free flights is small. PMID:26064548

  1. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 2; High Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag, prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executives summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  2. Performance of SMA-reinforced composites in an aerodynamic profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, John; Boller, Christian

    2002-07-01

    Within the European collaborative applied fundamental research project ADAPT, fundamentals of SMA-reinforced composites were evaluated and the specific manufacturing techniques for these composites developed and realised. The involved partners are listed at the end. To demonstrate applicability of these composites a realistically scaled aerodynamic profile of around 0.5m span by 0.5m root chord was designed, manufactured and assembled. The curved skins were manufactured as SMA composites with two layers of SMA-wires integrated into the layup of aramid fibre prepregs. All SMA wires were connected such that they can be operated as individual sets of wires and at low voltages, similar to the conditions for electrical energy generation in a real aircraft. The profile was then mounted on a vibration test rig and activated and excited by a shaker at its tip which allowed to test the dynamic performance of the profile under different external loading conditions with various internal actuation conditions through the SMA wires. The paper includes some background of the design and manufacturing of the aerodynamic profile and will discuss some of the results determined recently on the test rig. A view with regard to future wind tunnel testing will be given as well.

  3. Aerodynamic and directional acoustic performance of a scoop inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, J. M.; Dietrich, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Aerodynamic and directional acoustic performances of a scoop inlet were studied. The scoop inlet is designed with a portion of the lower cowling extended forward to direct upward any noise that is propagating out the front of the engine toward the ground. The tests were conducted in an anechoic wind tunnel facility at free stream velocities of 0, 18, 41, and 61 m/sec and angles of attack from -10 deg to 120 deg. Inlet throat Mach number was varied from 0.30 to 0.75. Aerodynamically, at a free stream velocity of 41 m/sec, the design throat Mach number (0.63), and an angle of attack of 50 deg, the scoop inlet total pressure recovery was 0.989 and the total pressure distortion was 0.15. The angles of attack where flow separation occurred with the scoop inlet were higher than those for a conventional symmetric inlet. Acoustically, the scoop inlet provided a maximum noise reduction of 12 to 15 db below the inlet over the entire range of throat Mach number and angle of attack at a free-stream velocity of 41 m/sec.

  4. Aerodynamic loads and rotor performance for the Darrieus wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Paraschivoiu, I.

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic blade loads and rotor performance are studied for the Darrieus windmill by using a double-multiple streamtube model. The Darrieus is represented as a pair of actuator disks in tandem at each level of the rotor, with upstream and downstream half-cycles. An equilibrium velocity exists in the center plane, and the upwind velocity is higher than the downwind velocity lift and drag coefficients are calculated from the Reynolds number and the local angle of attack. Half-rotor torque and power are found by averaging the contributions from each streamtube at each position of the rotor in the upwind cycle. An example is provided for a 17 m Darrieus employing NACA blades. While the method is found to be suitable for predicting blade and rotor performance, the need to incorporate the effects of dynamic stall in the model is stressed as a means to improve accuracy.

  5. Aeroacoustics and aerodynamic performance of a rotor with flatback airfoils.

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, Joshua A.; Barone, Matthew Franklin; Christiansen, Monica; Simley, Eric

    2010-06-01

    The aerodynamic performance and aeroacoustic noise sources of a rotor employing flatback airfoils have been studied in field test campaign and companion modeling effort. The field test measurements of a sub-scale rotor employing nine meter blades include both performance measurements and acoustic measurements. The acoustic measurements are obtained using a 45 microphone beamforming array, enabling identification of both noise source amplitude and position. Semi-empirical models of flatback airfoil blunt trailing edge noise are developed and calibrated using available aeroacoustic wind tunnel test data. The model results and measurements indicate that flatback airfoil noise is less than drive train noise for the current test turbine. It is also demonstrated that the commonly used Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model for blunt trailing edge noise may be over-conservative in predicting flatback airfoil noise for wind turbine applications.

  6. Assessment of aerodynamic performance of V/STOL and STOVL fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of V/STOL and STOVL fighter/attack aircraft was assessed. Aerodynamic and propulsion/airframe integration activities are described and small-and large-scale research programs are considered. Uncertainties affecting aerodynamic performance that are associated with special configuration features resulting from the V/STOL requirement are addressed. Example uncertainties related to minimum drag, wave drag, high angle of attack characteristics, and power-induced effects. Engine design configurations from several aircraft manufacturers are reviewed.

  7. Assessment of aerodynamic performance of V/STOL and STOVL fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of V/STOL and STOVL fighter/attack aircraft was assessed. Aerodynamic and propulsion/airframe integration activities are described and small and large scale research programs are considered. Uncertainties affecting aerodynamic performance that are associated with special configuration features resulting from the V/STOL requirement are addressed. Example uncertainties relate to minimum drag, wave drag, high angle of attack characteristics, and power induced effects.

  8. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B.

    1995-10-01

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. This requires experiments in appropriate research facilities in which complete flow field data, not only point measurements, are obtained and analyzed. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows.

  9. Aerodynamic performance prediction of horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, D. R.; Keith, T. G.; Aliakbarkhanafjeh, A.

    1981-01-01

    A new method for calculating the aerodynamic performance of horizontal axis wind turbines is described. The method, entitled the helical vortex method, directly calculates the local induced velocity due to helical vortices that originate at the rotor blade. Furthermore, the method does not require a specified circulation distribution. Results of the method are compared to similar results obtained from Wilson PROP code methods as well as to existing experimental data taken from a Mod-O wind turbine. It is shown that results of the proposed method agree well with experimental values of the power output both near cut-in and at rated wind speeds. Further, it is found that the method does not experience some of the numerical difficulties encountered by the PROP code when run at low wind velocities.

  10. Aerodynamic performance of osculating-cones waveriders at high altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Rick Evan

    The steady-state aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional waverider configurations immersed in hypersonic rarefied flows are investigated. Representative geometries are generated using an inverse design procedure, the method of osculating cones, which defines an exit plane shock shape and approximates the flow properties of the compression surface by assuming that each spanwise station along the shock profile lies within a region of locally conical flow. Vehicle surface and flow field properties are predicted using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method, a probabilistic numerical scheme in which simulated molecules are followed through representative collisions with each other and solid surfaces, and subsequent deterministic displacement. The aerodynamic properties of high- and low-Reynolds number waverider geometries, optimized for maximum lift-to-drag ratio and subject to mission-oriented constraints, are contrasted with results from reference caret and delta wings with similar internal volumes to quantify the relevance and advantage of the waverider concept at high altitudes. The high-Reynolds number waverider, optimized for the continuum regime at Minfinity = 4 and Reinfinity = 250 million, was the focus of recent wind tunnel testing for near on-design and off-design conditions, including low subsonic speeds. The present work extends the previous analyses into the high-altitude regime. The low-Reynolds number waverider, optimized at Minfinity = 20 and Reinfinity = 2.5 million, is studied to determine if optimization potential exists for a high-Mach number waverider at high altitudes. A characteristic length of 5 m is assumed for both waverider configurations, representative of a hypersonic missile concept. The geometries are aerodynamically evaluated over a parametric space consisting of an altitude variation of 95 km to 150 km and an angle of attack range of --5° to 10°. The effect of off-design Mach number on the performance of the high

  11. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Rotor Alone Aerodynamic Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Jeracki, Robert J.; Woodward, Richard P.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of an isolated fan or rotor alone model was measured in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9- by 15- Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel as part of the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test conducted at NASA Glenn. The Source Diagnostic Test was conducted to identify the noise sources within a wind tunnel scale model of a turbofan engine and quantify their contribution to the overall system noise level. The fan was part of a 1/5th scale model representation of the bypass stage of a current technology turbofan engine. For the rotor alone testing, the fan and nacelle, including the inlet, external cowl, and fixed area fan exit nozzle, were modeled in the test hardware; the internal outlet guide vanes located behind the fan were removed. Without the outlet guide vanes, the velocity at the nozzle exit changes significantly, thereby affecting the fan performance. As part of the investigation, variations in the fan nozzle area were tested in order to match as closely as possible the rotor alone performance with the fan performance obtained with the outlet guide vanes installed. The fan operating performance was determined using fixed pressure/temperature combination rakes and the corrected weight flow. The performance results indicate that a suitable nozzle exit was achieved to be able to closely match the rotor alone and fan/outlet guide vane configuration performance on the sea level operating line. A small shift in the slope of the sea level operating line was measured, which resulted in a slightly higher rotor alone fan pressure ratio at take-off conditions, matched fan performance at cutback conditions, and a slightly lower rotor alone fan pressure ratio at approach conditions. However, the small differences in fan performance at all fan conditions were considered too small to affect the fan acoustic performance.

  12. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 2; High Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among die scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 2/Part 2 publication covers the tools and methods development session.

  13. 1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 2; High Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

  14. Aerodynamic Performance Measurements for a Forward Swept Low Noise Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian

    2006-01-01

    One source of noise in high tip speed turbofan engines, caused by shocks, is called multiple pure tone noise (MPT's). A new fan, called the Quiet High Speed Fan (QHSF), showed reduced noise over the part speed operating range, which includes MPT's. The QHSF showed improved performance in most respects relative to a baseline fan; however, a partspeed instability discovered during testing reduced the operating range below acceptable limits. The measured QHSF adiabatic efficiency on the fixed nozzle acoustic operating line was 85.1 percent and the baseline fan 82.9 percent, a 2.2 percent improvement. The operating line pressure rise at design point rotational speed and mass flow was 1.764 and 1.755 for the QHSF and baseline fan, respectively. Weight flow at design point speed was 98.28 lbm/sec for the QHSF and 97.97 lbm/sec for the baseline fan. The operability margin for the QHSF approached 0 percent at the 75 percent speed operating condition. The baseline fan maintained sufficient margin throughout the operating range as expected. Based on the stage aerodynamic measurements, this concept shows promise for improved performance over current technology if the operability limitations can be solved.

  15. Effects of wing deformation on aerodynamic performance of a revolving insect wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Ryusuke; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Flexible wings of insects and bio-inspired micro air vehicles generally deform remarkably during flapping flight owing to aerodynamic and inertial forces, which is of highly nonlinear fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems. To elucidate the novel mechanisms associated with flexible wing aerodynamics in the low Reynolds number regime, we have built up a FSI model of a hawkmoth wing undergoing revolving and made an investigation on the effects of flexible wing deformation on aerodynamic performance of the revolving wing model. To take into account the characteristics of flapping wing kinematics we designed a kinematic model for the revolving wing in two-fold: acceleration and steady rotation, which are based on hovering wing kinematics of hawkmoth, Manduca sexta. Our results show that both aerodynamic and inertial forces demonstrate a pronounced increase during acceleration phase, which results in a significant wing deformation. While the aerodynamic force turns to reduce after the wing acceleration terminates due to the burst and detachment of leading-edge vortices (LEVs), the dynamic wing deformation seem to delay the burst of LEVs and hence to augment the aerodynamic force during and even after the acceleration. During the phase of steady rotation, the flexible wing model generates more vertical force at higher angles of attack (40°-60°) but less horizontal force than those of a rigid wing model. This is because the wing twist in spanwise owing to aerodynamic forces results in a reduction in the effective angle of attack at wing tip, which leads to enhancing the aerodynamics performance by increasing the vertical force while reducing the horizontal force. Moreover, our results point out the importance of the fluid-structure interaction in evaluating flexible wing aerodynamics: the wing deformation does play a significant role in enhancing the aerodynamic performances but works differently during acceleration and steady rotation, which is mainly induced by

  16. STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS.

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

    2001-03-22

    This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits.

  17. Computations of Aerodynamic Performance Databases Using Output-Based Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Handle complex geometry problems; Control discretization errors via solution-adaptive mesh refinement; Focus on aerodynamic databases of parametric and optimization studies: 1. Accuracy: satisfy prescribed error bounds 2. Robustness and speed: may require over 105 mesh generations 3. Automation: avoid user supervision Obtain "expert meshes" independent of user skill; and Run every case adaptively in production settings.

  18. Effects of Shrouded Stator Cavity Flows on Multistage Axial Compressor Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellborn, Steven R.; Okiishi, Theodore H.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were performed on a low-speed multistage axial-flow compressor to assess the effects of shrouded stator cavity flows on aerodynamic performance. Five configurations, which involved changes in seal-tooth leakage rates and/or elimination of the shrouded stator cavities, were tested. Data collected enabled differences in overall individual stage and the third stage blade element performance parameters to be compared. The results show conclusively that seal-tooth leakage ran have a large impact on compressor aerodynamic performance while the presence of the shrouded stator cavities alone seemed to have little influence. Overall performance data revealed that for every 1% increase in the seal-tooth clearance to blade-height ratio the pressure rise dropped up to 3% while efficiency was reduced by 1 to 1.5 points. These observed efficiency penalty slopes are comparable to those commonly reported for rotor and cantilevered stator tip clearance variations. Therefore, it appears that in order to correctly predict overall performance it is equally important to account for the effects of seal-tooth leakage as it is to include the influence of tip clearance flows. Third stage blade element performance data suggested that the performance degradation observed when leakage was increased was brought about in two distinct ways. First, increasing seal-tooth leakage directly spoiled the near hub performance of the stator row in which leakage occurred. Second, the altered stator exit now conditions caused by increased leakage impaired the performance of the next downstream stage by decreasing the work input of the downstream rotor and increasing total pressure loss of the downstream stator. These trends caused downstream stages to progressively perform worse. Other measurements were acquired to determine spatial and temporal flow field variations within the up-and-downstream shrouded stator cavities. Flow within the cavities involved low momentum fluid traveling primarily

  19. Experimental quiet engine program aerodynamic performance of Fan C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, R. G.; Parker, D. E.; Dunbar, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    This report presents the aerodynamic component test results of Fan C, a high-bypass-ratio, low-aerodynamic-loading, 1550 feet per second (472.4 m/sec), single-stage fan, which was designed and tested as part of the NASA Experimental Quiet Engine Program. The fan was designed to deliver a bypass pressure ratio of 1.60 with an adiabatic efficiency of 84.2 percent at a total fan flow of 915 lb/sec (415.0 kg/sec). It was tested with and without inlet distortion. A bypass total-pressure ratio of 1.61 and an adiabatic efficiency of 83.9 percent at a total fan flow of 921 lb/sec (417.8 kg/sec) were actually achieved. An operating margin in excess of 14.6 percent was demonstrated at design speed.

  20. Aerodynamic Performance and Turbulence Measurements in a Turbine Vane Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Lucci, Barbara L.; Senyitko, Richard G.

    2002-01-01

    Turbine vane aerodynamics were measured in a three vane linear cascade. Surface pressures and blade row losses were obtained over a range of Reynolds and Mach number for three levels of turbulence. Comparisons are made with predictions using a quasi-3D Navier-Stokes analysis. Turbulence intensity measurement were made upstream and downstream of the vane. The purpose of the downstream measurements was to determine how the turbulence was affected by the strong contraction through 75 deg turning.

  1. Comprehensive analysis of imaging quality degradation of an airborne optical system for aerodynamic flow field around the optical window.

    PubMed

    Hao, Chenglong; Chen, Shouqian; Zhang, Wang; Ren, Jinhan; Li, Chong; Pang, Hongjun; Wang, Honghao; Liu, Qian; Wang, Chao; Zou, Huiying; Fan, Zhigang

    2013-11-20

    We investigated the influences exerted by the nonuniform aerodynamic flow field surrounding the optical window on the imaging quality degradation of an airborne optical system. The density distribution of flow fields around three typical optical windows, including a spherical window, an ellipsoidal window, and a paraboloidal window, were calculated by adopting the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the Spalart-Allmaras model provided by FLUENT. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm based ray-tracing program was used to simulate the optical transmission through the aerodynamic flow field. Four kinds of imaging quality evaluation parameters were presented: wave aberration of the entrance pupil, point spread function, encircled energy, and modulation transfer function. The results show that the imaging quality of the airborne optical system was affected by the shape of the optical window and angle of attack of the aircraft. PMID:24513738

  2. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 2; High Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of: Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization) and High-Lift. The review objectives were to: (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. The HSR AP Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas within the airframe element of the HSR Program. This Volume 2/Part 1 publication presents the High-Lift Configuration Development session.

  3. Research status on aerodynamic interference effects of wind-resistant performance of pylon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, Shengli; Lu, Yu; Wang, Dongwei; Chen, Huai

    2011-04-01

    The aerodynamic interference effects of wind-resistant performance for pylon is one of very important problems in numerical simulation studies of wind resistant of bridges. On the basis of looking through a great deal of related literatures at home and abroad, research history, contents, method and achievements of the aerodynamic interference effects are summarized, and the existing problem for galloping, buffeting and vortex-induced vibration of pylon and directions for the next research are pointed out.

  4. Ice Accretions and Full-Scale Iced Aerodynamic Performance Data for a Two-Dimensional NACA 23012 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Broeren, Andy P.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Lee, Sam; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, Emmanuel; Moens, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    in the IRT. From these molds, castings were made that closely replicated the features of the accreted ice. The castings were then mounted on the full-scale model in the F1 tunnel, and aerodynamic performance measurements were made using model surface pressure taps, the facility force balance system, and a large wake rake designed specifically for these tests. Tests were run over a range of Reynolds and Mach numbers. For each run, the model was rotated over a range of angles-of-attack that included airfoil stall. The benchmark data collected during these campaigns were, and continue to be, used for various purposes. The full-scale data form a unique, ice-accretion and associated aerodynamic performance dataset that can be used as a reference when addressing concerns regarding the use of subscale ice-accretion data to assess full-scale icing effects. Further, the data may be used in the development or enhancement of both ice-accretion prediction codes and computational fluid dynamic codes when applied to study the effects of icing. Finally, as was done in the wider study, the data may be used to help determine the level of geometric fidelity needed for artificial ice used to assess aerodynamic degradation due to aircraft icing. The structured, multifaceted approach used in this research effort provides a unique perspective on the aerodynamic effects of aircraft icing. The data presented in this report are available in electronic form upon formal approval by proper NASA and ONERA authorities.

  5. Electrical Contact Performance Degradation in Electromechanical Components

    SciTech Connect

    Peebles, D.E.; Dugger, M.T.; Neff, S.G.; Sorroche, E.H.; Robinson, J.A.; Fanska, J.; Ford, M.

    1999-03-23

    Detailed materials evaluations have been performed for MC2969 Intent Stronglink switch monitor circuit parts returned from the field out of retired weapon systems. Evaluations of local contact resistance, surface chemical composition and surface roughness and wear have been determined as a function of component level contact loop resistance testing position. Several degradation mechanisms have been identified and correlated with the component level measurements. Operational degradation produces surface smoothing and wear with each actuation of the monitor circuit, while aging degradation is observed in the segregation of contaminant species and alloy constituent elements to the surface in the stressed wear regions.

  6. Aerodynamic Characterization of a Thin, High-Performance Airfoil for Use in Ground Fluids Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Lee, Sam; Clark, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The FAA has worked with Transport Canada and others to develop allowance times for aircraft operating in ice-pellet precipitation. Wind-tunnel testing has been carried out to better understand the flowoff characteristics and resulting aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids contaminated with ice pellets using a thin, high-performance wing section at the National Research Council of Canada Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel. The objective of this paper is to characterize the aerodynamic behavior of this wing section in order to better understand the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination. Aerodynamic performance data, boundary-layer surveys and flow visualization were conducted at a Reynolds number of approximately 6.0 x 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.12. The clean, baseline model exhibited leading-edge stall characteristics including a leading-edge laminar separation bubble and minimal or no separation on the trailing edge of the main element or flap. These results were consistent with expected 2-D aerodynamics and showed no anomalies that could adversely affect the evaluation of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on the wing. Tests conducted with roughness and leading-edge flow disturbances helped to explain the aerodynamic impact of the anti-icing fluids and contamination. The stalling characteristics of the wing section with fluid and contamination appear to be driven at least partially by the effects of a secondary wave of fluid that forms near the leading edge as the wing is rotated in the simulated takeoff profile. These results have provided a much more complete understanding of the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on this wing section. This is important since these results are used, in part, to develop the ice-pellet allowance times that are applicable to many different airplanes.

  7. Aerodynamic Characterization of a Thin, High-Performance Airfoil for Use in Ground Fluids Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Lee, Sam; Clark, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The FAA has worked with Transport Canada and others to develop allowance times for aircraft operating in ice-pellet precipitation. Wind-tunnel testing has been carried out to better understand the flowoff characteristics and resulting aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids contaminated with ice pellets using a thin, high-performance wing section at the National Research Council of Canada Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel. The objective of this paper is to characterize the aerodynamic behavior of this wing section in order to better understand the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination. Aerodynamic performance data, boundary-layer surveys and flow visualization were conducted at a Reynolds number of approximately 6.0×10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.12. The clean, baseline model exhibited leading-edge stall characteristics including a leading-edge laminar separation bubble and minimal or no separation on the trailing edge of the main element or flap. These results were consistent with expected 2-D aerodynamics and showed no anomalies that could adversely affect the evaluation of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on the wing. Tests conducted with roughness and leading-edge flow disturbances helped to explain the aerodynamic impact of the anti-icing fluids and contamination. The stalling characteristics of the wing section with fluid and contamination appear to be driven at least partially by the effects of a secondary wave of fluid that forms near the leading edge as the wing is rotated in the simulated takeoff profile. These results have provided a much more complete understanding of the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on this wing section. This is important since these results are used, in part, to develop the ice-pellet allowance times that are applicable to many different airplanes.

  8. An analysis for high speed propeller-nacelle aerodynamic performance prediction. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. Alan; Anderson, Olof L.; Edwards, David E.; Landgrebe, Anton J.

    1988-01-01

    A user's manual for the computer program developed for the prediction of propeller-nacelle aerodynamic performance reported in, An Analysis for High Speed Propeller-Nacelle Aerodynamic Performance Prediction: Volume 1 -- Theory and Application, is presented. The manual describes the computer program mode of operation requirements, input structure, input data requirements and the program output. In addition, it provides the user with documentation of the internal program structure and the software used in the computer program as it relates to the theory presented in Volume 1. Sample input data setups are provided along with selected printout of the program output for one of the sample setups.

  9. Aerodynamic Characteristics and Glide-Back Performance of Langley Glide-Back Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Covell, Peter F.; Tartabini, Paul V.; Murphy, Kelly J.

    2004-01-01

    NASA-Langley Research Center is conducting system level studies on an-house concept of a small launch vehicle to address NASA's needs for rapid deployment of small payloads to Low Earth Orbit. The vehicle concept is a three-stage system with a reusable first stage and expendable upper stages. The reusable first stage booster, which glides back to launch site after staging around Mach 3 is named the Langley Glide-Back Booster (LGBB). This paper discusses the aerodynamic characteristics of the LGBB from subsonic to supersonic speeds, development of the aerodynamic database and application of this database to evaluate the glide back performance of the LGBB. The aerodynamic database was assembled using a combination of wind tunnel test data and engineering level analysis. The glide back performance of the LGBB was evaluated using a trajectory optimization code and subject to constraints on angle of attack, dynamic pressure and normal acceleration.

  10. Geometry effects on aerodynamics performance of a low aspect ratio turbine nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Naixing; Zhang, Hongwu; Xu, Yanji; Huang, Weiguang

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes the influence of some geometric parameters on aerodynamics performance of a low-aspect-ratio turbine blading designed by a novel method developed at the Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This is a part of the study on aerodynamics optimization of turbomachinery. It follows the development of the basic ideas in the turbomachinery aerodynamics research project at the institute. The present paper concentrates mainly on the effects of geometry, such as stagger angle, leading and trailing edge thickness, maximum thickness and its location on adiabatic efficiency, total pressure ratio and mass flow rate. The study was performed and assessed for a low-aspect ratio turbine nozzle using 3D steady Reynolds-averaged N.S. solver. Using the knowledge of the flow physics analysis an optimized turbine nozzle was obtained.

  11. Aerodynamic Performance Predictions of Single and Twin Jet Afterbodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.; Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Jones, William T.

    1995-01-01

    The multiblock three-dimensional Navier-Stokes method PAB3D was utilized by the Component Integration Branch (formerly Propulsion Aerodynamics Branch) at the NASA-Langley Research Center in an international study sponsored by AGARD Working Group #17 for the assessment of the state-of-the-art of propulsion-airframe integration testing techniques and CFD prediction technologies. Three test geometries from ONERA involving fundamental flow physics and four geometries from NASA-LaRC involving realistic flow interactions of wing, body, tail, and jet plumes were chosen by the Working Group. An overview of results on four (1 ONERA and 3 LaRC) of the seven test cases is presented. External static pressures, integrated pressure drag and total drag were calculated for the Langley test cases and jet plume velocity profiles and turbulent viscous stresses were calculated for the ONERA test case. Only selected data from these calculations are presented in this paper. The complete data sets calculated by the participants will be presented in an AGARD summary report. Predicted surface static pressures compared favorably with experimental data for the Langley geometries. Predicted afterbody drag compared well with experiment. Predicted nozzle drag was typically low due to over-compression of the flow near the trailing edge. Total drag was typically high. Predicted jet plume quantities on the ONERA case compared generally well with data.

  12. Analysis and Improvement of Aerodynamic Performance of Straight Bladed Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi-Baloutaki, Mojtaba

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) with straight blades are attractive for their relatively simple structure and aerodynamic performance. Their commercialization, however, still encounters many challenges. A series of studies were conducted in the current research to improve the VAWTs design and enhance their aerodynamic performance. First, an efficient design methodology built on an existing analytical approach is presented to formulate the design parameters influencing a straight bladed-VAWT (SB-VAWT) aerodynamic performance and determine the optimal range of these parameters for prototype construction. This work was followed by a series of studies to collectively investigate the role of external turbulence on the SB-VAWTs operation. The external free-stream turbulence is known as one of the most important factors influencing VAWTs since this type of turbines is mainly considered for urban applications where the wind turbulence is of great significance. Initially, two sets of wind tunnel testing were conducted to study the variation of aerodynamic performance of a SB-VAWT's blade under turbulent flows, in two major stationary configurations, namely two- and three-dimensional flows. Turbulent flows generated in the wind tunnel were quasi-isotropic having uniform mean flow profiles, free of any wind shear effects. Aerodynamic force measurements demonstrated that the free-stream turbulence improves the blade aerodynamic performance in stall and post-stall regions by delaying the stall and increasing the lift-to-drag ratio. After these studies, a SB-VAWT model was tested in the wind tunnel under the same type of turbulent flows. The turbine power output was substantially increased in the presence of the grid turbulence at the same wind speeds, while the increase in turbine power coefficient due to the effect of grid turbulence was small at the same tip speed ratios. The final section presents an experimental study on the aerodynamic interaction of VAWTs in arrays

  13. Aerodynamic performance due to forewing and hindwing interaction in gliding dragonfly flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2009-07-01

    Aerodynamic performance due to forewing and hindwing interaction in gliding dragonfly flight has been studied using a multiblock lattice Boltzmann method. We find that the interactions between forewing and hindwing effectively enhance the total lift force and reduce the drag force on the wings compared to two independent wings. The interaction mechanism may be associated with the triangular camber effect by modulating the relative arrangement of the forewing and hindwing. The results obtained in this Brief Report provide physical insight into the understanding of aerodynamic behaviors for gliding dragonfly flight.

  14. Effect of vane opening on aerodynamic performance of the ram-rotor test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ji-ang; Guan, Jian; Zhong, Jingjun; Yuan, Chenguang

    2016-06-01

    In order to research the influence of adjustable vane on the aerodynamic performance of the ram-rotor test system, FLUENT software has been adopted to simulate the flow passage of the ram-rotor test system numerically. The vane opening is controlled by changing the stagger angle of the vane blades. Results show that flow uniformity of vane outlet is influenced by the vane openings, which has an impact on the aerodynamic loss to some extent. Total pressure ratio, adiabatic efficiency and mass flow rate can be regulated by different openings of the vane. Compared with -8° vane opening, top efficiency of the ram-rotor increases by about 13.8% at +6° opening. And total pressure ratio drops by 5.87%. The rising opening increases the relative Mach number at inlet of the ram-rotor and weakens the intensity of the tip clearance leakage, which comes to a decreasing aerodynamic loss.

  15. Aerodynamic and Performance Measurements on a SWT-2.3-101 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, P.; Singh, M.; Johansen, J.; Jove, A.R.; Machefaux, E.; Fingersh, L. J.; Schreck, S.

    2011-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of a detailed wind turbine field experiment being conducted at NREL under U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship. The purpose of the experiment is to obtain knowledge about the aerodynamics, performance, noise emission and structural characteristics of the Siemens SWT-2.3-101 wind turbine.

  16. An Overview of National Transonic Facility Investigations for High Performance Military Aerodynamics (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    A review of National Transonic Facility (NTF) investigations for high-performance military aerodynamics has been completed. The review spans the entire operational period of the tunnel, and includes configurations ranging from full aircraft to basic research geometries. The intent for this document is to establish a comprehensive summary of these experiments with selected technical results

  17. Rotary-wing aerodynamics. Volume 2: Performance prediction of helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, C. N.; Stephniewski, W. Z. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Application of theories, as well as, special methods of procedures applicable to performance prediction are illustrated first, on an example of the conventional helicopter and then, winged and tandem configurations. Performance prediction of conventional helicopters in hover and vertical ascent are investigated. Various approaches to performance prediction in forward translation are presented. Performance problems are discussed only this time, a wing is added to the baseline configuration, and both aircraft are compared with respect to their performance. This comparison is extended to a tandem. Appendices on methods for estimating performance guarantees and growth of aircraft concludes this volume.

  18. Analytical determination of propeller performance degradation due to ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    A computer code has been developed which is capable of computing propeller performance for clean, glaze, or rime iced propeller configurations, thereby providing a mechanism for determining the degree of performance degradation which results from a given icing encounter. The inviscid, incompressible flow field at each specified propeller radial location is first computed using the Theodorsen transformation method of conformal mapping. A droplet trajectory computation then calculates droplet impingement points and airfoil collection efficiency for each radial location, at which point several user-selectable empirical correlations are available for determining the aerodynamic penalities which arise due to the ice accretion. Propeller performance is finally computed using strip analysis for either the clean or iced propeller. In the iced mode, the differential thrust and torque coefficient equations are modified by the drag and lift coefficient increments due to ice to obtain the appropriate iced values. Comparison with available experimental propeller icing data shows good agreement in several cases. The code's capability to properly predict iced thrust coefficient, power coefficient, and propeller efficiency is shown to be dependent on the choice of empirical correlation employed as well as proper specification of radial icing extent.

  19. Performance Degradation of Cryocoolers for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhyankar, Nandu; Roberts, Tom; Davis, Thom; Tomlinson, B. J.

    2004-06-01

    The Cryogenic Cooling Technology Group at the US Air Force Research Laboratory supports development of prototype cryocoolers to meet Department of Defense requirements for space surveillance and target detection. Some coolers have shown deterioration in performance during the detailed laboratory characterization and endurance evaluation. Some of them have shown anomalies due to material choice, contamination, manufacturing defects, or some yet unknown factors. The degradation is either manifested gradually, such as due to leaks, or abruptly, such as vibration-noise. The general causes and concerns for space cryocooler performance degradation are presented in the beginning followed by case studies of some of the developmental coolers, given in order to communicate lessons learned to the cryocooler community.

  20. Viking lander battery performance, degradation, and reconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Britting, A.O. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    On July 20 and September 3, 1976, Viking Landers 1 and 2 touched down on the surface of Mars. Prior to launch each lander, including its batteries was subjected to a sterilization temperature of 233 F for 54 hours. The results of battery performance, degradation and reconditioning are presented, including charge/discharge cycles, reconditioning technique, temperature history, early and current capacity. A brief description of the power system operation is also included.

  1. Aerodynamic Design Criteria for Class 8 Heavy Vehicles Trailer Base Devices to Attain Optimum Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Salari, K; Ortega, J

    2010-12-13

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of its Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), and Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) effort has investigated class 8 tractor-trailer aerodynamics for many years. This effort has identified many drag producing flow structures around the heavy vehicles and also has designed and tested many new active and passive drag reduction techniques and concepts for significant on the road fuel economy improvements. As part of this effort a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design for aerodynamic drag reduction devices has been established. The objective of this report is to provide design guidance for trailer base devices to improve their aerodynamic performance. These devices are commonly referred to as boattails, base flaps, tail devices, and etc. The information provided here is based on past research and our most recent full-scale experimental investigations in collaboration with Navistar Inc. Additional supporting data from LLNL/Navistar wind tunnel, track test, and on the road test will be published soon. The trailer base devices can be identified by 4 flat panels that are attached to the rear edges of the trailer base to form a closed cavity. These devices have been engineered in many different forms such as, inflatable and non-inflatable, 3 and 4-sided, closed and open cavity, and etc. The following is an in-depth discussion with some recommendations, based on existing data and current research activities, of changes that could be made to these devices to improve their aerodynamic performance. There are 6 primary factors that could influence the aerodynamic performance of trailer base devices: (1) Deflection angle; (2) Boattail length; (3) Sealing of edges and corners; (4) 3 versus 4-sided, Position of the 4th plate; (5) Boattail vertical extension, Skirt - boattail transition; and (6) Closed versus open cavity.

  2. The influence of vehicle aerodynamic and control response characteristics on driver-vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandridis, A. A.; Repa, B. S.; Wierwille, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of changes in understeer, control sensitivity, and location of the lateral aerodynamic center of pressure (c.p.) of a typical passenger car on the driver's opinion and on the performance of the driver-vehicle system were studied in a moving-base driving simulator. Twelve subjects with no prior experience on the simulator and no special driving skills performed regulation tasks in the presence of both random and step wind gusts.

  3. Building Integrated Active Flow Control: Improving the Aerodynamic Performance of Tall Buildings Using Fluid-Based Aerodynamic Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menicovich, David

    By 2050 an estimated 9 billion people will inhabit planet earth and almost all the growth in the next 40 years will be in urban areas putting tremendous pressure on creating sustainable cities. The rapid increase in population, rise in land value and decrease in plot sizes in cities around the world positions tall or more importantly slender buildings as the best suited building typology to address the increasingly critical demand for space in this pressing urbanization trend. However, the majority of new tall building urban developments have not followed principles of environmental and/or sustainable design and incentives to innovate, both technological and economic, are urgently required. The biggest climatic challenge to the design, construction and performance of tall buildings is wind sensitivity. This challenge is further emphasized seeing two market driven trends: on one hand as urban population grows, land value rises while plot sizes decrease; on the other, more cost effective modular construction techniques are introducing much lighter tall building structures. The combination of the two suggests a potential increase in the slenderness ratio of tall buildings (typically less than 6:1 but stretching to 20:1 in the near future) where not-so-tall but much lighter buildings will be the bulk of new construction in densely populated cities, providing affordable housing in the face of fast urbanization but also introducing wind sensitivity which was previously the problem of a very limited number of super tall buildings to a much larger number of buildings and communities. The proposed research aims to investigate a novel approach to the interaction between tall buildings and their environment. Through this approach the research proposes a new relationship between buildings and the flows around, through and inside them, where buildings could adapt to better control and manage the air flow around them, and consequently produce significant opportunities to reduce

  4. Performance degradation of GOME polarization monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanzi, Cristina P.; Hegels, E.; Aben, I.; Bramstedt, K.; Goede, A. P. H.

    1999-01-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) is a nadir-viewing double spectrometer which measures solar radiation backscattered from the Earth's atmosphere over a broad wavelength range, from the ultraviolet (UV) to the near infrared (Burrows, 1998). It has been operating since 1995 on board the ESA ERS-2 satellite, monitoring a large range of atmospheric trace constituents, with particular emphasis on ozone. The performance of the instrument is monitored in-flight by means of routine on-board calibration measurements, observing the sun and, occasionally, the moon. In this way, degradation of optical components in space can be monitored. The performance of the broad-band detectors which monitor the polarization state of the incoming light is analyzed by means of solar measurements. The measurements of the polarization detector which samples UV light show a degradation of 6% per year. The optical components affected can be (partially) identified by monitoring the fractional polarization, which is a characteristic of the light back-scattered by the Earth's atmosphere. The influence of the observed degradation on Earth radiation measurements is estimated to be in the order of 1.5% per year in the UV wavelength range.

  5. Unsteady aerodynamic interaction effects on turbomachinery blade life and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to address the impact of a class of unsteady flows on the life and performance of turbomachinery blading. These class of flows to be investigated are those whose characteristic frequency is an integral multiple of rotor shaft speed. Analysis of data recorded downstream of a compressor and turbine rotor will reveal that this class of flows can be highly three-dimensional and may lead to the generation of secondary flows within downstream blading. By explicitly accounting for these unsteady flows in the design of turbomachinery blading for multistage applications, it may be possible to bring about gains in performance and blade life.

  6. A computational study of the aerodynamic performance of a dragonfly wing section in gliding flight.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Abel; Mittal, Rajat; Dong, Haibo

    2008-06-01

    A comprehensive computational fluid-dynamics-based study of a pleated wing section based on the wing of Aeshna cyanea has been performed at ultra-low Reynolds numbers corresponding to the gliding flight of these dragonflies. In addition to the pleated wing, simulations have also been carried out for its smoothed counterpart (called the 'profiled' airfoil) and a flat plate in order to better understand the aerodynamic performance of the pleated wing. The simulations employ a sharp interface Cartesian-grid-based immersed boundary method, and a detailed critical assessment of the computed results was performed giving a high measure of confidence in the fidelity of the current simulations. The simulations demonstrate that the pleated airfoil produces comparable and at times higher lift than the profiled airfoil, with a drag comparable to that of its profiled counterpart. The higher lift and moderate drag associated with the pleated airfoil lead to an aerodynamic performance that is at least equivalent to and sometimes better than the profiled airfoil. The primary cause for the reduction in the overall drag of the pleated airfoil is the negative shear drag produced by the recirculation zones which form within the pleats. The current numerical simulations therefore clearly demonstrate that the pleated wing is an ingenious design of nature, which at times surpasses the aerodynamic performance of a more conventional smooth airfoil as well as that of a flat plate. For this reason, the pleated airfoil is an excellent candidate for a fixed wing micro-aerial vehicle design. PMID:18503106

  7. Experimental study of full-scale iced-airfoil aerodynamic performance using sub-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Greg T.

    Determining the aerodynamic effects of ice accretion on aircraft surfaces is an important step in aircraft design and certification. The goal of this work was to develop a complete sub-scale wind tunnel simulation methodology based on knowledge of the detailed iced-airfoil flowfield that allows the accurate measurement of aerodynamic penalties associated with the accretion of ice on an airfoil and to validate this methodology using full-scale iced-airfoil performance data obtained at near-flight Reynolds numbers. In earlier work, several classifications of ice shape were developed based on key aerodynamic features in the iced-airfoil flowfield: ice roughness, streamwise ice, horn ice, and tall and short spanwise-ridge ice. Castings of each of these classifications were acquired on a full-scale NACA 23012 airfoil model and the aero-dynamic performance of each was measured at a Reynolds number of 12.0 x 106 and a Mach number = 0.20. In the current study, sub-scale simple-geometry and 2-D smooth simulations of each of these castings were constructed based on knowledge of iced-airfoil flowfields. The effects of each simulation on the aerodynamic performance of an 18-inch chord NACA 23012 airfoil model was measured in the University of Illinois 3 x 4 ft. wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.8 x 106 and a Mach number of 0.18 and compared with that measured for the corresponding full-scale casting at high Reynolds number. Geometrically-scaled simulations of the horn-ice and tall spanwise-ridge ice castings modeled C l,maxto within 2% and Cd,min to within 15%. Good qualitative agreement in the Cp distributions suggests that important geometric features such as horn and ridge height, surface location, and angle with respect to the airfoil chordline were appropriately modeled. Geometrically-scaled simulations of the ice roughness, streamwise ice, and short-ridge ice tended to have conservative C l,max and Cd. The aerodynamic performance of simulations of these types of

  8. Supersonic airplane design optimization method for aerodynamic performance and low sonic boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson H.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for the optimization of supersonic airplane designs to meet the dual design objectives of low sonic boom and high aerodynamic performance. Two sets of design parameters are used on an existing High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration to maximize the aerodynamic performance and minimize the sonic boom under the flight track. One set of the parameters perturbs the camber line of the wing sections to maximize the lift-over-drag ratio (L/D). A preliminary optimization run yielded a 3.75 percent improvement in L/D over a baseline low-boom configuration. The other set of parameters modifies the fuselage area to achieve a target F-function. Starting from an initial configuration with strong bow, wing, and tail shocks, a modified design with a flat-top signature is obtained. The methods presented can easily incorporate other design variables and objective functions. Extensions to the present capability in progress are described.

  9. Aerodynamic/acoustic performance of YJ101/double bypass VCE with coannular plug nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vdoviak, J. W.; Knott, P. R.; Ebacker, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    Results of a forward Variable Area Bypass Injector test and a Coannular Nozzle test performed on a YJ101 Double Bypass Variable Cycle Engine are reported. These components are intended for use on a Variable Cycle Engine. The forward Variable Area Bypass Injector test demonstrated the mode shifting capability between single and double bypass operation with less than predicted aerodynamic losses in the bypass duct. The acoustic nozzle test demonstrated that coannular noise suppression was between 4 and 6 PNdB in the aft quadrant. The YJ101 VCE equipped with the forward VABI and the coannular exhaust nozzle performed as predicted with exhaust system aerodynamic losses lower than predicted both in single and double bypass modes. Extensive acoustic data were collected including far field, near field, sound separation/ internal probe measurements as Laser Velocimeter traverses.

  10. Aerodynamic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    In this article two integral computational fluid dynamics methods for steady-state and transient vehicle aerodynamic simulations are described using a Chevrolet Corvette ZR-1 surface panel model. In the last decade, road-vehicle aerodynamics have become an important design consideration. Originally, the design of low-drag shapes was given high priority due to worldwide fuel shortages that occurred in the mid-seventies. More recently, there has been increased interest in the role aerodynamics play in vehicle stability and passenger safety. Consequently, transient aerodynamics and the aerodynamics of vehicle in yaw have become important issues at the design stage. While there has been tremendous progress in Navier-Stokes methodology in the last few years, the physics of bluff-body aerodynamics are still very difficult to model correctly. Moreover, the computational effort to perform Navier-Stokes simulations from the geometric stage to complete flow solutions requires much computer time and impacts the design cycle time. In the short run, therefore, simpler methods must be used for such complicated problems. Here, two methods are described for the simulation of steady-state and transient vehicle aerodynamics.

  11. Evaluation of the performance degradation at PAFC effect of catalyst degradation on electrode performance

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizaki, K.; Uchida, H.; Watanabe, M.

    1996-12-31

    Aiming commercialization of Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) power plant, many researches and developments have been contributed. Over 20000 hours operations have been demonstrated by many PAFC power plants. But there is no effective method for the estimation of lifetime of electrochemical cells without a practical long-term operation. Conducted by New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO), cooperative research projects aiming development of PAFC lifetime estimation method have started since 1995 FY in Japan. As part of this project, this work has been performed to clarify basic phenomena of the performance degradation at PAFCs jointly by Yamanashi University, Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Technology Research Association (PAFC-TRA) and PAFC manufacturers (Toshiba Co., Mitsubishi Electric Co, Fuji Electric Co.). Among several main causes of the cell performance degradation, effects of catalyst degradation (reduction in metal surface area, dealloying, changes in catalyst support) on PAFC cathode performances are discussed in this work.

  12. Dynamic interactions between hypersonic vehicle aerodynamics and propulsion system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flandro, G. A.; Roach, R. L.; Buschek, H.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the development of a flexible simulation model for scramjet hypersonic propulsion systems. The primary goal is determination of sensitivity of the thrust vector and other system parameters to angle of attack changes of the vehicle. Such information is crucial in design and analysis of control system performance for hypersonic vehicles. The code is also intended to be a key element in carrying out dynamic interaction studies involving the influence of vehicle vibrations on propulsion system/control system coupling and flight stability. Simple models are employed to represent the various processes comprising the propulsion system. A method of characteristics (MOC) approach is used to solve the forebody and external nozzle flow fields. This results in a very fast computational algorithm capable of carrying out the vast number of simulation computations needed in guidance, stability, and control studies. The three-dimensional fore- and aft body (nozzle) geometry is characterized by the centerline profiles as represented by a series of coordinate points and body cross-section curvature. The engine module geometry is represented by an adjustable vertical grid to accommodate variations of the field parameters throughout the inlet and combustor. The scramjet inlet is modeled as a two-dimensional supersonic flow containing adjustable sidewall wedges and multiple fuel injection struts. The inlet geometry including the sidewall wedge angles, the number of injection struts, their sweepback relative to the vehicle reference line, and strut cross-section are user selectable. Combustion is currently represented by a Rayleigh line calculation including corrections for variable gas properties; improved models are being developed for this important element of the propulsion flow field. The program generates (1) variation of thrust magnitude and direction with angle of attack, (2) pitching moment and line of action of the thrust vector, (3) pressure and temperature

  13. Effects of Wing-Cuff on NACA 23015 Aerodynamic Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, S. M. A.; Belhenniche, M.; Madani Fouatih, O.; Imine, B.

    2014-03-01

    The main subject of this work is the numerical study control of flow separation on a NACA 23015 airfoil by using wing cuff. This last is a leading edge modification done to the wing. The modification consists of a slight extension of the chord on the outboard section of the wings. Different numerical cases are considered for the baseline and modified airfoil NACA 23015 according at different angle of incidence. The turbulence is modeled by two equations k-epsilon model. The results of this numerical investigation showed several benefits of the wing cuff compared with a conventional airfoil and an agreement is observed between the experimental data and the present study. The most intriguing result of this research is the capability for wing cuff to perform short take-offs and landings.

  14. Aerodynamic performance of a transonic low aspect ratio turbine nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Moustapha, S.H. . Turbine Aerodynamics); Carscallen, W.E. . Combustion and Fluids Engineering Lab.); McGeachy, J.D. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    This paper presents detailed information of the three-dimensional flow field in a realistic turbine nozzle with an aspect ratio of 0.65 and a turning angle of 76 deg. The nozzle has been tested in a large-scale planar cascade over a range of exit Mach numbers from 0.3 to 1.3. The experimental results are presented in the form of nozzle passage Mach number distributions and spanwise distribution of losses and exit flow angle. Details of the flow field inside the nozzle passage are examined by means of surface flow visualization and Schlieren pictures. The performance of the nozzle is compared to the data obtained for the same nozzle tested in an annular cascade and a stage environment. Excellent agreement is found between the measured pressure distribution and the prediction of a three-dimensional Euler flow solver.

  15. Charts Showing Relations Among Primary Aerodynamic Variables for Helicopter-performance Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talkin, Herbert W

    1947-01-01

    In order to facilitate solutions of the general problem of helicopter selection, the aerodynamic performance of rotors is presented in the form of charts showing relations between primary design and performance variables. By the use of conventional helicopter theory, certain variables are plotted and other variables are considered fixed. Charts constructed in such a manner show typical results, trends, and limits of helicopter performance. Performance conditions considered include hovering, horizontal flight, climb, and ceiling. Special problems discussed include vertical climb and the use of rotor-speed-reduction gears for hovering.

  16. A performance index approach to aerodynamic design with the use of analysis codes only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, Raymond L.; Moitra, Anutosh

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for designing an aerodynamic configuration for a specified performance vector, based on results from several similar, but not identical, trial configurations, each defined by a geometry parameter vector. The theory shows the method effective provided that: (1) the results for the trial configuration provide sufficient variation so that a linear combination of them approximates the specified performance; and (2) the difference between the performance vectors (including the specifed performance) are sufficiently small that the linearity assumption of sensitivity analysis applies to the differences. A computed example describes the design of a high supersonic Mach number missile wing body configuration based on results from a set of four trial configurations.

  17. Neural Net-Based Redesign of Transonic Turbines for Improved Unsteady Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Rai, Man Mohan; Huber, Frank W.

    1998-01-01

    A recently developed neural net-based aerodynamic design procedure is used in the redesign of a transonic turbine stage to improve its unsteady aerodynamic performance. The redesign procedure used incorporates the advantages of both traditional response surface methodology (RSM) and neural networks by employing a strategy called parameter-based partitioning of the design space. Starting from the reference design, a sequence of response surfaces based on both neural networks and polynomial fits are constructed to traverse the design space in search of an optimal solution that exhibits improved unsteady performance. The procedure combines the power of neural networks and the economy of low-order polynomials (in terms of number of simulations required and network training requirements). A time-accurate, two-dimensional, Navier-Stokes solver is used to evaluate the various intermediate designs and provide inputs to the optimization procedure. The optimization procedure yields a modified design that improves the aerodynamic performance through small changes to the reference design geometry. The computed results demonstrate the capabilities of the neural net-based design procedure, and also show the tremendous advantages that can be gained by including high-fidelity unsteady simulations that capture the relevant flow physics in the design optimization process.

  18. Improving the Unsteady Aerodynamic Performance of Transonic Turbines using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan; Madavan, Nateri K.; Huber, Frank W.

    1999-01-01

    A recently developed neural net-based aerodynamic design procedure is used in the redesign of a transonic turbine stage to improve its unsteady aerodynamic performance. The redesign procedure used incorporates the advantages of both traditional response surface methodology and neural networks by employing a strategy called parameter-based partitioning of the design space. Starting from the reference design, a sequence of response surfaces based on both neural networks and polynomial fits are constructed to traverse the design space in search of an optimal solution that exhibits improved unsteady performance. The procedure combines the power of neural networks and the economy of low-order polynomials (in terms of number of simulations required and network training requirements). A time-accurate, two-dimensional, Navier-Stokes solver is used to evaluate the various intermediate designs and provide inputs to the optimization procedure. The procedure yielded a modified design that improves the aerodynamic performance through small changes to the reference design geometry. These results demonstrate the capabilities of the neural net-based design procedure, and also show the advantages of including high-fidelity unsteady simulations that capture the relevant flow physics in the design optimization process.

  19. Aerodynamic Performance Enhancement of a Finite Span Wind Turbine Blade using Synthetic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Keith; Leong, Chia Min; Amitay, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Modern wind turbines undergo significant changes in pitch angle and structural loading through a revolution. Recent developments in flow control techniques, coupled with increased interest in green energy technologies, have led to interest in applying these techniques to wind turbines, in an effort to increase power output and reduce structural stress associated with widely varying loading. This reduction in structural stress could lead to reduced operational costs associated with the maintenance cycle. The effect of active flow control on the aerodynamic and structural aspects of finite span blade was investigated experimentally. When synthetic jets were employed the effect on aerodynamic performance and structural vibrations, during static and dynamic pitch conditions, was significant. In order to investigate if the jets can be actuated for less time (reduce their power consumption), they were actuated during only a portion of the pitch cycle or using pulse modulation. The results showed that these techniques result in significant reduction in the hysteresis loop and the structural vibrations.

  20. Aerodynamic Parameters of High Performance Aircraft Estimated from Wind Tunnel and Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Murphy, Patrick C.

    1999-01-01

    A concept of system identification applied to high performance aircraft is introduced followed by a discussion on the identification methodology. Special emphasis is given to model postulation using time invariant and time dependent aerodynamic parameters, model structure determination and parameter estimation using ordinary least squares and mixed estimation methods. At the same time problems of data collinearity detection and its assessment are discussed. These parts of methodology are demonstrated in examples using flight data of the X-29A and X-31A aircraft. In the third example wind tunnel oscillatory data of the F-16XL model are used. A strong dependence of these data on frequency led to the development of models with unsteady aerodynamic terms in the form of indicial functions. The paper is completed by concluding remarks.

  1. Aerodynamic Parameters of High Performance Aircraft Estimated from Wind Tunnel and Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Murphy, Patrick C.

    1998-01-01

    A concept of system identification applied to high performance aircraft is introduced followed by a discussion on the identification methodology. Special emphasis is given to model postulation using time invariant and time dependent aerodynamic parameters, model structure determination and parameter estimation using ordinary least squares an mixed estimation methods, At the same time problems of data collinearity detection and its assessment are discussed. These parts of methodology are demonstrated in examples using flight data of the X-29A and X-31A aircraft. In the third example wind tunnel oscillatory data of the F-16XL model are used. A strong dependence of these data on frequency led to the development of models with unsteady aerodynamic terms in the form of indicial functions. The paper is completed by concluding remarks.

  2. Glide performance and aerodynamics of non-equilibrium glides in northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus).

    PubMed

    Bahlman, Joseph W; Swartz, Sharon M; Riskin, Daniel K; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2013-03-01

    Gliding is an efficient form of travel found in every major group of terrestrial vertebrates. Gliding is often modelled in equilibrium, where aerodynamic forces exactly balance body weight resulting in constant velocity. Although the equilibrium model is relevant for long-distance gliding, such as soaring by birds, it may not be realistic for shorter distances between trees. To understand the aerodynamics of inter-tree gliding, we used direct observation and mathematical modelling. We used videography (60-125 fps) to track and reconstruct the three-dimensional trajectories of northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus) in nature. From their trajectories, we calculated velocities, aerodynamic forces and force coefficients. We determined that flying squirrels do not glide at equilibrium, and instead demonstrate continuously changing velocities, forces and force coefficients, and generate more lift than needed to balance body weight. We compared observed glide performance with mathematical simulations that use constant force coefficients, a characteristic of equilibrium glides. Simulations with varying force coefficients, such as those of live squirrels, demonstrated better whole-glide performance compared with the theoretical equilibrium state. Using results from both the observed glides and the simulation, we describe the mechanics and execution of inter-tree glides, and then discuss how gliding behaviour may relate to the evolution of flapping flight. PMID:23256188

  3. Effects of Wing Platform on the Aerodynamic Performance of Finite-Span Flapping Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meilin; Wang, Z. J.; Hu, Hui

    2010-11-01

    A numerical study is conducted to investigate the effects of wing platform on the aerodynamics performance of finite-span flapping wings. A three-dimensional high-order Navier-Stokes compressible flow solver was developed using the spectral difference method and dynamic grids. An AUSM^+-up Riemann solver was implemented to simulate the unsteady low Mach number flows over finite-span flapping wings with explicit third order Runge-Kutta time integration. The studied finite-span flapping wings, which include a rectangular flapping wing, an elliptic flapping wing and a bio-inspired flapping wing, have the same wing span, aspect ratio of the platform and the characteristics of the flapping motion (i.e., sinusoidal trajectory of the flapping wing tip, Strouhal number and reduced frequency). In the present study, the Strouhul number (Str) of the finite-span flapping wings was selected to be well within the optimal range usually used by flying insects and birds and swimming fishes (i.e., 0.2 < Str < 0.4). The effects of the wing platform on the aerodynamics performance of the finite-span flapping wings were elucidated in the terms of the evolutions and dynamic interaction between the leading edge vortices (LEV) and the wing tip vortices as well as the resultant aerodynamic forces (both lift and thrust) generated by the flapping wings.

  4. Glide performance and aerodynamics of non-equilibrium glides in northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus)

    PubMed Central

    Bahlman, Joseph W.; Swartz, Sharon M.; Riskin, Daniel K.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    Gliding is an efficient form of travel found in every major group of terrestrial vertebrates. Gliding is often modelled in equilibrium, where aerodynamic forces exactly balance body weight resulting in constant velocity. Although the equilibrium model is relevant for long-distance gliding, such as soaring by birds, it may not be realistic for shorter distances between trees. To understand the aerodynamics of inter-tree gliding, we used direct observation and mathematical modelling. We used videography (60–125 fps) to track and reconstruct the three-dimensional trajectories of northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus) in nature. From their trajectories, we calculated velocities, aerodynamic forces and force coefficients. We determined that flying squirrels do not glide at equilibrium, and instead demonstrate continuously changing velocities, forces and force coefficients, and generate more lift than needed to balance body weight. We compared observed glide performance with mathematical simulations that use constant force coefficients, a characteristic of equilibrium glides. Simulations with varying force coefficients, such as those of live squirrels, demonstrated better whole-glide performance compared with the theoretical equilibrium state. Using results from both the observed glides and the simulation, we describe the mechanics and execution of inter-tree glides, and then discuss how gliding behaviour may relate to the evolution of flapping flight. PMID:23256188

  5. Experimental analysis of the aerodynamic performance of an innovative low pressure turbine rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infantino, Daniele; Satta, Francesca; Simoni, Daniele; Ubaldi, Marina; Zunino, Pietro; Bertini, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    In the present work the aerodynamic performances of an innovative rotor blade row have been experimentally investigated. Measurements have been carried out in a large scale low speed single stage cold flow facility at a Reynolds number typical of aeroengine cruise, under nominal and off-design conditions. The time-mean blade aerodynamic loadings have been measured at three radial positions along the blade height through a pressure transducer installed inside the hollow shaft, by delivering the signal to the stationary frame with a slip ring. The time mean aerodynamic flow fields upstream and downstream of the rotor have been measured by means of a five-hole probe to investigate the losses associated with the rotor. The investigations in the single stage research turbine allow the reproduction of both wake-boundary layer interaction as well as vortex-vortex interaction. The detail of the present results clearly highlights the strong dissipative effects induced by the blade tip vortex and by the momentum defect as well as the turbulence production, which is generated during the migration of the stator wake in the rotor passage. Phase-locked hot-wire investigations have been also performed to analyze the time-varying flow during the wake passing period. In particular the interaction between stator and rotor structures has been investigated also under off-design conditions to further explain the mechanisms contributing to the loss generation for the different conditions.

  6. Performance degradation and cleaning of photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheskin, T. J.; Chang, G. C.; Cull, R. C.; Knapp, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    NASA tests results from an 18 mo program of cleaning silicone-encapsulated and glass fronted solar cell panels in urban and desert environments to examine the effects of cleaning on module performance are reported. The panels were cleaned on weekly, monthly, quarterly, or semi-annual basis, while other panels of the same construction were not cleaned and served as controls. Commercially-available detergents and city water were employed for the tests, and the measurements were maintained of the modules' continuing short-circuit current output. The decay of the output was determined by least square regression analyses. Performance degradation was noticeably less in glass covered, rather than silicone-encapsulated modules which decayed faster in urban than in desert environments. Lower frequency cleanings are recommended where labor costs are high.

  7. Aerodynamic loading distribution effects on the overall performance of ultra-high-lift LP turbine cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrino, M.; Satta, F.; Simoni, D.; Ubaldi, M.; Zunino, P.; Bertini, F.

    2014-02-01

    The present paper reports the results of an experimental investigation aimed at comparing aerodynamic performance of three low-pressure turbine cascades for several Reynolds numbers under steady and unsteady inflows. This study is focused on finding design criteria useful to reduce both profile and secondary losses in the aero-engine LP turbine for the different flight conditions. The baseline blade cascade, characterized by a standard aerodynamic loading (Zw=1.03), has been compared with two Ultra-High-Lift profiles with the same Zweifel number (Zw=1.3 for both cascades), but different velocity peak positions, leading to front and mid-loaded blade cascade configurations. The aerodynamic flow fields downstream of the cascades have been experimentally investigated for Reynolds numbers in the range 70000aerodynamic performance of the blade cascades in terms of profile and secondary losses and the understanding of the effects of loading distribution and Zweifel number on secondary flows. When operating under unsteady inflow, contrarily to the steady case, the mid-loaded cascade has been found to be characterized by the lowest profile and secondary losses, making it the most attractive solution for the design of blades working in real conditions where unsteady inflow effects are present.

  8. High fidelity quasi steady-state aerodynamic model effects on race vehicle performance predictions using multi-body simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrfeld-Halterman, J. A.; Uddin, M.

    2016-07-01

    We described in this paper the development of a high fidelity vehicle aerodynamic model to fit wind tunnel test data over a wide range of vehicle orientations. We also present a comparison between the effects of this proposed model and a conventional quasi steady-state aerodynamic model on race vehicle simulation results. This is done by implementing both of these models independently in multi-body quasi steady-state simulations to determine the effects of the high fidelity aerodynamic model on race vehicle performance metrics. The quasi steady state vehicle simulation is developed with a multi-body NASCAR Truck vehicle model, and simulations are conducted for three different types of NASCAR race tracks, a short track, a one and a half mile intermediate track, and a higher speed, two mile intermediate race track. For each track simulation, the effects of the aerodynamic model on handling, maximum corner speed, and drive force metrics are analysed. The accuracy of the high-fidelity model is shown to reduce the aerodynamic model error relative to the conventional aerodynamic model, and the increased accuracy of the high fidelity aerodynamic model is found to have realisable effects on the performance metric predictions on the intermediate tracks resulting from the quasi steady-state simulation.

  9. An Assessment of NASA Glenn's Aeroacoustic Experimental and Predictive Capabilities for Installed Cooling Fans. Part 1; Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Koch, L. Danielle; Wernet, Mark P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    Driven by the need for low production costs, electronics cooling fans have evolved differently than the bladed components of gas turbine engines which incorporate multiple technologies to enhance performance and durability while reducing noise emissions. Drawing upon NASA Glenn's experience in the measurement and prediction of gas turbine engine aeroacoustic performance, tests have been conducted to determine if these tools and techniques can be extended for application to the aerodynamics and acoustics of electronics cooling fans. An automated fan plenum installed in NASA Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory was used to map the overall aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a spaceflight qualified 80 mm diameter axial cooling fan. In order to more accurately identify noise sources, diagnose performance limiting aerodynamic deficiencies, and validate noise prediction codes, additional aerodynamic measurements were recorded for two operating points: free delivery and a mild stall condition. Non-uniformities in the fan s inlet and exhaust regions captured by Particle Image Velocimetry measurements, and rotor blade wakes characterized by hot wire anemometry measurements provide some assessment of the fan aerodynamic performance. The data can be used to identify fan installation/design changes which could enlarge the stable operating region for the fan and improve its aerodynamic performance and reduce noise emissions.

  10. Improvement of Aerodynamic Performance of the Aero-Train by Controlling Wing-Wing Interaction Using Single-Slotted Flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dong-Hee; Kohama, Yasuaki; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Kato, Takuma

    Aero-train is a new driving concept using aerodynamic technology under development by the Kohama Laboratory, Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University. It employs the wing-in-ground effect to enable travel at high speeds over land. Aero-train makes use of the ground effects of lift and side force between the wings and a U-shaped guideway for stability. The main wings have vertical wings at the tips, which are arranged in tandem to regulate the roll and yaw stability in the U-shaped guideway. However, the vertical wings deteriorate the lift-to-drag ratio of the Aero-train by aerodynamic interaction with the main wings. The present study was performed to improve the aerodynamic performance of the Aero-train by controlling wing-wing interaction. Installation of a single-slotted flap on the wings considerably improved the aerodynamic performance of the wings.

  11. Design and aerodynamic performance evaluation of a high-work mixed flow turbine stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neri, Remo N.; Elliott, Thomas J.; Marsh, David N.; Civinskas, Kestutis C.

    1994-01-01

    As axial and radial turbine designs have been pushed to their aerothermodynamic and mechanical limits, the mixed-flow turbine (MFT) concept has been projected to offer performance and durability improvements, especially when ceramic materials are considered. The objective of this NASA/U.S. Army sponsored mixed-flow turbine (AMFT) program was to determine the level of performance attainable with MFT technology within the mechanical constraints of 1997 projected ceramic material properties. The MFT geometry is similar to a radial turbine, exhibiting a large radius change from inlet to exit, but differing in that the inlet flowpath is not purely radial, nor axial, but mixed; it is the inlet geometry that gives rise to the name 'mixed-flow'. The 'mixed' orientation of the turbine inlet offers several advantages over radial designs by allowing a nonzero inlet blade angle yet maintaining radial-element blades. The oblique inlet not only improves the particle-impact survivability of the design, but improves the aerodynamic performance by reducing the incidence at the blade inlet. The difficulty, however, of using mixed-flow geometry lies in the scarcity of detailed data and documented design experience. This paper reports the design of a MFT stage designed with the intent to maximize aerodynamic performance by optimizing design parameters such as stage reaction, rotor incidence, flowpath shape, blade shape, vane geometry, and airfoil counts using 2-D, 3-D inviscid, and 3-D viscous computational fluid dynamics code. The aerodynamic optimization was accomplished while maintaining mechanical integrity with respect to vibration and stress levels in the rotor. A full-scale cold-flow rig test was performed with metallic hardware fabricated to the specifications of the hot ceramic geometry to evaluate the stage performance.

  12. Numerical investigations on the aerodynamic performance of wind turbine: Downwind versus upwind configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hu; Wan, Decheng

    2015-03-01

    Although the upwind configuration is more popular in the field of wind energy, the downwind one is a promising type for the offshore wind energy due to its special advantages. Different configurations have different aerodynamic performance and it is important to predict the performance of both downwind and upwind configurations accurately for designing and developing more reliable wind turbines. In this paper, a numerical investigation on the aerodynamic performance of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) phase VI wind turbine in downwind and upwind configurations is presented. The open source toolbox OpenFOAM coupled with arbitrary mesh interface (AMI) method is applied to tackle rotating problems of wind turbines. Two 3D numerical models of NREL phase VI wind turbine with downwind and upwind configurations under four typical working conditions of incoming wind velocities are set up for the study of different unsteady characteristics of the downwind and upwind configurations, respectively. Numerical results of wake vortex structure, time histories of thrust, pressure distribution on the blade and limiting streamlines which can be used to identify points of separation in a 3D flow are presented. It can be concluded that thrust reduction due to blade-tower interaction is small for upwind wind turbines but relatively large for downwind wind turbines and attention should be paid to the vibration at a certain frequency induced by the cyclic reduction for both configurations. The results and conclusions are helpful to analyze the different aerodynamic performance of wind turbines between downwind and upwind configurations, providing useful references for practical design of wind turbine.

  13. Aerodynamic Performance of Scale-Model Turbofan Outlet Guide Vanes Designed for Low Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.

    2001-01-01

    The design of effective new technologies to reduce aircraft propulsion noise is dependent on an understanding of the noise sources and noise generation mechanisms in the modern turbofan engine. In order to more fully understand the physics of noise in a turbofan engine, a comprehensive aeroacoustic wind tunnel test programs was conducted called the 'Source Diagnostic Test.' The text was cooperative effort between NASA and General Electric Aircraft Engines, as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program. A 1/5-scale model simulator representing the bypass stage of a current technology high bypass ratio turbofan engine was used in the test. The test article consisted of the bypass fan and outlet guide vanes in a flight-type nacelle. The fan used was a medium pressure ratio design with 22 individual, wide chord blades. Three outlet guide vane design configurations were investigated, representing a 54-vane radial Baseline configuration, a 26-vane radial, wide chord Low Count configuration and a 26-vane, wide chord Low Noise configuration with 30 deg of aft sweep. The test was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9 by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at velocities simulating the takeoff and approach phases of the aircraft flight envelope. The Source Diagnostic Test had several acoustic and aerodynamic technical objectives: (1) establish the performance of a scale model fan selected to represent the current technology turbofan product; (2) assess the performance of the fan stage with each of the three distinct outlet guide vane designs; (3) determine the effect of the outlet guide vane configuration on the fan baseline performance; and (4) conduct detailed flowfield diagnostic surveys, both acoustic and aerodynamic, to characterize and understand the noise generation mechanisms in a turbofan engine. This paper addresses the fan and stage aerodynamic performance results from the Source Diagnostic Test.

  14. Evaluating Suit Fit Using Performance Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margerum, Sarah E.; Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Benson, Elizabeth; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    The Mark III suit has multiple sizes of suit components (arm, leg, and gloves) as well as sizing inserts to tailor the fit of the suit to an individual. This study sought to determine a way to identify the point an ideal suit fit transforms into a bad fit and how to quantify this breakdown using mobility-based physical performance data. This study examined the changes in human physical performance via degradation of the elbow and wrist range of motion of the planetary suit prototype (Mark III) with respect to changes in sizing and as well as how to apply that knowledge to suit sizing options and improvements in suit fit. The methods implemented in this study focused on changes in elbow and wrist mobility due to incremental suit sizing modifications. This incremental sizing was within a range that included both optimum and poor fit. Suited range of motion data was collected using a motion analysis system for nine isolated and functional tasks encompassing the elbow and wrist joints. A total of four subjects were tested with motions involving both arms simultaneously as well as the right arm only. The results were then compared across sizing configurations. The results of this study indicate that range of motion may be used as a viable parameter to quantify at what stage suit sizing causes a detriment in performance; however the human performance decrement appeared to be based on the interaction of multiple joints along a limb, not a single joint angle. The study was able to identify a preliminary method to quantify the impact of size on performance and to develop a means to gauge tolerances around optimal size. More work is needed to improve the assessment of optimal fit and to compensate for multiple joint interactions.

  15. Evaluating Suit Fit Using Performance Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margerum, Sarah E.; Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Benson, Elizabeth; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2012-01-01

    The Mark III planetary technology demonstrator space suit can be tailored to an individual by swapping the modular components of the suit, such as the arms, legs, and gloves, as well as adding or removing sizing inserts in key areas. A method was sought to identify the transition from an ideal suit fit to a bad fit and how to quantify this breakdown using a metric of mobility-based human performance data. To this end, the degradation of the range of motion of the elbow and wrist of the suit as a function of suit sizing modifications was investigated to attempt to improve suit fit. The sizing range tested spanned optimal and poor fit and was adjusted incrementally in order to compare each joint angle across five different sizing configurations. Suited range of motion data were collected using a motion capture system for nine isolated and functional tasks utilizing the elbow and wrist joints. A total of four subjects were tested with motions involving both arms simultaneously as well as the right arm by itself. Findings indicated that no single joint drives the performance of the arm as a function of suit size; instead it is based on the interaction of multiple joints along a limb. To determine a size adjustment range where an individual can operate the suit at an acceptable level, a performance detriment limit was set. This user-selected limit reveals the task-dependent tolerance of the suit fit around optimal size. For example, the isolated joint motion indicated that the suit can deviate from optimal by as little as -0.6 in to -2.6 in before experiencing a 10% performance drop in the wrist or elbow joint. The study identified a preliminary method to quantify the impact of size on performance and developed a new way to gauge tolerances around optimal size.

  16. Laboratory evaluation of fan/filter units' aerodynamic and energy performance

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang; Jeng, Ming-Shan

    2004-07-27

    The paper discusses the benefits of having a consistent testing method to characterize aerodynamic and energy performance of FFUs. It presents evaluation methods of laboratory-measured performance of ten relatively new, 1220 mm x 610 mm (or 4 ft x 2 ft) fan-filter units (FFUs), and includes results of a set of relevant metrics such as energy performance indices (EPI) based upon the sample FFUs tested. This paper concludes that there are variations in FFUs' performance, and that using a consistent testing and evaluation method can generate compatible and comparable FFU performance information. The paper also suggests that benefits and opportunities exist for our method of testing FFU energy performance to be integrated in future recommended practices.

  17. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular plug nozzles. [variable cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, P. R.; Blozy, J. T.; Staid, P. S.

    1981-01-01

    The results of model scale parametric static and wind tunnel aerodynamic performance tests on unsuppressed coannular plug nozzle configurations with inverted velocity profile are discussed. The nozzle configurations are high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles applicable to dual-stream exhaust systems typical of a variable cycle engine for Advanced Supersonic Transport application. In all, seven acoustic models and eight aerodynamic performance models were tested. The nozzle geometric variables included outer stream radius ratio, inner stream to outer stream ratio, and inner stream plug shape. When compared to a conical nozzle at the same specific thrust, the results of the static acoustic tests with the coannular nozzles showed noise reductions of up to 7 PNdB. Extensive data analysis showed that the overall acoustic results can be well correlated using the mixed stream velocity and the mixed stream density. Results also showed that suppression levels are geometry and flow regulation dependent with the outer stream radius ratio, inner stream-to-outer stream velocity ratio and inner stream velocity ratio and inner stream plug shape, as the primary suppression parameters. In addition, high-radius ratio coannular plug nozzles were found to yield shock associated noise level reductions relative to a conical nozzle. The wind tunnel aerodynamic tests showed that static and simulated flight thrust coefficient at typical takeoff conditions are quite good - up to 0.98 at static conditions and 0.974 at a takeoff Mach number of 0.36. At low inner stream flow conditions significant thrust loss was observed. Using an inner stream conical plug resulted in 1% to 2% higher performance levels than nozzle geometries using a bent inner plug.

  18. Effect of design changes on aerodynamic and acoustic performance of translating-centerbody sonic inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of design changes on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of translating centerbody sonic inlets. Scale model inlets were tested in the Lewis Research Center's V/STOL wind tunnel. The effects of centerbody position, entry lip contraction ratio, diffuser length, and diffuser area ratio on inlet total pressure recovery, distortion, and noise suppression were investigated at static conditions and at forward velocity and angle of attack. With the centerbody in the takeoff position (retracted), good aerodynamic and acoustic performance was attained at static conditions and at forward velocity. At 0 deg incidence angle with a sound pressure level reduction of 20 dB, the total pressure recovery was 0.986. Pressure recovery at 50 deg was 0.981. With the centerbody in the approach position (extended), diffuser flow separation occurred at an incidence angle of approximately 20 deg. However, good performance was attained at lower angles. With the centerbody in the takeoff position the ability of the inlet to tolerate high incidence angles was improved by increasing the lip contraction ratio. However, at static conditions with the centerbody in the approach position, an optimum lip contraction ratio appears to exist, with both thinner and thicker lips yielding reduced performance.

  19. Cooled-turbine aerodynamic performance prediction from reduced primary to coolant total-temperature-ratio results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    The prediction of the cooled aerodynamic performance, for both stators and turbines, at actual primary to coolant inlet total temperature ratios from the results obtained at a reduced total temperature ratio is described. Theoretical and available experimental results were compared for convection film and transpiration cooled stator vanes and for a film cooled, single stage core turbine. For these tests the total temperature ratio varied from near 1.0 to about 2.7. The agreement between the theoretical and the experimental results was, in general, reasonable.

  20. Effect of Trailing Edge Flow Injection on Fan Noise and Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian; Woodward, Richard P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental investigation using trailing edge blowing for reducing fan rotor/guide vane wake interaction noise was completed in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Data were acquired to measure noise, aerodynamic performance, and flow features for a 22" tip diameter fan representative of modern turbofan technology. The fan was designed to use trailing edge blowing to reduce the fan blade wake momentum deficit. The test objective was to quantify noise reductions, measure impacts on fan aerodynamic performance, and document the flow field using hot-film anemometry. Measurements concentrated on approach, cutback, and takeoff rotational speeds as those are the primary conditions of acoustic interest. Data are presented for a 2% (relative to overall fan flow) trailing edge injection rate and show a 2 dB reduction in Overall Sound Power Level (OAPWL) at all fan test speeds. The reduction in broadband noise is nearly constant and is approximately 1.5 dB up to 20 kHz at all fan speeds. Measurements of tone noise show significant variation, as evidenced by reductions of up to 6 dB in the 2 BPF tone at 6700 rpm.: and increases of nearly 2 dB for the 4 BPF tone at approach speed. Aerodynamic performance measurements show the fan with 2 % injection has an overall efficiency that is comparable to the baseline fan and operates, as intended, with nearly the same pressure ratio and mass flow parameters. Hot-film measurements obtained at the approach operating condition indicate that mean blade wake filling in the tip region was not as significant as expected. This suggests that additional acoustic benefits could be realized if the trailing edge blowing could be modified to provide better filling of the wake momentum deficit. Nevertheless, the hot-film measurements indicate that the trailing edge blowing provided significant reductions in blade wake turbulence. Overall, these results indicate that further work may be required to fully understand the proper

  1. Aerodynamic performance of a 1.35-pressure-ratio axial-flow fan stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, W. M.; Moore, R. D.; Steinke, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The overall blade element performances and the aerodynamic design parameters are presented for a 1.35-pressure-ratio fan stage. The fan stage was designed for a weight flow of 32.7 kilograms per second and a tip speed of 302.8 meters per second. At design speed the stage peak efficiency of 0.879 occurred at a pressure ratio of 1.329 and design flow. Stage stall margin was approximately 14 percent. At design flow rotor efficiency was 0.94 and the pressure ratio was 1.360.

  2. NASA VCE test bed engine aerodynamic performance characteristics and test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, M. W.; Allen, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Core Driven Fan Stage (CDFS) Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) has been identified as a leading candidate for advanced supersonic cruise aircraft. A scale demonstrator version of this engine has been designed and tested. This testbed engine features a split fan with double bypass capability, variable forward and aft mixers, and a variable area low pressure turbine nozzle to permit exploration and optimization of the cycle in both single and double bypass modes. This paper presents the aerodynamic performance characteristics and experimental results obtained from both the core engine and full engine tests.

  3. Investigation of Injector Slot Geometry on Curved-Diffuser Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Odlanier

    2004-01-01

    The Compressor Branch vision is to be recognized as world-class leaders in research for fluid mechanics of compressors. Its mission is to conduct research and develop technology to advance the state of the art of compressors and transfer new technology to U.S. industries. Maintain partnerships with U.S. industries, universities, and other government organizations. Maintain a balance between customers focused and long range research. Flow control comprises enabling technologies to meet compression system performance requirements driven by emissions and fuel reduction goals (e.g., in UEET), missions (e.g., access-to-space), aerodynamically aggressive vehicle configurations (e.g., UAV and future blended wing body configurations with highly distorted inlets), and cost goals (e.g., in VAATE). The compression system requirements include increased efficiency, power-to-weight, and adaptability (i.e., robustness in terms of wide operability, distortion tolerance, and engine system health and reliability). The compressor flow control task comprises efforts to develop, demonstrate, and transfer adaptive flow control technology to industry to increase aerodynamic loading at current blade row loss levels, to enable adaptive1 y wide operability, and to develop plant models for adaptive compression systems. In this context, flow control is the controlled modification of a flow field by a deliberate means beyond the natural (uncontrolled) shaping of the solid surfaces that define the principal flow path. The objective of the compressor flow control task is to develop and apply techniques that control circulation, aerodynamic blockage, and entropy production in order to enhance the performance and operability of compression systems for advanced aero-propulsion applications. This summer I would be working with a curved-diffuser because it simulates what happens with flow in the stator blades in the compressor. With this experiment I will be doing some data analysis and parametric

  4. Vortex shedding and aerodynamic performance of an airfoil with multi-scale trailing edge modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedic, Jovan; Vassilicos, J. Christos

    2014-11-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted into the aerodynamic performance and nature of the vortex shedding generated by truncated and non-flat serrated trailing edges of a NACA 0012 wing section. The truncated trailing edge generates a significant amount of vortex shedding, whilst increasing both the maximum lift and drag coefficients, resulting in an overall reduction in the maximum lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) compared to a plain NACA0012 wing section. By decreasing the chevron angle (ϕ) of the non-flat trailing edge serrations (i.e. by making them sharper), the energy of the vortex shedding significantly decreases and L/D increase compared to a plain NACA0012 wing section. Fractal/multi-scale patterns were also investigated with a view to further improve performance. It was found that the energy of the vortex shedding increases with increasing fractal iteration if the chevron is broad (ϕ ~65°), but decreases for sharper chevrons (ϕ =45°). It is believed that if ϕ is too big, the multi-scale trailing edges are too far away from each other to interact and break down the vortex shedding mechanism. Fractal/multi-scale trailing edges are also able to improve aerodynamic performance compared to the NACA 0012 wing section.

  5. JT9D performance deterioration results from a simulated aerodynamic load test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.; Stromberg, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the results of testing to identify the effects of simulated aerodynamic flight loads on JT9D engine performance. The test results were also used to refine previous analytical studies on the impact of aerodynamic flight loads on performance losses. To accomplish these objectives, a JT9D-7AH engine was assembled with average production clearances and new seals as well as extensive instrumentation to monitor engine performance, case temperatures, and blade tip clearance changes. A special loading device was designed and constructed to permit application of known moments and shear forces to the engine by the use of cables placed around the flight inlet. The test was conducted in the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft X-Ray Test Facility to permit the use of X-ray techniques in conjunction with laser blade tip proximity probes to monitor important engine clearance changes. Upon completion of the test program, the test engine was disassembled, and the condition of gas path parts and final clearances were documented. The test results indicate that the engine lost 1.1 percent in thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), as measured under sea level static conditions, due to increased operating clearances caused by simulated flight loads. This compares with 0.9 percent predicted by the analytical model and previous study efforts.

  6. JT9D performance deterioration results from a simulated aerodynamic load test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.; Stromberg, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of testing to identify the effects of simulated aerodynamic flight loads on JT9D engine performance are presented. The test results were also used to refine previous analytical studies on the impact of aerodynamic flight loads on performance losses. To accomplish these objectives, a JT9D-7AH engine was assembled with average production clearances and new seals as well as extensive instrumentation to monitor engine performance, case temperatures, and blade tip clearance changes. A special loading device was designed and constructed to permit application of known moments and shear forces to the engine by the use of cables placed around the flight inlet. The test was conducted in the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft X-Ray Test Facility to permit the use of X-ray techniques in conjunction with laser blade tip proximity probes to monitor important engine clearance changes. Upon completion of the test program, the test engine was disassembled, and the condition of gas path parts and final clearances were documented. The test results indicate that the engine lost 1.1 percent in thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), as measured under sea level static conditions, due to increased operating clearances caused by simulated flight loads. This compares with 0.9 percent predicted by the analytical model and previous study efforts.

  7. An analysis for high speed propeller-nacelle aerodynamic performance prediction. Volume 1: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. Alan; Anderson, Olof L.; Edwards, David E.; Landgrebe, Anton J.

    1988-01-01

    A computer program, the Propeller Nacelle Aerodynamic Performance Prediction Analysis (PANPER), was developed for the prediction and analysis of the performance and airflow of propeller-nacelle configurations operating over a forward speed range inclusive of high speed flight typical of recent propfan designs. A propeller lifting line, wake program was combined with a compressible, viscous center body interaction program, originally developed for diffusers, to compute the propeller-nacelle flow field, blade loading distribution, propeller performance, and the nacelle forebody pressure and viscous drag distributions. The computer analysis is applicable to single and coaxial counterrotating propellers. The blade geometries can include spanwise variations in sweep, droop, taper, thickness, and airfoil section type. In the coaxial mode of operation the analysis can treat both equal and unequal blade number and rotational speeds on the propeller disks. The nacelle portion of the analysis can treat both free air and tunnel wall configurations including wall bleed. The analysis was applied to many different sets of flight conditions using selected aerodynamic modeling options. The influence of different propeller nacelle-tunnel wall configurations was studied. Comparisons with available test data for both single and coaxial propeller configurations are presented along with a discussion of the results.

  8. Development of Pneumatic Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Englar

    2000-06-19

    Under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is developing and evaluating pneumatic (blown) aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles. The objective of this program is to apply the pneumatic aerodynamic aircraft technology previously developed and flight-tested by GTRI personnel to the design of an efficient blown tractor-trailer configuration. Recent experimental results obtained by GTRI using blowing have shown drag reductions of 35% on a streamlined automobile wind-tunnel model. Also measured were lift or down-load increases of 100-150% and the ability to control aerodynamic moments about all 3 axes without any moving control surfaces. Similar drag reductions yielded by blowing on bluff afterbody trailers in current US trucking fleet operations are anticipated to reduce yearly fuel consumption by more than 1.2 billion gallons, while even further reduction is possible using pneumatic lift to reduce tire rolling resistance. Conversely, increased drag and down force generated instantaneously by blowing can greatly increase braking characteristics and control in wet/icy weather due to effective ''weight'' increases on the tires. Safety is also enhanced by controlling side loads and moments caused on these Heavy Vehicles by winds, gusts and other vehicles passing. This may also help to eliminate the jack-knifing problem if caused by extreme wind side loads on the trailer. Lastly, reduction of the turbulent wake behind the trailer can reduce splash and spray patterns and rough air being experienced by following vehicles. To be presented by GTRI in this paper will be results developed during the early portion of this effort, including a preliminary systems study, CFD prediction of the blown flowfields, and design of the baseline conventional tractor-trailer model and the pneumatic wind-tunnel model.

  9. Improvement in Capsule Abort Performance Using Supersonic Aerodynamic Interaction by Fences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Hiroto; Wang, Yunpeng; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Doi, Katsunori; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    The space transportation system will need advanced abort systems to secure crew against serious accidents. Here this study deals with the capsule-type space transportation systems with a Launch Abort System (LAS). This system is composed of a conic capsule as a Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) and a cylindrical rocket as a Service Module (SM), and the capsule is moved away from the rocket by supersonic aerodynamic interactions in an emergency. We propose a method to improve the performance of the LAV by installing fences at the edges of surfaces on the rocket and capsule sides. Their effects were investigated by experimental measurements and numerical simulations. Experimental results show that the fences on the rocket and capsule surfaces increase the aerodynamic thrust force on the capsule by 70% in a certain clearance between the capsule and rocket. Computational results show the detailed flow fields where the centripetal flow near the surface on the rocket side is induced by the fence on the rocket side and the centrifugal flow near the surface on the capsule side is blocked by the fence on the capsule side. These results can confirm favorable effects of the fences on the performance of the LAS.

  10. The Role of Free Stream Turbulence on the Aerodynamic Performance of a Wind Turbine Blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Victor; Thormann, Adrien; Meneveau, Charles; Castillo, Luciano

    2014-11-01

    Effects of free stream turbulence with large integral scale on the aerodynamic performance of an S809 airfoil-based wind turbine blade at low Reynolds number are studied using wind tunnel experiments. A constant chord (2-D) S809 airfoil wind turbine blade model with an operating Reynolds number of 208,000 based on chord length was tested for a range of angles of attack representative of fully attached and stalled flow as encountered in typical wind turbine operation. The smooth-surface blade was subjected to a quasi-laminar free stream with very low free-stream turbulence as well as to elevated free-stream turbulence generated by an active grid. This turbulence contained large-scale eddies with levels of free-stream turbulence intensity of up to 6.14% and an integral length scale of about 60% of chord-length. The pressure distribution was acquired using static pressure taps and the lift was subsequently computed by numerical integration. The wake velocity deficit was measured utilizing hot-wire anemometry to compute the drag coefficient also via integration. In addition, the mean flow was quantified using 2-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) over the suction surface of the blade. Results indicate that turbulence, even with very large-scale eddies comparable in size to the chord-length, significantly improves the aerodynamic performance of the blade by increasing the lift coefficient and overall lift-to-drag ratio, L/D for all angles tested except zero degrees.

  11. Axial compressor blade design for desensitization of aerodynamic performance and stability to tip clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erler, Engin

    Tip clearance flow is the flow through the clearance between the rotor blade tip and the shroud of a turbomachine, such as compressors and turbines. This flow is driven by the pressure difference across the blade (aerodynamic loading) in the tip region and is a major source of loss in performance and aerodynamic stability in axial compressors of modern aircraft engines. An increase in tip clearance, either temporary due to differential radial expansion between the blade and the shroud during transient operation or permanent due to engine wear or manufacturing tolerances on small blades, increases tip clearance flow and results in higher fuel consumption and higher risk of engine surge. A compressor design that can reduce the sensitivity of its performance and aerodynamic stability to tip clearance increase would have a major impact on short and long-term engine performance and operating envelope. While much research has been carried out on improving nominal compressor performance, little had been done on desensitization to tip clearance increase beyond isolated observations that certain blade designs such as forward chordwise sweep, seem to be less sensitive to tip clearance size increase. The current project aims to identify through a computational study the flow features and associated mechanisms that reduces sensitivity of axial compressor rotors to tip clearance size and propose blade design strategies that can exploit these results. The methodology starts with the design of a reference conventional axial compressor rotor followed by a parametric study with variations of this reference design through modification of the camber line and of the stacking line of blade profiles along the span. It is noted that a simple desensitization method would be to reduce the aerodynamic loading of the blade tip which would reduce the tip clearance flow and its proportional contribution to performance loss. However, with the larger part of the work on the flow done in this

  12. The aerodynamic design and performance of the NASA/GE E3 low pressure turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, D. G.; Dengler, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and scaled rig test results of the low pressure turbine (LPT) component for the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine (E3) are presented. The low pressure turbine is a highly loaded five-stage design featuring high outer wall slope, controlled vortex aerodynamics, low stage flow coefficient, and reduced clearances. An assessment of its performance has been made based on a series of scaled air turbine tests which were divided into two phases: Block I (March through August, 1979) and Block II (June through September, 1981). Results from the Block II five-stage test, summarized in the paper, indicate that the E3 LPT will attain an efficiency level of 91.5 percent at the Mach 0.8/35,000 ft. max. climb altitude design point. This is relative to program goals of 91.1 percent for the E3 demonstrator engine and 91.7 percent for a fully developed flight propulsion system LPT.

  13. Summary of shuttle data processing and aerodynamic performance comparisons for the first 11 flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Findlay, J. T.; Kelly, G. M.; Heck, M. L.; Mcconnell, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    NASA Space Shuttle aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic research is but one part of the most comprehensive end-to-end flight test program ever undertaken considering: the extensive pre-flight experimental data base development; the multitude of spacecraft and remote measurements taken during entry flight; the complexity of the Orbiter aerodynamic configuration; the variety of flight conditions available across the entire speed regime; and the efforts devoted to flight data reduction throughout the aerospace community. Shuttle entry flights provide a wealth of research quality data, in essence a veritable flying wind tunnel, for use by researchers to verify and improve the operational capability of the Orbiter and provide data for evaluations of experimental facilities as well as computational methods. This final report merely summarizes the major activities conducted by the AMA, Inc. under NASA Contract NAS1-16087 as part of that interesting research. Investigators desiring more detailed information can refer to the glossary of AMA publications attached herein as Appendix A. Section I provides background discussion of software and methodology development to enable Best Estimate Trajectory (BET) generation. Actual products generated are summarized in Section II as tables which completely describe the post-flight products available from the first three-year Shuttle flight history. Summary results are presented in Section III, with longitudinal performance comparisons included as Appendices for each of the flights.

  14. Aerodynamic performance of a full-scale lifting ejector system in a STOVL fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brian E.; Garland, Doug; Poppen, William A.

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of an advanced lifting ejector system incorporated into a full-scale, powered, fighter aircraft model were measured at statically and at transition airspeeds in the 40- by 80- and 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnels at NASA-Ames. The ejector system was installed in an ejector-lift/vectored thrust STOVL (Short Take-Off Vertical Landing) fighter aircraft configuration. Ejector thrust augmentation ratios approaching 1.6 were demonstrated during static testing. Changes in the internal aerodynamics and exit flow conditions of the ejector ducts are presented for a variety of wind-off and forward-flight test conditions. Wind-on test results indicate a small decrease in ejector performance and increase in exit flow nonuniformity with forward speed. Simulated ejector start-up at high speed, nose-up attitudes caused only small effects on overall vehicle forces and moments despite the fact that the ejector inlet flow was found to induce large regions of negative pressure on the upper surface of the wing apex adjacent to the inlets.

  15. Advanced Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, Handling, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Englar

    2001-05-14

    Research is being conducted at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) to develop advanced aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability, handling and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles by using previously-developed and flight-tested pneumatic (blown) aircraft technology. Recent wind-tunnel investigations of a generic Heavy Vehicle model with blowing slots on both the leading and trailing edges of the trailer have been conducted under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. These experimental results show overall aerodynamic drag reductions on the Pneumatic Heavy Vehicle of 50% using only 1 psig blowing pressure in the plenums, and over 80% drag reductions if additional blowing air were available. Additionally, an increase in drag force for braking was confirmed by blowing different slots. Lift coefficient was increased for rolling resistance reduction by blowing only the top slot, while downforce was produced for traction increase by blowing only the bottom. Also, side force and yawing moment were generated on either side of the vehicle, and directional stability was restored by blowing the appropriate side slot. These experimental results and the predicted full-scale payoffs are presented in this paper, as is a discussion of additional applications to conventional commercial autos, buses, motor homes, and Sport Utility Vehicles.

  16. Effect of moment of inertia to H type vertical axis wind turbine aerodynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. X.; Li, S. T.

    2013-12-01

    The main aerodynamic performances (out power out power coefficient torque torque coefficient and so on) of H type Vertical Axis wind Turbine (H-VAWT) which is rotating machinery will be impacted by moment of inertia. This article will use NACA0018 airfoil profile to analyze that moment of inertia through impact performance of H type VAWT by utilizing program of Matlab and theory of Double-Multiple Streamtube. The results showed that the max out power coefficient was barely impacted when moment of inertia is changed in a small area,but the lesser moment of inertia's VAWT needs a stronger wind velocity to obtain the max out power. The lesser moment of inertia's VAWT has a big out power coefficient, torque coefficient and out power before it gets to the point of max out power coefficient. Out power coefficient, torque and torque coefficient will obviously change with wind velocity increased for VAWT of the lesser moment of inertia.

  17. Aerodynamic performance of a 1.25-pressure-ratio axial-flow fan stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Steinke, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Aerodynamic design parameters and overall and blade-element performances of a 1.25-pressure-ratio fan stage are reported. Detailed radial surveys were made over the stable operating flow range at rotative speeds from 70 to 120 percent of design speed. At design speed, the measured stage peak efficiency of 0.872 occurred at a weight flow of 34.92 kilograms per second and a pressure ratio of 1.242. Stage stall margin is about 20 percent based on the peak efficiency and stall conditions. The overall peak efficiency for the rotor was 0.911. The overall stage performance showed no significant change when the stators were positioned at 1, 2, or 4 chords downstream of the rotor.

  18. Performance deterioration based on simulated aerodynamic loads test, JT9D jet engine diagnostics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stromberg, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    An engine was specially prepared with extensive instrumentation to monitor performance, case temperatures, and clearance changes. A special loading device was used to apply known loads on the engine by the use of cables placed around the flight inlet. These loads simulated the estimated aerodynamic pressure distributions that occur on the inlet in various segments of a typical airplane flight. Test results indicate that the engine lost 1.3 percent in take-off thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC) during the course of the test effort. Permanent clearance changes due to the loads accounted for 1.1 percent; increase in low pressure compressor airfoil roughness and thermal distortion in the high pressure turbine accounted for 0.2 percent. Pretest predicted performance loss due to clearance changes was 0.9 percent in TSFC. Therefore, the agreement between measurement and prediction is considered to be excellent.

  19. Effects of aerodynamic interaction between main and tail rotors on helicopter hover performance and noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menger, R. P.; Wood, T. L.; Brieger, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    A model test was conducted to determine the effects of aerodynamic interaction between main rotor, tail rotor, and vertical fin on helicopter performance and noise in hover out of ground effect. The experimental data were obtained from hover tests performed with a .151 scale Model 222 main rotor, tail rotor and vertical fin. Of primary interest was the effect of location of the tail rotor with respect to the main rotor. Penalties on main rotor power due to interaction with the tail rotor ranged up to 3% depending upon tail rotor location and orientation. Penalties on tail rotor power due to fin blockage alone ranged up to 10% for pusher tail rotors and up to 50% for tractor tail rotors. The main rotor wake had only a second order effect on these tail rotor/fin interactions. Design charts are presented showing the penalties on main rotor power as a function of the relative location of the tail rotor.

  20. Combined experimental and numerical investigations on the roughness effects on the aerodynamic performances of LPT blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrino, Marco; Bigoni, Fabio; Simoni, Daniele; Giovannini, Matteo; Marconcini, Michele; Pacciani, Roberto; Bertini, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a high-load low-pressure turbine blade cascade has been analyzed for three different distributed surface roughness levels (Ra) for steady and unsteady inflows. Results from CFD simulations and experiments are presented for two different Reynolds numbers (300000 and 70000 representative of take-off and cruise conditions, respectively) in order to evaluate the roughness effects for two typical operating conditions. Computational fluid dynamics has been used to support and interpret experimental results, analyzing in detail the flow field on the blade surface and evaluating the non-dimensional local roughness parameters, further contributing to understand how and where roughness have some influence on the aerodynamic performance of the blade. The total pressure distributions in the wake region have been measured by means of a five-hole miniaturized pressure probe for the different flow conditions, allowing the evaluation of profile losses and of their dependence on the surface finish, as well as a direct comparison with the simulations. Results reported in the paper clearly highlight that only at the highest Reynolds number tested (Re=300000) surface roughness have some influence on the blade performance, both for steady and unsteady incoming flows. In this flow condition profile losses grow as the surface roughness increases, while no appreciable variations have been found at the lowest Reynolds number. The boundary layer evolution and the wake structure have shown that this trend is due to a thickening of the suction side boundary layer associated to an anticipation of transition process. On the other side, no effects have been observed on the pressure side boundary layer.

  1. Design and performance of a shape memory alloy-reinforced composite aerodynamic profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. C.; Boller, C.

    2008-04-01

    Based on a shape memory alloy (SMA)-reinforced composite developed separately, the applicability of the composite has been demonstrated through realization of a realistically scaled aerodynamic profile of around 0.5 m span by 0.5 m root chord whose skins had been made from this composite. The design, manufacturing and assembly of the profile are described. The curved skins were manufactured with two layers of SMA wires integrated into the layup of aramid fibre prepregs. All SMA wires were connected such that they can be operated as individual sets of wires and at low voltages, similar to the conditions for electrical energy generation in a real aircraft. The profile was then mounted on a vibration test rig and excited by a shaker at its tip which allowed the dynamic performance of the profile to be validated under internal actuation conditions generated through the SMA wires.

  2. Effects of aerodynamic heating and TPS thermal performance uncertainties on the Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, W. D.; Derry, S. M.; Maraia, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for estimating uncertainties in the aerodynamic-heating and thermal protection system (TPS) thermal-performance methodologies developed for the Shuttle Orbiter is presented. This procedure is used in predicting uncertainty bands around expected or nominal TPS thermal responses for the Orbiter during entry. Individual flowfield and TPS parameters that make major contributions to these uncertainty bands are identified and, by statistical considerations, combined in a manner suitable for making engineering estimates of the TPS thermal confidence intervals and temperature margins relative to design limits. Thus, for a fixed TPS design, entry trajectories for future Orbiter missions can be shaped subject to both the thermal-margin and confidence-interval requirements. This procedure is illustrated by assessing the thermal margins offered by selected areas of the existing Orbiter TPS design for an entry trajectory typifying early flight test missions.

  3. Numerical study of improving aerodynamic performance of low solidity LPT cascade through increasing trailing edge thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Yan, Peigang; Wang, Xiangfeng; Han, Wanjin; Wang, Qingchao

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a new idea to reduce the solidity of low-pressure turbine (LPT) blade cascades, while remain the structural integrity of LPT blade. Aerodynamic performance of a low solidity LPT cascade was improved by increasing blade trailing edge thickness (TET). The solidity of the LPT cascade blade can be reduced by about 12.5% through increasing the TET of the blade without a significant drop in energy efficiency. For the low solidity LPT cascade, increasing the TET can decrease energy loss by 23.30% and increase the flow turning angle by 1.86% for Reynolds number (Re) of 25,000 and freestream turbulence intensities (FSTI) of 2.35%. The flow control mechanism governing behavior around the trailing edge of an LPT cascade is also presented. The results show that appropriate TET is important for the optimal design of high-lift load LPT blade cascades.

  4. Aerodynamic Stability and Performance of Next-Generation Parachutes for Mars Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonyea, Keir C.; Tanner, Christopher L.; Clark, Ian G.; Kushner, Laura K.; Schairer, Edward T.; Braun, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Project is developing a next-generation supersonic parachute for use on future Mars missions. In order to determine the new parachute configuration, a wind tunnel test was conducted at the National Full-scale Aerodynamics Complex 80- by 120-foot Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center. The goal of the wind tunnel test was to quantitatively determine the aerodynamic stability and performance of various canopy configurations in order to help select the design to be flown on the Supersonic Flight Dynamics tests. Parachute configurations included the diskgap- band, ringsail, and ringsail-variant designs referred to as a disksail and starsail. During the wind tunnel test, digital cameras captured synchronized image streams of the parachute from three directions. Stereo hotogrammetric processing was performed on the image data to track the position of the vent of the canopy throughout each run. The position data were processed to determine the geometric angular history of the parachute, which were then used to calculate the total angle of attack and its derivatives at each instant in time. Static and dynamic moment coefficients were extracted from these data using a parameter estimation method involving the one-dimensional equation of motion for a rotation of parachute. The coefficients were calculated over all of the available canopy states to reconstruct moment coefficient curves as a function of total angle of attack. From the stability curves, useful metrics such as the trim total angle of attack and pitch stiffness at the trim angle could be determined. These stability metrics were assessed in the context of the parachute's drag load and geometric porosity. While there was generally an inverse relationship between the drag load and the stability of the canopy, the data showed that it was possible to obtain similar stability properties as the disk-gap-band with slightly higher drag loads by appropriately tailoring the

  5. Aerodynamic and performance characterization of supersonic retropropulsion for application to planetary entry and descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzun, Ashley M.

    shock layer of a blunt body in supersonic flow. Although numerous wind tunnel tests of relevance to SRP have been conducted, the scope of the work is limited in the freestream conditions and composition, retropropulsion conditions and composition, and configurations and geometries explored. The SRP aerodynamic - propulsive interaction alters the aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle, and models must be developed that accurately represent the impact of SRP on system mass and performance. Work within this thesis has defined and advanced the state of the art for supersonic retropropulsion. This has been achieved through the application of systems analysis, computational analysis, and analytical methods. The contributions of this thesis include a detailed performance analysis and exploration of the design space specific to supersonic retropropulsion, establishment of the relationship between vehicle performance and the aerodynamic - propulsive interaction, and an assessment of the required fidelity and computational cost in simulating supersonic retropropulsion flowfields, with emphasis on the effort required to develop aerodynamic databases for conceptual design.

  6. Comparative aerodynamic performance of flapping flight in two bat species using time-resolved wake visualization.

    PubMed

    Muijres, Florian T; Johansson, L Christoffer; Winter, York; Hedenström, Anders

    2011-10-01

    Bats are unique among extant actively flying animals in having very flexible wings, controlled by multi-jointed fingers. This gives the potential for fine-tuned active control to optimize aerodynamic performance throughout the wingbeat and thus a more efficient flight. But how bat wing performance scales with size, morphology and ecology is not yet known. Here, we present time-resolved fluid wake data of two species of bats flying freely across a range of flight speeds using stereoscopic digital particle image velocimetry in a wind tunnel. From these data, we construct an average wake for each bat species and speed combination, which is used to estimate the flight forces throughout the wingbeat and resulting flight performance properties such as lift-to-drag ratio (L/D). The results show that the wake dynamics and flight performance of both bat species are similar, as was expected since both species operate at similar Reynolds numbers (Re) and Strouhal numbers (St). However, maximum L/D is achieved at a significant higher flight speed for the larger, highly mobile and migratory bat species than for the smaller non-migratory species. Although the flight performance of these bats may depend on a range of morphological and ecological factors, the differences in optimal flight speeds between the species could at least partly be explained by differences in their movement ecology. PMID:21367776

  7. Comparative aerodynamic performance of flapping flight in two bat species using time-resolved wake visualization

    PubMed Central

    Muijres, Florian T.; Johansson, L. Christoffer; Winter, York; Hedenström, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Bats are unique among extant actively flying animals in having very flexible wings, controlled by multi-jointed fingers. This gives the potential for fine-tuned active control to optimize aerodynamic performance throughout the wingbeat and thus a more efficient flight. But how bat wing performance scales with size, morphology and ecology is not yet known. Here, we present time-resolved fluid wake data of two species of bats flying freely across a range of flight speeds using stereoscopic digital particle image velocimetry in a wind tunnel. From these data, we construct an average wake for each bat species and speed combination, which is used to estimate the flight forces throughout the wingbeat and resulting flight performance properties such as lift-to-drag ratio (L/D). The results show that the wake dynamics and flight performance of both bat species are similar, as was expected since both species operate at similar Reynolds numbers (Re) and Strouhal numbers (St). However, maximum L/D is achieved at a significant higher flight speed for the larger, highly mobile and migratory bat species than for the smaller non-migratory species. Although the flight performance of these bats may depend on a range of morphological and ecological factors, the differences in optimal flight speeds between the species could at least partly be explained by differences in their movement ecology. PMID:21367776

  8. Influence of surrounding structures upon the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the outdoor unit of a split air-conditioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengjun; Liu, Jiang; Pan, Jie

    2014-07-01

    DC-inverter split air-conditioner is widely used in Chinese homes as a result of its high-efficiency and energy-saving. Recently, the researches on its outdoor unit have focused on the influence of surrounding structures upon the aerodynamic and acoustic performance, however they are only limited to the influence of a few parameters on the performance, and practical design of the unit requires more detailed parametric analysis. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics(CFD) and computational aerodynamic acoustics(CAA) simulation based on FLUENT solver is used to study the influence of surrounding structures upon the aforementioned properties of the unit. The flow rate and sound pressure level are predicted for different rotating speed, and agree well with the experimental results. The parametric influence of three main surrounding structures(i.e. the heat sink, the bell-mouth type shroud and the outlet grille) upon the aerodynamic performance of the unit is analyzed thoroughly. The results demonstrate that the tip vortex plays a major role in the flow fields near the blade tip and has a great effect on the flow field of the unit. The inlet ring's size and throat's depth of the bell-mouth type shroud, and the through-flow area and configuration of upwind and downwind sections of the outlet grille are the most important factors that affect the aerodynamic performance of the unit. Furthermore, two improved schemes against the existing prototype of the unit are developed, which both can significantly increase the flow rate more than 6 %(i.e. 100 m3·h-1) at given rotating speeds. The inevitable increase of flow noise level when flow rate is increased and the advantage of keeping a lower rotating speed are also discussed. The presented work could be a useful guideline in designing the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the split air-conditioner in engineering practice.

  9. Gap and stagger effects on the aerodynamic performance and the wake behind a biplane with endplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hantae

    Modern flow diagnostics applied to a very old aerodynamic problem has produced a number of intriguing new results and new insight into previous results. The aerodynamic performance and associated flow physics of the biplane with endplates as a function of variation in gap and stagger were analytically and experimentally investigated. A combination of vortex lattice method, integrated force measurement, streamwise PIV, and Trefftz plane Stereo PIV were used to better understand the flowfield around the biplane with endplates. This study was performed to determine the configuration with the optimal aerodynamic performance and to understand the fluid mechanics behind optimal and suboptimal performance of the configuration. The Vortex Lattice code (AVL) shows that the gap and stagger have the most dramatic effects out of the six parameters studied: gap, stagger, dihedral, decalage, sweep and overhang. The force balance measurements with fourteen biplane configurations of different gaps and staggers show that as gap and stagger increase, the lift efficiency also increases at all angles of attack tested at both Re 60,000 and 120,000. Using the force balance data, a generalized empirical method for the prediction of lift coefficient as a function of gap, stagger and angle of attack has been determined and validated when combined with existing relations for CL--α adjustments for AR and taper effects. The resulting empirical approach allows for a rapid determination of CL for a biplane having different gap, stagger, AR and taper without the need for a complete flowfield analysis. Two Dimensional PIV results show a distinctive pattern in the downwash angle for the different gap and stagger configurations tested. The downwash angle increases with increasing gap and stagger. It is also evident that the change in downwash angle is directly proportional to the change in lift coefficient as would be expected. Increasing gap spacing increases the downwash angle as well. Based on

  10. Effects of measuring positions on the measured aerodynamic performance of a centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongwei; Zhang, Jun

    2010-04-01

    This paper performs a numerical simulation of three-dimensional flow field in a centrifugal compressor with long inlet and outlet pipes using CFX software. By arranging virtual probes at different positions in both inlet and outlet planes, the aerodynamic performance of the centrifugal compressor is measured and compared with each other. Then effects of measuring positions on measurement results are discussed. The results show that it will generate notable measuring errors of the pressure ratio and efficiency if the inlet total pressure is measured using a single-point probe. The inlet total pressure data can be accurate when they are measured using a 3-point rake. The outlet total pressure and total temperature data can not be accurate if they are respectively measured at one circumferential position even using a multi-point rake. Increasing tangential measuring positions at the outlet is effective to improve the test accuracy. When the outlet total pressure and total temperature are respectively measured at 3 tangential positions, the data can be almost accurate.

  11. The aerodynamic design and performance of the General Electric/NASA EEE fan. [Energy Efficient Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Hager, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and test results of the fan and quarter-stage component for the GE/NASA Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) are presented. The fan is a high bypass ratio, single-stage design having 32 part-span shrouded rotor blades, coupled with a unique quarter-stage arrangement that provides additional core-stream pressure ratio and particle separation. The fan produces a bypass pressure ratio of 1.65 at the exit of the low aspect ratio vane/frame and a core-stream pressure ratio of 1.67 at the entrance to the core frame struts. The full-scale fan vehicle was instrumented, assembled and tested as a component in November 1981. Performance mapping was conducted over a range of speeds and bypass ratios using individually-controlled bypass and core-stream discharge valves. The fan bypass and core-stream test data showed excellent results, with the fan exceeding all performance goals at the important engine operating conditions.

  12. Effects of inlet circumferential fluctuation on the sweep aerodynamic performance of axial fans/compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Xingmin; Zhu, Fang; Wan, Ke; Jin, Donghai

    2013-10-01

    Swept blades have been widely used in the transonic fan/compressor of aircraft engines with the aids of 3D CFD simulation since the design concept of controlling the shock structure was firstly proposed and successfully tested by Dr. Wennerstrom in the 1980s. However, some disadvantage phenomenon has also been induced by excessively 3D blade geometries on the structure stress insufficiency, vibration and reliability. Much confusion in the procedure of design practice leading us to recognize a new view on the flow mechanism of sweep aerodynamical induction: the new radial equilibrium established by the influence of inlet circumferential fluctuation (CF) changes the inlet flows of blading and induces the performance modification of axial fans/compressors blade. The view is verified by simplified models through numerical simulation and circumferentially averaged analysis in the present paper. The results show that the CF source items which originate from design parameters, such as the spanwise distributions of the loading and blading geometries, contribute to the changing of averaged incidence spanwise distribution, and further more affect the performance of axial fans/compressors with swept blades.

  13. Aerodynamic design and initial performance measurements for the SANDIA 34-metre diameter vertical-axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.E.; Klimas, P.C.; Stephenson, W.A. )

    1989-01-01

    The DOE/Sandia 34-m diameter Vertical-Axis Wind turbine (VAWT) utilizes a step-tapered, multiple-airfoil section blade. One of the airfoil sections is a natural laminar flow profile, the SAND 0018/50, designed specifically for use on VAWTs. The turbine has now been fully operational for more than a year, and extensive turbine aerodynamic performance data have been obtained. This paper reviews the design and fabrication of the rotor blade, with emphasis on the SAND 0018/50 airfoil, and compares the performance measurements to date with the performance predictions. Possible sources of the discrepancies between measured and predicted performance are identified, and plans for additional aerodynamic testing on the turbine are briefly discussed. 12 refs., 10 figs.

  14. An Aerodynamic Performance Evaluation of the NASA/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, Paul F.

    1987-01-01

    The results of an aerodynamic performance evaluation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS), conducted in association with the Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics, are presented. The ACFS is a full-mission flight simulator which provides an excellent platform for the critical evaluation of emerging flight systems and aircrew performance. The propulsion and flight dynamics models were evaluated using classical flight test techniques. The aerodynamic performance model of the ACFS was found to realistically represent that of current day, medium range transport aircraft. Recommendations are provided to enhance the capabilities of the ACFS to a level forecast for 1995 transport aircraft. The graphical and tabular results of this study will establish a performance section of the ACFS Operation's Manual.

  15. Aerodynamic design and initial performance measurements for the SANDIA 34-metre diameter vertical-axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Dale E.; Klimas, Paul C.; Stephenson, William A.

    The DOE/Sandia 34-m diameter Vertical-Axis Wind turbine (VAWT) utilizes a step-tapered, multiple-airfoil section blade. One of the airfoil sections is a natural laminar flow profile, the SAND 0018/50, designed specifically for use on VAWTs. The turbine has now been fully operational for more than a year, and extensive turbine aerodynamic performance data have been obtained. This paper reviews the design and fabrication of the rotor blade, with emphasis on the SAND 0018/50 airfoil, and compares the performance measurements to date with the performance predictions. Possible sources of the discrepancies between measured and predicted performance are identified, and plans for additional aerodynamic testing on the turbine are briefly discussed.

  16. Aerodynamic force generation, performance and control of body orientation during gliding in sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Kristin L

    2007-08-01

    Gliding has often been discussed in the literature as a possible precursor to powered flight in vertebrates, but few studies exist on the mechanics of gliding in living animals. In this study I analyzed the 3D kinematics of sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps) during short glides in an enclosed space. Short segments of the glide were captured on video, and the positions of marked anatomical landmarks were used to compute linear distances and angles, as well as whole body velocities and accelerations. From the whole body accelerations I estimated the aerodynamic forces generated by the animals. I computed the correlations between movements of the limbs and body rotations to examine the control of orientation during flight. Finally, I compared these results to those of my earlier study on the similarly sized and distantly related southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans). The sugar gliders in this study accelerated downward slightly (1.0+/-0.5 m s(-2)), and also accelerated forward (2.1+/-0.6 m s(-2)) in all but one trial, indicating that the body weight was not fully supported by aerodynamic forces and that some of the lift produced forward acceleration rather than just balancing body weight. The gliders used high angles of attack (44.15+/-3.12 degrees ), far higher than the angles at which airplane wings would stall, yet generated higher lift coefficients (1.48+/-0.18) than would be expected for a stalled wing. Movements of the limbs were strongly correlated with body rotations, suggesting that sugar gliders make extensive use of limb movements to control their orientation during gliding flight. In addition, among individuals, different limb movements were associated with a given body rotation, suggesting that individual variation exists in the control of body rotations. Under similar conditions, flying squirrels generated higher lift coefficients and lower drag coefficients than sugar gliders, yet had only marginally shallower glides. Flying squirrels have a

  17. Improvement of the aerodynamic performance by wing flexibility and elytra–hind wing interaction of a beetle during forward flight

    PubMed Central

    Le, Tuyen Quang; Truong, Tien Van; Park, Soo Hyung; Quang Truong, Tri; Ko, Jin Hwan; Park, Hoon Cheol; Byun, Doyoung

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the aerodynamic performance of beetle wing in free-forward flight was explored by a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) simulation with measured wing kinematics. It is shown from the CFD results that twist and camber variation, which represent the wing flexibility, are most important when determining the aerodynamic performance. Twisting wing significantly increased the mean lift and camber variation enhanced the mean thrust while the required power was lower than the case when neither was considered. Thus, in a comparison of the power economy among rigid, twisting and flexible models, the flexible model showed the best performance. When the positive effect of wing interaction was added to that of wing flexibility, we found that the elytron created enough lift to support its weight, and the total lift (48.4 mN) generated from the simulation exceeded the gravity force of the beetle (47.5 mN) during forward flight. PMID:23740486

  18. Aerodynamic Performance of a Compact, High Work-Factor Centrifugal Compressor at the Stage and Subcomponent Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Welch, Gerard E.; Skoch, Gary J.; Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.

    2014-01-01

    The measured aerodynamic performance of a compact, high work factor, single-stage centrifugal compressor, comprising an impeller, diffuser, 90-bend, and exit guide vane (EGV), is reported. Performance levels are based on steady-state total-pressure and total-temperature rake and angularity-probe data acquired at key machine rating planes during recent testing at NASA Glenn Research Center. Aerodynamic performance at the stage level are reported for operation between 70 to 105 of design corrected speed, with subcomponent (impeller, diffuser, and exitguide-vane) detailed flow field measurements presented and discussed at the 100 design-speed condition. Individual component losses from measurements are compared with pre-test predictions on a limited basis.

  19. Aerodynamic Performance of a Compact, High Work-Factor Centrifugal Compressor at the Stage and Subcomponent Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Welch, Gerard E.; Skoch, Gary J.; Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.

    2015-01-01

    The measured aerodynamic performance of a compact, high work-factor, single-stage centrifugal compressor, comprising an impeller, diffuser, 90deg-bend, and exit guide vane is reported. Performance levels are based on steady-state total-pressure and total-temperature rake and angularity-probe data acquired at key machine rating planes during recent testing at NASA Glenn Research Center. Aerodynamic performance at the stage level is reported for operation between 70 to 105 percent of design corrected speed, with subcomponent (impeller, diffuser, and exit-guide-vane) flow field measurements presented and discussed at the 100 percent design-speed condition. Individual component losses from measurements are compared with pre-test CFD predictions on a limited basis.

  20. Aerodynamic Performance of a Compact, High Work-Factor Centrifugal Compressor at the Stage and Subcomponent Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Welch, Gerard E.; Skoch, Gary J.; Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.

    2014-01-01

    The measured aerodynamic performance of a compact, high work-factor, single-stage centrifugal compressor, comprising an impeller, diffuser, 90º-bend, and exit guide vane is reported. Performance levels are based on steady-state total-pressure and total-temperature rake and angularity-probe data acquired at key machine rating planes during recent testing at NASA Glenn Research Center. Aerodynamic performance at the stage level is reported for operation between 70 to 105% of design corrected speed, with subcomponent (impeller, diffuser, and exit-guide-vane) flow field measurements presented and discussed at the 100% design-speed condition. Individual component losses from measurements are compared with pre-test CFD predictions on a limited basis.

  1. Aerodynamic performance of a vibrating piezoelectric fan under varied operational conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, J.; Jeffers, N.

    2014-07-01

    This paper experimentally examines the bulk aerodynamic performance of a vibrating fan operating in the first mode of vibration. The influence of operating condition on the local velocity field has also been investigated to understand the flow distribution at the exit region and determine the stalling condition for vibrating fans. Fan motion has been generated and controlled using a piezoelectric ceramic attached to a stainless steel cantilever. The frequency and amplitude at resonance were 109.4 Hz and 12.5 mm, respectively. A test facility has been developed to measure the pressure-flow characteristics of the vibrating fan and simultaneously conduct local velocity field measurements using particle image velocimetry. The results demonstrate the impact of system characteristics on the local velocity field. High momentum regions generated due to the oscillating motion exist with a component direction that is tangent to the blade at maximum displacement. These high velocity zones are significantly affected by increasing impedance while flow reversal is a dominant feature at maximum pressure rise. The findings outlined provide useful information for design of thermal management solutions that may incorporate this air cooling approach.

  2. Effect of longitudinal ridges on the aerodynamic performance of a leatherback turtle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Kyeongtae; Kim, Jooha; Kim, Heesu; Lee, Sang-Im; Choi, Haecheon

    2012-11-01

    Leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) are known as the fastest swimmer and the deepest diver in the open ocean among marine turtles. Unlike other marine turtles, leatherback sea turtles have five longitudinal ridges on their carapace. To investigate the effect of these longitudinal ridges on the aerodynamic performance of a leatherback turtle model, the experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel at Re = 1.0 × 105 - 1.4 × 106 (including that of real leatherback turtle in cruising condition) based on the model length. We measure the drag and lift forces on the leatherback turtle model with and without longitudinal ridges. The presence of longitudinal ridges increases both the lift and drag forces on the model, but increases the lift-to-drag ratio by 15 - 40%. We also measure the velocity field around the model with and without the ridges using particle image velocimetry. More details will be shown in the presentation. Supported by the NRF program (2011-0028032).

  3. Aerodynamic Performance of an Active Flow Control Configuration Using Unstructured-Grid RANS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Viken, Sally A.

    2001-01-01

    This research is focused on assessing the value of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methodology for active flow control applications. An experimental flow control database exists for a TAU0015 airfoil, which is a modification of a NACA0015 airfoil. The airfoil has discontinuities at the leading edge due to the implementation of a fluidic actuator and aft of mid chord on the upper surface. This paper documents two- and three-dimensional computational results for the baseline wing configuration (no control) with tile experimental results. The two-dimensional results suggest that the mid-chord discontinuity does not effect the aerodynamics of the wing and can be ignored for more efficient computations. The leading-edge discontinuity significantly affects tile lift and drag; hence, the integrity of the leading-edge notch discontinuity must be maintained in the computations to achieve a good match with the experimental data. The three-dimensional integrated performance results are in good agreement with the experiments inspite of some convergence and grid resolution issues.

  4. Aerodynamic performance of a wing with a deflected tip-mounted reverse half-delta wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.; Su, Y. Y.

    2012-11-01

    The impact of a tip-mounted 65°-sweep reverse half-delta wing (RHDW), set at different deflections, on the aerodynamic performance of a rectangular NACA 0012 wing was investigated experimentally at Re = 2.45 × 105. This study is a continuation of the work of Lee and Su (Exp Fluids 52(6):1593-1609, 2012) on the passive control of wing tip vortex by the use of a reverse half-delta wing. The present results show that for RHDW deflection with -5° ≤ δ ≤ +15°, the lift was found to increase nonlinearly with increasing δ compared to the baseline wing. The lift increment was accompanied by an increased total drag. For negative RHDW deflection with δ < -5°, the RHDW-induced lift decrement was, however, accompanied by an improved drag. The deflected RHDW also significantly modified and weakened the tip vortex, leading to a persistently lowered lift-induced drag, regardless of its deflection, compared to the baseline wing. Physical mechanisms responsible for the observed RHDW-induced phenomenon were also discussed.

  5. Aerodynamic Performance of an Active Flow Control Configuration Using Unstructured-Grid RANS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Viken, Sally A.

    2001-01-01

    This research is focused on assessing the value of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methodology for active flow control applications. An experimental flow control database exists for a TAU0015 airfoil, which is a modification of a NACA0015 airfoil. The airfoil has discontinuities at the leading edge due to the implementation of a fluidic actuator and aft of mid chord oil the upper surface. This paper documents two- and three-dimensional computational results for the baseline wing configuration (no control) with the experimental results. The two-dimensional results suggest that the mid-chord discontinuity does not effect the aerodynamics of the wing and can be ignored for more efficient computations. The leading-edge discontinuity significantly affects the lift and drag; hence the integrity of the leading-edge notch discontinuity must be maintained in the computations to achieve a good match with the experimental data. The three-dimensional integrated performance results are in good agreement with the experiments in spite of some convergence and grid resolution issues.

  6. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Performance of Two Choked-Flow Inlets Under Static Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. A.; Abbott, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of two choking flow inlets under static conditions. One inlet choked the flow in the cowl throat by an axial translation of the inlet centerbody. The other inlet employed a translating grid of airfoils to choke the flow. Both inlets were sized to fit a 13.97 cm diameter fan with a design weight flow of 2.49 kg/sec. The inlets were operated in both the choked and unchoked modes over a range of weight flows. Measurements were made of inlet pressure recovery, flow distortion, surface static pressure distribution, and fan noise suppression. Choking of the translating centerbody inlet reduced blade passing frequency noise by 29 db while yielding a total pressure recovery of 0.985. Noise reductions were also measured at 1/3-octave band center frequencies of 2500, 5000, and 20,000 cycles. The translating grid inlet gave a total pressure recovery of 0.968 when operating close to the choking weight flow. However, an intermittent high intensity noise source was encountered with this inlet that precluded an accurate measurement of inlet noise suppression.

  7. The measure of environmental sensitivity in detection performance degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zong-wei; Sun, Chao; Xiang, Long-feng

    2012-11-01

    It is known that environmental mismatch in an uncertain ocean can cause performance degradation to sonar detection algorithms. However, there has been relatively little work in defining practical quantitative measures of environmental sensitivity. In previous studies, mismatch analysis was mainly performed on matched field processing for target localization. Environmental sensitivity for ocean acoustic propagation has also been studied where the acoustic field's pressure amplitude variation was considered. Based on these facts, this paper defines a measure of environmental sensitivity in the degradation of detection performance, in order to account for realistic uncertainties in various environmental parameters. Sensitivity is here defined for two detectors. One is the optimum detector in the deterministic ocean environment and another is the optimum Bayesian detector in the uncertain ocean environment. The Malta Plateau, a well-studied shallow-water region of the Mediterranean Sea, is used to perform the detection performance degradation sensitivity analysis. The result shows that (1) the sensitivity is range-and depth-dependent, and its value in the sound channel is much smaller compared to other regions of the ocean; (2) the optimum detector derived for the deterministic environment may suffer a great detection performance degradation when applied to the uncertain environment; and (3) the water-column sound-speed profile and the upper seabed layer are the most sensitive parameters for the degradation of detection performance.

  8. Isolation, identification, and degradation performance of a PFOA-degrading strain.

    PubMed

    Yi, L B; Chai, L Y; Xie, Y; Peng, Q J; Peng, Q Z

    2016-01-01

    The perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)-degrading strain YAB1 was isolated from the soil near a perfluorinated compound production plant through acclimation and enrichment culture, using PFOA as the sole carbon source. This strain was preliminarily identified as Pseudomonas parafulva based on colony morphology, physiological and biochemical features, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Using shaking flask fermentation, the maximum tolerable concentration of YAB1 on PFOA was found to be 1000 mg/L. The optimal conditions for bacterial growth and PFOA degradation were 30°C, pH 7, 2% inoculum, and an initial PFOA concentration of 500 mg/L. After 96 h of culture, the PFOA degradation rate determined by GC-MS analysis was 32.4%. When 1 g/L glucose was added to the inorganic salt culture medium, the degradation rate increased to 48.1%. Glucose was the best exogenous carbon source for the degradation of PFOA. This study reports the degradation performance of PFOA-degrading bacteria. PMID:27173322

  9. Aerodynamic Performance and Flow-Field Characteristics of Two Waverider-Derived Hypersonic Cruise Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; Finley, Dennis B.

    1995-01-01

    The component integration of a class of hypersonic high-lift configurations known as waveriders into hypersonic cruise vehicles was evaluated. A wind-tunnel model was developed which integrates realistic vehicle components with two waverider shapes, referred to as the straight-wing and cranked-wing shapes. Both shapes were conical-flow-derived waveriders for a design Mach number of 4.0. Experimental data and limited computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions were obtained over a Mach number range of 1.6 to 4.63 at a Reynolds number of 2.0 x 10(exp 6) per foot. The CFD predictions and flow visualization data confirmed the shock attachment characteristics of the baseline waverider shapes and illustrated the waverider flow-field properties. Experimental data showed that no significant performance degradations, in terms of maximum lift-to-drag ratios, occur at off-design Mach numbers for the waverider shapes and the integrated configurations. A comparison of the fully-integrated waverider vehicles to the baseline shapes showed that the performance was significantly degraded when all of the components were added to the waveriders, with the most significant degradation resulting from aftbody closure and the addition of control surfaces. Both fully-integrated configurations were longitudinally unstable over the Mach number range studied with the selected center of gravity location and for unpowered conditions. The cranked-wing configuration provided better lateral-directional stability characteristics than the straight-wing configuration.

  10. Aerodynamic performances of three fan stator designs operating with rotor having tip speed of 337 meters per second and pressure ratio of 1.54. 1: Experimental performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelder, T. F.

    1980-01-01

    The aerodynamic performances of four stator-blade rows are presented and evaluated. The aerodynamic designs of two of these stators were compromised to reduce noise, a third design was not. On a calculated operating line passing through the design point pressure ratio, the best stator had overall pressure-ratio and efficiency decrements of 0.031 and 0.044, respectively, providing a stage pressure ratio of 1.483 and efficiency of 0.865. The other stators showed some correctable deficiencies due partly to the design compromises for noise. In the end-wall regions blade-element losses were significantly less for the shortest chord studied.

  11. Influence of heat transfer on the aerodynamic performance of a plunging and pitching NACA0012 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, Denis F.; Alighanbari, Hekmat; Breitsamter, Christian

    2013-02-01

    The unsteady low Reynolds number aerodynamics phenomena around flapping wings are addressed in several investigations. Elsewhere, airfoils at higher Mach numbers and Reynolds numbers have been treated quite comprehensively in the literature. It is duly noted that the influence of heat transfer phenomena on the aerodynamic performance of flapping wings configurations is not well studied. The objective of the present study is to investigate the effect of heat transfer upon the aerodynamic performance of a pitching and plunging NACA0012 airfoil in the low Reynolds number flow regime with particular emphasis upon the airfoil's lift and drag coefficients. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a finite volume method. To consider the variation of fluid properties with temperature, the values of dynamic viscosity and thermal diffusivity are evaluated with Sutherland's formula and the Eucken model, respectively. Instantaneous and mean lift and drag coefficients are calculated for several temperature differences between the airfoil surface and freestream within the range 0-100 K. Simulations are performed for a prescribed airfoil motion schedule and flow parameters. It is learnt that the aerodynamic performance in terms of the lift CL and drag CD behavior is strongly dependent upon the heat transfer rate from the airfoil to the flow field. In the plunging case, the mean value of CD tends to increase, whereas the amplitude of CL tends to decrease with increasing temperature difference. In the pitching case, on the other hand, the mean value and the amplitude of both CD and CL decrease. A spectral analysis of CD and CL in the pitching case shows that the amplitudes of both CD and CL decrease with increasing surface temperature, whereas the harmonic frequencies are not affected.

  12. CF6 Jet Engine Performance Improvement Program: High Pressure Turbine Aerodynamic Performance Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasching, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The improved single shank high pressure turbine design was evaluated in component tests consisting of performance, heat transfer and mechanical tests, and in core engine tests. The instrumented core engine test verified the thermal, mechanical, and aeromechanical characteristics of the improved turbine design. An endurance test subjected the improved single shank turbine to 1000 simulated flight cycles, the equivalent of approximately 3000 hours of typical airline service. Initial back-to-back engine tests demonstrated an improvement in cruise sfc of 1.3% and a reduction in exhaust gas temperature of 10 C. An additional improvement of 0.3% in cruise sfc and 6 C in EGT is projected for long service engines.

  13. An investigation on the aerodynamic performance of a vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaishnav, Etesh

    Scope and Method of Study. The two dimensional unsteady flow around a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) comprising three rotating symmetric airfoils (NACA0018) was studied numerically with the consideration of the near wake. The flow around the wind turbine was simulated using ANSYS FLUENT 12.0.16 at Reynolds number of 106. ICEM CFD was used as a pre-processor to generate hexahedral grid and arbitrary sliding mesh technique was implemented to create a moving mesh. SST k-o turbulence model was employed for the analysis and simulation was set to run at several tip speed ratios ranging from 1 to 5. The variation of the performance coefficient (Cp) as a function of tip speed ratio (lambda) was investigated by plotting a graph between them. A validation was made by comparing CFD results with experimental results. Maximum Cp of 0.34 was obtained at lambda of 3.8. In addition, the effect of the rotor diameter on the VAWT's performance was investigated. In this regard, rotor diameter was halved and the angular velocity was doubled to keep the tip speed ratio constant. Furthermore, the effect of laminar boundary layer separation on Cp of a VAWT was studied by comparing the results of Laminar viscous model and RANS turbulence model. Apart from that, the effect of solidity on Cp was investigated by comparing the Cp obtained from six bladed turbine with the three bladed turbine. Findings and Conclusions. Influence of rotor diameter on the aerodynamic performance of a VAWT was investigated and found that Cp remained almost constant at the same value of lambda ranging from 1 to 5. This was due to the fact that the ratio of the chord length and the rotor radius were kept the same in both cases. For Laminar flow at low Reynolds number, Cp was found to be low due to the presence of leading edge separation bubble and reduced lift-to-drag ratio. Therefore, in order to increase Cp of a VAWT at low Reynolds numbers (e.g. small VAWT), different blade geometry (e.g. cambered) and

  14. Initial Low-Reynolds Number Iced Aerodynamic Performance for CRM Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Brian; Diebold, Jeff; Broeren, Andy; Potapczuk, Mark; Lee, Sam; Bragg, Michael

    2015-01-01

    NASA, FAA, ONERA, and other partner organizations have embarked on a significant, collaborative research effort to address the technical challenges associated with icing on large scale, three-dimensional swept wings. These are extremely complex phenomena important to the design, certification and safe operation of small and large transport aircraft. There is increasing demand to balance trade-offs in aircraft efficiency, cost and noise that tend to compete directly with allowable performance degradations over an increasing range of icing conditions. Computational fluid dynamics codes have reached a level of maturity that they are being proposed by manufacturers for use in certification of aircraft for flight in icing. However, sufficient high-quality data to evaluate their performance on iced swept wings are not currently available in the public domain and significant knowledge gaps remain.

  15. Iodinated contrast media electro-degradation: process performance and degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Del Moro, Guido; Pastore, Carlo; Di Iaconi, Claudio; Mascolo, Giuseppe

    2015-02-15

    The electrochemical degradation of six of the most widely used iodinated contrast media was investigated. Batch experiments were performed under constant current conditions using two DSA® electrodes (titanium coated with a proprietary and patented mixed metal oxide solution of precious metals such as iridium, ruthenium, platinum, rhodium and tantalum). The degradation removal never fell below 85% (at a current density of 64 mA/cm(2) with a reaction time of 150 min) when perchlorate was used as the supporting electrolyte; however, when sulphate was used, the degradation performance was above 80% (at a current density of 64 mA/cm(2) with a reaction time of 150 min) for all of the compounds studied. Three main degradation pathways were identified, namely, the reductive de-iodination of the aromatic ring, the reduction of alkyl aromatic amides to simple amides and the de-acylation of N-aromatic amides to produce aromatic amines. However, as amidotrizoate is an aromatic carboxylate, this is added via the decarboxylation reaction. The investigation did not reveal toxicity except for the lower current density used, which has shown a modest toxicity, most likely for some reaction intermediates that are not further degraded. In order to obtain total removal of the contrast media, it was necessary to employ a current intensity between 118 and 182 mA/cm(2) with energy consumption higher than 370 kWh/m(3). Overall, the electrochemical degradation was revealed to be a reliable process for the treatment of iodinated contrast media that can be found in contaminated waters such as hospital wastewater or pharmaceutical waste-contaminated streams. PMID:25433384

  16. Effects of perforation number of blade on aerodynamic performance of dual-rotor small axial flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongjun; Wang, Yanping; Li, Guoqi; Jin, Yingzi; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2015-04-01

    Compared with single rotor small axial flow fans, dual-rotor small axial flow fans is better regarding the static characteristics. But the aerodynamic noise of dual-rotor small axial flow fans is worse than that of single rotor small axial flow fans. In order to improve aerodynamic noise of dual-rotor small axial flow fans, the pre-stage blades with different perforation numbers are designed in this research. The RANS equations and the standard k-ɛ turbulence model as well as the FW-H noise model are used to simulate the flow field within the fan. Then, the aerodynamic performance of the fans with different perforation number is compared and analyzed. The results show that: (1) Compared to the prototype fan, the noise of fans with perforation blades is reduced. Additionally, the noise of the fans decreases with the increase of the number of perforations. (2) The vorticity value in the trailing edge of the pre-stage blades of perforated fans is reduced. It is found that the vorticity value in the trailing edge of the pre-stage blades decreases with the increase of the number of perforations. (3) Compared to the prototype fan, the total pressure rising and efficiency of the fans with perforation blades drop slightly.

  17. Air-permeable hole-pattern and nose-droop control improve aerodynamic performance of primary feathers.

    PubMed

    Eder, Heinrich; Fiedler, Wolfgang; Pascoe, Xaver

    2011-01-01

    Primary feathers of soaring land birds have evolved into highly specialized flight feathers characterized by morphological improvements affecting aerodynamic performance. The foremost feathers in the cascade have to bear high lift-loading with a strong bending during soaring flight. A challenge to the study of feather aerodynamics is to understand how the observed low drag and high lift values in the Reynolds (Re) regime from 1.0 to 2.0E4 can be achieved. Computed micro-tomography images show that the feather responds to high lift-loading with an increasing nose-droop and profile-camber. Wind-tunnel tests conducted with the foremost primary feather of a White Stork (Ciconia ciconia) at Re = 1.8E4 indicated a surprisingly high maximum lift coefficient of 1.5 and a glide ratio of nearly 10. We present evidence that this is due to morphologic characteristics formed by the cristae dorsales as well as air-permeable arrays along the rhachis. Measurements of lift and drag forces with open and closed pores confirmed the efficiency of this mechanism. Porous structures facilitate a blow out, comparable to technical blow-hole turbulators for sailplanes and low speed turbine-blades. From our findings, we conclude that the mechanism has evolved in order to affect the boundary layer and to reduce aerodynamic drag of the feather. PMID:20938776

  18. Quiet Clean Short-Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Over-The-Wing (OTW) propulsion system test report. Volume 2: Aerodynamics and performance. [engine performance tests to define propulsion system performance on turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design and testing of the over the wing engine, a high bypass, geared turbofan engine, are discussed. The propulsion system performance is examined for uninstalled performance and installed performance. The fan aerodynamic performance and the D nozzle and reverser thrust performance are evaluated.

  19. Aerodynamic performance of a drag reduction device on a full-scale tractor/trailer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanser, Wendy R.; Ross, James C.; Kaufman, Andrew E.

    1991-09-01

    The effectiveness of an aerodynamic boattail on a tractor/trailer road vehicle was measured in the NASA Ames Research Center 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. Results are examined for the tractor/trailer with and without the drag reduction device. Pressure measurements and flow visualization show that the aerodynamic boattail traps a vortex or eddy in the corner formed between the device and the rear corner of the trailer. This recirculating flow turns the flow inward as it separates from the edges of the base of the trailer. This modified flow behavior increases the pressure acting over the base area of the truck, thereby reducing the net aerodynamic drag of the vehicle. Drag measurements and pressure distributions in the region of the boattail device are presented for selected configurations. The optimum configuration reduces the overall drag of the tractor/trailer combination by about 10 percent at a zero yaw angle. Unsteady pressure measurements do not indicate strong vortex shedding, although the addition of the boattail plates increases high frequency content of the fluctuating pressure.

  20. Evaluating the catching performance of aerodynamic rain gauges through field comparisons and CFD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Michael; Colli, Matteo; Stagnaro, Mattia; Lanza, Luca; Quinn, Paul; Dutton, Mark; O'Donnell, Greg; Wilkinson, Mark; Black, Andrew; O'Connell, Enda

    2016-04-01

    Accurate rainfall measurement is a fundamental requirement in a broad range of applications including flood risk and water resource management. The most widely used method of measuring rainfall is the rain gauge, which is often also considered to be the most accurate. In the context of hydrological modelling, measurements from rain gauges are interpolated to produce an areal representation, which forms an important input to drive hydrological models and calibrate rainfall radars. In each stage of this process another layer of uncertainty is introduced. The initial measurement errors are propagated through the chain, compounding the overall uncertainty. This study looks at the fundamental source of error, in the rainfall measurement itself; and specifically addresses the largest of these, the systematic 'wind-induced' error. Snowfall is outside the scope. The shape of a precipitation gauge significantly affects its collection efficiency (CE), with respect to a reference measurement. This is due to the airflow around the gauge, which causes a deflection in the trajectories of the raindrops near the gauge orifice. Computational Fluid-Dynamic (CFD) simulations are used to evaluate the time-averaged airflows realized around the EML ARG100, EML SBS500 and EML Kalyx-RG rain gauges, when impacted by wind. These gauges have a similar aerodynamic profile - a shape comparable to that of a champagne flute - and they are used globally. The funnel diameter of each gauge, respectively, is 252mm, 254mm and 127mm. The SBS500 is used by the UK Met Office and the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency. Terms of comparison are provided by the results obtained for standard rain gauge shapes manufactured by Casella and OTT which, respectively, have a uniform and a tapered cylindrical shape. The simulations were executed for five different wind speeds; 2, 5, 7, 10 and 18 ms-1. Results indicate that aerodynamic gauges have a different impact on the time-averaged airflow patterns

  1. Models for evaluating the performability of degradable computing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L. T.

    1982-01-01

    Recent advances in multiprocessor technology established the need for unified methods to evaluate computing systems performance and reliability. In response to this modeling need, a general modeling framework that permits the modeling, analysis and evaluation of degradable computing systems is considered. Within this framework, several user oriented performance variables are identified and shown to be proper generalizations of the traditional notions of system performance and reliability. Furthermore, a time varying version of the model is developed to generalize the traditional fault tree reliability evaluation methods of phased missions.

  2. Missile aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N.

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental aerodynamics of slender bodies is examined in the reprint edition of an introductory textbook originally published in 1960. Chapters are devoted to the formulas commonly used in missile aerodynamics; slender-body theory at supersonic and subsonic speeds; vortices in viscid and inviscid flow; wing-body interference; downwash, sidewash, and the wake; wing-tail interference; aerodynamic controls; pressure foredrag, base drag, and skin friction; and stability derivatives. Diagrams, graphs, tables of terms and formulas are provided.

  3. Aerodynamic performance of two-dimensional, chordwise flexible flapping wings at fruit fly scale in hover flight.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Madhu; Kang, Chang-kwon

    2015-06-01

    Fruit flies have flexible wings that deform during flight. To explore the fluid-structure interaction of flexible flapping wings at fruit fly scale, we use a well-validated Navier-Stokes equation solver, fully-coupled with a structural dynamics solver. Effects of chordwise flexibility on a two dimensional hovering wing is studied. Resulting wing rotation is purely passive, due to the dynamic balance between aerodynamic loading, elastic restoring force, and inertial force of the wing. Hover flight is considered at a Reynolds number of Re = 100, equivalent to that of fruit flies. The thickness and density of the wing also corresponds to a fruit fly wing. The wing stiffness and motion amplitude are varied to assess their influences on the resulting aerodynamic performance and structural response. Highest lift coefficient of 3.3 was obtained at the lowest-amplitude, highest-frequency motion (reduced frequency of 3.0) at the lowest stiffness (frequency ratio of 0.7) wing within the range of the current study, although the corresponding power required was also the highest. Optimal efficiency was achieved for a lower reduced frequency of 0.3 and frequency ratio 0.35. Compared to the water tunnel scale with water as the surrounding fluid instead of air, the resulting vortex dynamics and aerodynamic performance remained similar for the optimal efficiency motion, while the structural response varied significantly. Despite these differences, the time-averaged lift scaled with the dimensionless shape deformation parameter γ. Moreover, the wing kinematics that resulted in the optimal efficiency motion was closely aligned to the fruit fly measurements, suggesting that fruit fly flight aims to conserve energy, rather than to generate large forces. PMID:25946079

  4. Numerical investigation of the aerodynamic performance for the newly designed cavity vane type vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suffer, K. H.; Usubamatov, R.; Quadir, G. A.; Ismail, K. A.

    2015-05-01

    Research and development activities in the field of renewable energy, especially wind and solar, have been considerably increased, due to the worldwide energy crisis and high global emission. However, the available technical designs are not yet adequate to develop a reliable distributed wind energy converter for low wind speed conditions. The last few years have proved that Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs) are more suitable for urban areas than Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs). To date, very little has been published in this area to assess good performance and lifetime of VAWTs either in open or urban areas. The power generated by vertical axis wind turbines is strongly dependent on the aerodynamic performance of the turbines. The main goal of this current research is to investigate numerically the aerodynamic performance of a newly designed cavity type vertical axis wind turbine. In the current new design the power generated depends on the drag force generated by the individual blades and interactions between them in a rotating configuration. For numerical investigation, commercially available computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software GAMBIT and FLUENT were used. In this numerical analysis the Shear Stress Transport (SST) k-ω turbulence model is used which is better than the other turbulence models available as suggested by some researchers. The computed results show good agreement with published experimental results.

  5. Analysis and compilation of missile aerodynamic data. Volume 2: Performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhalter, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    A general analysis is given of the flight dynamics of several surface-to-air and two air-to-air missile configurations. The analysis involves three phases: vertical climb, straight and level flight, and constant altitude turn. Wind tunnel aerodynamic data and full scale missile characteristics are used where available; unknown data are estimated. For the constant altitude turn phase, a three degree of freedom flight simulation is used. Important parameters considered in this analysis are the vehicle weight, Mach number, heading angle, thrust level, sideslip angle, g loading, and time to make the turn. The actual flight path during the turn is also determined. Results are presented in graphical form.

  6. Environmentally degradable, high-performance thermoplastics from phenolic phytomonomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Tatsuo; Thi, Tran Hang; Shi, Dong Jian; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2006-12-01

    Aliphatic polyesters, such as poly(lactic acid), which degrade by hydrolysis, from naturally occurring molecules form the main components of biodegradable plastics. However, these polyesters have become substitutes for only a small percentage of the currently used plastic materials because of their poor thermal and mechanical properties. Polymers that degrade into natural molecules and have a performance closer to that of engineering plastics would be highly desirable. Although the use of a high-strength filler such as a bacterial cellulose or modified lignin greatly increases the plastic properties, it is the matrix polymer that determines the intrinsic properties of the composite. The introduction of an aromatic component into the thermoplastic polymer backbone is an efficient method to intrinsically improve the material performance. Here, we report the preparation of environmentally degradable, liquid crystalline, wholly aromatic polyesters. The polyesters were derived from polymerizable plant-derived chemicals-in other words, `phytomonomers' that are widely present as lignin biosynthetic precursors. The mechanical performance of these materials surpasses that of current biodegradable plastics, with a mechanical strength, σ, of 63MPa, a Young's modulus, E, of 16GPa, and a maximum softening temperature of 169∘C. On light irradiation, their mechanical properties improved further and the rate of hydrolysis accelerated.

  7. Aerodynamic performance of a new LM 17.2 m rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, F.

    1985-03-01

    The aerodynamic properties of a 17.2 m diameter rotor mounted on a 55 kW windmill were measured. Power curves were measured for a range of blade tip angles to find the best angle in relation to energy production and stalling characteristics. With this optimum blade setting the flapwise blade root bending moment was measured as a function of wind speed. The drag coefficient at 90 deg angle of attack was calculated from measurements of the integrated value, i.e., the flapwise blade root bending moment as a function of wind speed during stand still. Profile properties are estimated from aerodynamic calculations, and the results compared to profile data from three dimensional wind tunnel measurements. The flapwise blade root bending moment versus blade angular position during one revolution was measured in skew wind and compared with calculations. The influence of surface roughnes introduced at a certain percentage of the section chord and the dependency on the Reynolds number is investigated, and discussed from observed discrepancies in the measured power curves.

  8. Complementary Aerodynamic Performance Datasets for Variable Speed Power Turbine Blade Section from Two Independent Transonic Turbine Cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.; Welch, Gerard E.; Giel, Paul W.; Ames, Forrest E.; Long, Jonathon A.

    2015-01-01

    Two independent experimental studies were conducted in linear cascades on a scaled, two-dimensional mid-span section of a representative Variable Speed Power Turbine (VSPT) blade. The purpose of these studies was to assess the aerodynamic performance of the VSPT blade over large Reynolds number and incidence angle ranges. The influence of inlet turbulence intensity was also investigated. The tests were carried out in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility and at the University of North Dakota (UND) High Speed Compressible Flow Wind Tunnel Facility. A large database was developed by acquiring total pressure and exit angle surveys and blade loading data for ten incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. Data were acquired over six flow conditions with exit isentropic Reynolds number ranging from 0.05×106 to 2.12×106 and at exit Mach numbers of 0.72 (design) and 0.35. Flow conditions were examined within the respective facility constraints. The survey data were integrated to determine average exit total-pressure and flow angle. UND also acquired blade surface heat transfer data at two flow conditions across the entire incidence angle range aimed at quantifying transitional flow behavior on the blade. Comparisons of the aerodynamic datasets were made for three "match point" conditions. The blade loading data at the match point conditions show good agreement between the facilities. This report shows comparisons of other data and highlights the unique contributions of the two facilities. The datasets are being used to advance understanding of the aerodynamic challenges associated with maintaining efficient power turbine operation over a wide shaft-speed range.

  9. Off-design computer code for calculating the aerodynamic performance of axial-flow fans and compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, James F.

    1995-01-01

    An off-design axial-flow compressor code is presented and is available from COSMIC for predicting the aerodynamic performance maps of fans and compressors. Steady axisymmetric flow is assumed and the aerodynamic solution reduces to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. A streamline curvature method is used for calculating this flow-field outside the blade rows. This code allows for bleed flows and the first five stators can be reset for each rotational speed, capabilities which are necessary for large multistage compressors. The accuracy of the off-design performance predictions depend upon the validity of the flow loss and deviation correlation models. These empirical correlations for the flow loss and deviation are used to model the real flow effects and the off-design code will compute through small reverse flow regions. The input to this off-design code is fully described and a user's example case for a two-stage fan is included with complete input and output data sets. Also, a comparison of the off-design code predictions with experimental data is included which generally shows good agreement.

  10. Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Jungil; Park, Hyungmin

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the aerodynamics of heavy vehicles, such as tractor-trailers, high-speed trains, and buses. We introduce three-dimensional flow structures around simplified model vehicles and heavy vehicles and discuss the flow-control devices used for drag reduction. Finally, we suggest important unsteady flow structures to investigate for the enhancement of aerodynamic performance and future directions for experimental and numerical approaches.

  11. Effects of icing on the aerodynamic performance of high lift airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, L. N.; Phaengsook, N.; Bangalore, A.

    1993-01-01

    A 2D compressible Navier-Stokes solver capable of analyzing multi-element airfoils is described. The flow field is divided into multiple zones. In each zone, the governing equations are solved using an implicit finite difference scheme. The flow solver is validated through a study of the aerodynamic characteristics of a GA(W)-1 configuration, for which good quality measured surface pressure data and load data are available. The solver is next applied to a study of the effects of icing on an iced 5-element airfoil configuration, experimentally studied at NASA Lewis Research Center. It is demonstrated that the formation of ice over the leading edge slat and the main airfoil can lead to significant flow separation, and a significant loss in lift, compared to clean configurations.

  12. The role of free stream turbulence and blade surface conditions on the aerodynamic performance of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Victor Hugo

    Wind turbines operate within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) which gives rise to turbulence among other flow phenomena. There are several factors that contribute to turbulent flow: The operation of wind turbines in two layers of the atmosphere, the surface layer and the mixed layer. These layers often have unstable wind conditions due to the daily heating and cooling of the atmosphere which creates turbulent thermals. In addition, wind turbines often operate in the wake of upstream turbines such as in wind farms; where turbulence generated by the rotor can be compounded if the turbines are not sited properly. Although turbulent flow conditions are known to affect performance, i.e. power output and lifespan of the turbine, the flow mechanisms by which atmospheric turbulence and other external conditions (such as blade debris contamination) adversely impact wind turbines are not known in enough detail to address these issues. The main objectives of the current investigation are thus two-fold: (i) to understand the interaction of the turbulent integral length scales and surface roughness on the blade and its effect on aerodynamic performance, and (ii) to develop and apply flow control (both passive and active) techniques to alleviate some of the adverse fluid dynamics phenomena caused by the atmosphere (i.e. blade contamination) and restore some of the aerodynamic performance loss. In order to satisfy the objectives of the investigation, a 2-D blade model based on the S809 airfoil for horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) applications was manufactured and tested at the Johns Hopkins University Corrsin Stanley Wind Tunnel facility. Additional levels of free stream turbulence with an intensity of 6.14% and integral length scale of about 0.321 m was introduced into the flow via an active grid. The free stream velocity was 10 m/s resulting in a Reynolds number based on blade chord of Rec ≃ 2.08x105. Debris contamination on the blade was modeled as surface roughness

  13. The Effect of Bypass Nozzle Exit Area on Fan Aerodynamic Performance and Noise in a Model Turbofan Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Podboy, Gary, G.; Woodward, Richard P.; Jeracki, Robert, J.

    2013-01-01

    The design of effective new technologies to reduce aircraft propulsion noise is dependent on identifying and understanding the noise sources and noise generation mechanisms in the modern turbofan engine, as well as determining their contribution to the overall aircraft noise signature. Therefore, a comprehensive aeroacoustic wind tunnel test program was conducted called the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test as part of the NASA Quiet Aircraft Technology program. The test was performed in the anechoic NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel using a 1/5 scale model turbofan simulator which represented a current generation, medium pressure ratio, high bypass turbofan aircraft engine. The investigation focused on simulating in model scale only the bypass section of the turbofan engine. The test objectives were to: identify the noise sources within the model and determine their noise level; investigate several component design technologies by determining their impact on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the fan stage; and conduct detailed flow diagnostics within the fan flow field to characterize the physics of the noise generation mechanisms in a turbofan model. This report discusses results obtained for one aspect of the Source Diagnostic Test that investigated the effect of the bypass or fan nozzle exit area on the bypass stage aerodynamic performance, specifically the fan and outlet guide vanes or stators, as well as the farfield acoustic noise level. The aerodynamic performance, farfield acoustics, and Laser Doppler Velocimeter flow diagnostic results are presented for the fan and four different fixed-area bypass nozzle configurations. The nozzles simulated fixed engine operating lines and encompassed the fan stage operating envelope from near stall to cruise. One nozzle was selected as a baseline reference, representing the nozzle area which would achieve the design point operating conditions and fan stage performance. The total area change from

  14. Effect of Two Advanced Noise Reduction Technologies on the Aerodynamic Performance of an Ultra High Bypass Ratio Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christoper E.; Gazzaniga, John A.

    2013-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center anechoic 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel to investigate two new advanced noise reduction technologies in support of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. The goal of the experiment was to demonstrate the noise reduction potential and effect on fan model performance of the two noise reduction technologies in a scale model Ultra-High Bypass turbofan at simulated takeoff and approach aircraft flight speeds. The two novel noise reduction technologies are called Over-the-Rotor acoustic treatment and Soft Vanes. Both technologies were aimed at modifying the local noise source mechanisms of the fan tip vortex/fan case interaction and the rotor wake-stator interaction. For the Over-the-Rotor acoustic treatment, two noise reduction configurations were investigated. The results showed that the two noise reduction technologies, Over-the-Rotor and Soft Vanes, were able to reduce the noise level of the fan model, but the Over-the-Rotor configurations had a significant negative impact on the fan aerodynamic performance; the loss in fan aerodynamic efficiency was between 2.75 to 8.75 percent, depending on configuration, compared to the conventional solid baseline fan case rubstrip also tested. Performance results with the Soft Vanes showed that there was no measurable change in the corrected fan thrust and a 1.8 percent loss in corrected stator vane thrust, which resulted in a total net thrust loss of approximately 0.5 percent compared with the baseline reference stator vane set.

  15. The effect of prewhirl on the internal aerodynamics and performance of a mixed flow research centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, William B.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1987-01-01

    The internal three-dimensional steady and time-varying flow through the diffusing elements of a centrifugal impeller were investigated using a moderate scale, subsonic, mixed flow research compressor facility. The characteristics of the test facility which permit the measurement of internal flow conditions throughout the entire research compressor and radial diffuser for various operating conditions are described. Results are presented in the form of graphs and charts to cover a range of mass flow rates with inlet guide vane settings varying from minus 15 degrees to plus 45 degrees. The static pressure distributions in the compressor inlet section and on the impeller and exit diffuser vanes, as well as the overall pressure and temperature rise and mass flow rate, were measured and analyzed at each operating point to determine the overall performance as well as the detailed aerodynamics throughout the compressor.

  16. On the flight derived/aerodynamic data base performance comparisons for the NASA Space Shuttle entries during the hypersonic regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Findlay, J. T.; Compton, H. R.

    1983-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance data from the first four Shuttle reentry flights are compared with preflight predictions covering hypersonic longitudinal mode down to Mach 2. The extraction of the flight coefficients, as measured by the spacecraft angular rates and the linear accelerations, derived from the inertial measurement unit, the best estimate trajectory, and the remotely measured atmosphere are discussed. The ground predictions were developed from 30,000 hr of wind tunnel testing. Actual flight data are presented for 80-260 kft, from Mach 2-26, comprising the dynamic pressure, the vehicle air relative attitude angles, control surface deflections, reaction jet activity, and body axis rates and accelerations. The second and fourth flights gave results which deviated from predictions between 230-260 kft. The accuracy limits of the derived atmospheric densities are considered, together with potential data base updates in the light of limitations imposed on the corrections by available flight data.

  17. Aerodynamic performance of a transonic turbine guide vane with trailing edge coolant ejection. Part 1: Experimental approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kapteijn, C.; Amecke, J.; Michelassi, V.

    1996-07-01

    Inlet guide vanes (IGV) of high-temperature gas turbines require an effective trailing edge cooling. But this cooling significantly influences the aerodynamic performance caused by the unavoidable thickening of the trailing edge and the interference of the cooling flow with the main flow. As part of a comprehensive research program, an inlet guide vane was designed and manufactured with two different trailing edge shapes. The results from the cascade tests show that the flow behavior upstream of the trailing edge remains unchanged. The homogeneous values downstream show higher turning and higher losses for the cut-back blade, especially in the supersonic range. Additional tests were conducted with carbon dioxide ejection, in order to analyze the mixing process downstream of the cascade.

  18. Aerodynamics of the flying snake Chrysopelea paradisi: how a bluff body cross-sectional shape contributes to gliding performance.

    PubMed

    Holden, Daniel; Socha, John J; Cardwell, Nicholas D; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2014-02-01

    A prominent feature of gliding flight in snakes of the genus Chrysopelea is the unique cross-sectional shape of the body, which acts as the lifting surface in the absence of wings. When gliding, the flying snake Chrysopelea paradisi morphs its circular cross-section into a triangular shape by splaying its ribs and flattening its body in the dorsoventral axis, forming a geometry with fore-aft symmetry and a thick profile. Here, we aimed to understand the aerodynamic properties of the snake's cross-sectional shape to determine its contribution to gliding at low Reynolds numbers. We used a straight physical model in a water tunnel to isolate the effects of 2D shape, analogously to studying the profile of an airfoil of a more typical flyer. Force measurements and time-resolved (TR) digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) were used to determine lift and drag coefficients, wake dynamics and vortex-shedding characteristics of the shape across a behaviorally relevant range of Reynolds numbers and angles of attack. The snake's cross-sectional shape produced a maximum lift coefficient of 1.9 and maximum lift-to-drag ratio of 2.7, maintained increases in lift up to 35 deg, and exhibited two distinctly different vortex-shedding modes. Within the measured Reynolds number regime (Re=3000-15,000), this geometry generated significantly larger maximum lift coefficients than many other shapes including bluff bodies, thick airfoils, symmetric airfoils and circular arc airfoils. In addition, the snake's shape exhibited a gentle stall region that maintained relatively high lift production even up to the highest angle of attack tested (60 deg). Overall, the cross-sectional geometry of the flying snake demonstrated robust aerodynamic behavior by maintaining significant lift production and near-maximum lift-to-drag ratios over a wide range of parameters. These aerodynamic characteristics help to explain how the snake can glide at steep angles and over a wide range of angles of attack

  19. The Aerodynamic Performance of an Over-The-Rotor Liner with Circumferential Grooves on a High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Rick; Hughes, Christopher; Buckley, James

    2013-01-01

    While liners have been utilized throughout turbofan ducts to attenuate fan noise, additional attenuation is obtainable by placing an acoustic liner over-the-rotor. Previous experiments have shown significant fan performance losses when acoustic liners are installed over-the-rotor. The fan blades induce an oscillating flow in the acoustic liners which results in a performance loss near the blade tip. An over-the-rotor liner was designed with circumferential grooves between the fan blade tips and the acoustic liner to reduce the oscillating flow in the acoustic liner. An experiment was conducted in the W-8 Single-Stage Axial Compressor Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center on a 1.5 pressure ratio fan to evaluate the impact of this over-the-rotor treatment design on fan aerodynamic performance. The addition of a circumferentially grooved over-the-rotor design between the fan blades and the acoustic liner reduced the performance loss, in terms of fan adiabatic efficiency, to less than 1% which is within the repeatability of this experiment.

  20. The Aerodynamic Performance of an Over-the-Rotor Liner With Circumferential Grooves on a High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Buckley, James

    2013-01-01

    While liners have been utilized throughout turbofan ducts to attenuate fan noise, additional attenuation is obtainable by placing an acoustic liner over-the-rotor. Previous experiments have shown significant fan performance losses when acoustic liners are installed over-the-rotor. The fan blades induce an oscillating flow in the acoustic liners which results in a performance loss near the blade tip. An over-the-rotor liner was designed with circumferential grooves between the fan blade tips and the acoustic liner to reduce the oscillating flow in the acoustic liner. An experiment was conducted in the W-8 Single-Stage Axial Compressor Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center on a 1.5 pressure ratio fan to evaluate the impact of this over-the-rotor treatment design on fan aerodynamic performance. The addition of a circumferentially grooved over-the-rotor design between the fan blades and the acoustic liner reduced the performance loss, in terms of fan adiabatic efficiency, to less than 1 percent which is within the repeatability of this experiment.

  1. Vortex wake, downwash distribution, aerodynamic performance and wingbeat kinematics in slow-flying pied flycatchers

    PubMed Central

    Muijres, Florian T.; Bowlin, Melissa S.; Johansson, L. Christoffer; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Many small passerines regularly fly slowly when catching prey, flying in cluttered environments or landing on a perch or nest. While flying slowly, passerines generate most of the flight forces during the downstroke, and have a ‘feathered upstroke’ during which they make their wing inactive by retracting it close to the body and by spreading the primary wing feathers. How this flight mode relates aerodynamically to the cruising flight and so-called ‘normal hovering’ as used in hummingbirds is not yet known. Here, we present time-resolved fluid dynamics data in combination with wingbeat kinematics data for three pied flycatchers flying across a range of speeds from near hovering to their calculated minimum power speed. Flycatchers are adapted to low speed flight, which they habitually use when catching insects on the wing. From the wake dynamics data, we constructed average wingbeat wakes and determined the time-resolved flight forces, the time-resolved downwash distributions and the resulting lift-to-drag ratios, span efficiencies and flap efficiencies. During the downstroke, slow-flying flycatchers generate a single-vortex loop wake, which is much more similar to that generated by birds at cruising flight speeds than it is to the double loop vortex wake in hovering hummingbirds. This wake structure results in a relatively high downwash behind the body, which can be explained by the relatively active tail in flycatchers. As a result of this, slow-flying flycatchers have a span efficiency which is similar to that of the birds in cruising flight and which can be assumed to be higher than in hovering hummingbirds. During the upstroke, the wings of slowly flying flycatchers generated no significant forces, but the body–tail configuration added 23 per cent to weight support. This is strikingly similar to the 25 per cent weight support generated by the wing upstroke in hovering hummingbirds. Thus, for slow-flying passerines, the upstroke cannot be regarded as

  2. Validation of a computer code for analysis of subsonic aerodynamic performance of wings with flaps in combination with a canard or horizontal tail and an application to optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Harry W.; Darden, Christine M.; Mann, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive correlations of computer code results with experimental data are employed to illustrate the use of a linearized theory, attached flow method for the estimation and optimization of the longitudinal aerodynamic performance of wing-canard and wing-horizontal tail configurations which may employ simple hinged flap systems. Use of an attached flow method is based on the premise that high levels of aerodynamic efficiency require a flow that is as nearly attached as circumstances permit. The results indicate that linearized theory, attached flow, computer code methods (modified to include estimated attainable leading-edge thrust and an approximate representation of vortex forces) provide a rational basis for the estimation and optimization of aerodynamic performance at subsonic speeds below the drag rise Mach number. Generally, good prediction of aerodynamic performance, as measured by the suction parameter, can be expected for near optimum combinations of canard or horizontal tail incidence and leading- and trailing-edge flap deflections at a given lift coefficient (conditions which tend to produce a predominantly attached flow).

  3. Performance and aerodynamic braking of a horizontal-axis wind turbine from small-scale wind tunnel tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.V.; Wentz, W.H. Jr.

    1987-07-01

    Wind tunnel tests of three 20-inch diameter, zero-twist, zero-pitch wind turbine rotor models have been conducted in the WSU 7' x 10' wind tunnel to determine the performance of such rotors with NACA 23024 and NACA 64/sub 3/-621 airfoil sections. Aerodynamic braking characteristics of a 38 percent span, 30 percent chord, vented aileron configuration were measured on the NACA 23024 rotor. Surface flow patterns were observed using fluorescent mini-tufts attached to the suction side of the rotor blades. Experimental results with and without ailerons are compared to predictions using airfoil section data and a momentum performance code. Results of the performance studies show that the 64/sub 3/-621 rotor produces higher peak power than the 23024 rotor for a given rotor speed. Analytical studies, however, indicate that the 23024 should produce higher power. Transition strip experiments show that the 23024 rotor is much more sensitive to roughness than the 64/sub 3/-621 rotor. These trends agree with analytical predictions. Results of the aileron tests show that this aileron, when deflected, produces a braking torque at all tip-speed ratios. In free-wheeling coastdowns the rotor blade stopped, then rotated backward at a tip-speed ratio of -0.6. Results of the tuft studies indicate that substantial spanwise flow develops as blade stall occurs at low tip-speed ratios.

  4. Aerodynamic performance of conventional and advanced design labyrinth seals with solid-smooth abradable, and honeycomb lands. [gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, H. L.; Cox, D. M.; Holle, G. F.

    1977-01-01

    Labyrinth air seal static and dynamic performance was evaluated using solid, abradable, and honeycomb lands with standard and advanced seal designs. The effects on leakage of land surface roughness, abradable land porosity, rub grooves in abradable lands, and honeycomb land cell size and depth were studied using a standard labyrinth seal. The effects of rotation on the optimum seal knife pitch were also investigated. Selected geometric and aerodynamic parameters for an advanced seal design were evaluated to derive an optimized performance configuration. The rotational energy requirements were also measured to determine the inherent friction and pumping energy absorbed by the various seal knife and land configurations tested in order to properly assess the net seal system performance level. Results indicate that: (1) seal leakage can be significantly affected with honeycomb or abradable lands; (2) rotational energy absorption does not vary significantly with the use of a solid-smooth, an abradable, or a honeycomb land; and (3) optimization of an advanced lab seal design produced a configuration that had leakage 25% below a conventional stepped seal.

  5. Performance and aerodynamic braking of a horizontal-axis wind turbine from small-scale wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, H. V.; Wentz, W. H., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of three 20" diameter, zero twist, zero pitch wind turbine rotor models were conducted in a 7' x 10' wind tunnel to determine the performance of such rotors with NACA 23024 and NACA 64 sub 3-621 airfoil sections. Aerodynamic braking characteristics of a 38% span, 30% chord, vented aileron configuration were measured on the NACA 23024 rotor. Surface flow patterns were observed using fluorescent mini-tufts attached to the suction side of the rotor blades. Experimental results with and without ailerons are compared to predictions using airfoil section data and a momentum performance code. Results of the performance studies show that the 64 sub 3-621 rotor produces higher peak power than the 23024 rotor for a given rotor speed. Analytical studies, however, indicate that the 23024 should produce higher power. Transition strip experiments show that the 23024 rotor is much more sensitive to roughness than the 64 sub 3-621 rotor. These trends agree with analytical predictions. Results of the aileron test show that this aileron, when deflected, produces a braking torque at all tip speed ratios. In free wheeling coastdowns the rotor blade stopped, then rotated backward at a tip speed ratio of -0.6.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of cyclist aerodynamics: performance of different turbulence-modelling and boundary-layer modelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Defraeye, Thijs; Blocken, Bert; Koninckx, Erwin; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Jan

    2010-08-26

    This study aims at assessing the accuracy of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for applications in sports aerodynamics, for example for drag predictions of swimmers, cyclists or skiers, by evaluating the applied numerical modelling techniques by means of detailed validation experiments. In this study, a wind-tunnel experiment on a scale model of a cyclist (scale 1:2) is presented. Apart from three-component forces and moments, also high-resolution surface pressure measurements on the scale model's surface, i.e. at 115 locations, are performed to provide detailed information on the flow field. These data are used to compare the performance of different turbulence-modelling techniques, such as steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), with several k-epsilon and k-omega turbulence models, and unsteady large-eddy simulation (LES), and also boundary-layer modelling techniques, namely wall functions and low-Reynolds number modelling (LRNM). The commercial CFD code Fluent 6.3 is used for the simulations. The RANS shear-stress transport (SST) k-omega model shows the best overall performance, followed by the more computationally expensive LES. Furthermore, LRNM is clearly preferred over wall functions to model the boundary layer. This study showed that there are more accurate alternatives for evaluating flow around bluff bodies with CFD than the standard k-epsilon model combined with wall functions, which is often used in CFD studies in sports. PMID:20488446

  7. Insights into PEMFC Performance Degradation from HCl in Air

    SciTech Connect

    O Baturina; A Epshteyn; P Northrup; K Swider-Lyons

    2011-12-31

    The performance degradation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is studied in the presence of HCl in the air stream. The cathode employing carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles (Pt/C) was exposed to 4 ppm HCl in air while the cell voltage was held at 0.6 V. The HCl poisoning results in generation of chloride and chloroplatinate ions on the surface of Pt/C catalyst as determined by a combination of electrochemical tests and ex-situ chlorine K-edge X-Ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The chloride ions inhibit the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and likely affect the wetting properties of diffusion media/catalyst layer, while the chloroplatinate ions are responsible for enhanced platinum particle growth most likely due to platinum dissolution-redeposition. The chloride ions can cause corrosion of the Pt nanoparticles in the presence of aqueous HCl in air even if no potential is applied. Although the majority of chloride ions are desorbed from the Pt surface by hydrogen treatment of the cathode, they partially remain in the system and re-adsorb on platinum at cell voltages of 0.5-0.9 V. Chloride ions are removed from the system and fuel cell performance at 0.5-0.7 V is restored by multiple exposures to low potentials.

  8. Validation of a pair of computer codes for estimation and optimization of subsonic aerodynamic performance of simple hinged-flap systems for thin swept wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Harry W.; Darden, Christine M.

    1988-01-01

    Extensive correlations of computer code results with experimental data are employed to illustrate the use of linearized theory attached flow methods for the estimation and optimization of the aerodynamic performance of simple hinged flap systems. Use of attached flow methods is based on the premise that high levels of aerodynamic efficiency require a flow that is as nearly attached as circumstances permit. A variety of swept wing configurations are considered ranging from fighters to supersonic transports, all with leading- and trailing-edge flaps for enhancement of subsonic aerodynamic efficiency. The results indicate that linearized theory attached flow computer code methods provide a rational basis for the estimation and optimization of flap system aerodynamic performance at subsonic speeds. The analysis also indicates that vortex flap design is not an opposing approach but is closely related to attached flow design concepts. The successful vortex flap design actually suppresses the formation of detached vortices to produce a small vortex which is restricted almost entirely to the leading edge flap itself.

  9. Carrier-based dry powder inhalation: Impact of carrier modification on capsule filling processability and in vitro aerodynamic performance.

    PubMed

    Faulhammer, Eva; Wahl, Verena; Zellnitz, Sarah; Khinast, Johannes G; Paudel, Amrit

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of carrier characteristics and dosator capsule filling operation on the in vitro deposition of mixtures containing salbutamol sulphate (SS) and lactose and mannitol as model carrier materials. The carrier surfaces of lactose and mannitol were modified via wet decantation. The impact of the decantation process on the properties of carriers was investigated by laser diffraction, density and powder flow measurements, N2 physisorption, small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SWAXS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Differences in carrier type and untreated and decanted materials were identified and the SAXS measurements proved to be a promising technology confirming the successful removal of fines. Adhesive carrier API mixtures with carrier-to-API ratio of 99:1 wt% were prepared, mixture homogeneity was tested and subsequently the mixtures were filled into capsules at different process settings. Finally, the influence of the decantation process on the in vitro performance of the adhesive mixtures was tested with a next generation impactor. For lactose, the decantation decreased the fine particle fraction (FPF) of SS, whereas the FPF of mannitol as a carrier was only affected by the capsule filling process. In summary, the DPI formulation based on untreated lactose, especially by capsule filling using a dosing chamber to powder layer (compression) ratio of 1:2, proved to be superior in terms of the dosing accuracy (RSD<0.8%) and the in vitro aerodynamic performance (FPF of 12%). PMID:26136200

  10. Improvement of the cruise performances of a wing by means of aerodynamic optimization. Validation with a Far-Field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Varona, J.; Ponsin Roca, J.

    2015-06-01

    Under a contract with AIRBUS MILITARY (AI-M), an exercise to analyze the potential of optimization techniques to improve the wing performances at cruise conditions has been carried out by using an in-house design code. The original wing was provided by AI-M and several constraints were posed for the redesign. To maximize the aerodynamic efficiency at cruise, optimizations were performed using the design techniques developed internally at INTA under a research program (Programa de Termofluidodinámica). The code is a gradient-based optimizaa tion code, which uses classical finite differences approach for gradient computations. Several techniques for search direction computation are implemented for unconstrained and constrained problems. Techniques for geometry modifications are based on different approaches which include perturbation functions for the thickness and/or mean line distributions and others by Bézier curves fitting of certain degree. It is very e important to afford a real design which involves several constraints that reduce significantly the feasible design space. And the assessment of the code is needed in order to check the capabilities and the possible drawbacks. Lessons learnt will help in the development of future enhancements. In addition, the validation of the results was done using also the well-known TAU flow solver and a far-field drag method in order to determine accurately the improvement in terms of drag counts.

  11. Fuzzy regression modeling for tool performance prediction and degradation detection.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Er, M J; Lim, B S; Zhou, J H; Gan, O P; Rutkowski, L

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, the viability of using Fuzzy-Rule-Based Regression Modeling (FRM) algorithm for tool performance and degradation detection is investigated. The FRM is developed based on a multi-layered fuzzy-rule-based hybrid system with Multiple Regression Models (MRM) embedded into a fuzzy logic inference engine that employs Self Organizing Maps (SOM) for clustering. The FRM converts a complex nonlinear problem to a simplified linear format in order to further increase the accuracy in prediction and rate of convergence. The efficacy of the proposed FRM is tested through a case study - namely to predict the remaining useful life of a ball nose milling cutter during a dry machining process of hardened tool steel with a hardness of 52-54 HRc. A comparative study is further made between four predictive models using the same set of experimental data. It is shown that the FRM is superior as compared with conventional MRM, Back Propagation Neural Networks (BPNN) and Radial Basis Function Networks (RBFN) in terms of prediction accuracy and learning speed. PMID:20945519

  12. EGADS: A microcomputer program for estimating the aerodynamic performance of general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.

    1994-01-01

    EGADS is a comprehensive preliminary design tool for estimating the performance of light, single-engine general aviation aircraft. The software runs on the Apple Macintosh series of personal computers and assists amateur designers and aeronautical engineering students in performing the many repetitive calculations required in the aircraft design process. The program makes full use of the mouse and standard Macintosh interface techniques to simplify the input of various design parameters. Extensive graphics, plotting, and text output capabilities are also included.

  13. Cool and Quiet: Partnering to Enhance the Aerodynamic and Acoustic Performance of Installed Electronics Cooling Fans: A White Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle; VanZante, Dale E.

    2006-01-01

    Breathtaking images of distant planets. Spacewalks to repair a telescope in orbit. Footprints on the moon. The awesome is made possible by the mundane. Every achievement in space exploration has relied on solid, methodical advances in engineering. Space exploration fuels economic development like no other endeavor can. But which advances will make their way into our homes and businesses? And how long will it take? Answers to these questions are dependent upon industrial involvement in government sponsored research initiatives, market demands, and timing. Recognizing an opportunity is half the battle. This proposal describes the framework for a collaborative research program aimed at improving the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of electronics cooling fans. At its best, the program would involve NASA and academic researchers, as well as corporate researchers representing the Information Technology (IT) and fan manufacturing industries. The momentum of space exploration, the expertise resultant from the nation's substantial investment in turbofan noise reduction research, and the competitiveness of the IT industry are intended to be catalysts of innovation.

  14. The effect of incidence angle on the overall three-dimensional aerodynamic performance of a classical annular airfoil cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergsten, D. E.; Fleeter, S.

    1983-01-01

    To be of quantitative value to the designer and analyst, it is necessary to experimentally verify the flow modeling and the numerics inherent in calculation codes being developed to predict the three dimensional flow through turbomachine blade rows. This experimental verification requires that predicted flow fields be correlated with three dimensional data obtained in experiments which model the fundamental phenomena existing in the flow passages of modern turbomachines. The Purdue Annular Cascade Facility was designed specifically to provide these required three dimensional data. The overall three dimensional aerodynamic performance of an instrumented classical airfoil cascade was determined over a range of incidence angle values. This was accomplished utilizing a fully automated exit flow data acquisition and analysis system. The mean wake data, acquired at two downstream axial locations, were analyzed to determine the effect of incidence angle, the three dimensionality of the cascade exit flow field, and the similarity of the wake profiles. The hub, mean, and tip chordwise airfoil surface static pressure distributions determined at each incidence angle are correlated with predictions from the MERIDL and TSONIC computer codes.

  15. Aerodynamic performance of a 5-metre-diameter Darrieus turbine with extruded aluminum NACA-0015 blades

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldahl, R.E.; Klimas, P.C.; Feltz, L.V.

    1980-03-01

    A 5-metre-diameter vertical-axis wind turbine has undergone continued testing since 1976 at the Sandia Laboratories Wind Turbine site. The latest tests of this machine have been with extruded aluminum blades of NACA-0015 airfoil cross section. The results of these tests at several turbine rotational speeds are presented and compared with earlier test results. A performance comparison is made with a vortex/lifting line computational code. The performance of the turbine with the extruded blades met all expectations.

  16. Effect of coolant flow ejection on aerodynamic performance of low-aspect-ratio vanes. 2: Performance with coolant flow ejection at temperature ratios up to 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, J. E.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a 0.5 aspect ratio turbine vane configuration with coolant flow ejection was experimentally determined in a full annular cascade. The vanes were tested at a nominal mean section ideal critical velocity ratio of 0.890 over a range of primary to coolant total temperature ratio from 1.0 to 2.08 and a range of coolant to primary total pressure ratio from 1.0 to 1.4 which corresponded to coolant flows from 3.0 to 10.7 percent of the primary flow. The variations in primary and thermodynamic efficiency and exit flow conditions with circumferential and radial position were obtained.

  17. Cold-air annular-cascade investigation of aerodynamic performance of core-engine-cooled turbine vanes. 1: Solid-vane performance and facility description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1975-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid (uncooled) version of a core engine cooled stator vane was experimentally determined in a full-annular cascade, where three-dimensional effects could be obtained. The solid vane, which serves as a basis for comparison with subsequent cooled tests, was tested over a range of aftermixed critical velocity ratios of 0.57 to 0.90. Overall vane aftermixed efficiencies were obtained over this critical velocity ratio range and compared with results from a two-dimensional cascade. The variation in vane efficiency and aftermixed flow conditions with circumferential and radial position were obtained and compared with design values. Vane surface static-pressure distributions were also measured and compared with theoretical results.

  18. Aerodynamic performance of a 5-metre-diameter Darrieus turbine with extruded aluminum NACA-0015 blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldahl, R. E.; Klimas, P. C.; Feltz, L. V.

    1980-03-01

    A 5 metric-diameter vertical-axis wind turbine with extruded aluminum blades of NACA-0015 airfoil cross section was tested. Several turbine rotational speeds are presented and compared with earlier test results. Performance comparison is made with a vortex/lifting line computational code.

  19. An Engine Research Program Focused on Low Pressure Turbine Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Wyzykowski, John; Chiapetta, Santo; Adamczyk, John

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive test program was performed in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland Ohio using a highly instrumented Pratt and Whitney Canada PW 545 turbofan engine. A key objective of this program was the development of a high-altitude database on small, high-bypass ratio engine performance and operability. In particular, the program documents the impact of altitude (Reynolds Number) on the aero-performance of the low-pressure turbine (fan turbine). A second objective was to assess the ability of a state-of-the-art CFD code to predict the effect of Reynolds number on the efficiency of the low-pressure turbine. CFD simulation performed prior and after the engine tests will be presented and discussed. Key findings are the ability of a state-of-the art CFD code to accurately predict the impact of Reynolds Number on the efficiency and flow capacity of the low-pressure turbine. In addition the CFD simulations showed the turbulent intensity exiting the low-pressure turbine to be high (9%). The level is consistent with measurements taken within an engine.

  20. Aerodynamic drag is not the major determinant of performance during giant slalom skiing at the elite level.

    PubMed

    Supej, M; Saetran, L; Oggiano, L; Ettema, G; Šarabon, N; Nemec, B; Holmberg, H-C

    2013-02-01

    This investigation was designed to (a) develop an individualized mechanical model for measuring aerodynamic drag (F(d) ) while ski racing through multiple gates, (b) estimate energy dissipation (E(d) ) caused by F(d) and compare this to the total energy loss (E(t) ), and (c) investigate the relative contribution of E(d) /E(t) to performance during giant slalom skiing (GS). Nine elite skiers were monitored in different positions and with different wind velocities in a wind tunnel, as well as during GS and straight downhill skiing employing a Global Navigation Satellite System. On the basis of the wind tunnel measurements, a linear regression model of drag coefficient multiplied by cross-sectional area as a function of shoulder height was established for each skier (r > 0.94, all P < 0.001). Skiing velocity, F(d) , E(t) , and E(d) per GS turn were 15-21 m/s, 20-60 N, -11 to -5 kJ, and -2.3 to -0.5 kJ, respectively. E(d) /E(t) ranged from ∼5% to 28% and the relationship between E(t) /v(in) and E(d) was r = -0.12 (all NS). In conclusion, (a) F(d) during alpine skiing was calculated by mechanical modeling, (b) E(d) made a relatively small contribution to E(t) , and (c) higher relative E(d) was correlated to better performance in elite GS skiers, suggesting that reducing ski-snow friction can improve this performance. PMID:23121340

  1. On-Orbit Performance Degradation of the International Space Station P6 Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Gustafson, Eric D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the on-orbit performance and performance degradation of the International Space Station P6 solar array wings (SAWs) from the period of December 2000 through February 2003. Data selection considerations and data reduction methods are reviewed along with the approach for calculating array performance degradation based on measured string shunt current levels. Measured degradation rates are compared with those predicted by the computational tool SPACE and prior degradation rates measured with the same SAW technology on the Mir space station. Initial results show that the measured SAW short-circuit current is degrading 0.2 to 0.5 percent per year. This degradation rate is below the predicted rate of 0.8 percent per year and is well within the 3 percent estimated uncertainty in measured SAW current levels. General contributors to SAW degradation are briefly discussed.

  2. Aerodynamic performance of 1.38-pressure-ratio, variable-pitch fan stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Osborn, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    The performance of a variable pitch fan stage tested over a range of blade setting angles, speeds, and flows is presented. The fan was designed for a tip speed of 289.6 m/sec and a flow of 29.6 kg/sec. The measured performance agreed reasonably well with the design point. The stall margin was only 5 percent. Static thrust values along an operating line ranged from less than 15 to over 115 percent of that at design angle as the blade setting angle was varied from 25 degrees (closed) to -8 degrees (opened). The use of casing treatment increased the stall margin to 20.6 percent but decreased efficiency by 4 percentage points.

  3. Performance of anaerobic granules for degradation of pentachlorophenol.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, W M; Bhatnagar, L; Zeikus, J G

    1993-01-01

    Anaerobic granules degrading pentachlorophenol (PCP) with specific PCP removal activity up to 14.6 mg/g of volatile suspended solids per day were developed in a laboratory-scale anaerobic upflow sludge blanket reactor at 28 degrees C, by using a mixture of acetate, propionate, butyrate, and methanol as the carbon source. The reactor was able to treat synthetic wastewater containing 40 to 60 mg of PCP per liter at a volumetric loading rate of up to 90 mg/liter of reactor volume per day, with a hydraulic retention time of 10.8 to 15 h. PCP removal of more than 99% was achieved. Results of adsorption of PCP by granular biomass indicated that the PCP removal by the granules was due to biodegradation rather than adsorption. A radiotracer assay demonstrated that the PCP-degrading granules mineralized [14C]PCP to 14CH4 and 14CO2. Toxicity test results indicated that syntrophic propionate degraders and acetate-utilizing methanogens were more sensitive to PCP than syntrophic butyrate degraders. The PCP-degrading granules also exhibited a higher tolerance to the inhibition caused by PCP for methane production and degradation of acetate, propionate, and butyrate, compared with anaerobic granules unadapted to PCP. PMID:8434908

  4. Aerodynamic and propeller performance characteristics of a propfan-powered, semispan model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Alan D.; Smith, Ronald C.; Wood, Richard D.

    1985-01-01

    A semispan wing/body model with a powered propeller was tested to provide data on a total powerplant installation drag penalty of advanced propfan-powered aircraft. The test objectives were to determine the total power plant installation drag penalty on a representative propfan aircraft; to study the effect of configuration modifications on the installed powerplant drag; and to determine performance characteristics of an advanced design propeller which was mounted on a representative nacelle in the presence of a wing.

  5. Aerodynamic optimization, comparison, and trim design of canard and conventional high performance general aviation configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, M. W.; Selberg, B. P.

    1983-01-01

    A design study has been conducted to optimize trim cruise flight of high performance general aviation canard aircraft which achieve minimum drag. In order to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of canard configured aircraft, corresponding conventional tail-aft 'baseline' aircraft were designed and used for comparison. Two-dimensional predictions were obtained by coupling inviscid results from a vortex panel multi-element program to a momentum integral boundary layer analysis. Using the results of the two-dimensional vortex panel analysis, a vortex lattice method was employed to predict the finite wing results. The analysis utilized a turbulent airfoil and a natural laminar airfoil which are two NASA state-of-the-art airfoil sections. The canard aircraft designs give quantitative results of wing and canard loadings, wing-to-canard moment arm ratios, and aspect ratio effects for trim cruise flight for a wide range of wing-to-canard area ratios. Both canard and baseline aircraft achieved a 25 to 30 percent improvement in performance over typical current technology aircraft, but high canard loading necessary for trim resulted in slightly poorer performance of the canard aircraft as compared to the baseline designs.

  6. Aerodynamics of Race Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, suspension, road, aerodynamics, and of course the driver. In recent years, however, vehicle aerodynamics gained increased attention, mainly due to the utilization of the negative lift (downforce) principle, yielding several important performance improvements. This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic downforce and how it improves race car performance. After this short introduction various methods to generate downforce such as inverted wings, diffusers, and vortex generators are discussed. Due to the complex geometry of these vehicles, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flows and lifting surface shapes unlike traditional airplane wings. Typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development, are discussed as well. In spite of the tremendous progress of these design tools (due to better instrumentation, communication, and computational power), the fluid dynamic phenomenon is still highly nonlinear, and predicting the effect of a particular modification is not always trouble free. Several examples covering a wide range of vehicle shapes (e.g., from stock cars to open-wheel race cars) are presented to demonstrate this nonlinear nature of the flow field.

  7. Aerodynamic design guidelines and computer program for estimation of subsonic wind tunnel performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, W. T.; Mort, K. W.; Jope, J.

    1976-01-01

    General guidelines are given for the design of diffusers, contractions, corners, and the inlets and exits of non-return tunnels. A system of equations, reflecting the current technology, has been compiled and assembled into a computer program (a user's manual for this program is included) for determining the total pressure losses. The formulation presented is applicable to compressible flow through most closed- or open-throat, single-, double-, or non-return wind tunnels. A comparison of estimated performance with that actually achieved by several existing facilities produced generally good agreement.

  8. Enhanced performance of wind energy harvester by aerodynamic treatment of a square prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Gang; Tse, K. T.; Kwok, K. C. S.

    2016-03-01

    This letter presents the effects that fitting fins to various corners of a square-prism galloping-based piezoelectric energy harvester (PEH) has on its performance, based on results from a series of wind tunnel model tests. The results show that attaching fins to the leading edge significantly improves the efficiency of the harvester, achieving a maximum power 2.5 times that attained by a plain square prism PEH. Furthermore, a length that is 1/6 of the prism's cross-sectional width is found to be optimal for fins that are attached to the harvester.

  9. Investigation of Active Flow Control to Improve Aerodynamic Performance of Oscillating Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narducci, Robert P.; Bowersox, Rodney; Bussom, Richard; McVeigh, Michael; Raghu, Surya; White, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to design a promising active flow control concept on an oscillating airfoil for on-blade alleviation of dynamic stall. The concept must be designed for a range of representative Mach numbers (0.2 to 0.5) and representative reduced frequency characteristics of a full-scale rotorcraft. Specifications for a sweeping-jet actuator to mitigate the detrimental effects of retreating blade stall experienced by edgewise rotors in forward flight has been performed. Wind tunnel modifications have been designed to accommodate a 5x6 test section in the Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel at Texas A&M University that will allow the tunnel to achieve Mach 0.5. The flow control design is for a two-dimensional oscillating VR-7 blade section with a 15- inch chord at rotor-relevant flow conditions covering the range of reduced frequencies from 0.0 to 0.15 and Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.5. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to influence the placement of the flow control devices for optimal effectiveness.

  10. Iterative learning control applied to a non-linear vortex panel model for improved aerodynamic load performance of wind turbines with smart rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Mark W.; Tutty, Owen R.; Rogers, Eric; Sandberg, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of smart devices in wind turbine rotor blades could, in conjunction with collective and individual pitch control, improve the aerodynamic performance of the rotors. This is currently an active area of research with the primary objective of reducing the fatigue loads but mitigating the effects of extreme loads is also of interest. The aerodynamic loads on a wind turbine blade contain periodic and non-periodic components and one approach is to consider the application of iterative learning control algorithms. In this paper, the control design is based on a simple, in relative terms, computational fluid dynamics model that uses non-linear wake effects to represent flow past an airfoil. A representation for the actuator dynamics is included to undertake a detailed investigation into the level of control possible and on how performance can be effectively measured.

  11. Evaluation of the performance degradation at PAFC effect of electrolyte fill-level on electrode performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kitai, Takashi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    1996-12-31

    As a complimentary research project to the demonstration project of 5MW and 1MW PAFC plants, the mechanism and rate of deterioration of the cells and stacks have been studied from 1995 FY, with the objective of establishing an estimation method for the service life-time of the cell stacks. This work has been performed in the Basic Research Project, as part of that project on PAFC`s, selecting four subjects (Electrocatalysts degradation, Electrolyte fill-level, Cell material corrosion, Electrolyte loss) as the essential factors relating to the life-time. In this report, we will exhibit the effect of the electrolyte fill-level on the electrode performances.

  12. Aerodynamic performance investigation of advanced mechanical suppressor and ejector nozzle concepts for jet noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagenknecht, C. D.; Bediako, E. D.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced Supersonic Transport jet noise may be reduced to Federal Air Regulation limits if recommended refinements to a recently developed ejector shroud exhaust system are successfully carried out. A two-part program consisting of a design study and a subscale model wind tunnel test effort conducted to define an acoustically treated ejector shroud exhaust system for supersonic transport application is described. Coannular, 20-chute, and ejector shroud exhaust systems were evaluated. Program results were used in a mission analysis study to determine aircraft takeoff gross weight to perform a nominal design mission, under Federal Aviation Regulation (1969), Part 36, Stage 3 noise constraints. Mission trade study results confirmed that the ejector shroud was the best of the three exhaust systems studied with a significant takeoff gross weight advantage over the 20-chute suppressor nozzle which was the second best.

  13. The effect of shielding on the aerodynamic performance of Savonius wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcos, S. M.; Khalafallah, M. G.; Heikel, H. A.

    The effect of the flat plate shield on the performance of two-bladed Savonius rotor has been experimentally determined. Tests were carried out in a low speed wind tunnel with a working section of 1.0 sq m. Flat plate shields with various values of plate width and inclination angle were tested in order to determine the optimum configuration. The maximum power coefficient of the Savonius rotor was increased from 0.22 for the case without shielding to 0.34 for the case with an optimum shielding configuration. The addition of a flat plate shield to the Savonius rotor can, therefore, enhance the power coefficient to values approaching the more elaborate wind turbines without affecting the simplicity of the Savonius rotor.

  14. The aerodynamic performance of several flow control devices for internal flow systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, W. T.; Wettlaufer, B. M.; Mort, K. W.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental reseach and development program was undertaken to develop and document new flow-control devices for use in the major modifications to the 40 by 80 Foot wind tunnel at Ames Research Center. These devices, which are applicable to other facilities as well, included grid-type and quasi-two-dimensional flow straighteners, louver panels for valving, and turning-vane cascades with net turning angles from 0 deg to 90 deg. The tests were conducted at model scale over a Reynolds number range from 2 x 100,000 to 17 x 100,000, based on chord. The results showed quantitatively the performance benefits of faired, low-blockage, smooth-surface straightener systems, and the advantages of curved turning-vanes with hinge-line gaps sealed and a preferred chord-to-gap ratio between 2.5 and 3.0 for 45 deg or 90 deg turns.

  15. Heterogeneous UV/Fenton degradation of TBBPA catalyzed by titanomagnetite: catalyst characterization, performance and degradation products.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yuanhong; Liang, Xiaoliang; Zhong, Yin; Zhu, Jianxi; Zhu, Sanyuan; Yuan, Peng; He, Hongping; Zhang, Jing

    2012-10-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a widely used brominated flame retardant, could negatively affect various aspects of mammalian and human physiology, which triggers effective techniques for its removal. In this work, the degradation characteristics of TBBPA in heterogeneous UV/Fenton reaction catalyzed by titanomagnetite (Fe(3-x)Ti(x)O₄) were studied. Batch tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of titanomagnetite dosage, H₂O₂ concentration and titanium content in magnetite on TBBPA degradation. In the system with 0.125 g L⁻¹ of Fe₂.₀₂Ti₀.₉₈O₄ and 10 mmol L⁻¹) of H₂O₂, almost complete degradation of TBBPA (20 mg L⁻¹) was accomplished within 240 min UV irradiation at pH 6.5. The titanium incorporation obviously enhanced the catalytic activity of magnetite. As shown by the XRD and XANES results, titanomagnetite had a spinel structure with Ti⁴⁺ occupying the octahedral sites. On the basis of the degradation products identified by GC-MS, the degradation pathways of TBBPA were proposed. TBBPA possibly underwent the sequential debromination to form TriBBPA, DiBBPA, MonoBBPA and BPA, and β-scission to generate seven brominated compounds. All of these products were finally completely removed from reaction solution. In addition, the reused catalyst Fe₂.₀₂Ti₀.₉₈O₄ still retained the catalytic activity after three cycles, indicating that titanomagnetite had good stability and reusability. These results demonstrated that heterogeneous UV/Fenton reaction catalyzed by titanomagnetite is a promising advanced oxidation technology for the treatment of wastewater containing TBBPA. PMID:22784808

  16. Characterization of Aerodynamic Performance of Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet Under Crosswind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Lee, Byung Joon

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been studying future transport concepts, envisioned to be technically realizable in the timeframe of 2020-2030, to meet environmental and performance goals. One concept receiving considerable interest involves a propulsion system embedded into a hybrid wing-body aircraft. While offering significant advantages in fuel savings and noise reduction by this concept, there are several technical challenges that are not encountered in the current fleet and must be overcome so as to deliver target performance and operability. One of these challenges is associated with an inlet system that ingests a significantly thick boundary layer, developing along the wing-body surface, into a serpentine diffuser before the flow meeting fan blades. The flow is subject to considerable total pressure loss and distorted at the fan face, much more significantly than in the inlet system of conventional aircraft. In our previous studies [1, 2], we have shown that through innovative design changes on the airframe surface, it is possible to simultaneously increase total pressure recovery and decrease distortion in the flow, without resorting to conventional penalty-ridden flow control concepts, such as vortex generator or boundary layer bleeding/suction. In the current study, we are interested in understanding the following issues: how the embedded propulsion system performs under a crosswind condition by studying in detail the flow characteristics of two inlets, the baseline and another optimized previously under the cruise condition. With the insight, it is hoped that it can help in the follow-on study by devising effective strategies to minimize flow distortion arising from the integration of an embedded-engine system into an airframe to the level acceptable to the operation and fuel consumption before 2030. To achieve these demanding goals, non-conventional concepts are called for; but technology gap is too big that it requires evolutionary approach by focusing various concepts and

  17. Assessment of an Unstructured-Grid Method for Predicting Aerodynamic Performance of Jet Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Josue; Anders, Scott G.

    2006-01-01

    The application of a Computational Fluid Dynamics tool to a jet flap control effector on an elliptical airfoil-section wing was investigated. The study utilized the Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver code used was USM3D. The CFD-based jet flap simulations were compared to experimental results from a wind tunnel test conducted at the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The wind tunnel model consisted of a six percent thick elliptical airfoil with a modified trailing edge. The jet flap was located at 95% chord and exited at 90 degrees to the lower surface. The experimental model was designed to promote two-dimensional flow across the wing. It was found that the CFD simulation had to model the three-dimensional geometry of the experiment in order to obtain good agreement. Tests were performed at two Mach numbers at several different jet momentum coefficients. In order to be consistent with the experimental method, the CFD lift and pitching moment values were determined by integrating the pressures over the wing.

  18. Simulation and experiment research of aerodynamic performance of small axial fans with struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wei; Lin, Peifeng; Zhang, Li; Jin, Yingzi; Wang, Yanping; Kim, Heuy Dong; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2016-06-01

    Interaction between rotor and struts has great effect on the performance of small axial fan systems. The small axial fan systems are selected as the studied objects in this paper, and four square struts are downstream of the rotor. The cross section of the struts is changed to the cylindrical shapes for the investigation: one is in the same hydraulic diameter as the square struts and another one is in the same cross section as the square struts. Influence of the shape of the struts on the static pressure characteristics, the internal flow and the sound emission of the small axial fans are studied. Standard K-ɛ turbulence model and SIMPLE algorithm are applied in the calculation of the steady fluid field, and the curves of the pressure rising against the flow rate are obtained, which demonstrates that the simulation results are in nice consistence with the experimental data. The steady calculation results are set as the initial field in the unsteady calculation. Large eddy simulation and PISO algorithm are used in the transient calculation, and the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings model is introduced to predict the sound level at the eight monitoring points. The research results show that: the static pressure coefficients of the fan with cylindrical struts increase by about 25% compared to the fan with square struts, and the efficiencies increase by about 28.6%. The research provides a theoretical guide for shape optimization and noise reduction of small axial fan with struts.

  19. Analysis of Performance of Jet Engine from Characteristics of Components I : Aerodynamic and Matching Characteristics of Turbine Component Determined with Cold Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W

    1947-01-01

    The performance of the turbine component of an NACA research jet engine was investigated with cold air. The interaction and the matching of the turbine with the NACA eight-stage compressor were computed with the combination considered as a jet engine. The over-all performance of the engine was then determined. The internal aerodynamics were studied to the extent of investigating the performance of the first stator ring and its influence on the turbine performance. For this ring, the stream-filament method for computing velocity distribution permitted efficient sections to be designed, but the design condition of free-vortex flow with uniform axial velocities was not obtained.

  20. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a 1.83-meter (6-ft) diameter 1.25-pressure-ratio fan (QF-8)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    A 1.25-pressure-ratio 1.83-meter (6-ft) tip diameter experimental fan stage with characteristics suitable for engine application on STOL aircraft was tested for acoustic and aerodynamic performance. The design incorporated proven features for low noise, including absence of inlet guide vanes, low rotor blade tip speed, low aerodynamic blade loading, and long axial spacing between the rotor and stator blade rows. The fan was operated with five exhaust nozzle areas. The stage noise levels generally increased with a decrease in nozzle area. Separation of the acoustic one-third octave results into broadband and pure-tone components showed the broadband noise to be greater than the corresponding pure-tone components. The sideline perceived noise was highest in the rear quadrants. The acoustic results of QF-8 were compared with those of two similar STOL application fans in the test series. The QF-8 had somewhat higher relative noise levels than those of the other two fans. The aerodynamic results of QF-8 and the other two fans were compared with corresponding results from 50.8-cm (20-in.) diam scale models of these fans and design values. Although the results for the full-scale and scale models of the other two fans were in reasonable agreement for each design, the full-scale fan QF-8 results showed poor performance compared with corresponding model results and design expectations. Facility effects of the full-scale fan QF-8 installation were considered in analyzing this discrepancy.

  1. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    The modern theory of aerodynamic sound originates from Lighthill's two papers in 1952 and 1954, as is well known. I have heard that Lighthill was motivated in writing the papers by the jet-noise emitted by the newly commercialized jet-engined airplanes at that time. The technology of aerodynamic sound is destined for environmental problems. Therefore the theory should always be applied to newly emerged public nuisances. This issue of Fluid Dynamics Research (FDR) reflects problems of environmental sound in present Japanese technology. The Japanese community studying aerodynamic sound has held an annual symposium since 29 years ago when the late Professor S Kotake and Professor S Kaji of Teikyo University organized the symposium. Most of the Japanese authors in this issue are members of the annual symposium. I should note the contribution of the two professors cited above in establishing the Japanese community of aerodynamic sound research. It is my pleasure to present the publication in this issue of ten papers discussed at the annual symposium. I would like to express many thanks to the Editorial Board of FDR for giving us the chance to contribute these papers. We have a review paper by T Suzuki on the study of jet noise, which continues to be important nowadays, and is expected to reform the theoretical model of generating mechanisms. Professor M S Howe and R S McGowan contribute an analytical paper, a valuable study in today's fluid dynamics research. They apply hydrodynamics to solve the compressible flow generated in the vocal cords of the human body. Experimental study continues to be the main methodology in aerodynamic sound, and it is expected to explore new horizons. H Fujita's study on the Aeolian tone provides a new viewpoint on major, longstanding sound problems. The paper by M Nishimura and T Goto on textile fabrics describes new technology for the effective reduction of bluff-body noise. The paper by T Sueki et al also reports new technology for the

  2. Performance of an aerodynamic yaw controller mounted on the space shuttle orbiter body flap at Mach 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scallion, W. I.

    1995-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of the effectiveness of an aerodynamic yaw controller mounted on the lower surface of a shuttle orbiter model body flap was conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel. The controller consisted of a 60 deg delta fin mounted perpendicular to the body flap lower surface and yawed 30 deg to the free stream direction. The control was tested at angles of attack from 20 deg to 40 deg at zero sideslip for a Reynolds number based on wing mean aerodynamic chord of 0.66 x 10(exp 6). The aerodynamic and control effectiveness characteristics are presented along with an analysis of the effectiveness of the controller in making a bank maneuver for Mach 18 flight conditions. The controller was effective in yaw and produced a favorable rolling moment. The analysis showed that the controller was as effective as the reaction control system in making the bank maneuver. These results warrant further studies of the aerodynamic/aerothermodynamic characteristics of the control concept for application to future transportation vehicles.

  3. DEGRADATION OF EMISSIONS CONTROL PERFORMANCE OF WOODSTOVES IN CRESTED BUTTE, CO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the degradation of emissions control performance of woodstoves in Crested Butte, Colorado. Four seasons of field monitoring of EPA-certified woodstoves in and around Crested Butte has demonstrated some significant failures in emissions control performance. In...

  4. Hidden Markov model and nuisance attribute projection based bearing performance degradation assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Huiming; Chen, Jin; Dong, Guangming

    2016-05-01

    Hidden Markov model (HMM) has been widely applied in bearing performance degradation assessment. As a machine learning-based model, its accuracy, subsequently, is dependent on the sensitivity of the features used to estimate the degradation performance of bearings. It's a big challenge to extract effective features which are not influenced by other qualities or attributes uncorrelated with the bearing degradation condition. In this paper, a bearing performance degradation assessment method based on HMM and nuisance attribute projection (NAP) is proposed. NAP can filter out the effect of nuisance attributes in feature space through projection. The new feature space projected by NAP is more sensitive to bearing health changes and barely influenced by other interferences occurring in operation condition. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, two different experimental databases are utilized. The results show that the combination of HMM and NAP can effectively improve the accuracy and robustness of the bearing performance degradation assessment system.

  5. Steady and Unsteady Aerodynamics of Thin Airfoils with Porosity Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajian, Rozhin; Jaworski, Justin W.

    2015-11-01

    Porous treatments have been shown in previous studies to reduce turbulence noise generation from the edges of wings and blades. However, this acoustical benefit can come at the cost of aerodynamic performance that is degraded by seepage flow through the wing. To better understand the trade-off between acoustic stealth and the desired airfoil performance, the aerodynamic loads of a thin airfoil in uniform flow with a prescribed porosity distribution are determined analytically in closed form, provided that the distribution is Hölder-continuous. The theoretical model is extended to include unsteady heaving and pitching motions of the airfoil section, which has applications to the performance estimation of biologically-inspired swimmers and fliers and to the future assessment of vortex noise production from porous airfoils.

  6. Supersonic aerodynamics of delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    Through the empirical correlation of experimental data and theoretical analysis, a set of graphs has been developed which summarize the inviscid aerodynamics of delta wings at supersonic speeds. The various graphs which detail the aerodynamic performance of delta wings at both zero-lift and lifting conditions were then employed to define a preliminary wing design approach in which both the low-lift and high-lift design criteria were combined to define a feasible design space.

  7. Aerodynamics of a linear oscillating cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, Daniel H.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1990-01-01

    The steady and unsteady aerodynamics of a linear oscillating cascade are investigated using experimental and computational methods. Experiments are performed to quantify the torsion mode oscillating cascade aerodynamics of the NASA Lewis Transonic Oscillating Cascade for subsonic inlet flowfields using two methods: simultaneous oscillation of all the cascaded airfoils at various values of interblade phase angle, and the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. Analysis of these data and correlation with classical linearized unsteady aerodynamic analysis predictions indicate that the wind tunnel walls enclosing the cascade have, in some cases, a detrimental effect on the cascade unsteady aerodynamics. An Euler code for oscillating cascade aerodynamics is modified to incorporate improved upstream and downstream boundary conditions and also the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. The new boundary conditions are shown to improve the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. The new boundary conditions are shown to improve the unsteady aerodynamic predictions of the code, and the computational unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique is shown to be a viable alternative for calculation of oscillating cascade aerodynamics.

  8. Unstructured Grid Euler Method Assessment for Longitudinal and Lateral/Directional Aerodynamic Performance Analysis of the HSR Technology Concept Airplane at Supersonic Cruise Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    1999-01-01

    Unstructured grid Euler computations, performed at supersonic cruise speed, are presented for a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration, designated as the Technology Concept Airplane (TCA) within the High Speed Research (HSR) Program. The numerical results are obtained for the complete TCA cruise configuration which includes the wing, fuselage, empennage, diverters, and flow through nacelles at M (sub infinity) = 2.4 for a range of angles-of-attack and sideslip. Although all the present computations are performed for the complete TCA configuration, appropriate assumptions derived from the fundamental supersonic aerodynamic principles have been made to extract aerodynamic predictions to complement the experimental data obtained from a 1.675%-scaled truncated (aft fuselage/empennage components removed) TCA model. The validity of the computational results, derived from the latter assumptions, are thoroughly addressed and discussed in detail. The computed surface and off-surface flow characteristics are analyzed and the pressure coefficient contours on the wing lower surface are shown to correlate reasonably well with the available pressure sensitive paint results, particularly, for the complex flow structures around the nacelles. The predicted longitudinal and lateral/directional performance characteristics for the truncated TCA configuration are shown to correlate very well with the corresponding wind-tunnel data across the examined range of angles-of-attack and sideslip. The complementary computational results for the longitudinal and lateral/directional performance characteristics for the complete TCA configuration are also presented along with the aerodynamic effects due to empennage components. Results are also presented to assess the computational method performance, solution sensitivity to grid refinement, and solution convergence characteristics.

  9. Aerodynamic performance and particle image velocimetery of piezo actuated biomimetic manduca sexta engineered wings towards the design and application of a flapping wing flight vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, Anthony M.

    Considerable research and investigation has been conducted on the aerodynamic performance, and the predominate flow physics of the Manduca Sexta size of biomimetically designed and fabricated wings as part of the AFIT FWMAV design project. Despite a burgeoning interest and research into the diverse field of flapping wing flight and biomimicry, the aerodynamics of flapping wing flight remains a nebulous field of science with considerable variance into the theoretical abstractions surrounding aerodynamic mechanisms responsible for aerial performance. Traditional FWMAV flight models assume a form of a quasi-steady approximation of wing aerodynamics based on an infinite wing blade element model (BEM). An accurate estimation of the lift, drag, and side force coefficients is a critical component of autonomous stability and control models. This research focused on two separate experimental avenues into the aerodynamics of AFIT's engineered hawkmoth wings|forces and flow visualization. 1. Six degree of freedom force balance testing, and high speed video analysis was conducted on 30°, 45°, and 60° angle stop wings. A novel, non-intrusive optical tracking algorithm was developed utilizing a combination of a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) and ComputerVision (OpenCV) tools to track the wing in motion from multiple cameras. A complete mapping of the wing's kinematic angles as a function of driving amplitude was performed. The stroke angle, elevation angle, and angle of attack were tabulated for all three wings at driving amplitudes ranging from A=0.3 to A=0.6. The wing kinematics together with the force balance data was used to develop several aerodynamic force coefficient models. A combined translational and rotational aerodynamic model predicted lift forces within 10%, and vertical forces within 6%. The total power consumption was calculated for each of the three wings, and a Figure of Merit was calculated for each wing as a general expression of the overall efficiency of

  10. Cold-air annular-cascade investigation of aerodynamic performance of cooled turbine vanes. 2: Trailing-edge ejection, film cooling, and transpiration cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1975-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of four different cooled vane configurations was experimentally determined in a full-annular cascade at a primary- to coolant-total-temperature ratio of 1.0. The vanes were tested over a range of coolant flow rates and pressure ratios. Overall vane efficiencies were obtained and compared, where possible, with the results obtained in a four-vane, annular-sector cascade. The vane efficiency and exit flow conditions as functions of radial position were also determined and compared with solid (uncooled) vane results.

  11. A performability solution method for degradable nonrepairable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furchtgott, D. G.; Meyer, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    The present performability model-solving algorithm identifies performance with 'reward', representing the state behavior of a system S by a finite-state stochastic process and determining reward by means of reward rates that are associated with the states of the base model. A general method is obtained for determining the probability distribution function of the performance (reward) variable, and therefore the performability, of the corresponding system. This is done for bounded utilization periods, and the result is an integral expression which is either analytically or numerically solvable.

  12. New technology in turbine aerodynamics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Cursory review of some recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flowfields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

  13. Bearing Performance Degradation Assessment Using Linear Discriminant Analysis and Coupled HMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Chen, J.; Zhou, X. N.; Xiao, W. B.

    2012-05-01

    Bearing is one of the most important units in rotary machinery, its performance may vary significantly under different working stages. Thus it is critical to choose the most effective features for bearing performance degradation prediction. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) is a useful method in finding few feature's dimensions that best discriminate a set of features extracted from original vibration signals. Another challenge in bearing performance degradation is how to build a model to recognize the different conditions with the data coming from different monitoring channels. In this paper, coupled hidden Markov models (CHMM) is presented to model interacting processes which can overcome the defections of the HMM. Because the input data in CHMM are collected by several sensors, and the interacting information can be fused by coupled modalities, it is more effective than HMM which used only one state chain. The model can be used in estimating the bearing performance degradation states according to several observation data. When becoming degradation pattern recognition, the new observation features should be input into the pre-trained CHMM and calculate the performance index (PI) of the outputs, the changing of PI could be used to describe the different degradation level of the bearings. The results show that PI will decline with the increase of the bearing degradation. Assessment results of the whole life time experimental bearing signals validate the feasibility and effectiveness of this method.

  14. The preparation and degradation performance of CdS photocatalysts to methyl orange solution.

    PubMed

    Duan, Limei; Zhao, Weiqiang; Xu, Ling; Chen, Xiaohong; Lita, A; Liu, Zongrui

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the CdS samples were prepared using thiourea or sodium sulfide as sulfur source by hydrothermal or solvothermal synthesis method, the results of XRD, TEM and SEM showed all the samples belong to hexagonal CdS nano-material with different morphologies. Using the degradation of methyl orange solution as a model reaction, the photocatalytic performance of different CdS samples was measured, and the samples prepared using thiourea as sulfur source exhibited better photocatalytic activity than those using sodium sulfide as sulfur source. The factors on degradation effect were discussed including the pH value of degradation system and the type of light source. The degradation effect of CdS samples increased with the pH value decreased, and the degradation effect was better when the methyl orange solution was irradiated under sunlight than under 250 W mercury lamp. PMID:23755673

  15. Performance degradation in fast frequency-scanned circular arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, R. K.; Patel, M. R.

    1983-05-01

    The effects of high-speed scanning in frequency-scanned circular arrays are investigated. It is found that at high scanning rates the performance deteriorates with both a loss of main beam amplitude and an increase in side-lobe level. The performance of a circular array is similar to that of a linear array, although the deterioration observed in the case of a circular array is less than that observed in the case of a linear array having a length equal to the diameter of the circular array. However, in contrast with the case of a linear array, the circular array does not exhibit any significant changes in the 3 dB bandwidth, nor does it show a frequency spread associated with a fast scanning linear array. Examples from both radar and sonar are examined.

  16. Augmentation of Cavity Optical Inspection by Replicas Without Performance Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, M.; Burk, D.; Hicks, D.; Wu, G.; Thompson, C.; Cooley, L.D.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Although cavity optical inspection systems provide a huge amount of qualitative information about surface features, the amount of quantitative topographic informa-tion is limited. Here, we report the use of silicone-based RTV for replicas and moldings that provide increased details of topographic data associated with the optical cavity images. Profilometry scans of the molds yield mi-crometer-scale details associated with equator weld struc-tures and weld pits. This confirms at least two different types of pits, one which is bowl-shaped, and one which has a small peak at the bottom. The contour information extracted from profilometry can be used to evaluate mechanisms by which pits and other features limit RF performance. We present calculations based on a con-formal transformation of the profiles above. We also show that application of the replica followed by rinsing does not adversely affect the cavity performance.

  17. Turbulence degradation and mitigation performance for handheld weapon ID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinola, Richard L.; Aghera, Sameer; Thompson, Roger; Miller, Jason

    2012-06-01

    Atmospheric turbulence can severely limit the range performance of state-of-the-art large aperture imaging sensor systems, specifically those intended for long range ground to ground target identification. Simple and cost-effective mitigation solutions which operate in real-time are desired. Software-based post-processing techniques are attractive as they lend themselves to easy implementation and integration into the back-end of existing sensor systems. Recently, various post-processing algorithms to mitigate turbulence have been developed and implemented in real-time hardware. To determine their utility in Army-relevant tactical scenarios, an assessment of the impact of the post processing on observer performance is required. In this paper, we test a set of representative turbulence mitigation algorithms on field collected data of human targets carrying various handheld objects in varying turbulence conditions. We use a controlled human perception test to assess handheld weapon identification performance before and after turbulence mitigation post-processing. In addition, novel image analysis tools are implemented to estimate turbulence strength from the scene. Results of this assessment will lead to recommendations on cost-effective turbulence mitigation strategies suitable for future sensor systems.

  18. Storage life of power switching transistors based on performance degradation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haochun, Qi; Xiaoling, Zhang; Xuesong, Xie; Changzhi, Lü; Chengju, Chen; Li, Zhao

    2014-04-01

    NPN-type small and medium power switching transistors in 3DK series are used to conduct analyses and studies of accelerating degradation. Through three group studies of accelerating degradation in different temperature-humidity constant stresses, the failure sensitive parameters of transistors are identified and the lifetime of samples is extrapolated from the performance degradation data. Average lifetimes in three common distributions are given, when, combined with the Hallberg-Peck temperature-humidity model, the storage lifetime of transistor samples in the natural storage condition is extrapolated between 105-107 h. According to its definition, the accelerating factor is 1462 in 100°C/100% relative humidity (RH) stress condition, and 25°C/25% RH stress condition. Finally, the degradation causes of performance parameters of the test samples are analyzed. The findings can provide certain references for the storage reliability of domestic transistors.

  19. Aerodynamic performance of transonic and subsonic airfoils: Effects of surface roughness, turbulence intensity, Mach number, and streamline curvature-airfoil shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang

    The effects of surface roughness, turbulence intensity, Mach number, and streamline curvature-airfoil shape on the aerodynamic performance of turbine airfoils are investigated in compressible, high speed flows. The University of Utah Transonic Wind Tunnel is employed for the experimental part of the study. Two different test sections are designed to produce Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, passage mass flow rates, and physical dimensions, which match values along turbine blades in operating engines: (i) a nonturning test section with a symmetric airfoil, and (ii) a cascade test section with a cambered turbine vane. The nonuniform, irregular, three-dimensional surface roughness is characterized using the equivalent sand grain roughness size. Changing the airfoil surface roughness condition has a substantial effect on wake profiles of total pressure loss coefficients, normalized Mach number, normalized kinetic energy, and on the normalized and dimensional magnitudes of Integrated Aerodynamic Losses produced by the airfoils. Comparisons with results for a symmetric airfoil and a cambered vane show that roughness has more substantial effects on losses produced by the symmetric airfoil than the cambered vane. Data are also provided that illustrate the larger loss magnitudes are generally present with flow turning and cambered airfoils, than with symmetric airfoils. Wake turbulence structure of symmetric airfoils and cambered vanes are also studied experimentally. The effects of surface roughness and freestream turbulence levels on wake distributions of mean velocity, turbulence intensity, and power spectral density profiles and vortex shedding frequencies are quantified one axial chord length downstream of the test airfoils. As the level of surface roughness increases, all wake profile quantities broaden significantly and nondimensional vortex shedding frequencies decrease. Wake profiles produced by the symmetric airfoil are more sensitive to variations of surface

  20. Degradation mode surveys of high performance candidate container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1990-12-01

    Corrosion resistant materials are being considered for the metallic barrier of the Yucca Mountain Project`s high-level radioactive waste disposal containers. Nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys and titanium alloys have good corrosion resistance properties and are considered good candidates for the metallic barrier. The localized corrosion phenomena, pitting and crevice corrosion, are considered as potentially limiting for the barrier lifetime. An understanding of the mechanisms of localized corrosion and of how various parameters affect it will be necessary for adequate performance assessment of candidate container materials. Examples of some of the concerns involving localized corrosion are discussed. The effects of various parameters, such as temperature and concentration of halide species, on localized corrosion are given. In addition, concerns about aging of the protective oxide layer in the expected service temperature range (50 to 250{degree}C) are presented. Also some mechanistic considerations of localized corrosion are given. 45 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Structural and aerodynamic loads and performance measurements of an SA349/2 helicopter with an advanced geometry rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffernan, Ruth M.; Gaubert, Michel

    1986-01-01

    A flight test program was conducted to obtain data from an upgraded Gazelle helicopter with an advanced geometry, three bladed rotor. Data were acquired on upper and lower surface chordwise blade pressure, blade bending and torsion moments, and fuselage structural loads. Results are presented from 16 individual flight conditions, including level flights ranging from 10 to 77 m/sec at 50 to 3000 m altitude, turning flights up to 2.0 g, and autorotation. Rotor aerodynamic data include information from 51 pressure transducers distributed chordwise at 75, 88, and 97% radial stations. Individual tranducer pressure coefficients and airfoil section lift and pitching moment coefficients are presented, as are steady state flight condition parameters and time dependence rotor loads. All dynamic data are presented as harmonic analysis coefficients.

  2. The long-term performance degradation of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator using silicon germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapfer, G.; Truscello, V. C.

    1976-01-01

    The successful utilization of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) as the power source for spaceflight missions requires that the performance of such an RTG be predictable throughout the mission. Several mechanisms occur within the generator which tend to degrade the performance as a function of operating time. The impact which these mechanisms have on the available output power of an RTG depends primarily on such factors as time, temperature and self-limiting effects. The relative magnitudes, rates and temperature dependency of these various degradation mechanisms have been investigated separately by coupon experiments as well as 4-couple and 18-couple module experiments. This paper discusses the different individual mechanisms and summarizes their combined influence on the performance of an RTG. Also presented as part of the RTG long-term performance characteristics is the sensitivity of the available RTG output power to variations of the individual degradation mechanisms thus identifying the areas of greatest concern for a successful long-term mission.

  3. A Method for Integrating Thrust-Vectoring and Actuated Forebody Strakes with Conventional Aerodynamic Controls on a High-Performance Fighter Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallman, Frederick J.; Davidson, John B.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    1998-01-01

    A method, called pseudo controls, of integrating several airplane controls to achieve cooperative operation is presented. The method eliminates conflicting control motions, minimizes the number of feedback control gains, and reduces the complication of feedback gain schedules. The method is applied to the lateral/directional controls of a modified high-performance airplane. The airplane has a conventional set of aerodynamic controls, an experimental set of thrust-vectoring controls, and an experimental set of actuated forebody strakes. The experimental controls give the airplane additional control power for enhanced stability and maneuvering capabilities while flying over an expanded envelope, especially at high angles of attack. The flight controls are scheduled to generate independent body-axis control moments. These control moments are coordinated to produce stability-axis angular accelerations. Inertial coupling moments are compensated. Thrust-vectoring controls are engaged according to their effectiveness relative to that of the aerodynamic controls. Vane-relief logic removes steady and slowly varying commands from the thrust-vectoring controls to alleviate heating of the thrust turning devices. The actuated forebody strakes are engaged at high angles of attack. This report presents the forward-loop elements of a flight control system that positions the flight controls according to the desired stability-axis accelerations. This report does not include the generation of the required angular acceleration commands by means of pilot controls or the feedback of sensed airplane motions.

  4. Configuration Aerodynamics: Past - Present - Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Bencze, Daniel P.; Kulfan, Robert M.; Wilson, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    The Configuration Aerodynamics (CA) element of the High Speed Research (HSR) program is managed by a joint NASA and Industry team, referred to as the Technology Integration Development (ITD) team. This team is responsible for the development of a broad range of technologies for improved aerodynamic performance and stability and control characteristics at subsonic to supersonic flight conditions. These objectives are pursued through the aggressive use of advanced experimental test techniques and state of the art computational methods. As the HSR program matures and transitions into the next phase the objectives of the Configuration Aerodynamics ITD are being refined to address the drag reduction needs and stability and control requirements of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. In addition, the experimental and computational tools are being refined and improved to meet these challenges. The presentation will review the work performed within the Configuration Aerodynamics element in 1994 and 1995 and then discuss the plans for the 1996-1998 time period. The final portion of the presentation will review several observations of the HSR program and the design activity within Configuration Aerodynamics.

  5. Mechanochemical degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A: performance, products and pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kunlun; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Wang; Yu, Yunfei; Deng, Shubo; Yu, Gang

    2012-12-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is the most widely used brominated flame retardant (BFR), which has received more and more concerns due to its high lipophilicity, persistency and endocrine disrupting property in the environment. Considering the possible need for the safe disposal of TBBPA containing wastes in the future, the potential of mechanochemical (MC) destruction as a promising non-combustion technology was investigated in this study. TBBPA was co-ground with calcium oxide (CaO) or the mixture of iron powder and quartz sand (Fe+SiO(2)) in a planetary ball mill at room temperature. The method of Fe+SiO(2) destructed over 98% of initial TBBPA after 3h and acquired 95% debromination rate after 5h, which showed a better performance than the CaO method. Raman spectra and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrated the generation of inorganic carbon with the disappearance of benzene ring and CBr bond, indicating the carbonization and debromination process during mechanochemical reaction. LC-MS-MS screening showed that the intermediates of the treatment with Fe+SiO(2) were tri-, bi-, mono-brominated BPA, BPA and other fragments. Finally all the intermediates were also destroyed after 5h grinding. The bromine balance was calculated and a possible reaction pathway was proposed. PMID:23158692

  6. Degradation of radiator performance on Mars due to dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Forkapa, Mark

    1992-01-01

    An artificial mineral of the approximate elemental composition of Martian soil was manufactured, crushed, and sorted into four different size ranges. Dust particles from three of these size ranges were applied to arc-textured Nb-1 percent Zr and Cu radiator surfaces to assess their effect on radiator performance. Particles larger than 75 microns did not have sufficient adhesive forces to adhere to the samples at angles greater than about 27 deg. Pre-deposited dust layers were largely removed by clear wind velocities greater than 40 m/s, or by dust-laden wind velocities as low as 25 m/s. Smaller dust grains were more difficult to remove. Abrasion was found to be significant only in high velocity winds (89 m/s or greater). Dust-laden winds were found to be more abrasive than clear wind. Initially dusted samples abraded less than initially clear samples in dust laden wind. Smaller dust particles of the simulant proved to be more abrasive than large. This probably indicates that the larger particles were in fact agglomerates.

  7. Photoelectric performance degradation of several laser-irradiated Si detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeglin, Jean-Pierre; Gautier, Bernard; Joeckle, Rene C.; Bolmont, Dominique

    1998-04-01

    The modifications of the basic photoelectric properties in visible Si photodiodes irradiated by laser pulses have been measured and an attempt to link them to the observed/computed dopant distribution has been performed. These detectors have been irradiated 'in band' with two types of lasers: 1) a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, frequency doubled with a 'short' pulse duration of 4 ns and 2) dye laser R6G with a 'long' pulse of 2 microsecond(s) . The single pulse fluence range extended form 0.4 to 50 J/cm2 well above the surface melting fluence threshold. Specially manufactured detectors have been tested. These detectors have a linearly graded junction with different resistivities. The detector responsivity decrease (DRD) vs applied irradiation fluence has been measured for both irradiation types. SIMS has been used to measure the changes in the dopant profile. It has been shown that a large spreading with a 'plateau like shape' of the boron distribution is obtained, resulting from a gas phase diffusion of dopant during the vaporization/condensation cycle. A relationship between DRD and boron profile has been established for Si detectors irradiated by the dye laser. A local sensitivity drop of 70 percent inside the damaged area location has been measured. Furthermore, it has been shown that high irradiation fluences induce a sequential loss of the different photoelectric properties rather than a complete detector breakdown at a prescribed fluence threshold.

  8. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, V. L.; Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.; Bailey, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    The history of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program, which is designed to provide a leading-edge capability to computational aerodynamicists, is traced back to its origin in 1975. Factors motivating its development and examples of solutions to successively refined forms of the governing equations are presented. The NAS Processing System Network and each of its eight subsystems are described in terms of function and initial performance goals. A proposed usage allocation policy is discussed and some initial problems being readied for solution on the NAS system are identified.

  9. Children's Auditory Working Memory Performance in Degraded Listening Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osman, Homira; Sullivan, Jessica R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to determine (a) whether school-age children with typical hearing demonstrate poorer auditory working memory performance in multitalker babble at degraded signal-to-noise ratios than in quiet; and (b) whether the amount of cognitive demand of the task contributed to differences in performance in noise. It…

  10. Effects of ice accretions on aircraft aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Frank T.; Khodadoust, Abdollah

    2001-11-01

    This article is a systematic and comprehensive review, correlation, and assessment of test results available in the public domain which address the aerodynamic performance and control degradations caused by various types of ice accretions on the lifting surfaces of fixed wing aircraft. To help put the various test results in perspective, overviews are provided first of the important factors and limitations involved in computational and experimental icing simulation techniques, as well as key aerodynamic testing simulation variables and governing flow physics issues. Following these are the actual reviews, assessments, and correlations of a large number of experimental measurements of various forms of mostly simulated in-flight and ground ice accretions, augmented where appropriate by similar measurements for other analogous forms of surface contamination and/or disruptions. In-flight icing categories reviewed include the initial and inter-cycle ice accretions inherent in the use of de-icing systems which are of particular concern because of widespread misconceptions about the thickness of such accretions which can be allowed before any serious consequences occur, and the runback/ridge ice accretions typically associated with larger-than-normal water droplet encounters which are of major concern because of the possible potential for catastrophic reductions in aerodynamic effectiveness. The other in-flight ice accretion category considered includes the more familiar large rime and glaze ice accretions, including ice shapes with rather grotesque features, where the concern is that, in spite of all the research conducted to date, the upper limit of penalties possible has probably not been defined. Lastly, the effects of various possible ground frost/ice accretions are considered. The concern with some of these is that for some types of configurations, all of the normally available operating margins to stall at takeoff may be erased if these accretions are not

  11. Classical Aerodynamic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A collection of papers on modern theoretical aerodynamics is presented. Included are theories of incompressible potential flow and research on the aerodynamic forces on wing and wing sections of aircraft and on airship hulls.

  12. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J.; Hessenius, Kristin A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Hicks, Gary; Richardson, Pamela F.; Unger, George; Neumann, Benjamin; Moss, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The annual accomplishments is reviewed for the Aerodynamics Division during FY 1991. The program includes both fundamental and applied research directed at the full spectrum of aerospace vehicles, from rotorcraft to planetary entry probes. A comprehensive review is presented of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications; CFD validation; transition and turbulence physics; numerical aerodynamic simulation; test techniques and instrumentation; configuration aerodynamics; aeroacoustics; aerothermodynamics; hypersonics; subsonics; fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  13. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Schairer, Edward; Hicks, Gary; Wander, Stephen; Blankson, Isiaiah; Rose, Raymond; Olson, Lawrence; Unger, George

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a comprehensive review of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation, transition and turbulence physics, numerical aerodynamic simulation, drag reduction, test techniques and instrumentation, configuration aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, aerothermodynamics, hypersonics, subsonic transport/commuter aviation, fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  14. Influence of Flow Rotation Within a Cooling Tower on the Aerodynamic Interaction with Crosswind Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, M. M. Hemmasian; Dobrego, K. V.

    2014-03-01

    Environmental crosswind changes the aerodynamic pattern inside a cooling tower, destroys uniform and axisymmetric distribution of flow at its inlet and outlet, and may degrade fill zone performance. In this paper, the effect of flow rotation in the over-shower zone of a natural draft cooling tower (NDCT) on the aerodynamic interaction with crosswind is studied numerically. The 3D geometry of an actual NDCT and three models of induced rotation velocity fields are utilized for simulation. It is demonstrated that flow rotation results in homogenization of the aerodynamic field in the over-shower zone. The inhomogeneity of the velocity field in the outlet cross section decreases linearly with rotation intensification. The effect of main stream switching under strong wind conditions is found. It is shown that even moderate flow rotation eliminates this effect.

  15. Aerodynamic drag on intermodal railcars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinghorn, Philip; Maynes, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The aerodynamic drag associated with transport of commodities by rail is becoming increasingly important as the cost of diesel fuel increases. This study aims to increase the efficiency of intermodal cargo trains by reducing the aerodynamic drag on the load carrying cars. For intermodal railcars a significant amount of aerodynamic drag is a result of the large distance between loads that often occurs and the resulting pressure drag resulting from the separated flow. In the present study aerodynamic drag data have been obtained through wind tunnel testing on 1/29 scale models to understand the savings that may be realized by judicious modification to the size of the intermodal containers. The experiments were performed in the BYU low speed wind tunnel and the test track utilizes two leading locomotives followed by a set of five articulated well cars with double stacked containers. The drag on a representative mid-train car is measured using an isolated load cell balance and the wind tunnel speed is varied from 20 to 100 mph. We characterize the effect that the gap distance between the containers and the container size has on the aerodynamic drag of this representative rail car and investigate methods to reduce the gap distance.

  16. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Sean; Bigatel, Patrick

    2004-10-17

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

  17. Distributed Aerodynamic Sensing and Processing Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin; Jutte, Christine; Mangalam, Arun

    2011-01-01

    A Distributed Aerodynamic Sensing and Processing (DASP) toolbox was designed and fabricated for flight test applications with an Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) mounted under the fuselage of an F-15B on the Flight Test Fixture (FTF). DASP monitors and processes the aerodynamics with the structural dynamics using nonintrusive, surface-mounted, hot-film sensing. This aerodynamic measurement tool benefits programs devoted to static/dynamic load alleviation, body freedom flutter suppression, buffet control, improvement of aerodynamic efficiency through cruise control, supersonic wave drag reduction through shock control, etc. This DASP toolbox measures local and global unsteady aerodynamic load distribution with distributed sensing. It determines correlation between aerodynamic observables (aero forces) and structural dynamics, and allows control authority increase through aeroelastic shaping and active flow control. It offers improvements in flutter suppression and, in particular, body freedom flutter suppression, as well as aerodynamic performance of wings for increased range/endurance of manned/ unmanned flight vehicles. Other improvements include inlet performance with closed-loop active flow control, and development and validation of advanced analytical and computational tools for unsteady aerodynamics.

  18. A Framework for Evaluating the Effects of Degraded Digital I and C Systems on Human Performance

    SciTech Connect

    OHara,J.; Gunther, B.; Hughes, N.; Barnes, V.

    2009-04-09

    New and advanced reactors will use integrated digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems to support operators in their monitoring and control functions. Even though digital systems are typically highly reliable, their potential for degradation or failure could significantly affect operator situation awareness and performance and, consequently, impact plant safety. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a research project to investigate the effects of degraded I&C systems on human performance and plant operations. The ultimate objective of this project is to develop the technical basis for human factors review guidance for conditions of degraded I&C, including complete failure. Based on the results of this effort, NRC will determine the need for developing new guidance or revising NUREG-0800, NUREG-0711, NUREG-0700 and other pertinent NRC review guidance. This paper reports on the first phase of the research, the development of a framework for linking degraded I&C system conditions to human performance. The framework consists of three levels: I&C subsystems, human-system interfaces, and human performance. Each level is composed of a number of discrete elements. This paper will describe the elements at each level and their integration. In the next phase of the research, the framework will be used to systematically investigate the human performance consequences of various classes of failures.

  19. Comparison study of different coatings on degradation performance and cell response of Mg-Sr alloy.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Yongming; Sun, Lina; Wan, Peng; Tan, Lili; Wang, Chengyue; Fan, Xinmin; Qin, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-12-01

    To solve the problem of rapid degradation for magnesium-based implants, surface modification especially coating method is widely studied and showed the great potential for clinical application. However, as concerned to the further application and medical translation for biodegradable magnesium alloys, there are still lack of data and comparisons among different coatings on their degradation and biological properties. This work studied three commonly used coatings on Mg-Sr alloy, including micro-arc oxidation coating, electrodeposition coating and chemical conversion coating, and compared these coatings for requirements of favorable degradation and biological performances, how each of these coating systems has performed. Finally the mechanism for the discrepancy between these coatings is proposed. The results indicate that the micro-arc oxidation coating on Mg-Sr alloy exhibited the best corrosion resistance and cell response among these coatings, and is proved to be more suitable for the orthopedic application. PMID:27612693

  20. New technology in turbine aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    A cursory review is presented of some of the recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research at NASA-Lewis Research Center. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. An extensive bibliography is included. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Turbines currently being investigated make use of advanced blading concepts designed to maintain high efficiency under conditions of high aerodynamic loading. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flow fields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

  1. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1988-01-01

    The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

  2. Progress Towards Understanding the Degradation and Performance Characteristics of the PROBA2-LYRA Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. R.; McMullin, D. R.; Dominique, M.; Dammasch, I.

    2013-12-01

    The Large Yield Radiometer, LYRA is a solar radiometer on the ESA PROBA2 spacecraft launched November 2, 2009. LYRA has been designed to provide measurements of the solar XUV to MUV (soft X-ray to middle ultraviolet) region of the solar spectrum. The LYRA instrument observes in four broad spectral channels, from soft X-ray to UV, chosen for their relevance to solar physics and space weather. Each of the four channels has the capability of acquiring irradiance measurements at a nominal cadence of 20 Hz, but can be increased to 100 Hz. Each of the four channels has suffered from significant degradation almost immediately after launch. The degradation observed in the LYRA channels is significant and detrimental to the potential science. Preliminary work in this effort has shown that the most likely cause of the observed degradation is contaminant buildup on the filters at the front of the instrument. In this work, we present initial results of our investigation into the performance characteristics and observed degradation. We have developed and will present results from our three-step approach: 1. Develop models for each LYRA channel using measured calibrations and instrument design parameters; 2. Use the models to estimate the sensitivity changes due to possible degradation sources (thickness and composition); 3. Evaluate corrected sensor performance by comparing the measured data with independent measurements from currently operating instruments.

  3. Comparison of symptomatology and performance degradation for motion and radiation sickness. Technical report, 6 January 1984-31 March 1985

    SciTech Connect

    McClellan, G.E.; Wiker, S.F.

    1985-05-31

    This report quantifies for the first time the relationship between the signs and symptoms of acute radiation sickness and those of motion sickness. With this relationship, a quantitative comparison is made between data on human performance degradation during motion sickness and estimates of performance degradation during radiation sickness. The comparison validates estimates made by the Intermediate Dose Program on the performance degradation from acute radiation sickness.

  4. Aerodynamic challenges of ALT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, I.; Homan, D.; Romere, P. O.

    1985-01-01

    The approach and landing test (ALT) of the Space Shuttle Orbiter presented a number of unique challenges in the area of aerodynamics. The purpose of the ALT program was both to confirm the use of the Boeing 747 as a transport vehicle for ferrying the Orbiter across the country and to demonstrate the flight characteristics of the Orbiter in its approach and landing phase. Concerns for structural fatigue and performance dictated a tailcone be attached to the Orbiter for ferry and for the initial landing tests. The Orbiter with a tailcone attached presented additional challenges to the normal aft sting concept of wind tunnel testing. The landing tests required that the Orbiter be separated from the 747 at approximately 20,000 feet using aerodynamic forces to fly the vehicles apart. The concept required a complex test program to determine the relative effects of the two vehicles on each other. Also of concern, and tested, was the vortex wake created by the 747 and the means for the Orbiter to avoid it following separation.

  5. A Collaborative Analysis Tool for Integrated Hypersonic Aerodynamics, Thermal Protection Systems, and RBCC Engine Performance for Single Stage to Orbit Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Thomas Troy; Alexander, Reginald; Landrum, Brian

    2000-01-01

    engine model. HYFIM performs the aerodynamic analysis of forebodies and inlet characteristics of RBCC powered SSTO launch vehicles. HYFIM is applicable to the analysis of the ramjet/scramjet engine operations modes (Mach 3-12), and provides estimates of parameters such as air capture area, shock-on-lip Mach number, design Mach number, compression ratio, etc., based on a basic geometry routine for modeling axisymmetric cones, 2-D wedge geometries. HYFIM also estimates the variation of shock layer properties normal to the forebody surface. The thermal protection system (TPS) is directly linked to determination of the vehicle moldline and the shaping of the trajectory. Thermal protection systems to maintain the structural integrity of the vehicle must be able to mitigate the heat transfer to the structure and be lightweight. Herein lies the interdependency, in that as the vehicle's speed increases, the TPS requirements are increased. And as TPS masses increase the effect on the propulsion system and all other systems is compounded. The need to analyze vehicle forebody and engine inlet is critical to be able to design the RBCC vehicle. To adequately determine insulation masses for an RBCC vehicle, the hypersonic aerodynamic environment and aeroheating loads must be calculated and the TPS thicknesses must be calculated for the entire vehicle. To accomplish this an ascent or reentry trajectory is obtained using the computer code Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST). The trajectory is then used to calculate the convective heat rates on several locations on the vehicles using the Miniature Version of the JA70 Aerodynamic Heating Computer Program (MINIVER). Once the heat rates are defined for each body point on the vehicle, then insulation thicknesses that are required to maintain the vehicle within structural limits are calculated using Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA) models. If the TPS masses are too heavy for the performance of the vehicle

  6. Dual task performance with LPC (Linear Predictive Coding) degraded speech in a sentence verification task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Nielsen, Astrid; Kallman, Howard J.; Meijer, Corinne

    1989-10-01

    The results of a preliminary study on the effects of reduced speech intelligibility on dual task performance are reported. The speech task was a sentence verification task, and the speech degradation was accomplished using a narrowband digital voice transmission system operating with and without random bit errors. The second task was a visual picture sorting task. There was a dual task decrement on the sorting task, and in addition, there was a further decrease in sorts per minute as the speech was increasingly degraded. Reaction time for the speech task increased with the concurrent sorting task, but the dual task condition did not affect speech task error rates.

  7. Performance degradation of QAM based inter-satellite optical communication system under gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Zhao, Shanghong; Gong, Zizheng; Zhao, Jing; Li, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Main devices in quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) based inter-satellite optical communication system were irradiated to a total dose of 20 krad with the dose rate of 5 rad/s using a Co60 radiation source. Gamma irradiation impacts on devices were analyzed and on the basis, system performance degradation was simulated. Variety of system BER along with onboard working time for different inter-satellite links was presented. In addition, some adaption methods were proposed to reduce gamma irradiation induced degradation.

  8. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  9. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-04-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  10. Effect of ultracapacitor-modified PHEV protocol on performance degradation in lithium-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochgraf, Clark G.; Basco, John K.; Bohn, Theodore P.; Bloom, Ira

    2014-01-01

    The cycle life of lithium-ion batteries was investigated using a modified USABC electric vehicle testing protocol designed to simulate the effect of a hybrid energy-storage system (ultracapacitor and battery) in a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle. A side-by-side comparison of battery capacity and impedance changes with and without the effect of the ultracapacitor was performed. Calendar-life degradation effects were corrected for using control cells. The battery's rate of cycle-related capacity degradation decreased by a factor of 2 and rate of cycle-related impedance degradation, by a factor of 5.9 when exposed to the ultracapacitor-modified profile. The modified profile avoids exposure to regeneration energy and reduces maximum voltage of the battery.

  11. Insights into the Mechanism and Kinetics of Thermo-Oxidative Degradation of HFPE High Performance Polymer.

    PubMed

    Kunnikuruvan, Sooraj; Parandekar, Priya V; Prakash, Om; Tsotsis, Thomas K; Nair, Nisanth N

    2016-06-01

    The growing requisite for materials having high thermo-oxidative stability makes the design and development of high performance materials an active area of research. Fluorination of the polymer backbone is a widely applied strategy to improve various properties of the polymer, most importantly the thermo-oxidative stability. Many of these fluorinated polymers are known to have thermo-oxidative stability up to 700 K. However, for space and aerospace applications, it is important to improve its thermo-oxidative stability beyond 700 K. Molecular-level details of the thermo-oxidative degradation of such polymers can provide vital information to improve the polymer. In this spirit, we have applied quantum mechanical and microkinetic analysis to scrutinize the mechanism and kinetics of the thermo-oxidative degradation of a fluorinated polymer with phenylethenyl end-cap, HFPE. This study gives an insight into the thermo-oxidative degradation of HFPE and explains most of the experimental observations on the thermo-oxidative degradation of this polymer. Thermolysis of C-CF3 bond in the dianhydride component (6FDA) of HFPE is found to be the rate-determining step of the degradation. Reaction pathways that are responsible for the experimentally observed weight loss of the polymer is also scrutinized. On the basis of these results, we propose a modification of HFPE polymer to improve its thermo-oxidative stability. PMID:27187246

  12. Enhanced degradation performances of plate-like micro/nanostructured zero valent iron to DDT.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shenghong; Liu, Shengwen; Wang, Huimin; Cai, Weiping

    2016-04-15

    Micro/nanostructured zero valent iron (MNZVI) is successfully mass-synthesized by ball-milling the industrially-reduced iron powders. The as-prepared MNZVI is plate-like in morphology with about 2-5μm in planar size and 35-55nm in thickness, and ∼16m(2)/g in specific surface area. Such plate-like MNZVI has demonstrated much higher degradation performances to DDT [or 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl) ethane] in the aqueous solution than the commercial ZVI powders under acidic conditions. The MNZVI-induced DDT degradation is also much faster than the previously reported results. The time-dependent DDT removal amount can be described by the pseudo first-order kinetic model. Further experiments have shown that more than 50% of DDT can be mineralized in 20min and the rest is dechlorinated to DDX (the products with less chlorine). It has been revealed that the DDT degradation could be attributed to the acid assisted ZVI-induced mineralization and dechlorination. The mineralization process is dominant during the initial stage within 20min, and the dechlorination is the main reaction in the anaphase of the degradation. This work not only deepens understanding of DDT degradation but also could provide a highly efficient material for the practical treatment of the DDT in a real environment. PMID:26780701

  13. Switchable and Tunable Aerodynamic Drag on Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttag, Mark; Lopez Jimenez, Francisco; Reis, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    We report results on the performance of Smart Morphable Surfaces (Smporhs) that can be mounted onto cylindrical structures to actively reduce their aerodynamic drag. Our system comprises of an elastomeric thin shell with a series of carefully designed subsurface cavities that, once depressurized, lead to a dramatic deformation of the surface topography, on demand. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the giant cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) which possesses an array of axial grooves, which are thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. We perform systematic wind tunnel tests on cylinders covered with our Smorphs and characterize their aerodynamic performance. The switchable and tunable nature of our system offers substantial advantages for aerodynamic performance when compared to static topographies, due to their operation over a wider range of flow conditions.

  14. Switchable and Tunable Aerodynamic Drag on Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttag, Mark; Lopéz Jiménez, Francisco; Upadhyaya, Priyank; Kumar, Shanmugam; Reis, Pedro

    We report results on the performance of Smart Morphable Surfaces (Smporhs) that can be mounted onto cylindrical structures to actively reduce their aerodynamic drag. Our system comprises of an elastomeric thin shell with a series of carefully designed subsurface cavities that, once depressurized, lead to a dramatic deformation of the surface topography, on demand. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the giant cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) which possesses an array of axial grooves, thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. We perform systematic wind tunnel tests on cylinders covered with our Smorphs and characterize their aerodynamic performance. The switchable and tunable nature of our system offers substantial advantages for aerodynamic performance when compared to static topographies, due to their operation over a wider range of flow conditions.

  15. Iron-contamination-induced performance degradation of an iron-fed fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Min; Song, Wei; Zhai, Lin-Feng; Tong, Zhong-Hua

    2014-02-01

    The iron-fed fuel cell is an effective technology to recover iron and electricity from acid mine drainage (AMD). However, this technology suffers from the problem of performance degradation which significantly reduces its power output during long-term operation. In this work, the performance degradation of iron-fed fuel cell is comprehensively evaluated with the objective to elucidate the mechanisms involved in such a phenomenon. The iron contamination is identified as the main cause responsible for the performance degradation of fuel cell. The iron contaminant is present in the form of α-FeO(OH), which is the main product recovered by the iron-fed fuel cell. Both the electrode and membrane are deteriorated by iron contamination, whereas the membrane deterioration is more significant. Fed-batch experiments demonstrate the performance loss of fuel cell due to contamination of membrane is more than 50% greater than the performance loss due to contamination of electrode. The α-FeO(OH) contaminant not only forms fouling layers on the surfaces of carbon electrode and membrane, but also migrates into the membrane to damage the membrane structure. As a result, both the charge transfer and mass transfer resistances of fuel cell are dramatically increased, which leads to delayed electro-oxidation kinetics of Fe(II).

  16. Nano-JASMINE: cosmic radiation degradation of CCD performance and centroid detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Shimura, Yuki; Niwa, Yoshito; Yano, Taihei; Gouda, Naoteru; Yamada, Yoshiyuki

    2012-09-01

    Nano-JASMINE (NJ) is a very small astrometry satellite project led by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. The satellite is ready for launch, and the launch is currently scheduled for late 2013 or early 2014. The satellite is equipped with a fully depleted CCD and is expected to perform astrometry observations for stars brighter than 9 mag in the zw-band (0.6 µm-1.0 µm). Distances of stars located within 100 pc of the Sun can be determined by using annual parallax measurements. The targeted accuracy for the position determination of stars brighter than 7.5 mag is 3 mas, which is equivalent to measuring the positions of stars with an accuracy of less than one five-hundredth of the CCD pixel size. The position measurements of stars are performed by centroiding the stellar images taken by the CCD that operates in the time and delay integration mode. The degradation of charge transfer performance due to cosmic radiation damage in orbit is proved experimentally. A method is then required to compensate for the effects of performance degradation. One of the most effective ways of achieving this is to simulate observed stellar outputs, including the effect of CCD degradation, and then formulate our centroiding algorithm and evaluate the accuracies of the measurements. We report here the planned procedure to simulate the outputs of the NJ observations. We also developed a CCD performance-measuring system and present preliminary results obtained using the system.

  17. Aerodynamic Design Study of an Advanced Active Twist Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekula, Martin K.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Yeager, William T., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    An Advanced Active Twist Rotor (AATR) is currently being developed by the U.S. Army Vehicle Technology Directorate at NASA Langley Research Center. As a part of this effort, an analytical study was conducted to determine the impact of blade geometry on active-twist performance and, based on those findings, propose a candidate aerodynamic design for the AATR. The process began by creating a baseline design which combined the dynamic design of the original Active Twist Rotor and the aerodynamic design of a high lift rotor concept. The baseline model was used to conduct a series of parametric studies to examine the effect of linear blade twist and blade tip sweep, droop, and taper on active-twist performance. Rotor power requirements and hub vibration were also examined at flight conditions ranging from hover to advance ratio = 0.40. A total of 108 candidate designs were analyzed using the second-generation version of the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD II) code. The study concluded that the vibration reduction capabilities of a rotor utilizing controlled, strain-induced twisting are enhanced through the incorporation of blade tip sweep, droop, and taper into the blade design, while they are degraded by increasing the nose-down linear blade twist. Based on the analysis of rotor power, hub vibration, and active-twist response, a candidate aerodynamic design for the AATR consisting of a blade with approximately 10 degrees of linear blade twist and a blade tip design with 30 degree sweep, 10 degree droop, and 2.5:1 taper ratio over the outer five percent of the blade is proposed.

  18. A global fouling factor methodology for analyzing steam generator thermal performance degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Kreider, M.A.; White, G.A.; Varrin, R.D. Jr.

    1998-06-01

    Over the past few years, steam generator (SG) thermal performance degradation has led to decreased plant efficiency and power output at numerous PWR nuclear power plants with recirculating-type SGs. The authors have developed and implemented methodologies for quantitatively evaluating the various sources of SG performance degradation, both internal and external to the SG pressure boundary. These methodologies include computation of the global fouling factor history, evaluation of secondary deposit thermal resistance using deposit characterization data, and consideration of pressure loss causes unrelated to the tube bundle, such as hot-leg temperature streaming and SG moisture separator fouling. In order to evaluate the utility of the global fouling factor methodology, the authors performed case studies for a number of PWR SG designs. Key results from two of these studies are presented here. In tandem with the fouling-factor analyses, a study evaluated for each plant the potential causes of pressure loss. The combined results of the global fouling factor calculations and the pressure-loss evaluations demonstrated two key points: (1) that the available thermal margin against fouling, which can vary substantially from plant to plant, has an important bearing on whether a given plant exhibits losses in electrical generating capacity, and (2) that a wide variety of causes can result in SG thermal performance degradation.

  19. Degradation of solar cell optical performance due to plume particle pitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidl, William; Smith, Kendall; Soares, Carlos; Steagall, Courtney; Shaw, Christopher G.

    2008-08-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) solar arrays provide power that is needed for on-orbit experiments and operations. The ISS solar arrays are exposed to space environment effects that include contamination, atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation and thermal cycling. The contamination effects include exposure to thruster plume contamination and erosion. This study was performed to better understand potential solar cell optical performance degradation due to increased scatter caused by plume particle pitting. A ground test was performed using a light gas gun to shoot glass beads at a solar cell with a shotgun approach. The increase in scatter was then measured and correlated with the surface damage.

  20. Effect of Flow Rate on In Vitro Aerodynamic Performance of NEXThaler® in Comparison with Diskus® and Turbohaler® Dry Powder Inhalers

    PubMed Central

    Buttini, Francesca; Brambilla, Gaetano; Copelli, Diego; Sisti, Viviana; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Bettini, Ruggero; Pasquali, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: European and United States Pharmacopoeia compendial procedures for assessing the in vitro emitted dose and aerodynamic size distribution of a dry powder inhaler require that 4.0 L of air at a pressure drop of 4 kPa be drawn through the inhaler. However, the product performance should be investigated using conditions more representative of what is achievable by the patient population. This work compares the delivered dose and the drug deposition profile at different flow rates (30, 40, 60, and 90 L/min) of Foster NEXThaler® (beclomethasone dipropionate/formoterol fumarate), Seretide® Diskus® (fluticasone propionate/salmeterol xinafoate), and Symbicort® Turbohaler® (budesonide/formoterol fumarate). Methods: The delivered dose uniformity was tested using a dose unit sampling apparatus (DUSA) at inhalation volumes either 2.0 or 4.0 L and flow rates 30, 40, 60, or 90 L/min. The aerodynamic assessment was carried out using a Next Generation Impactor by discharging each inhaler at 30, 40, 60, or 90 L/min for a time sufficient to obtain an air volume of 4 L. Results: Foster® NEXThaler® and Seretide® Diskus® showed a consistent dose delivery for both the drugs included in the formulation, independently of the applied flow rate. Contrary, Symbicort® Turbohaler® showed a high decrease of the emitted dose for both budesonide and formoterol fumarate when the device was operated at airflow rate lower that 60 L/min. The aerosolizing performance of NEXThaler® and Diskus® was unaffected by the flow rate applied. Turbohaler® proved to be the inhaler most sensitive to changes in flow rate in terms of fine particle fraction (FPF) for both components. Among the combinations tested, Foster NEXThaler® was the only one capable to deliver around 50% of extra-fine particles relative to delivered dose. Conclusions: NEXThaler® and Diskus® were substantially unaffected by flow rate through the inhaler in terms of both delivered dose and

  1. Aerodynamic measurements concerned with a turret model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, K. R.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out in the 14 by 14 ft Ames transonic wind tunnel on a turret model. The aerodynamic parameters measured were steady and unsteady pressures (static and total fluid pressures), local mean velocities, and local mean densities at selected locations along the optical beam path for the azimuth look angles of 90, 120, and 150 degrees from the turret. The test stream Mach numbers considered are 0.55, 0.65 and 0.75, and the Reynolds number per meter is in the range of 10 million. The results indicate that severe optical degradation can be expected at aft look azimuth, angles, this degradation in optical performance increases as the azimuth angle is increased. The ratio of rms static pressure to the local mean static pressure peaks in the range of 0.07 to 0.12 and the ratio of rms total pressure to the local mean total pressure peaks in the range of 0.02 to 0.04. These values depend on the Mach number and the aft look azimuth angle. The scale lengths obtained from correlation considerations are also presented.

  2. Performance degradation of a model helicopter rotor with a generic ice shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkan, K. D.; Cross, E. J., Jr.; Miller, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental program using a commercially available remotely controlled model helicopter in the Texas A&M University (TAMU) subsonic wind tunnel has been conducted to investigate the performance degradation resulting from the simulated formation of ice on the leading edge of the main rotor blades in both hover and forward flight. The rotor blades utilized a NACA 0012 airfoil with a 2.5-in. constant chord. A generic ice shape derived from a predetermined natural ice condition was applied to the 53.375-in.-diameter main rotor, and thrust and torque coefficients were measured for the main rotor as functions of velocity, main rotor rpm, fuselage angle of incidence, collective pitch angle, and spanwise extent of icing. The model helicopter test exhibited significant performance degradation of the main rotor when generic ice was added. An increase of approximately 150 percent in torque coefficient to maintain a constant thrust coefficient was noted when generic ice had been applied to the 85 percent rotor radial location. Also, considerable additional degradation occurred when generic ice was applied to the 100 percent rotor radial location, as compared with the 85 percent simulated ice performance values, indicating the sensitivity of the rotor tip region.

  3. Performance of three different anodes in electrochemical degradation of 4-para-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Murugaesan, Pramila; Aravind, Priyadharshini; Muniyandi, Neelavannan Guruswamy; Kandasamy, Subramanian

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, removal of pollutants from wastewater by electrochemical oxidation has become an attractive method. The present investigation deals with the degradation of 4-para-nitrophenol (4-PNP) by electrochemical oxidation using three different anodes, namely TiO2-RuO2-IrO2/Ti (titanium substrate insoluble anode - TSIA)), IrO2-PbO2/Ti and graphite. Electrochemical oxidation of 4-PNP was carried out employing sodium chloride as the supporting electrolyte, at pH 7 with a current density of 15 mA/cm(2). The degradation of 4-PNP by electro-oxidation was characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography. The performance efficiency and current efficiency of the three anodic materials in this study were evaluated by chemical oxygen demand (COD). Comparisons of energy consumption for the three anodes employed were also calculated. Among electrodes investigated, the IrO2-PbO2/Ti electrode resulted in 98% of COD removal in 30 min comparatively at a less energy consumption of 1 × 10(-2) kWh m(-3), depicting its higher performance efficiency in 4-PNP degradation. PMID:25885262

  4. Aerodynamic effects of simulated ice shapes on two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alansatan, Sait

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of simulated glaze ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance characteristics of two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail. The two dimensional tests involved two NACA 0011 airfoils with chords of 24 and 12 inches. Glaze ice shapes computed with the LEWICE code that were representative of 22.5-min and 45-min ice accretions were simulated with spoilers, which were sized to approximate the horn heights of the LEWICE ice shapes. Lift, drag, pitching moment, and surface pressure coefficients were obtained for a range of test conditions. Test variables included Reynolds number, geometric scaling, control deflection and the key glaze ice features, which were horn height, horn angle, and horn location. For the three-dimensional tests, a 25%-scale business jet empennage (BJE) with a T-tail configuration was used to study the effect of ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance of a swept horizontal tail. Simulated glaze ice shapes included the LEWICE and spoiler ice shapes to represent 9-min and 22.5-min ice accretions. Additional test variables included Reynolds number and elevator deflection. Lift, drag, hinge moment coefficients as well as boundary layer velocity profiles were obtained. The experimental results showed substantial degradation in aerodynamic performance of the airfoils and the swept horizontal tail due to the simulated ice shapes. For the two-dimensional airfoils, the largest aerodynamic penalties were obtained when the 3-in spoiler-ice, which was representative of 45-min glaze ice accretions, was set normal to the chord. Scale and Reynolds effects were not significant for lift and drag. However, pitching moments and pressure distributions showed great sensitivity to Reynolds number and geometric scaling. For the threedimensional study with the swept finite tail, the 22.5-min ice shapes resulted in greater aerodynamic performance degradation than the 9-min ice shapes. The addition of 24

  5. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of historical and current numerical aerodynamic simulation (NAS) is given. The capabilities and goals of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility are outlined. Emphasis is given to numerical flow visualization and its applications to structural analysis of aircraft and spacecraft bodies. The uses of NAS in computational chemistry, engine design, and galactic evolution are mentioned.

  6. Uncertainty in Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Hemsch, M. J.; Morrison, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    An approach is presented to treat computational aerodynamics as a process, subject to the fundamental quality assurance principles of process control and process improvement. We consider several aspects affecting uncertainty for the computational aerodynamic process and present a set of stages to determine the level of management required to meet risk assumptions desired by the customer of the predictions.

  7. Computation of dragonfly aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafson, Karl; Leben, Robert

    1991-04-01

    Dragonflies are seen to hover and dart, seemingly at will and in remarkably nimble fashion, with great bursts of speed and effectively discontinuous changes of direction. In their short lives, their gossamer flight provides us with glimpses of an aerodynamics of almost extraterrestrial quality. Here we present the first computer simulations of such aerodynamics.

  8. Model-Scale Aerodynamic Performance Testing of Proposed Modifications to the NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Coston, Calvin W., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Tests were performed on a 1/20th-scale model of the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel to determine the performance effects of insertion of acoustic baffles in the tunnel inlet, replacement of the existing collector with a new collector design in the open jet test section, and addition of flow splitters to the acoustic baffle section downstream of the test section. As expected, the inlet baffles caused a reduction in facility performance. About half of the performance loss was recovered by addition the flow splitters to the downstream baffles. All collectors tested reduced facility performance. However, test chamber recirculation flow was reduced by the new collector designs and shielding of some of the microphones was reduced owing to the smaller size of the new collector. Overall performance loss in the facility is expected to be a 5 percent top flow speed reduction, but the facility will meet OSHA limits for external noise levels and recirculation in the test section will be reduced.

  9. Aerodynamic Performance and Static Stability at Mach Number 3.3 of an Aircraft Configuration Employing Three Triangular Wing Panels and a Body Equal Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Carlton S.

    1960-01-01

    An aircraft configuration, previously conceived as a means to achieve favorable aerodynamic stability characteristics., high lift-drag ratio, and low heating rates at high supersonic speeds., was modified in an attempt to increase further the lift-drag ratio without adversely affecting the other desirable characteristics. The original configuration consisted of three identical triangular wing panels symmetrically disposed about an ogive-cylinder body equal in length to the root chord of the panels. This configuration was modified by altering the angular disposition of the wing panels, by reducing the area of the panel forming the vertical fin, and by reshaping the body to produce interference lift. Six-component force and moment tests of the modified configuration at combined angles of attack and sideslip were made at a Mach number of 3.3 and a Reynolds number of 5.46 million. A maximum lift-drag ratio of 6.65 (excluding base drag) was measured at a lift coefficient of 0.100 and an angle of attack of 3.60. The lift-drag ratio remained greater than 3 up to lift coefficient of 0.35. Performance estimates, which predicted a maximum lift-drag ratio for the modified configuration 27 percent greater than that of the original configuration, agreed well with experiment. The modified configuration exhibited favorable static stability characteristics within the test range. Longitudinal and directional centers of pressure were slightly aft of the respective centroids of projected plan-form and side area.

  10. Wind Tunnel Results of the Aerodynamic Performance of a 1/8-Scale Model of a Twin-Engine Transport with Multi-Element Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laflin, Brenda E. Gile; Applin, Zachary T.; Jones, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was performed in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel on a pressure instrumented 1/8-scale twin-engine subsonic transport to better understand the flow physics on a multi-element wing section. The wing consisted of a part-span, triple-slotted trailing edge flap, inboard leading-edge Krueger flap and an outboard leading-edge slat. The model was instrumented with flush pressure ports at the fuselage centerline and seven spanwise wing locations. The model was tested in cruise, take-off and landing configurations at dynamic pressures and Mach numbers from 10 lbf/ft(exp 2) to 50 lbf/ft(exp 2) and 0.08 to 0.17, respectively. This resulted in corresponding Reynolds numbers of 0.8 x 10(exp 5) to 1.8 x 10(exp 6). Pressure data were collected using electronically scanned pressure devices and force and moment data were collected with a six component strain gauge balance. Results are presented for various control surface deflections over an angle-of-attack range from -4 degrees to 16 degrees and sideslip angle range from -10 degrees to 10 degrees. Longitudinal and lateral directional aerodynamic data are presented as well as chordwise pressure distributions at the seven spanwise wing locations and the fuselage centerline.

  11. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a variable-pitch 1.83-meter-(6-ft) diameter 1.20-pressure-ratio fan stage (QF-9)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, F. W.; Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Far field noise data and related aerodynamic performance are presented for a variable pitch fan stage having characteristics suitable for low noise, STOL engine application. However, no acoustic suppression material was used in the flow passages. The fan was externally driven by an electric motor. Tests were made at several forward thrust rotor blade pitch angles and one for reverse thrust. Fan speed was varied from 60 to 120 percent of takeoff (design) speed, and exhaust nozzles having areas 92 to 105 percent of design were tested. The fan noise level was at a minimum at the design rotor blade pitch angles of 64 deg for takeoff thrust and at 57 deg for approach (50 percent takeoff thrust). Perceived noise along a 152.4-m sideline reached 100.1 PNdb for the takeoff (design) configuration for a stage pressure ratio of 1.17 and thrust of 57,600 N. For reverse thrust the PNL values were 4 to 5 PNdb above the takeoff values at comparable fan speeds.

  12. Investigation of possible causes for human-performance degradation during microgravity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, James E.; Tuttle, Megan L.

    1992-01-01

    The results of the first year of a three year study of the effects of microgravity on human performance are given. Test results show support for the hypothesis that the effects of microgravity can be studied indirectly on Earth by measuring performance in an altered gravitational field. The hypothesis was that an altered gravitational field could disrupt performance on previously automated behaviors if gravity was a critical part of the stimulus complex controlling those behaviors. In addition, it was proposed that performance on secondary cognitive tasks would also degrade, especially if the subject was provided feedback about degradation on the previously automated task. In the initial experimental test of these hypotheses, there was little statistical support. However, when subjects were categorized as high or low in automated behavior, results for the former group supported the hypotheses. The predicted interaction between body orientation and level of workload in their joint effect on performance in the secondary cognitive task was significant for the group high in automatized behavior and receiving feedback, but no such interventions were found for the group high in automatized behavior but not receiving feedback, or the group low in automatized behavior.

  13. Performance Degradation of Encapsulated Monocrystalline-Si Solar Cells upon Accelerated Weathering Exposures: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, S. H.; Pern, F. J.; Watson, G. L.; Tomek, D.; Raaff, J.

    2001-10-01

    Presented at 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Performed accelerated exposures to study performance reliability/materials degradation of encapsulated c-Si cells using weathering protocols in 2 weatherometers. We have performed accelerated exposures to study performance reliability and materials degradation of a total of forty-one 3-cm x 3-cm monocrystalline-Si (c-Si) solar cells that were variously encapsulated using accelerated weathering protocols in two weatherometers (WOMs), with and without front specimen water sprays. Laminated cells (EVA/c-Si/EVA, ethylene vinyl acetate) with one of five superstrate/substrate variations and other features including with and without: (i) load resistance, (ii) Al foil light masks, and (iii) epoxy edge-sealing were studied. Three additional samples, omitting EVA, were exposed under a full-spectrum solar simulator, or heated in an oven, for comparison. After exposures, cell performance decreased irregularly, but to a relatively greater extent for samples exposed in WOM where light, heat, and humidity cycles were present (solar simulator or oven lacked such cycles). EVA laminates in the samples masked with aluminum (Al) foils were observed to retain moisture in WOM with water spray. Moisture effects caused substantial efficiency losses probably related in part to increasing series resistance.

  14. Closed-form solutions of performability. [modeling of a degradable buffer/multiprocessor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Methods which yield closed form performability solutions for continuous valued variables are developed. The models are similar to those employed in performance modeling (i.e., Markovian queueing models) but are extended so as to account for variations in structure due to faults. In particular, the modeling of a degradable buffer/multiprocessor system is considered whose performance Y is the (normalized) average throughput rate realized during a bounded interval of time. To avoid known difficulties associated with exact transient solutions, an approximate decomposition of the model is employed permitting certain submodels to be solved in equilibrium. These solutions are then incorporated in a model with fewer transient states and by solving the latter, a closed form solution of the system's performability is obtained. In conclusion, some applications of this solution are discussed and illustrated, including an example of design optimization.

  15. A Distributed Electrochemistry Modeling Tool for Simulating SOFC Performance and Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Ryan, Emily M.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-10-13

    This report presents a distributed electrochemistry (DEC) model capable of investigating the electrochemistry and local conditions with the SOFC MEA based on the local microstructure and multi-physics. The DEC model can calculate the global current-voltage (I-V) performance of the cell as determined by the spatially varying local conditions through the thickness of the electrodes and electrolyte. The simulation tool is able to investigate the electrochemical performance based on characteristics of the electrode microstructure, such as particle size, pore size, electrolyte and electrode phase volume fractions, and triple-phase-boundary length. It can also investigate performance as affected by fuel and oxidant gas flow distributions and other environmental/experimental conditions such as temperature and fuel gas composition. The long-term objective for the DEC modeling tool is to investigate factors that cause electrode degradation and the decay of SOFC performance which decrease longevity.

  16. Aerodynamic Synthesis of a Centrifugal Impeller Using CFD and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, L. M.; Skoch, G. J.; Prahst, P. S.

    1997-01-01

    The performance and flow structure in an unshrouded impeller of approximately 4:1 pressure ratio is synthesized on the basis of a detailed analysis of 3D viscous CFD results and aerodynamic measurements. A good data match was obtained between CFD and measurements using laser anemometry and pneumatic probes. This solidified the role of the CFD model as a reliable representation of the impeller internal flow structure and integrated performance. Results are presented showing the loss production and secondary flow structure in the impeller. The results indicate that while the overall impeller efficiency is high, the impeller shroud static pressure recovery potential is underdeveloped leading to a performance degradation in the downstream diffusing element. Thus, a case is made for a follow-on impeller parametric design study to improve the flow quality. A strategy for aerodynamic performance enhancement is outlined and an estimate of the gain in overall impeller efficiency that might be realized through improvements to the relative diffusion process is provided.

  17. Performance and test section flow characteristics of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.; Flack, Karen

    1989-01-01

    Results from the performance and test section flow calibration of the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented. A flow calibration test was conducted in May and June 1987. The goal of the flow calibration test was to determine detailed spatial variations in the 40- by 80-ft test section flow quality throughout the tunnel operational envelope. Data were collected for test section speeds up to 300 knots and for air exchange rates of 0, 5, and 10 percent. The tunnel performance was also calibrated during the detailed mapping of the test section flow field. Experimental results presented indicate that the flow quality in the test section, with the exception of temperature, is relatively insensitive to the level of dynamic pressure and the air exchange rate. The dynamic pressure variation in the test section is within + or - 0.5 deg at all test section velocities. Cross-stream temperature gradients in the test section caused by the air exchange system were documented, and a correction method was established. Streamwise static pressure variation on the centerline is about 1 percent of test section dynamic pressure over 30 ft of the test section length.

  18. Performance and test section flow characteristics of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.

    1993-01-01

    Results from the performance and test section flow calibration of the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented. Measurements indicating the 80- by 120-ft test section flow quality were obtained throughout the tunnel operational envelope and for atmospheric wind speeds up to approximately 20 knots. Tunnel performance characteristics and a dynamic pressure system calibration were also documented during the process of mapping the test section flow field. Experimental results indicate that the test section flow quality is relatively insensitive to dynamic pressure and the level of atmospheric winds experienced during the calibration. The dynamic pressure variation in the test section is within +/-75 percent of the average. The axial turbulence intensity is less than 0.5 percent up to the maximum test section speed of 100 knots, and the vertical and lateral flow angle variations are within +/-5 deg and +/-7 deg, respectively. Atmospheric winds were found to affect the pressure distribution in the test section only at high ratios of wind speed to test section speed.

  19. Aerodynamic Characterization of a Modern Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.; Holland, Scott D.; Blevins, John A.

    2011-01-01

    A modern launch vehicle is by necessity an extremely integrated design. The accurate characterization of its aerodynamic characteristics is essential to determine design loads, to design flight control laws, and to establish performance. The NASA Ares Aerodynamics Panel has been responsible for technical planning, execution, and vetting of the aerodynamic characterization of the Ares I vehicle. An aerodynamics team supporting the Panel consists of wind tunnel engineers, computational engineers, database engineers, and other analysts that address topics such as uncertainty quantification. The team resides at three NASA centers: Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Ames Research Center. The Panel has developed strategies to synergistically combine both the wind tunnel efforts and the computational efforts with the goal of validating the computations. Selected examples highlight key flow physics and, where possible, the fidelity of the comparisons between wind tunnel results and the computations. Lessons learned summarize what has been gleaned during the project and can be useful for other vehicle development projects.

  20. ULSD and B20 Hydrocarbon Impacts on EGR Cooler Performance and Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Sluder, Scott; Storey, John Morse; Youngquist, Adam D

    2009-01-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler fouling has emerged as an important issue in diesel engine development. Uncertainty about the level of impact that fuel chemistry may have upon this issue has resulted in a need to investigate the cooler fouling process with emerging non-traditional fuel sources to gage their impact on the process. This study reports experiments using both ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and 20% biodiesel (B20) at elevated exhaust hydrocarbon conditions to investigate the EGR cooler fouling process. The results show that there is little difference between the degradation in cooler effectiveness for ULSD and B20 at identical conditions. At lower coolant temperatures, B20 exhibits elevated organic fractions in the deposits compared with ULSD, but this does not appear to lead to incremental performance degradation under the conditions studied. Comparisons with a previous study conducted at low HC levels shows that the presence of increased volatiles in the deposit does not impact the degradation in effectiveness significantly. Moreover, the effectiveness loss divided by the deposit mass gain for both low- and high-HC conditions seems to indicate that the HC fraction in the deposit does not significantly alter the overall thermal properties of the deposit layer.

  1. Viking entry aerodynamics and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polutchko, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the Mars entry including the mission sequence of events and associated spacecraft weights are described along with the Viking spacecraft. Test data are presented for the aerodynamic characteristics of the entry vehicle showing trimmed alpha, drag coefficient, and trimmed lift to drag ratio versus Mach number; the damping characteristics of the entry configuration; the angle of attack time history of Viking entries; stagnation heating and pressure time histories; and the aeroshell heating distribution as obtained in tests run in a shock tunnel for various gases. Flight tests which demonstrate the aerodynamic separation of the full-scale aeroshell and the flying qualities of the entry configuration in an uncontrolled mode are documented. Design values selected for the heat protection system based on the test data and analysis performed are presented.

  2. Performance of different vegetation indices in assessing degradation of community grazing lands in Indian arid zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Suresh; Bastin, Gary; Friedel, Margaret; Narain, Pratap; Saha, D. K.; Ahuja, U. R.; Mathur, B. K.

    2006-12-01

    Vegetation in arid community grazinglands shows monsoonal growth. Its matching phenology with crops makes its detection difficult during July to September. While crops are harvested during September-October, using satellite data thereafter for the natural vegetation seems most appropriate but by then it turns dry. An index capable of sensing dry vegetation was needed since conventional NDVI is sensitive to greenness of vegetation. Performance of NDVI vis-à-vis another index, PD54, based on cover was therefore compared in assessing degradation of grazinglands. The PD54 was used to isolate anthropogenic impacts from environmental induced degradation by analyzing satellite images from dry and wet seasons. Substantial absence of appreciable vegetation response indicated poor resilience and severe degradation. Five grazinglands in Shergarh tehsil of Jodhpur district in Rajasthan were studied following above approach. Ground radiometric observations were recorded. Satellite data of IRS 1C/1D/P6 with LISS 3 sensor for both pre and post monsoon season were acquired for three contrasting wet-dry season events. These were geometrically registered and radiometrically calibrated to calculate an index of vegetation cover PD54 as well as NDVI. PD54 is a perpendicular vegetation index based on the green and red spectral band width. The PD54 and NDVI calculated from spectro-radiometer were related to vegetation cover measured on ground in permanent plots. This confirmed that PD54 was superior index for estimating cover in arid dry grasslands. These ground vegetation trends in a good rainfall year (2001) with drought year (2002) were related with satellite data for a protected and four unprotected grazinglands. NDVI failed to detect any vegetation in protected areas supporting excellent grass cover which was succinctly brought out by PD54. Successful validation of PD54 in detecting degradation of 13 additional sites confirmed its efficacy. These findings have implication in forage

  3. Aerodynamic performance of 0.4066-scale model of JT8D refan stage with S-duct inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Kovich, G.; Lewis, G. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A scale model of the JT8D refan stage was tested with a scale model of the S-duct inlet design for the refanned Boeing 727 center engine. Detailed survey data of pressures, temperatures, and flow angles were obtained over a range of flows at speeds from 70 to 97 percent of design speed. Two S-duct configurations were tested; one with a bellmouth inlet and the other with a flight lip inlet. The results indicated that the overall performance was essentially unaffected by the distortion generated by the S-duct inlet. The stall weight flow increased by less than 0.5 kg/sec (approximately 1.5% of design flow) with the S-duct inlet compared with that obtained with uniform flow. The detailed measurements indicated that the inlet guide vane (IGV) significantly reduced circumferential variations. For example, the flow angles ahead of the IGV were positive in the right half of the inlet and negative in the left half. Behind the IGV, the flow angles tended to be more uniform circumferentially.

  4. Computational Study of the Impact of Unsteadiness on the Aerodynamic Performance of a Variable- Speed Power Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    2012-01-01

    The design-point and off-design performance of an embedded 1.5-stage portion of a variable-speed power turbine (VSPT) was assessed using Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) analyses with mixing-planes and sector-periodic, unsteady RANS analyses. The VSPT provides one means by which to effect the nearly 50 percent main-rotor speed change required for the NASA Large Civil Tilt-Rotor (LCTR) application. The change in VSPT shaft-speed during the LCTR mission results in blade-row incidence angle changes of as high as 55 . Negative incidence levels of this magnitude at takeoff operation give rise to a vortical flow structure in the pressure-side cove of a high-turn rotor that transports low-momentum flow toward the casing endwall. The intent of the effort was to assess the impact of unsteadiness of blade-row interaction on the time-mean flow and, specifically, to identify potential departure from the predicted trend of efficiency with shaft-speed change of meanline and 3-D RANS/mixing-plane analyses used for design.

  5. Computational Assessment of the Aerodynamic Performance of a Variable-Speed Power Turbine for Large Civil Tilt-Rotor Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    2011-01-01

    The main rotors of the NASA Large Civil Tilt-Rotor notional vehicle operate over a wide speed-range, from 100% at take-off to 54% at cruise. The variable-speed power turbine offers one approach by which to effect this speed variation. Key aero-challenges include high work factors at cruise and wide (40 to 60 deg.) incidence variations in blade and vane rows over the speed range. The turbine design approach must optimize cruise efficiency and minimize off-design penalties at take-off. The accuracy of the off-design incidence loss model is therefore critical to the turbine design. In this effort, 3-D computational analyses are used to assess the variation of turbine efficiency with speed change. The conceptual design of a 4-stage variable-speed power turbine for the Large Civil Tilt-Rotor application is first established at the meanline level. The design of 2-D airfoil sections and resulting 3-D blade and vane rows is documented. Three-dimensional Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes computations are used to assess the design and off-design performance of an embedded 1.5-stage portion-Rotor 1, Stator 2, and Rotor 2-of the turbine. The 3-D computational results yield the same efficiency versus speed trends predicted by meanline analyses, supporting the design choice to execute the turbine design at the cruise operating speed.

  6. Effect of Thermal Degradation on High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducer Performance in Small Modular Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgunde, Prathamesh N.; Bond, Leonard J.

    Prototype ultrasonic NDT transducers for use in immersion in coolants for small modular reactors have shown low signal to noise ratio. The reasons for the limitations in performance at high temperature are under investigation, and include changes in component properties. This current work seeks to quantify the issue of thermal expansion and degradation of the piezoelectric material in a transducer using a finite element method. The computational model represents an experimental set up for an ultrasonic transducer in a pulse-echo mode immersed in a liquid sodium coolant. Effect on transmitted and received ultrasonic signal due to elevated temperature (∼200oC) has been analysed.

  7. Performance of an electrically raised, synchronous satellite when subjected to radiation degradation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cake, J. E.; Regetz, J. D., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    The use of solar electric propulsion to raise a high-power communication satellite from a low altitude, inclined circular orbit of the geosynchronous orbit is evaluated. Since the satellite ascends through the high intensity radiation belts, the power available from the solar array and therefore to the ion thrusters degrades. The performance of the solar electric stage in combination with the thrust augmented Thor/Delta launch vehicle is evaluated for two thrust steering programs. The transfer times and solar array requirements are presented for total geosynchronous payloads from 450 to 1100 kg.

  8. Aerodynamic Design Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan; Madavan, Nateri K.

    2003-01-01

    The design of aerodynamic components of aircraft, such as wings or engines, involves a process of obtaining the most optimal component shape that can deliver the desired level of component performance, subject to various constraints, e.g., total weight or cost, that the component must satisfy. Aerodynamic design can thus be formulated as an optimization problem that involves the minimization of an objective function subject to constraints. A new aerodynamic design optimization procedure based on neural networks and response surface methodology (RSM) incorporates the advantages of both traditional RSM and neural networks. The procedure uses a strategy, denoted parameter-based partitioning of the design space, to construct a sequence of response surfaces based on both neural networks and polynomial fits to traverse the design space in search of the optimal solution. Some desirable characteristics of the new design optimization procedure include the ability to handle a variety of design objectives, easily impose constraints, and incorporate design guidelines and rules of thumb. It provides an infrastructure for variable fidelity analysis and reduces the cost of computation by using less-expensive, lower fidelity simulations in the early stages of the design evolution. The initial or starting design can be far from optimal. The procedure is easy and economical to use in large-dimensional design space and can be used to perform design tradeoff studies rapidly. Designs involving multiple disciplines can also be optimized. Some practical applications of the design procedure that have demonstrated some of its capabilities include the inverse design of an optimal turbine airfoil starting from a generic shape and the redesign of transonic turbines to improve their unsteady aerodynamic characteristics.

  9. Integrated aerodynamic/structural design of a sailplane wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, B.; Gurdal, Z.; Haftka, R. T.; Strauch, G. J.; Eppard, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Using lifting-line theory and beam analysis, the geometry (planiform and twist) and composite material structural sizes (skin thickness, spar cap, and web thickness) were designed for a sailplane wing, subject to both structural and aerodynamic constraints. For all elements, the integrated design (simultaneously designing the aerodynamics and the structure) was superior in terms of performance and weight to the sequential design (where the aerodynamic geometry is designed to maximize the performance, following which a structural/aeroelastic design minimizes the weight). Integrated designs produced less rigid, higher aspect ratio wings with favorable aerodynamic/structural interactions.

  10. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  11. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  12. Evaluation of the Fatigue Performance and Degradability of Resorbable PLDLLA-TMC Osteofixations

    PubMed Central

    Landes, Constantin; Ballon, Alexander; Ghanaati, Shahram; Ebel, Daniel; Ulrich, Dieter; Spohn, Uwe; Heunemann, Ute; Sader, Robert; Jaeger, Raimund

    2013-01-01

    The fatigue performance of explanted in-situ degraded osteofixations/osteosyntheses, fabricated from poly (70L-lactide-co-24DL-lactide-6-trimethylane-carbonate or PLDLLA-TMC) copolymer was compared to that of virgin products. The fatigue test was performed on 21 explants retrieved from 12 women and 6 men; 16-46 years by a custom-designed three-point bend apparatus using a staircase method and a specified failure criterion (an increase of the deflection of the specimen > 1 mm) with run-out designated as “no failure” after 150,000 loading cycles. While all the virgin products showed run-out at 38N, all of the specimens fabricated from explants failed at this load level. For the explant specimens, although there was a trend of decreased failure load with increased in-situ time, this decrease was pronounced after 4 months in-situ, however, not yet statistically significant, while a 6-month in-situ explant had significantly less failure load. Three and four month in-situ explants had highly significant differences in failure load between measurements close and distant to the osteotomy line: p=0.0017 (the region of maximum load in-situ). In the virgin products, there were only traces of melt joining and cooling, left from a stage in the manufacturing process. For the implants retrieved after 4.5 months in-situ, the fracture surfaces showed signs of degradation of the implants, possibly caused by hydrolysis, and for those retrieved after 9 months in-situ, there were cracks and pores. Thus, the morphological results are consistent with those obtained in the fatigue test. The present results suggest that resorbable osteofixations fabricated from PLDLLA-TMC are stable enough to allow loading of the healing bone and degrade reliably PMID:24363786

  13. Evaluation of the Fatigue Performance and Degradability of Resorbable PLDLLA-TMC Osteofixations.

    PubMed

    Landes, Constantin; Ballon, Alexander; Ghanaati, Shahram; Ebel, Daniel; Ulrich, Dieter; Spohn, Uwe; Heunemann, Ute; Sader, Robert; Jaeger, Raimund

    2013-01-01

    The fatigue performance of explanted in-situ degraded osteofixations/osteosyntheses, fabricated from poly (70L-lactide-co-24DL-lactide-6-trimethylane-carbonate or PLDLLA-TMC) copolymer was compared to that of virgin products. The fatigue test was performed on 21 explants retrieved from 12 women and 6 men; 16-46 years by a custom-designed three-point bend apparatus using a staircase method and a specified failure criterion (an increase of the deflection of the specimen > 1 mm) with run-out designated as "no failure" after 150,000 loading cycles. While all the virgin products showed run-out at 38N, all of the specimens fabricated from explants failed at this load level. For the explant specimens, although there was a trend of decreased failure load with increased in-situ time, this decrease was pronounced after 4 months in-situ, however, not yet statistically significant, while a 6-month in-situ explant had significantly less failure load. Three and four month in-situ explants had highly significant differences in failure load between measurements close and distant to the osteotomy line: p=0.0017 (the region of maximum load in-situ). In the virgin products, there were only traces of melt joining and cooling, left from a stage in the manufacturing process. For the implants retrieved after 4.5 months in-situ, the fracture surfaces showed signs of degradation of the implants, possibly caused by hydrolysis, and for those retrieved after 9 months in-situ, there were cracks and pores. Thus, the morphological results are consistent with those obtained in the fatigue test. The present results suggest that resorbable osteofixations fabricated from PLDLLA-TMC are stable enough to allow loading of the healing bone and degrade reliably. PMID:24363786

  14. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell performance degradation by coolant leakage and recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Ju Hae; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Seung Hyun; Joo, Sang Hoon; Choi, Won Mook; Kim, Junbom

    2013-03-01

    Coolant leakage leads to decrease in performance during the operation of electric vehicles which make use of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). This study examines the effects of various coolant leak conditions in 3-cell stack and single cell. The experimental results show that an irreversible reduction in performance occurs after coolant injection into the anode side of the stack. Poisoning of carbon monoxide (CO) on the platinum (Pt) catalyst is caused by electro-oxidation reaction of EG. Water cleaning is selected because CO poisoning is desorbed to reaction with water molecules. Performance is quickly reduced when the interval between coolant injections is short. Performance reduction is indicated by the experimental results for the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). It shows that performance of the MEA with the GDL exposed to coolant decreased, but it is recovered after water cleaning. In contrast, results for performance of the MEA exposed to coolant for long time could not be reversed after water cleaning. Therefore, we propose that performance degradation of coolant leak on the Pt catalyst surface and GDL can be recovered by the water cleaning simply without disassembly of stack.

  15. Performance degradation studies on an poly 2,5-benzimidazole high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell using an accelerated degradation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Guo-Bin; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Yan, Wei-Mon

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the performance degradation of a poly 2,5-benzimidazole (ABPBI) based high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) was examined using an accelerated degradation technique (ADT). Experiments using an ADT with 30 min intervals were performed by applying 1.5 V to a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with hydrogen and nitrogen feeding to the anode and cathode, respectively, to simulate the high voltage generated during fuel cell shutdown and restart. The characterization of the MEAs was performed using in-situ and ex-situ electrochemical methods, such as polarization curves, AC impedance, and cyclic voltammetry (CV), and TEM imaging before and after the ADT experiments. The measured results demonstrated that the ADT testing could be used to dramatically reduce the duration of the degradation. The current output at 0.4 V decreased by 48% after performing ADT testing for 30 min. From the AC impedance, CV and RTGA measurements, the decline in cell performance was found to be primarily due to corrosion and thinning of the catalyst layer (or carbon support) during the first 30 min, leading to the dissolution and agglomeration of the platinum catalyst.

  16. [Electricity generation and contaminants degradation performances of a microbial fuel cell fed with Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhu, Xiu-Ping; Xu, Nan; Ni, Jin-Ren

    2011-01-01

    The electricity generation performance of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) utilizing Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater was studied with an H-shape reactor. Indexes including pH, conductivity, oxidation peak potential and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the anolyte were monitored to investigate the contaminants degradation performance of the MFC during the electricity generation process, besides, contaminant ingredients in anodic influent and effluent were analyzed by GC-MS and IR spectra as well. The maximum power density of the MFC could achieve 118.1 mW/m2 and the internal resistance was about 480 omega. Connected with a 1 000 omega external resistance, the output potential was about 0.4 V. Fed with 5 mL Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater, the electricity generation lasted about 133 h and the coulombic efficiency was about 3.93%. At the end of electricity generation cycle, COD decreased by 90.1% while NH4(+) -N decreased by 66.8%. Furfural compounds, phenols and some other complicated organics could be decomposed and utilized in the electricity generation process, and the residual contaminants in effluent included some long-chain fatty acids, esters, ethers, and esters with benzene ring, cycloalkanes, cycloolefins, etc. The results indicate that MFC, which can degrade and utilize the organic contaminants in Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater simultaneously, provides a new approach for resource recovery treatment of Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater. PMID:21404685

  17. Simultaneous degradation estimation and restoration of confocal images and performance evaluation by colocalization analysis.

    PubMed

    Rooms, F; Philips, W; Lidke, D S

    2005-04-01

    A novel method for joint restoration and estimation of the degradation of confocal microscope images is presented. The observed images are degraded due to two sources: blurring due to the band-limited nature of the optical system [modelled by the point spread function (PSF)], and Poisson noise contaminates the observations due to the discrete nature of the photon detection process. The proposed method iterates noise reduction, blur estimation and deblurring, and applies these steps in two phases, i.e. a training phase and a restoration phase. In the first phase, these three steps are iterated until the blur estimation converges. Noise reduction and blur estimation are performed using steerable pyramids, and the deblurring is performed by the Richardson-Lucy algorithm. The second phase is the actual restoration. From then on, the blur estimation is used as a criterion to measure the image quality. The iterations are stopped when this measure converges, a result that is guaranteed. The integrated method is completely automatic, and no prior information on the image is required. The method has been given the name SPERRIL (Steerable Pyramid-based Estimation and Regularized Richardson-Lucy restoration). Compared with existing techniques by both objective measures and visual observation, in the SPERRIL-restored images noise is better suppressed. PMID:15817060

  18. Effect of particle size of Martian dust on the degradation of photovoltaic cell performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.

    1991-01-01

    Glass coverglass and SiO2 covered and uncovered silicon photovoltaic (PV) cells were subjected to conditions simulating a Mars dust storm, using the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel, to assess the effect of particle size on the performance of PV cells in the Martian environment. The dust used was an artificial mineral of the approximate elemental composition of Martian soil, which was sorted into four different size ranges. Samples were tested both initially clean and initially dusted. The samples were exposed to clear and dust laden winds, wind velocities varying from 23 to 116 m/s, and attack angles from 0 to 90 deg. It was found that transmittance through the coverglass approximates the power produced by a dusty PV cell. Occultation by the dust was found to dominate the performance degradation for wind velocities below 50 m/s, whereas abrasion dominates the degradation at wind velocities above 85 m/s. Occultation is most severe at 0 deg (parallel to the wind), is less pronounced from 22.5 to 67.5 deg, and is somewhat larger at 90 deg (perpendicular to the wind). Abrasion is negligible at 0 deg, and increases to a maximum at 90 deg. Occultation is more of a problem with small particles, whereas large particles (unless they are agglomerates) cause more abrasion.

  19. Applied aerodynamics: Challenges and expectations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Victor L.; Smith, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Aerospace is the leading positive contributor to this country's balance of trade, derived largely from the sale of U.S. commercial aircraft around the world. This powerfully favorable economic situation is being threatened in two ways: (1) the U.S. portion of the commercial transport market is decreasing, even though the worldwide market is projected to increase substantially; and (2) expenditures are decreasing for military aircraft, which often serve as proving grounds for advanced aircraft technology. To retain a major share of the world market for commercial aircraft and continue to provide military aircraft with unsurpassed performance, the U.S. aerospace industry faces many technological challenges. The field of applied aerodynamics is necessarily a major contributor to efforts aimed at meeting these technological challenges. A number of emerging research results that will provide new opportunities for applied aerodynamicists are discussed. Some of these have great potential for maintaining the high value of contributions from applied aerodynamics in the relatively near future. Over time, however, the value of these contributions will diminish greatly unless substantial investments continue to be made in basic and applied research efforts. The focus: to increase understanding of fluid dynamic phenomena, identify new aerodynamic concepts, and provide validated advanced technology for future aircraft.

  20. Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: October 31, 2002--January 31, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, M. S.; McGranahan, B. D.

    2004-10-01

    Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbinesrepresents the fourth installment in a series of volumes documenting the ongoing work of th University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Low-Speed Airfoil Tests Program. This particular volume deals with airfoils that are candidates for use on small wind turbines, which operate at low Reynolds numbers.

  1. Steady state performance, photo-induced performance degradation and their relation to transient hysteresis in perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Ajay Kumar; Kulkarni, Ashish; Ikegami, Masashi; Miyasaka, Tsutomu

    2016-03-01

    Hysteresis in current-voltage curves of perovskite solar cells is a serious concern as it creates confusions about actual cell performance and raises questions on its reliability. Although a lot of effort has been made to understand the origin of hysteresis, knowing whether hysteresis affects the cell performance while they are in practical use (operated constantly at maximum power point) is not yet examined. In the present study, we investigate steady state performance and performance stability of perovskite solar cells (planar architecture with varying perovskite film thickness and TiO2 mesoscopic structure with different TiO2 compact layer thickness exhibiting hysteresis of different magnitudes) operating across an external load in relation to hysteresis. The planar cells with larger hysteresis exhibit a steady state current that closely matches the value determined on forward voltage scan. Cyclic photocurrent-dark current measurements on cells with hysteresis of different magnitudes reveal that photo-induced electrical instability (not material degradation), which might be originated from ion migration or photo-induced traps formation, is not related to hysteresis. Performance of the cells is recovered partially or fully, depending on the device structure, on storage in dark. TiO2 meso-structure cells tend to show complete recovery while the planar cells recover partially.

  2. Aerodynamics of Wiffle Balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utvich, Alexis; Jemmott, Colin; Logan, Sheldon; Rossmann, Jenn

    2003-11-01

    A team of undergraduate students has performed experiments on Wiffle balls in the Harvey Mudd College wind tunnel facility. Wiffle balls are of particular interest because they can attain a curved trajectory with little or no pitcher-imparted spin. The reasons behind this have not previously been quantified formally. A strain gauge device was designed and constructed to measure the lift and drag forces on the Wiffle ball; a second device to measure lift and drag on a spinning ball was also developed. Experiments were conducted over a range of Reynolds numbers corresponding to speeds of roughly 0-40 mph. Lift forces of up to 0.2 N were measured for a Wiffle ball at 40 mph. This is believed to be due to air flowing into the holes on the Wiffle ball in addition to the effect of the holes on external boundary layer separation. A fog-based flow visualization system was developed in order to provide a deeper qualitative understanding of what occurred in the flowfield surrounding the ball. The data and observations obtained in this study support existing assumptions about Wiffle ball aerodynamics and begin to elucidate the mechanisms involved in Wiffle ball flight.

  3. The aerodynamics of propellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Quentin R.

    2006-02-01

    The theory and the design of propellers of minimum induced loss is treated. The pioneer analysis of this problem was presented more than half a century ago by Theodorsen, but obscurities in his treatment and inaccuracies and limited coverage in his tables of the Goldstein circulation function for helicoidal vortex sheets have not been remedied until the present work which clarifies and extends his work. The inverse problem, the prediction of the performance of a given propeller of arbitrary form, is also treated. The theory of propellers of minimum energy loss is dependent on considerations of a regular helicoidal trailing vortex sheet; consequently, a more detailed discussion of the dynamics of vortex sheets and the consequences of their instability and roll up is presented than is usually found in treatments of propeller aerodynamics. Complete and accurate tables of the circulation function are presented. Interference effects between a fuselage or a nacelle and the propeller are considered. The regimes of propeller, vortex ring, and windmill operation are characterized.

  4. Inner workings of aerodynamic sweep

    SciTech Connect

    Wadia, A.R.; Szucs, P.N.; Crall, D.W.

    1998-10-01

    The recent trend in using aerodynamic sweep to improve the performance of transonic blading has been one of the more significant technological evolutions for compression components in turbomachinery. This paper reports on the experimental and analytical assessment of the pay-off derived from both aft and forward sweep technology with respect to aerodynamic performance and stability. The single-stage experimental investigation includes two aft-swept rotors with varying degree and type of aerodynamic sweep and one swept forward rotor. On a back-to-back test basis, the results are compared with an unswept rotor with excellent performance and adequate stall margin. Although designed to satisfy identical design speed requirements as the unswept rotor, the experimental results reveal significant variations in efficiency and stall margin with the swept rotors. At design speed, all the swept rotors demonstrated a peak stage efficiency level that was equal to that of the unswept rotor. However, the forward-swept rotor achieved the highest rotor-alone peak efficiency. At the same time, the forward-swept rotor demonstrated a significant improvement in stall margin relative to the already satisfactory level achieved by the unswept rotor. Increasing the level of aft sweep adversely affected the stall margin. A three-dimensional viscous flow analysis was used to assist in the interpretation of the data. The reduced shock/boundary layer interaction, resulting from reduced axial flow diffusion and less accumulation of centrifuged blade surface boundary layer at the tip, was identified as the prime contributor to the enhanced performance with forward sweep. The impact of tip clearance on the performance and stability for one of the aft-swept rotors was also assessed.

  5. Performance assessment of the Saltstone wasteform: Potential effects of the degradation of hydraulic, diffusive, and geochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Yu, A.

    1993-12-01

    A radiological performance assessment (RPA) of the Saltstone Disposal Facility at the Savannah River Site was recently completed. Disposal of low-level radioactive waste as a cementitious wasteform was assessed with respect to potential impacts on off-site members of the general public, inadvertent intruders, and groundwater local to the facility. Because longlived radionuclides are present in the waste, degradation of engineered features of the facility, including the wasteform itself, was considered in the assessment. Degradation can occur as a result of numerous physical and chemical mechanisms. Timing and extent of degradation processes are difficult to establish; therefore, the focus of the RPA was to consider bounding scenarios with respect to degradation. The work reported here addresses the sensitivity of saltstone performance to changes in hydraulic conductivity, diffusivity, and geochemistry as a result of degradation. Performance, in terms of annual radionuclide release from the facility, is compared for a range of saltstone properties, and the sensitivity of performance to these properties is discussed. The results suggest that degradation of diffusive properties is relatively unimportant due to the increasing importance of convective transport as hydraulic conductivity increases. Furthermore, geochemical changes that may occur over a long period of time are important to the performance of a facility if long-lived radionuclides are present and are likely to become more mobile as a result of these changes.

  6. Aerodynamic Simulation of Ice Accretion on Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Bragg, Michael B.; Busch, Greg T.; Montreuil, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    This report describes recent improvements in aerodynamic scaling and simulation of ice accretion on airfoils. Ice accretions were classified into four types on the basis of aerodynamic effects: roughness, horn, streamwise, and spanwise ridge. The NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to generate ice accretions within these four types using both subscale and full-scale models. Large-scale, pressurized windtunnel testing was performed using a 72-in.- (1.83-m-) chord, NACA 23012 airfoil model with high-fidelity, three-dimensional castings of the IRT ice accretions. Performance data were recorded over Reynolds numbers from 4.5 x 10(exp 6) to 15.9 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.28. Lower fidelity ice-accretion simulation methods were developed and tested on an 18-in.- (0.46-m-) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model in a small-scale wind tunnel at a lower Reynolds number. The aerodynamic accuracy of the lower fidelity, subscale ice simulations was validated against the full-scale results for a factor of 4 reduction in model scale and a factor of 8 reduction in Reynolds number. This research has defined the level of geometric fidelity required for artificial ice shapes to yield aerodynamic performance results to within a known level of uncertainty and has culminated in a proposed methodology for subscale iced-airfoil aerodynamic simulation.

  7. Effect of cleaning agents and additives on Protein A ligand degradation and chromatography performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihua; Harding, Jason D; Ivanov, Alexander V; Ramasubramanyan, Natarajan; Dong, Diane D

    2015-03-13

    Protein A chromatography, employing the recombinant Protein A ligand, is widely used as a capture step for antibody and Fc-fusion proteins manufacture. Protein A ligands in these matrices are susceptible to degradation/loss when exposed to cleaning agents such as sodium hydroxide, resulting in loss of capacity on reuse. In this study, MabSelect Protein A ligand and MabSelect SuRe Protein A ligand were chosen to evaluate the impact of alkaline cleaning solutions on the ligands and the packed columns. The Protein A ligands alone and the Protein A columns were incubated or cycled in different concentrations of sodium hydroxide solutions with and without additives, respectively. Ligand integrity (degradation) and ligand function (binding affinity) were studied using SDS-PAGE and customized Biacore technology, surface plasma resonance (SPR) and were successfully correlated with column performance measurement in terms of static binding capacity (SBC), dynamic binding capacity (DBC) and recovery as a function of exposure to cleaning agents with and without additives. The findings and the methodology presented in this study are not only able to determine appropriate cleaning conditions for Protein A chromatography, but also provided tools to enable systematic and rapid study of the cleaning solutions and conditions. PMID:25680549

  8. International Space Station Solar Array Wing On-Orbit Electrical Performance Degradation Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, Eric D.; Kerslake, Thomas W.

    2004-01-01

    The port-side photovoltaic power module (P6) was activated on the International Space Station in December 2000. P6 provides electrical power to channels 2B and 4B to operate ISS power loads. A P6 is shown in the preceding photograph. This article highlights the work done at the NASA Glenn Research Center to calculate the on-orbit degradation of the P6 solar array wings (SAWs) using on-orbit data from December 2000 to February 2003. During early ISS operations, the 82 strings of photovoltaic cells that make up a SAW can provide much more power than is necessary to meet the demand. To deal with excess power, a sequential shunt unit successively shunts the current from the strings. This shunt current was the parameter chosen for the SAW performance degradation study for the following reasons: (1) it is based on a direct shunt current measurement in the sequential shunt unit, (2) the shunt current has a low temperature dependence that reduces the data correction error from using a computationally derived array temperature, and (3) the SSU shunt current is essentially the same as the SAW short-circuit current on a per-string basis.

  9. Performance and degradation of high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, A. S.; Stassi, A.; Modica, E.; Ornelas, R.; Gatto, I.; Passalacqua, E.; Antonucci, V.

    An investigation of carbon-supported Pt/C and PtCo/C catalysts was carried out with the aim to evaluate their stability under high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) operation. Carbon-supported nanosized Pt and PtCo particles with a mean particle size between 1.5 nm and 3 nm were prepared by using a colloidal route. A suitable degree of alloying was obtained for the PtCo catalyst by using a carbothermal reduction. The catalyst stability was investigated to understand the influence of carbon black corrosion, platinum dissolution and sintering in gas-fed sulphuric acid electrolyte half-cell at 75 °C and in PEMFC at 130 °C. Electrochemical active surface area and catalyst performance were determined in PEMFC at 80 °C and 130 °C. A maximum power density of about 700 mW cm -2 at 130 °C and 3 bar abs. O 2 pressure with 0.3 mg Pt cm -2 loading was achieved. The PtCo alloy showed a better stability than Pt in sulphuric acid after cycling; yet, the PtCo/C catalyst showed a degradation after the carbon corrosion test. The PtCo/C catalyst showed smaller sintering effects than Pt/C after accelerated degradation tests in PEMFC at 130 °C.

  10. [Determination of main degradation products of lignin using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhijing; Zhu, Junjun; Li, Xin; Lian, Zhina; Yu, Shiyuan; Yong, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    An analytical method using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) was developed for the separation and quantitative determination of main degradation products of lignin (4-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillin and syringaldehyde) during the steam exploded pretreatment for corn stovers. The separation was carried out on a C18 column with the mobile phase of acetonitrile-water (containing 1.5% acetic acid) at 30 degrees C at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min and the detection wavelengths of 254 and 280 nm. Under the optimized conditions, the correlation coefficients of the 6 compounds were between 0.999 9 and 1.000 0. The recoveries of the 6 compounds were all above 96% and the relative standard deviations (n = 6) were less than 2.5%. This method is suitable for the determination of the main degradation products of lignin during the steam exploded pretreatment of lignocellulosics. PMID:21574401

  11. Using High Resolution Design Spaces for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Under Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Padula, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    This paper explains why high resolution design spaces encourage traditional airfoil optimization algorithms to generate noisy shape modifications, which lead to inaccurate linear predictions of aerodynamic coefficients and potential failure of descent methods. By using auxiliary drag constraints for a simultaneous drag reduction at all design points and the least shape distortion to achieve the targeted drag reduction, an improved algorithm generates relatively smooth optimal airfoils with no severe off-design performance degradation over a range of flight conditions, in high resolution design spaces parameterized by cubic B-spline functions. Simulation results using FUN2D in Euler flows are included to show the capability of the robust aerodynamic shape optimization method over a range of flight conditions.

  12. Tactical missile aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J. (Editor); Nielsen, Jack N. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on tactical missile aerodynamics discusses autopilot-related aerodynamic design considerations, flow visualization methods' role in the study of high angle-of-attack aerodynamics, low aspect ratio wing behavior at high angle-of-attack, supersonic airbreathing propulsion system inlet design, missile bodies with noncircular cross section and bank-to-turn maneuvering capabilities, 'waverider' supersonic cruise missile concepts and design methods, asymmetric vortex sheding phenomena from bodies-of-revolution, and swept shock wave/boundary layer interaction phenomena. Also discussed are the assessment of aerodynamic drag in tactical missiles, the analysis of supersonic missile aerodynamic heating, the 'equivalent angle-of-attack' concept for engineering analysis, the vortex cloud model for body vortex shedding and tracking, paneling methods with vorticity effects and corrections for nonlinear compressibility, the application of supersonic full potential method to missile bodies, Euler space marching methods for missiles, three-dimensional missile boundary layers, and an analysis of exhaust plumes and their interaction with missile airframes.

  13. An experimental investigation of multi-element airfoil ice accretion and resulting performance degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, Mark G.; Berkowitz, Brian M.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of the ice accretion pattern and performance characteristics of a multi-element airfoil was undertaken in the NASA Lewis 6- by 9-Foot Icing Research Tunnel. Several configurations of main airfoil, slat, and flaps were employed to examine the effects of ice accretion and provide further experimental information for code validation purposes. The text matrix consisted of glaze, rime, and mixed icing conditions. Airflow and icing cloud conditions were set to correspond to those typical of the operating environment anticipated tor a commercial transport vehicle. Results obtained included ice profile tracings, photographs of the ice accretions, and force balance measurements obtained both during the accretion process and in a post-accretion evaluation over a range of angles of attack. The tracings and photographs indicated significant accretions on the slat leading edge, in gaps between slat or flaps and the main wing, on the flap leading-edge surfaces, and on flap lower surfaces. Force measurments indicate the possibility of severe performance degradation, especially near C sub Lmax, for both light and heavy ice accretion and performance analysis codes presently in use. The LEWICE code was used to evaluate the ice accretion shape developed during one of the rime ice tests. The actual ice shape was then evaluated, using a Navier-Strokes code, for changes in performance characteristics. These predicted results were compared to the measured results and indicate very good agreement.

  14. Thickness-dependent photocatalytic performance of graphite oxide for degrading organic pollutants under visible light.

    PubMed

    Oh, Junghoon; Chang, Yun Hee; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, Sungjin

    2016-04-20

    Photocatalysts use sustainable solar light energy to trigger various catalytic reactions. Metal-free nanomaterials have been suggested as cost-effective and environmentally friendly photocatalysts. In this work, we propose thickness-controlled graphite oxide (GO) as a metal-free photocatalyst, which is produced by exfoliating thick GO particles via stirring and sonication. All GO samples exhibit photocatalytic activity for degrading an organic pollutant, rhodamine B under visible light, and the thickest sample shows the best catalytic performance. UV-vis-NIR diffuse reflectance absorption spectra indicate that thicker GO samples absorb more vis-NIR light than thinner ones. Density-functional theory calculations show that GO has a much smaller band gap than that of single-layer graphene oxide, and thus suggest that the largely-reduced band gap is responsible for this trend of light absorption. PMID:27040040

  15. Study on performance simulation of polymer electrolyte fuel cell for preventing degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Fukuda, T.; Doi, M.; Hashimoto, R.; Kanematsu, H.; Utsumi, Y.

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, the distribution of water content in the membrane of PEFC was analyzed by using a numerical simulation as well as understanding the behavior of internal moisture of PEFC. Eight parameters were selected for the simulation then 18 combinations of the parameters were allocated by design of experiments, thus the data obtained were analyzed by multiple regression analysis to understand the influence factor of operating conditions quantitatively. As a result, the influence of the operating parameters on the dryness of the membrane for the anode side and the cathode side of PEFC was quantitatively shown by using the method of the multiple regression analysis. Further it was found that the area where cerium carbonate ought to be coated for preventing the degradation without decreasing performance.

  16. Applied computational aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The present volume discusses the original development of the panel method, the mapping solutions and singularity distributions of linear potential schemes, the capabilities of full-potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes schemes, the use of the grid-generation methodology in applied aerodynamics, subsonic airfoil design, inverse airfoil design for transonic applications, the divergent trailing-edge airfoil innovation in CFD, Euler and potential computational results for selected aerodynamic configurations, and the application of CFD to wing high-lift systems. Also discussed are high-lift wing modifications for an advanced-capability EA-6B aircraft, Navier-Stokes methods for internal and integrated propulsion system flow predictions, the use of zonal techniques for analysis of rotor-stator interaction, CFD applications to complex configurations, CFD applications in component aerodynamic design of the V-22, Navier-Stokes computations of a complete F-16, CFD at supersonic/hypersonic speeds, and future CFD developments.

  17. Aerodynamic design and performance testing of an advanced 30 deg swept, eight bladed propeller at Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. M.; Menthe, R. W.; Wainauski, H. S.

    1978-01-01

    The increased emphasis on fuel conservation in the world has stimulated a series of studies of both conventional and unconventional propulsion systems for commercial aircraft. Preliminary results from these studies indicate that a fuel saving of from 15 to 28 percent may be realized by the use of an advanced high speed turboprop. The turboprop must be capable of high efficiency at Mach 0.8 above 10.68 km (35,000 ft) altitude if it is to compete with turbofan powered commercial aircraft. An advanced turboprop concept was wind tunnel tested. The model included such concepts as an aerodynamically integrated propeller/nacelle, blade sweep and power (disk) loadings approximately three times higher than conventional propeller designs. The aerodynamic design for the model is discussed. Test results are presented which indicate propeller net efficiencies near 80 percent were obtained at high disk loadings at Mach 0.8.

  18. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a 1.5-pressure-ratio, 1.83-meter (6 ft) diameter fan stage for turbofan engines (QF-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.; Balombin, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The fan was externally driven by an electric motor. Design features for low-noise generation included the elimination of inlet guide vanes, long axial spacing between the rotor and stator blade rows, and the selection of blade-vane numbers to achieve duct-mode cutoff. The fan QF-2 results were compared with those of another full-scale fan having essentially identical aerodynamic design except for nozzle geometry and the direction of rotation. The fan QF-2 aerodynamic results were also compared with those obtained from a 50.8 cm rotor-tip-diameter model of the reverse rotation fan QF-2 design. Differences in nozzle geometry other than exit area significantly affected the comparison of the results of the full-scale fans.

  19. Effect of cooling-hole geometry on aerodynamic performance of a film-cooled turbine vane tested with cold air in a two-dimensional cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, J. F.; Stabe, R. G.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of the orientation and cooling-hole size on turbine-vane aerodynamic losses was evaluated. The contribution of individual vane regions to the overall effect was also investigated. Test configurations were based upon a representative configuration having 45 spanwise rows of holes spaced about the entire vane profile. Nominal hole diameters of 0.0254 and 0.0356 cm and nominal hole orientations of 35 deg, 45 deg, and 55 deg from the local vane surface and 0 deg, 45 deg, and 90 deg from the main-stream flow direction were investigated. Flow conditions and aerodynamic losses were determined by vane-exit surveys of total pressure, static pressure, and flow angle.

  20. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  1. Bat flight: aerodynamics, kinematics and flight morphology.

    PubMed

    Hedenström, Anders; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-03-01

    Bats evolved the ability of powered flight more than 50 million years ago. The modern bat is an efficient flyer and recent research on bat flight has revealed many intriguing facts. By using particle image velocimetry to visualize wake vortices, both the magnitude and time-history of aerodynamic forces can be estimated. At most speeds the downstroke generates both lift and thrust, whereas the function of the upstroke changes with forward flight speed. At hovering and slow speed bats use a leading edge vortex to enhance the lift beyond that allowed by steady aerodynamics and an inverted wing during the upstroke to further aid weight support. The bat wing and its skeleton exhibit many features and control mechanisms that are presumed to improve flight performance. Whereas bats appear aerodynamically less efficient than birds when it comes to cruising flight, they have the edge over birds when it comes to manoeuvring. There is a direct relationship between kinematics and the aerodynamic performance, but there is still a lack of knowledge about how (and if) the bat controls the movements and shape (planform and camber) of the wing. Considering the relatively few bat species whose aerodynamic tracks have been characterized, there is scope for new discoveries and a need to study species representing more extreme positions in the bat morphospace. PMID:25740899

  2. Impact of Charge Degradation on the Life Cycle Climate Performance of a Residential Air-Conditioning System

    SciTech Connect

    Beshr, Mohamed; Aute, Vikrant; Abdelaziz, Omar; Fricke, Brian A; Radermacher, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Vapor compression systems continuously leak a small fraction of their refrigerant charge to the environment, whether during operation or servicing. As a result of the slow leak rate occurring during operation, the refrigerant charge decreases until the system is serviced and recharged. This charge degradation, after a certain limit, begins to have a detrimental effect on system capacity, energy consumption, and coefficient of performance (COP). This paper presents a literature review and a summary of previous experimental work on the effect of undercharging or charge degradation of different vapor compression systems, especially those without a receiver. These systems include residential air conditioning and heat pump systems utilizing different components and refrigerants, and water chiller systems. Most of these studies show similar trends for the effect of charge degradation on system performance. However, it is found that although much experimental work exists on the effect of charge degradation on system performance, no correlation or comparison between charge degradation and system performance yet exists. Thus, based on the literature review, three different correlations that characterize the effect of charge on system capacity and energy consumption are developed for different systems as follows: one for air-conditioning systems, one for vapor compression water-to-water chiller systems, and one for heat pumps. These correlations can be implemented in vapor compression cycle simulation tools to obtain a better prediction of the system performance throughout its lifetime. In this paper, these correlations are implemented in an open source tool for life cycle climate performance (LCCP) based design of vapor compression systems. The LCCP of a residential air-source heat pump is evaluated using the tool and the effect of charge degradation on the results is studied. The heat pump is simulated using a validated component-based vapor compression system model and

  3. Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, J. B.; Lan, C. Edward

    1989-01-01

    Thrust vectoring as a means to enhance maneuverability and aerodynamic performane of a tactical aircraft is discussed. This concept usually involves the installation of a multifunction nozzle. With the nozzle, the engine thrust can be changed in direction without changing the attitude of the aircraft. Change in the direction of thrust induces a significant change in the aerodynamic forces on the aircraft. Therefore, this device can be used for lift-augmenting as well as stability and control purposes. When the thrust is deflected in the longitudinal direction, the lift force and the pitching stability can be manipulated, while the yawing stability can be controlled by directing the thrust in the lateral direction.

  4. Aerodynamic Decelerators for Planetary Exploration: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juna R.; Lingard, J. Stephen

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, aerodynamic decelerators are defined as textile devices intended to be deployed at Mach numbers below five. Such aerodynamic decelerators include parachutes and inflatable aerodynamic decelerators (often known as ballutes). Aerodynamic decelerators play a key role in the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) of planetary exploration vehicles. Among the functions performed by aerodynamic decelerators for such vehicles are deceleration (often from supersonic to subsonic speeds), minimization of descent rate, providing specific descent rates (so that scientific measurements can be obtained), providing stability (drogue function - either to prevent aeroshell tumbling or to meet instrumentation requirements), effecting further aerodynamic decelerator system deployment (pilot function), providing differences in ballistic coefficients of components to enable separation events, and providing height and timeline to allow for completion of the EDL sequence. Challenging aspects in the development of aerodynamic decelerators for planetary exploration missions include: deployment in the unusual combination of high Mach numbers and low dynamic pressures, deployment in the wake behind a blunt-body entry vehicle, stringent mass and volume constraints, and the requirement for high drag and stability. Furthermore, these aerodynamic decelerators must be qualified for flight without access to the exotic operating environment where they are expected to operate. This paper is an introduction to the development and application of aerodynamic decelerators for robotic planetary exploration missions (including Earth sample return missions) from the earliest work in the 1960s to new ideas and technologies with possible application to future missions. An extensive list of references is provided for additional study.

  5. Reference values and improvement of aerodynamic drag in professional cyclists.

    PubMed

    García-López, Juan; Rodríguez-Marroyo, José Antonio; Juneau, Carl-Etienne; Peleteiro, José; Martínez, Alfredo Córdova; Villa, José Gerardo

    2008-02-01

    The aims of this study were to measure the aerodynamic drag in professional cyclists, to obtain aerodynamic drag reference values in static and effort positions, to improve the cyclists' aerodynamic drag by modifying their position and cycle equipment, and to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these modifications. The study was performed in a wind tunnel with five professional cyclists. Four positions were assessed with a time-trial bike and one position with a standard racing bike. In all positions, aerodynamic drag and kinematic variables were recorded. The drag area for the time-trial bike was 31% higher in the effort than static position, and lower than for the standard racing bike. Changes in the cyclists' position decreased the aerodynamic drag by 14%. The aero-helmet was not favourable for all cyclists. The reliability of aerodynamic drag measures in the wind tunnel was high (r > 0.96, coefficient of variation < 2%). In conclusion, we measured and improved the aerodynamic drag in professional cyclists. Our results were better than those of other researchers who did not assess aerodynamic drag during effort at race pace and who employed different wheels. The efficiency of the aero-helmet, and the validity, reliability, and sensitivity of the wind tunnel and aerodynamic field testing were addressed. PMID:17943597

  6. Computer graphics in aerodynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cozzolongo, J. V.

    1984-01-01

    The use of computer graphics and its application to aerodynamic analyses on a routine basis is outlined. The mathematical modelling of the aircraft geometries and the shading technique implemented are discussed. Examples of computer graphics used to display aerodynamic flow field data and aircraft geometries are shown. A future need in computer graphics for aerodynamic analyses is addressed.

  7. Aerodynamic Effects and Modeling of Damage to Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Gautam H.

    2008-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to measure the aerodynamic effects of damage to lifting and stability/control surfaces of a commercial transport aircraft configuration. The modeling of such effects is necessary for the development of flight control systems to recover aircraft from adverse, damage-related loss-of-control events, as well as for the estimation of aerodynamic characteristics from flight data under such conditions. Damage in the form of partial or total loss of area was applied to the wing, horizontal tail, and vertical tail. Aerodynamic stability and control implications of damage to each surface are presented, to aid in the identification of potential boundaries in recoverable stability or control degradation. The aerodynamic modeling issues raised by the wind tunnel results are discussed, particularly the additional modeling requirements necessitated by asymmetries due to damage, and the potential benefits of such expanded modeling.

  8. Aerodynamics Improve Wind Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, V. W.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications based on aerodynamic concepts would raise efficiency of wind-wheel electric-power generator. Changes smooth airflow, to increase power output, without increasing size of wheel. Significant improvements in efficiency anticipated without any increase in size or number of moving parts and without departing from simplicity of original design.

  9. Evaluation of the performance degradation at PAFC effect of operating conditions on acid loss

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Hideaki; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    1996-12-31

    As a complimentary research project to the demonstration project of 5MW and 1 MW PAFC plants, the mechanism and rate of deterioration of the cells and stacks have been studied from 1995 FY conducted by NEDO, with the objective of establishing an estimation method for the service life-time of the cell stacks. As part of this project, this work has been performed to clarify basic phenomena of the performance degradation at PAFCs jointly by Yamanashi University, PAFC-TRA and PAFC manufacturers. The acid loss into exhaust gases is one of life limiting factors in PAFCs. To design the cells of long-life, it is important to estimate the phosphoric acid loss and to contrive ideas eliminating it. With the objective of obtaining basic data for simulating the acid loss in the large size cells, the effect of the operating conditions on the acid loss into exhaust gases has been studied experimentally by using a single cell with an active electrode area of 100 cm{sup 2}.

  10. Photo-enhanced performance and photo-tunable degradation in LC ecopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Tatsuo

    2007-05-01

    Photosensitive, liquid crystalline (LC) polymers were prepared by in-bulk polymerization of phytomonomers such as cinnamic acid derivatives. The p-coumaric acid (4HCA) homopolymer showed a thermotropic LC phase where a photoreaction of [2+2] cycloaddition occurred by ultraviolet irradiation. LC phase was exhibited only in a low molecular weight state but the polymer was too brittle to materialize. Then we copolymerized 4HCA with multifunctional cinnamate, 3,4 dihydroxycinnamic acid (caffeic acid; DHCA), to prepare the hyperbranching architecture. Many branches increased the apparent size of the polymer chain but kept the low number-average molecular weight. P(4HCA-co-DHCA)s showed high performances which may be attained through the entanglement by in-bulk formation of hyperbranching, rigid structures. P(4HCA-co-DHCA)s showed a smooth hydrolysis, an in-soil degradation and a photoreaction cross-linking from conjugated cinnamate esters to aliphatic esters. The change in photoconversion degree tuned the polymer performance and chain hydrolysis.

  11. Inoculation of tannin-degrading bacteria into novel hosts increases performance on tannin-rich diets.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Kevin D; Stengel, Ashley; Dearing, M Denise

    2016-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that herbivores host tannin-degrading bacteria (TDB) to overcome the toxic challenges posed by plant tannins. While TDB have been isolated from the guts of numerous mammals, their functional significance to their hosts has never been explicitly tested. We introduced TDB into lab rats, which do not host TDB, and measured host performance on tannin-rich diets. We first isolated three species of TDB, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis, from the guts of the desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida), which regularly feeds on tannin-rich plants. Then, we inoculated isolated TDB, as well as full woodrat microbial communities into laboratory rats. A control group was inoculated with sterilized woodrat faeces. Recipient lab rats were fed increasing concentrations of tannic acid, and we monitored tannic acid intake, body mass and liver damage as measured by serum alanine aminotransferase activity. Lab rats given TDB as isolates or full communities exhibited increased tannic acid intake, higher maintenance of body mass and lower indicators of liver damage compared with control animals. These differences were maintained when the trial was repeated after 6 weeks of feeding on tannin-free diets. Our results are the first to demonstrate that TDB significantly increase host performance on tannin-rich diets. PMID:25753857

  12. Sonocatalytic performance of Er-doped ZnO for degradation of a textile dye.

    PubMed

    Khataee, Alireza; Saadi, Shabnam; Safarpour, Mahdie; Joo, Sang Woo

    2015-11-01

    Pure and erbium (Er)-doped ZnO samples were synthesized through a sonochemical method and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-Vis spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The synthesized samples were used as a catalyst for the sonocatalytic decolorization of Reactive Orange 29 (RO29) as a model organic pollutant. The decolorization efficiency was 63%, 68%, 88%, and 75% for undoped, 2%, 4%, and 6% Er-doped ZnO, respectively. The effect of different experimental parameters including catalyst content, dye concentration and ultrasound power was investigated on the sonocatalytic decolorization of RO29. Among several radical scavengers (i.e. chloride, carbonate and sulfate anions and t-butanol), the chloride anion showed the most inhibitive effect on the sonocatalysis performance. Improvement of the sonocatalytic process by K2S2O8 and H2O2 enhancers was also studied. The reusability of the synthesized sonocatalyst was evaluated in several consecutive runs, and a decline of only 4% was observed in the process performance after five runs. The intermediates produced during the degradation of RO29 were identified by GC-MS analysis. PMID:26186857

  13. Aerodynamic performance of 0.5 meter-diameter, 337 meter-per-second tip speed, 1.5 pressure-ratio, single-stage fan designed for low noise aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelder, T. F.; Lewis, G. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Overall and blade-element aerodynamic performance of a 0.271-scale model of QF-1 are presented, examined, and then compared and evaluated with that from similar low noise fan stage designs. The tests cover a wide range of speeds and weight flows along with variations in stator setting angle and stator axial spacing from the rotor. At design speed with stator at design setting angle and a fixed distance between stage measuring stations, there were no significant effects of increasing the axial spacing between rotor stator from 1.0 to 3.5 rotor chords on stage overall pressure ratio, efficiency or stall margin.

  14. NASA/HAA Advanced Rotorcraft Technology and Tilt Rotor Workshops. Volume 3: Aerodynamics and Structures Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Advanced rotorcraft technology and tilt rotor aircraft were discussed. Rotorcraft performance, acoustics, and vibrations were discussed, as was the use of composite materials in rotorcraft structures. Rotorcraft aerodynamics, specifically the aerodynamic phenomena of a rotating and the aerodynamics of fuselages, was discussed.

  15. Study of aerodynamic technology for single-cruise-engine V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, J. R.; Bear, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A viable, single engine, supersonic V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft concept was defined. This vectored thrust, canard wing configuration utilizes an advanced technology separated flow engine with fan stream burning. The aerodynamic characteristics of this configuration were estimated and performance evaluated. Significant aerodynamic and aerodynamic propulsion interaction uncertainties requiring additional investigation were identified. A wind tunnel model concept and test program to resolve these uncertainties and validate the aerodynamic prediction methods were defined.

  16. Summary analysis of the Gemini entry aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitnah, A. M.; Howes, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic data that were derived in 1967 from the analysis of flight-generated data for the Gemini entry module are presented. These data represent the aerodynamic characteristics exhibited by the vehicle during the entry portion of Gemini 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12 missions. For the Gemini, 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12 missions, the flight-generated lift-to-drag ratios and corresponding angles of attack are compared with the wind tunnel data. These comparisons show that the flight generated lift-to-drag ratios are consistently lower than were anticipated from the tunnel data. Numerous data uncertainties are cited that provide an insight into the problems that are related to an analysis of flight data developed from instrumentation systems, the primary functions of which are other than the evaluation of flight aerodynamic performance.

  17. Prediction of ionizing radiation effects induced performance degradation in homodyne BPSK based inter-satellite optical communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Zhao, Shanghong; Gong, Zizheng; Zhao, Jing; Li, Xuan; Dong, Chen

    2016-03-01

    Ionizing radiation effects induced on-orbit performance degradation in homodyne binary phase shift keying (BPSK) based inter-satellite optical communication system is predicted in this paper. Essential optoelectronic devices involved in optical communication system were irradiated by Co60 gamma ray and ionizing radiation environment of three general orbits was analyzed. On this basis, variations of terminal performance loss and system BER degradation along with on-orbit working time were simulated. Influences of terminal location and orbit environment were further discussed. Radiation protection on laser transmitters requires more strengthening, especially for those located in MEO and GEO satellites.

  18. Aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.

    1986-08-12

    An aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus is described which consists of: an aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator adapted to be located on the leading edge of an airframe of a hypersonic aircraft and being responsive to aerodynamic heating of water by a compression shock airstream to produce steam pressure; an expansion shock air-cooled condensor adapted to be located in the airframe rearward of and operatively coupled to the aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator to receive and condense the steam pressure; and an aerodynamic heated steam injector manifold adapted to distribute heated steam into the airstream flowing through an exterior generating channel of an air-breathing, ducted power plant.

  19. The Effect of Degraded Digital Instrumentation and Control systems on Human-system Interfaces and Operator Performance

    SciTech Connect

    OHara, J.M.; Gunther, B.; Martinez-Guridi, G.; Xing, J.; Barnes, V.

    2010-11-07

    Integrated digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in new and advanced nuclear power plants (NPPs) will support operators in monitoring and controlling the plants. Even though digital systems typically are expected to be reliable, their potential for degradation or failure significantly could affect the operators performance and, consequently, jeopardize plant safety. This U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) research investigated the effects of degraded I&C systems on human performance and on plant operations. The objective was to develop technical basis and guidance for human factors engineering (HFE) reviews addressing the operator's ability to detect and manage degraded digital I&C conditions. We reviewed pertinent standards and guidelines, empirical studies, and plant operating experience. In addition, we evaluated the potential effects of selected failure modes of the digital feedwater control system of a currently operating pressurized water reactor (PWR) on human-system interfaces (HSIs) and the operators performance. Our findings indicated that I&C degradations are prevalent in plants employing digital systems, and the overall effects on the plant's behavior can be significant, such as causing a reactor trip or equipment to operate unexpectedly. I&C degradations may affect the HSIs used by operators to monitor and control the plant. For example, deterioration of the sensors can complicate the operators interpretation of displays, and sometimes may mislead them by making it appear that a process disturbance has occurred. We used the findings as the technical basis upon which to develop HFE review guidance.

  20. Aerodynamic performance and pressure distributions for a NASA SC(2)-0714 airfoil tested in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Renaldo V.; Hill, Acquilla S.; Ray, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents in graphic and tabular forms the aerodynamic coefficient and surface pressure distribution data for a NASA SC(2)-0714 airfoil tested in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. The test was another in a series of tests involved in the joint NASA/U.S. Industry Advanced Technology Airfoil Tests program. This 14% thick supercritical airfoil was tested at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.76 and angles of attack from -2.0 to 6.0 degrees. The test Reynolds numbers were 4 million, 6 million, 10 million, 15 million, 30 million, 40 million, and 45 million.

  1. Analysis and interpretation of the performance degradation of glass Resistive Plate Chambers operated in streamer mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Patteri, P.; Piccolo, M.; Della Mea, G.; Restello, S.; Ferri, F.; Musella, P.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Tinti, G.; Mannocchi, G.; Trinchero, G.

    2007-10-01

    The long-term stability of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) with glass electrodes was studied for one year with a dedicated test station hosting about 10 m2 of detectors. RPCs were operated in streamer mode with a ternary gas mixture containing argon (27%), isobutane (9%) and tetrafluoroethane (64%). Environmental conditions were kept under control and, in particular, the water pollution in the gas, deemed responsible for the degradation of glass RPC performance, was monitored never to exceed 30 ppm in the exhaust line. Evidence for a substantial aging of the detectors was observed, resulting in a loss of efficiency correlated to an increased rate of spurious streamers. This can be ascribed to the chemical attack of the glass surface by hydrofluoric acid formed in the streamer process, as confirmed by detailed morphological and chemical analyses of the electrode surface. Our results strengthen the indication that the instability of glass RPCs in the long term is related to the use of fluorocarbons as quenching medium and is not due to external pollutants.

  2. Effects of anode flooding on the performance degradation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mansu; Jung, Namgee; Eom, KwangSup; Yoo, Sung Jong; Kim, Jin Young; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Hong, Bo Ki; Cho, EunAe

    2014-11-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stacks in a fuel cell vehicle can be inevitably exposed to harsh environments such as cold weather in winter, causing water flooding by the direct flow of condensed water to the electrodes. In this study, anode flooding was experimentally investigated with condensed water generated by cooling the anode gas line during a long-term operation (∼1600 h). The results showed that the performance of the PEMFC was considerably degraded. After the long-term experiment, the thickness of the anode decreased, and the ratio of Pt to carbon in the anode increased. Moreover, repeated fuel starvation of the half-cell severely oxidized the carbon surface due to the high induced potential (>1.5 VRHE). The cyclic voltammogram of the anode in the half-cell experiments indicated that the characteristic feature of the oxidized carbon surface was similar to that of the anode in the single cell under anode flooding conditions during the long-term experiment. Therefore, repeated fuel starvation by anode flooding caused severe carbon corrosion in the anode because the electrode potential locally increased to >1.0 VRHE. Consequently, the density of the tri-phase boundary decreased due to the corrosion of carbons supporting the Pt nanoparticles in the anode.

  3. Modeling and Simulation of HVAC Faulty Operations and Performance Degradation due to Maintenance Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liping; Hong, Tianzhen

    2013-01-01

    Almost half of the total energy used in the U.S. buildings is consumed by heating, ventilation and air conditionings (HVAC) according to EIA statistics. Among various driving factors to energy performance of building, operations and maintenance play a significant role. Many researches have been done to look at design efficiencies and operational controls for improving energy performance of buildings, but very few study the impacts of HVAC systems maintenance. Different practices of HVAC system maintenance can result in substantial differences in building energy use. If a piece of HVAC equipment is not well maintained, its performance will degrade. If sensors used for control purpose are not calibrated, not only building energy usage could be dramatically increased, but also mechanical systems may not be able to satisfy indoor thermal comfort. Properly maintained HVAC systems can operate efficiently, improve occupant comfort, and prolong equipment service life. In the paper, maintenance practices for HVAC systems are presented based on literature reviews and discussions with HVAC engineers, building operators, facility managers, and commissioning agents. We categorize the maintenance practices into three levels depending on the maintenance effort and coverage: 1) proactive, performance-monitored maintenance; 2) preventive, scheduled maintenance; and 3) reactive, unplanned or no maintenance. A sampled list of maintenance issues, including cooling tower fouling, boiler/chiller fouling, refrigerant over or under charge, temperature sensor offset, outdoor air damper leakage, outdoor air screen blockage, outdoor air damper stuck at fully open position, and dirty filters are investigated in this study using field survey data and detailed simulation models. The energy impacts of both individual maintenance issue and combined scenarios for an office building with central VAV systems and central plant were evaluated by EnergyPlus simulations using three approaches: 1) direct

  4. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  5. HYSHOT-2 Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, T.; Owen, R.; Walton, C.

    2005-02-01

    The scramjet flight test Hyshot-2, flew on the 30 July 2002. The programme, led by the University of Queensland, had the primary objective of obtaining supersonic combustion data in flight for comparison with measurements made in shock tunnels. QinetiQ was one of the sponsors, and also provided aerodynamic data and trajectory predictions for the ballistic re-entry of the spinning sounding rocket. The unconventional missile geometry created by the nose-mounted asymmetric-scramjet in conjunction with the high angle of attack during re-entry makes the problem interesting. This paper presents the wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamic calculations used as input for the trajectory prediction. Indirect comparison is made with data obtained in the Hyshot-2 flight using a 6 degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation.

  6. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  7. Airfoil Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, E.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, ONERA, and the University of Illinois are conducting a major research program whose goal is to improve our understanding of the aerodynamic scaling of ice accretions on airfoils. The program when it is completed will result in validated scaled simulation methods that produce the essential aerodynamic features of the full-scale iced-airfoil. This research will provide some of the first, high-fidelity, full-scale, iced-airfoil aerodynamic data. An initial study classified ice accretions based on their aerodynamics into four types: roughness, streamwise ice, horn ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. Subscale testing using a NACA 23012 airfoil was performed in the NASA IRT and University of Illinois wind tunnel to better understand the aerodynamics of these ice types and to test various levels of ice simulation fidelity. These studies are briefly reviewed here and have been presented in more detail in other papers. Based on these results, full-scale testing at the ONERA F1 tunnel using cast ice shapes obtained from molds taken in the IRT will provide full-scale iced airfoil data from full-scale ice accretions. Using these data as a baseline, the final step is to validate the simulation methods in scale in the Illinois wind tunnel. Computational ice accretion methods including LEWICE and ONICE have been used to guide the experiments and are briefly described and results shown. When full-scale and simulation aerodynamic results are available, these data will be used to further develop computational tools. Thus the purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the program and key results to date.

  8. Aerodynamics: The Wright Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Jennifer Hansen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the basic principles of aerodynamics. Included in the presentation are: a few demonstrations of the principles, an explanation of the concepts of lift, drag, thrust and weight, a description of Bernoulli's principle, the concept of the airfoil (i.e., the shape of the wing) and how that effects lift, and the method of controlling an aircraft by manipulating the four forces using control surfaces.

  9. On Cup Anemometer Rotor Aerodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Javier; Avila-Sanchez, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups' front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer's performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal), tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a linear dependency of both calibration constants, the slope and the offset, on the cups' center rotation radius, the influence of the front area of the cups also being observed. The analytical model of Kondo et al. was proved to be accurate if it is based on precise data related to the aerodynamic behavior of a rotor's cup. PMID:22778638

  10. Preparation and photocatalytic degradation performance of Ag3PO4 with a two-step approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiwen; Ji, Xiaojing; Li, Xian; Hu, Xianghua; Sun, Yanfang; Ma, Jingjun; Qiao, Gaowei

    2016-05-01

    Ag3PO4 photocatalysts were prepared via two and one-step through a facile ion-exchange route. The photocatalysts were then characterized through powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the samples was evaluated on the basis of the photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange (MO) and methylene blue (MB) under solar irradiation. The MO degradation rate of the Photocatalyst synthesized by the two-step ion-exchange route was 89.18% in 60 min. This value was four times that of the Photocatalyst synthesized by the one-step approach.The MB degradation rate was 97% in 40 min. After six cycling runs were completed, the MO degradation rate was 73%

  11. Modelling and verification of monopropellant thruster performance degradation due to silica contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinds, J. W.; Demaire, A.; Brandt, R.; Schmitz, H. D.

    1992-07-01

    Monopropellant hydrazine thrusters have been found to be degraded by such nonvolatile residues as silica, when the hydrazine has been exposed to propellant tank diaphragm materials. Attention is given to the experimental investigation of 5-20 N output thruster systems' silica-contamination problem, with a view to modeling the mechanism of such degradation. The mechanism is found to be complex and dependent on overall fuel consumption, burn history, and tank/thruster combination. Prospective solutions are discussed.

  12. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Suei; Lan, C. Edward

    1990-01-01

    Due to the requirement of increased performance and maneuverability, the flight envelope of a modern fighter is frequently extended to the high angle-of-attack regime. Vehicles maneuvering in this regime are subjected to nonlinear aerodynamic loads. The nonlinearities are due mainly to three-dimensional separated flow and concentrated vortex flow that occur at large angles of attack. Accurate prediction of these nonlinear airloads is of great importance in the analysis of a vehicle's flight motion and in the design of its flight control system. A satisfactory evaluation of the performance envelope of the aircraft may require a large number of coupled computations, one for each change in initial conditions. To avoid the disadvantage of solving the coupled flow-field equations and aircraft's motion equations, an alternate approach is to use a mathematical modeling to describe the steady and unsteady aerodynamics for the aircraft equations of motion. Aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a rapidly maneuvering aircraft are, in general, nonlinear functions of motion variables, their time rate of change, and the history of maneuvering. A numerical method was developed to analyze the nonlinear and time-dependent aerodynamic response to establish the generalized indicial function in terms of motion variables and their time rates of change.

  13. Aerodynamics of a Cryogenic Semi-Tanker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jason; Salari, Kambiz

    2009-11-01

    The design of a modern cryogenic semi-tanker is based primarily upon functionality with little consideration given to aerodynamic drag. As a result, these tankers have maintained the appearance of a wheeled cylinder for several decades. To reduce the fuel usage of these vehicles, this study investigates their aerodynamics. A detailed understanding of the flow field about the vehicle and its influence on aerodynamic drag is obtained by performing Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of a full-scale tractor and cryogenic tanker-trailer operating at highway speed within a crosswind. The tanker-trailer has a length to diameter ratio of 6.3. The Reynolds number, based upon the tanker diameter, is 4.0x10^6, while the effective vehicle yaw angle is 6.1 . The flow field about the vehicle is characterized by large flow separation regions at the tanker underbody and base. In addition, the relatively large gap between the tractor and the tanker-trailer allows the free-stream flow to be entrained into the tractor-tanker gap. By mitigating these drag-producing phenomena through the use of simple geometry modifications, it may be possible to reduce the aerodynamic drag of cryogenic semi-tankers and, thereby, improve their fuel economy. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Aerodynamic analysis of an isolated vehicle wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leśniewicz, P.; Kulak, M.; Karczewski, M.

    2014-08-01

    Increasing fuel prices force the manufacturers to look into all aspects of car aerodynamics including wheels, tyres and rims in order to minimize their drag. By diminishing the aerodynamic drag of vehicle the fuel consumption will decrease, while driving safety and comfort will improve. In order to properly illustrate the impact of a rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body, precise analysis of an isolated wheel should be performed beforehand. In order to represent wheel rotation in contact with the ground, presented CFD simulations included Moving Wall boundary as well as Multiple Reference Frame should be performed. Sliding mesh approach is favoured but too costly at the moment. Global and local flow quantities obtained during simulations were compared to an experiment in order to assess the validity of the numerical model. Results of investigation illustrates dependency between type of simulation and coefficients (drag and lift). MRF approach proved to be a better solution giving result closer to experiment. Investigation of the model with contact area between the wheel and the ground helps to illustrate the impact of rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body.

  15. Aerodynamic drag in cycling: methods of assessment.

    PubMed

    Debraux, Pierre; Grappe, Frederic; Manolova, Aneliya V; Bertucci, William

    2011-09-01

    When cycling on level ground at a speed greater than 14 m/s, aerodynamic drag is the most important resistive force. About 90% of the total mechanical power output is necessary to overcome it. Aerodynamic drag is mainly affected by the effective frontal area which is the product of the projected frontal area and the coefficient of drag. The effective frontal area represents the position of the cyclist on the bicycle and the aerodynamics of the cyclist-bicycle system in this position. In order to optimise performance, estimation of these parameters is necessary. The aim of this study is to describe and comment on the methods used during the last 30 years for the evaluation of the effective frontal area and the projected frontal area in cycling, in both laboratory and actual conditions. Most of the field methods are not expensive and can be realised with few materials, providing valid results in comparison with the reference method in aerodynamics, the wind tunnel. Finally, knowledge of these parameters can be useful in practice or to create theoretical models of cycling performance. PMID:21936289

  16. Performance and degradation of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells: State of the art in modeling from atomistic to system scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, T.; Futter, G.; Latz, A.; Malkow, T.; Papakonstantinou, G.; Tsotridis, G.; Schott, P.; Gérard, M.; Quinaud, M.; Quiroga, M.; Franco, A. A.; Malek, K.; Calle-Vallejo, F.; Ferreira de Morais, R.; Kerber, T.; Sautet, P.; Loffreda, D.; Strahl, S.; Serra, M.; Polverino, P.; Pianese, C.; Mayur, M.; Bessler, W. G.; Kompis, C.

    2016-02-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) are energy efficient and environmentally friendly alternatives to conventional energy conversion systems in many yet emerging applications. In order to enable prediction of their performance and durability, it is crucial to gain a deeper understanding of the relevant operation phenomena, e.g., electrochemistry, transport phenomena, thermodynamics as well as the mechanisms leading to the degradation of cell components. Achieving the goal of providing predictive tools to model PEMFC performance, durability and degradation is a challenging task requiring the development of detailed and realistic models reaching from the atomic/molecular scale over the meso scale of structures and materials up to components, stack and system level. In addition an appropriate way of coupling the different scales is required. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in modeling of PEMFC, covering all relevant scales from atomistic up to system level as well as the coupling between these scales. Furthermore, it focuses on the modeling of PEMFC degradation mechanisms and on the coupling between performance and degradation models.

  17. Experimental analysis of performance degradation of micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells fed by different fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calise, F.; Restucccia, G.; Sammes, N.

    This paper analyzes the thermodynamic and electrochemical dynamic performance of an anode supported micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) fed by different types of fuel. The micro-tubular SOFC used is anode supported, consisting of a NiO and Gd 0.2Ce 0.8O 2- x (GDC) cermet anode, thin GDC electrolyte, and a La 0.6Sr 0.4Co 0.2Fe 0.8O 3- y (LSCF) and GDC cermet cathode. The fabrication of the cells under investigation is briefly summarized, with emphasis on the innovations with respect to traditional techniques. Such micro-tubular cells were tested using a Test Stand consisting of: a vertical tubular furnace, an electrical load, a galvanostast, a bubbler, gas pipelines, temperature, pressure and flow meters. The tests on the micro-SOFC were performed using H 2, CO, CH 4 and H 2O in different combinations at 550 °C, to determine the cell polarization curves under several load cycles. Long-term experimental tests were also performed in order to assess degradation of the electrochemical performance of the cell. Results of the tests were analyzed aiming at determining the sources of the cell performance degradation. Authors concluded that the cell under investigation is particularly sensitive to the carbon deposition which significantly reduces cell performance, after few cycles, when fed by light hydrocarbons. A significant performance degradation is also detected when hydrogen is used as fuel. In this case, the authors ascribe the degradation to the micro-cracks, the change in materials crystalline structure and problems with electrical connections.

  18. [Performance Study of Bromochloracetonitrile Degradation in Drinking Water by Fe/Cu Catalytic Reduction].

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun-sheng; Ma, Hai-long; Fu, Yang-ping; Zhao, Shi-du; Li, Dong-bing

    2015-06-01

    The paper used the method of iron copper catalyst reduction to degrade low concentrations of bromochloracetonitrile (BCAN) to lighten the damage to human being, which is a kind of disinfection by-products (DBPs) produced during the chlorination process of drinking water. The removal efficiency of BCAN and its influencing factors were investigated. The mechanism of degradation and kinetics were also explored. The results indicated that iron copper had a greater degradation ability towards BCAN, and the degradation rate of iron copper (mass ratio of 10:1) was 1.5 times that of the zero-valent iron. The removal of BCAN increased obviously with the increase of Fe/Cu dosage. When the initial concentration was set at 20 microg x L(-1), after a reaction time of 150 min, removal of BCAN was improved from 51.1% to 89.5% with the increase of iron copper (mass ratio of 10:1) dosage from 5 g x L(-1) to 10 g x L(-1). The temperature also had great impact on BCAN removal and the removal increased with the increase of temperature. However, BCAN removal did not change a lot with the variation of the initial concentration of BCAN when it was at a low level. The BCAN degradation by iron copper catalytic-reduction followed the first-order kinetics model. PMID:26387315

  19. An application of high performance liquid chromatographic assay for the kinetic analysis of degradation of faropenem.

    PubMed

    Cielecka-Piontek, J; Krause, A; Paczkowska, M

    2012-11-01

    An isocratic RP-HPLC-DAD procedure was developed and validated for kinetic analysis of degradation of faropenem in bulk drug substance and in tablets. It involved the use of a C-18 analytical column (5 microm particle size, 250 mm x 4.6 mm), flow rate 1.3 ml/min and 50 microl injection volume. The mobile phase consisted of acetate buffer (pH 3.5) - acetonitrile (70:30 v/v). The determination was carried out at the wavelength of 323 nm. Kinetic studies of faropenem degradation in aqueous solutions included hydrolysis, oxidation, photolysis and thermal degradation. A derivative spectrophotometry was used as an alternative method to compare the observed rate constants. PMID:23210240

  20. Electrochemical performance and capacity degradation mechanism of single-phase La-Mg-Ni-based hydrogen storage alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingjing; Li, Yuan; Han, Da; Yang, Shuqin; Chen, Xiaocui; Zhang, Lu; Han, Shumin

    2015-12-01

    La-Mg-Ni-based hydrogen storage alloys are a promising candidate for the negative electrode materials of nickel metal hydride batteries. However, their fast capacity degradation hinders them from more extensive application. In this study, the electrochemical performance and capacity degradation mechanism of single-phase La2MgNi9, La3MgNi14 and La4MgNi19 alloys are studied from the perspective of their constituent subunits. It is found that the rate capability and cycling stability of the alloy electrodes increase with higher [LaNi5]/[LaMgNi4] subunit ratio, while the discharge capacity shows a reverse trend. Degradation study shows that the inter-molecular strains in the alloys are the main reason that leads to the fast capacity degradation of La-Mg-Ni-based alloys. The strains are caused by the difference in the expansion/contraction properties between [LaNi5] and [LaMgNi4] subunits during charge/discharge which is mainly observed in the H-dissolved solid solution instead of hydride. It is also found that the strains can be relieved by adjusting [LaNi5]/[LaMgNi4] subunit ratio of the alloys, thus achieving less pulverization and oxidation, and better cycling stability. We expect our findings can inspire new thoughts on improving the electrochemical performance of La-Mg-Ni-based alloys by tuning their superlattice structures.

  1. Aerodynamic research on tipvane windturbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbussel, G. J. W.; Vanholten, T.; Vankuik, G. A. M.

    1982-09-01

    Tipvanes are small auxiliary wings mounted at the tips of windturbine blades in such a way that a diffuser effect is generated, resulting in a mass flow augmentation through the turbine disc. For predicting aerodynamic loads on the tipvane wind turbine, the acceleration potential is used and an expansion method is applied. In its simplest form, this method can essentially be classified as a lifting line approach, however, with a proper choice of the basis load distributions of the lifting line, the numerical integration of the pressurefield becomes one dimensional. the integration of the other variable can be performed analytically. The complete analytical expression for the pressure field consists of two series of basic pressure fields. One series is related to the basic load distributions over the turbineblade, and the other series to the basic load distribution over the tipvane.

  2. Performance degradation mechanisms and modes in terrestrial photovoltaic arrays and technology for their diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noel, G. T.; Sliemers, F. A.; Derringer, G. C.; Wood, V. E.; Wilkes, K. E.; Gaines, G. B.; Carmichael, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Accelerated life-prediction test methodologies have been developed for the validation of a 20-year service life for low-cost photovoltaic arrays. Array failure modes, relevant materials property changes, and primary degradation mechanisms are discussed as a prerequisite to identifying suitable measurement techniques and instruments. Measurements must provide sufficient confidence to permit selection among alternative designs and materials and to stimulate widespread deployment of such arrays. Furthermore, the diversity of candidate materials and designs, and the variety of potential environmental stress combinations, degradation mechanisms and failure modes require that combinations of measurement techniques be identified which are suitable for the characterization of various encapsulation system-cell structure-environment combinations.

  3. Nozzle Aerodynamic Stability During a Throat Shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawecki, Edwin J.; Ribeiro, Gregg L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on the internal aerodynamic stability of a family of two-dimensional (2-D) High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) nozzle concepts. These nozzles function during takeoff as mixer-ejectors to meet acoustic requirements, and then convert to conventional high-performance convergent-divergent (CD) nozzles at cruise. The transition between takeoff mode and cruise mode results in the aerodynamic throat and the minimum cross-sectional area that controls the engine backpressure shifting location within the nozzle. The stability and steadiness of the nozzle aerodynamics during this so called throat shift process can directly affect the engine aerodynamic stability, and the mechanical design of the nozzle. The objective of the study was to determine if pressure spikes or other perturbations occurred during the throat shift process and, if so, identify the caused mechanisms for the perturbations. The two nozzle concepts modeled in the test program were the fixed chute (FC) and downstream mixer (DSM). These 2-D nozzles differ principally in that the FC has a large over-area between the forward throat and aft throat locations, while the DSM has an over-area of only about 10 percent. The conclusions were that engine mass flow and backpressure can be held constant simultaneously during nozzle throat shifts on this class of nozzles, and mode shifts can be accomplished at a constant mass flow and engine backpressure without upstream pressure perturbations.

  4. Compendium of NASA Langley reports on hypersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabo, Frances E.; Cary, Aubrey M.; Lawson, Shirley W.

    1987-01-01

    Reference is made to papers published by the Langley Research Center in various areas of hypersonic aerodynamics for the period 1950 to 1986. The research work was performed either in-house by the Center staff or by other personnel supported entirely or in part by grants or contracts. Abstracts have been included with the references when available. The references are listed chronologically and are grouped under the following general headings: (1) Aerodynamic Measurements - Single Shapes; (2) Aerodynamic Measurements - Configurations; (3) Aero-Heating; (4) Configuration Studies; (5) Propulsion Integration Experiment; (6) Propulsion Integration - Study; (7) Analysis Methods; (8) Test Techniques; and (9) Airframe Active Cooling Systems.

  5. Laccase-catalyzed decolorization of malachite green: performance optimization and degradation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Yang, Xiaodan; Lin, Yonghui; Ng, Tzi Bun; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun

    2015-01-01

    Malachite green (MG) was decolorized by laccase (LacA) of white-rot fungus Cerrena sp. with strong decolorizing ability. Decolorization conditions were optimized with response surface methodology. A highly significant quadratic model was developed to investigate MG decolorization with LacA, and the maximum MG decolorization ratio of 91.6% was predicted under the conditions of 2.8 U mL(-1) LacA, 109.9 mg L(-1) MG and decolorization for 172.4 min. Kinetic studies revealed the Km and kcat values of LacA toward MG were 781.9 mM and 9.5 s(-1), respectively. UV-visible spectra confirmed degradation of MG, and the degradation mechanism was explored with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Based on the LC-MS spectra of degradation products, LacA catalyzed MG degradation via two simultaneous pathways. In addition, the phytotoxicity of MG, in terms of inhibition on seed germination and seedling root elongation of Nicotiana tabacum and Lactuca sativa, was reduced after laccase treatment. These results suggest that laccase of Cerrena was effective in decolorizing MG and promising in bioremediation of wastewater in food and aquaculture industries. PMID:26020270

  6. Recommendations for Exploring the Disfluency Hypothesis for Establishing Whether Perceptually Degrading Materials Impacts Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlosky, John; Mueller, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    The target articles explore a common hypothesis pertaining to whether perceptually degrading materials will improve reasoning, memory, and metamemory. Outcomes are mixed, yet some evidence was garnered in support of a version of the disfluency hypothesis that includes moderators, and along with evidence from prior research, researchers will likely…

  7. Laccase-Catalyzed Decolorization of Malachite Green: Performance Optimization and Degradation Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Yang, Xiaodan; Lin, Yonghui; Ng, Tzi Bun; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun

    2015-01-01

    Malachite green (MG) was decolorized by laccase (LacA) of white-rot fungus Cerrena sp. with strong decolorizing ability. Decolorization conditions were optimized with response surface methodology. A highly significant quadratic model was developed to investigate MG decolorization with LacA, and the maximum MG decolorization ratio of 91.6% was predicted under the conditions of 2.8 U mL-1 LacA, 109.9 mg L-1 MG and decolorization for 172.4 min. Kinetic studies revealed the Km and kcat values of LacA toward MG were 781.9 mM and 9.5 s-1, respectively. UV–visible spectra confirmed degradation of MG, and the degradation mechanism was explored with liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Based on the LC-MS spectra of degradation products, LacA catalyzed MG degradation via two simultaneous pathways. In addition, the phytotoxicity of MG, in terms of inhibition on seed germination and seedling root elongation of Nicotiana tabacum and Lactuca sativa, was reduced after laccase treatment. These results suggest that laccase of Cerrena was effective in decolorizing MG and promising in bioremediation of wastewater in food and aquaculture industries. PMID:26020270

  8. Performance degradation of grid-tied photovoltaic modules in a hot-dry climatic condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleske, Adam; Singh, Jaspreet; Kuitche, Joseph; Tamizh-Mani, Govindasamy

    2011-09-01

    The crystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) modules under open circuit conditions typically degrade at a rate of about 0.5% per year. However, it is suspected that the modules in an array level may degrade, depending on equipment/frame grounding and array grounding, at higher rates because of higher string voltage and increased module mismatch over the years of operation in the field. This paper compares and analyzes the degradation rates of grid-tied photovoltaic modules operating over 10-17 years in a desert climatic condition of Arizona. The nameplate open-circuit voltages of the arrays ranged between 400 and 450 V. Six different types/models of crystalline silicon modules with glass/glass and glass/polymer constructions were evaluated. About 1865 modules were inspected using an extended visual inspection checklist and infrared (IR) scanning. The visual inspection checklist included encapsulant discoloration, cell/interconnect cracks, delamination and corrosion. Based on the visual inspection and IR studies, a large fraction of these modules were identified as allegedly healthy and unhealthy modules and they were electrically isolated from the system for currentvoltage (I-V) measurements of individual modules. The annual degradation rate for each module type is determined based on the I-V measurements.

  9. Post-Flight Aerodynamic and Aerothermal Model Validation of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Chun; Muppidi, Suman; Bose, Deepak; Van Norman, John W.; Tanimoto, Rebekah; Clark, Ian

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Program is developing new technologies that will enable the landing of heavier payloads in low density environments, such as Mars. A recent flight experiment conducted high above the Hawaiian Islands has demonstrated the performance of several decelerator technologies. In particular, the deployment of the Robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R) was highly successful, and valuable data were collected during the test flight. This paper outlines the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis used to estimate the aerodynamic and aerothermal characteristics of the SIAD-R. Pre-flight and post-flight predictions are compared with the flight data, and a very good agreement in aerodynamic force and moment coefficients is observed between the CFD solutions and the reconstructed flight data.

  10. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  11. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  12. Aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, E. M.; Chapman, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    The procedure of using numerical optimization methods coupled with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes for the development of an aerodynamic design is examined. Several approaches that replace wind tunnel tests, develop pressure distributions and derive designs, or fulfill preset design criteria are presented. The method of Aerodynamic Design by Numerical Optimization (ADNO) is described and illustrated with examples.

  13. On Wings: Aerodynamics of Eagles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millson, David

    2000-01-01

    The Aerodynamics Wing Curriculum is a high school program that combines basic physics, aerodynamics, pre-engineering, 3D visualization, computer-assisted drafting, computer-assisted manufacturing, production, reengineering, and success in a 15-hour, 3-week classroom module. (JOW)

  14. Aerodynamics of a Party Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that a party balloon can be made to fly erratically across a room, but it can also be used for quantitative measurements of other aspects of aerodynamics. Since a balloon is light and has a large surface area, even relatively weak aerodynamic forces can be readily demonstrated or measured in the classroom. Accurate measurements…

  15. Degradation of refractory dibutyl phthalate by peroxymonosulfate activated with novel catalysts cobalt metal-organic frameworks: Mechanism, performance, and stability.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanxuan; Wan, Jinquan; Ma, Yongwen; Wang, Yan; Chen, Xi; Guan, Zeyu

    2016-11-15

    In this work, a new effective and relatively stable heterogeneous catalyst of Metal-Organic Framework Co3(BTC)2·12H2O (Co-BTC) has been synthesized and tested to activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for removal of refractory dibutyl phthalate (DBP). Co-BTC(A) and Co-BTC(B) were synthesized by different methods, which resulted in different activity towards PMS. The results indicated that Co-BTC(A) showed better performance on DBP degradation. The highest degradation rate of 100% was obtained within 30min. The initial pH showed respective level on DBP degradation with a rank of 5.0>2.75>9.0>7.0>11.0 in PMS/Co-BTC(A) system. No remarkable reduction of DBP was observed in the catalytic activity of Co-BTC(A) at 2nd run as demonstrated by recycling. However, the DBP degradation efficiency decreased by 8.26%, 10.9% and 25.6% in the 3rd, 4th, and 5th runs, respectively. The loss of active catalytic sites of Co(II) from Co-BTC(A) is responsible for the activity decay. Sulfate radicals (SO4(-)) and hydroxyl radicals (OH) were found at pH 2.75. Here, we propose the possible mechanism for activation of PMS by Co-BTC(A), which is involved in homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions in the solutions and the surface of Co-BTC(A), respectively. PMID:27420387

  16. Aerodynamic Simulation of Runback Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Whalen, Edward A.; Busch, Greg T.; Bragg, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of recent investigations into the aerodynamics of simulated runback ice accretion on airfoils. Aerodynamic tests were performed on a full-scale model using a high-fidelity, ice-casting simulation at near-flight Reynolds (Re) number. The ice-casting simulation was attached to the leading edge of a 72-in. (1828.8-mm ) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model. Aerodynamic performance tests were conducted at the ONERA F1 pressurized wind tunnel over a Reynolds number range of 4.7?10(exp 6) to 16.0?10(exp 6) and a Mach (M) number ran ge of 0.10 to 0.28. For Re = 16.0?10(exp 6) and M = 0.20, the simulated runback ice accretion on the airfoil decreased the maximum lift coe fficient from 1.82 to 1.51 and decreased the stalling angle of attack from 18.1deg to 15.0deg. The pitching-moment slope was also increased and the drag coefficient was increased by more than a factor of two. In general, the performance effects were insensitive to Reynolds numb er and Mach number changes over the range tested. Follow-on, subscale aerodynamic tests were conducted on a quarter-scale NACA 23012 model (18-in. (457.2-mm) chord) at Re = 1.8?10(exp 6) and M = 0.18, using low-fidelity, geometrically scaled simulations of the full-scale castin g. It was found that simple, two-dimensional simulations of the upper- and lower-surface runback ridges provided the best representation of the full-scale, high Reynolds number iced-airfoil aerodynamics, whereas higher-fidelity simulations resulted in larger performance degrada tions. The experimental results were used to define a new subclassification of spanwise ridge ice that distinguishes between short and tall ridges. This subclassification is based upon the flow field and resulting aerodynamic characteristics, regardless of the physical size of the ridge and the ice-accretion mechanism.

  17. Preliminary aerodynamic design considerations for advanced laminar flow aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph L., Jr.; Yip, Long P.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Modern composite manufacturing methods have provided the opportunity for smooth surfaces that can sustain large regions of natural laminar flow (NLF) boundary layer behavior and have stimulated interest in developing advanced NLF airfoils and improved aircraft designs. Some of the preliminary results obtained in exploratory research investigations on advanced aircraft configurations at the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed. Results of the initial studies have shown that the aerodynamic effects of configuration variables such as canard/wing arrangements, airfoils, and pusher-type and tractor-type propeller installations can be particularly significant at high angles of attack. Flow field interactions between aircraft components were shown to produce undesirable aerodynamic effects on a wing behind a heavily loaded canard, and the use of properly designed wing leading-edge modifications, such as a leading-edge droop, offset the undesirable aerodynamic effects by delaying wing stall and providing increased stall/spin resistance with minimum degradation of laminar flow behavior.

  18. Mimicking the humpback whale: An aerodynamic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftab, S. M. A.; Razak, N. A.; Mohd Rafie, A. S.; Ahmad, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    This comprehensive review aims to provide a critical overview of the work on tubercles in the past decade. The humpback whale is of interest to aerodynamic/hydrodynamic researchers, as it performs manoeuvres that baffle the imagination. Researchers have attributed these capabilities to the presence of lumps, known as tubercles, on the leading edge of the flipper. Tubercles generate a unique flow control mechanism, offering the humpback exceptional manoeuverability. Experimental and numerical studies have shown that the flow pattern over the tubercle wing is quite different from conventional wings. Research on the Tubercle Leading Edge (TLE) concept has helped to clarify aerodynamic issues such as flow separation, tonal noise and dynamic stall. TLE shows increased lift by delaying and restricting spanwise separation. A summary of studies on different airfoils and reported improvement in performance is outlined. The major contributions and limitations of previous work are also reported.

  19. Aerodynamic enhancement of space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walberg, G. D.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a number of recent investigations are reviewed and used to demonstrate gains in launch, orbital transfer, and planetary vehicle performance and economy that can result from the proper exploitation of aerodynamic phenomena. For launch vehicles, application of control-configured design is shown to allow substantial reduction in wing and vertical fin area (and hence, weight) while maintaining acceptable vehicle performance and control. For orbital transfer and planetary vehicles, the use of aerodynamic lift and drag to reduce retropropulsion requirements is shown to produce payload increases of up to 100 percent and to enable some planetary missions that are not feasible with all-propulsive vehicles. Finally, the application of various advanced technologies to a complete set of launch and orbit transfer vehicles in an early space industrialization mission scenario is considered.

  20. The aerodynamic challenges of SRB recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacchus, D. L.; Kross, D. A.; Moog, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Recovery and reuse of the Space Shuttle solid rocket boosters was baselined to support the primary goal to develop a low cost space transportation system. The recovery system required for the 170,000-lb boosters was for the largest and heaviest object yet to be retrieved from exoatmospheric conditions. State-of-the-art design procedures were ground-ruled and development testing minimized to produce both a reliable and cost effective system. The ability to utilize the inherent drag of the boosters during the initial phase of reentry was a key factor in minimizing the parachute loads, size and weight. A wind tunnel test program was devised to enable the accurate prediction of booster aerodynamic characteristics. Concurrently, wind tunnel, rocket sled and air drop tests were performed to develop and verify the performance of the parachute decelerator subsystem. Aerodynamic problems encountered during the overall recovery system development and the respective solutions are emphasized.

  1. THE HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS PROGRAM AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: OBSERVATIONS ON PERFORMANCE DEGRADATION

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the high-temperature electrolysis research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory, with selected observations of electrolysis cell degradation at the single-cell, small stack and large facility scales. The objective of the INL program is to address the technical and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for hydrogen production from steam. In the envisioned application, high-temperature electrolysis would be coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor for efficient large-scale non-fossil non-greenhouse-gas hydrogen production. The program supports a broad range of activities including small bench-scale experiments, larger scale technology demonstrations, detailed computational fluid dynamic modeling, and system modeling. A summary of the current status of these activities and future plans will be provided, with a focus on the problem of cell and stack degradation.

  2. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE). Aerodynamic and aeromechanical performance of a 50.8 cm (20 inch) diameter 1.34 PR variable pitch fan with core flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, R. G.; Mcfalls, R. A.; Beacher, B. F.

    1977-01-01

    The fan aerodynamic and aeromechanical performance tests of the quiet clean short haul experimental engine under the wing fan and inlet with a simulated core flow are described. Overall forward mode fan performance is presented at each rotor pitch angle setting with conventional flow pressure ratio efficiency fan maps, distinguishing the performance characteristics of the fan bypass and fan core regions. Effects of off design bypass ratio, hybrid inlet geometry, and tip radial inlet distortion on fan performance are determined. The nonaxisymmetric bypass OGV and pylon configuration is assessed relative to both total pressure loss and induced circumferential flow distortion. Reverse mode performance, obtained by resetting the rotor blades through both the stall pitch and flat pitch directions, is discussed in terms of the conventional flow pressure ratio relationship and its implications upon achievable reverse thrust. Core performance in reverse mode operation is presented in terms of overall recovery levels and radial profiles existing at the simulated core inlet plane. Observations of the starting phenomena associated with the initiation of stable rotor flow during acceleration in the reverse mode are briefly discussed. Aeromechanical response characteristics of the fan blades are presented as a separate appendix, along with a description of the vehicle instrumentation and method of data reduction.

  3. Reduced order modeling of mechanical degradation induced performance decay in lithium-ion battery porous electrodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barai, Pallab; Smith, Kandler; Chen, Chien -Fan; Kim, Gi -Heon; Mukherjee, Partha P.

    2015-06-17

    In this paper, a one-dimensional computational framework is developed that can solve for the evolution of voltage and current in a lithium-ion battery electrode under different operating conditions. A reduced order model is specifically constructed to predict the growth of mechanical degradation within the active particles of the carbon anode as a function of particle size and C-rate. Using an effective diffusivity relation, the impact of microcracks on the diffusivity of the active particles has been captured. Reduction in capacity due to formation of microcracks within the negative electrode under different operating conditions (constant current discharge and constant current constantmore » voltage charge) has been investigated. At the beginning of constant current discharge, mechanical damage to electrode particles predominantly occurs near the separator. As the reaction front shifts, mechanical damage spreads across the thickness of the negative electrode and becomes relatively uniform under multiple discharge/charge cycles. Mechanical degradation under different drive cycle conditions has been explored. It is observed that electrodes with larger particle sizes are prone to capacity fade due to microcrack formation. Finally, under drive cycle conditions, small particles close to the separator and large particles close to the current collector can help in reducing the capacity fade due to mechanical degradation.« less

  4. Reduced order modeling of mechanical degradation induced performance decay in lithium-ion battery porous electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Barai, Pallab; Smith, Kandler; Chen, Chien -Fan; Kim, Gi -Heon; Mukherjee, Partha P.

    2015-06-17

    In this paper, a one-dimensional computational framework is developed that can solve for the evolution of voltage and current in a lithium-ion battery electrode under different operating conditions. A reduced order model is specifically constructed to predict the growth of mechanical degradation within the active particles of the carbon anode as a function of particle size and C-rate. Using an effective diffusivity relation, the impact of microcracks on the diffusivity of the active particles has been captured. Reduction in capacity due to formation of microcracks within the negative electrode under different operating conditions (constant current discharge and constant current constant voltage charge) has been investigated. At the beginning of constant current discharge, mechanical damage to electrode particles predominantly occurs near the separator. As the reaction front shifts, mechanical damage spreads across the thickness of the negative electrode and becomes relatively uniform under multiple discharge/charge cycles. Mechanical degradation under different drive cycle conditions has been explored. It is observed that electrodes with larger particle sizes are prone to capacity fade due to microcrack formation. Finally, under drive cycle conditions, small particles close to the separator and large particles close to the current collector can help in reducing the capacity fade due to mechanical degradation.

  5. Supersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of Blunt Body Trim Tab Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korzun, Ashley M.; Murphy, Kelly J.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Trim tabs are aerodynamic control surfaces that can allow an entry vehicle to meet aerodynamic performance requirements while reducing or eliminating the use of ballast mass and providing a capability to modulate the lift-to-drag ratio during entry. Force and moment data were obtained on 38 unique, blunt body trim tab configurations in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The data were used to parametrically assess the supersonic aerodynamic performance of trim tabs and to understand the influence of tab area, cant angle, and aspect ratio. Across the range of conditions tested (Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5; angles of attack from -4deg to +20deg; angles of sideslip from 0deg to +8deg), the effects of varying tab area and tab cant angle were found to be much more significant than effects from varying tab aspect ratio. Aerodynamic characteristics exhibited variation with Mach number and forebody geometry over the range of conditions tested. Overall, the results demonstrate that trim tabs are a viable approach to satisfy aerodynamic performance requirements of blunt body entry vehicles with minimal ballast mass. For a 70deg sphere-cone, a tab with 3% area of the forebody and canted approximately 35deg with no ballast mass was found to give the same trim aerodynamics as a baseline model with ballast mass that was 5% of the total entry mass.

  6. Reciprocity relations in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaslet, Max A; Spreiter, John R

    1953-01-01

    Reverse flow theorems in aerodynamics are shown to be based on the same general concepts involved in many reciprocity theorems in the physical sciences. Reciprocal theorems for both steady and unsteady motion are found as a logical consequence of this approach. No restrictions on wing plan form or flight Mach number are made beyond those required in linearized compressible-flow analysis. A number of examples are listed, including general integral theorems for lifting, rolling, and pitching wings and for wings in nonuniform downwash fields. Correspondence is also established between the buildup of circulation with time of a wing starting impulsively from rest and the buildup of lift of the same wing moving in the reverse direction into a sharp-edged gust.

  7. Tryptophan oxidation catabolite, N-formylkynurenine, in photo degraded cell culture medium results in reduced cell culture performance.

    PubMed

    McElearney, Kyle; Ali, Amr; Gilbert, Alan; Kshirsagar, Rashmi; Zang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Chemically defined media have been widely used in the biopharmaceutical industry to enhance cell culture productivities and ensure process robustness. These media, which are quite complex, often contain a mixture of many components such as vitamins, amino acids, metals and other chemicals. Some of these components are known to be sensitive to various stress factors including photodegradation. Previous work has shown that small changes in impurity concentrations induced by these potential stresses can have a large impact on the cell culture process including growth and product quality attributes. Furthermore, it has been shown to be difficult to detect these modifications analytically due to the complexity of the cell culture media and the trace level of the degradant products. Here, we describe work performed to identify the specific chemical(s) in photodegraded medium that affect cell culture performance. First, we developed a model system capable of detecting changes in cell culture performance. Second, we used these data and applied an LC-MS analytical technique to characterize the cell culture media and identify degradant products which affect cell culture performance. Riboflavin limitation and N-formylkynurenine (NFK), a tryptophan oxidation catabolite, were identified as chemicals which results in a reduction in cell culture performance. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:74-82, 2016. PMID:26560839

  8. A Case Study of Performance Degradation Attributable to Run-Time Bounds Checks on C++ Vector Access

    PubMed Central

    Flater, David; Guthrie, William F

    2013-01-01

    Programmers routinely omit run-time safety checks from applications because they assume that these safety checks would degrade performance. The simplest example is the use of arrays or array-like data structures that do not enforce the constraint that indices must be within bounds. This report documents an attempt to measure the performance penalty incurred by two different implementations of bounds-checking in C and C++ using a simple benchmark and a desktop PC with a modern superscalar CPU. The benchmark consisted of a loop that wrote to array elements in sequential order. With this configuration, relative to the best performance observed for any access method in C or C++, mean degradation of only (0.881 ± 0.009) % was measured for a standard bounds-checking access method in C++. This case study showed the need for further work to develop and refine measurement methods and to perform more comparisons of this type. Comparisons across different use cases, configurations, programming languages, and environments are needed to determine under what circumstances (if any) the performance advantage of unchecked access is actually sufficient to outweigh the negative consequences for security and software quality. PMID:26401432

  9. The aerodynamics of supersonic parachutes

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.W.

    1987-06-01

    A discussion of the aerodynamics and performance of parachutes flying at supersonic speeds is the focus of this paper. Typical performance requirements for supersonic parachute systems are presented, followed by a review of the literature on supersonic parachute configurations and their drag characteristics. Data from a recent supersonic wind tunnel test series is summarized. The value and limitations of supersonic wind tunnel data on hemisflo and 20-degree conical ribbon parachutes behind several forebody shapes and diameters are discussed. Test techniques were derived which avoided many of the opportunities to obtain erroneous supersonic parachute drag data in wind tunnels. Preliminary correlations of supersonic parachute drag with Mach number, forebody shape and diameter, canopy porosity, inflated canopy diameter and stability are presented. Supersonic parachute design considerations are discussed and applied to a M = 2 parachute system designed and tested at Sandia. It is shown that the performance of parachutes in supersonic flows is a strong function of parachute design parameters and their interactions with the payload wake.

  10. Effect of surface degradation on optical performance of potassium dihydrogen phosphate optics.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Elizabeth K; Fluck, Regula; Woods, Bruce; Whitman, Pamela K

    2003-09-20

    We have measured scatter produced by roughening of bare potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) surfaces and by surface degradation (etch pits) that develop beneath a porous solgel coating on KDP after exposure to ambient relative humidity. The etch pits that form on coated KDP scatter incident light into strongly anisotropic angular distributions characteristic of the defect size and shape. The total integrated scatter (TIS) can be as high as 9% for a crystal with etch pits as compared with 0.05% for the as-manufactured crystal. The amount of TIS correlates with the area obscured by defects as measured by optical microscopy. PMID:14526844

  11. Computational Aerodynamic Analysis of Offshore Upwind and Downwind Turbines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, Qiuying; Sheng, Chunhua; Afjeh, Abdollah

    2014-01-01

    Aerodynamic interactions of the model NREL 5 MW offshore horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) are investigated using a high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Four wind turbine configurations are considered; three-bladed upwind and downwind and two-bladed upwind and downwind configurations, which operate at two different rotor speeds of 12.1 and 16 RPM. In the present study, both steady and unsteady aerodynamic loads, such as the rotor torque, blade hub bending moment, and base the tower bending moment of the tower, are evaluated in detail to provide overall assessment of different wind turbine configurations. Aerodynamic interactions between the rotor and tower are analyzed,more » including the rotor wake development downstream. The computational analysis provides insight into aerodynamic performance of the upwind and downwind, two- and three-bladed horizontal axis wind turbines.« less

  12. High-angle-of-attack aerodynamics - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the military and civil technical communities have undertaken numerous studies of the high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of advanced airplane and missile configurations. The method of approach and the design methodology employed have necessarily been experimental and exploratory in nature, due to the complex nature of separated flows. However, despite the relatively poor definition of many of the key aerodynamic phenomena involved for high-alpha conditions, some generic guidelines for design consideration have been identified. The present paper summarizes some of the more important lessons learned in the area of high angle-of-attack aerodynamics with examples of a number of key concepts and with particular emphasis on high-alpha stability and control characteristics of high performance aircraft. Topics covered in the discussion include the impact of design evolution, forebody flows, control of separated flows, configuration effects, aerodynamic controls, wind-tunnel flight correlation, and recent NASA research activities.

  13. Hydraulic performance of a proposed in situ photocatalytic reactor for degradation of MTBE in water.

    PubMed

    Lim, Leonard Lik Pueh; Lynch, Rod

    2011-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) groundwater remediation projects often require a combination of technologies resulting in increasing the project costs. A cost-effective in situ photocatalytic reactor design, Honeycomb II, is proposed and tested for its efficiency in MTBE degradation at various flows. This study is an intermediate phase of the research in developing an in situ photocatalytic reactor for groundwater remediation. It examines the effect of the operating variables: air and water flow and double passages through Honeycomb II, on the MTBE removal. MTBE vaporisation is affected by not only temperature, Henry's law constant and air flow to volume ratio but also reactor geometry. The column reactor achieved more than 84% MTBE removal after 8 h at flows equivalent to horizontal groundwater velocities slower than 21.2 cm d⁻¹. Despite the contrasting properties between a photocatalytic indicator methylene blue and MTBE, the reactor efficiency in degrading both compounds showed similar responses towards flow (equivalent groundwater velocity and hydraulic residence time (HRT)). The critical HRT for both compounds was approximately 1 d, which corresponded to a velocity of 21.2 cm d⁻¹. A double pass through both new and used catalysts achieved more than 95% MTBE removal after two passes in 48 h. It also verified that the removal efficiency can be estimated via the sequential order of the removal efficiency of one pass obtained in the laboratory. This study reinforces the potential of this reactor design for in situ groundwater remediation. PMID:21067793

  14. Degradation of dichloromethane by an isolated strain Pandoraea pnomenusa and its performance in a biotrickling filter.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianming; Cai, Wenji; Cheng, Zhuowei; Chen, Jianmeng

    2014-05-01

    A strain Pandoraea pnomenusa LX-1 that uses dichloromethane (DCM) as sole carbon and energy source has been isolated and identified in our laboratory. The optimum aerobic biodegradation of DCM in batch culture was evaluated by response surface methodology. Maximum biodegradation (5.35 mg/(L·hr)) was achieved under cultivation at 32.8°C, pH 7.3, and 0.66% NaCl. The growth and biodegradation processes were well fitted by Haldane's kinetic model, yielding maximum specific growth and degradation rates of 0.133 hr(-1) and 0.856 hr(-1), respectively. The microorganism efficiently degraded a mixture of DCM and coexisting components (benzene, toluene and chlorobenzene). The carbon recovery (52.80%-94.59%) indicated that the targets were predominantly mineralized and incorporated into cell materials. Electron acceptors increased the DCM biodegradation rate in the following order: mixed > oxygen > iron > sulfate > nitrate. The highest dechlorination rate was 0.365 mg Cl(-)/(hr·mg biomass), obtained in the presence of mixed electron acceptors. Removal was achieved in a continuous biotrickling filter at 56%-85% efficiency, with a mineralization rate of 75.2%. Molecular biology techniques revealed the predominant strain as P. pnomenusa LX-1. These results clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of strain LX-1 in treating DCM-containing industrial effluents. As such, the strain is a strong candidate for remediation of DCM coexisting with other organic compounds. PMID:25079641

  15. CFD research, parallel computation and aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1995-01-01

    Over five years of research in Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications are covered in this report. Using CFD as an established tool, aerodynamic optimization on parallel architectures is explored. The objective of this work is to provide better tools to vehicle designers. Submarine design requires accurate force and moment calculations in flow with thick boundary layers and large separated vortices. Low noise production is critical, so flow into the propulsor region must be predicted accurately. The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) has been the subject of recent work. This vehicle is to be a passenger vehicle with the capability of cutting overseas flight times by more than half. A successful design must surpass the performance of comparable planes. Fuel economy, other operational costs, environmental impact, and range must all be improved substantially. For all these reasons, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer and other disciplines.

  16. High speed civil transport aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report of work in support of the Computational Aerosciences (CAS) element of the Federal HPCC program. Specifically, CFD and aerodynamic optimization are being performed on parallel computers. The long-range goal of this work is to facilitate teraflops-rate multidisciplinary optimization of aerospace vehicles. This year's work is targeted for application to the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), one of four CAS grand challenges identified in the HPCC FY 1995 Blue Book. This vehicle is to be a passenger aircraft, with the promise of cutting overseas flight time by more than half. To meet fuel economy, operational costs, environmental impact, noise production, and range requirements, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer, controls, and perhaps other disciplines. The fundamental goal of this project is to contribute to improved design tools for U.S. industry, and thus to the nation's economic competitiveness.

  17. Aerodynamic interference between two Darrieus wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Schatzle, P.R.; Klimas, P.C.; Spahr, H.R.

    1981-04-01

    The effect of aerodynamic interference on the performance of two curved bladed Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines has been calculated using a vortex/lifting line aerodynamic model. The turbines have a tower-to-tower separation distance of 1.5 turbine diameters, with the line of turbine centers varying with respect to the ambient wind direction. The effects of freestream turbulence were neglected. For the cases examined, the calculations showed that the downwind turbine power decrement (1) was significant only when the line of turbine centers was coincident with the ambient wind direction, (2) increased with increasing tipspeed ratio, and (3) is due more to induced flow angularities downstream than to speed deficits near the downstream turbine.

  18. Transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doig, G.

    2014-08-01

    A review of recent and historical work in the field of transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics has been conducted, focussing on applied research on wings and aircraft, present and future ground transportation, projectiles, rocket sleds and other related bodies which travel in close ground proximity in the compressible regime. Methods for ground testing are described and evaluated, noting that wind tunnel testing is best performed with a symmetry model in the absence of a moving ground; sled or rail testing is ultimately preferable, though considerably more expensive. Findings are reported on shock-related ground influence on aerodynamic forces and moments in and accelerating through the transonic regime - where force reversals and the early onset of local supersonic flow is prevalent - as well as more predictable behaviours in fully supersonic to hypersonic ground effect flows.

  19. Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test: Trajectory, Atmosphere, and Aerodynamics Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutty, Prasad; Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Blood, Eric M.; O'Farrell, Clara; Ginn, Jason M.; Shoenenberger, Mark; Dutta, Soumyo

    2015-01-01

    The Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test is a full-scale flight test of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator, which is part of the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator technology development project. The purpose of the project is to develop and mature aerodynamic decelerator technologies for landing large mass payloads on the surface of Mars. The technologies include a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator and Supersonic Parachutes. The first Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test occurred on June 28th, 2014 at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. This test was used to validate the test architecture for future missions. The flight was a success and, in addition, was able to acquire data on the aerodynamic performance of the supersonic inflatable decelerator. This paper describes the instrumentation, analysis techniques, and acquired flight test data utilized to reconstruct the vehicle trajectory, atmosphere, and aerodynamics. The results of the reconstruction show significantly higher lofting of the trajectory, which can partially be explained by off-nominal booster motor performance. The reconstructed vehicle force and moment coefficients fall well within pre-flight predictions. A parameter identification analysis indicates that the vehicle displayed greater aerodynamic static stability than seen in pre-flight computational predictions and ballistic range tests.

  20. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sean Graham

    2007-10-31

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by a DOE category two Inventions and Innovations grant to commercialize and improve upon aerodynamic technology for semi-tuck trailers, capable of decreasing heavy vehicle fuel consumption, related environmental damage, and U.S. consumption of foreign oil. Major project goals included the demonstration of aerodynamic trailer technology in trucking fleet operations, and the development and testing of second generation products. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck’s fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Freight Wing utilized a 2003 category one Inventions and Innovations grant to develop practical solutions to trailer aerodynamics. Fairings developed for the front, rear, and bottom of standard semi-trailers together demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy in scientific tests conducted by the Transportation Research Center (TRC). Operational tests with major trucking fleets proved the functionality of the products, which were subsequently brought to market. This category two grant enabled Freight Wing to further develop, test and commercialize its products, resulting in greatly increased understanding and acceptance of aerodynamic trailer technology. Commercialization was stimulated by offering trucking fleets 50% cost sharing on trial implementations of Freight Wing products for testing and evaluation purposes. Over 230 fairings were implemented through the program with 35 trucking fleets including industry leaders such as Wal-Mart, Frito Lay and Whole Foods. The feedback from these testing partnerships was quite positive with product performance exceeding fleet expectations in many cases. Fleet feedback also was also valuable from a product development standpoint and assisted the design of several second generation products

  1. Estimating the erosion and degradation performance of ceramic and polymeric insulator materials in high current arc environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, T. G.; Kristiansen, M.; O'Hair, E.; Marx, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    Modeling the erosion and holdoff degradation performance of various commercially available polymeric and ceramic insulators is addressed. The insulators are tested on a surface discharge switch at about 300 kA in atmospheric air. Test diagnostics include the surface voltage holdoff recovery and the eroded mass loss of the insulator and electrode materials used. The ceramic materials tested include several types of aluminum and magnesium silicates, several alumina and zirconia composites, and aluminum and silicon nitride. The polymeric insulators include polyvinyl chloride, low- and high-molecular-weight polyethylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, polyamide, acetyl, polyamide-imide, and several types of glass-reinforced epoxies, melamines, and phenolics. The test results indicate that the holdoff degradation resistance and erosion rates can be qualitatively predicated by the use of merit figures which are based on the thermochemical properties of the insulator. The holdoff degradation and erosion rates can be improved for some thermoset polymers by a suitable choice of electrode material and/or by the ultraviolet stabilization of the insulator.

  2. The design of missile's dome that fits both optical and aerodynamic needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qun; Zhang, Xin; Jia, Hongguang

    2010-10-01

    Optical guidance missiles requires a dome which fits both optical and aerodynamic needs when they attack at 3 Ma. In this study, ellipse is the figure chosen to be the dome's shape. The ellipticity ɛ is the main variable should to be decided. The optimized function was built by optical and aerodynamic performance function multiply by their weights. The optical and aerodynamic functions were all obtained by computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation's results after normalization. In this study, the optical and aerodynamic performances have equal weights, after optimzing the ellipticity ɛis 2 for the missile.

  3. Aerodynamic flight control to increase payload capability of future launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, John E., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The development of new launch vehicles will require that designers use innovative approaches to achieve greater performance in terms of pay load capability. The objective of the work performed under this delivery order was to provide technical assistance to the Contract Officer's Technical Representative (COTR) in the development of ideas and concepts for increasing the payload capability of launch vehicles by incorporating aerodynamic controls. Although aerodynamic controls, such as moveable fins, are currently used on relatively small missiles, the evolution of large launch vehicles has been moving away from aerodynamic control. The COTR reasoned that a closer investigation of the use of aerodynamic controls on large vehicles was warranted.

  4. Aerodynamic flight control to increase payload capability of future launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, John E., Jr.

    1995-02-01

    The development of new launch vehicles will require that designers use innovative approaches to achieve greater performance in terms of pay load capability. The objective of the work performed under this delivery order was to provide technical assistance to the Contract Officer's Technical Representative (COTR) in the development of ideas and concepts for increasing the payload capability of launch vehicles by incorporating aerodynamic controls. Although aerodynamic controls, such as moveable fins, are currently used on relatively small missiles, the evolution of large launch vehicles has been moving away from aerodynamic control. The COTR reasoned that a closer investigation of the use of aerodynamic controls on large vehicles was warranted.

  5. New aircraft configurations handling qualities studies based on the aerodynamic invariant concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazile, J.

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes an innovative approach to go deeper in the Handling Qualities knowledge for New Aircraft Configurations based on the Aerodynamic Invariant Concept. By manipulating the Doublet Lattice Method for aerodynamic derivatives computation, an Aerodynamic Invariant can be highlighted. It contributes to many aircraft dynamics parameters and can be considered as "key driver" of the longitudinal aircraft dynamics. The aim of this new approach is to study the impact of this aerodynamic invariant on aircraft Handling Qualities and to ask the question: "Could this aerodynamic invariant be used in parallel with Performance in the conceptual design phase to "seek" New Aircraft configurations capable of achieving further Handling Qualities improvement with Performance benefits?" The enclosed results highlight that the aerodynamic invariant could allow to improve and to optimize the aircraft Handling Qualities by relaxing the aircraft dynamics stability.

  6. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, P.; Mehta, U. B.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of artificial intelligence are considered and questions are speculated on, including how knowledge-based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use 'expert' systems and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. The anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements are examined for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics. Considering two of the essentials of computational aerodynamics - reasoniing and calculating - it is believed that a substantial part of the reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence, with computers being used as reasoning machines to set the stage for calculating. Expert systems will probably be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  7. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The general principles of artificial intelligence are reviewed and speculations are made concerning how knowledge based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use expert systems, and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. In addition, the anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics are examined. Three main conclusions are presented. First, there are two related aspects of computational aerodynamics: reasoning and calculating. Second, a substantial portion of reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence. It offers the opportunity of using computers as reasoning machines to set the stage for efficient calculating. Third, expert systems are likely to be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  8. Method and system for detecting a failure or performance degradation in a dynamic system such as a flight vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert H. (Inventor); Ribbens, William B. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method and system for detecting a failure or performance degradation in a dynamic system having sensors for measuring state variables and providing corresponding output signals in response to one or more system input signals are provided. The method includes calculating estimated gains of a filter and selecting an appropriate linear model for processing the output signals based on the input signals. The step of calculating utilizes one or more models of the dynamic system to obtain estimated signals. The method further includes calculating output error residuals based on the output signals and the estimated signals. The method also includes detecting one or more hypothesized failures or performance degradations of a component or subsystem of the dynamic system based on the error residuals. The step of calculating the estimated values is performed optimally with respect to one or more of: noise, uncertainty of parameters of the models and un-modeled dynamics of the dynamic system which may be a flight vehicle or financial market or modeled financial system.

  9. Dynamic soaring: aerodynamics for albatrosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Albatrosses have evolved to soar and glide efficiently. By maximizing their lift-to-drag ratio L/D, albatrosses can gain energy from the wind and can travel long distances with little effort. We simplify the difficult aerodynamic equations of motion by assuming that albatrosses maintain a constant L/D. Analytic solutions to the simplified equations provide an instructive and appealing example of fixed-wing aerodynamics suitable for undergraduate demonstration.

  10. Derivation of aerodynamic kernel functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.; Ventres, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    The method of Fourier transforms is used to determine the kernel function which relates the pressure on a lifting surface to the prescribed downwash within the framework of Dowell's (1971) shear flow model. This model is intended to improve upon the potential flow aerodynamic model by allowing for the aerodynamic boundary layer effects neglected in the potential flow model. For simplicity, incompressible, steady flow is considered. The proposed method is illustrated by deriving known results from potential flow theory.

  11. Development and performance of a large-scale, transonic turbine blade cascade facility for aerodynamic studies of merging coolant-mainstream flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sayeh, Amjad Isaaf

    1998-11-01

    A new, large scale, linear cascade facility of turbine blades has been developed for the experimental exploration of the aerodynamic aspects of film cooling technology. Primary interest is in the mixing of the ejected coolant with the mainstream, at both subsonic and supersonic mainstream Mach numbers at the cascade exit. In order to achieve a spatial resolution adequate for the exploration of details on the scale of the coolant ejection holes, the cascade dimensions were maximized, within the limitations of the air supply system. The cascade contains four blades (three passages) with 14.05 cm axial chord, 17.56 cm span and a design total turning angle of 130.6 degrees. Exit Mach numbers range from 0.6 to 1.5 and Reynolds numbers from 0.5 to 1.5 million. The air supply system capacity allows run times up to five minutes at maximum flow rates. A coolant supply system has been built to deliver mixtures of SFsb6 and air to simulate coolant/mainstream density ratios up to 2. The cascade contains several novel features. A full-perimeter bleed slot upstream of the blades is used to remove the approach boundary layer from all four walls, to improve the degree of two-dimensionality. The exit flow is bounded by two adjustable tailboards that are hinged at the trailing edges and actuated to set the exit flow direction according to the imposed pressure ratio. The boards are perforated and subjected to mass removal near the blades, to minimize the undesirable reflection of shocks and expansion waves. A probe actuator is incorporated that allows continuous positioning of probes in the exhaust stream, in both the streamwise and pitchwise directions. Diagnostic methods include extensive surface pressure taps on the approach and exhaust ducts and on the blade surfaces. The large size permitted as many as 19 taps on the trailing edge itself. Shadowgraph and schlieren are available. A three-prong wake probe has been constructed to simultaneously measure total and static pressures

  12. Aerodynamics of badminton shuttlecocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Aekaansh; Desai, Ajinkya; Mittal, Sanjay

    2013-08-01

    A computational study is carried out to understand the aerodynamics of shuttlecocks used in the sport of badminton. The speed of the shuttlecock considered is in the range of 25-50 m/s. The relative contribution of various parts of the shuttlecock to the overall drag is studied. It is found that the feathers, and the net in the case of a synthetic shuttlecock, contribute the maximum. The gaps, in the lower section of the skirt, play a major role in entraining the surrounding fluid and causing a difference between the pressure inside and outside the skirt. This pressure difference leads to drag. This is confirmed via computations for a shuttlecock with no gaps. The synthetic shuttle experiences more drag than the feather model. Unlike the synthetic model, the feather shuttlecock is associated with a swirling flow towards the end of the skirt. The effect of the twist angle of the feathers on the drag as well as the flow has also been studied.

  13. Aerodynamics of bird flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Unlike airplanes birds must have either flapping or oscillating wings (the hummingbird). Only such wings can produce both lift and thrust - two sine qua non attributes of flying.The bird wings have several possibilities how to obtain the same functions as airplane wings. All are realized by the system of flight feathers. Birds have also the capabilities of adjusting the shape of the wing according to what the immediate flight situation demands, as well as of responding almost immediately to conditions the flow environment dictates, such as wind gusts, object avoidance, target tracking, etc. In bird aerodynamics also the tail plays an important role. To fly, wings impart downward momentum to the surrounding air and obtain lift by reaction. How this is achieved under various flight situations (cruise flight, hovering, landing, etc.), and what the role is of the wing-generated vortices in producing lift and thrust is discussed.The issue of studying bird flight experimentally from in vivo or in vitro experiments is also briefly discussed.

  14. Aerodynamic Reconstruction Applied to Parachute Test Vehicle Flight Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassady, Leonard D.; Ray, Eric S.; Truong, Tuan H.

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamics, both static and dynamic, of a test vehicle are critical to determining the performance of the parachute cluster in a drop test and for conducting a successful test. The Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is conducting tests of NASA's Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) parachutes at the Army Yuma Proving Ground utilizing the Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV). The PTV shape is based on the MPCV, but the height has been reduced in order to fit within the C-17 aircraft for extraction. Therefore, the aerodynamics of the PTV are similar, but not the same as, the MPCV. A small series of wind tunnel tests and computational fluid dynamics cases were run to modify the MPCV aerodynamic database for the PTV, but aerodynamic reconstruction of the flights has proven an effective source for further improvements to the database. The acceleration and rotational rates measured during free flight, before parachute inflation but during deployment, were used to con rm vehicle static aerodynamics. A multibody simulation is utilized to reconstruct the parachute portions of the flight. Aerodynamic or parachute parameters are adjusted in the simulation until the prediction reasonably matches the flight trajectory. Knowledge of the static aerodynamics is critical in the CPAS project because the parachute riser load measurements are scaled based on forebody drag. PTV dynamic damping is critical because the vehicle has no reaction control system to maintain attitude - the vehicle dynamics must be understood and modeled correctly before flight. It will be shown here that aerodynamic reconstruction has successfully contributed to the CPAS project.

  15. Asymmetric Uncertainty Expression for High Gradient Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T

    2012-01-01

    When the physics of the flow around an aircraft changes very abruptly either in time or space (e.g., flow separation/reattachment, boundary layer transition, unsteadiness, shocks, etc), the measurements that are performed in a simulated environment like a wind tunnel test or a computational simulation will most likely incorrectly predict the exact location of where (or when) the change in physics happens. There are many reasons for this, includ- ing the error introduced by simulating a real system at a smaller scale and at non-ideal conditions, or the error due to turbulence models in a computational simulation. The un- certainty analysis principles that have been developed and are being implemented today do not fully account for uncertainty in the knowledge of the location of abrupt physics changes or sharp gradients, leading to a potentially underestimated uncertainty in those areas. To address this problem, a new asymmetric aerodynamic uncertainty expression containing an extra term to account for a phase-uncertainty, the magnitude of which is emphasized in the high-gradient aerodynamic regions is proposed in this paper. Additionally, based on previous work, a method for dispersing aerodynamic data within asymmetric uncer- tainty bounds in a more realistic way has been developed for use within Monte Carlo-type analyses.

  16. Integrated aerodynamic-structural-control wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, M.; Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.; Unger, E. R.

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic-structural-control design of a forward-swept composite wing for a high subsonic transport aircraft is considered. The structural analysis is based on a finite-element method. The aerodynamic calculations are based on a vortex-lattice method, and the control calculations are based on an output feedback control. The wing is designed for minimum weight subject to structural, performance/aerodynamic and control constraints. Efficient methods are used to calculate the control-deflection and control-effectiveness sensitivities which appear as second-order derivatives in the control constraint equations. To suppress the aeroelastic divergence of the forward-swept wing, and to reduce the gross weight of the design aircraft, two separate cases are studied: (1) combined application of aeroelastic tailoring and active controls; and (2) aeroelastic tailoring alone. The results of this study indicated that, for this particular example, aeroelastic tailoring is sufficient for suppressing the aeroelastic divergence, and the use of active controls was not necessary.

  17. Aerodynamic sampling for landmine trace detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settles, Gary S.; Kester, Douglas A.

    2001-10-01

    Electronic noses and similar sensors show promise for detecting buried landmines through the explosive trace signals they emit. A key step in this detection is the sampler or sniffer, which acquires the airborne trace signal and presents it to the detector. Practicality demands no physical contact with the ground. Further, both airborne particulates and molecular traces must be sampled. Given a complicated minefield terrain and microclimate, this becomes a daunting chore. Our prior research on canine olfactory aerodynamics revealed several ways that evolution has dealt with such problems: 1) proximity of the sniffer to the scent source is important, 2) avoid exhaling back into the scent source, 3) use an aerodynamic collar on the sniffer inlet, 4) use auxiliary airjets to stir up surface particles, and 5) manage the 'impedance mismatch' between sniffer and sensor airflows carefully. Unfortunately, even basic data on aerodynamic sniffer performance as a function of inlet-tube and scent-source diameters, standoff distance, etc., have not been previously obtained. A laboratory-prototype sniffer was thus developed to provide guidance for landmine trace detectors. Initial experiments with this device are the subject of this paper. For example, a spike in the trace signal is observed upon starting the sniffer airflow, apparently due to rapid depletion of the available signal-laden air. Further, shielding the sniffer from disruptive ambient airflows arises as a key issue in sampling efficiency.

  18. Aerodynamic Design Opportunities for Future Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.

    2002-01-01

    A discussion of a diverse set of aerodynamic opportunities to improve the aerodynamic performance of future supersonic aircraft has been presented and discussed. These ideas are offered to the community in a hope that future supersonic vehicle development activities will not be hindered by past efforts. A number of nonlinear flow based drag reduction technologies are presented and discussed. The subject technologies are related to the areas of interference flows, vehicle concepts, vortex flows, wing design, advanced control effectors, and planform design. The authors also discussed the importance of improving the aerodynamic design environment to allow creativity and knowledge greater influence. A review of all of the data presented show that pressure drag reductions on the order of 50 to 60 counts are achievable, compared to a conventional supersonic cruise vehicle, with the application of several of the discussed technologies. These drag reductions would correlate to a 30 to 40% increase in cruise L/D (lift-to-drag ratio) for a commercial supersonic transport.

  19. Investigation of degrading effects and performance optimization in long-haul WDM transmission systems and reconfigurable networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lianshan

    Optical signals experience various degrading effects in optical fiber transmission systems and reconfigurable networks. Among those the most important effects include chromatic dispersion, fiber nonlinearities, polarization-related impairments such as polarization mode dispersion (PMD) and polarization dependent loss (PDL), as well as their mutual or combined effects. Depending upon the signal nature (analog or digital, as well as different data formats) and system's structure (reconfigurable network or point-to-point transmission), the way to improve or optimize system performance may be different. Recirculating fiber loop testbed is a powerful tool to investigate different perspectives in typical optically amplified long-haul or ultra-long-haul (ULH) systems by sending optical signals through a certain length fiber repeatedly. Most of the study in this dissertation is based on the testbed with different system parameters or configurations. Polarization-related impairments became a big hurdle to high performance systems, especially when the data rate increases to >10-Gb/s/channel. Both PMD and PDL can induce statistical system fluctuations, and enhanced degradations will happen due to their interaction. Using a loop-synchronized polarization scrambling technique, we replicate a distributed long-haul link with accurate polarization statistics. Thus we are able to show experimentally two major degrading effects due to PMD and PDL: (i) combined effects of PMD and PDL, and (ii) degrading effects due to low frequency polarization scrambling in the presence of PDL. The major part of this dissertation is performance optimization where we show different approaches to (i) overcome the limitations due to fiber dispersion and nonlinearities using pulse-width management for return-to-zero (RZ) systems, (ii) combat PMD and PDL effects by applying dynamic monitoring, optical compensation and electronic mitigation. The advanced methods of PMD emulation, including both the

  20. Sharp Hypervelocity Aerodynamic Research Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey; Kolodziej, Paul; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this flight demonstration is to deploy a slender-body hypervelocity aerodynamic research probe (SHARP) from an orbiting platform using a tether, deorbit and fly it along its aerothermal performance constraint, and recover it intact in mid-air. To accomplish this objective, two flight demonstrations are proposed. The first flight uses a blunt-body, tethered reentry experiment vehicle (TREV) to prove out tethered deployment technology for accurate entries, a complete SHARP electronics suite, and a new soft mid-air helicopter recovery technique. The second flight takes advantage of this launch and recovery capability to demonstrate revolutionary sharp body concepts for hypervelocity vehicles, enabled by new Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) recently developed by Ames Research Center. Successful demonstration of sharp body hypersonic vehicle technologies could have radical impact on space flight capabilities, including: enabling global reentry cross range capability from Station, eliminating reentry communications blackout, and allowing new highly efficient launch systems incorporating air breathing propulsion and zeroth staging.

  1. Skylon Aerodynamics and SABRE Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel; Afosmis, Michael; Bowles, Jeffrey; Pandya, Shishir

    2015-01-01

    An independent partial assessment is provided of the technical viability of the Skylon aerospace plane concept, developed by Reaction Engines Limited (REL). The objectives are to verify REL's engineering estimates of airframe aerodynamics during powered flight and to assess the impact of Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) plumes on the aft fuselage. Pressure lift and drag coefficients derived from simulations conducted with Euler equations for unpowered flight compare very well with those REL computed with engineering methods. The REL coefficients for powered flight are increasingly less acceptable as the freestream Mach number is increased beyond 8.5, because the engineering estimates did not account for the increasing favorable (in terms of drag and lift coefficients) effect of underexpanded rocket engine plumes on the aft fuselage. At Mach numbers greater than 8.5, the thermal environment around the aft fuselage is a known unknown-a potential design and/or performance risk issue. The adverse effects of shock waves on the aft fuselage and plumeinduced flow separation are other potential risks. The development of an operational reusable launcher from the Skylon concept necessitates the judicious use of a combination of engineering methods, advanced methods based on required physics or analytical fidelity, test data, and independent assessments.

  2. Aerodynamic design trends for commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbig, R.; Koerner, H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent research on advanced-configuration commercial aircraft at DFVLR is surveyed, with a focus on aerodynamic approaches to improved performance. Topics examined include transonic wings with variable camber or shock/boundary-layer control, wings with reduced friction drag or laminarized flow, prop-fan propulsion, and unusual configurations or wing profiles. Drawings, diagrams, and graphs of predicted performance are provided, and the need for extensive development efforts using powerful computer facilities, high-speed and low-speed wind tunnels, and flight tests of models (mounted on specially designed carrier aircraft) is indicated.

  3. Dual nozzle aerodynamic and cooling analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meagher, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical models to predict performance and operating characteristics of dual nozzle concepts were developed and improved. Aerodynamic models are available to define flow characteristics and bleed requirements for both the dual throat and dual expander concepts. Advanced analytical techniques were utilized to provide quantitative estimates of the bleed flow, boundary layer, and shock effects within dual nozzle engines. Thermal analyses were performed to define cooling requirements for baseline configurations, and special studies of unique dual nozzle cooling problems defined feasible means of achieving adequate cooling.

  4. New horizon for high performance Mg-based biomaterial with uniform degradation behavior: Formation of stacking faults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinghuai; Xu, Chi; Jing, Yongbin; Lv, Shuhui; Liu, Shujuan; Fang, Daqing; Zhuang, Jinpeng; Zhang, Milin; Wu, Ruizhi

    2015-01-01

    Designing the new microstructure is an effective way to accelerate the biomedical application of magnesium (Mg) alloys. In this study, a novel Mg-8Er-1Zn alloy with profuse nano-spaced basal plane stacking faults (SFs) was prepared by combined processes of direct-chill semi-continuous casting, heat-treatment and hot-extrusion. The formation of SFs made the alloy possess outstanding comprehensive performance as the biodegradable implant material. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS: 318 MPa), tensile yield strength (TYS: 207 MPa) and elongation (21%) of the alloy with SFs were superior to those of most reported degradable Mg-based alloys. This new alloy showed acceptable biotoxicity and degradation rate (0.34 mm/year), and the latter could be further slowed down through optimizing the microstructure. Most amazing of all, the uniquely uniform in vitro/vivo corrosion behavior was obtained due to the formation of SFs. Accordingly we proposed an original corrosion mechanism for the novel Mg alloy with SFs. The present study opens a new horizon for developing new Mg-based biomaterials with highly desirable performances. PMID:26349676

  5. New horizon for high performance Mg-based biomaterial with uniform degradation behavior: Formation of stacking faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinghuai; Xu, Chi; Jing, Yongbin; Lv, Shuhui; Liu, Shujuan; Fang, Daqing; Zhuang, Jinpeng; Zhang, Milin; Wu, Ruizhi

    2015-09-01

    Designing the new microstructure is an effective way to accelerate the biomedical application of magnesium (Mg) alloys. In this study, a novel Mg-8Er-1Zn alloy with profuse nano-spaced basal plane stacking faults (SFs) was prepared by combined processes of direct-chill semi-continuous casting, heat-treatment and hot-extrusion. The formation of SFs made the alloy possess outstanding comprehensive performance as the biodegradable implant material. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS: 318 MPa), tensile yield strength (TYS: 207 MPa) and elongation (21%) of the alloy with SFs were superior to those of most reported degradable Mg-based alloys. This new alloy showed acceptable biotoxicity and degradation rate (0.34 mm/year), and the latter could be further slowed down through optimizing the microstructure. Most amazing of all, the uniquely uniform in vitro/vivo corrosion behavior was obtained due to the formation of SFs. Accordingly we proposed an original corrosion mechanism for the novel Mg alloy with SFs. The present study opens a new horizon for developing new Mg-based biomaterials with highly desirable performances.

  6. New horizon for high performance Mg-based biomaterial with uniform degradation behavior: Formation of stacking faults

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinghuai; Xu, Chi; Jing, Yongbin; Lv, Shuhui; Liu, Shujuan; Fang, Daqing; Zhuang, Jinpeng; Zhang, Milin; Wu, Ruizhi

    2015-01-01

    Designing the new microstructure is an effective way to accelerate the biomedical application of magnesium (Mg) alloys. In this study, a novel Mg–8Er–1Zn alloy with profuse nano-spaced basal plane stacking faults (SFs) was prepared by combined processes of direct-chill semi-continuous casting, heat-treatment and hot-extrusion. The formation of SFs made the alloy possess outstanding comprehensive performance as the biodegradable implant material. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS: 318 MPa), tensile yield strength (TYS: 207 MPa) and elongation (21%) of the alloy with SFs were superior to those of most reported degradable Mg-based alloys. This new alloy showed acceptable biotoxicity and degradation rate (0.34 mm/year), and the latter could be further slowed down through optimizing the microstructure. Most amazing of all, the uniquely uniform in vitro/vivo corrosion behavior was obtained due to the formation of SFs. Accordingly we proposed an original corrosion mechanism for the novel Mg alloy with SFs. The present study opens a new horizon for developing new Mg-based biomaterials with highly desirable performances. PMID:26349676

  7. Aerodynamic Flight-Test Results for the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Smith, Mark S.; Ali, Aliyah N.; Bui, Trong T.; Ellsworth, Joel C.; Garcia, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    The aerodynamic effects of compliant flaps installed onto a modified Gulfstream III airplane were investigated. Analyses were performed prior to flight to predict the aerodynamic effects of the flap installation. Flight tests were conducted to gather both structural and aerodynamic data. The airplane was instrumented to collect vehicle aerodynamic data and wing pressure data. A leading-edge stagnation detection system was also installed. The data from these flights were analyzed and compared with predictions. The predictive tools compared well with flight data for small flap deflections, but differences between predictions and flight estimates were greater at larger deflections. This paper describes the methods used to examine the aerodynamics data from the flight tests and provides a discussion of the flight-test results in the areas of vehicle aerodynamics, wing sectional pressure coefficient profiles, and air data.

  8. Aerodynamic Characteristics, Database Development and Flight Simulation of the X-34 Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Ruth, Michael J.; Fuhrmann, Henri D.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of the aerodynamic characteristics, development of the preflight aerodynamic database and flight simulation of the NASA/Orbital X-34 vehicle is presented in this paper. To develop the aerodynamic database, wind tunnel tests from subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers including ground effect tests at low subsonic speeds were conducted in various facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center. Where wind tunnel test data was not available, engineering level analysis is used to fill the gaps in the database. Using this aerodynamic data, simulations have been performed for typical design reference missions of the X-34 vehicle.

  9. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Under-The-Wing (UTW) engine composite nacelle test report. Volume 1: Summary, aerodynamic and mechanical performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The performance test results of the final under-the-wing engine configuration are presented. One hundred and six hours of engine operation were completed, including mechanical and performance checkout, baseline acoustic testing with a bellmouth inlet, reverse thrust testing, acoustic technology tests, and limited controls testing. The engine includes a variable pitch fan having advanced composite fan blades and using a ball-spline pitch actuation system.

  10. Aerodynamics via acoustics - Application of acoustic formulas for aerodynamic calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    Prediction of aerodynamic loads on bodies in arbitrary motion is considered from an acoustic point of view, i.e., in a frame of reference fixed in the undisturbed medium. An inhomogeneous wave equation which governs the disturbance pressure is constructed and solved formally using generalized function theory. When the observer is located on the moving body surface there results a singular linear integral equation for surface pressure. Two different methods for obtaining such equations are discussed. Both steady and unsteady aerodynamic calculations are considered. Two examples are presented, the more important being an application to propeller aerodynamics. Of particular interest for numerical applications is the analytical behavior of the kernel functions in the various integral equations.

  11. Aerodynamics Via Acoustics: Application of Acoustic Formulas for Aerodynamic Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    Prediction of aerodynamic loads on bodies in arbitrary motion is considered from an acoustic point of view, i.e., in a frame of reference fixed in the undisturbed medium. An inhomogeneous wave equation which governs the disturbance pressure is constructed and solved formally using generalized function theory. When the observer is located on the moving body surface there results a singular linear integral equation for surface pressure. Two different methods for obtaining such equations are discussed. Both steady and unsteady aerodynamic calculations are considered. Two examples are presented, the more important being an application to propeller aerodynamics. Of particular interest for numerical applications is the analytical behavior of the kernel functions in the various integral equations.

  12. The DELTA MONSTER: An RPV designed to investigate the aerodynamics of a delta wing platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Kristen; Flynn, Mike; Gallagher, Randy; Greek, Chris; Kozlowski, Marc; Mcdonald, Brian; Mckenna, Matt; Sellar, Rich; Shearon, Andy

    1989-01-01

    The mission requirements for the performance of aerodynamic tests on a delta wind planform posed some problems, these include aerodynamic interference; structural support; data acquisition and transmission instrumentation; aircraft stability and control; and propulsion implementation. To eliminate the problems of wall interference, free stream turbulence, and the difficulty of achieving dynamic similarity between the test and actual flight aircraft that are associated with aerodynamic testing in wind tunnels, the concept of the remotely piloted vehicle which can perform a basic aerodynamic study on a delta wing was the main objective for the Green Mission - the Delta Monster. The basic aerodynamic studies were performed on a delta wing with a sweep angle greater than 45 degrees. These tests were performed at various angles of attack and Reynolds numbers. The delta wing was instrumented to determine the primary leading edge vortex formation and location, using pressure measurements and/or flow visualization. A data acquisition system was provided to collect all necessary data.

  13. Study of aerodynamic technology for VSTOL fighter/attack aircraft, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driggers, H. H.

    1978-01-01

    A conceptual design study was performed of a vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL) fighter/attack aircraft. The configuration has a close-coupled canard-delta wing, side two-dimensional ramp inlets, and two augmented turbofan engines with thrust vectoring capability. Performance and sensitivities to objective requirements were calculated. Aerodynamic characteristics were estimated based on contractor and NASA wind tunnel data. Computer simulations of VATOL transitions were performed. Successful transitions can be made, even with series post-stall instabilities, if reaction controls are properly phased. Principal aerodynamic uncertainties identified were post-stall aerodynamics, transonic aerodynamics with thrust vectoring and inlet performance in VATOL transition. A wind tunnel research program was recommended to resolve the aerodynamic uncertainties.

  14. Effects of camelina meal supplementation on ruminal forage degradability, performance, and physiological responses of beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three experiments compared ruminal, physiological, and performance responses of beef steers consuming hay ad libitum and receiving grain-based supplements without (CO) or with (CAM) the inclusion of camelina meal. In Exp. 1, 9 steers fitted with ruminal cannulas received CAM (2.04 kg of DM/d; n = 5)...

  15. Nozzle and wing geometry effects on OTW aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U.; Groesbeck, D.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of nozzle geometry and wing size on the aerodynamic performance of several 5:1 aspect ratio slot nozzles are presented for over-the-wing (OTW) configurations. Nozzle geometry variables include roof angle, sidewall cutback, and nozzle chordwise location. Wing variables include chord size, and flap deflection. Several external deflectors also were included for comparison. The data indicate that good flow turning may not necessarily provide the best aerodynamic performance. The results suggest that a variable exhaust nozzle geometry offers the best solution for a viable OTW configuration.

  16. Performance of intact and partially degraded concrete barriers in limiting mass transport

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.C. )

    1992-06-01

    Mass transport through concrete barriers and release rate from concrete vaults are quantitatively evaluated. The thorny issue of appropriate diffusion coefficients for use in performance assessment calculations is covered, with no ultimate solution found. Release from monolithic concrete vaults composed of concrete waste forms is estimated with a semi-analytical solution. A parametric study illustrates the importance of different parameters on release. A second situation of importance is the role of a concrete shell or vault placed around typical waste forms in limiting mass transport. In both situations, the primary factor controlling concrete performance is cracks. The implications of leaching behavior on likely groundwater concentrations is examined. Frequently, lower groundwater concentrations can be expected in the absence of engineered covers that reduce infiltration.

  17. Performance and degradation evaluation of five different commercial lithium-ion cells

    SciTech Connect

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Shim, Joongpyo

    2004-04-20

    The initial performance of five different types of Li-ion rechargeable batteries, from Quallion Corp, UltraLife Battery and Toshiba, was measured and compared. Cell characterization included variable-rate constant-current cycling, various USDOE pulse-test protocols and full-spectrum electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Changes in impedance and capacity were monitored during electrochemical cycling under various conditions, including constant-current cycling over 100 percent DOD at a range of temperature and pulse profile cycling over a very narrow range of DOD at room temperature. All cells were found to maintain more than 80 percent of their rated capacity for more than 400 constant current 100 percent DOD cycles. The power fade (or impedance rise) of the cells varied considerably. New methods for interpreting the pulse resistance data were evaluated for their usefulness in interpreting performance mechanism as a function of test protocol and cell design.

  18. Performance and Reliability Optimization for Aerospace Systems subject to Uncertainty and Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.; Uebelhart, Scott A.; Blaurock, Carl

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes work performed by the Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) for NASA Langley Research Center in the field of performance optimization for systems subject to uncertainty. The objective of the research is to develop design methods and tools to the aerospace vehicle design process which take into account lifecycle uncertainties. It recognizes that uncertainty between the predictions of integrated models and data collected from the system in its operational environment is unavoidable. Given the presence of uncertainty, the goal of this work is to develop means of identifying critical sources of uncertainty, and to combine these with the analytical tools used with integrated modeling. In this manner, system uncertainty analysis becomes part of the design process, and can motivate redesign. The specific program objectives were: 1. To incorporate uncertainty modeling, propagation and analysis into the integrated (controls, structures, payloads, disturbances, etc.) design process to derive the error bars associated with performance predictions. 2. To apply modern optimization tools to guide in the expenditure of funds in a way that most cost-effectively improves the lifecycle productivity of the system by enhancing the subsystem reliability and redundancy. The results from the second program objective are described. This report describes the work and results for the first objective: uncertainty modeling, propagation, and synthesis with integrated modeling.

  19. Recent advances in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh K.; Desse, Jerry E.

    1991-04-01

    The current state of the art in computational aerodynamics is described. Recent advances in the discretization of surface geometry, grid generation, and flow simulation algorithms have led to flowfield predictions for increasingly complex and realistic configurations. As a result, computational aerodynamics is emerging as a crucial enabling technology for the development and design of flight vehicles. Examples illustrating the current capability for the prediction of aircraft, launch vehicle and helicopter flowfields are presented. Unfortunately, accurate modeling of turbulence remains a major difficulty in the analysis of viscosity-dominated flows. In the future inverse design methods, multidisciplinary design optimization methods, artificial intelligence technology and massively parallel computer technology will be incorporated into computational aerodynamics, opening up greater opportunities for improved product design at substantially reduced costs.

  20. Fire performance, microstructure and thermal degradation of an epoxy based nano intumescent fire retardant coating for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Hammad; Ahmad, Faiz; Yusoff, P. S. M. Megat; Zia-ul-Mustafa, M.

    2015-07-01

    Intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC) is a passive fire protection system which swells upon heating to form expanded multi-cellular char layer that protects the substrate from fire. In this research work, IFRC's were developed using different flame retardants such as ammonium polyphosphate, expandable graphite, melamine and boric acid. These flame retardants were bound together with the help of epoxy binder and cured together using curing agent. IFRC was then reinforced with nano magnesium oxide and nano alumina as inorganic fillers to study their effect towards fire performance, microstructure and thermal degradation. Small scale fire test was conducted to investigate the thermal insulation of coating whereas fire performance was calculated using thermal margin value. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the microstructure of char obtained after fire test. Thermogravimetric analysis was conducted to investigate the residual weight of coating. Results showed that the performance of the coating was enhanced by reinforcement with nano size fillers as compared to non-filler based coating. Comparing both nano size magnesium oxide and nano size alumina; nano size alumina gave better fire performance with improved microstructure of char and high residual weight.

  1. Fire performance, microstructure and thermal degradation of an epoxy based nano intumescent fire retardant coating for structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Hammad Ahmad, Faiz Yusoff, P. S. M. Megat; Zia-ul-Mustafa, M.

    2015-07-22

    Intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC) is a passive fire protection system which swells upon heating to form expanded multi-cellular char layer that protects the substrate from fire. In this research work, IFRC’s were developed using different flame retardants such as ammonium polyphosphate, expandable graphite, melamine and boric acid. These flame retardants were bound together with the help of epoxy binder and cured together using curing agent. IFRC was then reinforced with nano magnesium oxide and nano alumina as inorganic fillers to study their effect towards fire performance, microstructure and thermal degradation. Small scale fire test was conducted to investigate the thermal insulation of coating whereas fire performance was calculated using thermal margin value. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the microstructure of char obtained after fire test. Thermogravimetric analysis was conducted to investigate the residual weight of coating. Results showed that the performance of the coating was enhanced by reinforcement with nano size fillers as compared to non-filler based coating. Comparing both nano size magnesium oxide and nano size alumina; nano size alumina gave better fire performance with improved microstructure of char and high residual weight.

  2. Aerodynamic Performance of a 0.27-Scale Model of an AH-64 Helicopter with Baseline and Alternate Rotor Blade Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Henry L.

    1990-01-01

    Performance of a 27 percent scale model rotor designed for the AH-64 helicopter (alternate rotor) was measured in hover and forward flight and compared against and AH-64 baseline rotor model. Thrust, rotor tip Mach number, advance ratio, and ground proximity were varied. In hover, at a nominal thrust coefficient of 0.0064, the power savings was about 6.4 percent for the alternate rotor compared to the baseline. The corresponding thrust increase at this condition was approx. 4.5 percent which represents an equivalent full scale increase in lift capability of about 660 lbs. Comparable results were noted in forward flight except for the high thrust, high speed cases investigated where the baseline rotor was slightly superior. Reduced performance at the higher thrusts and speeds was likely due to Reynolds number effects and blade elasticity differences.

  3. Aerodynamic comparisons of STS-1 Space Shuttle entry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    A conventional flight-test program, which slowly and cautiously approaches more severe flight conditions, was not possible with the Orbiter. On the first flight, the Orbiter entered the atmosphere at Mach 28 and decelerated through the Mach range. (The subsonic portion of flight was also flown by another orbiter vehicle during the Approach and Landing Test Program.) Certification for the first flight was achieved by an extensive wind-tunnel test and analysis program and by restricting the flight maneuvers severely. The initial flights of the orbiter were heavily instrumented for the purpose of obtaining accurate aerodynamic data. Even without maneuvers to excite the system, the first flight provided comparisons between flight and wind-tunnel-derived predicted data in the areas of aerodynamic performance, longitudinal trim, and reaction-control jet interaction. The aerodynamic performance comparisons are presented.

  4. Fitting aerodynamics and propulsion into the puzzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick J.; Whitehead, Allen H., Jr.; Chapman, Gary T.

    1987-01-01

    The development of an airbreathing single-stage-to-orbit vehicle, in particular the problems of aerodynamics and propulsion integration, is examined. The boundary layer transition on constant pressure surfaces at hypersonic velocities, and the effects of noise on the transition are investigated. The importance of viscosity, real-gas effects, and drag at hypersonic speeds is discussed. A propulsion system with sufficient propulsive lift to enhance the performance of the vehicle is being developed. The difficulties of engine-airframe integration are analyzed.

  5. Evaluation of the performance degradation at PAFC investigation of dealloying process of electrocatalysts with in-situ XRD

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Noriyuki; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    1996-12-31

    As a complementary research project to the demonstration project of 5MW and 1 MW PAFC plants, the mechanism and rate of deterioration of the cells and stacks have been studied from 1995 FY, with the objective of establishing an estimation method for the service life-time of the cell stacks. This work has been performed in the Basic Research Project, as part of that project on PAFC`s, selecting four subjects (Electrocatalysts degradation, Electrolyte fill-level, Cell material corrosion, Electrolyte loss) as the essential factors relating to the life-time. In this study, the effect of temperature and potential on the dealloying process of electrocatalysts was examined in H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} electrolyte with X-ray diffraction measurement.

  6. Synthesis of S-doped WO3 nanowires with enhanced photocatalytic performance towards dye degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fugui; Li, Heping; Fu, Li; Yang, Jun; Liu, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    In this letter, S-doped WO3 nanowires (S-WO3) were prepared using a hydrothermal method followed by a low-temperature solid-state annealing treatment. The synthesized S-WO3 was characterized by SEM, EDX, XRD, XPS, Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis DRS and photocurrent responses. The results indicated that S could enhance the light harvesting capacity of WO3 nanowires. The photocatalytic performance of the S-WO3 was investigated by photodegradation of methyl orange (MO) under visible light irradiation. Results demonstrated that the photocatalytic activity of the S-WO3 nanowires is much higher than that of pure WO3 nanowires.

  7. Aerodynamics Research Revolutionizes Truck Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center conducted numerous tests to refine the shape of trucks to reduce aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the 1980s and 1990s, a team based at Langley Research Center explored controlling drag and the flow of air around a moving body. Aeroserve Technologies Ltd., of Ottawa, Canada, with its subsidiary, Airtab LLC, in Loveland, Colorado, applied the research from Dryden and Langley to the development of the Airtab vortex generator. Airtabs create two counter-rotating vortices to reduce wind resistance and aerodynamic drag of trucks, trailers, recreational vehicles, and many other vehicles.

  8. Flow Quality Measurements in an Aerodynamic Model of NASA Lewis' Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canacci, Victor A.; Gonsalez, Jose C.

    1999-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to improve the aerodynamic flow characteristics of the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT), a modular scale model of the facility was fabricated. This 1/10th-scale model was used to gain further understanding of the flow characteristics in the IRT. The model was outfitted with instrumentation and data acquisition systems to determine pressures, velocities, and flow angles in the settling chamber and test section. Parametric flow quality studies involving the insertion and removal of a model of the IRT's distinctive heat exchanger (cooler) and/or of a honeycomb in the settling chamber were performed. These experiments illustrate the resulting improvement or degradation in flow quality.

  9. Influence of Fiber Bragg Grating Spectrum Degradation on the Performance of Sensor Interrogation Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Lamberti, Alfredo; Vanlanduit, Steve; De Pauw, Ben; Berghmans, Francis

    2014-01-01

    The working principle of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors is mostly based on the tracking of the Bragg wavelength shift. To accomplish this task, different algorithms have been proposed, from conventional maximum and centroid detection algorithms to more recently-developed correlation-based techniques. Several studies regarding the performance of these algorithms have been conducted, but they did not take into account spectral distortions, which appear in many practical applications. This paper addresses this issue and analyzes the performance of four different wavelength tracking algorithms (maximum detection, centroid detection, cross-correlation and fast phase-correlation) when applied to distorted FBG spectra used for measuring dynamic loads. Both simulations and experiments are used for the analyses. The dynamic behavior of distorted FBG spectra is simulated using the transfer-matrix approach, and the amount of distortion of the spectra is quantified using dedicated distortion indices. The algorithms are compared in terms of achievable precision and accuracy. To corroborate the simulation results, experiments were conducted using three FBG sensors glued on a steel plate and subjected to a combination of transverse force and vibration loads. The analysis of the results showed that the fast phase-correlation algorithm guarantees the best combination of versatility, precision and accuracy. PMID:25521386

  10. Application of CAD/CAE class systems to aerodynamic analysis of electric race cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, L.; Baier, A.; Buchacz, A.; Majzner, M.; Sobek, M.

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamics is one of the most important factors which influence on every aspect of a design of a car and car driving parameters. The biggest influence aerodynamics has on design of a shape of a race car body, especially when the main objective of the race is the longest distance driven in period of time, which can not be achieved without low energy consumption and low drag of a car. Designing shape of the vehicle body that must generate the lowest possible drag force, without compromising the other parameters of the drive. In the article entitled „Application of CAD/CAE class systems to aerodynamic analysis of electric race cars” are being presented problems solved by computer analysis of cars aerodynamics and free form modelling. Analysis have been subjected to existing race car of a Silesian Greenpower Race Team. On a basis of results of analysis of existence of Kammback aerodynamic effect innovative car body were modeled. Afterwards aerodynamic analysis were performed to verify existence of aerodynamic effect for innovative shape and to recognize aerodynamics parameters of the shape. Analysis results in the values of coefficients and aerodynamic drag forces. The resulting drag forces Fx, drag coefficients Cx(Cd) and aerodynamic factors Cx*A allowed to compare all of the shapes to each other. Pressure distribution, air velocities and streams courses were useful in determining aerodynamic features of analyzed shape. For aerodynamic tests was used Ansys Fluent CFD software. In a paper the ways of surface modeling with usage of Realize Shape module and classic surface modeling were presented. For shapes modeling Siemens NX 9.0 software was used. Obtained results were used to estimation of existing shapes and to make appropriate conclusions.

  11. Aerodynamics Of Missiles: Present And Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N.

    1991-01-01

    Paper reviews variety of topics in aerodynamics of missiles. Describes recent developments and suggests areas in which future research fruitful. Emphasis on stability and control of tactical missiles. Aerodynamic problems discussed in general terms without reference to particular missiles.

  12. The Effects of Degraded Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems on Human-system Interfaces and Operator Performance: HFE Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.M.; W. Gunther, G. Martinez-Guridi

    2010-02-26

    New and advanced reactors will use integrated digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems to support operators in their monitoring and control functions. Even though digital systems are typically highly reliable, their potential for degradation or failure could significantly affect operator performance and, consequently, impact plant safety. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) supported this research project to investigate the effects of degraded I&C systems on human performance and plant operations. The objective was to develop human factors engineering (HFE) review guidance addressing the detection and management of degraded digital I&C conditions by plant operators. We reviewed pertinent standards and guidelines, empirical studies, and plant operating experience. In addition, we conducted an evaluation of the potential effects of selected failure modes of the digital feedwater system on human-system interfaces (HSIs) and operator performance. The results indicated that I&C degradations are prevalent in plants employing digital systems and the overall effects on plant behavior can be significant, such as causing a reactor trip or causing equipment to operate unexpectedly. I&C degradations can impact the HSIs used by operators to monitor and control the plant. For example, sensor degradations can make displays difficult to interpret and can sometimes mislead operators by making it appear that a process disturbance has occurred. We used the information obtained as the technical basis upon which to develop HFE review guidance. The guidance addresses the treatment of degraded I&C conditions as part of the design process and the HSI features and functions that support operators to monitor I&C performance and manage I&C degradations when they occur. In addition, we identified topics for future research.

  13. Aerodynamic Design Study of Advanced Multistage Axial Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, Louis M.; Wood, Jerry R.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Medd, Adam J.; Dang, Thong Q.

    2002-01-01

    As a direct response to the need for further performance gains from current multistage axial compressors, an investigation of advanced aerodynamic design concepts that will lead to compact, high-efficiency, and wide-operability configurations is being pursued. Part I of this report describes the projected level of technical advancement relative to the state of the art and quantifies it in terms of basic aerodynamic technology elements of current design systems. A rational enhancement of these elements is shown to lead to a substantial expansion of the design and operability space. Aerodynamic design considerations for a four-stage core compressor intended to serve as a vehicle to develop, integrate, and demonstrate aerotechnology advancements are discussed. This design is biased toward high efficiency at high loading. Three-dimensional blading and spanwise tailoring of vector diagrams guided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are used to manage the aerodynamics of the high-loaded endwall regions. Certain deleterious flow features, such as leakage-vortex-dominated endwall flow and strong shock-boundary-layer interactions, were identified and targeted for improvement. However, the preliminary results were encouraging and the front two stages were extracted for further aerodynamic trimming using a three-dimensional inverse design method described in part II of this report. The benefits of the inverse design method are illustrated by developing an appropriate pressure-loading strategy for transonic blading and applying it to reblade the rotors in the front two stages of the four-stage configuration. Multistage CFD simulations based on the average passage formulation indicated an overall efficiency potential far exceeding current practice for the front two stages. Results of the CFD simulation at the aerodynamic design point are interrogated to identify areas requiring additional development. In spite of the significantly higher aerodynamic loadings, advanced CFD

  14. Handling properties of diverse automobiles and correlation with full scale response data. [driver/vehicle response to aerodynamic disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoh, R. H.; Weir, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Driver/vehicle response and performance of a variety of vehicles in the presence of aerodynamic disturbances are discussed. Steering control is emphasized. The vehicles include full size station wagon, sedan, compact sedan, van, pickup truck/camper, and wagon towing trailer. Driver/vehicle analyses are used to estimate response and performance. These estimates are correlated with full scale data with test drivers and the results are used to refine the driver/vehicle models, control structure, and loop closure criteria. The analyses and data indicate that the driver adjusts his steering control properties (when he can) to achieve roughly the same level of performance despite vehicle variations. For the more disturbance susceptible vehicles, such as the van, the driver tightens up his control. Other vehicles have handling dynamics which cause him to loosen his control response, even though performance degrades.

  15. Aerodynamic performance of the DeSiReH high-lift laminar wing at free flight and ETW in-tunnel conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosnyakov, S.; Kazhan, E.; Kursakov, I.; Matyash, S.; Mikhaylov, S.; Lysenkov, A.

    2015-06-01

    The current research concerns a half-model high-lift configuration inside the European Transonic Wind Tunnel (ETW) at landing regime. The influence of the wind-tunnel walls (both slotted and closed) is investigated and the numerical results are compared with measured data. The investigated model is a three-element landing configuration with Krueger device and flap. All calculations are performed on structured grids using EWT-TsAGI code. The computed in-tunnel results are in good agreement with uncorrected experimental data, with maximum lift predicted at the same angle of attack. The slotted wall configuration produces less wall interference than the closed wall configuration.

  16. Investigation of aerodynamic braking devices for wind turbine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the selection and preliminary design of a new aerodynamic braking system for use on the stall-regulated AWT-26/27 wind turbines. The goal was to identify and design a configuration that offered improvements over the existing tip brake used by Advanced Wind Turbines, Inc. (AWT). Although the design objectives and approach of this report are specific to aerodynamic braking of AWT-26/27 turbines, many of the issues addressed in this work are applicable to a wider class of turbines. The performance trends and design choices presented in this report should be of general use to wind turbine designers who are considering alternative aerodynamic braking methods. A literature search was combined with preliminary work on device sizing, loads and mechanical design. Candidate configurations were assessed on their potential for benefits in the areas of cost, weight, aerodynamic noise, reliability and performance under icing conditions. As a result, two configurations were identified for further study: the {open_quotes}spoiler-flap{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}flip-tip.{close_quotes} Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at Wichita State University to evaluate the performance of the candidate aerodynamic brakes on an airfoil section representative of the AWT-26/27 blades. The wind tunnel data were used to predict the braking effectiveness and deployment characteristics of the candidate devices for a wide range of design parameters. The evaluation was iterative, with mechanical design and structural analysis being conducted in parallel with the braking performance studies. The preliminary estimate of the spoiler-flap system cost was $150 less than the production AWT-26/27 tip vanes. This represents a reduction of approximately 5 % in the cost of the aerodynamic braking system. In view of the preliminary nature of the design, it would be prudent to plan for contingencies in both cost and weight.

  17. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 1: Orbiter aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the steady and unsteady aerodynamics of the space shuttle orbiter has been performed. It is shown that slender wing theory can be modified to account for the effect of Mach number and leading edge roundness on both attached and separated flow loads. The orbiter unsteady aerodynamics can be computed by defining two equivalent slender wings, one for attached flow loads and another for the vortex-induced loads. It is found that the orbiter is in the transonic speed region subject to vortex-shock-boundary layer interactions that cause highly nonlinear or discontinuous load changes which can endanger the structural integrity of the orbiter wing and possibly cause snap roll problems. It is presently impossible to simulate these interactions in a wind tunnel test even in the static case. Thus, a well planned combined analytic and experimental approach is needed to solve the problem.

  18. Statistical Simulation of the Performance and Degradation of a PEMFC Membrane Electrode Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, David; Bellemare-Davis, Alexander; Karan, Kunal; Jayansankar, Barath; Pharoah, Jon; Colbow, Vesna; Young, Alan; Wessel, Silvia

    2012-07-01

    A 1-D MEA Performance model was developed that considered transport of liquid water, agglomerate catalyst structure, and the statistical variation of the MEA characteristic parameters. The model was validated against a low surface area carbon supported catalyst across various platinum loadings and operational conditions. The statistical variation was found to play a significant role in creating noise in the validation data and that there was a coupling effect between movement in material properties with liquid water transport. Further, in studying the low platinum loaded catalyst layers it was found that liquid water played a significant role in the increasing the overall transport losses. The model was then further applied to study platinum dissolution via potential cycling accelerated stress tests, in which the platinum was found to dissolve nearest the membrane effectively resulting in reaction distribution shifts within the layer.

  19. Control mechanism to prevent correlated message arrivals from degrading signaling no. 7 network performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosal, Haluk; Skoog, Ronald A.

    1994-04-01

    Signaling System No. 7 (SS7) is designed to provide a connection-less transfer of signaling messages of reasonable length. Customers having access to user signaling bearer capabilities as specified in the ANSI T1.623 and CCITT Q.931 standards can send bursts of correlated messages (e.g., by doing a file transfer that results in the segmentation of a block of data into a number of consecutive signaling messages) through SS7 networks. These message bursts with short interarrival times could have an adverse impact on the delay performance of the SS7 networks. A control mechanism, Credit Manager, is investigated in this paper to regulate incoming traffic to the SS7 network by imposing appropriate time separation between messages when the incoming stream is too bursty. The credit manager has a credit bank where credits accrue at a fixed rate up to a prespecified credit bank capacity. When a message arrives, the number of octets in that message is compared to the number of credits in the bank. If the number of credits is greater than or equal to the number of octets, then the message is accepted for transmission and the number of credits in the bank is decremented by the number of octets. If the number of credits is less than the number of octets, then the message is delayed until enough credits are accumulated. This paper presents simulation results showing delay performance of the SS7 ISUP and TCAP message traffic with a range of correlated message traffic, and control parameters of the credit manager (i.e., credit generation rate and bank capacity) are determined that ensure the traffic entering the SS7 network is acceptable. The results show that control parameters can be set so that for any incoming traffic stream there is no detrimental impact on the SS7 ISUP and TCAP message delay, and the credit manager accepts a wide range of traffic patterns without causing significant delay.

  20. Experimental aerodynamic performance of advanced 40 deg-swept 10-blade propeller model at Mach 0.6 to 0.85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Glenn A.

    1988-01-01

    A propeller designated as SR-6, designed with 40 deg of sweep and 10 blades to cruise at Mach 0.8 at an altitude of 10.7 km (35,000 ft), was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center's 8- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel. This propeller was one of a series of advanced single rotation propeller models designed and tested as part of the NASA Advanced Turboprop Project. Design-point net efficiency was almost constant to Mach 0.75 but fell above this speed more rapidly than that of any previously tested advanced propeller. Alternative spinners that further reduced the near-hub interblade Mach numbers and relieved the observed hub choking improved performance above Mach 0.75. One spinner attained estimated SR-6 Design-point net deficiencies of 80.6 percent at Mach 0.75 and 79.2 percent at Mach 0.8, higher than the measured performance of any previously tested advanced single-rotation propeller at these speeds.