Science.gov

Sample records for aerodynamic prediction methods

  1. Application of Hybrid Method for Aerodynamic Noise Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Song, W. P.

    2011-09-01

    A hybrid prediction method for aerodynamic noise is performed using high order accuracy method in this paper. The method combines a two-dimensional Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes(URANS) solver with the acoustic analogy method using Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation with penetrable data surface (FW-Hpds). Tandem cylinders are chosen to validate the prediction method. The computations are conducted at a Reynolds number of 1.66 × 105 based on the cylinder diameter. Both the aerodynamic and acoustic results show good agreement with the experimental data, showing a successful application of the hybrid prediction method using two-dimensional URANS simulation.

  2. Utilization of vortex methods for parachute aerodynamic predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.; Meyer, J.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief review of vortex methods with application to parachute aerodynamics. A somewhat generalized discussion of analysis techniques which are applicable to development of both two- and three-dimensional numerical solutions will be presented. A brief review of results from several bluff body simulations will be presented along with very recent results from work being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories in this area. 32 refs.

  3. Development of aerodynamic prediction methods for irregular planform wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benepe, D. B., Sr.

    1983-01-01

    A set of empirical methods was developed to predict low-speed lift, drag and pitching-moment variations with angle of attack for a class of low aspect ratio irregular planform wings suitable for application to advanced aerospace vehicles. The data base, an extensive series of wind-tunnel tests accomplished by the Langley Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is summarized. The approaches used to analyze the wind tunnel data, the evaluation of previously existing methods, data correlation efforts, and the development of the selected methods are presented and discussed. A summary of the methods is also presented to document the equations, computational charts and design guides which have been programmed for digital computer solution. Comparisons of predictions and test data are presented which show that the new methods provide a significant improvement in capability for evaluating the landing characteristics of advanced aerospace vehicles during the preliminary design phase of the configuration development cycle.

  4. Correction factory techniques for improving aerodynamic prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giesing, J. P.; Kalman, T. P.; Rodden, W. P.

    1976-01-01

    A method for correcting discrete element lifting surface theory to reflect given experimental data is presented. Theoretical pressures are modified such that imposed constraints are satisfied while minimizing the changes to the pressures. Several types of correction procedures are presented and correlated; (1) scaling of pressures; (2) scaling of downwash values; and (3) addition of an increment to the downwash that is proportioned to pressure. Some special features are included in these methods and they include: (1) consideration of experimental data from multiple deflection modes, (2) limitation of the amplitudes of the correction factors, and (3) the use of correction factor mode shapes. These methods are correlated for cases involving all three Mach Number ranges using a FORTRAN IV computer program. Subsonically, a wing with an oscillating partial span control surface and a wing with a leading edge droop are presented. Transonically a two-dimensional airfoil with an oscillating flap is considered. Supersonically an arrow wing with and without camber is analyzed. In addition to correction factor methods an investigation is presented dealing with a new simplified transonic modification of the two-dimensional subsonic lifting surface theory. Correlations are presented for an airfoil with an oscillating flap.

  5. Wing flutter boundary prediction using unsteady Euler aerodynamic method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Batina, John T.

    1993-01-01

    Modifications to an existing 3D implicit upwind Euler/Navier-Stokes code for the aeroelastic analysis of wings are described. These modifications include the incorporation of a deforming mesh algorithm and the addition of the structural equations of motion for their simultaneous time-integration with the governing flow equations. The paper gives a brief description of these modifications and presents unsteady calculations which check the modifications to the code. Euler flutter results for an isolated 45 deg swept-back wing are compared with experimental data for seven freestream Mach numbers which define the flutter boundary over a range of Mach number from 0.499 to 1.14. These comparisons show good agreement in flutter characteristics for freestream Mach numbers below unity. For freestream Mach numbers above unity, the computed aeroelastic results predict a premature rise in the flutter boundary as compared with the experimental boundary. Steady and unsteady contours of surface Mach number and pressure are included to illustrate the basic flow characteristics of the time-marching flutter calculations and to aid in identifying possible causes for the premature rise in the computational flutter boundary.

  6. Wing flutter boundary prediction using an unsteady Euler aerodynamic method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Batina, John T.

    1993-01-01

    Modifications to an existing three-dimensional, implicit, upwind Euler/Navier-Stokes code (CFL3D Version 2.1) for the aeroelastic analysis of wings are described. These modifications, which were previously added to CFL3D Version 1.0, include the incorporation of a deforming mesh algorithm and the addition of the structural equations of motion for their simultaneous time-integration with the government flow equations. The paper gives a brief description of these modifications and presents unsteady calculations which check the modifications to the code. Euler flutter results for an isolated 45 degree swept-back wing are compared with experimental data for seven freestream Mach numbers which define the flutter boundary over a range of Mach number from 0.499 to 1.14. These comparisons show good agreement in flutter characteristics for freestream Mach numbers below unity. For freestream Mach numbers above unity, the computed aeroelastic results predict a premature rise in the flutter boundary as compared with the experimental boundary. Steady and unsteady contours of surface Mach number and pressure are included to illustrate the basic flow characteristics of the time-marching flutter calculations and to aid in identifying possible causes for the premature rise in the computational flutter boundary.

  7. Assessment of analytic methods for the prediction of aerodynamic characteristics of arbitrary bodies at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landrum, E. J.; Miller, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Trends toward the automation of the design process for airplanes and missiles accentuate the need for analytic techniques for the prediction of aerodynamic characteristics. A number of computer codes have been developed or are under development which show promise of significantly improving the estimation of aerodynamic characteristics for arbitrarily-shaped bodies at supersonic speeds. The programs considered range in complexity from a simple linearized solution employing slender body theory to an exact finite difference solution of the Euler equations. The results from five computer codes are compared with experimental data to determine the accuracy, range of applicability, ease of use, and computer time and cost of the programs. The results provide a useful guide for selecting the appropriate method for treating bodies at the various levels of an automated design process.

  8. A fast and accurate method to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2014-12-01

    A quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic flows. This method is suitable for offshore wind turbine design software as it is a very accurate and computationally reasonably cheap method. This study shows the results for a NACA 0012 airfoil. The two applied solvers converge to the experimental values when the grid is refined. We also show that in separation the eigenvalues remain positive thus avoiding the Goldstein singularity at separation. In 3D we show a flow over a dent in which separation occurs. A rotating flat plat is used to show the applicability of the method for rotating flows. The shown capabilities of the method indicate that the quasi-simultaneous interaction method is suitable for design methods for offshore wind turbine blades.

  9. LinAir: A multi-element discrete vortex Weissinger aerodynamic prediction method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durston, Donald A.

    1993-01-01

    LinAir is a vortex lattice aerodynamic prediction method similar to Weissinger's extended lifting-line theory, except that the circulation around a wing is represented by discrete horseshoe vortices, not a continuous distribution of vorticity. The program calculates subsonic longitudinal and lateral/directional aerodynamic forces and moments for arbitrary aircraft geometries. It was originally written by Dr. Ilan Kroo of Stanford University, and subsequently modified by the author to simplify modeling of complex configurations. The Polhamus leading-edge suction analogy was added by the author to extend the range of applicability of LinAir to low aspect ratio (i.e., fighter-type) configurations. A brief discussion of the theory of LinAir is presented, and details on how to run the program are given along with some comparisons with experimental data to validate the code. Example input and output files are given in the appendices to aid in understanding the program and its use. This version of LinAir runs in the VAX/VMS, Cray UNICOS, and Silicon Graphics Iris workstation environments at the time of this writing.

  10. Modification and Validation of Conceptual Design Aerodynamic Prediction Method HASC95 With VTXCHN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, Alan E.; Dixon, Charles J.; Hegedus, Martin C.

    1996-01-01

    A conceptual/preliminary design level subsonic aerodynamic prediction code HASC (High Angle of Attack Stability and Control) has been improved in several areas, validated, and documented. The improved code includes improved methodologies for increased accuracy and robustness, and simplified input/output files. An engineering method called VTXCHN (Vortex Chine) for prediciting nose vortex shedding from circular and non-circular forebodies with sharp chine edges has been improved and integrated into the HASC code. This report contains a summary of modifications, description of the code, user's guide, and validation of HASC. Appendices include discussion of a new HASC utility code, listings of sample input and output files, and a discussion of the application of HASC to buffet analysis.

  11. Application of a full potential method for predicting supersonic flow fields and aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, K. M.

    1983-01-01

    A nonlinear aerodynamic prediction technique which solves the conservative full potential equation has been applied to the analysis of three waverider configurations. This technique was selected based on its capability to analyze the off-design characteristics of the waveriders. Very good correlations were achieved with surface pressure data for both the Mach 4 elliptic cone waverider and the Mach 6 caret-wing derivative. Off-design Mach number and angle-of-attack pressure correlations were very good for the elliptic cone waverider. The range of correlation with data exceeded that expected based on the theory limitations. A surface pressure integration routine was demonstrated and agreement between predicted aerodynamic forces and experimental force data for the Mach 4 waverider was excellent. Analysis of a nonconical waverider configuration was initiated where a discrete input option is used to achieve the computational gridding. Preliminary analysis of this configuration indicates the correct shock location will be predicted.

  12. Aircraft aerodynamic prediction method for V/STOL transition including flow separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmer, B. R.; Miner, G. A.; Bristow, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed for the aerodynamic force and moment analysis of V/STOL aircraft operating in the transition regime between hover and conventional forward flight. The trajectories, cross sectional area variations, and mass entrainment rates of the jets are calculated by the Adler-Baron Jet-in-Crossflow Program. The inviscid effects of the interaction between the jets and airframe on the aerodynamic properties are determined by use of the MCAIR 3-D Subsonic properties are determined by use of the MCAIR 3-D Subsonic Potential Flow Program, a surface panel method. In addition, the MCAIR 3-D Geometry influence Coefficient Program is used to calculate a matrix of partial derivatives that represent the rate of change of the inviscid aerodynamic properties with respect to arbitrary changes in the effective wing shape.

  13. Semiempirical method for prediction of aerodynamic forces and moments on a steadily spinning light airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A semi-empirical method is presented for the estimation of aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a steadily spinning (rotating) light airplane. The airplane is divided into wing, body, and tail surfaces. The effect of power is ignored. The strip theory is employed for each component of the spinning airplane to determine its contribution to the total aerodynamic coefficients. Then, increments to some of the coefficients which account for centrifugal effect are estimated. The results are compared to spin tunnel rotary balance test data.

  14. Prediction method for two-dimensional aerodynamic losses of cooled vanes using integral boundary-layer parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Augler, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    A generalized analysis to predict the two-dimensional aerodynamic losses of film-cooled vanes by using integral boundary-layer parameters is presented. Heat-transfer and trailing-edge injection effects are included in the method. An approximate solution of the generalized equations is also included to show more clearly the effect of the different boundary-layer and cooling parameters on the losses. The analytical predictions agree well with the experimental results, indicating that available boundary-layer calculations for cooled vanes are of sufficient accuracy to use in the prediction method.

  15. NASA Perspective on Requirements for Development of Advanced Methods Predicting Unsteady Aerodynamics and Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past three years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has initiated design, development, and testing of a new human-rated space exploration system under the Constellation Program. Initial designs within the Constellation Program are scheduled to replace the present Space Shuttle, which is slated for retirement within the next three years. The development of vehicles for the Constellation system has encountered several unsteady aerodynamics challenges that have bearing on more traditional unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis. This paper focuses on the synergy between the present NASA challenges and the ongoing challenges that have historically been the subject of research and method development. There are specific similarities in the flows required to be analyzed for the space exploration problems and those required for some of the more nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic problems encountered on aircraft. The aggressive schedule, significant technical challenge, and high-priority status of the exploration system development is forcing engineers to implement existing tools and techniques in a design and application environment that is significantly stretching the capability of their methods. While these methods afford the users with the ability to rapidly turn around designs and analyses, their aggressive implementation comes at a price. The relative immaturity of the techniques for specific flow problems and the inexperience with their broad application to them, particularly on manned spacecraft flight system, has resulted in the implementation of an extensive wind tunnel and flight test program to reduce uncertainty and improve the experience base in the application of these methods. This provides a unique opportunity for unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelastic method developers to test and evaluate new analysis techniques on problems with high potential for acquisition of test and even flight data against which they

  16. Predicting aerodynamic characteristics of vortical flows on three-dimensional configurations using a surface-singularity panel method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskew, B.

    1983-01-01

    A general low-order surface-singularity panel method is used to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of a problem where a wing-tip vortex from one wing closely interacts with an aft mounted wing in a low Reynolds Number flow; i.e., 125,000. Nonlinear effects due to wake roll-up and the influence of the wings on the vortex path are included in the calculation by using a coupled iterative wake relaxation scheme. The interaction also affects the wing pressures and boundary layer characteristics: these effects are also considered using coupled integral boundary layer codes and preliminary calculations using free vortex sheet separation modelling are included. Calculated results are compared with water tunnel experimental data with generally remarkably good agreement.

  17. Assessment of an Unstructured-Grid Method for Predicting Aerodynamic Performance of Jet Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Josue; Anders, Scott G.

    2006-01-01

    The application of a Computational Fluid Dynamics tool to a jet flap control effector on an elliptical airfoil-section wing was investigated. The study utilized the Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver code used was USM3D. The CFD-based jet flap simulations were compared to experimental results from a wind tunnel test conducted at the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The wind tunnel model consisted of a six percent thick elliptical airfoil with a modified trailing edge. The jet flap was located at 95% chord and exited at 90 degrees to the lower surface. The experimental model was designed to promote two-dimensional flow across the wing. It was found that the CFD simulation had to model the three-dimensional geometry of the experiment in order to obtain good agreement. Tests were performed at two Mach numbers at several different jet momentum coefficients. In order to be consistent with the experimental method, the CFD lift and pitching moment values were determined by integrating the pressures over the wing.

  18. Aircraft Noise Prediction Program theoretical manual: Propeller aerodynamics and noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, W. E. (Editor); Weir, D. S. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The prediction sequence used in the aircraft noise prediction program (ANOPP) is described. The elements of the sequence are called program modules. The first group of modules analyzes the propeller geometry, the aerodynamics, including both potential and boundary-layer flow, the propeller performance, and the surface loading distribution. This group of modules is based entirely on aerodynamic strip theory. The next group of modules deals with the first group. Predictions of periodic thickness and loading noise are determined with time-domain methods. Broadband noise is predicted by a semiempirical method. Near-field predictions of fuselage surface pressrues include the effects of boundary layer refraction and scattering. Far-field predictions include atmospheric and ground effects.

  19. Nonplanar Method for Predicting Incompressible Aerodynamic Coefficients of Rectangular Wings with Circular-Arc Camber. Ph.D. Thesis - Virginia Polytechnic Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    The development of a nonplanar lifting surface method having a continuous distribution of singularities and satisfying the tangent flow boundary condition on the mean camber surface is given. The method predicts some incompressible longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients of rectangular wings which have circular-arc camber. The solution method is of the integral-equation type and the resulting surface integrals are evaluated by either using numerical or analytical techniques, as are appropriate. Applications are made and the results compared with those from an exact two-dimensional circular-arc camber solution, a three-dimensional flat-wing solution which represents the camber by a projected slope onto the flat surface, and a flat-wing experiment. From these comparisons, the present method is found to predict well the flat-wing experiment and limiting values, in addition to the center of pressure variation at an angle of attack of zero for any camber. For wings having camber ratios larger than about 1.25% and moderate to high aspect ratios, the results deterioriate due to the inadequacy of lifting pressure modes employed.

  20. Predicting Accumulations of Ice on Aerodynamic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin; Potapczuk, Mark; Addy, Gene; Wright, William

    2003-01-01

    LEWICE is a computer program that predicts the accumulation of ice on two-dimensional aerodynamic surfaces under conditions representative of the flight of an aircraft through an icing cloud. The software first calculates the airflow surrounding the body of interest, then uses the airflow to compute the trajectories of water droplets that impinge on the surface of the body. The droplet trajectories are also used to compute impingement limits and local collection efficiencies, which are used in subsequent ice-growth calculations and are also useful for designing systems to protect against icing. Next, the software predicts the shape of accumulating ice by modeling transfers of mass and energy in small control volumes. The foregoing computations are repeated over several computational time steps until the total icing exposure time is reached. Results of computations by LEWICE have been compared with an extensive database of measured ice shapes obtained from experiments, and have been shown to closely approximate those shapes under most conditions of interest to the aviation community.

  1. Turbine stage aerodynamics and heat transfer prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Lisa W.; Mcconnaughey, H. V.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical study of the aerodynamic and thermal environment associated with axial turbine stages is presented. Computations were performed using a modification of the unsteady NASA Ames viscous code, ROTOR1, and an improved version of the NASA Lewis steady inviscid cascade system MERIDL-TSONIC coupled with boundary layer codes BLAYER and STAN5. Two different turbine stages were analyzed: the first stage of the United Technologies Research Center Large Scale Rotating Rig (LSRR) and the first stage of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel turbopump turbine. The time-averaged airfoil midspan pressure and heat transfer profiles were predicted for numerous thermal boundary conditions including adiabatic wall, prescribed surface temperature, and prescribed heat flux. Computed solutions are compared with each other and with experimental data in the case of the LSRR calculations. Modified ROTOR1 predictions of unsteady pressure envelopes and instantaneous contour plots are also presented for the SSME geometry. Relative merits of the two computational approaches are discussed.

  2. Method of reducing drag in aerodynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrach, Frank J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    In the present method, boundary layer thickening is combined with laminar flow control to reduce drag. An aerodynamic body is accelerated enabling a ram turbine on the body to receive air at velocity V sub 0. The discharge air is directed over an aft portion of the aerodynamic body producing boundary layer thickening. The ram turbine also drives a compressor by applying torque to a shaft connected between the ram turbine and the compressor. The compressor sucks in lower boundary layer air through inlets in the shell of the aircraft producing laminar flow control and reducing drag. The discharge from the compressor is expanded in a nozzle to produce thrust.

  3. A study of prediction methods for the high angle-of-attack aerodynamics of straight wings and fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, O. J.; Mendenhall, M. R.; Perkins, S. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Work is described dealing with two areas which are dominated by the nonlinear effects of vortex flows. The first area concerns the stall/spin characteristics of a general aviation wing with a modified leading edge. The second area concerns the high-angle-of-attack characteristics of high performance military aircraft. For each area, the governing phenomena are described as identified with the aid of existing experimental data. Existing analytical methods are reviewed, and the most promising method for each area used to perform some preliminary calculations. Based on these results, the strengths and weaknesses of the methods are defined, and research programs recommended to improve the methods as a result of better understanding of the flow mechanisms involved.

  4. Comparisons of several aerodynamic methods for application to dynamic loads analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, R. I.; Miller, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a study are presented in which the applicability at subsonic speeds of several aerodynamic methods for predicting dynamic gust loads on aircraft, including active control systems, was examined and compared. These aerodynamic methods varied from steady state to an advanced unsteady aerodynamic formulation. Brief descriptions of the structural and aerodynamic representations and of the motion and load equations are presented. Comparisons of numerical results achieved using the various aerodynamic methods are shown in detail. From these results, aerodynamic representations for dynamic gust analyses are identified. It was concluded that several aerodynamic methods are satisfactory for dynamic gust analyses of configurations having either controls fixed or active control systems that primarily affect the low frequency rigid body aircraft response.

  5. Subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of interacting lifting surfaces with separated flow around sharp edges predicted by a vortex-lattice method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.; Gloss, B. B.

    1975-01-01

    Because the potential flow suction along the leading and side edges of a planform can be used to determine both leading- and side-edge vortex lift, the present investigation was undertaken to apply the vortex-lattice method to computing side-edge suction force for isolated or interacting planforms. Although there is a small effect of bound vortex sweep on the computation of the side-edge suction force, the results obtained for a number of different isolated planforms produced acceptable agreement with results obtained from a method employing continuous induced-velocity distributions. By using the method outlined, better agreement between theory and experiment was noted for a wing in the presence of a canard than was previously obtained.

  6. Aerodynamic drag in cycling: methods of assessment.

    PubMed

    Debraux, Pierre; Grappe, Frederic; Manolova, Aneliya V; Bertucci, William

    2011-09-01

    When cycling on level ground at a speed greater than 14 m/s, aerodynamic drag is the most important resistive force. About 90% of the total mechanical power output is necessary to overcome it. Aerodynamic drag is mainly affected by the effective frontal area which is the product of the projected frontal area and the coefficient of drag. The effective frontal area represents the position of the cyclist on the bicycle and the aerodynamics of the cyclist-bicycle system in this position. In order to optimise performance, estimation of these parameters is necessary. The aim of this study is to describe and comment on the methods used during the last 30 years for the evaluation of the effective frontal area and the projected frontal area in cycling, in both laboratory and actual conditions. Most of the field methods are not expensive and can be realised with few materials, providing valid results in comparison with the reference method in aerodynamics, the wind tunnel. Finally, knowledge of these parameters can be useful in practice or to create theoretical models of cycling performance. PMID:21936289

  7. Unsteady Aerodynamic Validation Experiences From the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Chawlowski, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    The AIAA Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW) was held in April 2012, bringing together communities of aeroelasticians, computational fluid dynamicists and experimentalists. The extended objective was to assess the state of the art in computational aeroelastic methods as practical tools for the prediction of static and dynamic aeroelastic phenomena. As a step in this process, workshop participants analyzed unsteady aerodynamic and weakly-coupled aeroelastic cases. Forced oscillation and unforced system experiments and computations have been compared for three configurations. This paper emphasizes interpretation of the experimental data, computational results and their comparisons from the perspective of validation of unsteady system predictions. The issues examined in detail are variability introduced by input choices for the computations, post-processing, and static aeroelastic modeling. The final issue addressed is interpreting unsteady information that is present in experimental data that is assumed to be steady, and the resulting consequences on the comparison data sets.

  8. An unsteady aerodynamic formulation for efficient rotor tonal noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennaretti, M.; Testa, C.; Bernardini, G.

    2013-12-01

    An aerodynamic/aeroacoustic solution methodology for predction of tonal noise emitted by helicopter rotors and propellers is presented. It is particularly suited for configurations dominated by localized, high-frequency inflow velocity fields as those generated by blade-vortex interactions. The unsteady pressure distributions are determined by the sectional, frequency-domain Küssner-Schwarz formulation, with downwash including the wake inflow velocity predicted by a three-dimensional, unsteady, panel-method formulation suited for the analysis of rotors operating in complex aerodynamic environments. The radiated noise is predicted through solution of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation. The proposed approach yields a computationally efficient solution procedure that may be particularly useful in preliminary design/multidisciplinary optimization applications. It is validated through comparisons with solutions that apply the airloads directly evaluated by the time-marching, panel-method formulation. The results are provided in terms of blade loads, noise signatures and sound pressure level contours. An estimation of the computational efficiency of the proposed solution process is also presented.

  9. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients using Neural Networks for Sparse Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Basic aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of angles of attack and sideslip with vehicle lateral symmetry and compressibility effects. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. In this paper a fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network. The training data for the neural network is derived from wind tunnel test and numerical simulations. The coefficients of lift, drag, pitching moment are expressed as a function of alpha (angle of attack) and Mach number. The results produced from preliminary neural network analysis are very good.

  10. A New Aerodynamic Data Dispersion Method for Launch Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for implementing aerodynamic data dispersion analysis is herein introduced. A general mathematical approach combined with physical modeling tailored to the aerodynamic quantity of interest enables the generation of more realistically relevant dispersed data and, in turn, more reasonable flight simulation results. The method simultaneously allows for the aerodynamic quantities and their derivatives to be dispersed given a set of non-arbitrary constraints, which stresses the controls model in more ways than with the traditional bias up or down of the nominal data within the uncertainty bounds. The adoption and implementation of this new method within the NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Project has resulted in significant increases in predicted roll control authority, and lowered the induced risks for flight test operations. One direct impact on launch vehicles is a reduced size for auxiliary control systems, and the possibility of an increased payload. This technique has the potential of being applied to problems in multiple areas where nominal data together with uncertainties are used to produce simulations using Monte Carlo type random sampling methods. It is recommended that a tailored physics-based dispersion model be delivered with any aerodynamic product that includes nominal data and uncertainties, in order to make flight simulations more realistic and allow for leaner spacecraft designs.

  11. Prediction of Hyper-X Stage Separation Aerodynamics Using CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Wong, Tin-Chee; Dilley, Arthur D.; Pao, Jenn L.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA X-43 "Hyper-X" hypersonic research vehicle will be boosted to a Mach 7 flight test condition mounted on the nose of an Orbital Sciences Pegasus launch vehicle. The separation of the research vehicle from the Pegasus presents some unique aerodynamic problems, for which computational fluid dynamics has played a role in the analysis. This paper describes the use of several CFD methods for investigating the aerodynamics of the research and launch vehicles in close proximity. Specifically addressed are unsteady effects, aerodynamic database extrapolation, and differences between wind tunnel and flight environments.

  12. Aerodynamic Performance Predictions of Single and Twin Jet Afterbodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.; Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Jones, William T.

    1995-01-01

    The multiblock three-dimensional Navier-Stokes method PAB3D was utilized by the Component Integration Branch (formerly Propulsion Aerodynamics Branch) at the NASA-Langley Research Center in an international study sponsored by AGARD Working Group #17 for the assessment of the state-of-the-art of propulsion-airframe integration testing techniques and CFD prediction technologies. Three test geometries from ONERA involving fundamental flow physics and four geometries from NASA-LaRC involving realistic flow interactions of wing, body, tail, and jet plumes were chosen by the Working Group. An overview of results on four (1 ONERA and 3 LaRC) of the seven test cases is presented. External static pressures, integrated pressure drag and total drag were calculated for the Langley test cases and jet plume velocity profiles and turbulent viscous stresses were calculated for the ONERA test case. Only selected data from these calculations are presented in this paper. The complete data sets calculated by the participants will be presented in an AGARD summary report. Predicted surface static pressures compared favorably with experimental data for the Langley geometries. Predicted afterbody drag compared well with experiment. Predicted nozzle drag was typically low due to over-compression of the flow near the trailing edge. Total drag was typically high. Predicted jet plume quantities on the ONERA case compared generally well with data.

  13. Interdisciplinary optimization combining electromagnetic and aerodynamic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Anders James

    The design of missile body shapes often requires a compromise between aero-dynamic and electromagnetic performance goals. In general, the missile shape producing the lowest radar signature will be different from the preferred aero-dynamic shape. Interdisciplinary shape optimization is utilized to combine multiple disciplines to determine the best possible shape for a hybrid aerodynamic-electromagnetic problem. A composite missile body consisting of an axisymmetric body of revolution (BOR) and two thin flat plate attachments is considered. The goal is to minimize the drag and backscatter associated with this composite shape. The body is assumed to be perfectly conducting, and flying at zero degrees angle of attack. The variable nose shape serves as the optimization design parameter. To characterize the system performance, a cost function is defined which is comprised of weighted values of the drag and backscatter. To solve the electromagnetic problem, methods to treat electrically large complex bodies are investigated. Hybrid methods which combine the method of moments (MoM) with physical optics (PO) are developed to calculate the scattering from simple two-dimensional bodies. A surface-wave hybrid approach is shown to effectively approximate the traveling wave currents on the smooth interior portions of a BOR. Asymptotic methods are used to solve the resulting integral equations more efficiently. The hybrid methods are shown to produce MoM-quality results, while requiring less computational resources. To solve the composite body problem, an iterative technique is developed that preserves the simplicity of the original BOR scheme. In this formulation, the current over each part of the composite body is solved independently. The results from one part of the body are used to update the fields incident on the other part of the body. This procedure is repeated until the solution converges. To solve the aerodynamic problem, slender body theory is used to calculate the

  14. Unsteady aerodynamic analyses for turbomachinery aeroelastic predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Barnett, M.; Ayer, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    Applications for unsteady aerodynamics analysis in this report are: (1) aeroelastic: blade flutter and forced vibration; (2) aeroacoustic: noise generation; (3) vibration and noise control; and (4) effects of unsteadiness on performance. This requires that the numerical simulations and analytical modeling be accurate and efficient and contain realistic operating conditions and arbitrary modes of unsteady excitation. The assumptions of this application contend that: (1) turbulence and transition can be modeled with the Reynolds averaged and using Navier-Stokes equations; (2) 'attached' flow with high Reynolds number will require thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations, or inviscid/viscid interaction analyses; (3) small-amplitude unsteady excitations will need nonlinear steady and linearized unsteady analyses; and (4) Re to infinity will concern inviscid flow. Several computer programs (LINFLO, CLT, UNSVIS, AND SFLOW-IVI) are utilized for these analyses. Results and computerized grid examples are shown. This report was given during NASA LeRC Workshop on Forced Response in Turbomachinery in August of 1993.

  15. Unsteady Aerodynamic Model Tuning for Precise Flutter Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi

    2011-01-01

    A simple method for an unsteady aerodynamic model tuning is proposed in this study. This method is based on the direct modification of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices. The aerostructures test wing 2 flight-test data is used to demonstrate the proposed model tuning method. The flutter speed margin computed using only the test validated structural dynamic model can be improved using the additional unsteady aerodynamic model tuning, and then the flutter speed margin requirement of 15 percent in military specifications can apply towards the test validated aeroelastic model. In this study, unsteady aerodynamic model tunings are performed at two time invariant flight conditions, at Mach numbers of 0.390 and 0.456. When the Mach number for the unsteady aerodynamic model tuning approaches to the measured fluttering Mach number, 0.502, at the flight altitude of 9,837 ft, the estimated flutter speed is approached to the measured flutter speed at this altitude. The minimum flutter speed difference between the estimated and measured flutter speed is -0.14 percent.

  16. Prediction of Complex Aerodynamic Flows with Explicit Algebraic Stress Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, Ridha; Morrison, Joseph H.; Gatski, Thomas B.; Speziale, Charles G.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit algebraic stress equation, developed by Gatski and Speziale, is used in the framework of K-epsilon formulation to predict complex aerodynamic turbulent flows. The nonequilibrium effects are modeled through coefficients that depend nonlinearly on both rotational and irrotational strains. The proposed model was implemented in the ISAAC Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons with the experimental data are presented which clearly demonstrate that explicit algebraic stress models can predict the correct response to nonequilibrium flow.

  17. Advanced prediction technique for the low speed aerodynamics of V/STOL aircraft. Volume 1: Technical discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, T. D.; Worthey, M. K.

    1984-01-01

    The V/STOL Aircraft Propulsive Effects (VAPE) computerized prediction method is evaluated. The program analyzes viscous effects, various jet, inlet, and Short TakeOff and Landing (STOL) models, and examines the aerodynamic configurations of V/STOL aircraft.

  18. Predicting aerodynamic characteristic of typical wind turbine airfoils using CFD

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.P.; Ochs, S.S.

    1997-09-01

    An investigation was conducted into the capabilities and accuracy of a representative computational fluid dynamics code to predict the flow field and aerodynamic characteristics of typical wind-turbine airfoils. Comparisons of the computed pressure and aerodynamic coefficients were made with wind tunnel data. This work highlights two areas in CFD that require further investigation and development in order to enable accurate numerical simulations of flow about current generation wind-turbine airfoils: transition prediction and turbulence modeling. The results show that the laminar-to turbulent transition point must be modeled correctly to get accurate simulations for attached flow. Calculations also show that the standard turbulence model used in most commercial CFD codes, the k-e model, is not appropriate at angles of attack with flow separation. 14 refs., 28 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Numerical prediction of axial turbine stage aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnaughey, H. V.; Griffin, L. W.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary assessment is made of two NASA-developed unsteady turbine stage computer codes. The methodology and previous partial validation of the codes are briefly outlined. Application of these codes to a Space Shuttle main engine turbine for two sets of operating conditions is then described. Steady and unsteady, two and three-dimensional results are presented, compared, and discussed. These results include time-mean and instantaneous airfoil pressure distributions and pressure fluctuations, streamlines on the airfoil surfaces and endwalls, and relative total pressure contours at different axial locations in the rotor passage. Although not available at the time of this writing, experimental data for one of the operating conditions simulated is forthcoming and will be used to assess the accuracy of the unsteady, as well as, the steady predictions presented. Issues related to code usage and resource requirements of the two codes are also discussed.

  20. Unsteady Aerodynamic Model Tuning for Precise Flutter Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2011-01-01

    A simple method for an unsteady aerodynamic model tuning is proposed in this study. This method is based on the direct modification of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices. The aerostructures test wing 2 flight-test data is used to demonstrate the proposed model tuning method. The flutter speed margin computed using only the test validated structural dynamic model can be improved using the additional unsteady aerodynamic model tuning, and then the flutter speed margin requirement of 15 % in military specifications can apply towards the test validated aeroelastic model. In this study, unsteady aerodynamic model tunings are performed at two time invariant flight conditions, at Mach numbers of 0.390 and 0.456. When the Mach number for the unsteady model tuning approaches to the measured fluttering Mach number, 0.502, at the flight altitude of 9,837 ft, the estimated flutter speed is approached to the measured flutter speed at this altitude. The minimum flutter speed difference between the estimated and measured flutter speed is -.14 %.

  1. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficient using Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network for Sparse Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Wind tunnels use scale models to characterize aerodynamic coefficients, Wind tunnel testing can be slow and costly due to high personnel overhead and intensive power utilization. Although manual curve fitting can be done, it is highly efficient to use a neural network to define the complex relationship between variables. Numerical simulation of complex vehicles on the wide range of conditions required for flight simulation requires static and dynamic data. Static data at low Mach numbers and angles of attack may be obtained with simpler Euler codes. Static data of stalled vehicles where zones of flow separation are usually present at higher angles of attack require Navier-Stokes simulations which are costly due to the large processing time required to attain convergence. Preliminary dynamic data may be obtained with simpler methods based on correlations and vortex methods; however, accurate prediction of the dynamic coefficients requires complex and costly numerical simulations. A reliable and fast method of predicting complex aerodynamic coefficients for flight simulation I'S presented using a neural network. The training data for the neural network are derived from numerical simulations and wind-tunnel experiments. The aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of the flow characteristics and the control surfaces of the vehicle. The basic coefficients of lift, drag and pitching moment are expressed as functions of angles of attack and Mach number. The modeled and training aerodynamic coefficients show good agreement. This method shows excellent potential for rapid development of aerodynamic models for flight simulation. Genetic Algorithms (GA) are used to optimize a previously built Artificial Neural Network (ANN) that reliably predicts aerodynamic coefficients. Results indicate that the GA provided an efficient method of optimizing the ANN model to predict aerodynamic coefficients. The reliability of the ANN using the GA includes prediction of aerodynamic

  2. Space Shuttle entry longitudinal aerodynamic comparisons of flight 2 with preflight predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romere, P. O.; Young, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    An overview of the aerodynamic performance, longitudinal trim, and control surface effectiveness as developed from the second Shuttle flight is presented, along with comparisons with preflight predictions. The Orbiter enters the atmosphere at Mach 29 and descends through all the Mach speeds until touchdown. Control mechanisms for the Orbiter are outlined, noting the lessening of angle of attack as the terminal configuration is reached. Methods of developing the wind tunnel predictions are reviewed, including performance in different altitudes and speed regimes, and the impetus to decouple the flight control system from aerodynamics with respect to uncertainties. Preflight predictions agreed well with the lift/drag ratio above Mach 1, but higher L/D was exhibited than predicted below Mach 1. A deficiency in the wind tunnel environment was concluded for the inaccuracies in the predictions for hypersonic trim characteristics.

  3. Development of mathematical models and numerical methods for aerodynamic design on multiprocessor computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, F. A.; Churakov, D. A.; Shevelev, Yu. D.

    2011-02-01

    Complex-geometry design and grid generation are addressed. The gasdynamic equations are solved, and the numerical results are compared with experimental data. For aerodynamic problems, a suite of mathematical and information technology tools is proposed for the support and management of geometric models of actual objects. Based on the mathematical modeling methods developed, numerical experiments can be performed for a wide class of geometric forms and the aerodynamic properties of aircraft can be predicted with allowance for the viscosity effects.

  4. Tactical missile aerodynamics - Prediction methodology. Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics. Vol. 142

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, M.R. )

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses tactical missile aerodynamic drag, drag-prediction methods for axisymmetric missile bodies, an aerodynamic heating analysis for supersonic missiles, a component buildup method for engineering analysis of missiles at low-to-high angles of attack, experimental and analytical methods for missiles with noncircular fuselages, and a vortex-cloud model for body vortex shedding and tracking. Also discussed are panel methods with vorticity effects and corrections for nonlinear compressibility, supersonic full-potential methods for missile body analysis, space-marching Euler solvers, the time-asymptotic Euler/Navier-Stokes methods for subsonic and transonic flows, 3D boundary layers on missiles, Navier-Stokes analyses of flows over slender airframes, and the interaction of exhaust plumes with missile airframes.

  5. Aerodynamic performance prediction of horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, D. R.; Keith, T. G.; Aliakbarkhanafjeh, A.

    1981-01-01

    A new method for calculating the aerodynamic performance of horizontal axis wind turbines is described. The method, entitled the helical vortex method, directly calculates the local induced velocity due to helical vortices that originate at the rotor blade. Furthermore, the method does not require a specified circulation distribution. Results of the method are compared to similar results obtained from Wilson PROP code methods as well as to existing experimental data taken from a Mod-O wind turbine. It is shown that results of the proposed method agree well with experimental values of the power output both near cut-in and at rated wind speeds. Further, it is found that the method does not experience some of the numerical difficulties encountered by the PROP code when run at low wind velocities.

  6. Prediction and Validation of Mars Pathfinder Hypersonic Aerodynamic Data Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Braun, Robert D.; Weilmuenster, K. James; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Engelund, Walter C.; Powell, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Postflight analysis of the Mars Pathfinder hypersonic, continuum aerodynamic data base is presented. Measured data include accelerations along the body axis and axis normal directions. Comparisons of preflight simulation and measurements show good agreement. The prediction of two static instabilities associated with movement of the sonic line from the shoulder to the nose and back was confirmed by measured normal accelerations. Reconstruction of atmospheric density during entry has an uncertainty directly proportional to the uncertainty in the predicted axial coefficient. The sensitivity of the moment coefficient to freestream density, kinetic models and center-of-gravity location are examined to provide additional consistency checks of the simulation with flight data. The atmospheric density as derived from axial coefficient and measured axial accelerations falls within the range required for sonic line shift and static stability transition as independently determined from normal accelerations.

  7. Improvements to the missile aerodynamic prediction code DEMON3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillenius, Marnix F. E.; Johnson, David L.; Lesieutre, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The computer program DEMON3 was developed for the aerodynamic analysis of nonconventional supersonic configurations comprising a body with noncircular cross section and up to two wing or fin sections. Within a wing or fin section, the lifting surfaces may be cruciform, triform, planar, or low profile layouts; the planforms of the lifting surfaces allow for breaks in sweep. The body and fin sections are modeled by triplet and constant u-velocity panels, respectively, accounting for mutual body-fin interference. Fin thickness effects are included for the use of supersonic planar source panels. One of the unique features of DEMON3 is the modeling of high angle of attack vortical effects associated with the lifting surfaces and the body. In addition, shock expansion and Newtonian pressure calculation methods can be optionally engaged. These two dimensional nonlinear methods are augmented by aerodynamic interference determined from the linear panel methods. Depending on the geometric details of the body, the DEMON3 program can be used to analyze nonconventional configurations at angles of attack up to 25 degrees for Mach numbers from 1.1 to 6. Calculative results and comparisons with experimental data demonstrate the capabilities of DEMON3. Limitations and deficiencies are listed.

  8. Multigrid Methods for Aerodynamic Problems in Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caughey, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Work has been directed at the development of efficient multigrid methods for the solution of aerodynamic problems involving complex geometries, including the development of computational methods for the solution of both inviscid and viscous transonic flow problems. The emphasis is on problems of complex, three-dimensional geometry. The methods developed are based upon finite-volume approximations to both the Euler and the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The methods are developed for use on multi-block grids using diagonalized implicit multigrid methods to achieve computational efficiency. The work is focused upon aerodynamic problems involving complex geometries, including advanced engine inlets.

  9. Modelling Aerodynamically Generated Sound: Recent Advances in Rotor Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the modeling of aerodynamically generated sound for rotors over the past decade. The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H ) equation has been the foundation for much of the development. Both subsonic and supersonic quadrupole noise formulations have been developed for the prediction of high-speed impulsive noise. In an effort to eliminate the need to compute the quadrupole contribution, the FW-H has also been utilized on permeable surfaces surrounding all physical noise sources. Comparison of the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces with the FW-H equation have shown that the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces can give erroneous results for aeroacoustic problems.

  10. System Identification and POD Method Applied to Unsteady Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Deman; Kholodar, Denis; Juang, Jer-Nan; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The representation of unsteady aerodynamic flow fields in terms of global aerodynamic modes has proven to be a useful method for reducing the size of the aerodynamic model over those representations that use local variables at discrete grid points in the flow field. Eigenmodes and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) modes have been used for this purpose with good effect. This suggests that system identification models may also be used to represent the aerodynamic flow field. Implicit in the use of a systems identification technique is the notion that a relative small state space model can be useful in describing a dynamical system. The POD model is first used to show that indeed a reduced order model can be obtained from a much larger numerical aerodynamical model (the vortex lattice method is used for illustrative purposes) and the results from the POD and the system identification methods are then compared. For the example considered, the two methods are shown to give comparable results in terms of accuracy and reduced model size. The advantages and limitations of each approach are briefly discussed. Both appear promising and complementary in their characteristics.

  11. Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

    SciTech Connect

    Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

    2012-07-08

    A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

  12. Computational methods for aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeters, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Five methods to increase the computational efficiency of aerodynamic design using numerical optimization, by reducing the computer time required to perform gradient calculations, are examined. The most promising method consists of drastically reducing the size of the computational domain on which aerodynamic calculations are made during gradient calculations. Since a gradient calculation requires the solution of the flow about an airfoil whose geometry was slightly perturbed from a base airfoil, the flow about the base airfoil is used to determine boundary conditions on the reduced computational domain. This method worked well in subcritical flow.

  13. Efficient Helicopter Aerodynamic and Aeroacoustic Predictions on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wissink, Andrew M.; Lyrintzis, Anastasios S.; Strawn, Roger C.; Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents parallel implementations of two codes used in a combined CFD/Kirchhoff methodology to predict the aerodynamics and aeroacoustics properties of helicopters. The rotorcraft Navier-Stokes code, TURNS, computes the aerodynamic flowfield near the helicopter blades and the Kirchhoff acoustics code computes the noise in the far field, using the TURNS solution as input. The overall parallel strategy adds MPI message passing calls to the existing serial codes to allow for communication between processors. As a result, the total code modifications required for parallel execution are relatively small. The biggest bottleneck in running the TURNS code in parallel comes from the LU-SGS algorithm that solves the implicit system of equations. We use a new hybrid domain decomposition implementation of LU-SGS to obtain good parallel performance on the SP-2. TURNS demonstrates excellent parallel speedups for quasi-steady and unsteady three-dimensional calculations of a helicopter blade in forward flight. The execution rate attained by the code on 114 processors is six times faster than the same cases run on one processor of the Cray C-90. The parallel Kirchhoff code also shows excellent parallel speedups and fast execution rates. As a performance demonstration, unsteady acoustic pressures are computed at 1886 far-field observer locations for a sample acoustics problem. The calculation requires over two hundred hours of CPU time on one C-90 processor but takes only a few hours on 80 processors of the SP2. The resultant far-field acoustic field is analyzed with state of-the-art audio and video rendering of the propagating acoustic signals.

  14. Comparison of theoretically predicted lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics with full-scale wind tunnel data on the ATLIT airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griswold, M.; Roskam, J.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical method is presented for predicting lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of light twin engine propeller-driven airplanes. This method is applied to the Advanced Technology Light Twin Engine airplane. The calculated characteristics are correlated against full-scale wind tunnel data. The method predicts the sideslip derivatives fairly well, although angle of attack variations are not well predicted. Spoiler performance was predicted somewhat high but was still reasonable. The rudder derivatives were not well predicted, in particular the effect of angle of attack. The predicted dynamic derivatives could not be correlated due to lack of experimental data.

  15. Development of a linearized unsteady aerodynamic analysis for cascade gust response predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Hall, Kenneth C.

    1990-01-01

    A method for predicting the unsteady aerodynamic response of a cascade of airfoils to entropic, vortical, and acoustic gust excitations is being developed. Here, the unsteady flow is regarded as a small perturbation of a nonuniform isentropic and irrotational steady background flow. A splitting technique is used to decompose the linearized unsteady velocity into rotational and irrotational parts leading to equations for the complex amplitudes of the linearized unsteady entropy, rotational velocity, and velocity potential that are coupled only sequentially. The entropic and rotational velocity fluctuations are described by transport equations for which closed-form solutions in terms of the mean-flow drift and stream functions can be determined. The potential fluctuation is described by an inhomogeneous convected wave equation in which the source term depends on the rotational velocity field, and is determined using finite-difference procedures. The analytical and numerical techniques used to determine the linearized unsteady flow are outlined. Results are presented to indicate the status of the solution procedure and to demonstrate the impact of blade geometry and mean blade loading on the aerodynamic response of cascades to vortical gust excitations. The analysis described herein leads to very efficient predictions of cascade unsteady aerodynamic response phenomena making it useful for turbomachinery aeroelastic and aeroacoustic design applications.

  16. A hybrid numerical technique for predicting the aerodynamic and acoustic fields of advanced turboprops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homicz, G. F.; Moselle, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid numerical procedure is presented for the prediction of the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of advanced turboprops. A hybrid scheme is proposed which in principle leads to a consistent simultaneous prediction of both fields. In the inner flow a finite difference method, the Approximate-Factorization Alternating-Direction-Implicit (ADI) scheme, is used to solve the nonlinear Euler equations. In the outer flow the linearized acoustic equations are solved via a Boundary-Integral Equation (BIE) method. The two solutions are iteratively matched across a fictitious interface in the flow so as to maintain continuity. At convergence the resulting aerodynamic load prediction will automatically satisfy the appropriate free-field boundary conditions at the edge of the finite difference grid, while the acoustic predictions will reflect the back-reaction of the radiated field on the magnitude of the loading source terms, as well as refractive effects in the inner flow. The equations and logic needed to match the two solutions are developed and the computer program implementing the procedure is described. Unfortunately, no converged solutions were obtained, due to unexpectedly large running times. The reasons for this are discussed and several means to alleviate the situation are suggested.

  17. Determination of slender body aerodynamics using discrete vortex methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebert, G. A.

    1994-03-01

    Current aerodynamic interest has turned to the study of supermaneuverable fighters and weapon performance when launched in extreme flight conditions. The evaluation of design missile performance requires multiple runs of six degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) simulations, analyzing the missile behavior for a variety of launch and flight conditions. Before wind-tunnel tests, it is necessary to produce the aerodynamic loading of candidate missiles for 6-DOF analyses. Since semi-empirical formulas fail in regions of nonlinear aerodynamics, and solutions to the full Navier-Stokes equations are too costly and time consuming, an alternative method of discrete vortex analysis is re-examined. The present theory examines the three-dimensional nature of the shed vorticity and generalizes previous discrete vortex analyses. Consequently, the results demonstrate relative user independence in determining all slender-body loading at angles of attack from 0 to 70 deg. The rapid calculations of the discrete vortex method makes it a prime candidate for the determinations of high angle-of-attack aerodynamic databases.

  18. Aerodynamic design optimization by using a continuous adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, JiaQi; Xiong, JunTao; Liu, Feng

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents the fundamentals of a continuous adjoint method and the applications of this method to the aerodynamic design optimization of both external and internal flows. General formulation of the continuous adjoint equations and the corresponding boundary conditions are derived. With the adjoint method, the complete gradient information needed in the design optimization can be obtained by solving the governing flow equations and the corresponding adjoint equations only once for each cost function, regardless of the number of design parameters. An inverse design of airfoil is firstly performed to study the accuracy of the adjoint gradient and the effectiveness of the adjoint method as an inverse design method. Then the method is used to perform a series of single and multiple point design optimization problems involving the drag reduction of airfoil, wing, and wing-body configuration, and the aerodynamic performance improvement of turbine and compressor blade rows. The results demonstrate that the continuous adjoint method can efficiently and significantly improve the aerodynamic performance of the design in a shape optimization problem.

  19. Variational Methods in Sensitivity Analysis and Optimization for Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, A. H.; Hou, G. J.-W.; Tiwari, S. N. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Variational methods (VM) sensitivity analysis, which is the continuous alternative to the discrete sensitivity analysis, is employed to derive the costate (adjoint) equations, the transversality conditions, and the functional sensitivity derivatives. In the derivation of the sensitivity equations, the variational methods use the generalized calculus of variations, in which the variable boundary is considered as the design function. The converged solution of the state equations together with the converged solution of the costate equations are integrated along the domain boundary to uniquely determine the functional sensitivity derivatives with respect to the design function. The determination of the sensitivity derivatives of the performance index or functional entails the coupled solutions of the state and costate equations. As the stable and converged numerical solution of the costate equations with their boundary conditions are a priori unknown, numerical stability analysis is performed on both the state and costate equations. Thereafter, based on the amplification factors obtained by solving the generalized eigenvalue equations, the stability behavior of the costate equations is discussed and compared with the state (Euler) equations. The stability analysis of the costate equations suggests that the converged and stable solution of the costate equation is possible only if the computational domain of the costate equations is transformed to take into account the reverse flow nature of the costate equations. The application of the variational methods to aerodynamic shape optimization problems is demonstrated for internal flow problems at supersonic Mach number range. The study shows, that while maintaining the accuracy of the functional sensitivity derivatives within the reasonable range for engineering prediction purposes, the variational methods show a substantial gain in computational efficiency, i.e., computer time and memory, when compared with the finite

  20. Rotary-wing aerodynamics. Volume 2: Performance prediction of helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, C. N.; Stephniewski, W. Z. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Application of theories, as well as, special methods of procedures applicable to performance prediction are illustrated first, on an example of the conventional helicopter and then, winged and tandem configurations. Performance prediction of conventional helicopters in hover and vertical ascent are investigated. Various approaches to performance prediction in forward translation are presented. Performance problems are discussed only this time, a wing is added to the baseline configuration, and both aircraft are compared with respect to their performance. This comparison is extended to a tandem. Appendices on methods for estimating performance guarantees and growth of aircraft concludes this volume.

  1. Aerodynamic influence coefficient method using singularity splines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, J. E.; Weber, J. A.; Lesferd, E. P.

    1973-01-01

    A new numerical formulation with computed results, is presented. This formulation combines the adaptability to complex shapes offered by paneling schemes with the smoothness and accuracy of the loading function methods. The formulation employs a continuous distribution of singularity strength over a set of panels on a paneled wing. The basic distributions are independent, and each satisfies all of the continuity conditions required of the final solution. These distributions are overlapped both spanwise and chordwise (termed 'spline'). Boundary conditions are satisfied in a least square error sense over the surface using a finite summing technique to approximate the integral.

  2. Aerodynamic influence coefficient method using singularity splines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, J. E.; Weber, J. A.; Lesferd, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    A numerical lifting surface formulation, including computed results for planar wing cases is presented. This formulation, referred to as the vortex spline scheme, combines the adaptability to complex shapes offered by paneling schemes with the smoothness and accuracy of loading function methods. The formulation employes a continuous distribution of singularity strength over a set of panels on a paneled wing. The basic distributions are independent, and each satisfied all the continuity conditions required of the final solution. These distributions are overlapped both spanwise and chordwise. Boundary conditions are satisfied in a least square error sense over the surface using a finite summing technique to approximate the integral. The current formulation uses the elementary horseshoe vortex as the basic singularity and is therefore restricted to linearized potential flow. As part of the study, a non planar development was considered, but the numerical evaluation of the lifting surface concept was restricted to planar configurations. Also, a second order sideslip analysis based on an asymptotic expansion was investigated using the singularity spline formulation.

  3. Training Data Requirement for a Neural Network to Predict Aerodynamic Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor); Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Basic aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of angle of attack, speed brake deflection angle, Mach number, and side slip angle. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. We previously demonstrated that a neural network is a fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients. We encountered few under fitted and/or over fitted results during prediction. The training data for the neural network are derived from wind tunnel test measurements and numerical simulations. The basic questions that arise are: how many training data points are required to produce an efficient neural network prediction, and which type of transfer functions should be used between the input-hidden layer and hidden-output layer. In this paper, a comparative study of the efficiency of neural network prediction based on different transfer functions and training dataset sizes is presented. The results of the neural network prediction reflect the sensitivity of the architecture, transfer functions, and training dataset size.

  4. Prediction of longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of STOL configurations with externally blown high lift devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, M. R.; Spangler, S. B.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical method has been developed to predict the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of engine-wing-flap combinations with externally blown flaps (EBF) and upper surface blowing (USB) high lift devices. Potential flow models of the lifting surfaces and the jet wake are combined to calculate the induced interference of the engine wakes on the lifting surfaces. The engine wakes may be circular, elliptic, or rectangular cross-sectional jets, and the lifting surfaces are comprised of a wing with multiple-slotted trailing-edge flaps or a deflected trailing-edge Coanda surface. Results are presented showing comparisons of measured and predicted forces, pitching moments, span-load distributions, and flow fields.

  5. Nonlinear Predictive Control of Wind Energy Conversion System Using Dfig with Aerodynamic Torque Observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, Ouari; Mohand, Ouhrouche; Toufik, Rekioua; Taib, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    In order to improvement of the performances for wind energy conversions systems (WECS), an advanced control techniques must be used. In this paper, as an alternative to conventional PI-type control methods, a nonlinear predictive control (NPC) approach is developed for DFIG-based wind turbine. To enhance the robustness of the controller, a disturbance observer is designed to estimate the aerodynamic torque which is considered as an unknown perturbation. An explicitly analytical form of the optimal predictive controller is given consequently on-line optimization is not necessary The DFIG is fed through the rotor windings by a back-to-back converter controlled by Pulse Width Modulation (PWM), where the stator winding is directly connected to the grid. The presented simulation results show a good performance in trajectory tracking of the proposed strategy and rejection of disturbances is successfully achieved.

  6. A Comparative Study Using CFD to Predict Iced Airfoil Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, x.; Li, Y.; Chen, H.; Addy, H. E.; Choo, Y. K.; Shih, T. I-P.

    2005-01-01

    WIND, Fluent, and PowerFLOW were used to predict the lift, drag, and moment coefficients of a business-jet airfoil with a rime ice (rough and jagged, but no protruding horns) and with a glaze ice (rough and jagged end has two or more protruding horns) for angles of attack from zero to and after stall. The performance of the following turbulence models were examined by comparing predictions with available experimental data. Spalart-Allmaras (S-A), RNG k-epsilon, shear-stress transport, v(sup 2)-f, and a differential Reynolds stress model with and without non-equilibrium wall functions. For steady RANS simulations, WIND and FLUENT were found to give nearly identical results if the grid about the iced airfoil, the turbulence model, and the order of accuracy of the numerical schemes used are the same. The use of wall functions was found to be acceptable for the rime ice configuration and the flow conditions examined. For rime ice, the S-A model was found to predict accurately until near the stall angle. For glaze ice, the CFD predictions were much less satisfactory for all turbulence models and codes investigated because of the large separated region produced by the horns. For unsteady RANS, WIND and FLUENT did not provide better results. PowerFLOW, based on the Lattice Boltzmann method, gave excellent results for the lift coefficient at and near stall for the rime ice, where the flow is inherently unsteady.

  7. An analysis for high speed propeller-nacelle aerodynamic performance prediction. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. Alan; Anderson, Olof L.; Edwards, David E.; Landgrebe, Anton J.

    1988-01-01

    A user's manual for the computer program developed for the prediction of propeller-nacelle aerodynamic performance reported in, An Analysis for High Speed Propeller-Nacelle Aerodynamic Performance Prediction: Volume 1 -- Theory and Application, is presented. The manual describes the computer program mode of operation requirements, input structure, input data requirements and the program output. In addition, it provides the user with documentation of the internal program structure and the software used in the computer program as it relates to the theory presented in Volume 1. Sample input data setups are provided along with selected printout of the program output for one of the sample setups.

  8. The predicted effect of aerodynamic detuning on coupled bending-torsion unstalled supersonic flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyniak, D.; Fleeter, S.

    1986-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to predict the enhanced coupled bending-torsion unstalled supersonic flutter stability due to alternate circumferential spacing aerodynamic detuning of a turbomachine rotor. The translational and torsional unsteady aerodynamic coefficients are developed in terms of influence coefficients, with the coupled bending-torsion stability analysis developed by considering the coupled equations of motion together with the unsteady aerodynamic loading. The effect of this aerodynamic detuning on coupled bending-torsion unstalled supersonic flutter as well as the verification of the modeling are then demonstrated by considering an unstable 12 bladed rotor, with Verdon's uniformly spaced Cascade B flow geometry as a baseline. However, with the elastic axis and center of gravity at 60 percent of the chord, this type of aerodynamic detuning has a minimal effect on stability. For both uniform and nonuniform circumferentially space rotors, a single degree of freedom torsion mode analysis was shown to be appropriate for values of the bending-torsion natural frequency ratio lower than 0.6 and higher 1.2. When the elastic axis and center of gravity are not coincident, the effect of detuning on cascade stability was found to be very sensitive to the location of the center of gravity with respect to the elastic axis. In addition, it was determined that when the center of gravity was forward of an elastic axis located at midchord, a single degree of freedom torsion model did not accurately predict cascade stability.

  9. A simple method for converting frequency domain aerodynamics to the time domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.

    1980-01-01

    A simple, direct procedure was developed for converting frequency domain aerodynamics into indicial aerodynamics. The data required for aerodynamic forces in the frequency domain may be obtained from any available (linear) theory. The method retains flexibility for the analyst and is based upon the particular character of the frequency domain results. An evaluation of the method was made for incompressible, subsonic, and transonic two dimensional flows.

  10. Real-time prediction of unsteady aerodynamics: Application for aircraft control and manoeuvrability enhancement.

    PubMed

    Faller, W E; Schreck, S J

    1995-01-01

    The capability to control unsteady separated flow fields could dramatically enhance aircraft agility. To enable control, however, real-time prediction of these flow fields over a broad parameter range must be realized. The present work describes real-time predictions of three-dimensional unsteady separated flow fields and aerodynamic coefficients using neural networks. Unsteady surface-pressure readings were obtained from an airfoil pitched at a constant rate through the static stall angle. All data sets were comprised of 15 simultaneously acquired pressure records and one pitch angle record. Five such records and the associated pitch angle histories were used to train the neural network using a time-series algorithm. Post-training, the input to the network was the pitch angle (alpha), the angular velocity (dalpha/dt), and the initial 15 recorded surface pressures at time (t (0)). Subsequently, the time (t+Deltat) network predictions, for each of the surface pressures, were fed back as the input to the network throughout the pitch history. The results indicated that the neural network accurately predicted the unsteady separated flow fields as well as the aerodynamic coefficients to within 5% of the experimental data. Consistent results were obtained both for the training set as well as for generalization to both other constant pitch rates and to sinusoidal pitch motions. The results clearly indicated that the neural-network model could predict the unsteady surface-pressure distributions and aerodynamic coefficients based solely on angle of attack information. The capability for real-time prediction of both unsteady separated flow fields and aerodynamic coefficients across a wide range of parameters in turn provides a critical step towards the development of control systems targeted at exploiting unsteady aerodynamics for aircraft manoeuvrability enhancement. PMID:18263439

  11. Rotor Airloads Prediction Using Loose Aerodynamic Structural Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potsdam, Mark; Yeo, Hyeonsoo; Johnson, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    This work couples a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code and rotorcraft computational structural dynamics (CSD) code to calculate helicopter rotor airloads across a range of flight conditions. An iterative loose (weak) coupling methodology is used to couple the CFD and CSD codes on a per revolution, periodic basis. The CFD uses a high fidelity, Navier-Stokes, overset grid methodology with first principles-based wake capturing. Modifications are made to the CFD code for aeroelastic analysis. For a UH-60A Blackhawk helicopter, four challenging level flight conditions are computed: 1) low speed (u = 0.15) with blade-vortex interaction, 2) high speed (u = 0.37) with advancing blade negative lift, 3) high thrust with dynamic stall (u = 0.24), and 4) hover. Results are compared with UH-60A Airloads Program fight test data. Most importantly, for all cases the loose coupling methodology is shown to be stable, convergent, and robust with full coupling of normal force, pitching moment, and chord force. In comparison with flight test data, normal force and pitching moment magnitudes are in good agreement. For the high speed and dynamic stall cases a phase lag in comparison with the data is seen, nonetheless, the shapes of the curves are very good. Overall, the results are noteworthy improvement over lifting line aerodynamics used in rotorcraft comprehensive codes.

  12. Characterization of Space Shuttle Ascent Debris Aerodynamics Using CFD Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Rogers, Stuart E.

    2005-01-01

    An automated Computational Fluid Dynamics process for determining the aerodynamic Characteristics of debris shedding from the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle during ascent is presented. This process uses Cartesian fully-coupled, six-degree-of-freedom simulations of isolated debris pieces in a Monte Carlo fashion to produce models for the drag and crossrange behavior over a range of debris shapes and shedding scenarios. A validation of the Cartesian methods against ballistic range data for insulating foam debris shapes at flight conditions, as well as validation of the resulting models, are both contained. These models are integrated with the existing shuttle debris transport analysis software to provide an accurate and efficient engineering tool for analyzing debris sources and their potential for damage.

  13. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients for Wind Tunnel Data using a Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Aragon, Cecilia; Bardina, Jorge; Britten, Roy

    2002-01-01

    A fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network optimized by a genetic algorithm. Basic aerodynamic coefficients (e.g. lift, drag, pitching moment) are modelled as functions of angle of attack and Mach number. The neural network is first trained on a relatively rich set of data from wind tunnel tests of numerical simulations to learn an overall model. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. A new set of data, which can be relatively sparse, is then supplied to the network to produce a new model consistent with the previous model and the new data. Because the new model interpolates realistically between the sparse test data points, it is suitable for use in piloted simulations. The genetic algorithm is used to choose a neural network architecture to give best results, avoiding over-and under-fitting of the test data.

  14. What Was Learned in Predicting Slender Airframe Aerodynamics with the F16-XL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Arthur; Lucking, James M.

    2014-01-01

    The CAWAPI-2 coordinated project has been underway to improve CFD predictions of slender airframe aerodynamics. The work is focused on two flow conditions and leverages a unique flight data set obtained with the F-16XL aircraft for comparison and verification. These conditions, a low-speed high angle-of-attack case and a transonic low angle-of-attack case, were selected from a prior prediction campaign wherein the CFD failed to provide acceptable results. In re-visiting these two cases, approaches for improved results include better, denser grids using more grid adaptation to local flow features as well as unsteady higher-fidelity physical modeling like hybrid RANS/URANS-LES methods. The work embodies predictions from multiple numerical formulations that are contributed from multiple organizations where some authors investigate other possible factors that could explain the discrepancies in agreement, e.g. effects due to deflected control surfaces during the flight tests, as well as static aeroelastic deflection of the outer wing. This paper presents the synthesis of all the results and findings and draws some conclusions that lead to an improved understanding of the underlying flow physics, and finally making the connections between the physics and aircraft features.

  15. Investigation to advance prediction techniques of the low-speed aerodynamics of V/STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskew, B.; Strash, D.; Nathman, J.; Dvorak, F. A.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program, VSAERO, has been applied to a number of V/STOL configurations with a view to advancing prediction techniques for the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics. The program couples a low-order panel method with surface streamline calculation and integral boundary layer procedures. The panel method--which uses piecewise constant source and doublet panels-includes an iterative procedure for wake shape and models boundary layer displacement effect using the source transpiration technique. Certain improvements to a basic vortex tube jet model were installed in the code prior to evaluation. Very promising results were obtained for surface pressures near a jet issuing at 90 deg from a flat plate. A solid core model was used in the initial part of the jet with a simple entrainment model. Preliminary representation of the downstream separation zone significantly improve the correlation. The program accurately predicted the pressure distribution inside the inlet on the Grumman 698-411 design at a range of flight conditions. Furthermore, coupled viscous/potential flow calculations gave very close correlation with experimentally determined operational boundaries dictated by the onset of separation inside the inlet. Experimentally observed degradation of these operational boundaries between nacelle-alone tests and tests on the full configuration were also indicated by the calculation. Application of the program to the General Dynamics STOL fighter design were equally encouraging. Very close agreement was observed between experiment and calculation for the effects of power on pressure distribution, lift and lift curve slope.

  16. Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) Noise and Airload Prediction Using Loose Aerodynamic/Structural Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, B. W.; Lim, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    Predictions of blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise, using blade airloads obtained from a coupled aerodynamic and structural methodology, are presented. This methodology uses an iterative, loosely-coupled trim strategy to cycle information between the OVERFLOW-2 (CFD) and CAMRAD-II (CSD) codes. Results are compared to the HART-II baseline, minimum noise and minimum vibration conditions. It is shown that this CFD/CSD state-of-the-art approach is able to capture blade airload and noise radiation characteristics associated with BVI. With the exception of the HART-II minimum noise condition, predicted advancing and retreating side BVI for the baseline and minimum vibration conditions agrees favorably with measured data. Although the BVI airloads and noise amplitudes are generally under-predicted, this CFD/CSD methodology provides an overall noteworthy improvement over the lifting line aerodynamics and free-wake models typically used in CSD comprehensive analysis codes.

  17. Space Shuttle entry aerodynamic comparisons of flight 1 with preflight predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. C.; Perez, L. F.; Romere, P. O.; Kanipe, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    Results of comparisons of predictions of aerodynamic performance, longitudinal trim, and reaction control jet interaction with data from the initial Shuttle flight are presented. The Shuttle's control surfaces are described, and it is noted that the flight plan contained no provisions for maneuvering capability tests. Wind tunnel testing totaling 35,000 hr were used to replace graduated flight testing, and calculations were made to allow for nonsimulated structural deformation, flowfield parameters, and profile drag. The goal was to desensitize the flight control system with respect to the aerodynamics by adding variations to the predictions. Lift/drag agreed well above Mach 1, while lower drag was encountered below Mach 1. Trim characteristics were predicted accurately between Mach 2-10, and less than satisfactorily outside that range. Discrepancies were also observed for jet interaction effects for the aft yaw jets at Mach numbers greater than 10.

  18. Calculated Low-Speed Steady and Time-Dependent Aerodynamic Derivatives for Some Airfoils Using a Discrete Vortex Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a collection of some results of four individual studies presenting calculated numerical values for airfoil aerodynamic stability derivatives in unseparated inviscid incompressible flow due separately to angle-of-attack, pitch rate, flap deflection, and airfoil camber using a discrete vortex method. Both steady conditions and oscillatory motion were considered. Variables include the number of vortices representing the airfoil, the pitch axis / moment center chordwise location, flap chord to airfoil chord ratio, and circular or parabolic arc camber. Comparisons with some experimental and other theoretical information are included. The calculated aerodynamic numerical results obtained using a limited number of vortices provided in each study compared favorably with thin airfoil theory predictions. Of particular interest are those aerodynamic results calculated herein (such as induced drag) that are not readily available elsewhere.

  19. X-33 Computational Aeroheating/Aerodynamic Predictions and Comparisons With Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Thompson, Richard A.; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alter, Stephen J.

    2003-01-01

    This report details a computational fluid dynamics study conducted in support of the phase II development of the X-33 vehicle. Aerodynamic and aeroheating predictions were generated for the X-33 vehicle at both flight and wind-tunnel test conditions using two finite-volume, Navier-Stokes solvers. Aerodynamic computations were performed at Mach 6 and Mach 10 wind-tunnel conditions for angles of attack from 10 to 50 with body-flap deflections of 0 to 20. Additional aerodynamic computations were performed over a parametric range of free-stream conditions at Mach numbers of 4 to 10 and angles of attack from 10 to 50. Laminar and turbulent wind-tunnel aeroheating computations were performed at Mach 6 for angles of attack of 20 to 40 with body-flap deflections of 0 to 20. Aeroheating computations were performed at four flight conditions with Mach numbers of 6.6 to 8.9 and angles of attack of 10 to 40. Surface heating and pressure distributions, surface streamlines, flow field information, and aerodynamic coefficients from these computations are presented, and comparisons are made with wind-tunnel data.

  20. Prediction of aerodynamic characteristics for wings with extensive separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskew, B.; Rao, B. M.; Dvorak, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a simple yet effective technique for modelling the effects of trailing edge separation is discussed. The model encloses the low energy region with free vortex sheets coupled with a potential flow panel method. The technique includes an interation cycle between viscous and potential flow routines and its development from the two dimensional case to the three dimensional case is discussed. A description of the potential flow panel method, which is based on an internal Dirichlet boundary condition, is included.

  1. Sideslip of wing-body combinations. [disturbance theory for predicting aerodynamics of aircraft in sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubbert, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    A small-disturbance theory is developed for predicting the aerodynamics of an airplane in sideslip. Second-order terms involving the interaction between sideslip angle and angle of attack, sideslip angle and wing camber, etc., are retained. It is found that the second-order terms can produce the dominant sideslip effects when the dihedral of the lifting surfaces is small. Numerical implementation of the theory requires a solution procedure capable of producing accurate velocity gradients in the first-order solution.

  2. Aerodynamic and acoustic investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular exhaust nozzle models and development of aerodynamic and acoustic prediction procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. S.; Nelson, D. P.; Stevens, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Five co-annular nozzle models, covering a systematic variation of nozzle geometry, were tested statically over a range of exhaust conditions including inverted velocity profile (IVP) (fan to primary stream velocity ratio 1) and non IVP profiles. Fan nozzle pressure ratio (FNPR) was varied from 1.3 to 4.1 at primary nozzle pressure ratios (PNPR) of 1.53 and 2.0. Fan stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R) and 1089 K(1960 deg R) were tested with primary stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R), 811 K (1460 deg R), and 1089 K (1960 deg R). At fan and primary stream velocities of 610 and 427 m/sec (2000 and 1400 ft/sec), respectively, increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced peak perceived noise level (PNL) 3 dB, and an increase in primary radius ratio from 0 to 0.81 (fan radius ratio constant at 0.83) reduced peak PNL an additional 1.0 dB. There were no noise reductions at a fan stream velocity of 853 m/sec (2800 ft/sec). Increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced nozzle thrust coefficient 1.2 to 1.5% at a PNPR of 1.53, and 1.7 to 2.0% at a PNPR of 2.0. The developed acoustic prediction procedure collapsed the existing data with standard deviation varying from + or - 8 dB to + or - 7 dB. The aerodynamic performance prediction procedure collapsed thrust coefficient measurements to within + or - .004 at a FNPR of 4.0 and a PNPR of 2.0.

  3. A PDE Sensitivity Equation Method for Optimal Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borggaard, Jeff; Burns, John

    1996-01-01

    The use of gradient based optimization algorithms in inverse design is well established as a practical approach to aerodynamic design. A typical procedure uses a simulation scheme to evaluate the objective function (from the approximate states) and its gradient, then passes this information to an optimization algorithm. Once the simulation scheme (CFD flow solver) has been selected and used to provide approximate function evaluations, there are several possible approaches to the problem of computing gradients. One popular method is to differentiate the simulation scheme and compute design sensitivities that are then used to obtain gradients. Although this black-box approach has many advantages in shape optimization problems, one must compute mesh sensitivities in order to compute the design sensitivity. In this paper, we present an alternative approach using the PDE sensitivity equation to develop algorithms for computing gradients. This approach has the advantage that mesh sensitivities need not be computed. Moreover, when it is possible to use the CFD scheme for both the forward problem and the sensitivity equation, then there are computational advantages. An apparent disadvantage of this approach is that it does not always produce consistent derivatives. However, for a proper combination of discretization schemes, one can show asymptotic consistency under mesh refinement, which is often sufficient to guarantee convergence of the optimal design algorithm. In particular, we show that when asymptotically consistent schemes are combined with a trust-region optimization algorithm, the resulting optimal design method converges. We denote this approach as the sensitivity equation method. The sensitivity equation method is presented, convergence results are given and the approach is illustrated on two optimal design problems involving shocks.

  4. Survey of engineering computational methods and experimental programs for estimating supersonic missile aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, W. C.; Allen, J. M.; Hernandez, G.; Dillenius, M. F. E.; Hemsch, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of engineering computational methods and experimental programs used for estimating the aerodynamic characteristics of missile configurations. Emphasis is placed on those methods which are suitable for preliminary design of conventional and advanced concepts. An analysis of the technical approaches of the various methods is made in order to assess their suitability to estimate longitudinal and/or lateral-directional characteristics for different classes of missile configurations. Some comparisons between the predicted characteristics and experimental data are presented. These comparisons are made for a large variation in flow conditions and model attitude parameters. The paper also presents known experimental research programs developed for the specific purpose of validating analytical methods and extending the capability of data-base programs.

  5. Space shuttle entry longitudinal aerodynamic comparisons of flights 1-4 with preflight predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romere, P. O.; Whitnah, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    The Space Shuttle orbiter flight test program has required the aerodynamicist to take a new approach in determining flight characteristics. A conventional flight test program of slowly and cautiously approaching more severe flight conditions was not possible with the orbiter. On the first four orbital flights, The orbiter entered the atmosphere at approximately Mach 29 and decelerated through the Mach range (the subsonic portion of flight had also been flown by another orbiter vehicle during the Approach and Landing Test Program). Certification for these flights was achieved by an extensive wind tunnel test and analysis program. The initial series of flights of the orbiter were heavily instrumented for the purpose of obtaining accurate aerodynamic data. The flight data derived from the entry Mach range provided comparisons between flight and wind tunnel derived predicted data in the areas of both aerodynamic performance and longitudinal trim.

  6. An initial investigation into methods of computing transonic aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted during the period from July 1991 through December 1992 is covered. A method based upon the quasi-analytical approach was developed for computing the aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients of three dimensional wings in transonic and subsonic flow. In addition, the method computes for comparison purposes the aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients using the finite difference approach. The accuracy and validity of the methods are currently under investigation.

  7. Improved nonlinear prediction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adenan, Nur Hamiza; Md Noorani, Mohd Salmi

    2014-06-01

    The analysis and prediction of time series data have been addressed by researchers. Many techniques have been developed to be applied in various areas, such as weather forecasting, financial markets and hydrological phenomena involving data that are contaminated by noise. Therefore, various techniques to improve the method have been introduced to analyze and predict time series data. In respect of the importance of analysis and the accuracy of the prediction result, a study was undertaken to test the effectiveness of the improved nonlinear prediction method for data that contain noise. The improved nonlinear prediction method involves the formation of composite serial data based on the successive differences of the time series. Then, the phase space reconstruction was performed on the composite data (one-dimensional) to reconstruct a number of space dimensions. Finally the local linear approximation method was employed to make a prediction based on the phase space. This improved method was tested with data series Logistics that contain 0%, 5%, 10%, 20% and 30% of noise. The results show that by using the improved method, the predictions were found to be in close agreement with the observed ones. The correlation coefficient was close to one when the improved method was applied on data with up to 10% noise. Thus, an improvement to analyze data with noise without involving any noise reduction method was introduced to predict the time series data.

  8. Application of empirical and linear methods to VSTOL powered-lift aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margason, Richard; Kuhn, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Available prediction methods applied to problems of aero/propulsion interactions for short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft are critically reviewed and an assessment of their strengths and weaknesses provided. The first two problems deal with aerodynamic performance effects during hover: (1) out-of-ground effect, and (2) in-ground effect. The first can be evaluated for some multijet cases; however, the second problem is very difficult to evaluate for multijets. The ground-environment effects due to wall jets and fountain flows directly affect hover performance. In a related problem: (3) hot-gas ingestion affects the engine operation. Both of these problems as well as jet noise affect the ability of people to work near the aircraft and the ability of the aircraft to operate near the ground. Additional problems are: (4) the power-augmented lift due to jet-flap effects (both in- and out-of-ground effects), and (5) the direct jet-lift effects during short takeoff and landing (STOL) operations. The final problem: (6) is the aerodynamic/propulsion interactions in transition between hover and wing-borne flight. Areas where modern CFD methods can provide improvements to current computational capabilities are identified.

  9. Successive smoothing algorithm for constructing the semiempirical model developed at ONERA to predict unsteady aerodynamic forces. [aeroelasticity in helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petot, D.; Loiseau, H.

    1982-01-01

    Unsteady aerodynamic methods adopted for the study of aeroelasticity in helicopters are considered with focus on the development of a semiempirical model of unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on an oscillating profile at high incidence. The successive smoothing algorithm described leads to the model's coefficients in a very satisfactory manner.

  10. Computation of interactional aerodynamics for noise prediction of heavy lift rotorcraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennes, Christopher C.

    Many computational tools are used when developing a modern helicopter. As the design space is narrowed, more accurate and time-intensive tools are brought to bear. These tools are used to determine the effect of a design decision on the performance, handling, stability and efficiency of the aircraft. One notable parameter left out of this process is acoustics. This is due in part to the difficulty in making useful acoustics calculations that reveal the differences between various design configurations. This thesis presents a new approach designed to bridge the gap in prediction capability between fast but low-fidelity Lagrangian particle methods, and slow but high-fidelity Eulerian computational fluid dynamics simulations. A multi-pronged approach is presented. First, a simple flow solver using well-understood and tested flow solution methodologies is developed specifically to handle bodies in arbitrary motion. To this basic flow solver two new technologies are added. The first is an Immersed Boundary technique designed to be tolerant of geometric degeneracies and low-resolution grids. This new technique allows easy inclusion of complex fuselage geometries at minimal computational cost, improving the ability of a solver to capture the complex interactional aerodynamic effects expected in modern rotorcraft design. The second new technique is an extension of a concept from flow visualization where the motion of tip vortices are tracked through the solution using massless particles convecting with the local flow. In this extension of that concept, the particles maintain knowledge of the expected and actual vortex strength. As a post-processing step, when the acoustic calculations are made, these particles are used to augment the loading noise calculation and reproduce the highly-impulsive character of blade-vortex interaction noise. In combination these new techniques yield a significant improvement to the state of the art in rotorcraft blade-vortex interaction noise

  11. Cross-spectral recognition method of bridge deck aerodynamic admittance function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lin; Ge, Yaojun

    2015-12-01

    This study proposes a new identification algorithm about the admittance function, which can estimate the full set of six aerodynamic admittance functions considering cross power spectral density functions about the forces and the turbulence components. The method was first numerically validated through Monte Carlo simulations, and then adopted to estimate the aerodynamic admittance of a streamlined bridge deck. The identification method was further validated through a comparison between the numerical calculation and wind tunnel tests on a moving bridge section.

  12. A Comparison of Interactional Aerodynamics Methods for a Helicopter in Low Speed Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; Letnikov, Victor; Bavykina, Irena; Chaffin, Mark S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in computing subsonic flow have been applied to helicopter configurations with various degrees of success. This paper is a comparison of two specific methods applied to a particularly challenging regime of helicopter flight, very low speeds, where the interaction of the rotor wake and the fuselage are most significant. Comparisons are made between different methods of predicting the interactional aerodynamics associated with a simple generic helicopter configuration. These comparisons are made using fuselage pressure data from a Mach-scaled powered model helicopter with a rotor diameter of approximately 3 meters. The data shown are for an advance ratio of 0.05 with a thrust coefficient of 0.0066. The results of this comparison show that in this type of complex flow both analytical techniques have regions where they are more accurate in matching the experimental data.

  13. Cooled-turbine aerodynamic performance prediction from reduced primary to coolant total-temperature-ratio results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    The prediction of the cooled aerodynamic performance, for both stators and turbines, at actual primary to coolant inlet total temperature ratios from the results obtained at a reduced total temperature ratio is described. Theoretical and available experimental results were compared for convection film and transpiration cooled stator vanes and for a film cooled, single stage core turbine. For these tests the total temperature ratio varied from near 1.0 to about 2.7. The agreement between the theoretical and the experimental results was, in general, reasonable.

  14. A method for the reduction of aerodynamic drag of road vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Taylor, Larry W.; Leary, Terrance O.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for the reduction of the aerodynamic drag of bluff bodies, particularly for application to road transport vehicles. This technique consists of installation of panels on the forward surface of the vehicle facing the airstream. With the help of road tests, it was demonstrated that the attachment of proposed panels can reduce aerodynamic drag of road vehicles and result in significant fuel cost savings and conservation of energy resources.

  15. Membrane Protein Prediction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Punta, Marco; Forrest, Lucy R.; Bigelow, Henry; Kernytsky, Andrew; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard

    2007-01-01

    We survey computational approaches that tackle membrane protein structure and function prediction. While describing the main ideas that have led to the development of the most relevant and novel methods, we also discuss pitfalls, provide practical hints and highlight the challenges that remain. The methods covered include: sequence alignment, motif search, functional residue identification, transmembrane segment and protein topology predictions, homology and ab initio modeling. Overall, predictions of functional and structural features of membrane proteins are improving, although progress is hampered by the limited amount of high-resolution experimental information available. While predictions of transmembrane segments and protein topology rank among the most accurate methods in computational biology, more attention and effort will be required in the future to ameliorate database search, homology and ab initio modeling. PMID:17367718

  16. Toward Improved CFD Predictions of Slender Airframe Aerodynamics Using the F-16XL Aircraft (CAWAPI-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.; Rizzi, Arthur; Davis, M. Bruce

    2014-01-01

    A coordinated project has been underway to improve CFD predictions of slender airframe aerodynamics. The work is focused on two flow conditions and leverages a unique flight data set obtained with an F-16XL aircraft. These conditions, a low-speed high angleof- attack case and a transonic low angle-of-attack case, were selected from a prior prediction campaign wherein the CFD failed to provide acceptable results. In this paper the background, objectives and approach to the current project are presented. The work embodies predictions from multiple numerical formulations that are contributed from multiple organizations, and the context of this campaign to other multi-code, multiorganizational efforts is included. The relevance of this body of work toward future supersonic commercial transport concepts is also briefly addressed.

  17. High fidelity quasi steady-state aerodynamic model effects on race vehicle performance predictions using multi-body simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrfeld-Halterman, J. A.; Uddin, M.

    2016-07-01

    We described in this paper the development of a high fidelity vehicle aerodynamic model to fit wind tunnel test data over a wide range of vehicle orientations. We also present a comparison between the effects of this proposed model and a conventional quasi steady-state aerodynamic model on race vehicle simulation results. This is done by implementing both of these models independently in multi-body quasi steady-state simulations to determine the effects of the high fidelity aerodynamic model on race vehicle performance metrics. The quasi steady state vehicle simulation is developed with a multi-body NASCAR Truck vehicle model, and simulations are conducted for three different types of NASCAR race tracks, a short track, a one and a half mile intermediate track, and a higher speed, two mile intermediate race track. For each track simulation, the effects of the aerodynamic model on handling, maximum corner speed, and drive force metrics are analysed. The accuracy of the high-fidelity model is shown to reduce the aerodynamic model error relative to the conventional aerodynamic model, and the increased accuracy of the high fidelity aerodynamic model is found to have realisable effects on the performance metric predictions on the intermediate tracks resulting from the quasi steady-state simulation.

  18. An analysis for high speed propeller-nacelle aerodynamic performance prediction. Volume 1: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. Alan; Anderson, Olof L.; Edwards, David E.; Landgrebe, Anton J.

    1988-01-01

    A computer program, the Propeller Nacelle Aerodynamic Performance Prediction Analysis (PANPER), was developed for the prediction and analysis of the performance and airflow of propeller-nacelle configurations operating over a forward speed range inclusive of high speed flight typical of recent propfan designs. A propeller lifting line, wake program was combined with a compressible, viscous center body interaction program, originally developed for diffusers, to compute the propeller-nacelle flow field, blade loading distribution, propeller performance, and the nacelle forebody pressure and viscous drag distributions. The computer analysis is applicable to single and coaxial counterrotating propellers. The blade geometries can include spanwise variations in sweep, droop, taper, thickness, and airfoil section type. In the coaxial mode of operation the analysis can treat both equal and unequal blade number and rotational speeds on the propeller disks. The nacelle portion of the analysis can treat both free air and tunnel wall configurations including wall bleed. The analysis was applied to many different sets of flight conditions using selected aerodynamic modeling options. The influence of different propeller nacelle-tunnel wall configurations was studied. Comparisons with available test data for both single and coaxial propeller configurations are presented along with a discussion of the results.

  19. An Assessment of NASA Glenn's Aeroacoustic Experimental and Predictive Capabilities for Installed Cooling Fans. Part 1; Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Koch, L. Danielle; Wernet, Mark P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    Driven by the need for low production costs, electronics cooling fans have evolved differently than the bladed components of gas turbine engines which incorporate multiple technologies to enhance performance and durability while reducing noise emissions. Drawing upon NASA Glenn's experience in the measurement and prediction of gas turbine engine aeroacoustic performance, tests have been conducted to determine if these tools and techniques can be extended for application to the aerodynamics and acoustics of electronics cooling fans. An automated fan plenum installed in NASA Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory was used to map the overall aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a spaceflight qualified 80 mm diameter axial cooling fan. In order to more accurately identify noise sources, diagnose performance limiting aerodynamic deficiencies, and validate noise prediction codes, additional aerodynamic measurements were recorded for two operating points: free delivery and a mild stall condition. Non-uniformities in the fan s inlet and exhaust regions captured by Particle Image Velocimetry measurements, and rotor blade wakes characterized by hot wire anemometry measurements provide some assessment of the fan aerodynamic performance. The data can be used to identify fan installation/design changes which could enlarge the stable operating region for the fan and improve its aerodynamic performance and reduce noise emissions.

  20. An Engineering Aerodynamic Heating Method for Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; DeJarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  1. Aerodynamics of a linear oscillating cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, Daniel H.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1990-01-01

    The steady and unsteady aerodynamics of a linear oscillating cascade are investigated using experimental and computational methods. Experiments are performed to quantify the torsion mode oscillating cascade aerodynamics of the NASA Lewis Transonic Oscillating Cascade for subsonic inlet flowfields using two methods: simultaneous oscillation of all the cascaded airfoils at various values of interblade phase angle, and the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. Analysis of these data and correlation with classical linearized unsteady aerodynamic analysis predictions indicate that the wind tunnel walls enclosing the cascade have, in some cases, a detrimental effect on the cascade unsteady aerodynamics. An Euler code for oscillating cascade aerodynamics is modified to incorporate improved upstream and downstream boundary conditions and also the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. The new boundary conditions are shown to improve the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. The new boundary conditions are shown to improve the unsteady aerodynamic predictions of the code, and the computational unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique is shown to be a viable alternative for calculation of oscillating cascade aerodynamics.

  2. Prediction of the aerodynamic environment and heat transfer for rotor-stator configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, L. W.; Mcconnaughey, H. V.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical study of the aerodynamic and thermal environment associated with axial turbine stages is presented. Computations were performed using a modification of the unsteady viscous code, ROTORI, and an improved version of the steady inviscid cascade system, MERIDL-TSONIC, coupled with boundary layer codes, BLAYER and STAN5. Two different turbine stages were analyzed: the first stage of the United Technologies Research Center Large Scale Rotating Rig (LSRR) and the first stage of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel turbopump turbine. The time-averaged airfoil midspan pressure and heat transfer profiles were predicted for numerous thermal boundary conditions including adiabatic wall, prescribed surface temperature, and prescribed heat flux. Computed solutions are compared with each other and with experimental data in the case of the LSRR calculations. Modified ROTORI predictions of unsteady pressure envelopes and instantaneous contour plots are also presented. Relative merits of the two computational approaches are discussed.

  3. Prediction of the aerodynamic environment and heat transfer for rotor-stator configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, L. W.; McConnaughey, H. V.

    1989-06-01

    A numerical study of the aerodynamic and thermal environment associated with axial turbine stages is presented. Computations were performed using a modification of the unsteady viscous code, ROTORI, and an improved version of the steady inviscid cascade system, MERIDL-TSONIC, coupled with boundary layer codes, BLAYER and STAN5. Two different turbine stages were analyzed: the first stage of the United Technologies Research Center Large Scale Rotating Rig (LSRR) and the first stage of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel turbopump turbine. The time-averaged airfoil midspan pressure and heat transfer profiles were predicted for numerous thermal boundary conditions including adiabatic wall, prescribed surface temperature, and prescribed heat flux. Computed solutions are compared with each other and with experimental data in the case of the LSRR calculations. Modified ROTORI predictions of unsteady pressure envelopes and instantaneous contour plots are also presented. Relative merits of the two computational approaches are discussed.

  4. Possible Deficiencies in Predicting Transonic Aerodynamics on the X-43A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labbe, Steven G.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Kehoe, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    The initial X-43A flight test, June 2, 2001, resulted in a mishap and loss of the vehicle. A mishap investigation board (MIB) report and findings, including the established root cause, were publicly released on July, 23, 2003. The X-43A Flight 1 Hyper-X Launch Vehicle (HXLV) failed because the vehicle control system design was deficient for the trajectory flown due to inaccurate analytical models (Pegasus heritage and HXLV specific), which overestimated the (control) system margin ? X-43A Mishap Investigation Report, Vol. I. ? included as Reference 1. Several specific errors were noted, 1) HXLV aerodynamics ? failure to model changes to wing, fin and rudder airfoil shapes due to addition of thermal protection system (TPS); 2) Fin actuation system (FAS) modeling ? under prediction of the control surface hinge moments and FAS compliance; and 3) Parametric uncertainties ? insufficient variation in the aerodynamic, FAS and control system models. In response to the MIB findings, the X-43A program has been working RTF through an approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) over the last two years.

  5. Coupling a Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction Model with Large-Eddy Simulation for Realistic Wind Plant Aerodynamics Simulations (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Draxl, C.; Churchfield, M.; Mirocha, J.; Lee, S.; Lundquist, J.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Purkayastha, A.; Sprague, M.; Vanderwende, B.

    2014-06-01

    Wind plant aerodynamics are influenced by a combination of microscale and mesoscale phenomena. Incorporating mesoscale atmospheric forcing (e.g., diurnal cycles and frontal passages) into wind plant simulations can lead to a more accurate representation of microscale flows, aerodynamics, and wind turbine/plant performance. Our goal is to couple a numerical weather prediction model that can represent mesoscale flow [specifically the Weather Research and Forecasting model] with a microscale LES model (OpenFOAM) that can predict microscale turbulence and wake losses.

  6. A new method to calibrate aerodynamic roughness over the Tibetan Plateau using Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Timmermans, J.; Su, Z.; Mancini, M.

    2012-04-01

    Aerodynamic roughness height (Zom) is a key parameter required in land surface hydrological model, since errors in heat flux estimations are largely dependent on accurate optimization of this parameter. Despite its significance, it remains an uncertain parameter that is not easily determined. This is mostly because of non-linear relationship in Monin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) and unknown vertical characteristic of vegetation. Previous studies determined aerodynamic roughness using traditional wind profile method, remotely sensed vegetation index, minimization of cost function over MOS relationship or linear regression. However, these are complicated procedures that presume high accuracy for several other related parameters embedded in MOS equations. In order to simplify a procedure and reduce the number of parameters in need, this study suggests a new approach to extract aerodynamic roughness parameter via Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) that affords non-linearity and that requires only single or two heat flux measurement. So far, to our knowledge, no previous study has applied EnKF to aerodynamic roughness estimation, while a majority of data assimilation study has paid attention to land surface state variables such as soil moisture or land surface temperature. This approach was applied to grassland in semi-arid Tibetan area and maize on moderately wet condition in Italy. It was demonstrated that aerodynamic roughness parameter can inversely be tracked from data assimilated heat flux analysis. The aerodynamic roughness height estimated in this approach was consistent with eddy covariance result and literature value. Consequently, this newly estimated input adjusted the sensible heat overestimated and latent heat flux underestimated by the original Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) model, suggesting better heat flux estimation especially during the summer Monsoon period. The advantage of this approach over other methodologies is that aerodynamic roughness height

  7. Unstructured-grid methods development for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.; Lee, Elizabeth M.; Kleb, William L.; Rausch, Russ D.

    1991-01-01

    The current status of unstructured grid methods development in the Unsteady Aerodynamics Branch at NASA-Langley is described. These methods are being developed for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses. The flow solvers are highlighted which were developed for the solution of the unsteady Euler equations and selected results are given which show various features of the capability. The results demonstrate 2-D and 3-D applications for both steady and unsteady flows. Comparisons are also made with solutions obtained using a structured grid code and with experimental data to determine the accuracy of the unstructured grid methodology. These comparisons show good agreement which thus verifies the accuracy.

  8. Unstructured-grid methods development for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.; Lee, Elizabeth M.; Kleb, William L.; Rausch, Russ D.

    1992-01-01

    The current status of unstructured grid methods developed in the Unsteady Aerodynamics Branch at NASA Langley Research Center is described. These methods are being developed for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses. Flow solvers that have been developed for the solution of unsteady Euler equations are highlighted. The results demonstrate two and three dimensional applications for both steady and unsteady flows. Comparisons are also made with solutions obtained using a structured grid code and with experimental data to determine the accuracy of the unstructured grid methodology. These comparisons show good agreement which thus verifies the accuracy.

  9. Aerodynamic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    In this article two integral computational fluid dynamics methods for steady-state and transient vehicle aerodynamic simulations are described using a Chevrolet Corvette ZR-1 surface panel model. In the last decade, road-vehicle aerodynamics have become an important design consideration. Originally, the design of low-drag shapes was given high priority due to worldwide fuel shortages that occurred in the mid-seventies. More recently, there has been increased interest in the role aerodynamics play in vehicle stability and passenger safety. Consequently, transient aerodynamics and the aerodynamics of vehicle in yaw have become important issues at the design stage. While there has been tremendous progress in Navier-Stokes methodology in the last few years, the physics of bluff-body aerodynamics are still very difficult to model correctly. Moreover, the computational effort to perform Navier-Stokes simulations from the geometric stage to complete flow solutions requires much computer time and impacts the design cycle time. In the short run, therefore, simpler methods must be used for such complicated problems. Here, two methods are described for the simulation of steady-state and transient vehicle aerodynamics.

  10. Method for obtaining aerodynamic data on hypersonic configurations with scramjet exhaust flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartill, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    A hypersonic wind tunnel test method for obtaining credible aerodynamic data on a complete hypersonic vehicle (generic X-24c) with scramjet exhaust flow simulation is described. The general problems of simulating the scramjet exhaust as well as accounting for scramjet inlet flow and vehicle forces are analyzed, and candidate test methods are described and compared. The method selected as most useful makes use of a thrust-minus-drag flow-through balance with a completely metric model. Inlet flow is diverted by a fairing. The incremental effect of the fairing is determined in the testing of two reference models. The net thrust of the scramjet module is an input to be determined in large-scale module tests with scramjet combustion. Force accounting is described, and examples of force component levels are predicted. Compatibility of the test method with candidate wind tunnel facilities is described, and a preliminary model mechanical arrangement drawing is presented. The balance design and performance requirements are described in a detailed specification. Calibration procedures, model instrumentation, and a test plan for the model are outlined.

  11. Downstream prediction using a nonlinear prediction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adenan, N. H.; Noorani, M. S. M.

    2013-11-01

    The estimation of river flow is significantly related to the impact of urban hydrology, as this could provide information to solve important problems, such as flooding downstream. The nonlinear prediction method has been employed for analysis of four years of daily river flow data for the Langat River at Kajang, Malaysia, which is located in a downstream area. The nonlinear prediction method involves two steps; namely, the reconstruction of phase space and prediction. The reconstruction of phase space involves reconstruction from a single variable to the m-dimensional phase space in which the dimension m is based on optimal values from two methods: the correlation dimension method (Model I) and false nearest neighbour(s) (Model II). The selection of an appropriate method for selecting a combination of preliminary parameters, such as m, is important to provide an accurate prediction. From our investigation, we gather that via manipulation of the appropriate parameters for the reconstruction of the phase space, Model II provides better prediction results. In particular, we have used Model II together with the local linear prediction method to achieve the prediction results for the downstream area with a high correlation coefficient. In summary, the results show that Langat River in Kajang is chaotic, and, therefore, predictable using the nonlinear prediction method. Thus, the analysis and prediction of river flow in this area can provide river flow information to the proper authorities for the construction of flood control, particularly for the downstream area.

  12. Predictive spark timing method

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, D.L.; Chang, M.F.; Sultan, M.C.

    1990-01-09

    This patent describes a method of determining spark time in a spark timing system of an internal combustion engine having a plurality of cylinders and a spark period for each cylinder in which a spark occurs. It comprises: generating at least one crankshaft position reference pulse for each spark firing event, the reference pulse nearest the next spark being set to occur within a same cylinder event as the next spark; measuring at least two reference periods between recent reference pulses; calculating the spark timing synchronously with crankshaft position by performing the calculation upon receipt of the reference pulse nearest the next spark; predicting the engine speed for the next spark period from at least two reference periods including the most recent reference period; and based on the predicted speed, calculating a spark time measured from the the reference pulse nearest the next spark.

  13. Semi-Empirical Prediction of Aircraft Low-Speed Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Erik D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper lays out a comprehensive methodology for computing a low-speed, high-lift polar, without requiring additional details about the aircraft design beyond what is typically available at the conceptual design stage. Introducing low-order, physics-based aerodynamic analyses allows the methodology to be more applicable to unconventional aircraft concepts than traditional, fully-empirical methods. The methodology uses empirical relationships for flap lift effectiveness, chord extension, drag-coefficient increment and maximum lift coefficient of various types of flap systems as a function of flap deflection, and combines these increments with the characteristics of the unflapped airfoils. Once the aerodynamic characteristics of the flapped sections are known, a vortex-lattice analysis calculates the three-dimensional lift, drag and moment coefficients of the whole aircraft configuration. This paper details the results of two validation cases: a supercritical airfoil model with several types of flaps; and a 12-foot, full-span aircraft model with slats and double-slotted flaps.

  14. Variable Camber Continuous Aerodynamic Control Surfaces and Methods for Active Wing Shaping Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamic control apparatus for an air vehicle improves various aerodynamic performance metrics by employing multiple spanwise flap segments that jointly form a continuous or a piecewise continuous trailing edge to minimize drag induced by lift or vortices. At least one of the multiple spanwise flap segments includes a variable camber flap subsystem having multiple chordwise flap segments that may be independently actuated. Some embodiments also employ a continuous leading edge slat system that includes multiple spanwise slat segments, each of which has one or more chordwise slat segment. A method and an apparatus for implementing active control of a wing shape are also described and include the determination of desired lift distribution to determine the improved aerodynamic deflection of the wings. Flap deflections are determined and control signals are generated to actively control the wing shape to approximate the desired deflection.

  15. Modified method of aerodynamic resistance calculation and its application to potential evapotranspiration estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodný, Marek; Nolz, Reinhard; Novák, Viliam; Hlaváčiková, Hana; Loiskandl, Willibald; Himmelbauer, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to present and validate an alternative evapotranspiration calculation procedure that includes specific expression for the aerodynamic resistance. Calculated daily potential evapotranspiration totals were compared to the results of FAO56 procedure application and to the results of measurements taken with a precision weighing lysimeter permanently grown with irrigated, short grass. For the examination period from March 17 through October 31, 2011, it was found that daily potential evapotranspiration estimates obtained by both calculation procedures fitted well to the lysimeter measurements. Potential evapotranspiration daily totals calculated with the use of the proposed aerodynamic resistance calculation procedure gave better results for days with higher evapotranspiration, compared to the FAO56 method. The most important is that the approach based on the proposed alternative aerodynamic resistance could be effectively used even for a wide variety of crops, because it is not limited to any particular crop.

  16. Integral-equation methods in steady and unsteady subsonic, transonic and supersonic aerodynamics for interdisciplinary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. Carson, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Progress in the development of computational methods for steady and unsteady aerodynamics has perennially paced advancements in aeroelastic analysis and design capabilities. Since these capabilities are of growing importance in the analysis and design of high-performance aircraft, considerable effort has been directed toward the development of appropriate aerodynamic methodology. The contributions to those efforts from the integral-equations research program at the NASA Langley Research Center is reviewed. Specifically, the current scope, progress, and plans for research and development for inviscid and viscous flows are discussed, and example applications are shown in order to highlight the generality, versatility, and attractive features of this methodology.

  17. Viscous-Inviscid Methods in Unsteady Aerodynamic Analysis of Bio-Inspired Morphing Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhruv, Akash V.

    Flight has been one of the greatest realizations of human imagination, revolutionizing communication and transportation over the years. This has greatly influenced the growth of technology itself, enabling researchers to communicate and share their ideas more effectively, extending the human potential to create more sophisticated systems. While the end product of a sophisticated technology makes our lives easier, its development process presents an array of challenges in itself. In last decade, scientists and engineers have turned towards bio-inspiration to design more efficient and robust aerodynamic systems to enhance the ability of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to be operated in cluttered environments, where tight maneuverability and controllability are necessary. Effective use of UAVs in domestic airspace will mark the beginning of a new age in communication and transportation. The design of such complex systems necessitates the need for faster and more effective tools to perform preliminary investigations in design, thereby streamlining the design process. This thesis explores the implementation of numerical panel methods for aerodynamic analysis of bio-inspired morphing wings. Numerical panel methods have been one of the earliest forms of computational methods for aerodynamic analysis to be developed. Although the early editions of this method performed only inviscid analysis, the algorithm has matured over the years as a result of contributions made by prominent aerodynamicists. The method discussed in this thesis is influenced by recent advancements in panel methods and incorporates both viscous and inviscid analysis of multi-flap wings. The surface calculation of aerodynamic coefficients makes this method less computationally expensive than traditional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solvers available, and thus is effective when both speed and accuracy are desired. The morphing wing design, which consists of sequential feather-like flaps installed

  18. Comparisons Between Pretest Prediction and Flight Test Data of Aerodynamic Loading for EFT-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Exploration Flight Test One (EFT-1) was an incredible milestone in the development NASA's Orion spacecraft. It incorporated hundreds of articles of flight test instrumentation and returned with a wealth of data. Aerodynamic surface pressures were collected during launch vehicle ascent and capsule reentry and descent. These discrete surface pressure measurements enable comparisons to computational results and ground test data. This paper details the comparisons between pre-test predictions and flight test data for the Orion MPCV Crew Module (CM) and Launch Abort Tower (LAT) during all phases of flight. Regions with strong comparisons, poor predictions, and lessons learned are discussed. 38 pressure measurements were made on the LAT during ascent. Nine of the gauges were Honeywell PPTs and the remainder were Kulite pressure transducers. In order to address bias in the Kulites, a two-point linear calibration was used and the details are discussed. Results from the flight are compared to existing database products. 44 pressure measurements were made on the CM during reentry and descent. Nine of the gauges were Honeywell PPTs and the remainder were Kulite pressure transducers. In order to address bias in the Kulites, a tare was made against the vacuum measurements as described below. Once the bias was removed from the gauges, comparisons between predicted loading and the measured results are compared.

  19. Applied computational aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The present volume discusses the original development of the panel method, the mapping solutions and singularity distributions of linear potential schemes, the capabilities of full-potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes schemes, the use of the grid-generation methodology in applied aerodynamics, subsonic airfoil design, inverse airfoil design for transonic applications, the divergent trailing-edge airfoil innovation in CFD, Euler and potential computational results for selected aerodynamic configurations, and the application of CFD to wing high-lift systems. Also discussed are high-lift wing modifications for an advanced-capability EA-6B aircraft, Navier-Stokes methods for internal and integrated propulsion system flow predictions, the use of zonal techniques for analysis of rotor-stator interaction, CFD applications to complex configurations, CFD applications in component aerodynamic design of the V-22, Navier-Stokes computations of a complete F-16, CFD at supersonic/hypersonic speeds, and future CFD developments.

  20. Estimation of Supersonic Stage Separation Aerodynamics of Winged-Body Launch Vehicles Using Response Surface Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Deloach, Richard

    2008-01-01

    A collection of statistical and mathematical techniques referred to as response surface methodology was used to estimate the longitudinal stage separation aerodynamic characteristics of a generic, bimese, winged multi-stage launch vehicle configuration using data obtained on small-scale models at supersonic speeds in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The simulated Mach 3 staging was dominated by multiple shock wave interactions between the orbiter and booster vehicles throughout the relative spatial locations of interest. This motivated a partitioning of the overall inference space into several contiguous regions within which the separation aerodynamics were presumed to be well-behaved and estimable using cuboidal and spherical central composite designs capable of fitting full second-order response functions. The primary goal was to approximate the underlying overall aerodynamic response surfaces of the booster vehicle in belly-to-belly proximity to the orbiter vehicle using relatively simple, lower-order polynomial functions that were piecewise-continuous across the full independent variable ranges of interest. The quality of fit and prediction capabilities of the empirical models were assessed in detail, and the issue of subspace boundary discontinuities was addressed. The potential benefits of augmenting the central composite designs to full third order using computer-generated D-optimality criteria were also evaluated. The usefulness of central composite designs, the subspace sizing, and the practicality of fitting low-order response functions over a partitioned inference space dominated by highly nonlinear and possibly discontinuous shock-induced aerodynamics are discussed.

  1. Estimation of Supersonic Stage Separation Aerodynamics of Winged-Body Launch Vehicles Using Response Surface Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Response surface methodology was used to estimate the longitudinal stage separation aerodynamic characteristics of a generic, bimese, winged multi-stage launch vehicle configuration at supersonic speeds in the NASA LaRC Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The Mach 3 staging was dominated by shock wave interactions between the orbiter and booster vehicles throughout the relative spatial locations of interest. The inference space was partitioned into several contiguous regions within which the separation aerodynamics were presumed to be well-behaved and estimable using central composite designs capable of fitting full second-order response functions. The underlying aerodynamic response surfaces of the booster vehicle in belly-to-belly proximity to the orbiter vehicle were estimated using piecewise-continuous lower-order polynomial functions. The quality of fit and prediction capabilities of the empirical models were assessed in detail, and the issue of subspace boundary discontinuities was addressed. Augmenting the central composite designs to full third-order using computer-generated D-optimality criteria was evaluated. The usefulness of central composite designs, the subspace sizing, and the practicality of fitting lower-order response functions over a partitioned inference space dominated by highly nonlinear and possibly discontinuous shock-induced aerodynamics are discussed.

  2. Plasma Flowfields Around Low Earth Orbit Objects: Aerodynamics to Underpin Orbit Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capon, Christopher; Boyce, Russell; Brown, Melrose

    2016-07-01

    Interactions between orbiting bodies and the charged space environment are complex. The large variation in passive body parameters e.g. size, geometry and materials, makes the plasma-body interaction in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) a region rich in fundamental physical phenomena. The aerodynamic interaction of LEO orbiting bodies with the neutral environment constitutes the largest non-conservative force on the body. However in general, study of the LEO plasma-body interaction has not been concerned with external flow physics, but rather with the effects on surface charging. The impact of ionospheric flow physics on the forces on space debris (and active objects) is not well understood. The work presented here investigates the contribution that plasma-body interactions have on the flow structure and hence on the total atmospheric force vector experienced by a polar orbiting LEO body. This work applies a hybrid Particle-in-Cell (PIC) - Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code, pdFoam, to self-consistently model the electrostatic flowfield about a cylinder with a uniform, fixed surface potential. Flow conditions are representative of the mean conditions experienced by the Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) based on the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI-86). The electron distribution function is represented by a non-linear Boltzmann electron fluid and ion gas-surface interactions are assumed to be that of a neutralising, conducting, thermally accommodating solid wall with diffuse reflections. The variation in flowfield and aerodynamic properties with surface potential at a fixed flow condition is investigated, and insight into the relative contributions of charged and neutral species to the flow physics experienced by a LEO orbiting body is provided. This in turn is intended to help improve the fidelity of physics-based orbit predictions for space debris and other near-Earth space objects.

  3. Motor degradation prediction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor`s duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures.

  4. Experimental Aerodynamic Characteristics of the Pegasus Air-Launched Booster and Comparisons with Predicted and Flight Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhode, M. N.; Engelund, Walter C.; Mendenhall, Michael R.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics were obtained for the Pegasus and Pegasus XL configurations over a Mach number range from 1.6 to 6 and angles of attack from -4 to +24 degrees. Angle of sideslip was varied from -6 to +6 degrees, and control surfaces were deflected to obtain elevon, aileron, and rudder effectiveness. Experimental data for the Pegasus configuration are compared with engineering code predictions performed by Nielsen Engineering & Research, Inc. (NEAR) in the aerodynamic design of the Pegasus vehicle, and with results from the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System (APAS) code. Comparisons of experimental results are also made with longitudinal flight data from Flight #2 of the Pegasus vehicle. Results show that the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of the Pegasus and Pegasus XL configurations are similar, having the same lift-curve slope and drag levels across the Mach number range. Both configurations are longitudinally stable, with stability decreasing towards neutral levels as Mach number increases. Directional stability is negative at moderate to high angles of attack due to separated flow over the vertical tail. Dihedral effect is positive for both configurations, but is reduced 30-50 percent for the Pegasus XL configuration because of the horizontal tail anhedral. Predicted longitudinal characteristics and both longitudinal and lateral-directional control effectiveness are generally in good agreement with experiment. Due to the complex leeside flowfield, lateral-directional characteristics are not as well predicted by the engineering codes. Experiment and flight data are in good agreement across the Mach number range.

  5. Aerodynamic investigation of an air-cooled axial-flow turbine. Part 2: Rotor blade tip-clearance effects on overall turbine performance and internal gas flow conditions: Experimental results and prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, A.; Takahara, K.; Nouse, H.; Mimura, F.; Inoue, S.; Usui, H.

    1977-01-01

    Total turbine blade performance was investigated while changing the blade tip clearance in three ways. The internal flow at the moving blade outlet point was measured. Experimental results were compared with various theoretical methods. Increased blade clearance leads to decreased turbine efficiency.

  6. Unsteady aerodynamic simulation of multiple bodies in relative motion: A prototype method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    A prototype method for time-accurate simulation of multiple aerodynamic bodies in relative motion is presented. The method is general and features unsteady chimera domain decomposition techniques and an implicit approximately factored finite-difference procedure to solve the time-dependent thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. The method is applied to a set of two- and three- dimensional test problems to establish spatial and temporal accuracy, quantify computational efficiency, and begin to test overall code robustness.

  7. Special methods for aerodynamic-moment calculations from parachute FSI modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.; Boswell, Cody; Tsutsui, Yuki; Montel, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    The space-time fluid-structure interaction (STFSI) methods for 3D parachute modeling are now at a level where they can bring reliable, practical analysis to some of the most complex parachute systems, such as spacecraft parachutes. The methods include the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized ST method as the core computational technology, and a good number of special FSI methods targeting parachutes. Evaluating the stability characteristics of a parachute based on how the aerodynamic moment varies as a function of the angle of attack is one of the practical analyses that reliable parachute FSI modeling can deliver. We describe the special FSI methods we developed for this specific purpose and present the aerodynamic-moment data obtained from FSI modeling of NASA Orion spacecraft parachutes and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) subscale parachutes.

  8. Implementation of a multiblock sensitivity analysis method in numerical aerodynamic shape optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacasse, James M.

    1995-01-01

    A multiblock sensitivity analysis method is applied in a numerical aerodynamic shape optimization technique. The Sensitivity Analysis Domain Decomposition (SADD) scheme which is implemented in this study was developed to reduce the computer memory requirements resulting from the aerodynamic sensitivity analysis equations. Discrete sensitivity analysis offers the ability to compute quasi-analytical derivatives in a more efficient manner than traditional finite-difference methods, which tend to be computationally expensive and prone to inaccuracies. The direct optimization procedure couples CFD analysis based on the two-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations with a gradient-based numerical optimization technique. The linking mechanism is the sensitivity equation derived from the CFD discretized flow equations, recast in adjoint form, and solved using direct matrix inversion techniques. This investigation is performed to demonstrate an aerodynamic shape optimization technique on a multiblock domain and its applicability to complex geometries. The objectives are accomplished by shape optimizing two aerodynamic configurations. First, the shape optimization of a transonic airfoil is performed to investigate the behavior of the method in highly nonlinear flows and the effect of different grid blocking strategies on the procedure. Secondly, shape optimization of a two-element configuration in subsonic flow is completed. Cases are presented for this configuration to demonstrate the effect of simultaneously reshaping interfering elements. The aerodynamic shape optimization is shown to produce supercritical type airfoils in the transonic flow from an initially symmetric airfoil. Multiblocking effects the path of optimization while providing similar results at the conclusion. Simultaneous reshaping of elements is shown to be more effective than individual element reshaping due to the inclusion of mutual interference effects.

  9. The role of unsteady aerodynamics in aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul

    1988-01-01

    The role of acoustics and unsteady aerodynamics research in understanding the fundamental physics of time-dependent fluid phenomena is reviewed. The key issues are illustrated by considering the sound radiation of turbulent jets and the aeroacoustics of rotating bodies such as helicopter rotors. The importance of computational methods as a link between aerodynamics and acoustics is also discussed. It is noted that where acoustic analogy techniques are sufficiently accurate, unsteady aerodynamics can be used for acoustic prediction. In supersonic problems where acoustics and aerodynamics are coupled, an integrated nonlinear analysis can provide an accurate problem solution.

  10. An Efficient Inverse Aerodynamic Design Method For Subsonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milholen, William E., II

    2000-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics based design methods are maturing to the point that they are beginning to be used in the aircraft design process. Many design methods however have demonstrated deficiencies in the leading edge region of airfoil sections. The objective of the present research is to develop an efficient inverse design method which is valid in the leading edge region. The new design method is a streamline curvature method, and a new technique is presented for modeling the variation of the streamline curvature normal to the surface. The new design method allows the surface coordinates to move normal to the surface, and has been incorporated into the Constrained Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (CDISC) design method. The accuracy and efficiency of the design method is demonstrated using both two-dimensional and three-dimensional design cases.

  11. Development of computational methods for unsteady aerodynamics at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. Carson, Jr.; Whitlow, Woodrow, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The current scope, recent progress, and plans for research and development of computational methods for unsteady aerodynamics at the NASA Langley Research Center are reviewed. Both integral equations and finite difference methods for inviscid and viscous flows are discussed. Although the great bulk of the effort has focused on finite difference solution of the transonic small perturbation equation, the integral equation program is given primary emphasis here because it is less well known.

  12. Development of computational methods for unsteady aerodynamics at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. Carson, Jr.; Whitlow, Woodrow, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The current scope, recent progress, and plans for research and development of computational methods for unsteady aerodynamics at the NASA Langley Research Center are reviewed. Both integral-equations and finite-difference method for inviscid and viscous flows are discussed. Although the great bulk of the effort has focused on finite-difference solution of the transonic small-perturbation equation, the integral-equation program is given primary emphasis here because it is less well known.

  13. Application of a one-strip integral method to the unsteady supersonic aerodynamics of an inclined flat surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    The method of integral relations is applied in a one-strip approximation to the perturbation equations governing small motions of an inclined, sharp-edged, flat surface about the mean supersonic steady flow. Algebraic expressions for low reduced-frequency aerodynamics are obtained and a set of ordinary differential equations are obtained for general oscillatory motion. Results are presented for low reduced-frequency aerodynamics and for the variation of the unsteady forces with frequency. The method gives accurate results for the aerodynamic forces at low reduced frequency which are in good agreement with available experimental data. However, for cases in which the aerodynamic forces vary rapidly with frequency, the results are qualitatively correct, but of limited accuracy. Calculations indicate that for a range of inclination angles near shock detachment such that the flow in the shock layer is low supersonic, the aerodynamic forces vary rapidly both with inclination angle and with reduced frequency.

  14. Current status of computational methods for transonic unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelastic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Malone, John B.

    1992-01-01

    The current status of computational methods for unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelasticity is reviewed. The key features of challenging aeroelastic applications are discussed in terms of the flowfield state: low-angle high speed flows and high-angle vortex-dominated flows. The critical role played by viscous effects in determining aeroelastic stability for conditions of incipient flow separation is stressed. The need for a variety of flow modeling tools, from linear formulations to implementations of the Navier-Stokes equations, is emphasized. Estimates of computer run times for flutter calculations using several computational methods are given. Applications of these methods for unsteady aerodynamic and transonic flutter calculations for airfoils, wings, and configurations are summarized. Finally, recommendations are made concerning future research directions.

  15. Preliminary Structural Sensitivity Study of Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Using Probabilistic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Acceptance of new spacecraft structural architectures and concepts requires validated design methods to minimize the expense involved with technology validation via flighttesting. This paper explores the implementation of probabilistic methods in the sensitivity analysis of the structural response of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD). HIAD architectures are attractive for spacecraft deceleration because they are lightweight, store compactly, and utilize the atmosphere to decelerate a spacecraft during re-entry. However, designers are hesitant to include these inflatable approaches for large payloads or spacecraft because of the lack of flight validation. In the example presented here, the structural parameters of an existing HIAD model have been varied to illustrate the design approach utilizing uncertainty-based methods. Surrogate models have been used to reduce computational expense several orders of magnitude. The suitability of the design is based on assessing variation in the resulting cone angle. The acceptable cone angle variation would rely on the aerodynamic requirements.

  16. Current status of computational methods for transonic unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelastic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Malone, John B.

    1992-01-01

    The status of computational methods for unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelasticity is reviewed. The key features of challenging aeroelastic applications is discussed in terms of the flowfield state - low angle high speed flows and high angle vortex dominated flows. The critical role played by viscous effects in determining aeroelastic stability for conditions of incipient flow separation is stressed. The need for a variety of flow modeling tools, from linear formulations to implementations of the Navier-Stokes equations, is emphasized. Estimates of computer run times for flutter calculations using several computational methods are given. Applications of these methods for unsteady aerodynamic and transonic flutter calculations for airfoils, wings, and configurations are summarized. Finally, recommendations are made concerning future research directions.

  17. Current status of computational methods for transonic unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelastic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.; Malone, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The current status of computational methods for unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelasticity is reviewed. The key features of challenging aeroelastic applications are discussed in terms of the flowfield state: low-angle high speed flows and high-angle vortex-dominated flows. The critical role played by viscous effects in determining aeroelastic stability for conditions of incipient flow separation is stressed. The need for a variety of flow modeling tools, from linear formulations to implementations of the Navier-Stokes equations, is emphasized. Estimates of computer run times for flutter calculations using several computational methods are given. Application of these methods for unsteady aerodynamic and transonic flutter calculations for airfoils, wings, and configurations are summarized. Finally, recommendations are made concerning future research directions.

  18. Aerodynamic flow simulation using a pressure-based method and a two-equation turbulence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Y. G. J.; Przekwas, A. J.; So, R. M. C.

    1993-07-01

    In the past, most aerodynamic flow calculations were carried out with density-based numerical methods and zero-equation turbulence models. However, pressure-based methods and more advanced turbulence models have been routinely used in industry for many internal flow simulations and for incompressible flows. Unfortunately, their usefulness in calculating aerodynamic flows is still not well demonstrated and accepted. In this study, an advanced pressure-based numerical method and a recently proposed near-wall compressible two-equation turbulence model are used to calculate external aerodynamic flows. Several TVD-type schemes are extended to pressure-based method to better capture discontinuities such as shocks. Some improvements are proposed to accelerate the convergence of the numerical method. A compressible near-wall two-equation turbulence model is then implemented to calculate transonic turbulent flows over NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoils with and without shocks. The calculated results are compared with wind tunnel data as well as with results obtained from the Baldwin-Lomax model. The performance of the two-equation turbulence model is evaluated and its merits or lack thereof are discussed.

  19. Computational methods of robust controller design for aerodynamic flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The development of Riccati iteration, a tool for the design and analysis of linear control systems is examined. First, Riccati iteration is applied to the problem of pole placement and order reduction in two-time scale control systems. Order reduction, yielding a good approximation to the original system, is demonstrated using a 16th order linear model of a turbofan engine. Next, a numerical method for solving the Riccati equation is presented and demonstrated for a set of eighth order random examples. A literature review of robust controller design methods follows which includes a number of methods for reducing the trajectory and performance index sensitivity in linear regulators. Lastly, robust controller design for large parameter variations is discussed.

  20. Application of smoothed particle hydrodynamics method in aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortina, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshless Lagrangian method in which the domain is represented by particles. Each particle is assigned properties such as mass, pressure, density, temperature, and velocity. These properties are then evaluated at the particle positions using a smoothing kernel that integrates over the values of the surrounding particles. In the present study the SPH method is first used to obtain numerical solutions for fluid flows over a cylinder and then we are going to apply the same principle over an airfoil obstacle.

  1. The research progress on Hodograph Method of aerodynamic design at Tsinghua University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zuoyi; Guo, Jingrong

    1991-01-01

    Progress in the use of the Hodograph method of aerodynamic design is discussed. It was found that there are some restricted conditions in the application of Hodograph design to transonic turbine and compressor cascades. The Hodograph method is suitable not only to the transonic turbine cascade but also to the transonic compressor cascade. The three dimensional Hodograph method will be developed after obtaining the basic equation for the three dimensional Hodograph method. As an example of the Hodograph method, the use of the method to design a transonic turbine and compressor cascade is discussed.

  2. A Navier-Stokes analysis of airfoils in oscillating transonic cascades for the prediction of aerodynamic damping

    SciTech Connect

    Abhari, R.S.; Giles, M.

    1997-01-01

    An unsteady, compressible, two-dimensional, thin shear layer Navier-Stokes solver is modified to predict the motion-dependent unsteady flow around oscillating airfoils in a cascade. A quasi-three-dimensional formulation is used to account for the stream-wise variation of streamtube height. The code uses Ni`s Lax-Wendroff algorithm in the outer region an implicit ADI method in the inner region, conservative coupling at the interface, and the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model. The computational mesh consists of an O-grid around each blade plus an unstructured outer grid of quadrilateral or triangular cells. The unstructured computational grid was adapted to the flow to better resolve shocks and wakes. Motion of each airfoil was simulated at each time step by stretching and compressing the mesh within the O-grid. This imposed motion consists of harmonic solid body translation in two directions and rotation, combined with the correct interblade phase angles. The validity of the code is illustrated by comparing its predictions to a number of test cases, including an axially oscillating flat plate in laminar flow, the Aeroelasticity of Turbomachines Symposium Fourth Standard Configuration (a transonic turbine cascade), and the Seventh Standard Configuration (a transonic compressor cascade). The overall comparison between the predictions and the test data is reasonably good. A numerical study on a generic transonic compressor rotor was performed in which the impact of varying the amplitude of the airfoil oscillation on the normalized predicted magnitude and phase of the unsteady pressure around the airfoil was studied. It was observed that for this transonic compressor, the nondimensional aerodynamic damping was influenced by the amplitude of the oscillation.

  3. An initial investigation into methods of computing transonic aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1994-01-01

    The primary accomplishments of the project are as follows: (1) Using the transonic small perturbation equation as a flowfield model, the project demonstrated that the quasi-analytical method could be used to obtain aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients for airfoils at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic conditions for design variables such as Mach number, airfoil thickness, maximum camber, angle of attack, and location of maximum camber. It was established that the quasi-analytical approach was an accurate method for obtaining aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives for airfoils at transonic conditions and usually more efficient than the finite difference approach. (2) The usage of symbolic manipulation software to determine the appropriate expressions and computer coding associated with the quasi-analytical method for sensitivity derivatives was investigated. Using the three dimensional fully conservative full potential flowfield model, it was determined that symbolic manipulation along with a chain rule approach was extremely useful in developing a combined flowfield and quasi-analytical sensitivity derivative code capable of considering a large number of realistic design variables. (3) Using the three dimensional fully conservative full potential flowfield model, the quasi-analytical method was applied to swept wings (i.e. three dimensional) at transonic flow conditions. (4) The incremental iterative technique has been applied to the three dimensional transonic nonlinear small perturbation flowfield formulation, an equivalent plate deflection model, and the associated aerodynamic and structural discipline sensitivity equations; and coupled aeroelastic results for an aspect ratio three wing in transonic flow have been obtained.

  4. Development of unstructured grid methods for steady and unsteady aerodynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1990-01-01

    The current status of the development of unstructured grid methods in the Unsteady Aerodynamics Branch at NASA-Langley is described. These methods are being developed for steady and unsteady aerodynamic applications. The flow solvers that were developed for the solution of the unsteady Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are highlighted and selected results are given which demonstrate various features of the capability. The results demonstrate 2-D and 3-D applications for both steady and unsteady flows. Comparisons are also made with solutions obtained using a structured grid code and with experimental data to determine the accuracy of the unstructured grid methodology. These comparisons show good agreement which thus verifies the accuracy.

  5. Development of unstructured grid methods for steady and unsteady aerodynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1990-01-01

    The current status of the development of unstructured grid methods in the Unsteady Aerodynamic Branch at NASA-Langley is described. These methods are being developed for steady and unsteady aerodynamic applications. The flow solvers that were developed for the solution of the unsteady Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are highlighted and selected results are given which demonstrate various features of the capability. The results demonstrate 2-D and 3-D applications for both steady and unsteady flows. Comparisons are also made with solutions obtained using a structured grid code and with experimental data to determine the accuracy of the unstructured grid methodology. These comparisons show good agreement which thus verifies the accuracy.

  6. An Euler aerodynamic method for leading-edge vortex flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, P.; Long, L. N.

    1986-01-01

    The current capabilities and the future plans for a three dimensional Euler Aerodynamic Method are described. The basic solution algorithm is based on the finite volume, Runge-Kutta pseudo-time-stepping scheme of FLO-57. Several modifications to improve accuracy and computational efficiency were incorporated and others are being investigated. The computer code is used to analyze a cropped delta wing at 0.6 Mach number and an arrow wing at 0.85 Mach number. Computed aerodynamic parameters are compared with experimental data. In all cases, the configuration is impulsively started and no Kutta condition is applied at sharp edges. The results indicate that with additional development and validation, the present method will be a useful tool for engineering analysis of high speed aircraft.

  7. Prediction of static aerodynamic characteristics for slender bodies alone and with lifting surfaces to very high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, L. H.

    1977-01-01

    An engineering-type method is presented for computing normal-force and pitching-moment coefficients for slender bodies of circular and noncircular cross section alone and with lifting surfaces. In this method, a semi-empirical term representing viscous-separation crossflow is added to a term representing potential-theory crossflow. For many bodies of revolution, computed aerodynamic characteristics are shown to agree with measured results for investigated free-stream Mach numbers from 0.6 to 2.9. The angles of attack extend from 0 deg to 180 deg for M = 2.9 from 0 deg to 60 deg for M = 0.6 to 2.0. For several bodies of elliptic cross section, measured results are also predicted reasonably well over the investigated Mach number range from 0.6 to 2.0 and at angles of attack from 0 deg to 60 deg. As for the bodies of revolution, the predictions are best for supersonic Mach numbers. For body-wing and body-wing-tail configurations with wings of aspect ratios 3 and 4, measured normal-force coefficients and centers are predicted reasonably well at the upper test Mach number of 2.0. Vapor-screen and oil-flow pictures are shown for many body, body-wing and body-wing-tail configurations. When spearation and vortex patterns are asymmetric, undesirable side forces are measured for the models even at zero sideslip angle. Generally, the side-force coefficients decrease or vanish with the following: increase in Mach number, decrease in nose fineness ratio, change from sharp to blunt nose, and flattening of body cross section (particularly the body nose).

  8. Prediction of static aerodynamic characteristics for slender bodies alone and with lifting surfaces to very high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, L. H.

    1976-01-01

    An engineering-type method is presented for computing normal-force and pitching-moment coefficients for slender bodies of circular and noncircular cross section alone and with lifting surfaces. In this method, a semi-empirical term representing viscous-separation crossflow is added to a term representing potential-theory crossflow. For many bodies of revolution, computed aerodynamic characteristics are shown to agree with measured results for investigated free-stream Mach numbers from 0.6 to 2.9. For several bodies of elliptic cross section, measured results are also predicted reasonably well over the investigated Mach number range from 0.6 to 2.0 and at angles of attack from 0 to 60 deg. As for the bodies of revolution, the predictions are best for supersonic Mach numbers. For body-wing and body-wing-tail configurations with wings of aspect ratios 3 and 4, measured normal-force coefficients and centers are predicted reasonably well at the upper test Mach number of 2.0. However, with a decrease in Mach number to 0.6, the agreement for C sub N rapidly deteriorates, although the normal-force centers remain in close agreement. Vapor-screen and oil-flow pictures are shown for many body, body-wing, and body-wing-tail configurations. When separation and vortex patterns are asymmetric, undesirable side forces are measured for the models even at zero sideslip angle. Generally, the side-force coefficients decrease or vanish with the following: increase in Mach number, decrease in nose fineness ratio, change from sharp to blunt nose, and flattening of body cross section (particularly the body nose).

  9. Aeroheating and Aerodynamic CFD Validation And Prediction for The X-38 Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, Mark P.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Davies, Carol B.; Berry, Scott; Horvath, Tom; Campbell, Charles

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a computational fluid dynamics validation exercise using the General Aerodynamic Simulation Program (GASP) code for vehicles under consideration for the X-38 program. The scope of the exercise involved simulation and comparison with wind tunnel aeroheating and aerodynamic data in the hypersonic regime. In addition, simulations were performed and results are presented for the full-scale flight vehicle along an expected re- entry trajectory.

  10. Spectral methods and their implementation to solution of aerodynamic and fluid mechanic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streett, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    Fundamental concepts underlying spectral collocation methods, especially pertaining to their use in the solution of partial differential equations, are outlined. Theoretical accuracy results are reviewed and compared with results from test problems. A number of practical aspects of the construction and use of spectral methods are detailed, along with several solution schemes which have found utility in applications of spectral methods to practical problems. Results from a few of the successful applications of spectral methods to problems of aerodynamic and fluid mechanic interest are then outlined, followed by a discussion of the problem areas in spectral methods and the current research under way to overcome these difficulties.

  11. A program to compute three-dimensional subsonic unsteady aerodynamic characteristics using the doublet lattice method, L216 (DUBFLEX). Volume 2: Supplemental system design and maintenance document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, B. A.; Richard, M.

    1979-01-01

    The information necessary for execution of the digital computer program L216 on the CDC 6600 is described. L216 characteristics are based on the doublet lattice method. Arbitrary aerodynamic configurations may be represented with combinations of nonplanar lifting surfaces composed of finite constant pressure panel elements, and axially summetric slender bodies composed of constant pressure line elements. Program input consists of configuration geometry, aerodynamic parameters, and modal data; output includes element geometry, pressure difference distributions, integrated aerodynamic coefficients, stability derivatives, generalized aerodynamic forces, and aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices. Optionally, modal data may be input on magnetic field (tape or disk), and certain geometric and aerodynamic output may be saved for subsequent use.

  12. AEROX: Computer program for transonic aircraft aerodynamics to high angles of attack. Volume 1: Aerodynamic methods and program users' guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelson, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The AEROX program estimates lift, induced-drag and pitching moments to high angles (typ. 60 deg) for wings and for wingbody combinations with or without an aft horizontal tail. Minimum drag coefficients are not estimated, but may be input for inclusion in the total aerodynamic parameters which are output in listed and plotted formats. The theory, users' guide, test cases, and program listing are presented.

  13. MIST - MINIMUM-STATE METHOD FOR RATIONAL APPROXIMATION OF UNSTEADY AERODYNAMIC FORCE COEFFICIENT MATRICES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpel, M.

    1994-01-01

    Various control analysis, design, and simulation techniques of aeroservoelastic systems require the equations of motion to be cast in a linear, time-invariant state-space form. In order to account for unsteady aerodynamics, rational function approximations must be obtained to represent them in the first order equations of the state-space formulation. A computer program, MIST, has been developed which determines minimum-state approximations of the coefficient matrices of the unsteady aerodynamic forces. The Minimum-State Method facilitates the design of lower-order control systems, analysis of control system performance, and near real-time simulation of aeroservoelastic phenomena such as the outboard-wing acceleration response to gust velocity. Engineers using this program will be able to calculate minimum-state rational approximations of the generalized unsteady aerodynamic forces. Using the Minimum-State formulation of the state-space equations, they will be able to obtain state-space models with good open-loop characteristics while reducing the number of aerodynamic equations by an order of magnitude more than traditional approaches. These low-order state-space mathematical models are good for design and simulation of aeroservoelastic systems. The computer program, MIST, accepts tabular values of the generalized aerodynamic forces over a set of reduced frequencies. It then determines approximations to these tabular data in the LaPlace domain using rational functions. MIST provides the capability to select the denominator coefficients in the rational approximations, to selectably constrain the approximations without increasing the problem size, and to determine and emphasize critical frequency ranges in determining the approximations. MIST has been written to allow two types data weighting options. The first weighting is a traditional normalization of the aerodynamic data to the maximum unit value of each aerodynamic coefficient. The second allows weighting the

  14. Supersonic airplane design optimization method for aerodynamic performance and low sonic boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson H.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for the optimization of supersonic airplane designs to meet the dual design objectives of low sonic boom and high aerodynamic performance. Two sets of design parameters are used on an existing High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration to maximize the aerodynamic performance and minimize the sonic boom under the flight track. One set of the parameters perturbs the camber line of the wing sections to maximize the lift-over-drag ratio (L/D). A preliminary optimization run yielded a 3.75 percent improvement in L/D over a baseline low-boom configuration. The other set of parameters modifies the fuselage area to achieve a target F-function. Starting from an initial configuration with strong bow, wing, and tail shocks, a modified design with a flat-top signature is obtained. The methods presented can easily incorporate other design variables and objective functions. Extensions to the present capability in progress are described.

  15. Prediction of dynamic and aerodynamic characteristics of the centrifugal fan with forward curved blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanský, Jiří; Kalmár, László; Gášpár, Roman

    2013-12-01

    The main aim of this paper is determine the centrifugal fan with forward curved blades aerodynamic characteristics based on numerical modeling. Three variants of geometry were investigated. The first, basic "A" variant contains 12 blades. The geometry of second "B" variant contains 12 blades and 12 semi-blades with optimal length [1]. The third, control variant "C" contains 24 blades without semi-blades. Numerical calculations were performed by CFD Ansys. Another aim of this paper is to compare results of the numerical simulation with results of approximate numerical procedure. Applied approximate numerical procedure [2] is designated to determine characteristics of the turbulent flow in the bladed space of a centrifugal-flow fan impeller. This numerical method is an extension of the hydro-dynamical cascade theory for incompressible and inviscid fluid flow. Paper also partially compares results from the numerical simulation and results from the experimental investigation. Acoustic phenomena observed during experiment, during numerical simulation manifested as deterioration of the calculation stability, residuals oscillation and thus also as a flow field oscillation. Pressure pulsations are evaluated by using frequency analysis for each variant and working condition.

  16. An Efficient Multiblock Method for Aerodynamic Analysis and Design on Distributed Memory Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Alonso, Juan Jose; Vassberg, John C.; Jameson, Antony; Martinelli, Luigi

    1997-01-01

    The work presented in this paper describes the application of a multiblock gridding strategy to the solution of aerodynamic design optimization problems involving complex configurations. The design process is parallelized using the MPI (Message Passing Interface) Standard such that it can be efficiently run on a variety of distributed memory systems ranging from traditional parallel computers to networks of workstations. Substantial improvements to the parallel performance of the baseline method are presented, with particular attention to their impact on the scalability of the program as a function of the mesh size. Drag minimization calculations at a fixed coefficient of lift are presented for a business jet configuration that includes the wing, body, pylon, aft-mounted nacelle, and vertical and horizontal tails. An aerodynamic design optimization is performed with both the Euler and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations governing the flow solution and the results are compared. These sample calculations establish the feasibility of efficient aerodynamic optimization of complete aircraft configurations using the RANS equations as the flow model. There still exists, however, the need for detailed studies of the importance of a true viscous adjoint method which holds the promise of tackling the minimization of not only the wave and induced components of drag, but also the viscous drag.

  17. Aerodynamic interference effects on tilting proprotor aircraft. [using the Green function method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soohoo, P.; Morino, L.; Noll, R. B.; Ham, N. D.

    1977-01-01

    The Green's function method was used to study tilting proprotor aircraft aerodynamics with particular application to the problem of the mutual interference of the wing-fuselage-tail-rotor wake configuration. While the formulation is valid for fully unsteady rotor aerodynamics, attention was directed to steady state aerodynamics, which was achieved by replacing the rotor with the actuator disk approximation. The use of an actuator disk analysis introduced a mathematical singularity into the formulation; this problem was studied and resolved. The pressure distribution, lift, and pitching moment were obtained for an XV-15 wing-fuselage-tail rotor configuration at various flight conditions. For the flight configurations explored, the effects of the rotor wake interference on the XV-15 tilt rotor aircraft yielded a reduction in the total lift and an increase in the nose-down pitching moment. This method provides an analytical capability that is simple to apply and can be used to investigate fuselage-tail rotor wake interference as well as to explore other rotor design problem areas.

  18. Prediction method abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This conference was held December 4--8, 1994 in Asilomar, California. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information concerning the prediction of protein structure. Attention if focused on the following: comparative modeling; sequence to fold assignment; and ab initio folding.

  19. Summary of methods for calculating dynamic lateral stability and response and for estimating aerodynamic stability derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, John P; Mckinney, Marion O

    1952-01-01

    A summary of methods for making dynamic lateral stability and response calculations and for estimating the aerodynamic stability derivatives required for use in these calculations is presented. The processes of performing calculations of the time histories of lateral motions, of the period and damping of these motions, and of the lateral stability boundaries are presented as a series of simple straightforward steps. Existing methods for estimating the stability derivatives are summarized and, in some cases, simple new empirical formulas are presented. Detailed estimation methods are presented for low-subsonic-speed conditions but only a brief discussion and a list of references are given for transonic and supersonic speed conditions.

  20. Development of Improved Surface Integral Methods for Jet Aeroacoustic Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilon, Anthony R.; Lyrintzis, Anastasios S.

    1997-01-01

    The accurate prediction of aerodynamically generated noise has become an important goal over the past decade. Aeroacoustics must now be an integral part of the aircraft design process. The direct calculation of aerodynamically generated noise with CFD-like algorithms is plausible. However, large computer time and memory requirements often make these predictions impractical. It is therefore necessary to separate the aeroacoustics problem into two parts, one in which aerodynamic sound sources are determined, and another in which the propagating sound is calculated. This idea is applied in acoustic analogy methods. However, in the acoustic analogy, the determination of far-field sound requires the solution of a volume integral. This volume integration again leads to impractical computer requirements. An alternative to the volume integrations can be found in the Kirchhoff method. In this method, Green's theorem for the linear wave equation is used to determine sound propagation based on quantities on a surface surrounding the source region. The change from volume to surface integrals represents a tremendous savings in the computer resources required for an accurate prediction. This work is concerned with the development of enhancements of the Kirchhoff method for use in a wide variety of aeroacoustics problems. This enhanced method, the modified Kirchhoff method, is shown to be a Green's function solution of Lighthill's equation. It is also shown rigorously to be identical to the methods of Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings. This allows for development of versatile computer codes which can easily alternate between the different Kirchhoff and Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings formulations, using the most appropriate method for the problem at hand. The modified Kirchhoff method is developed primarily for use in jet aeroacoustics predictions. Applications of the method are shown for two dimensional and three dimensional jet flows. Additionally, the enhancements are generalized so that

  1. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Schairer, Edward; Hicks, Gary; Wander, Stephen; Blankson, Isiaiah; Rose, Raymond; Olson, Lawrence; Unger, George

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a comprehensive review of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation, transition and turbulence physics, numerical aerodynamic simulation, drag reduction, test techniques and instrumentation, configuration aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, aerothermodynamics, hypersonics, subsonic transport/commuter aviation, fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  2. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J.; Hessenius, Kristin A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Hicks, Gary; Richardson, Pamela F.; Unger, George; Neumann, Benjamin; Moss, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The annual accomplishments is reviewed for the Aerodynamics Division during FY 1991. The program includes both fundamental and applied research directed at the full spectrum of aerospace vehicles, from rotorcraft to planetary entry probes. A comprehensive review is presented of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications; CFD validation; transition and turbulence physics; numerical aerodynamic simulation; test techniques and instrumentation; configuration aerodynamics; aeroacoustics; aerothermodynamics; hypersonics; subsonics; fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  3. Recent advances in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh K.; Desse, Jerry E.

    1991-04-01

    The current state of the art in computational aerodynamics is described. Recent advances in the discretization of surface geometry, grid generation, and flow simulation algorithms have led to flowfield predictions for increasingly complex and realistic configurations. As a result, computational aerodynamics is emerging as a crucial enabling technology for the development and design of flight vehicles. Examples illustrating the current capability for the prediction of aircraft, launch vehicle and helicopter flowfields are presented. Unfortunately, accurate modeling of turbulence remains a major difficulty in the analysis of viscosity-dominated flows. In the future inverse design methods, multidisciplinary design optimization methods, artificial intelligence technology and massively parallel computer technology will be incorporated into computational aerodynamics, opening up greater opportunities for improved product design at substantially reduced costs.

  4. Recent advances in Euler and Navier-Stokes methods for calculating helicopter rotor aerodynamics and acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, G. R.; Baeder, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper outlines some recent advances in the application of the Euler and Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics methods to analyze nonlinear problems of helicopter aerodynamics and acoustics. A complete flowfield simulation of helicopters is currently not feasible with these methods. However, the use of the state-of-the-art numerical algorithms in conjunction with powerful supercomputers, like the Cray-2, have enabled notable progress to be made in modeling several individual components of this complex flow in hover and forward flight.

  5. Theoretical and experimental investigation of supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of a twin-fuselage concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. M.; Miller, D. S.; Brentner, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation has been conducted to evaluate the fundamental supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of a generic twin-body model at a Mach number of 2.70. Results show that existing aerodynamic prediction methods are adequate for making preliminary aerodynamic estimates.

  6. Seizure Prediction: Methods

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Paul R.; Myers, Stephen; Geyer, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy, one of the most common neurological diseases, affects over 50 million people worldwide. Epilepsy can have a broad spectrum of debilitating medical and social consequences. Although antiepileptic drugs have helped treat millions of patients, roughly a third of all patients have seizures that are refractory to pharmacological intervention. The evolution of our understanding of this dynamic disease leads to new treatment possibilities. There is great interest in the development of devices that incorporate algorithms capable of detecting early onset of seizures or even predicting them hours before they occur. The lead time provided by these new technologies will allow for new types of interventional treatment. In the near future, seizures may be detected and aborted before physical manifestations begin. In this chapter we discuss the algorithms that make these devices possible and how they have been implemented to date. We also compare and contrast these measures, and review their individual strengths and weaknesses. Finally, we illustrate how these techniques can be combined in a closed-loop seizure prevention system. PMID:22078526

  7. Aerodynamics of Race Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, suspension, road, aerodynamics, and of course the driver. In recent years, however, vehicle aerodynamics gained increased attention, mainly due to the utilization of the negative lift (downforce) principle, yielding several important performance improvements. This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic downforce and how it improves race car performance. After this short introduction various methods to generate downforce such as inverted wings, diffusers, and vortex generators are discussed. Due to the complex geometry of these vehicles, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flows and lifting surface shapes unlike traditional airplane wings. Typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development, are discussed as well. In spite of the tremendous progress of these design tools (due to better instrumentation, communication, and computational power), the fluid dynamic phenomenon is still highly nonlinear, and predicting the effect of a particular modification is not always trouble free. Several examples covering a wide range of vehicle shapes (e.g., from stock cars to open-wheel race cars) are presented to demonstrate this nonlinear nature of the flow field.

  8. Sensitivity analysis in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Information on sensitivity analysis in computational aerodynamics is given in outline, graphical, and chart form. The prediction accuracy if the MCAERO program, a perturbation analysis method, is discussed. A procedure for calculating perturbation matrix, baseline wing paneling for perturbation analysis test cases and applications of an inviscid sensitivity matrix are among the topics covered.

  9. Design of control laws for flutter suppression based on the aerodynamic energy concept and comparisons with other design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1989-01-01

    The aerodynamic energy method is used in this paper to synthesize control laws for NASA's Drone for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing-Aerodynamic Research Wing 1 (DAST-ARW1) mathematical model. The performance of these control laws in terms of closed-loop flutter dynamic pressure, control surface activity, and robustness is compared against other control laws that appear in the literature and relate to the same model. A control law synthesis technique that makes use of the return difference singular values is developed in this paper. it is based on the aerodynamic energy approach and is shown to yield results superior to those given in the literature and based on optimal control theory. Nyquist plots are presented together with a short discussion regarding the relative merits of the minimum singular value as a measure of robustness, compared with the more traditional measure of robustness involving phase and gain margins.

  10. Design of control laws for flutter suppression based on the aerodynamic energy concept and comparisons with other design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, Eli

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic energy method is used to synthesize control laws for NASA's drone for aerodynamic and structural testing-aerodynamic research wing 1 (DAST-ARW1) mathematical model. The performance of these control laws in terms of closed-loop flutter dynamic pressure, control surface activity, and robustness is compared with other control laws that relate to the same model. A control law synthesis technique that makes use of the return difference singular values is developed. It is based on the aerodynamic energy approach and is shown to yield results that are superior to those results given in the literature and are based on optimal control theory. Nyquist plots are presented, together with a short discussion regarding the relative merits of the minimum singular value as a measure of robustness as compared with the more traditional measure involving phase and gain margins.

  11. Methods to Determine the Deformation of the IRVE Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Small resonant targets used in conjunction with a microwave reflectometer to determine the deformation of the Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) during reentry are investigated. The reflectometer measures the distance to the targets and from this the HIAD deformation is determined. The HIAD is used by the Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) which investigates the use of inflatable heat shields for atmospheric reentry. After several different microwave reflectometer systems were analyzed and compared it was determined that the most desirable for this application is the Frequency Doubling Target method.

  12. CAD-Based Aerodynamic Design of Complex Configurations using a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    A modular framework for aerodynamic optimization of complex geometries is developed. By working directly with a parametric CAD system, complex-geometry models are modified nnd tessellated in an automatic fashion. The use of a component-based Cartesian method significantly reduces the demands on the CAD system, and also provides for robust and efficient flowfield analysis. The optimization is controlled using either a genetic or quasi-Newton algorithm. Parallel efficiency of the framework is maintained even when subject to limited CAD resources by dynamically re-allocating the processors of the flow solver. Overall, the resulting framework can explore designs incorporating large shape modifications and changes in topology.

  13. Nonlinear programming extensions to rational function approximation methods for unsteady aerodynamic forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiffany, Sherwood H.; Adams, William M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The approximation of unsteady generalized aerodynamic forces in the equations of motion of a flexible aircraft are discussed. Two methods of formulating these approximations are extended to include the same flexibility in constraining the approximations and the same methodology in optimizing nonlinear parameters as another currently used extended least-squares method. Optimal selection of nonlinear parameters is made in each of the three methods by use of the same nonlinear, nongradient optimizer. The objective of the nonlinear optimization is to obtain rational approximations to the unsteady aerodynamics whose state-space realization is lower order than that required when no optimization of the nonlinear terms is performed. The free linear parameters are determined using the least-squares matrix techniques of a Lagrange multiplier formulation of an objective function which incorporates selected linear equality constraints. State-space mathematical models resulting from different approaches are described and results are presented that show comparative evaluations from application of each of the extended methods to a numerical example.

  14. New technology in turbine aerodynamics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Cursory review of some recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flowfields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

  15. A review of steps taken to create an international virtual laboratory at NASA Langley for aerodynamic prediction and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamar, John E.; Cronin, Catherine K.; Scott, Laura E.

    2004-04-01

    A review of the steps taken to establish an international virtual laboratory (VL) at the NASA Langley Research Center for aerodynamic prediction and comparison of flight data in the post-09/11/2001 cyber-terrorist environment is detailed here. The key features of the VL include an intuitive, web-based user interface for ease of access, a secure high-speed Internet connection between browser and server, a relational database architecture for data and information search, and a secure file-storage system. The detailed planning and handling of such issues as security, computer firewall access and legal protection of data are provided.

  16. Study of aerodynamic technology for single-cruise-engine V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, J. R.; Bear, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A viable, single engine, supersonic V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft concept was defined. This vectored thrust, canard wing configuration utilizes an advanced technology separated flow engine with fan stream burning. The aerodynamic characteristics of this configuration were estimated and performance evaluated. Significant aerodynamic and aerodynamic propulsion interaction uncertainties requiring additional investigation were identified. A wind tunnel model concept and test program to resolve these uncertainties and validate the aerodynamic prediction methods were defined.

  17. Aerodynamic derivatives of a cone with a semi-apex angle 20° at supersonic velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamov, N. P.; Kharitonov, A. M.; Chasovnikov, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    The paper deals with an experimental study of stationary and nonstationary aerodynamic characteristics of a circular cone in the range of Mach numbers 1.75-7. The experimental equipment and the method of determining the aerodynamic characteristics are briefly described. The integral aerodynamic characteristics of the model in tests with force measurements and the aerodynamic derivatives of the pitching moment in dynamic tests on a setup with free oscillations are obtained. The experimental data are compared with numerical predictions.

  18. Predicted Aerodynamic Characteristics of a NACA 0015 Airfoil Having a 25% Integral-Type Trailing Edge Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, Ahmed

    1999-01-01

    Using the two-dimensional ARC2D Navier-Stokes flow solver analyses were conducted to predict the sectional aerodynamic characteristics of the flapped NACA-0015 airfoil section. To facilitate the analyses and the generation of the computational grids, the airfoil with the deflected trailing edge flap was treated as a single element airfoil with no allowance for a gap between the flap's leading edge and the base of the forward portion of the airfoil. Generation of the O-type computational grids was accomplished using the HYGRID hyperbolic grid generation program. Results were obtained for a wide range of Mach numbers, angles of attack and flap deflections. The predicted sectional lift, drag and pitching moment values for the airfoil were then cast in tabular format (C81) to be used in lifting-line helicopter rotor aerodynamic performance calculations. Similar were also generated for the flap. Mathematical expressions providing the variation of the sectional lift and pitching moment coefficients for the airfoil and for the flap as a function of flap chord length and flap deflection angle were derived within the context of thin airfoil theory. The airfoil's sectional drag coefficient were derived using the ARC2D drag predictions for equivalent two dimensional flow conditions.

  19. A New Formulation of the Filter-Error Method for Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation in Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2015-01-01

    A new formulation of the filter-error method for estimating aerodynamic parameters in nonlinear aircraft dynamic models during turbulence was developed and demonstrated. The approach uses an estimate of the measurement noise covariance to identify the model parameters, their uncertainties, and the process noise covariance, in a relaxation method analogous to the output-error method. Prior information on the model parameters and uncertainties can be supplied, and a post-estimation correction to the uncertainty was included to account for colored residuals not considered in the theory. No tuning parameters, needing adjustment by the analyst, are used in the estimation. The method was demonstrated in simulation using the NASA Generic Transport Model, then applied to the subscale T-2 jet-engine transport aircraft flight. Modeling results in different levels of turbulence were compared with results from time-domain output error and frequency- domain equation error methods to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  20. Convergence characteristics of nonlinear vortex-lattice methods for configuration aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Rusak, Z.; Wasserstrom, E.

    1983-01-01

    Nonlinear panel methods have no proof for the existence and uniqueness of their solutions. The convergence characteristics of an iterative, nonlinear vortex-lattice method are, therefore, carefully investigated. The effects of several parameters, including (1) the surface-paneling method, (2) an integration method of the trajectories of the wake vortices, (3) vortex-grid refinement, and (4) the initial conditions for the first iteration on the computed aerodynamic coefficients and on the flow-field details are presented. The convergence of the iterative-solution procedure is usually rapid. The solution converges with grid refinement to a constant value, but the final value is not unique and varies with the wing surface-paneling and wake-discretization methods within some range in the vicinity of the experimental result.

  1. Simplified sonic-boom prediction. [using aerodynamic configuration charts and calculators or slide rules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.

    1978-01-01

    Sonic boom overpressures and signature duration may be predicted for the entire affected ground area for a wide variety of supersonic airplane configurations and spacecraft operating at altitudes up to 76 km in level flight or in moderate climbing or descending flight paths. The outlined procedure relies to a great extent on the use of charts to provide generation and propagation factors for use in relatively simple expressions for signature calculation. Computational requirements can be met by hand-held scientific calculators, or even by slide rules. A variety of correlations of predicted and measured sonic-boom data for airplanes and spacecraft serve to demonstrate the applicability of the simplified method.

  2. Measured and predicted aerodynamic coefficients and shock shapes for Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Two scaled models of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle were tested in two air wind tunnels and one CF4 tunnel. The tests were to determine the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics, and shock shapes for the configuration in hypersonic continuum flow. The tests were conducted with a range of angle of attack to evaluate the effects of Mach number, Reynolds numbers, and normal shock density ratio.

  3. Development of an Innovative Algorithm for Aerodynamics-Structure Interaction Using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Ren-Wei; Shyy, Wei; Yu, Da-Zhi; Luo, Li-Shi; Rudy, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) is a kinetic formulation which offers an alternative computational method capable of solving fluid dynamics for various systems. Major advantages of the method are owing to the fact that the solution for the particle distribution functions is explicit, easy to implement, and the algorithm is natural to parallelize. In this final report, we summarize the works accomplished in the past three years. Since most works have been published, the technical details can be found in the literature. Brief summary will be provided in this report. In this project, a second-order accurate treatment of boundary condition in the LBE method is developed for a curved boundary and tested successfully in various 2-D and 3-D configurations. To evaluate the aerodynamic force on a body in the context of LBE method, several force evaluation schemes have been investigated. A simple momentum exchange method is shown to give reliable and accurate values for the force on a body in both 2-D and 3-D cases. Various 3-D LBE models have been assessed in terms of efficiency, accuracy, and robustness. In general, accurate 3-D results can be obtained using LBE methods. The 3-D 19-bit model is found to be the best one among the 15-bit, 19-bit, and 27-bit LBE models. To achieve desired grid resolution and to accommodate the far field boundary conditions in aerodynamics computations, a multi-block LBE method is developed by dividing the flow field into various blocks each having constant lattice spacing. Substantial contribution to the LBE method is also made through the development of a new, generalized lattice Boltzmann equation constructed in the moment space in order to improve the computational stability, detailed theoretical analysis on the stability, dispersion, and dissipation characteristics of the LBE method, and computational studies of high Reynolds number flows with singular gradients. Finally, a finite difference-based lattice Boltzmann method is

  4. Reduction of computer usage costs in predicting unsteady aerodynamic loadings caused by control surface motions: Analysis and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, W. S.; Sebastian, J. D.; Petrarca, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Results of theoretical and numerical investigations conducted to develop economical computing procedures were applied to an existing computer program that predicts unsteady aerodynamic loadings caused by leading and trailing edge control surface motions in subsonic compressible flow. Large reductions in computing costs were achieved by removing the spanwise singularity of the downwash integrand and evaluating its effect separately in closed form. Additional reductions were obtained by modifying the incremental pressure term that account for downwash singularities at control surface edges. Accuracy of theoretical predictions of unsteady loading at high reduced frequencies was increased by applying new pressure expressions that exactly satisified the high frequency boundary conditions of an oscillating control surface. Comparative computer result indicated that the revised procedures provide more accurate predictions of unsteady loadings as well as providing reduction of 50 to 80 percent in computer usage costs.

  5. Direct method for the design of optimal three-dimensional aerodynamic shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakova, N. P.; Kraiko, A. A.; P'yankov, K. S.

    2012-11-01

    A direct optimization method for a broad class of three-dimensional aerodynamic shapes based on the approximation of the desired geometry by Bernstein-Bézier surfaces is developed. The high efficiency of the method is demonstrated by applying it to the design of an optimal supersonic section of an axisymmetric maximum-thrust de Laval nozzle. The method is also tested as applied to the design of a three-dimensional supersonic nozzle section in a dense multi-nozzle setup. In addition to three-dimensional supersonic nozzle sections with a circular throat, nozzles with a varying throat shape are considered. The results suggest that the method can be applied to various problems of 3D shape optimization.

  6. A method of infrared imaging missile's aerodynamic heating modeling and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chunqin; Xiang, Jingbo; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Wang, Weiqiang

    2013-09-01

    The infrared (IR) imaging missile's dome will be heated when fly at high speed in the atmosphere because of the friction of the air flow blocking. The detector's performance will be decline if the dome surface is heated to a certain temperature. In this paper, we find a right way to evaluate the aerothermal effects in the imaging and information processing algorithm. Which have three steps including the aerothermal radiation calculation, quantization and image reconstruction. Firstly, the aerothermal radiation is calculated by using a combination of both methods of theoretical analysis and experiment data. Secondly, the relationship between aerothermal radiation and IR images background mean gray and noise can be calculated through the analysis of the experiment data. At last, we can rebuild an aerodynamic heating effect of infrared images fusion with target and decoy, which can be used for virtual prototyping platform missile trajectory simulation. It can be found that the above constructed images have good agreements with the actual image according to comparison between the simulation data and experiment data. It is an economic method that can solve the lab aerodynamic heating simulation and modeling problems.

  7. Computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack

    DOEpatents

    Gard, Eric; Riot, Vincent; Coffee, Keith; Woods, Bruce; Tobias, Herbert; Birch, Jim; Weisgraber, Todd

    2011-11-22

    A computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack, using input from a designer related to, for example, particle size range to be considered, characteristics of the gas to be flowed through the system, the upstream temperature and pressure at the top of a first focusing lens, the flow rate through the aerodynamic focusing lens stack equivalent at atmosphere pressure; and a Stokes number range. Based on the design parameters, the method and system determines the total number of focusing lenses and their respective orifice diameters required to focus the particle size range to be considered, by first calculating for the orifice diameter of the first focusing lens in the Stokes formula, and then using that value to determine, in iterative fashion, intermediate flow values which are themselves used to determine the orifice diameters of each succeeding focusing lens in the stack design, with the results being output to a designer. In addition, the Reynolds numbers associated with each focusing lens as well as exit nozzle size may also be determined to enhance the stack design.

  8. Determination of aerodynamic parameters of urban surfaces: methods and results revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, A. F.; Zaki, S. A.; Hagishima, A.; Ali, M. S. M.

    2015-11-01

    Estimates of aerodynamic parameters, in particular roughness length z 0 and displacement height d, are important for the analysis of the roughness of an urban surface, which affects processes that occur within the urban boundary layer such as pollutant dispersion and urban ventilation. Findings regarding the aerodynamic effects of various configurations of urban arrays were compiled from various studies. Several experimental, numerical and semi-empirical studies to estimate z 0 and d were reviewed and compared with each other. The results can be summarized as follows: (1) the influence of the frontal area index ( λ f ) on z 0 is significant and their relationship has been confirmed by both experimental and numerical data; (2) compared to one-parameter and two-parameter fitting methods, the three-parameter fitting method is the least accurate; (3) the physical meaning of d remains vague because its definition as the height where surface drag acts may not be accurate for sharp-edged roughness blocks and (4) the peak values of z 0 for uniform and heterogeneous block heights indicate presence of skimming or wake-interference flow effects, which may influence surface roughness. Finally, the semi-empirical models were found to be limited to cases derived from available experimental data, which normally involve uniform arrays of cubes.

  9. Aerodynamic analysis of Pegasus - Computations vs reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, Michael R.; Lesieutre, Daniel J.; Whittaker, C. H.; Curry, Robert E.; Moulton, Bryan

    1993-01-01

    Pegasus, a three-stage, air-launched, winged space booster was developed to provide fast and efficient commercial launch services for small satellites. The aerodynamic design and analysis of Pegasus was conducted without benefit of wind tunnel tests using only computational aerodynamic and fluid dynamic methods. Flight test data from the first two operational flights of Pegasus are now available, and they provide an opportunity to validate the accuracy of the predicted pre-flight aerodynamic characteristics. Comparisons of measured and predicted flight characteristics are presented and discussed. Results show that the computational methods provide reasonable aerodynamic design information with acceptable margins. Post-flight analyses illustrate certain areas in which improvements are desired.

  10. Voice assessment: Updates on perceptual, acoustic, aerodynamic, and endoscopic imaging methods

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Daryush D.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review This paper describes recent advances in perceptual, acoustic, aerodynamic, and endoscopic imaging methods for assessing voice production. Recent findings Perceptual assessment Speech-language pathologists are being encouraged to use the new CAPE-V inventory for auditory perceptual assessment of voice quality, and recent studies have provided new insights into listener reliability issues that have plagued subjective perceptual judgments of voice quality. Acoustic assessment Progress is being made on the development of algorithms that are more robust for analyzing disordered voices, including the capability to extract voice quality-related measures from running speech segments. Aerodynamic assessment New devices for measuring phonation threshold air pressures and air flows have the potential to serve as sensitive indices of glottal phonatory conditions, and recent developments in aeroacoustic theory may provide new insights into laryngeal sound production mechanisms. Endoscopic imaging The increased light sensitivity of new ultra high-speed color digital video processors is enabling high-quality endoscopic imaging of vocal fold tissue motion at unprecedented image capture rates, which promises to provide new insights into mechanisms of normal and disordered voice production. Summary Some of the recent research advances in voice quality assessment could be more readily adopted into clinical practice, while others will require further development. PMID:18475073

  11. Projected role of advanced computational aerodynamic methods at the Lockheed-Georgia company

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    Experience with advanced computational methods being used at the Lockheed-Georgia Company to aid in the evaluation and design of new and modified aircraft indicates that large and specialized computers will be needed to make advanced three-dimensional viscous aerodynamic computations practical. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility should be used to provide a tool for designing better aerospace vehicles while at the same time reducing development costs by performing computations using Navier-Stokes equations solution algorithms and permitting less sophisticated but nevertheless complex calculations to be made efficiently. Configuration definition procedures and data output formats can probably best be defined in cooperation with industry, therefore, the computer should handle many remote terminals efficiently. The capability of transferring data to and from other computers needs to be provided. Because of the significant amount of input and output associated with 3-D viscous flow calculations and because of the exceedingly fast computation speed envisioned for the computer, special attention should be paid to providing rapid, diversified, and efficient input and output.

  12. Gradient-Based Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using ADI Method for Large-Scale Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Baysal, Oktay

    1997-01-01

    A gradient-based shape optimization methodology, that is intended for practical three-dimensional aerodynamic applications, has been developed. It is based on the quasi-analytical sensitivities. The flow analysis is rendered by a fully implicit, finite volume formulation of the Euler equations.The aerodynamic sensitivity equation is solved using the alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) algorithm for memory efficiency. A flexible wing geometry model, that is based on surface parameterization and platform schedules, is utilized. The present methodology and its components have been tested via several comparisons. Initially, the flow analysis for for a wing is compared with those obtained using an unfactored, preconditioned conjugate gradient approach (PCG), and an extensively validated CFD code. Then, the sensitivities computed with the present method have been compared with those obtained using the finite-difference and the PCG approaches. Effects of grid refinement and convergence tolerance on the analysis and shape optimization have been explored. Finally the new procedure has been demonstrated in the design of a cranked arrow wing at Mach 2.4. Despite the expected increase in the computational time, the results indicate that shape optimization, which require large numbers of grid points can be resolved with a gradient-based approach.

  13. Aerodynamic Optimization of Rocket Control Surface Geometry Using Cartesian Methods and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Andrea; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    Aerodynamic design is an iterative process involving geometry manipulation and complex computational analysis subject to physical constraints and aerodynamic objectives. A design cycle consists of first establishing the performance of a baseline design, which is usually created with low-fidelity engineering tools, and then progressively optimizing the design to maximize its performance. Optimization techniques have evolved from relying exclusively on designer intuition and insight in traditional trial and error methods, to sophisticated local and global search methods. Recent attempts at automating the search through a large design space with formal optimization methods include both database driven and direct evaluation schemes. Databases are being used in conjunction with surrogate and neural network models as a basis on which to run optimization algorithms. Optimization algorithms are also being driven by the direct evaluation of objectives and constraints using high-fidelity simulations. Surrogate methods use data points obtained from simulations, and possibly gradients evaluated at the data points, to create mathematical approximations of a database. Neural network models work in a similar fashion, using a number of high-fidelity database calculations as training iterations to create a database model. Optimal designs are obtained by coupling an optimization algorithm to the database model. Evaluation of the current best design then gives either a new local optima and/or increases the fidelity of the approximation model for the next iteration. Surrogate methods have also been developed that iterate on the selection of data points to decrease the uncertainty of the approximation model prior to searching for an optimal design. The database approximation models for each of these cases, however, become computationally expensive with increase in dimensionality. Thus the method of using optimization algorithms to search a database model becomes problematic as the

  14. Aerodynamics via acoustics - Application of acoustic formulas for aerodynamic calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    Prediction of aerodynamic loads on bodies in arbitrary motion is considered from an acoustic point of view, i.e., in a frame of reference fixed in the undisturbed medium. An inhomogeneous wave equation which governs the disturbance pressure is constructed and solved formally using generalized function theory. When the observer is located on the moving body surface there results a singular linear integral equation for surface pressure. Two different methods for obtaining such equations are discussed. Both steady and unsteady aerodynamic calculations are considered. Two examples are presented, the more important being an application to propeller aerodynamics. Of particular interest for numerical applications is the analytical behavior of the kernel functions in the various integral equations.

  15. Aerodynamics Via Acoustics: Application of Acoustic Formulas for Aerodynamic Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    Prediction of aerodynamic loads on bodies in arbitrary motion is considered from an acoustic point of view, i.e., in a frame of reference fixed in the undisturbed medium. An inhomogeneous wave equation which governs the disturbance pressure is constructed and solved formally using generalized function theory. When the observer is located on the moving body surface there results a singular linear integral equation for surface pressure. Two different methods for obtaining such equations are discussed. Both steady and unsteady aerodynamic calculations are considered. Two examples are presented, the more important being an application to propeller aerodynamics. Of particular interest for numerical applications is the analytical behavior of the kernel functions in the various integral equations.

  16. A method for calculating aerodynamic heating on sounding rocket tangent ogive noses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, L. D.

    1972-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the aerodynamic heating and shear stresses at the wall for tangent ogive noses that are slender enough to maintain an attached nose shock through that portion of flight during which heat transfer from the boundary layer to the wall is significant. The lower entropy of the attached nose shock combined with the inclusion of the streamwise pressure gradient yields a reasonable estimate of the actual flow conditions. Both laminar and turbulent boundary layers are examined and an approximation of the effects of (up to) moderate angles-of-attack is included in the analysis. The analytical method has been programmed in FORTRAN 4 for an IBM 360/91 computer.

  17. Uncertainty in Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Hemsch, M. J.; Morrison, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    An approach is presented to treat computational aerodynamics as a process, subject to the fundamental quality assurance principles of process control and process improvement. We consider several aspects affecting uncertainty for the computational aerodynamic process and present a set of stages to determine the level of management required to meet risk assumptions desired by the customer of the predictions.

  18. Darrieus rotor aerodynamics in turbulent wind

    SciTech Connect

    Brahimi, M.T.; Paraschivoiu, I.

    1995-05-01

    The earlier aerodynamic models for studying vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT`s) are based on constant incident wind conditions and are thus capable of predicting only periodic variations in the loads. The purpose of the present study is to develop a model capable of predicting the aerodynamic loads on the Darrieus rotor in a turbulent wind. This model is based on the double-multiple streamtube method (DMS) and incorporates a stochastic wind model. The method used to simulate turbulent velocity fluctuations is based on the power spectral density. The problem consists in generating a region of turbulent flow with a relevant spectrum and spatial correlation. The first aerodynamic code developed is based on a one-dimensional turbulent wind model. However, since this model ignores the structure of the turbulence in the crossflow plane, an extension to three dimensions has been made. The computer code developed, CARDAAS, has been used to predict aerodynamic loads for the Sandia-17m rotor and compared to CARDAAV results and experimental data. Results have shown that the computed aerodynamic loads have been improved by including stochastic wind into the aerodynamic model.

  19. A parametric study of planform and aeroelastic effects on aerodynamic center, alpha- and q- stability derivatives. Appendix C: Method for computing the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix of nonplanar wing-body-tail configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1972-01-01

    Expressions are derived for computing the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix for nonplanar wing-body-tail configurations. An aerodynamic influence coefficient is defined as the load in lbs. induced on a panel as a result of a unit angle of attack on another panel. Fuselage, wing and tail thickness are assumed to be small with the result that the thickness effect on the flow-field is negligible. The method for determining the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix is based on the lifting solution to the small perturbation, steady potential flow equation.

  20. Aerodynamic aircraft design methods and their notable applications: Survey of the activity in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujii, Kozo; Takanashi, Susumu

    1991-01-01

    An overview of aerodynamic aircraft design methods and their recent applications in Japan is presented. A design code which was developed at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) and is in use now is discussed, hence, most of the examples are the result of the collaborative work between heavy industry and the National Aerospace Laboratory. A wide variety of applications in transonic to supersonic flow regimes are presented. Although design of aircraft elements for external flows are the main focus, some of the internal flow applications are also presented. Recent applications of the design code, using the Navier Stokes and Euler equations in the analysis mode, include the design of HOPE (a space vehicle) and Upper Surface Blowing (USB) aircraft configurations.

  1. Numerical Analysis of Aerodynamic Interference between Two Circular Cylinders Using the Overset Grid Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimatsu, Takuto; Morishita, Etsuo; Okunuki, Takeo; Koyama, Hisao

    Flows over two circular cylinders in tandem, side-by-side, and staggered arrangements were analyzed using the overset grid method, which is capable of handling a variety of sizes and arrangements. The Reynolds number was 100 based on the cylinder diameter. The present computation code was validated by comparison with benchmark solutions for flow around a single cylinder. Wind-tunnel experiments were conducted for the side-by-side cylinder flow for comparison with numerical simulations. Calculation showed two critical spacings in the tandem arrangement where the aerodynamic forces and Strouhal number change discontinuously. Three critical spacings and four distinct flow patterns were found numerically in the side-by-side arrangement. Similar critical spacings were found in the staggered arrangement calculation and formed critical lines. Furthermore, a pocket region was found for a staggered arrangement surrounded by the critical line.

  2. On the Use of Parmetric-CAD Systems and Cartesian Methods for Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    Automated, high-fidelity tools for aerodynamic design face critical issues in attempting to optimize real-life geometry arid in permitting radical design changes. Success in these areas promises not only significantly shorter design- cycle times, but also superior and unconventional designs. To address these issues, we investigate the use of a parmetric-CAD system in conjunction with an embedded-boundary Cartesian method. Our goal is to combine the modeling capabilities of feature-based CAD with the robustness and flexibility of component-based Cartesian volume-mesh generation for complex geometry problems. We present the development of an automated optimization frame-work with a focus on the deployment of such a CAD-based design approach in a heterogeneous parallel computing environment.

  3. Aerodynamic Design of Complex Configurations Using Cartesian Methods and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The objective for this paper is to present the development of an optimization capability for the Cartesian inviscid-flow analysis package of Aftosmis et al. We evaluate and characterize the following modules within the new optimization framework: (1) A component-based geometry parameterization approach using a CAD solid representation and the CAPRI interface. (2) The use of Cartesian methods in the development Optimization techniques using a genetic algorithm. The discussion and investigations focus on several real world problems of the optimization process. We examine the architectural issues associated with the deployment of a CAD-based design approach in a heterogeneous parallel computing environment that contains both CAD workstations and dedicated compute nodes. In addition, we study the influence of noise on the performance of optimization techniques, and the overall efficiency of the optimization process for aerodynamic design of complex three-dimensional configurations. of automated optimization tools. rithm and a gradient-based algorithm.

  4. Boundary-integral method for calculating aerodynamic sensitivities with illustration for lifting-surface theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. Carson, Jr.; Desmarais, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    The technique of implicit differentiation has been used in combination with linearized lifting-surface theory to derive analytical expressions for aerodynamic sensitivities (i.e., rates of change of lifting pressures with respect to general changes in aircraft geometry, including planform variations) for steady or oscillating planar or nonplanar lifting surfaces in subsonic, sonic, or supersonic flow. The geometric perturbation is defined in terms of a single variable, and the user need only provide simple expressions or similar means for defining the continuous or discontinuous global or local perturbation of interest. Example expressions are given for perturbations of the sweep, taper, and aspect ratio of a wing with trapezoidal semispan planform. The present process appears to be readily adaptable to more general surface-panel methods.

  5. Aerodynamic evaluation and frequency prediction for the last stage turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.D.; Amano, R.S.

    1999-07-01

    In designing a turbine airfoil, a continuous second derivative is desirable to prevent local flow separation and recirculation and a minimum curvature on the airfoil surface helps in decreasing turbulence level that causes potential energy loss in turbine efficiency. To meet this requirement, the design program uses the higher-order Bernstein polynomials to define for both the pressure-side and the suction-side profile curves. Two sets of data are required by the design program. The first is relevant to the geometric parameters that include radius of nose and tail, inlet and exit metal angles, length and orientation of chord, throat and pitch, bend angle, and wedge angle. The second set of data consists of five control variables to determine the suction-side profile and three control variables to determine the pressure-side profile. The program was successfully applied to modify an existing industrial airfoil. Geometric parameters were obtained by direct measurement. Trial and error procedures were employed to determine the values of those eight control variables so that the airfoil could be curve-fitted by running the design program. The shape of the airfoil reproduced by the present model was continuous and smooth. This was utilized in a subsequent computational fluid dynamics performance analysis and was revealed to be satisfactory as it eliminates certain discontinuities in the measured data. A more efficient shape of an airfoil could then be conformed by adjusting geometrical parameters and the control variables. Results obtained by using this program indicate that the present technique can not only effectively optimize an airfoil shape to achieve better aerodynamic performance but also can preserve the original design intents. A viscous flow program was used to aerodynamically analyze the original and the new designs. The produced airfoil was used to perform frequency response computations. The model developed in this study was shown to be useful for flutter

  6. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of an 840 ft/sec Tip Speed Advanced Ducted Propulsor Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Aerodynamic simulations of an 840 ft/sec tip speed, Advanced Ducted Propulsor fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, lownoise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone extensive experimental testing in the 9- by 15- foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center, resulting in quality, detailed aerodynamic and acoustic measurement data. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating conditions simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, excluding a long core duct section downstream of the core inlet guide vane. As a result, only fan rotational speed and system bypass ratio, set by specifying static pressure downstream of the core inlet guide vane row, were adjusted in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. The computed blade row flow fields for all five fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the computed flow fields reveals no excessive boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems. A few spanwise comparisons between

  7. Aerodynamics model for a generic ASTOVL lift-fan aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birckelbaw, Lourdes G.; Mcneil, Walter E.; Wardwell, Douglas A.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the aerodynamics model used in a simulation model of an advanced short takeoff and vertical landing (ASTOVL) lift-fan fighter aircraft. The simulation model was developed for use in piloted evaluations of transition and hover flight regimes, so that only low speed (M approximately 0.2) aerodynamics are included in the mathematical model. The aerodynamic model includes the power-off aerodynamic forces and moments and the propulsion system induced aerodynamic effects, including ground effects. The power-off aerodynamics data were generated using the U.S. Air Force Stability and Control Digital DATCOM program and a NASA Ames in-house graphics program called VORVIEW which allows the user to easily analyze arbitrary conceptual aircraft configurations using the VORLAX program. The jet-induced data were generated using the prediction methods of R. E. Kuhn et al., as referenced in this report.

  8. Focused Assessment of State-of-the-Art CFD Capabilities for Prediction of Subsonic Fixed Wing Aircraft Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Wahls, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Several recent workshops and studies are used to make an assessment of the current status of CFD for subsonic fixed wing aerodynamics. Uncertainty quantification plays a significant role in the assessment, so terms associated with verification and validation are given and some methodology and research areas are highlighted. For high-subsonic-speed cruise through buffet onset, the series of drag prediction workshops and NASA/Boeing buffet onset studies are described. For low-speed flow control for high lift, a circulation control workshop and a synthetic jet flow control workshop are described. Along with a few specific recommendations, gaps and needs identified through the workshops and studies are used to develop a list of broad recommendations to improve CFD capabilities and processes for this discipline in the future.

  9. Aerodynamic characteristics of nebulized terbutaline sulphate using the Next Generation Impactor (NGI) and CEN method.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahim, Mohamed E; Chrystyn, Henry

    2009-03-01

    Characterization of the aerosolized dose emitted from a nebulized system can be determined using CEN (prEN13544-1) methodology and more recently with a Next Generation Impactor (NGI), but evaporative effects can influence the results. We have investigated these characteristics using different flows and cooling with the NGI and compared the results to the standard CEN method using two different nebulizer systems. The NGI was operated using flows of 15 and 30 L min(-1) at room (ROOM) temperature and immediately after cooling at 5 degrees C for 90 min (COLD). Two nebulizer systems, the Sidestream jet nebulizer (SIDE) and the Aeroneb Pro (AERO), were used to nebulize terbutaline sulphate respiratory solution. The CEN method was also used to provide the aerodynamic characteristics of the aerosolized dose from these two nebulizer systems. The mean (SD) mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) using 15COLD, 15ROOM, 30COLD, 30ROOM, and CEN for AERO was 5.0(0.1), 4.1(0.3), 4.4(0.2), 2.0(0.3), and 3.0(1.1) microm, respectively, and 4.2(0.4), 2.6(0.4), 3.5(0.1), 1.7(0.1), and 3.2(0.3) microm for SIDE. The fine particle fraction (FPF), using the NGI, followed the expected trend associated with the corresponding MMAD values, ranging from 48.1 to 70.5% from AERO and 57.3 to 87.8% for SIDE. The mean FPF for AERO and SIDE using the CEN methodology was 72.5 and 63.6%. Overall there was a highly significant difference (p < 0.001) between the different operating conditions for the FPF and MMAD of both nebulizer systems. All methods revealed a significant difference between AERO and SIDE except CEN. Both nebulizer systems were prone to evaporation effects during in vitro testing. Cooling and using a slow flow minimizes evaporation effects with the NGI and should be adopted as the recommended compendial method. The CEN method provides different values to those of the NGI operating conditions and could not differentiate between the two nebulizers. PMID:19392586

  10. Program LRCDM2: Improved aerodynamic prediction program for supersonic canard-tail missiles with axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillenius, Marnix F. E.

    1985-01-01

    Program LRCDM2 was developed for supersonic missiles with axisymmetric bodies and up to two finned sections. Predicted are pressure distributions and loads acting on a complete configuration including effects of body separated flow vorticity and fin-edge vortices. The computer program is based on supersonic panelling and line singularity methods coupled with vortex tracking theory. Effects of afterbody shed vorticity on the afterbody and tail-fin pressure distributions can be optionally treated by companion program BDYSHD. Preliminary versions of combined shock expansion/linear theory and Newtonian/linear theory have been implemented as optional pressure calculation methods to extend the Mach number and angle-of-attack ranges of applicability into the nonlinear supersonic flow regime. Comparisons between program results and experimental data are given for a triform tail-finned configuration and for a canard controlled configuration with a long afterbody for Mach numbers up to 2.5. Initial tests of the nonlinear/linear theory approaches show good agreement for pressures acting on a rectangular wing and a delta wing with attached shocks for Mach numbers up to 4.6 and angles of attack up to 20 degrees.

  11. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    reduction of bluff-body noise. Xiaoyu Wang and Xiaofeng Sun discuss the interaction of fan stator and acoustic treatments using the transfer element method. S Saito and his colleagues in JAXA report the development of active devices for reducing helicopter noise. The paper by A Tamura and M Tsutahara proposes a brand new methodology for aerodynamic sound by applying the lattice Boltzmann finite difference method. As the method solves the fluctuation of air density directly, it has the advantage of not requiring modeling of the sound generation. M A Langthjem and M Nakano solve the hole-tone feedback cycle in jet flow by a numerical method. Y Ogami and S Akishita propose the application of a line-vortex method to the three-dimensional separated flow from a bluff body. I hope that a second issue on aerodynamic sound will be published in FDR in the not too distant future.

  12. Implications of scale effect for the prediction of high angle of attack aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, C. D.; Krus, P.; Jouannet, C.

    2005-04-01

    Scale effect is of significance in all experimental aerodynamics testing. At high angles of attack such issues as Reynolds and Mach number scaling are further complicated by the presence of complex, unsteady separated flow structures. The understanding and quantification of such flow effects remains a substantial challenge to the combat aircraft designer. The challenge, especially during conceptual and preliminary design stages, is to obtain sufficiently accurate information to make relevant design decisions, addressing potential weaknesses before proceeding to detail design. The focus in the present review is on the application of the water tunnel in such cases. The combination of qualitative and quantitative data obtainable from the water tunnel provides a useful complement to other tools during the early design stages. The effect of Reynolds number in particular is however critical; and appreciation of its effects are critical to the effective use of such a tool. It is shown however that for certain configurations such effects can be small in comparison to other experimental effects.

  13. Prediction of the hub vortex instability within wind turbine wakes and effects of the incoming wind and turbine aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Viola, Francesco; Camarri, Simone; Porté-Agel, Fernando; Gallaire, Francois

    2014-11-01

    Instability of the hub vortex, which is a vorticity structure present in wind turbine near-wake and mainly oriented along the streamwise direction, is predicted from wake velocity measurements. In this work, stability analysis is performed on wind tunnel velocity measurements acquired in the wake produced from a wind turbine model immersed in a uniform flow. Turbulence effects on wake dynamics are taken into account by modeling the Reynolds stresses through eddy-viscosity models, which are calibrated on the wind tunnel data. This formulation leads to the identification of one dominant mode associated with the hub vortex instability, which is characterized by a counter-winding single-helix mode. Moreover, this analysis also predicts accurately the frequency of the hub vortex instability observed experimentally. The hub vortex instability is also investigated by considering incoming wind fields with different turbulence characteristics, different turbine aerodynamic designs and operational regimes, which affect the morphology of the wake vorticity structures and their dynamics. The ultimate goal of this work consists in providing useful information for predicting wind turbine wake dynamics and their effects on downstream wake recovery, thus to maximize wind power harvesting.

  14. Aerodynamic Flight-Test Results for the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Smith, Mark S.; Ali, Aliyah N.; Bui, Trong T.; Ellsworth, Joel C.; Garcia, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    The aerodynamic effects of compliant flaps installed onto a modified Gulfstream III airplane were investigated. Analyses were performed prior to flight to predict the aerodynamic effects of the flap installation. Flight tests were conducted to gather both structural and aerodynamic data. The airplane was instrumented to collect vehicle aerodynamic data and wing pressure data. A leading-edge stagnation detection system was also installed. The data from these flights were analyzed and compared with predictions. The predictive tools compared well with flight data for small flap deflections, but differences between predictions and flight estimates were greater at larger deflections. This paper describes the methods used to examine the aerodynamics data from the flight tests and provides a discussion of the flight-test results in the areas of vehicle aerodynamics, wing sectional pressure coefficient profiles, and air data.

  15. New technology in turbine aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    A cursory review is presented of some of the recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research at NASA-Lewis Research Center. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. An extensive bibliography is included. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Turbines currently being investigated make use of advanced blading concepts designed to maintain high efficiency under conditions of high aerodynamic loading. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flow fields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

  16. Improved Method for Prediction of Attainable Wing Leading-Edge Thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Harry W.; McElroy, Marcus O.; Lessard, Wendy B.; McCullers, L. Arnold

    1996-01-01

    Prediction of the loss of wing leading-edge thrust and the accompanying increase in drag due to lift, when flow is not completely attached, presents a difficult but commonly encountered problem. A method (called the previous method) for the prediction of attainable leading-edge thrust and the resultant effect on airplane aerodynamic performance has been in use for more than a decade. Recently, the method has been revised to enhance its applicability to current airplane design and evaluation problems. The improved method (called the present method) provides for a greater range of airfoil shapes from very sharp to very blunt leading edges. It is also based on a wider range of Reynolds numbers than was available for the previous method. The present method, when employed in computer codes for aerodynamic analysis, generally results in improved correlation with experimental wing-body axial-force data and provides reasonable estimates of the measured drag.

  17. On the Use of CAD and Cartesian Methods for Aerodynamic Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, M.; Aftosmis, M. J.; Pulliam, T. H.

    2004-01-01

    The objective for this paper is to present the development of an optimization capability for Curt3D, a Cartesian inviscid-flow analysis package. We present the construction of a new optimization framework and we focus on the following issues: 1) Component-based geometry parameterization approach using parametric-CAD models and CAPRI. A novel geometry server is introduced that addresses the issue of parallel efficiency while only sparingly consuming CAD resources; 2) The use of genetic and gradient-based algorithms for three-dimensional aerodynamic design problems. The influence of noise on the optimization methods is studied. Our goal is to create a responsive and automated framework that efficiently identifies design modifications that result in substantial performance improvements. In addition, we examine the architectural issues associated with the deployment of a CAD-based approach in a heterogeneous parallel computing environment that contains both CAD workstations and dedicated compute engines. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the framework for a design problem that features topology changes and complex geometry.

  18. Future requirements and roles of computers in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    While faster computers will be needed to make solution of the Navier-Stokes equations practical and useful, most all of the other aerodynamic solution techniques can benefit from faster computers. There is a wide variety of computational and measurement techniques, the prospect of more powerful computers permits extension and an enhancement across all aerodynamic methods, including wind-tunnel measurement. It is expected that, as in the past, a blend of methods will be used to predict aircraft aerodynamics in the future. These will include methods based on solution of the Navier-Stokes equations and the potential flow equations as well as those based on empirical and measured results. The primary flows of interest in aircraft aerodynamics are identified, the predictive methods currently in use and/or under development are reviewed and two of these methods are analyzed in terms of the computational resources needed to improve their usefulness and practicality.

  19. First- and second-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives via automatic differentiation with incremental iterative methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, L.L.; Taylor, A.C. III; Hou, G.W.; Korivi, V.M.

    1996-12-01

    The straightforward automatic-differentiation and the hand-differentiated incremental iterative methods are interwoven to produce a hybrid scheme that captures some of the strengths of each strategy. With this compromise, discrete aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives are calculated with the efficient incremental iterative solution algorithm of the original flow code. Moreover, the principal advantage of automatic differentiation is retained. The basic equations for second-order sensitivity derivatives are presented, which results in a comparison of four different methods. Each of these four schemes for second-order derivatives requires that large systems are solved first for the first-order adjoint variables. Of these latter three schemes, two require no solutions of large systems thereafter. For the other two for which additional systems are solved, the equations and solution procedures are analogous to those for the first-order derivatives. From a practical viewpoint, implementation of the second-order methods is feasible only with software tools such as automatic differentiation, because of the extreme complexity and large number of terms. First- and second-order sensitivities are calculated accurately for two airfoil problems, including a turbulent-flow example. In each of these two sample problems, three dependent variables (coefficients of lift, drag, and pitching-moment) and six independent variables (three geometric-shape and three flow-condition design variables) are considered. Several different procedures are tested, and results are compared on the basis of accuracy, computational time, and computer memory. For first-order derivatives, the hybrid incremental iterative scheme obtained with automatic differentiation is competitive with the best hand-differentiated method. Furthermore, it is at least two to four times faster than central finite differences, without an overwhelming penalty in computer memory. 23 refs., 14 tabs.

  20. Unstructured Grid Euler Method Assessment for Longitudinal and Lateral/Directional Aerodynamic Performance Analysis of the HSR Technology Concept Airplane at Supersonic Cruise Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    1999-01-01

    Unstructured grid Euler computations, performed at supersonic cruise speed, are presented for a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration, designated as the Technology Concept Airplane (TCA) within the High Speed Research (HSR) Program. The numerical results are obtained for the complete TCA cruise configuration which includes the wing, fuselage, empennage, diverters, and flow through nacelles at M (sub infinity) = 2.4 for a range of angles-of-attack and sideslip. Although all the present computations are performed for the complete TCA configuration, appropriate assumptions derived from the fundamental supersonic aerodynamic principles have been made to extract aerodynamic predictions to complement the experimental data obtained from a 1.675%-scaled truncated (aft fuselage/empennage components removed) TCA model. The validity of the computational results, derived from the latter assumptions, are thoroughly addressed and discussed in detail. The computed surface and off-surface flow characteristics are analyzed and the pressure coefficient contours on the wing lower surface are shown to correlate reasonably well with the available pressure sensitive paint results, particularly, for the complex flow structures around the nacelles. The predicted longitudinal and lateral/directional performance characteristics for the truncated TCA configuration are shown to correlate very well with the corresponding wind-tunnel data across the examined range of angles-of-attack and sideslip. The complementary computational results for the longitudinal and lateral/directional performance characteristics for the complete TCA configuration are also presented along with the aerodynamic effects due to empennage components. Results are also presented to assess the computational method performance, solution sensitivity to grid refinement, and solution convergence characteristics.

  1. Comparison of theoretical predicted longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics with full-scale wind tunnel data on the ATLIT airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, C. P. G.; Griswold, M.; Roskam, J.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical method is presented for predicting the lift coefficient, the pitching moment coefficient, and the drag coefficient of light, twin-engine, propeller-driven airplanes. The method was applied to the Advanced Technology Light Twin-Engine airplane. The calculated characteristics were then correlated against full scale wind tunnel data. The analytical method was found to predict the drag and pitching moment fairly well. However, the lift prediction was extremely poor.

  2. Application of unstructured grid methods to steady and unsteady aerodynamic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose is to describe the development of unstructured grid methods which have several advantages when compared to methods which make use of structured grids. Unstructured grids, for example, easily allow the treatment of complex geometries, allow for general mesh movement for realistic motions and structural deformations of complete aircraft configurations which is important for aeroelastic analysis, and enable adaptive mesh refinement to more accurately resolve the physics of the flow. Steady Euler calculations for a supersonic fighter configuration to demonstrate the complex geometry capability; unsteady Euler calculations for the supersonic fighter undergoing harmonic oscillations in a complete-vehicle bending mode to demonstrate the general mesh movement capability; and vortex-dominated conical-flow calculations for highly-swept delta wings to demonstrate the adaptive mesh refinement capability are discussed. The basic solution algorithm is a multi-stage Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme with a finite-volume spatial discretization based on an unstructured grid of triangles in 2D or tetrahedra in 3D. The moving mesh capability is a general procedure which models each edge of each triangle (2D) or tetrahedra (3D) with a spring. The resulting static equilibrium equations which result from a summation of forces are then used to move the mesh to allow it to continuously conform to the instantaneous position or shape of the aircraft. The adaptive mesh refinement procedure enriches the unstructured mesh locally to more accurately resolve the vortical flow features. These capabilities are described in detail along with representative results which demonstrate several advantages of unstructured grid methods. The applicability of the unstructured grid methodology to steady and unsteady aerodynamic problems and directions for future work are discussed.

  3. Initial Aerodynamic and Acoustic Study of an Active Twist Rotor Using a Loosely Coupled CFD/CSD Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, David D. Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary aerodynamic and performance predictions for an active twist rotor for a HART-II type of configuration are performed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, OVERFLOW2, and a computational structural dynamics (CSD) code, CAMRAD -II. These codes are loosely coupled to compute a consistent set of aerodynamics and elastic blade motions. Resultant aerodynamic and blade motion data are then used in the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkins solver, PSU-WOPWOP, to compute noise on an observer plane under the rotor. Active twist of the rotor blade is achieved in CAMRAD-II by application of a periodic torsional moment couple (of equal and opposite sign) at the blade root and tip at a specified frequency and amplitude. To provide confidence in these particular active twist predictions for which no measured data is available, the rotor system geometry and computational set up examined here are identical to that used in a previous successful Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) computational study. For a single frequency equal to three times the blade passage frequency (3P), active twist is applied across a range of control phase angles at two different amplitudes. Predicted results indicate that there are control phase angles where the maximum mid-frequency noise level and the 4P non -rotating hub vibrations can be reduced, potentially, both at the same time. However, these calculated reductions are predicted to come with a performance penalty in the form of a reduction in rotor lift-to-drag ratio due to an increase in rotor profile power.

  4. A method of simultaneously measuring particle shape parameter and aerodynamic size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Zhang, JinBi; Zheng, HaiYang; Wang, YingPing; Fang, Li

    2016-08-01

    For the purpose of classification of airborne particles, this paper describes an experimental apparatus for simultaneously measuring shape characteristics and aerodynamic size at single particle level. The shape of a particle is indicated through near forward scattering light collected by 3 PMTs placed at 120-degree offset azimuthal angles and the aerodynamic diameter is obtained by time-of-flight that a particle takes to traverse double laser beams. Laboratory experiments are performed on sampled aerosol particles in spherical, cuboid and elongated shape, and preliminary results indicate that the experimental apparatus has a good capability of discriminating between spherical and irregular particles. A variance factor of scattered light related to shape of ambient airborne particles under different conditions are also presented, which can be modeled using lognormal probability density distribution. Combined with aerodynamic size information, these results suggest potential uses in environmental aerosol monitoring for characterizing constituents of particles.

  5. Characterization of Flapping Wing Aerodynamics and Flight Dynamics Analysis using Computational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rege, Alok Ashok

    Insect flight comes with a lot of intricacies that cannot be explained by conventional aerodynamics. Even with their small-size, insects have the ability to generate the required aerodynamic forces using high frequency flapping motion of their wings to perform different maneuvers. The maneuverability obtained by these flyers using flapping motion belies the classical aerodynamics theory and calls for a new approach to study this highly unsteady aerodynamics. Research is on to find new ways to realize the flight capabilities of these insects and engineer a micro-flyer which would have various applications, ranging from autonomous pollination of crop fields and oil & gas exploration to area surveillance and detection & rescue missions. In this research, a parametric study of flapping trajectories is performed using a two-dimensional wing to identify the factors that affect the force production. These factors are then non-dimensionalized and used in a design of experiments set-up to conduct sensitivity analysis. A procedure to determine an aerodynamic model comprising cycle-averaged force coefficients is described. This aerodynamic model is then used in a nonlinear dynamics framework to perform flight dynamics analysis using a micro-flyer with model properties based on Drosophila. Stability analysis is conducted to determine different steady state flight conditions that could achieved by the micro-flyer with the given model properties. The effect of scaling the mass properties is discussed. An LQR design is used for closed-loop control. Open and closed-loop simulations are performed. The results show that nonlinear dynamics framework can be used to determine values for model properties of a micro-flyer that would enable it to perform different flight maneuvers.

  6. Synthesized airfoil data method for prediction of dynamic stall and unsteady airloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangwani, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    A detailed analysis of dynamic stall experiments has led to a set of relatively compact analytical expressions, called synthesized unsteady airfoil data, which accurately describe in the time-domain the unsteady aerodynamic characteristics of stalled airfoils. An analytical research program was conducted to expand and improve this synthesized unsteady airfoil data method using additional available sets of unsteady airfoil data. The primary objectives were to reduce these data to synthesized form for use in rotor airload prediction analyses and to generalize the results. Unsteady drag data were synthesized which provided the basis for successful expansion of the formulation to include computation of the unsteady pressure drag of airfoils and rotor blades. Also, an improved prediction model for airfoil flow reattachment was incorporated in the method. Application of this improved unsteady aerodynamics model has resulted in an improved correlation between analytic predictions and measured full scale helicopter blade loads and stress data.

  7. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of a 1215 ft/sec Tip Speed Transonic Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Aerodynamic simulations of a 1215 ft/sec tip speed transonic fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, low-noise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone extensive experimental testing in the 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating points simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, which for this model did not include a split flow path with core and bypass ducts. As a result, it was only necessary to adjust fan rotational speed in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. Computed blade row flow fields at all fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the flow fields at all operating conditions reveals no excessive boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems.

  8. Missile aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N.

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental aerodynamics of slender bodies is examined in the reprint edition of an introductory textbook originally published in 1960. Chapters are devoted to the formulas commonly used in missile aerodynamics; slender-body theory at supersonic and subsonic speeds; vortices in viscid and inviscid flow; wing-body interference; downwash, sidewash, and the wake; wing-tail interference; aerodynamic controls; pressure foredrag, base drag, and skin friction; and stability derivatives. Diagrams, graphs, tables of terms and formulas are provided.

  9. Launch vehicle aerodynamic data base development comparison with flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, J. T.; Wallace, R. O.; Dill, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The aerodynamic development plan for the Space Shuttle integrated vehicle had three major objectives. The first objective was to support the evolution of the basic configuration by establishing aerodynamic impacts to various candidate configurations. The second objective was to provide continuing evaluation of the basic aerodynamic characteristics in order to bring about a mature data base. The third task was development of the element and component aerodynamic characteristics and distributed air loads data to support structural loads analyses. The complexity of the configurations rendered conventional analytic methods of little use and therefore required extensive wind tunnel testing of detailed complex models. However, the ground testing and analyses did not predict the aerodynamic characteristics that were extracted from the Space Shuttle flight test program. Future programs that involve the use of vehicles similar to the Space Shuttle should be concerned with the complex flow fields characteristics of these types of complex configurations.

  10. Design and Predictions for High-Altitude (Low Reynolds Number) Aerodynamic Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Donald; Harmory, Phil; Krake, Keith; Drela, Mark

    2000-01-01

    A sailplane being developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center will support a high-altitude flight experiment. The experiment will measure the performance parameters or an airfoil at high altitudes (70,000 - 100,000 ft), low Reynolds numbers (2 x 10(exp 5) - 7 x 10(exp 5)), and high subsonic Mach numbers (0.5 and 0.65). The airfoil section lift and drag are determined from pilot and static pressure measurements. The locations of the separation bubble, Tollmien-Schlichting boundary-layer instability frequencies, and vortex shedding are measured from a hot-film strip. The details of the planned flight experiment are presented as well as several predictions of the airfoil performance.

  11. Design and Predictions for a High-Altitude (Low-Reynolds-Number) Aerodynamic Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Donald; Hamory, Phil; Krake, Keith; Drela, Mark

    1999-01-01

    A sailplane being developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center will support a high-altitude flight experiment. The experiment will measure the performance parameters of an airfoil at high altitudes (70,000 to 100,000 ft), low Reynolds numbers (200,000 to 700,000), and high subsonic Mach numbers (0.5 and 0.65). The airfoil section lift and drag are determined from pitot and static pressure measurements. The locations of the separation bubble, Tollmien-Schlichting boundary layer instability frequencies, and vortex shedding are measured from a hot-film strip. The details of the planned flight experiment are presented. Several predictions of the airfoil performance are also presented. Mark Drela from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology designed the APEX-16 airfoil, using the MSES code. Two-dimensional Navier-Stokes analyses were performed by Mahidhar Tatineni and Xiaolin Zhong from the University of California, Los Angeles, and by the authors at NASA Dryden.

  12. A method of estimating the aerodynamic effects of ordinary and split flaps of airfoils similar to the Clark Y

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, H A

    1936-01-01

    An empirical method is given for estimating the aerodynamic effect of ordinary and split flaps on airfoils similar to the Clark Y. The method is based on a series of charts that have been derived from an analysis of existing wind-tunnel data. Factors are included by which such variables as flap location, flap span, wing aspect ratio, and wing taper may be taken into account. A series of comparisons indicate that the method would be suitable for use in making preliminary performance calculations and in structural design.

  13. Prediction of static aerodynamic characteristics for space-shuttle-like and other bodies at angles of attack from 0 deg to 180 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    An engineering-type procedure is presented for computing normal-force, axial-force, and pitching-moment coefficients for bodies at angles of attack from 0 deg to 180 deg. The procedure is ideally suited for estimating the aerodynamic characteristics of space shuttle booster-like bodies because of the wide range of angles of attack, Mach numbers, and Reynolds numbers to be encountered. The analytical formulas, plots, and references given are also applicable for shuttle orbiter, missile, and aircraft-like bodies of both circular and noncircular cross section. The method for computing normal-force and pitching-moment coefficients is based upon the original proposal of Allen that the crossflow or lift distribution over a body can be expressed as the sum of slender-body potential term and an empirical viscous crossflow term. Although experimental data from which to verify the procedure at very high angles of attack are extremely limited, the comparisons made thus far of computed with experimental results are good. In this report the procedure has been shown to be capable of predicting reasonably well the experimental variation of C sub N, C sub A, C sub m, and x sub ac/l with angle of attack for nine bodies of revolution at a free-stream Mach number of 2.86.

  14. Feasibility study of a novel method for real-time aerodynamic coefficient estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbacki, Phillip M.

    In this work, a feasibility study of a novel technique for the real-time identification of uncertain nonlinear aircraft aerodynamic coefficients has been conducted. The major objective of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of a system for parameter identification in a real-time flight environment. This system should be able to calculate aerodynamic coefficients and derivative information using typical pilot inputs while ensuring robust, stable, and rapid convergence. The parameter estimator investigated is based upon the nonlinear sliding mode control schema; one of the main advantages of the sliding mode estimator is the ability to guarantee a stable and robust convergence. Stable convergence is ensured by choosing a sliding surface and function that satisfies the Lyapunov stability criteria. After a proper sliding surface has been chosen, the nonlinear equations of motion for an F-16 aircraft are substituted into the sliding surface yielding an estimator capable of identifying a single aircraft parameter. Multiple sliding surfaces are then developed for each of the different flight parameters that will be identified. Sliding surfaces and parameter estimators have been developed and simulated for the pitching moment, lift force, and drag force coefficients of the F-16 aircraft. Comparing the estimated coefficients with the reference coefficients shows rapid and stable convergence for a variety of pilot inputs. Starting with simple doublet and sin wave commands, and followed by more complicated continuous pilot inputs, estimated aerodynamic coefficients have been shown to match the actual coefficients with a high degree of accuracy. This estimator is also shown to be superior to model reference or adaptive estimators, it is able to handle positive and negative estimated parameters and control inputs along with guaranteeing Lyapunov stability during convergence. Accurately estimating these aerodynamic parameters in real-time during a flight is essential

  15. Hypersonic Arbitrary-Body Aerodynamics (HABA) for conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Salguero, D.E.

    1990-03-15

    The Hypersonic Arbitrary-Body Aerodynamics (HABA) computer program predicts static and dynamic aerodynamic derivatives at hypersonic speeds for any vehicle geometry. It is intended to be used during conceptual design studies where fast computational speed is required. It uses the same geometry and hypersonic aerodynamic methods as the Mark IV Supersonic/Hypersonic Arbitrary-Body Program (SHABP) developed under sponsorship of the Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory; however, the input and output formats have been improved to make it easier to use. This program is available as part of the Department 9140 CAE software.

  16. Fluid Dynamics Panel Symposium on Aerodynamics of Power Plant Installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, W. P.

    1982-01-01

    Powerplant installations involve complex flows, strongly influenced by viscous effects and often with important aerodynamic interactions between the airframe and propulsion system. The introduction of vehicle propulsion concepts, and points of emphasis in aircraft and missile design requirements, provide an expanding range of aerodynamic problems which cal for both experimental and theoretical study. Aerodynamic problems in powerplant installation are surveyed and work which has improved basic understanding or has enhanced prediction and design methods in this field is reviewed. Powerplant installation effects for both combat and transport aircraft are emphasized.

  17. An Aerodynamic Analysis of a Spinning Missile with Dithering Canards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.; Nygaard, Tor A.

    2003-01-01

    A generic spinning missile with dithering canards is used to demonstrate the utility of an overset structured grid approach for simulating the aerodynamics of rolling airframe missile systems. The approach is used to generate a modest aerodynamic database for the generic missile. The database is populated with solutions to the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. It is used to evaluate grid resolution requirements for accurate prediction of instantaneous missile loads and the relative aerodynamic significance of angle-of-attack, canard pitching sequence, viscous effects, and roll-rate effects. A novel analytical method for inter- and extrapolation of database results is also given.

  18. A 3-D aerodynamic method for the analysis of isolated horizontal-axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Ammara, I.; Masson, C.; Paraschivoiu, I.

    1997-12-31

    In most existing performance-analysis methods, wind turbines are considered isolated so that interference effects caused by other rotors or by the site topography are neglected. The main objective of this paper is to propose a practical 3-D method suitable for the study of these effects, in order to optimize the arrangement and the positioning of Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs) in a wind farm. In the proposed methodology, the flow field around isolated HAWTs is predicted by solving the 3-D, time-averaged, steady-state, incompressible, Navier-Stokes equations in which the turbines are represented by distributions of momentum sources. The resulting governing equations are solved using a Control-Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM). The fundamental aspects related to the development of a practical 3-D method are discussed in this paper, with an emphasis on some of the challenges that arose during its implementation. The current implementation is limited to the analysis of isolated HAWTs. Preliminary results have indicated that, the proposed 3-D method reaches the same level of accuracy, in terms of performance predictions, that the previously developed 2-D axisymmetric model and the well-known momentum-strip theory, while still using reasonable computers resources. It can be considered as a useful tool for the design of HAWTs. Its main advantages, however, are its intrinsic capacity to predict the details of the flow in the wake, and its capabilities of modelling arbitrary wind-turbine arrangements and including ground effects.

  19. Numerical Predictions of Wind Turbine Power and Aerodynamic Loads for the NREL Phase II and IV Combined Experiment Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duque, Earl P. N.; Johnson, Wayne; vanDam, C. P.; Chao, David D.; Cortes, Regina; Yee, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Accurate, reliable and robust numerical predictions of wind turbine rotor power remain a challenge to the wind energy industry. The literature reports various methods that compare predictions to experiments. The methods vary from Blade Element Momentum Theory (BEM), Vortex Lattice (VL), to variants of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RaNS). The BEM and VL methods consistently show discrepancies in predicting rotor power at higher wind speeds mainly due to inadequacies with inboard stall and stall delay models. The RaNS methodologies show promise in predicting blade stall. However, inaccurate rotor vortex wake convection, boundary layer turbulence modeling and grid resolution has limited their accuracy. In addition, the inherently unsteady stalled flow conditions become computationally expensive for even the best endowed research labs. Although numerical power predictions have been compared to experiment. The availability of good wind turbine data sufficient for code validation experimental data that has been extracted from the IEA Annex XIV download site for the NREL Combined Experiment phase II and phase IV rotor. In addition, the comparisons will show data that has been further reduced into steady wind and zero yaw conditions suitable for comparisons to "steady wind" rotor power predictions. In summary, the paper will present and discuss the capabilities and limitations of the three numerical methods and make available a database of experimental data suitable to help other numerical methods practitioners validate their own work.

  20. Subsonic aerodynamic and flutter characteristics of several wings calculated by the SOUSSA P1.1 panel method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. C., Jr.; Cunningham, H. J.; Desmarais, R. N.; Silva, W. A.; Drobenko, B.

    1982-01-01

    The SOUSSA (steady, oscillatory, and unsteady subsonic and supersonic aerodynamics) program is the computational implementation of a general potential flow analysis (by the Green's function method) that can generate pressure distributions on complete aircraft having arbitrary shapes, motions and deformations. Some applications of the initial release version of this program to several wings in steady and oscillatory motion, including flutter are presented. The results are validated by comparisons with other calculations and experiments. Experiences in using the program as well as some recent improvements are described.

  1. Validation of engineering methods for predicting hypersonic vehicle controls forces and moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughmer, M.; Straussfogel, D.; Long, L.; Ozoroski, L.

    1991-01-01

    This work examines the ability of the aerodynamic analysis methods contained in an industry standard conceptual design code, the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System (APAS II), to estimate the forces and moments generated through control surface deflections from low subsonic to high hypersonic speeds. Predicted control forces and moments generated by various control effectors are compared with previously published wind-tunnel and flight-test data for three vehicles: the North American X-15, a hypersonic research airplane concept, and the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Qualitative summaries of the results are given for each force and moment coefficient and each control derivative in the various speed ranges. Results show that all predictions of longitudinal stability and control derivatives are acceptable for use at the conceptual design stage.

  2. Improved Aerodynamic Analysis for Hybrid Wing Body Conceptual Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gern, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of ongoing efforts to develop, evaluate, and validate different tools for improved aerodynamic modeling and systems analysis of Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft configurations. Results are being presented for the evaluation of different aerodynamic tools including panel methods, enhanced panel methods with viscous drag prediction, and computational fluid dynamics. Emphasis is placed on proper prediction of aerodynamic loads for structural sizing as well as viscous drag prediction to develop drag polars for HWB conceptual design optimization. Data from transonic wind tunnel tests at the Arnold Engineering Development Center s 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel was used as a reference data set in order to evaluate the accuracy of the aerodynamic tools. Triangularized surface data and Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) models of an X-48B 2% scale wind tunnel model were used to generate input and model files for the different analysis tools. In support of ongoing HWB scaling studies within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program, an improved finite element based structural analysis and weight estimation tool for HWB center bodies is currently under development. Aerodynamic results from these analyses are used to provide additional aerodynamic validation data.

  3. Aerodynamic airfoil design using the Euler equations based on the dynamic evolution method and the control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, YingYing; He, Feng; Shen, MengYu

    2011-04-01

    Based on the idea of adjoint method and the dynamic evolution method, a new optimum aerodynamic design technique is presented in this paper. It can be applied to the optimum problems with a large number of design variables and is time saving. The key of the new method lies in that the optimization process is regarded as an unsteady evolution, i.e., the optimization is executed, simultaneously with solving the unsteady flow governing equations and adjoint equations. Numerical examples for both the inverse problem and drag minimization using Euler equations have been presented, and the results show that the method presented in this paper is more efficient than the optimum methods based on the steady flow solution and the steady solution of adjoint equations.

  4. Interim prediction method for jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A method is provided for predicting jet noise for a wide range of nozzle geometries and operating conditions of interest for aircraft engines. Jet noise theory, data and existing prediction methods was reviewed, and based on this information a interim method of jet noise prediction is proposed. Problem areas are idenified where further research is needed to improve the prediction method. This method predicts only the noise generated by the exhaust jets mixing with the surrounding air and does not include other noises emanating from the engine exhaust, such as combustion and machinery noise generated inside the engine (i.e., core noise). It does, however, include thrust reverser noise. Prediction relations are provided for conical nozzles, plug nozzles, coaxial nozzles and slot nozzles.

  5. The equivalent angle-of-attack method for estimating the nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics of missile wings and control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, M. J.; Nielsen, J. N.

    1982-01-01

    A method has been developed for estimating the nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics of missile wing and control surfaces. The method is based on the following assumption: if a fin on a body has the same normal-force coefficient as a wing alone composed of two of the same fins joined together at their root chords, then the other force and moment coefficients of the fin and the wing alone are the same including the nonlinearities. The method can be used for deflected fins at arbitrary bank angles and at high angles of attack. In the paper, a full derivation of the method is given, its accuracy demonstrated and its use in extending missile data bases is shown.

  6. Aerodynamic characteristics of cruciform missiles at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesieutre, Daniel J.; Mendenhall, Michael R.; Nazario, Susana M.; Hemsch, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    An aerodynamic prediction method for missile aerodynamic performance and preliminary design has been developed to utilize a newly available systematic fin data base and an improved equivalent angle of attack methodology. The method predicts total aerodynamic loads and individual fin forces and moments for body-tail (wing-body) and canard-body-tail configurations with cruciform fin arrangements. The data base and the prediction method are valid for angles of attack up to 45 deg, arbitrary roll angles, fin deflection angles between -40 deg and 40 deg, Mach numbers between 0.6 and 4.5, and fin aspect ratios between 0.25 and 4.0. The equivalent angle of attack concept is employed to include the effects of vorticity and geometric scaling.

  7. A Method for Obtaining the Nonlinear Aerodynamic Stability Characteristics of Bodies of Revolution from Free-Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Donn B.

    1961-01-01

    A method is presented for obtaining the nonlinear aerodynamic stability characteristics of bodies of revolution from free-flight test.s The necessary conditions for the application of this method are: (1) that the roll rate and damping encountered in a single cycle of oscillation be small, and (2) that the resulting motion be reasonably planar. Four approximations to the nonlinear restoring moment are considered and solutions are obtained in closed form: 1. A single-term polynomial in an arbitrary power of the angle of attack. 2. A two-term polynomial having linear and cubic terms. 3. A three-term polynomial having linear, quadratic, and cubic terms. 4. A three-term polynomial having linear, quadratic, and cubic terms. An iteration procedure is formulated to allow the use of each of these approximations for obtaining the aerodynamic coefficients of bodies of revolution from free-flight test data. It is found that although the equations that are solved pertain strictly to planar motion, the solutions are applicable to motions that deviate to a fairly large degree from planar motion.

  8. Protein Residue Contacts and Prediction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Badri

    2016-01-01

    In the field of computational structural proteomics, contact predictions have shown new prospects of solving the longstanding problem of ab initio protein structure prediction. In the last few years, application of deep learning algorithms and availability of large protein sequence databases, combined with improvement in methods that derive contacts from multiple sequence alignments, have shown a huge increase in the precision of contact prediction. In addition, these predicted contacts have also been used to build three-dimensional models from scratch. In this chapter, we briefly discuss many elements of protein residue–residue contacts and the methods available for prediction, focusing on a state-of-the-art contact prediction tool, DNcon. Illustrating with a case study, we describe how DNcon can be used to make ab initio contact predictions for a given protein sequence and discuss how the predicted contacts may be analyzed and evaluated. PMID:27115648

  9. Protein Residue Contacts and Prediction Methods.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Badri; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    In the field of computational structural proteomics, contact predictions have shown new prospects of solving the longstanding problem of ab initio protein structure prediction. In the last few years, application of deep learning algorithms and availability of large protein sequence databases, combined with improvement in methods that derive contacts from multiple sequence alignments, have shown a huge increase in the precision of contact prediction. In addition, these predicted contacts have also been used to build three-dimensional models from scratch.In this chapter, we briefly discuss many elements of protein residue-residue contacts and the methods available for prediction, focusing on a state-of-the-art contact prediction tool, DNcon. Illustrating with a case study, we describe how DNcon can be used to make ab initio contact predictions for a given protein sequence and discuss how the predicted contacts may be analyzed and evaluated. PMID:27115648

  10. Tactical missile aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J. (Editor); Nielsen, Jack N. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on tactical missile aerodynamics discusses autopilot-related aerodynamic design considerations, flow visualization methods' role in the study of high angle-of-attack aerodynamics, low aspect ratio wing behavior at high angle-of-attack, supersonic airbreathing propulsion system inlet design, missile bodies with noncircular cross section and bank-to-turn maneuvering capabilities, 'waverider' supersonic cruise missile concepts and design methods, asymmetric vortex sheding phenomena from bodies-of-revolution, and swept shock wave/boundary layer interaction phenomena. Also discussed are the assessment of aerodynamic drag in tactical missiles, the analysis of supersonic missile aerodynamic heating, the 'equivalent angle-of-attack' concept for engineering analysis, the vortex cloud model for body vortex shedding and tracking, paneling methods with vorticity effects and corrections for nonlinear compressibility, the application of supersonic full potential method to missile bodies, Euler space marching methods for missiles, three-dimensional missile boundary layers, and an analysis of exhaust plumes and their interaction with missile airframes.

  11. Aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, E. M.; Chapman, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    The procedure of using numerical optimization methods coupled with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes for the development of an aerodynamic design is examined. Several approaches that replace wind tunnel tests, develop pressure distributions and derive designs, or fulfill preset design criteria are presented. The method of Aerodynamic Design by Numerical Optimization (ADNO) is described and illustrated with examples.

  12. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of a 1484 ft/sec Tip Speed Quiet High-Speed Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Aerodynamic simulations of a 1484 ft/sec tip speed quiet high-speed fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, low-noise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone experimental testing in the 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating points simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, which includes a core duct and a bypass duct that merge upstream of the fan system nozzle. As a result, only fan rotational speed and the system bypass ratio, set by means of a translating nozzle plug, were adjusted in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. Computed blade row flow fields at all fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the computed flow fields reveals no excessive or critical boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems, with the exception of the hub boundary layer at the core duct entrance. At that location a significant flow separation is present. The region of local flow

  13. A Semigraphical Method of Applying Impact Theory to an Arbitrary Body to Obtain the Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics at Angle of Attack and Sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Charlie M., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    A simple semigraphical method of applying impact theory to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of an arbitrary body at combined angle of attack and sideslip is presented. The necessary equations are derived, a general procedure for application is outlined, and the effects of graphical errors and areas of application are discussed. One of the features of the present method is the requirement of only one graphical construction for any combination of angle of attack and sideslip. As an example application the present method is applied to a blunted elliptical cone in order to obtain the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics at an angle of attack of 40 degrees and an angle of sideslip of 0 degrees.

  14. An Aerodynamic Force Estimation Method for Winged Models at the JAXA 60cm Magnetic Suspension and Balance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    澤田, 秀夫

    The aerodynamic performance of an AGARD-B model, as an example of a winged model, was measured in a low-speed wind tunnel equipped with the JAXA 60cm Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (MSBS). The flow speed was in the range between 25m/s and 35m/s, and the angle of attack and the yaw angle were in the range of [- 8, 4] and [- 3, 3] degrees, respectively. Six components of the aerodynamic force were evaluated by using the control coil currents of the MSBS. In evaluating the drag, the effect of the lift on the drag must be evaluated at MSBS when the lift is much larger than drag. A new evaluation method for drag and lift was proposed and was examined successfully by subjecting the model to the same loads as in the wind tunnel test. The drag coefficient at zero lift and the derivatives of the lift and pitching moment coefficient with respect to the angle of attack were evaluated and compared with other source data sets. The obtained data agreed well with the corresponding values of the other sources. The side force, yawing moment and rolling moment coefficients were also evaluated on the basis of corresponding calibration test results, and reasonable results were obtained, although they could not be compared due to the lack of reliable data sets.

  15. Study of the integration of wind tunnel and computational methods for aerodynamic configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, Lindsey E.; Ashby, Dale L.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of using a low-order panel code to estimate wind tunnel wall corrections. The corrections were found by two computations. The first computation included the test model and the surrounding wind tunnel walls, while in the second computation the wind tunnel walls were removed. The difference between the force and moment coefficients obtained by comparing these two cases allowed the determination of the wall corrections. The technique was verified by matching the test-section, wall-pressure signature from a wind tunnel test with the signature predicted by the panel code. To prove the viability of the technique, two cases were considered. The first was a two-dimensional high-lift wing with a flap that was tested in the 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The second was a 1/32-scale model of the F/A-18 aircraft which was tested in the low-speed wind tunnel at San Diego State University. The panel code used was PMARC (Panel Method Ames Research Center). Results of this study indicate that the proposed wind tunnel wall correction method is comparable to other methods and that it also inherently includes the corrections due to model blockage and wing lift.

  16. A method for predicting full scale buffet response with rigid wind tunnel model fluctuating pressure data. Volume 1: Prediction method development and assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.; Benepe, D. B.; Watts, D.; Waner, P. G.

    1978-01-01

    The method requires unsteady aerodynamic forces, natural airplane modes, and the measured pressure data as input. A gust response computer program is used to calculate buffet response due to the forcing function posed by the measured pressure data. By calculating both symmetric and antisymmetric solutions, upper and lower bounds on full-scale buffet response are formed. Comparisons of predictions with flight test results are made and the effects of horizontal tail loads and static aeroelasticity are shown. Discussions are also presented on the effects of primary wing torsion modes, chordwise and spanwise phase angles, and altitude.

  17. Aerodynamic Synthesis of Biocompatible Matrices and their Functionalization by Nanoparticles Obtained by the Method of Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol'basov, E. N.; Lapin, I. N.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Svetlichnyi, V. A.

    2014-07-01

    For applications in tissue engineering, three-dimensional biodegradable polymeric matrices, whose surface is functionalized by nanoparticles obtained in the liquid phase by the method of laser ablation from bulk metal (Ag or Zn) targets, are synthesized by the method of aerodynamic synthesis from a solution of poly-l-lactide acid. Their properties are investigated. It is demonstrated that the matrices represent a very porous spatial fibrous structure consisting of polymorphic fibers with diameters from 0.25 to 2.5 μm. It is established that functional coatings consisting of agglomerates of semiconductor (ZnO) or metal (Ag) nanoparticles can be produced on the surface of structural matrix elements by repeated matrix impregnation.

  18. Aerodynamic shape optimization using control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James

    1996-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape design has long persisted as a difficult scientific challenge due its highly nonlinear flow physics and daunting geometric complexity. However, with the emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it has become possible to make accurate predictions of flows which are not dominated by viscous effects. It is thus worthwhile to explore the extension of CFD methods for flow analysis to the treatment of aerodynamic shape design. Two new aerodynamic shape design methods are developed which combine existing CFD technology, optimal control theory, and numerical optimization techniques. Flow analysis methods for the potential flow equation and the Euler equations form the basis of the two respective design methods. In each case, optimal control theory is used to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which provides the necessary gradient information to a numerical optimization method much more efficiently then by conventional finite differencing. Each technique uses a quasi-Newton numerical optimization algorithm to drive an aerodynamic objective function toward a minimum. An analytic grid perturbation method is developed to modify body fitted meshes to accommodate shape changes during the design process. Both Hicks-Henne perturbation functions and B-spline control points are explored as suitable design variables. The new methods prove to be computationally efficient and robust, and can be used for practical airfoil design including geometric and aerodynamic constraints. Objective functions are chosen to allow both inverse design to a target pressure distribution and wave drag minimization. Several design cases are presented for each method illustrating its practicality and efficiency. These include non-lifting and lifting airfoils operating at both subsonic and transonic conditions.

  19. Development of an Aerodynamic Analysis Method and Database for the SLS Service Module Panel Jettison Event Utilizing Inviscid CFD and MATLAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applebaum, Michael P.; Hall, Leslie, H.; Eppard, William M.; Purinton, David C.; Campbell, John R.; Blevins, John A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development, testing, and utilization of an aerodynamic force and moment database for the Space Launch System (SLS) Service Module (SM) panel jettison event. The database is a combination of inviscid Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) data and MATLAB code written to query the data at input values of vehicle/SM panel parameters and return the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients of the panels as they are jettisoned from the vehicle. The database encompasses over 5000 CFD simulations with the panels either in the initial stages of separation where they are hinged to the vehicle, in close proximity to the vehicle, or far enough from the vehicle that body interference effects are neglected. A series of viscous CFD check cases were performed to assess the accuracy of the Euler solutions for this class of problem and good agreement was obtained. The ultimate goal of the panel jettison database was to create a tool that could be coupled with any 6-Degree-Of-Freedom (DOF) dynamics model to rapidly predict SM panel separation from the SLS vehicle in a quasi-unsteady manner. Results are presented for panel jettison simulations that utilize the database at various SLS flight conditions. These results compare favorably to an approach that directly couples a 6-DOF model with the Cart3D Euler flow solver and obtains solutions for the panels at exact locations. This paper demonstrates a method of using inviscid CFD simulations coupled with a 6-DOF model that provides adequate fidelity to capture the physics of this complex multiple moving-body panel separation event.

  20. The improved ET calculation for semiarid region based on an innovative aerodynamic roughness inversion method using multi-source remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Qiang; Wu, Bingfang; Zhu, Weiwei

    2014-03-01

    The aerodynamic roughness is one of the major parameters in describing the turbulent exchange process between terrestrial and atmosphere. Remote Sensing is recognized as an effective way to inverse this parameter at the regional scale. However, in the long time the inversion method is either dependent on the lookup table for different land covers or the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) factor only, which plays a very limited role in describing the spatial heterogeneity of this parameter and the evapotranspiration (ET) for different land covers. In fact, the aerodynamic roughness is influenced by different factors at the same time, including the roughness unit for hard surfaces, the vegetation dynamic growth and the undulating terrain. Therefore, this paper aims at developing an innovative aerodynamic roughness inversion method based on multi-source remote sensing data in a semiarid region, within the upper and middle reaches of Heihe River Basin. The radar backscattering coefficient was used to inverse the micro-relief of the hard surface. The NDVI was utilized to reflect the dynamic change of vegetated surface. Finally, the slope extracted from SRTM DEM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Digital Elevation Model) was used to correct terrain influence. The inversed aerodynamic roughness was imported into ETWatch system to validate the availability. The inversed and tested results show it plays a significant role in improving the spatial heterogeneity of the aerodynamic roughness and related ET for the experimental site.

  1. Efficient Global Aerodynamic Modeling from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for identifying global aerodynamic models from flight data in an efficient manner is explained and demonstrated. A novel experiment design technique was used to obtain dynamic flight data over a range of flight conditions with a single flight maneuver. Multivariate polynomials and polynomial splines were used with orthogonalization techniques and statistical modeling metrics to synthesize global nonlinear aerodynamic models directly and completely from flight data alone. Simulation data and flight data from a subscale twin-engine jet transport aircraft were used to demonstrate the techniques. Results showed that global multivariate nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies could be accurately identified using flight data from a single maneuver. Flight-derived global aerodynamic model structures, model parameter estimates, and associated uncertainties were provided for all six nondimensional force and moment coefficients for the test aircraft. These models were combined with a propulsion model identified from engine ground test data to produce a high-fidelity nonlinear flight simulation very efficiently. Prediction testing using a multi-axis maneuver showed that the identified global model accurately predicted aircraft responses.

  2. A Synthesis of Hybrid RANS/LES CFD Results for F-16XL Aircraft Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.; Park, Michael A.; Hitzel, Stephan M.; Jirasek, Adam; Lofthouse, Andrew J.; Morton, Scott A.; McDaniel, David R.; Rizzi, Arthur M.

    2015-01-01

    A synthesis is presented of recent numerical predictions for the F-16XL aircraft flow fields and aerodynamics. The computational results were all performed with hybrid RANS/LES formulations, with an emphasis on unsteady flows and subsequent aerodynamics, and results from five computational methods are included. The work was focused on one particular low-speed, high angle-of-attack flight test condition, and comparisons against flight-test data are included. This work represents the third coordinated effort using the F-16XL aircraft, and a unique flight-test data set, to advance our knowledge of slender airframe aerodynamics as well as our capability for predicting these aerodynamics with advanced CFD formulations. The prior efforts were identified as Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project International, with the acronyms CAWAPI and CAWAPI-2. All information in this paper is in the public domain.

  3. Crystallization mechanism and kinetics of mayenite glass prepared by aerodynamic levitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jiao; Liu, Yan; Gu, Yanjing; Pan, Xiuhong; Zheng, Xiaojie; Wang, Wei; Yu, Huimei; Yu, Jianding

    2016-05-01

    The mayenite glass with a wide high-temperature stability (ΔT=131∘C) was innovatively synthesized by the aerodynamic levitation (ADL) containerless technique without conventional glass-forming addictives. The crystallization mechanism and kinetics of mayenite glass were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scaning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectra and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. The crystallization mechanism study revealed that structure and morphology mainly evolved near the crystallization peak temperature by the networking process of isolated AlO4 tetrahedra units, resulting in the growth mechanism changing from “two-dimensional” to “three-dimensional”. Crystallization kinetics calculations based on the non-isothermal Matusita model indicated that the activation energy for the crystallization of mayenite glass was 844kJṡmol‑1. The calculated growth morphology parameters (m and n) also confirmed the surface crystallization along with bulk crystallization mechanism for the mayenite glass. This present study supplied a thermal-physical understanding about the crystallization of mayenite glass, which could be further applied in the exploitation of glass/glass-ceramics in the CaO-Al2O3 binary system.

  4. High-order Method for Modeling of Aerodynamics of Flapping Wings: Airfoil-Gust Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Harish; Povitsky, Alex

    2011-11-01

    The use of Micro Air Vehicles (MAV) with flapping wing motion has received considerable attention in the recent years due to their great potential in military and commercial applications. A number of analytical, experimental, and computational studies have been performed to investigate the aerodynamic performance of MAV. However, most of these studies have been performed under idealized operating conditions. Hence, there is a lack of detailed knowledge on the operation of MAV in complex flow environments including flights in wind gust and near obstacles. The current numerical study investigates the performance of a rigid MAV in the presence of periodic gust for two different kinematic motions: plunge and pitch. Two-dimensional rigid airfoils are taken as prototypes of MAVs wings. The gust is assumed to be sinusoidal and modeled as a source term in the Navier-Stokes equations to avoid the implementation of special boundary conditions. The investigation showed a significant drop in the average lift force for the plunging motion in the presence of the gust compared to the pitching motion.

  5. Reduction of computer usage costs in predicting unsteady aerodynamic loadings caused by control surface motions: Computer program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrarca, J. R.; Harrison, B. A.; Redman, M. C.; Rowe, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed to calculate unsteady loadings caused by motions of lifting surfaces with leading edge and trailing edge controls based on the subsonic kernel function approach. The pressure singularities at hinge line and side edges were extracted analytically as a preliminary step to solving the integral equation of collocation. The program calculates generalized aerodynamic forces for user supplied deflection modes. Optional intermediate output includes pressure at an array of points, and sectional generalized forces. From one to six controls on the half span can be accomodated.

  6. Wind-tunnel/flight correlation study of aerodynamic characteristics of a large flexible supersonic cruise airplane (XB-70-1). 3: A comparison between characteristics predicted from wind-tunnel measurements and those measured in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaiz, H. H.; Peterson, J. B., Jr.; Daugherty, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A program was undertaken by NASA to evaluate the accuracy of a method for predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of large supersonic cruise airplanes. This program compared predicted and flight-measured lift, drag, angle of attack, and control surface deflection for the XB-70-1 airplane for 14 flight conditions with a Mach number range from 0.76 to 2.56. The predictions were derived from the wind-tunnel test data of a 0.03-scale model of the XB-70-1 airplane fabricated to represent the aeroelastically deformed shape at a 2.5 Mach number cruise condition. Corrections for shape variations at the other Mach numbers were included in the prediction. For most cases, differences between predicted and measured values were within the accuracy of the comparison. However, there were significant differences at transonic Mach numbers. At a Mach number of 1.06 differences were as large as 27 percent in the drag coefficients and 20 deg in the elevator deflections. A brief analysis indicated that a significant part of the difference between drag coefficients was due to the incorrect prediction of the control surface deflection required to trim the airplane.

  7. Correlation of Puma airfoils - Evaluation of CFD prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawn, Roger C.; Desopper, Andre; Miller, Judith; Jones, Alan

    1989-01-01

    A cooperative program was undertaken by research organizations in England, France, Australia and the U.S. to study the capabilities of computational fluid dynamics codes (CFD) to predict the aerodynamic loading on helicopter rotor blades. The program goal is to compare predictions with experimental data for flight tests of a research Puma helicopter with rectangular and swept tip blades. Two topics are studied. First, computed results from three CFD codes are compared for flight test cases where all three codes use the same partial inflow-angle boundary conditions. Second, one of the CFD codes (FPR) is iteratively coupled with the CAMRAD/JA heilcopter performance code. These results are compared with experimental data and with an uncoupled CAMRAD/JA solution. The influence of flow field unsteadiness is found to play an important role in the blade aerodynamics. Alternate boundary conditions are suggested in order to properly model this unsteadiness in the CFD codes.

  8. Correlation of Puma airloads: Evaluation of CFD prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawn, Roger C.; Desopper, Andre; Miller, Judith; Jones, Alan

    1989-01-01

    A cooperative program was undertaken by research organizations in England, France, Australia and the U.S. to study the capabilities of computational fluid dynamics codes (CFD) to predict the aerodynamic loading on helicopter rotor blades. The program goal is to compare predictions with experimental data for flight tests of a research Puma helicopter with rectangular and swept tip blades. Two topics are studied. First, computed results from three CFD codes are compared for flight test cases where all three codes use the same partial inflow-angle boundary conditions. Second, one of the CFD codes (FPR) is iteratively coupled with the CAMRAD/JA helicopter performance code. These results are compared with experimental data and with an uncoupled CAMRAD/JA solution. The influence of flow field unsteadiness is found to play an important role in the blade aerodynamics. Alternate boundary conditions are suggested in order to properly model this unsteadiness in the CFD codes.

  9. Method determining the nature of oscillating motion of the aircraft based on the analysis of coefficients of aerodynamic damping derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyadkin, A. A.; Khatuntseva, O. N.

    2014-12-01

    Analysis of experimental data shows that the nature of the oscillating motion of an aircraft does not depend uniquely on the value of the coefficients of aerodynamic damping derivatives. The present work makes an attempt to explain this phenomenon and develops a methodology to adequately characterize the oscillating motion of aircraft based on the analysis of the coefficients of aerodynamic damping derivatives.

  10. An interaction algorithm for prediction of mean and fluctuating velocities in two-dimensional aerodynamic wake flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Orzechowski, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented yielding sets of partial differential equations for determination of turbulent aerodynamic flowfields in the vicinity of an airfoil trailing edge. A four phase interaction algorithm is derived to complete the analysis. Following input, the first computational phase is an elementary viscous corrected two dimensional potential flow solution yielding an estimate of the inviscid-flow induced pressure distribution. Phase C involves solution of the turbulent two dimensional boundary layer equations over the trailing edge, with transition to a two dimensional parabolic Navier-Stokes equation system describing the near-wake merging of the upper and lower surface boundary layers. An iteration provides refinement of the potential flow induced pressure coupling to the viscous flow solutions. The final phase is a complete two dimensional Navier-Stokes analysis of the wake flow in the vicinity of a blunt-bases airfoil. A finite element numerical algorithm is presented which is applicable to solution of all partial differential equation sets of inviscid-viscous aerodynamic interaction algorithm. Numerical results are discussed.

  11. Advanced prediction technique for the low speed aerodynamics of V/STOL aircraft. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, T. D.; Worthey, M. K.

    1984-01-01

    A computerized prediction method known as the Vought V/STOL Aircraft Propulsive Effects computer program (VAPE) for propulsive induced forces and moments in transition and Short TakeOff and Landing (STOL) flight is improved and evaluated. The VAPE program is capable of evaluating: (1) effects of relative wind about an aircraft, (2) effects of propulsive lift jet entrainment, vorticity and flow blockage, (3) effects of engine inlet flow on the aircraft flow field, (4) engine inlet forces and moments including inlet separation, (5) ground effects in the STOL region of flight, and (6) viscous effects on lifting surfaces.

  12. Hierarchical Ensemble Methods for Protein Function Prediction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Protein function prediction is a complex multiclass multilabel classification problem, characterized by multiple issues such as the incompleteness of the available annotations, the integration of multiple sources of high dimensional biomolecular data, the unbalance of several functional classes, and the difficulty of univocally determining negative examples. Moreover, the hierarchical relationships between functional classes that characterize both the Gene Ontology and FunCat taxonomies motivate the development of hierarchy-aware prediction methods that showed significantly better performances than hierarchical-unaware “flat” prediction methods. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive review of hierarchical methods for protein function prediction based on ensembles of learning machines. According to this general approach, a separate learning machine is trained to learn a specific functional term and then the resulting predictions are assembled in a “consensus” ensemble decision, taking into account the hierarchical relationships between classes. The main hierarchical ensemble methods proposed in the literature are discussed in the context of existing computational methods for protein function prediction, highlighting their characteristics, advantages, and limitations. Open problems of this exciting research area of computational biology are finally considered, outlining novel perspectives for future research. PMID:25937954

  13. Structural load prediction methods for space payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, B. K.

    1982-01-01

    The state of the art in structural loads prediction procedures for spacecraft is summarized. Three categories of prediction techniques delineated by cost, complexity, comprehensiveness, accuracy, and applications are outlined. The lowest cost method has been used for earth resources, communications, and weather satellites, the medium cost method for sun-synchronous orbits and the large space telescope, and the most expensive for planetary missions, comet rendezvous, and out-of-ecliptic orbits, all assuming Shuttle launch. The lowest cost method involves a mass-acceleration curve. A shock spectra technique predicts a least upper bound for loads. A recovered transient method analyzes the interface acceleration of two connected launch vehicles. The most accurate method devised thus far is a transient analysis of the total launch vehicle/payload dynamic system.

  14. HYSHOT-2 Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, T.; Owen, R.; Walton, C.

    2005-02-01

    The scramjet flight test Hyshot-2, flew on the 30 July 2002. The programme, led by the University of Queensland, had the primary objective of obtaining supersonic combustion data in flight for comparison with measurements made in shock tunnels. QinetiQ was one of the sponsors, and also provided aerodynamic data and trajectory predictions for the ballistic re-entry of the spinning sounding rocket. The unconventional missile geometry created by the nose-mounted asymmetric-scramjet in conjunction with the high angle of attack during re-entry makes the problem interesting. This paper presents the wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamic calculations used as input for the trajectory prediction. Indirect comparison is made with data obtained in the Hyshot-2 flight using a 6 degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation.

  15. An Investigation of the Impact of Aerodynamic Model Fidelity on Close-In Combat Effectiveness Prediction in Piloted Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persing, T. Ray; Bellish, Christine A.; Brandon, Jay; Kenney, P. Sean; Carzoo, Susan; Buttrill, Catherine; Guenther, Arlene

    2005-01-01

    Several aircraft airframe modeling approaches are currently being used in the DoD community for acquisition, threat evaluation, training, and other purposes. To date there has been no clear empirical study of the impact of airframe simulation fidelity on piloted real-time aircraft simulation study results, or when use of a particular level of fidelity is indicated. This paper documents a series of piloted simulation studies using three different levels of airframe model fidelity. This study was conducted using the NASA Langley Differential Maneuvering Simulator. Evaluations were conducted with three pilots for scenarios requiring extensive maneuvering of the airplanes during air combat. In many cases, a low-fidelity modified point-mass model may be sufficient to evaluate the combat effectiveness of the aircraft. However, in cases where high angle-of-attack flying qualities and aerodynamic performance are a factor or when precision tracking ability of the aircraft must be represented, use of high-fidelity models is indicated.

  16. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 2; High Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among die scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 2/Part 2 publication covers the tools and methods development session.

  17. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Suei; Lan, C. Edward

    1990-01-01

    Due to the requirement of increased performance and maneuverability, the flight envelope of a modern fighter is frequently extended to the high angle-of-attack regime. Vehicles maneuvering in this regime are subjected to nonlinear aerodynamic loads. The nonlinearities are due mainly to three-dimensional separated flow and concentrated vortex flow that occur at large angles of attack. Accurate prediction of these nonlinear airloads is of great importance in the analysis of a vehicle's flight motion and in the design of its flight control system. A satisfactory evaluation of the performance envelope of the aircraft may require a large number of coupled computations, one for each change in initial conditions. To avoid the disadvantage of solving the coupled flow-field equations and aircraft's motion equations, an alternate approach is to use a mathematical modeling to describe the steady and unsteady aerodynamics for the aircraft equations of motion. Aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a rapidly maneuvering aircraft are, in general, nonlinear functions of motion variables, their time rate of change, and the history of maneuvering. A numerical method was developed to analyze the nonlinear and time-dependent aerodynamic response to establish the generalized indicial function in terms of motion variables and their time rates of change.

  18. A program to compute three-dimensional subsonic unsteady aerodynamic characteristics using the doublet lattic method, L216 (DUBFLX). Volume 1: Engineering and usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, M.; Harrison, B. A.

    1979-01-01

    The program input presented consists of configuration geometry, aerodynamic parameters, and modal data; output includes element geometry, pressure difference distributions, integrated aerodynamic coefficients, stability derivatives, generalized aerodynamic forces, and aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices. Optionally, modal data may be input on magnetic file (tape or disk), and certain geometric and aerodynamic output may be saved for subsequent use.

  19. A T-EOF Based Prediction Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yung-An

    2002-01-01

    A new statistical time series prediction method based on temporal empirical orthogonal function (T-EOF) is introduced in this study. This method first applies singular spectrum analysis (SSA) to extract dominant T-EOFs from historical data. Then, the most recent data are projected onto an optimal subset of the T-EOFs to estimate the corresponding temporal principal components (T-PCs). Finally, a forecast is constructed from these T-EOFs and T-PCs. Results from forecast experiments on the El Niño sea surface temperature (SST) indices from 1993 to 2000 showed that this method consistently yielded better correlation skill than autoregressive models for a lead time longer than 6 months. Furthermore, the correlation skills of this method in predicting Niño-3 index remained above 0.5 for a lead time up to 36 months during this period. However, this method still encountered the `spring barrier' problem. Because the 1990s exhibited relatively weak spring barrier, these results indicate that the T-EOF based prediction method has certain extended forecasting capability in the period when the spring barrier is weak. They also suggest that the potential predictability of ENSO in a certain period may be longer than previously thought.

  20. Vortex model for airfoil stall prediction using an interactive boundary-layer method

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, P.; Coiro, D.P.; Bertolucci, S.

    1995-09-01

    An interactive boundary-layer method is developed that is able to predict the aerodynamic performance of airfoils throughout the stall region. This has been achieved by taking into account the net vorticity of the flow in the turbulent separated region on the suction surface. This vorticity is modelled as an inviscid counterclockwise vortex located above the trailing edge, whose direction of rotation is justified by global conservation of angular momentum. An empirical law for the intensity of the vortex as a function of a dimensionless parameter based on flow conditions is presented. Excellent comparisons with measured lift and moment curves and pressure distributions are then presented and discussed.

  1. GECluster: a novel protein complex prediction method

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lingtao; Liu, Guixia; Wang, Han; Tian, Yuan; Zhou, Zhihui; Han, Liang; Yan, Lun

    2014-01-01

    Identification of protein complexes is of great importance in the understanding of cellular organization and functions. Traditional computational protein complex prediction methods mainly rely on the topology of protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks but seldom take biological information of proteins (such as Gene Ontology (GO)) into consideration. Meanwhile, the environment relevant analysis of protein complex evolution has been poorly studied, partly due to the lack of high-precision protein complex datasets. In this paper, a combined PPI network is introduced to predict protein complexes which integrate both GO and expression value of relevant protein-coding genes. A novel protein complex prediction method GECluster (Gene Expression Cluster) was proposed based on a seed node expansion strategy, in which a combined PPI network was utilized. GECluster was applied to a training combined PPI network and it predicted more credible complexes than peer methods. The results indicate that using a combined PPI network can efficiently improve protein complex prediction accuracy. In order to study protein complex evolution within cells due to changes in the living environment surrounding cells, GECluster was applied to seven combined PPI networks constructed using the data of a test set including yeast response to stress throughout a wine fermentation process. Our results showed that with the rise of alcohol concentration, protein complexes within yeast cells gradually evolve from one state to another. Besides this, the number of core and attachment proteins within a protein complex both changed significantly. PMID:26019559

  2. Synthesized airfoil data method for prediction of dynamic stall and unsteady airloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangwani, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The synthesized unsteady airfoil data method, which accurately describes the unsteady aerodynamic characteristics of stalled airfoils in the time domain, is expanded and improved. Nine sets of unsteady drag data are synthesized, providing a basis for the successful expansion of the method to include the computation of unsteady pressure drag of airfoils and rotor blades. An improved prediction model for airfoil flow reattachment is incorporated into the method. Application of the model results in a better correlation of analytic predictions with measured full-scale helicopter blade loads and stress data. The results show that it is feasible to generalize the empirical parameters embedded in the method over a range of angles of attack, Mach number, airfoil shape, and sweep angle.

  3. Agglomeration multigrid methods with implicit Runge-Kutta smoothers applied to aerodynamic simulations on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    For unstructured finite volume methods an agglomeration multigrid with an implicit multistage Runge-Kutta method as a smoother is developed for solving the compressible Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The implicit Runge-Kutta method is interpreted as a preconditioned explicit Runge-Kutta method. The construction of the preconditioner is based on an approximate derivative. The linear systems are solved approximately with a symmetric Gauss-Seidel method. To significantly improve this solution method grid anisotropy is treated within the Gauss-Seidel iteration in such a way that the strong couplings in the linear system are resolved by tridiagonal systems constructed along these directions of strong coupling. The agglomeration strategy is adapted to this procedure by taking into account exactly these anisotropies in such a way that a directional coarsening is applied along these directions of strong coupling. Turbulence effects are included by a Spalart-Allmaras model, and the additional transport-type equation is approximately solved in a loosely coupled manner with the same method. For two-dimensional and three-dimensional numerical examples and a variety of differently generated meshes we show the wide range of applicability of the solution method. Finally, we exploit the GMRES method to determine approximate spectral information of the linearized RANS equations. This approximate spectral information is used to discuss and compare characteristics of multistage Runge-Kutta methods.

  4. Novel hyperspectral prediction method and apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemeny, Gabor J.; Crothers, Natalie A.; Groth, Gard A.; Speck, Kathy A.; Marbach, Ralf

    2009-05-01

    Both the power and the challenge of hyperspectral technologies is the very large amount of data produced by spectral cameras. While off-line methodologies allow the collection of gigabytes of data, extended data analysis sessions are required to convert the data into useful information. In contrast, real-time monitoring, such as on-line process control, requires that compression of spectral data and analysis occur at a sustained full camera data rate. Efficient, high-speed practical methods for calibration and prediction are therefore sought to optimize the value of hyperspectral imaging. A novel method of matched filtering known as science based multivariate calibration (SBC) was developed for hyperspectral calibration. Classical (MLR) and inverse (PLS, PCR) methods are combined by spectroscopically measuring the spectral "signal" and by statistically estimating the spectral "noise." The accuracy of the inverse model is thus combined with the easy interpretability of the classical model. The SBC method is optimized for hyperspectral data in the Hyper-CalTM software used for the present work. The prediction algorithms can then be downloaded into a dedicated FPGA based High-Speed Prediction EngineTM module. Spectral pretreatments and calibration coefficients are stored on interchangeable SD memory cards, and predicted compositions are produced on a USB interface at real-time camera output rates. Applications include minerals, pharmaceuticals, food processing and remote sensing.

  5. Derivation of aerodynamic kernel functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.; Ventres, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    The method of Fourier transforms is used to determine the kernel function which relates the pressure on a lifting surface to the prescribed downwash within the framework of Dowell's (1971) shear flow model. This model is intended to improve upon the potential flow aerodynamic model by allowing for the aerodynamic boundary layer effects neglected in the potential flow model. For simplicity, incompressible, steady flow is considered. The proposed method is illustrated by deriving known results from potential flow theory.

  6. Aerodynamic research on tipvane windturbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbussel, G. J. W.; Vanholten, T.; Vankuik, G. A. M.

    1982-09-01

    Tipvanes are small auxiliary wings mounted at the tips of windturbine blades in such a way that a diffuser effect is generated, resulting in a mass flow augmentation through the turbine disc. For predicting aerodynamic loads on the tipvane wind turbine, the acceleration potential is used and an expansion method is applied. In its simplest form, this method can essentially be classified as a lifting line approach, however, with a proper choice of the basis load distributions of the lifting line, the numerical integration of the pressurefield becomes one dimensional. the integration of the other variable can be performed analytically. The complete analytical expression for the pressure field consists of two series of basic pressure fields. One series is related to the basic load distributions over the turbineblade, and the other series to the basic load distribution over the tipvane.

  7. Improvement of the cruise performances of a wing by means of aerodynamic optimization. Validation with a Far-Field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Varona, J.; Ponsin Roca, J.

    2015-06-01

    Under a contract with AIRBUS MILITARY (AI-M), an exercise to analyze the potential of optimization techniques to improve the wing performances at cruise conditions has been carried out by using an in-house design code. The original wing was provided by AI-M and several constraints were posed for the redesign. To maximize the aerodynamic efficiency at cruise, optimizations were performed using the design techniques developed internally at INTA under a research program (Programa de Termofluidodinámica). The code is a gradient-based optimizaa tion code, which uses classical finite differences approach for gradient computations. Several techniques for search direction computation are implemented for unconstrained and constrained problems. Techniques for geometry modifications are based on different approaches which include perturbation functions for the thickness and/or mean line distributions and others by Bézier curves fitting of certain degree. It is very e important to afford a real design which involves several constraints that reduce significantly the feasible design space. And the assessment of the code is needed in order to check the capabilities and the possible drawbacks. Lessons learnt will help in the development of future enhancements. In addition, the validation of the results was done using also the well-known TAU flow solver and a far-field drag method in order to determine accurately the improvement in terms of drag counts.

  8. Predicting abrasive wear with coupled Lagrangian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Florian; Eberhard, Peter

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a mesh-less approach for the simulation of a fluid with particle loading and the prediction of abrasive wear is presented. We are using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method for modeling the fluid and the discrete element method (DEM) for the solid particles, which represent the loading of the fluid. These Lagrangian methods are used to describe heavily sloshing fluids with their free surfaces as well as the interface between the fluid and the solid particles accurately. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations model is applied for handling turbulences. We are predicting abrasive wear on the boundary geometry with two different wear models taking cutting and deformation mechanisms into account. The boundary geometry is discretized with special DEM particles. In doing so, it is possible to use the same particle type for both the calculation of the boundary conditions for the SPH method as well as the DEM and for predicting the abrasive wear. After a brief introduction to the SPH method and the DEM, the handling of the boundary and the coupling of the fluid and the solid particles are discussed. Then, the applied wear models are presented and the simulation scenarios are described. The first numerical experiment is the simulation of a fluid with loading which is sloshing inside a tank. The second numerical experiment is the simulation of the impact of a free jet with loading to a simplified pelton bucket. We are especially investigating the wear patterns inside the tank and the bucket.

  9. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied transonic aerodynamic wing design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1989-01-01

    An inverse wing design method was developed around an existing transonic wing analysis code. The original analysis code, TAWFIVE, has as its core the numerical potential flow solver, FLO30, developed by Jameson and Caughey. Features of the analysis code include a finite-volume formulation; wing and fuselage fitted, curvilinear grid mesh; and a viscous boundary layer correction that also accounts for viscous wake thickness and curvature. The development of the inverse methods as an extension of previous methods existing for design in Cartesian coordinates is presented. Results are shown for inviscid wing design cases in super-critical flow regimes. The test cases selected also demonstrate the versatility of the design method in designing an entire wing or discontinuous sections of a wing.

  10. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied aerodynamic design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1988-01-01

    Several inverse methods have been compared and initial results indicate that differences in results are primarily due to coordinate systems and fuselage representations and not to design procedures. Further, results from a direct-inverse method that includes 3-D wing boundary layer effects, wake curvature, and wake displacement are presented. These results show that boundary layer displacements must be included in the design process for accurate results.

  11. Transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doig, G.

    2014-08-01

    A review of recent and historical work in the field of transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics has been conducted, focussing on applied research on wings and aircraft, present and future ground transportation, projectiles, rocket sleds and other related bodies which travel in close ground proximity in the compressible regime. Methods for ground testing are described and evaluated, noting that wind tunnel testing is best performed with a symmetry model in the absence of a moving ground; sled or rail testing is ultimately preferable, though considerably more expensive. Findings are reported on shock-related ground influence on aerodynamic forces and moments in and accelerating through the transonic regime - where force reversals and the early onset of local supersonic flow is prevalent - as well as more predictable behaviours in fully supersonic to hypersonic ground effect flows.

  12. Progress in unstructured-grid methods development for unsteady aerodynamic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1992-01-01

    The development of unstructured-grid methods for the solution of the equations of fluid flow and what was learned over the course of the research are summarized. The focus of the discussion is on the solution of the time-dependent Euler equations including spatial discretizations, temporal discretizations, and boundary conditions. An example calculation with an implicit upwind method using a CFL number of infinity is presented for the Boeing 747 aircraft. The results were obtained in less than one hour CPU time on a Cray-2 computer, thus, demonstrating the speed and robustness of the capability. Additional calculations for the ONERA M6 wing demonstrate the accuracy of the method through the good agreement between calculated results and experimental data for a standard transonic flow case.

  13. The present status and the future of missile aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N.

    1988-01-01

    Some recent developments in the state of the art in missile aerodynamics are reviewed. Among the subjects covered are: (1) tri-service/NASA data base, (2) wing-body interference, (3) nonlinear controls, (4) hypersonic transition, (5) vortex interference, (6) airbreathers, supersonic inlets, (7) store separation problems, (8) correlation of missile data, (9) CFD codes for complete configurations, (10) engineering prediction methods, and (11) future configurations. Suggestions are made for future research and development to advance the state of the art of missile aerodynamics.

  14. The present status and the future of missile aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in the state of the art in missile aerodynamics are reviewed. Among the subjects covered are: (1) Tri-service/NASA data base, (2) wing-body interference, (3) nonlinear controls, (4) hypersonic transition, (5) vortex interference, (6) airbreathers, supersonic inlets, (7) store separation problems, (8) correlation of missile data, (9) CFD codes for complete configurations, (10) engineering prediction methods, and (11) future configurations. Suggestions are made for future research and development to advance the state of the art of missile aerodynamics.

  15. A study of transonic aerodynamic analysis methods for use with a hypersonic aircraft synthesis code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Davis, Paul Christopher

    1992-01-01

    A means of performing routine transonic lift, drag, and moment analyses on hypersonic all-body and wing-body configurations were studied. The analysis method is to be used in conjunction with the Hypersonic Vehicle Optimization Code (HAVOC). A review of existing techniques is presented, after which three methods, chosen to represent a spectrum of capabilities, are tested and the results are compared with experimental data. The three methods consist of a wave drag code, a full potential code, and a Navier-Stokes code. The wave drag code, representing the empirical approach, has very fast CPU times, but very limited and sporadic results. The full potential code provides results which compare favorably to the wind tunnel data, but with a dramatic increase in computational time. Even more extreme is the Navier-Stokes code, which provides the most favorable and complete results, but with a very large turnaround time. The full potential code, TRANAIR, is used for additional analyses, because of the superior results it can provide over empirical and semi-empirical methods, and because of its automated grid generation. TRANAIR analyses include an all body hypersonic cruise configuration and an oblique flying wing supersonic transport.

  16. Development of direct-inverse 3-D method for applied aerodynamic design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1987-01-01

    The primary tasks performed were the continued development of inverse design procedures for the TAWFIVE code, the development of corresponding relofting and trailing edge closure procedures, and the testing of the methods for a variety of cases. The period from July 1, 1986 through December 31, 1986 is covered.

  17. Method of successive approximations for the solution of certain problems in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvets, M E

    1951-01-01

    A method of successive approximations for the solution of problems in the fields of diffusion, boundary-layer flow, and heat-transfer is illustrated by solving problems in each of these fields. In most of the examples, the approximate solutions are compared with known accurate solutions and the agreement is shown to be good.

  18. Machine learning methods for predictive proteomics.

    PubMed

    Barla, Annalisa; Jurman, Giuseppe; Riccadonna, Samantha; Merler, Stefano; Chierici, Marco; Furlanello, Cesare

    2008-03-01

    The search for predictive biomarkers of disease from high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS) data requires a complex analysis path. Preprocessing and machine-learning modules are pipelined, starting from raw spectra, to set up a predictive classifier based on a shortlist of candidate features. As a machine-learning problem, proteomic profiling on MS data needs caution like the microarray case. The risk of overfitting and of selection bias effects is pervasive: not only potential features easily outnumber samples by 10(3) times, but it is easy to neglect information-leakage effects during preprocessing from spectra to peaks. The aim of this review is to explain how to build a general purpose design analysis protocol (DAP) for predictive proteomic profiling: we show how to limit leakage due to parameter tuning and how to organize classification and ranking on large numbers of replicate versions of the original data to avoid selection bias. The DAP can be used with alternative components, i.e. with different preprocessing methods (peak clustering or wavelet based), classifiers e.g. Support Vector Machine (SVM) or feature ranking methods (recursive feature elimination or I-Relief). A procedure for assessing stability and predictive value of the resulting biomarkers' list is also provided. The approach is exemplified with experiments on synthetic datasets (from the Cromwell MS simulator) and with publicly available datasets from cancer studies. PMID:18310105

  19. Advanced adaptive computational methods for Navier-Stokes simulations in rotorcraft aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowers, S. T.; Bass, J. M.; Oden, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    A phase 2 research and development effort was conducted in area transonic, compressible, inviscid flows with an ultimate goal of numerically modeling complex flows inherent in advanced helicopter blade designs. The algorithms and methodologies therefore are classified as adaptive methods, which are error estimation techniques for approximating the local numerical error, and automatically refine or unrefine the mesh so as to deliver a given level of accuracy. The result is a scheme which attempts to produce the best possible results with the least number of grid points, degrees of freedom, and operations. These types of schemes automatically locate and resolve shocks, shear layers, and other flow details to an accuracy level specified by the user of the code. The phase 1 work involved a feasibility study of h-adaptive methods for steady viscous flows, with emphasis on accurate simulation of vortex initiation, migration, and interaction. Phase 2 effort focused on extending these algorithms and methodologies to a three-dimensional topology.

  20. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  1. An initial investigation into methods of computing transonic aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1991-01-01

    The three dimensional quasi-analytical sensitivity analysis and the ancillary driver programs are developed needed to carry out the studies and perform comparisons. The code is essentially contained in one unified package which includes the following: (1) a three dimensional transonic wing analysis program (ZEBRA); (2) a quasi-analytical portion which determines the matrix elements in the quasi-analytical equations; (3) a method for computing the sensitivity coefficients from the resulting quasi-analytical equations; (4) a package to determine for comparison purposes sensitivity coefficients via the finite difference approach; and (5) a graphics package.

  2. Method for estimating the aerodynamic coefficients of wind turbine blades at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beans, E. W.; Jakubowski, G. S.

    1983-12-01

    The method is based on the hypothesis that at high angles of attack the force on an airfoil is produced by the deflection of the fluid across the lower surface. It is also hypothesized that all airfoils behave the same regardless of shape and that the effects of circulation and skin friction are small. It is pointed out that the expression for the force N normal to the airfoil due to momentum exchange can be written in terms of the component parallel to the flow (drag) and the component perpendicular to the flow (lift). A comparison of estimated values with measured values and generally accepted data indicates that the method given here estimates coefficients which are low. It is thought that the difference may derive from the persistence of circulation at high angles of attack. Low estimates are not seen as a serious limitation to the designer of wind turbines. Owing to the fifth power diameter relation, the effect of a low estimate of performance on the inner portion of the blade is minimized.

  3. Aerodynamics: The Wright Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Jennifer Hansen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the basic principles of aerodynamics. Included in the presentation are: a few demonstrations of the principles, an explanation of the concepts of lift, drag, thrust and weight, a description of Bernoulli's principle, the concept of the airfoil (i.e., the shape of the wing) and how that effects lift, and the method of controlling an aircraft by manipulating the four forces using control surfaces.

  4. Evaluation of the constant pressure panel method (CPM) for unsteady air loads prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appa, Kari; Smith, Michael J. C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper evaluates the capability of the constant pressure panel method (CPM) code to predict unsteady aerodynamic pressures, lift and moment distributions, and generalized forces for general wing-body configurations in supersonic flow. Stability derivatives are computed and correlated for the X-29 and an Oblique Wing Research Aircraft, and a flutter analysis is carried out for a wing wind tunnel test example. Most results are shown to correlate well with test or published data. Although the emphasis of this paper is on evaluation, an improvement in the CPM code's handling of intersecting lifting surfaces is briefly discussed. An attractive feature of the CPM code is that it shares the basic data requirements and computational arrangements of the doublet lattice method. A unified code to predict unsteady subsonic or supersonic airloads is therefore possible.

  5. Aerodynamic study of three-dimensional larynx models using finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira Rosa, Marcelo; Pereira, José Carlos

    2008-03-01

    The airflow velocities and pressures are calculated from a three-dimensional model of the human larynx by using the finite element method. The laryngeal airflow is assumed to be incompressible, isothermal, steady, and created by fixed pressure drops. The influence of different laryngeal profiles (convergent, parallel, and divergent), glottal area, and dimensions of false vocal folds in the airflow are investigated. The results indicate that vertical and horizontal phase differences in the laryngeal tissue movements are influenced by the nonlinear pressure distribution across the glottal channel, and the glottal entrance shape influences the air pressure distribution inside the glottis. Additionally, the false vocal folds increase the glottal duct pressure drop by creating a new constricted channel in the larynx, and alter the airflow vortexes formed after the true vocal folds.

  6. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied transonic aerodynamic wing design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1989-01-01

    Progress in the direct-inverse wing design method in curvilinear coordinates has been made. This includes the remedying of a spanwise oscillation problem and the assessment of grid skewness, viscous interaction, and the initial airfoil section on the final design. It was found that, in response to the spanwise oscillation problem that designing at every other spanwise station produced the best results for the cases presented, a smoothly varying grid is especially needed for the accurate design at the wing tip, the boundary layer displacement thicknesses must be included in a successful wing design, the design of high and medium aspect ratio wings is possible with this code, and the final airfoil section designed is fairly independent of the initial section.

  7. A numerical method for predicting hypersonic flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccormack, Robert W.; Candler, Graham V.

    1989-01-01

    The flow about a body traveling at hypersonic speed is energetic enough to cause the atmospheric gases to chemically react and reach states in thermal nonequilibrium. The prediction of hypersonic flowfields requires a numerical method capable of solving the conservation equations of fluid flow, the chemical rate equations for specie formation and dissociation, and the transfer of energy relations between translational and vibrational temperature states. Because the number of equations to be solved is large, the numerical method should also be as efficient as possible. The proposed paper presents a fully implicit method that fully couples the solution of the fluid flow equations with the gas physics and chemistry relations. The method flux splits the inviscid flow terms, central differences of the viscous terms, preserves element conservation in the strong chemistry source terms, and solves the resulting block matrix equation by Gauss Seidel line relaxation.

  8. Basis Function Approximation of Transonic Aerodynamic Influence Coefficient Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wesley W.; Pak, Chan-gi

    2011-01-01

    A technique for approximating the modal aerodynamic influence coefficients matrices by using basis functions has been developed and validated. An application of the resulting approximated modal aerodynamic influence coefficients matrix for a flutter analysis in transonic speed regime has been demonstrated. This methodology can be applied to the unsteady subsonic, transonic, and supersonic aerodynamics. The method requires the unsteady aerodynamics in frequency-domain. The flutter solution can be found by the classic methods, such as rational function approximation, k, p-k, p, root-locus et cetera. The unsteady aeroelastic analysis for design optimization using unsteady transonic aerodynamic approximation is being demonstrated using the ZAERO flutter solver (ZONA Technology Incorporated, Scottsdale, Arizona). The technique presented has been shown to offer consistent flutter speed prediction on an aerostructures test wing 2 configuration with negligible loss in precision in transonic speed regime. These results may have practical significance in the analysis of aircraft aeroelastic calculation and could lead to a more efficient design optimization cycle.

  9. Reduction of computer usage costs in predicting unsteady aerodynamic loadings caused by control surface motion. Addendum to computer program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, W. S.; Petrarca, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Changes to be made that provide increased accuracy and increased user flexibility in prediction of unsteady loadings caused by control surface motions are described. Analysis flexibility is increased by reducing the restrictions on the location of the downwash stations relative to the leading edge and the edges of the control surface boundaries. Analysis accuracy is increased in predicting unsteady loading for high Mach number analysis conditions through use of additional chordwise downwash stations. User guideline are presented to enlarge analysis capabilities of unusual wing control surface configurations. Comparative results indicate that the revised procedures provide accurate predictions of unsteady loadings as well as providing reductions of 40 to 75 percent in computer usage cost required by previous versions of this program.

  10. Predicted thermal response of a cryogenic fuel tank exposed to simulated aerodynamic heating profiles with different cryogens and fill levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, Gregory J.; Stephens, Craig A.

    1991-01-01

    A two dimensional finite difference thermal model was developed to predict the effects of heating profile, fill level, and cryogen type prior to experimental testing the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank (GRCT). These numerical predictions will assist in defining test scenarios, sensor locations, and venting requirements for the GRCT experimental tests. Boiloff rates, tank-wall and fluid temperatures, and wall heat fluxes were determined for 20 computational test cases. The test cases spanned three discrete fill levels and three heating profiles for hydrogen and nitrogen.

  11. Solution of plane cascade flow using improved surface singularity methods. [application of panel method to internal aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    A solution method was developed for calculating compressible inviscid flow through a linear cascade of arbitrary blade shapes. The method uses advanced surface singularity formulations which were adapted from those in current external flow analyses. The resulting solution technique provides a fast flexible calculation for flows through turbomachinery blade rows. The solution method and some examples of the method's capabilities are presented.

  12. Airframe Noise Prediction Using the Sngr Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rongqian; Wu, Yizhao; Xia, Jian

    In this paper, the Stochastic Noise Generation and Radiation method (SNGR) is used to predict airframe noise. The SNGR method combines a stochastic model with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), and it can give acceptable noise results while the computation cost is relatively low. In the method, the time-averaged mean flow field is firstly obtained by solving Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS), and a stochastic velocity is generated based on the obtained information. Then the turbulent field is used to generate the source for the Acoustic Perturbation Equations (APEs) that simulate the noise propagation. For numerical methods, timeaveraged RANS equations are solved by finite volume method, and the turbulent model is K - ɛ model; APEs are solved by finite difference method, and the numerical scheme is the Dispersion-Relation-Preserving (DRP) scheme, with explicit optimized 5-stage Rung-Kutta scheme time step. In order to test the APE solver, propagation of a Gaussian pulse in a uniform mean flow is firstly simulated and compared with the analytical solution. Then, using the method, the trailing edge noise of NACA0012 airfoil is calculated. The results are compared with reference data, and good agreements are demonstrated.

  13. Computational predictive methods for fracture and fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J.; Chang, A. T.; Nelson, N.; Kim, Y.

    1994-09-01

    The damage-tolerant design philosophy as used by aircraft industries enables aircraft components and aircraft structures to operate safely with minor damage, small cracks, and flaws. Maintenance and inspection procedures insure that damages developed during service remain below design values. When damage is found, repairs or design modifications are implemented and flight is resumed. Design and redesign guidelines, such as military specifications MIL-A-83444, have successfully reduced the incidence of damage and cracks. However, fatigue cracks continue to appear in aircraft well before the design life has expired. The F16 airplane, for instance, developed small cracks in the engine mount, wing support, bulk heads, the fuselage upper skin, the fuel shelf joints, and along the upper wings. Some cracks were found after 600 hours of the 8000 hour design service life and design modifications were required. Tests on the F16 plane showed that the design loading conditions were close to the predicted loading conditions. Improvements to analytic methods for predicting fatigue crack growth adjacent to holes, when multiple damage sites are present, and in corrosive environments would result in more cost-effective designs, fewer repairs, and fewer redesigns. The overall objective of the research described in this paper is to develop, verify, and extend the computational efficiency of analysis procedures necessary for damage tolerant design. This paper describes an elastic/plastic fracture method and an associated fatigue analysis method for damage tolerant design. Both methods are unique in that material parameters such as fracture toughness, R-curve data, and fatigue constants are not required. The methods are implemented with a general-purpose finite element package. Several proof-of-concept examples are given. With further development, the methods could be extended for analysis of multi-site damage, creep-fatigue, and corrosion fatigue problems.

  14. Computational predictive methods for fracture and fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, J.; Chang, A. T.; Nelson, N.; Kim, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The damage-tolerant design philosophy as used by aircraft industries enables aircraft components and aircraft structures to operate safely with minor damage, small cracks, and flaws. Maintenance and inspection procedures insure that damages developed during service remain below design values. When damage is found, repairs or design modifications are implemented and flight is resumed. Design and redesign guidelines, such as military specifications MIL-A-83444, have successfully reduced the incidence of damage and cracks. However, fatigue cracks continue to appear in aircraft well before the design life has expired. The F16 airplane, for instance, developed small cracks in the engine mount, wing support, bulk heads, the fuselage upper skin, the fuel shelf joints, and along the upper wings. Some cracks were found after 600 hours of the 8000 hour design service life and design modifications were required. Tests on the F16 plane showed that the design loading conditions were close to the predicted loading conditions. Improvements to analytic methods for predicting fatigue crack growth adjacent to holes, when multiple damage sites are present, and in corrosive environments would result in more cost-effective designs, fewer repairs, and fewer redesigns. The overall objective of the research described in this paper is to develop, verify, and extend the computational efficiency of analysis procedures necessary for damage tolerant design. This paper describes an elastic/plastic fracture method and an associated fatigue analysis method for damage tolerant design. Both methods are unique in that material parameters such as fracture toughness, R-curve data, and fatigue constants are not required. The methods are implemented with a general-purpose finite element package. Several proof-of-concept examples are given. With further development, the methods could be extended for analysis of multi-site damage, creep-fatigue, and corrosion fatigue problems.

  15. Trailing edge noise prediction using Amiet's method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, T. F.

    1981-01-01

    Amiet's (1976, 1978) solution to the problem of airfoil trailing edge noise prediction is discussed in light of the results of evanescent wave theory's application to the measured surface pressure behavior near the trailing edge of an airfoil with a turbulent boundary layer. The method employed by Amiet has the advantage of incorporating the effect of finite chord in its solution. The assumed form of the pressure distribution is examined as well as the constant turbulent boundary layer convection assumption, which is found to be unnecessarily restrictive.

  16. AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 10th, Palo Alto, CA, June 22-24, 1992, Technical Papers. Pts. 1 AND 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to vortex physics and aerodynamics; supersonic/hypersonic aerodynamics; STOL/VSTOL/rotors; missile and reentry vehicle aerodynamics; CFD as applied to aircraft; unsteady aerodynamics; supersonic/hypersonic aerodynamics; low-speed/high-lift aerodynamics; airfoil/wing aerodynamics; measurement techniques; CFD-solvers/unstructured grid; airfoil/drag prediction; high angle-of-attack aerodynamics; and CFD grid methods. Particular attention is given to transonic-numerical investigation into high-angle-of-attack leading-edge vortex flow, prediction of rotor unsteady airloads using vortex filament theory, rapid synthesis for evaluating the missile maneuverability parameters, transonic calculations of wing/bodies with deflected control surfaces; the static and dynamic flow field development about a porous suction surface wing; the aircraft spoiler effects under wind shear; multipoint inverse design of an infinite cascade of airfoils, turbulence modeling for impinging jet flows; numerical investigation of tail buffet on the F-18 aircraft; the surface grid generation in a parameter space; and the flip flop nozzle extended to supersonic flows.

  17. Computational aerodynamics applications to transport aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henne, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Examples are cited in assessing the effect that computational aerodynamics has had on the design of transport aircraft. The application of computational potential flow methods to wing design and to high-lift system design is discussed. The benefits offered by computational aerodynamics in reducing design cost, time, and risk are shown to be substantial.These aerodynamic methods have proved to be particularly effective in exposing inferior or poor aerodynamic designs. Particular attention is given to wing design, where the results have been dramatic.

  18. Rotary wing aerodynamically generated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. J.; Morse, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The history and methodology of aerodynamic noise reduction in rotary wing aircraft are presented. Thickness noise during hover tests and blade vortex interaction noise are determined and predicted through the use of a variety of computer codes. The use of test facilities and scale models for data acquisition are discussed.

  19. Recent NASA Research on Aerodynamic Modeling of Post-Stall and Spin Dynamics of Large Transport Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murch, Austin M.; Foster, John V.

    2007-01-01

    A simulation study was conducted to investigate aerodynamic modeling methods for prediction of post-stall flight dynamics of large transport airplanes. The research approach involved integrating dynamic wind tunnel data from rotary balance and forced oscillation testing with static wind tunnel data to predict aerodynamic forces and moments during highly dynamic departure and spin motions. Several state-of-the-art aerodynamic modeling methods were evaluated and predicted flight dynamics using these various approaches were compared. Results showed the different modeling methods had varying effects on the predicted flight dynamics and the differences were most significant during uncoordinated maneuvers. Preliminary wind tunnel validation data indicated the potential of the various methods for predicting steady spin motions.

  20. Asymmetric Uncertainty Expression for High Gradient Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T

    2012-01-01

    When the physics of the flow around an aircraft changes very abruptly either in time or space (e.g., flow separation/reattachment, boundary layer transition, unsteadiness, shocks, etc), the measurements that are performed in a simulated environment like a wind tunnel test or a computational simulation will most likely incorrectly predict the exact location of where (or when) the change in physics happens. There are many reasons for this, includ- ing the error introduced by simulating a real system at a smaller scale and at non-ideal conditions, or the error due to turbulence models in a computational simulation. The un- certainty analysis principles that have been developed and are being implemented today do not fully account for uncertainty in the knowledge of the location of abrupt physics changes or sharp gradients, leading to a potentially underestimated uncertainty in those areas. To address this problem, a new asymmetric aerodynamic uncertainty expression containing an extra term to account for a phase-uncertainty, the magnitude of which is emphasized in the high-gradient aerodynamic regions is proposed in this paper. Additionally, based on previous work, a method for dispersing aerodynamic data within asymmetric uncer- tainty bounds in a more realistic way has been developed for use within Monte Carlo-type analyses.

  1. A theoretical investigation of over-wing-blowing aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical method is established for determining the aerodynamic characteristics of over-wing-blowing configurations. The method accounts for both jet entrainment and jet interaction effects because of the differences in freestream and jet dynamic pressures and Mach numbers. The predicted lift increments agree well with available data. It is shown that the lift is underpredicted with entrainment effect alone when the jet is close to the wing surface.

  2. Subsonic aerodynamic and flutter characteristics of several wings calculated by the SOUSSA P1.1 panel method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. C., Jr.; Cunningham, H. J.; Desmarais, R. N.; Silva, W. A.; Drobenko, B.

    1982-01-01

    Several applications of the steady, oscillatory, and unsteady subsonic and supersonic aerodynamics (SOUSSA) computer program to wings with steady and oscillatory motion, including flutter, are discussed. The program employs a generalized Green's function to the full, time-dependent potential-flow equation to obtain an integral equation for the velocity potential at any point in a flow, even points on a body or whole bodies in a flow. Aerodynamic calculations are provided for two rectangular wings, a clipped-tip delta wing, and two swept wings with and without a fuselage. The number and distribution of the finite element panels are varied in order to demonstrate the convergence of the results. The results are shown to be close to those of lifting-surface theory, and further applications with bodies having deformities, arbitrary shapes, motions, and deformations are indicated.

  3. A nozzle internal performance prediction method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A prediction method was written and incorporated into a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code (PAB3D) for the calculation of nozzle internal performance. The following quantities are calculated: (1) discharge coefficient; (2) normal, side, and axial thrust ratios; (3) rolling, pitching, and yawing moments; and (4) effective pitch and yaw vector angles. Four different case studies are presented to confirm the applicability of the methodology. Internal and, in most situations, external flow-field regions are required to be modeled. The computed nozzle discharge coefficient matches both the level and the trend of the experimental data within quoted experimental data accuracy (0.5 percent). Moment and force ratios are generally within 1 to 2 percent of the absolute level of experimental data, with the trends of data matched accurately.

  4. Systems and methods for predicting materials properties

    DOEpatents

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Fischer, Chris; Tibbetts, Kevin; Morgan, Dane; Curtarolo, Stefano

    2007-11-06

    Systems and methods for predicting features of materials of interest. Reference data are analyzed to deduce relationships between the input data sets and output data sets. Reference data includes measured values and/or computed values. The deduced relationships can be specified as equations, correspondences, and/or algorithmic processes that produce appropriate output data when suitable input data is used. In some instances, the output data set is a subset of the input data set, and computational results may be refined by optionally iterating the computational procedure. To deduce features of a new material of interest, a computed or measured input property of the material is provided to an equation, correspondence, or algorithmic procedure previously deduced, and an output is obtained. In some instances, the output is iteratively refined. In some instances, new features deduced for the material of interest are added to a database of input and output data for known materials.

  5. Mode Decomposition Methods for Soil Moisture Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, R. B.; Efendiev, Y. R.; Mohanty, B.

    2014-12-01

    Lack of reliable, well-distributed, long-term datasets for model validation is a bottle-neck for most exercises in soil moisture analysis and prediction. Understanding what factors drive soil hydrological processes at different scales and their variability is very critical to further our ability to model the various components of the hydrologic cycle more accurately. For this, a comprehensive dataset with measurements across scales is very necessary. Intensive fine-resolution sampling of soil moisture over extended periods of time is financially and logistically prohibitive. Installation of a few long term monitoring stations is also expensive, and needs to be situated at critical locations. The concept of Time Stable Locations has been in use for some time now to find locations that reflect the mean values for the soil moisture across the watershed under all wetness conditions. However, the soil moisture variability across the watershed is lost when measuring at only time stable locations. We present here a study using techniques such as Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) and Discrete Empirical Interpolation Method (DEIM) that extends the concept of time stable locations to arrive at locations that provide not simply the average soil moisture values for the watershed, but also those that can help re-capture the dynamics across all locations in the watershed. As with the time stability, the initial analysis is dependent on an intensive sampling history. The DMD/DEIM method is an application of model reduction techniques for non-linearly related measurements. Using this technique, we are able to determine the number of sampling points that would be required for a given accuracy of prediction across the watershed, and the location of those points. Locations with higher energetics in the basis domain are chosen first. We present case studies across watersheds in the US and India. The technique can be applied to other hydro-climates easily.

  6. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in area of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodyamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  7. Classical Aerodynamic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A collection of papers on modern theoretical aerodynamics is presented. Included are theories of incompressible potential flow and research on the aerodynamic forces on wing and wing sections of aircraft and on airship hulls.

  8. Methods of Predicting Solid Waste Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Gail B.; Hawkins, Myron B.

    The project summarized by this report involved a preliminary design of a model for estimating and predicting the quantity and composition of solid waste and a determination of its feasibility. The novelty of the prediction model is that it estimates and predicts on the basis of knowledge of materials and quantities before they become a part of the…

  9. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to: (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 1/Part 1 publication covers configuration aerodynamics.

  10. Application of Approximate Unsteady Aerodynamics for Flutter Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Li, Wesley W.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for approximating the modal aerodynamic influence coefficient (AIC) matrices by using basis functions has been developed. A process for using the resulting approximated modal AIC matrix in aeroelastic analysis has also been developed. The method requires the unsteady aerodynamics in frequency domain, and this methodology can be applied to the unsteady subsonic, transonic, and supersonic aerodynamics. The flutter solution can be found by the classic methods, such as rational function approximation, k, p-k, p, root locus et cetera. The unsteady aeroelastic analysis using unsteady subsonic aerodynamic approximation is demonstrated herein. The technique presented is shown to offer consistent flutter speed prediction on an aerostructures test wing (ATW) 2 and a hybrid wing body (HWB) type of vehicle configuration with negligible loss in precision. This method computes AICs that are functions of the changing parameters being studied and are generated within minutes of CPU time instead of hours. These results may have practical application in parametric flutter analyses as well as more efficient multidisciplinary design and optimization studies.

  11. Prediction Methods in Solar Sunspots Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kim Kwee

    2016-02-01

    An understanding of the Ohl’s Precursor Method, which is used to predict the upcoming sunspots activity, is presented by employing a simplified movable divided-blocks diagram. Using a new approach, the total number of sunspots in a solar cycle and the maximum averaged monthly sunspots number Rz(max) are both shown to be statistically related to the geomagnetic activity index in the prior solar cycle. The correlation factors are significant and they are respectively found to be 0.91 ± 0.13 and 0.85 ± 0.17. The projected result is consistent with the current observation of solar cycle 24 which appears to have attained at least Rz(max) at 78.7 ± 11.7 in March 2014. Moreover, in a statistical study of the time-delayed solar events, the average time between the peak in the monthly geomagnetic index and the peak in the monthly sunspots numbers in the succeeding ascending phase of the sunspot activity is found to be 57.6 ± 3.1 months. The statistically determined time-delayed interval confirms earlier observational results by others that the Sun’s electromagnetic dipole is moving toward the Sun’s Equator during a solar cycle.

  12. Prediction Methods in Solar Sunspots Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kim Kwee

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the Ohl’s Precursor Method, which is used to predict the upcoming sunspots activity, is presented by employing a simplified movable divided-blocks diagram. Using a new approach, the total number of sunspots in a solar cycle and the maximum averaged monthly sunspots number Rz(max) are both shown to be statistically related to the geomagnetic activity index in the prior solar cycle. The correlation factors are significant and they are respectively found to be 0.91 ± 0.13 and 0.85 ± 0.17. The projected result is consistent with the current observation of solar cycle 24 which appears to have attained at least Rz(max) at 78.7 ± 11.7 in March 2014. Moreover, in a statistical study of the time-delayed solar events, the average time between the peak in the monthly geomagnetic index and the peak in the monthly sunspots numbers in the succeeding ascending phase of the sunspot activity is found to be 57.6 ± 3.1 months. The statistically determined time-delayed interval confirms earlier observational results by others that the Sun’s electromagnetic dipole is moving toward the Sun’s Equator during a solar cycle. PMID:26868269

  13. Prediction Methods in Solar Sunspots Cycles.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kim Kwee

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the Ohl's Precursor Method, which is used to predict the upcoming sunspots activity, is presented by employing a simplified movable divided-blocks diagram. Using a new approach, the total number of sunspots in a solar cycle and the maximum averaged monthly sunspots number Rz(max) are both shown to be statistically related to the geomagnetic activity index in the prior solar cycle. The correlation factors are significant and they are respectively found to be 0.91 ± 0.13 and 0.85 ± 0.17. The projected result is consistent with the current observation of solar cycle 24 which appears to have attained at least Rz(max) at 78.7 ± 11.7 in March 2014. Moreover, in a statistical study of the time-delayed solar events, the average time between the peak in the monthly geomagnetic index and the peak in the monthly sunspots numbers in the succeeding ascending phase of the sunspot activity is found to be 57.6 ± 3.1 months. The statistically determined time-delayed interval confirms earlier observational results by others that the Sun's electromagnetic dipole is moving toward the Sun's Equator during a solar cycle. PMID:26868269

  14. A Method for Integrating Thrust-Vectoring and Actuated Forebody Strakes with Conventional Aerodynamic Controls on a High-Performance Fighter Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallman, Frederick J.; Davidson, John B.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    1998-01-01

    A method, called pseudo controls, of integrating several airplane controls to achieve cooperative operation is presented. The method eliminates conflicting control motions, minimizes the number of feedback control gains, and reduces the complication of feedback gain schedules. The method is applied to the lateral/directional controls of a modified high-performance airplane. The airplane has a conventional set of aerodynamic controls, an experimental set of thrust-vectoring controls, and an experimental set of actuated forebody strakes. The experimental controls give the airplane additional control power for enhanced stability and maneuvering capabilities while flying over an expanded envelope, especially at high angles of attack. The flight controls are scheduled to generate independent body-axis control moments. These control moments are coordinated to produce stability-axis angular accelerations. Inertial coupling moments are compensated. Thrust-vectoring controls are engaged according to their effectiveness relative to that of the aerodynamic controls. Vane-relief logic removes steady and slowly varying commands from the thrust-vectoring controls to alleviate heating of the thrust turning devices. The actuated forebody strakes are engaged at high angles of attack. This report presents the forward-loop elements of a flight control system that positions the flight controls according to the desired stability-axis accelerations. This report does not include the generation of the required angular acceleration commands by means of pilot controls or the feedback of sensed airplane motions.

  15. Investigation of aerodynamic braking devices for wind turbine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the selection and preliminary design of a new aerodynamic braking system for use on the stall-regulated AWT-26/27 wind turbines. The goal was to identify and design a configuration that offered improvements over the existing tip brake used by Advanced Wind Turbines, Inc. (AWT). Although the design objectives and approach of this report are specific to aerodynamic braking of AWT-26/27 turbines, many of the issues addressed in this work are applicable to a wider class of turbines. The performance trends and design choices presented in this report should be of general use to wind turbine designers who are considering alternative aerodynamic braking methods. A literature search was combined with preliminary work on device sizing, loads and mechanical design. Candidate configurations were assessed on their potential for benefits in the areas of cost, weight, aerodynamic noise, reliability and performance under icing conditions. As a result, two configurations were identified for further study: the {open_quotes}spoiler-flap{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}flip-tip.{close_quotes} Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at Wichita State University to evaluate the performance of the candidate aerodynamic brakes on an airfoil section representative of the AWT-26/27 blades. The wind tunnel data were used to predict the braking effectiveness and deployment characteristics of the candidate devices for a wide range of design parameters. The evaluation was iterative, with mechanical design and structural analysis being conducted in parallel with the braking performance studies. The preliminary estimate of the spoiler-flap system cost was $150 less than the production AWT-26/27 tip vanes. This represents a reduction of approximately 5 % in the cost of the aerodynamic braking system. In view of the preliminary nature of the design, it would be prudent to plan for contingencies in both cost and weight.

  16. Configuration Aerodynamics: Past - Present - Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Bencze, Daniel P.; Kulfan, Robert M.; Wilson, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    The Configuration Aerodynamics (CA) element of the High Speed Research (HSR) program is managed by a joint NASA and Industry team, referred to as the Technology Integration Development (ITD) team. This team is responsible for the development of a broad range of technologies for improved aerodynamic performance and stability and control characteristics at subsonic to supersonic flight conditions. These objectives are pursued through the aggressive use of advanced experimental test techniques and state of the art computational methods. As the HSR program matures and transitions into the next phase the objectives of the Configuration Aerodynamics ITD are being refined to address the drag reduction needs and stability and control requirements of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. In addition, the experimental and computational tools are being refined and improved to meet these challenges. The presentation will review the work performed within the Configuration Aerodynamics element in 1994 and 1995 and then discuss the plans for the 1996-1998 time period. The final portion of the presentation will review several observations of the HSR program and the design activity within Configuration Aerodynamics.

  17. Aerodynamic drag on intermodal railcars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinghorn, Philip; Maynes, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The aerodynamic drag associated with transport of commodities by rail is becoming increasingly important as the cost of diesel fuel increases. This study aims to increase the efficiency of intermodal cargo trains by reducing the aerodynamic drag on the load carrying cars. For intermodal railcars a significant amount of aerodynamic drag is a result of the large distance between loads that often occurs and the resulting pressure drag resulting from the separated flow. In the present study aerodynamic drag data have been obtained through wind tunnel testing on 1/29 scale models to understand the savings that may be realized by judicious modification to the size of the intermodal containers. The experiments were performed in the BYU low speed wind tunnel and the test track utilizes two leading locomotives followed by a set of five articulated well cars with double stacked containers. The drag on a representative mid-train car is measured using an isolated load cell balance and the wind tunnel speed is varied from 20 to 100 mph. We characterize the effect that the gap distance between the containers and the container size has on the aerodynamic drag of this representative rail car and investigate methods to reduce the gap distance.

  18. Advanced validation of CFD-FDTD combined method using highly applicable solver for reentry blackout prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    An analysis model of plasma flow and electromagnetic waves around a reentry vehicle for radio frequency blackout prediction during aerodynamic heating was developed in this study. The model was validated based on experimental results from the radio attenuation measurement program. The plasma flow properties, such as electron number density, in the shock layer and wake region were obtained using a newly developed unstructured grid solver that incorporated real gas effect models and could treat thermochemically non-equilibrium flow. To predict the electromagnetic waves in plasma, a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method was used. Moreover, the complicated behaviour of electromagnetic waves in the plasma layer during atmospheric reentry was clarified at several altitudes. The prediction performance of the combined model was evaluated with profiles and peak values of the electron number density in the plasma layer. In addition, to validate the models, the signal losses measured during communication with the reentry vehicle were directly compared with the predicted results. Based on the study, it was suggested that the present analysis model accurately predicts the radio frequency blackout and plasma attenuation of electromagnetic waves in plasma in communication.

  19. Increased ephemeris accuracy using attitude-dependent aerodynamic force coefficients for inertially stabilized spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David C.; Baker, David F.

    1991-01-01

    The FREEMAC program used to generate the aerodynamic coefficients, as well as associated routines that allow the results to be used in other software is described. These capabilities are applied in two numerical examples to the short-term orbit prediction of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spacecraft. Predictions using attitude-dependent aerodynamic coefficients were made on a modified version of the PC-based Ephemeris Generation Program (EPHGEN) and were compared to definitive orbit solutions obtained from actual tracking data. The numerical results show improvement in the predicted semi-major axis and along-track positions that would seem to be worth the added computational effort. Finally, other orbit and attitude analysis applications are noted that could profit from using FREEMAC-calculated aerodynamic coefficients, including orbital lifetime studies, orbit determination methods, attitude dynamics simulators, and spacecraft control system component sizing.

  20. Basis Function Approximation of Transonic Aerodynamic Influence Coefficient Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wesley Waisang; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2010-01-01

    A technique for approximating the modal aerodynamic influence coefficients [AIC] matrices by using basis functions has been developed and validated. An application of the resulting approximated modal AIC matrix for a flutter analysis in transonic speed regime has been demonstrated. This methodology can be applied to the unsteady subsonic, transonic and supersonic aerodynamics. The method requires the unsteady aerodynamics in frequency-domain. The flutter solution can be found by the classic methods, such as rational function approximation, k, p-k, p, root-locus et cetera. The unsteady aeroelastic analysis for design optimization using unsteady transonic aerodynamic approximation is being demonstrated using the ZAERO(TradeMark) flutter solver (ZONA Technology Incorporated, Scottsdale, Arizona). The technique presented has been shown to offer consistent flutter speed prediction on an aerostructures test wing [ATW] 2 configuration with negligible loss in precision in transonic speed regime. These results may have practical significance in the analysis of aircraft aeroelastic calculation and could lead to a more efficient design optimization cycle

  1. Using the HARV simulation aerodynamic model to determine forebody strake aerodynamic coefficients from flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messina, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    The method described in this report is intended to present an overview of a process developed to extract the forebody aerodynamic increments from flight tests. The process to determine the aerodynamic increments (rolling pitching, and yawing moments, Cl, Cm, Cn, respectively) for the forebody strake controllers added to the F/A - 18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) aircraft was developed to validate the forebody strake aerodynamic model used in simulation.

  2. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  3. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-04-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  4. Aerodynamic Temperature Derived from Flux-Profile Measurements and Two-Source Model Predictions over a Cotton Row Crop in an Advective Environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface aerodynamic temperature (SAT) is related to the atmospheric forcing conditions (radiation, wind speed and air temperature) and surface conditions. SAT is required in the bulk surface resistance equation to calculate the rate of sensible heat flux exchange. SAT cannot be measured directly...

  5. Mathematical modeling of the aerodynamics of high-angle-of-attack maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, L. B.; Tobak, M.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is a review of the current state of aerodynamic mathematical modeling for aircraft motions at high angles of attack. The mathematical model serves to define a set of characteristic motions from whose known aerodynamic responses the aerodynamic response to an arbitrary high angle-of-attack flight maneuver can be predicted. Means are explored of obtaining stability parameter information in terms of the characteristic motions, whether by wind-tunnel experiments, computational methods, or by parameter-identification methods applied to flight-test data. A rationale is presented for selecting and verifying the aerodynamic mathematical model at the lowest necessary level of complexity. Experimental results describing the wing-rock phenomenon are shown to be accommodated within the most recent mathematical model by admitting the existence of aerodynamic hysteresis in the steady-state variation of the rolling moment with roll angle. Interpretation of the experimental results in terms of bifurcation theory reveals the general conditions under which aerodynamic hysteresis must exist.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics framework for aerodynamic model assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallespin, D.; Badcock, K. J.; Da Ronch, A.; White, M. D.; Perfect, P.; Ghoreyshi, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reviews the work carried out at the University of Liverpool to assess the use of CFD methods for aircraft flight dynamics applications. Three test cases are discussed in the paper, namely, the Standard Dynamic Model, the Ranger 2000 jet trainer and the Stability and Control Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle. For each of these, a tabular aerodynamic model based on CFD predictions is generated along with validation against wind tunnel experiments and flight test measurements. The main purpose of the paper is to assess the validity of the tables of aerodynamic data for the force and moment prediction of realistic aircraft manoeuvres. This is done by generating a manoeuvre based on the tables of aerodynamic data, and then replaying the motion through a time-accurate computational fluid dynamics calculation. The resulting forces and moments from these simulations were compared with predictions from the tables. As the latter are based on a set of steady-state predictions, the comparisons showed perfect agreement for slow manoeuvres. As manoeuvres became more aggressive some disagreement was seen, particularly during periods of large rates of change in attitudes. Finally, the Ranger 2000 model was used on a flight simulator.

  7. Semianalytic modeling of aerodynamic shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, R. L.; Adams, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    Equations for the semianalytic representation of a class of surfaces that vary smoothly in cross-sectional shape are presented. Some methods of fitting together and superimposing such surfaces are described. A brief discussion is also included of the application of the theory in various contexts such as computerized lofting of aerodynamic surfaces and grid generation.

  8. Earthquake prediction: Simple methods for complex phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luen, Bradley

    2010-09-01

    Earthquake predictions are often either based on stochastic models, or tested using stochastic models. Tests of predictions often tacitly assume predictions do not depend on past seismicity, which is false. We construct a naive predictor that, following each large earthquake, predicts another large earthquake will occur nearby soon. Because this "automatic alarm" strategy exploits clustering, it succeeds beyond "chance" according to a test that holds the predictions _xed. Some researchers try to remove clustering from earthquake catalogs and model the remaining events. There have been claims that the declustered catalogs are Poisson on the basis of statistical tests we show to be weak. Better tests show that declustered catalogs are not Poisson. In fact, there is evidence that events in declustered catalogs do not have exchangeable times given the locations, a necessary condition for the Poisson. If seismicity followed a stochastic process, an optimal predictor would turn on an alarm when the conditional intensity is high. The Epidemic-Type Aftershock (ETAS) model is a popular point process model that includes clustering. It has many parameters, but is still a simpli_cation of seismicity. Estimating the model is di_cult, and estimated parameters often give a non-stationary model. Even if the model is ETAS, temporal predictions based on the ETAS conditional intensity are not much better than those of magnitude-dependent automatic (MDA) alarms, a much simpler strategy with only one parameter instead of _ve. For a catalog of Southern Californian seismicity, ETAS predictions again o_er only slight improvement over MDA alarms

  9. 1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

  10. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 1/Part 2 publication covers the design optimization and testing sessions.

  11. 1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry HighSpeed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of. Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to: (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

  12. The aerodynamic cost of flight in the short-tailed fruit bat (Carollia perspicillata): comparing theory with measurement.

    PubMed

    von Busse, Rhea; Waldman, Rye M; Swartz, Sharon M; Voigt, Christian C; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2014-06-01

    Aerodynamic theory has long been used to predict the power required for animal flight, but widely used models contain many simplifications. It has been difficult to ascertain how closely biological reality matches model predictions, largely because of the technical challenges of accurately measuring the power expended when an animal flies. We designed a study to measure flight speed-dependent aerodynamic power directly from the kinetic energy contained in the wake of bats flying in a wind tunnel. We compared these measurements with two theoretical predictions that have been used for several decades in diverse fields of vertebrate biology and to metabolic measurements from a previous study using the same individuals. A high-accuracy displaced laser sheet stereo particle image velocimetry experimental design measured the wake velocities in the Trefftz plane behind four bats flying over a range of speeds (3-7 m s(-1)). We computed the aerodynamic power contained in the wake using a novel interpolation method and compared these results with the power predicted by Pennycuick's and Rayner's models. The measured aerodynamic power falls between the two theoretical predictions, demonstrating that the models effectively predict the appropriate range of flight power, but the models do not accurately predict minimum power or maximum range speeds. Mechanical efficiency--the ratio of aerodynamic power output to metabolic power input--varied from 5.9% to 9.8% for the same individuals, changing with flight speed. PMID:24718450

  13. The oscillating wing with aerodynamically balanced elevator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussner, H G; Schwartz, I

    1941-01-01

    The two-dimensional problem of the oscillating wing with aerodynamically balanced elevator is treated in the manner that the wing is replaced by a plate with bends and stages and the airfoil section by a mean line consisting of one or more straights. The computed formulas and tables permit, on these premises, the prediction of the pressure distribution and of the aerodynamic reactions of oscillating elevators and tabs with any position of elevator hinge in respect to elevator leading edge.

  14. Aerodynamic characteristics of wings designed with a combined-theory method to cruise at a Mach number of 4.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    A wind-tunnel study was conducted to determine the capability of a method combining linear theory and shock-expansion theory to design optimum camber surfaces for wings that will fly at high-supersonic/low-hypersonic speeds. Three force models (a flat-plate reference wing and two cambered and twisted wings) were used to obtain aerodynamic lift, drag, and pitching-moment data. A fourth pressure-orifice model was used to obtain surface-pressure data. All four wing models had the same planform, airfoil section, and centerbody area distribution. The design Mach number was 4.5, but data were also obtained at Mach numbers of 3.5 and 4.0. Results of these tests indicated that the use of airfoil thickness as a theoretical optimum, camber-surface design constraint did not improve the aerodynamic efficiency or performance of a wing as compared with a wing that was designed with a zero-thickness airfoil (linear-theory) constraint.

  15. Potential Method of Predicting Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imholt, Timothy

    2001-10-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) may be described as a blast of gas and highly charged solar mass fragments ejected into space. These ejections, when directed toward Earth, have many different effects on terrestrial systems ranging from the Aurora Borealis to changes in wireless communication. The early prediction of these solar events cannot be overlooked. There are several models currently accepted and utilized to predict these events, however, with earlier prediction of both the event and the location on the sun where the event occurs allows us to have earlier warnings as to when they will affect man-made systems. A better prediction could perhaps be achieved by utilizing low angular resolution radio telescope arrays to catalog data from the sun at different radio frequencies on a regular basis. Once this data is cataloged a better predictor for these CME’s could be found. We propose a model that allows a prediction to be made that appears to be longer than 24 hours.

  16. Potential Method of Predicting Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imholt, Timothy; Roberts, J. A.; Scott, J. B.; University Of North Texas Team

    2000-10-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) may be described as a blast of gas and highly charged solar mass fragments ejected into space. These ejections, when directed toward Earth, have many different effects on terrestrial systems ranging from the Aurora Borealis to changes in wireless communications. The importance of an early prediction of these solar events cannot be overlooked. There are several models currently accepted and utilized to predict these events, however, with earlier prediction of both the event and the location on the sun where the event occur allows us to have earlier warnings as to when they will effect man-made systems. A better prediction could perhaps be achieved by utilizing low angular resolution radio telescope arrays to catalog data from the sun at different radio frequencies on a regular basis. Once this data is cataloged a better predictor for these CME's could be found. We propose a model that allows a prediction to be made that appears to be longer than 24 hours.

  17. AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 8th, Portland, OR, Aug. 20-22, 1990, Technical Papers. Parts 1 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in CFD methods and their validation, vortices and vortical flows, STOL/VSTOL aerodynamics, boundary layer transition and separation, wing airfoil aerodynamics, laminar flow, supersonic and hypersonic aerodynamics, CFD for wing airfoil and nacelle applications, wind tunnel testing, flight testing, missile aerodynamics, unsteady flow, configuration aerodynamics, and multiple body/interference flows. Attention is given to the numerical simulation of vortical flows over close-coupled canard-wing configuration, propulsive lift augmentation by side fences, road-vehicle aerodynamics, a shock-capturing method for multidimensional flow, transition-detection studies in a cryogenic environment, a three-dimensional Euler analysis of ducted propfan flowfields, multiple vortex and shock interaction at subsonic and supersonic speeds, and a Navier-Stokes simulation of waverider flowfields. Also discussed are the induced drag of crescent-shaped wings, the preliminary design aerodynamics of missile inlets, finite wing lift prediction at high angles-of-attack, optimal supersonic/hypersonic bodies, and adaptive grid embedding for the two-dimensional Euler equations.

  18. AERODYNAMIC AND BLADING DESIGN OF MULTISTAGE AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSORS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The axial-flow compressor is used for aircraft engines because it has distinct configuration and performance advantages over other compressor types. However, good potential performance is not easily obtained. The designer must be able to model the actual flows well enough to adequately predict aerodynamic performance. This computer program has been developed for computing the aerodynamic design of a multistage axial-flow compressor and, if desired, the associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis. The aerodynamic solution gives velocity diagrams on selected streamlines of revolution at the blade row edges. The program yields aerodynamic and blading design results that can be directly used by flow and mechanical analysis codes. Two such codes are TSONIC, a blade-to-blade channel flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-10977), and MERIDL, a more detailed hub-to-shroud flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-12966). The aerodynamic and blading design program can reduce the time and effort required to obtain acceptable multistage axial-flow compressor configurations by generating good initial solutions and by being compatible with available analysis codes. The aerodynamic solution assumes steady, axisymmetric flow so that the problem is reduced to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. The streamline curvature method is used for the iterative aerodynamic solution at stations outside of the blade rows. If a blade design is desired, the blade elements are defined and stacked within the aerodynamic solution iteration. The blade element inlet and outlet angles are established by empirical incidence and deviation angles to the relative flow angles of the velocity diagrams. The blade element centerline is composed of two segments tangentially joined at a transition point. The local blade angle variation of each element can be specified as a fourth-degree polynomial function of path distance. Blade element thickness can also be specified

  19. A survey of aftbody flow prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, L. E.; Mace, J.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of computational methods used in the calculation of nozzle aftbody flows is presented. One class of methods reviewed are those which patch together solutions for the inviscid, boundary layer, and plume flow regions. The second class of methods reviewed are those which computationally solve the Navier Stokes equations over nozzle aftbodies with jet exhaust flow. Computed results from the methods are compared with experiment. Advantages and disadvantages of the various methods are discussed along with opportunities for further development of these methods.

  20. Aerodynamics and heat transfer investigations on a high Reynolds number turbine cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, Taher; Mcfarland, Eric; Yeh, Frederick

    1991-01-01

    The results of aerodynamic and heat transfer experimental investigations performed in a high Reynolds number turbine cascade test facility are analyzed. The experimental facility simulates the high Reynolds number flow conditions similar to those encountered in the Space Shuttle Main Engine. In order to determine the influence of Reynolds number on aerodynamic and thermal behavior of the blades, heat transfer coefficients were measured at various Reynolds numbers using liquid crystal temperature measurement technique. Potential flow calculation methods were used to predict the cascade pressure distributions. Boundary layer and heat transfer calculation methods were used with these pressure distributions to verify the experimental results.

  1. IUS solid rocket motor contamination prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, C. R.; Kearnes, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    A series of computer codes were developed to predict solid rocket motor produced contamination to spacecraft sensitive surfaces. Subscale and flight test data have confirmed some of the analytical results. Application of the analysis tools to a typical spacecraft has provided early identification of potential spacecraft contamination problems and provided insight into their solution; e.g., flight plan modifications, plume or outgassing shields and/or contamination covers.

  2. Echo state network prediction method and its application in flue gas turbine condition prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaohong; Chen, Tao; Xu, Xiaoli

    2010-12-01

    On the background of the complex production process of fluid catalytic cracking energy recovery system in large-scale petrochemical refineries, this paper introduced an improved echo state network (ESN) model prediction method which is used to address the condition trend prediction problem of the key power equipment--flue gas turbine. Singular value decomposition method was used to obtain the ESN output weight. Through selecting the appropriate parameters and discarding small singular value, this method overcame the defective solution problem in the prediction by using the linear regression algorithm, improved the prediction performance of echo state network, and gave the network prediction process. In order to solve the problem of noise contained in production data, the translation-invariant wavelet transform analysis method is combined to denoise the noisy time series before prediction. Condition trend prediction results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Aerodynamic Simulation of the MEXICO Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herraez, I.; Medjroubi, W.; Stoevesandt, B.; Peinke, J.

    2014-12-01

    CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations are a very promising method for predicting the aerodynamic behavior of wind turbines in an inexpensive and accurate way. One of the major drawbacks of this method is the lack of validated models. As a consequence, the reliability of numerical results is often difficult to assess. The MEXICO project aimed at solving this problem by providing the project partners with high quality measurements of a 4.5 meters rotor diameter wind turbine operating under controlled conditions. The large measurement data-set allows the validation of all kind of aerodynamic models. This work summarizes our efforts for validating a CFD model based on the open source software OpenFoam. Both steady- state and time-accurate simulations have been performed with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for several operating conditions. In this paper we will concentrate on axisymmetric inflow for 3 different wind speeds. The numerical results are compared with pressure distributions from several blade sections and PIV-flow data from the near wake region. In general, a reasonable agreement between measurements the and our simulations exists. Some discrepancies, which require further research, are also discussed.

  4. Numerical methods and a computer program for subsonic and supersonic aerodynamic design and analysis of wings with attainable thrust considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.; Walkley, K. B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes methodology and an associated computer program for the design of wing lifting surfaces with attainable thrust taken into consideration. The approach is based on the determination of an optimum combination of a series of candidate surfaces rather than the more commonly used candidate loadings. Special leading-edge surfaces are selected to provide distributed leading-edge thrust forces which compensate for any failure to achieve the full theoretical leading-edge thrust, and a second series of general candidate surfaces is selected to minimize drag subject to constraints on the lift coefficient and, if desired, on the pitching moment coefficient. A primary purpose of the design approach is the introduction of attainable leading-edge thrust considerations so that relatively mild camber surfaces may be employed in the achievement of aerodynamic efficiencies comparable to those attainable if full theoretical leading-edge thrust could be achieved. The program provides an analysis as well as a design capability and is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic flow.

  5. [The application of aerodynamic method for the evaluation of the efficiency of the vocal, articulation and respiratory organs during singing and playing wind instruments].

    PubMed

    Pawłowski, Z; Zółtowski, M; Kazanecka, E

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of the aerodynamic method for the estimation of the efficiency of the vocal articulation and respiratory organ during singing and playing wind instruments. An evaluation of the vocal and respiratory organ was carried out on the basis of an analysis and correlation between the following parameters: PV--phonation volume, MPT--maximum phonation/playing time, SP--subglottal/blowing pressure, MFR--mean flow rate, GR--glottal resistance, EP--expiratory power, W--work. Volume and airflow was measured by a pneumotachometr with an electronic spirometer. The application of a plethysmographic booth made it possible to carry out non-invasive, indirect measurements of the subglottal and blowing pressure. Changes of pressure during singing and playing were recorded in the form of an aerodynamogram curve. This curve was used to determine the maximum duration of sound. Other quantities were derived from a mathematical analysis. PMID:10763322

  6. Gaussian mixture models as flux prediction method for central receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobler, Annemarie; Gauché, Paul; Smit, Willie

    2016-05-01

    Flux prediction methods are crucial to the design and operation of central receiver systems. Current methods such as the circular and elliptical (bivariate) Gaussian prediction methods are often used in field layout design and aiming strategies. For experimental or small central receiver systems, the flux profile of a single heliostat often deviates significantly from the circular and elliptical Gaussian models. Therefore a novel method of flux prediction was developed by incorporating the fitting of Gaussian mixture models onto flux profiles produced by flux measurement or ray tracing. A method was also developed to predict the Gaussian mixture model parameters of a single heliostat for a given time using image processing. Recording the predicted parameters in a database ensures that more accurate predictions are made in a shorter time frame.

  7. A survey of the broadband shock associated noise prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Chan M.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Khavaran, Abbas

    1992-01-01

    Several different prediction methods to estimate the broadband shock associated noise of a supersonic jet are introduced and compared with experimental data at various test conditions. The nozzle geometries considered for comparison include a convergent and a convergent-divergent nozzle, both axisymmetric. Capabilities and limitations of prediction methods in incorporating the two nozzle geometries, flight effect, and temperature effect are discussed. Predicted noise field shows the best agreement for a convergent nozzle geometry under static conditions. Predicted results for nozzles in flight show larger discrepancies from data and more dependable flight data are required for further comparison. Qualitative effects of jet temperature, as observed in experiment, are reproduced in predicted results.

  8. Adaptive method for electron bunch profile prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheinker, Alexander; Gessner, Spencer

    2015-10-01

    We report on an experiment performed at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, in which a new adaptive control algorithm, one with known, bounded update rates, despite operating on analytically unknown cost functions, was utilized in order to provide quasi-real-time bunch property estimates of the electron beam. Multiple parameters, such as arbitrary rf phase settings and other time-varying accelerator properties, were simultaneously tuned in order to match a simulated bunch energy spectrum with a measured energy spectrum. The simple adaptive scheme was digitally implemented using matlab and the experimental physics and industrial control system. The main result is a nonintrusive, nondestructive, real-time diagnostic scheme for prediction of bunch profiles, as well as other beam parameters, the precise control of which are important for the plasma wakefield acceleration experiments being explored at FACET.

  9. Adaptive method for electron bunch profile prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander; Gessner, Spencer

    2015-10-01

    We report on an experiment performed at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, in which a new adaptive control algorithm, one with known, bounded update rates, despite operating on analytically unknown cost functions, was utilized in order to provide quasi-real-time bunch property estimates of the electron beam. Multiple parameters, such as arbitrary rf phase settings and other time-varying accelerator properties, were simultaneously tuned in order to match a simulated bunch energy spectrum with a measured energy spectrum. The simple adaptive scheme was digitally implemented using matlab and the experimental physics and industrial control system. The main result is a nonintrusive, nondestructive, real-time diagnostic scheme for prediction of bunch profiles, as well as other beam parameters, the precise control of which are important for the plasma wakefield acceleration experiments being explored at FACET. © 2015 authors. Published by the American Physical Society.

  10. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of historical and current numerical aerodynamic simulation (NAS) is given. The capabilities and goals of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility are outlined. Emphasis is given to numerical flow visualization and its applications to structural analysis of aircraft and spacecraft bodies. The uses of NAS in computational chemistry, engine design, and galactic evolution are mentioned.

  11. Computation of dragonfly aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafson, Karl; Leben, Robert

    1991-04-01

    Dragonflies are seen to hover and dart, seemingly at will and in remarkably nimble fashion, with great bursts of speed and effectively discontinuous changes of direction. In their short lives, their gossamer flight provides us with glimpses of an aerodynamics of almost extraterrestrial quality. Here we present the first computer simulations of such aerodynamics.

  12. Micro air vehicle motion tracking and aerodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, Daniel V.

    Aerodynamic performance of small-scale fixed-wing flight is not well understood, and flight data are needed to gain a better understanding of the aerodynamics of micro air vehicles (MAVs) flying at Reynolds numbers between 10,000 and 30,000. Experimental studies have shown the aerodynamic effects of low Reynolds number flow on wings and airfoils, but the amount of work that has been conducted is not extensive and mostly limited to tests in wind and water tunnels. In addition to wind and water tunnel testing, flight characteristics of aircraft can be gathered through flight testing. The small size and low weight of MAVs prevent the use of conventional on-board instrumentation systems, but motion tracking systems that use off-board triangulation can capture flight trajectories (position and attitude) of MAVs with minimal onboard instrumentation. Because captured motion trajectories include minute noise that depends on the aircraft size, the trajectory results were verified in this work using repeatability tests. From the captured glide trajectories, the aerodynamic characteristics of five unpowered aircraft were determined. Test results for the five MAVs showed the forces and moments acting on the aircraft throughout the test flights. In addition, the airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip angle were also determined from the trajectories. Results for low angles of attack (less than approximately 20 deg) showed the lift, drag, and moment coefficients during nominal gliding flight. For the lift curve, the results showed a linear curve until stall that was generally less than finite wing predictions. The drag curve was well described by a polar. The moment coefficients during the gliding flights were used to determine longitudinal and lateral stability derivatives. The neutral point, weather-vane stability and the dihedral effect showed some variation with different trim speeds (different angles of attack). In the gliding flights, the aerodynamic characteristics

  13. Intercomparison of Methods for the Simultaneous Estimation of Zero-Plane Displacement and Aerodynamic Roughness Length from Single-Level Eddy-Covariance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Alexander; van de Boer, Anneke; Moene, Arnold; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    We applied three approaches to estimate the zero-plane displacement through the aerodynamic measurement height (with and being the measurement height above the surface), and the aerodynamic roughness length , from single-level eddy covariance data. Two approaches (one iterative and one regression-based) were based on the universal function in the logarithmic wind profile and yielded an inherently simultaneous estimation of both and . The third approach was based on flux-variance similarity, where estimation of and consecutive estimation of are independent steps. Each approach was further divided into two methods differing either with respect to the solution technique (profile approaches) or with respect to the variable (variance of vertical wind and temperature, respectively). All methods were applied to measurements above a large, growing wheat field where a uniform canopy height and its frequent monitoring provided plausibility limits for the resulting estimates of time-variant and . After applying, for each approach, a specific data filtering that accounted for the range of conditions (e.g. stability) for which it is valid, five of the six methods were able to describe the temporal changes of roughness parameters associated with crop growth and harvest, and four of them agreed on to within 0.3 m most of the time. Application of the same methods to measurements with a more heterogeneous footprint consisting of fully-grown sugarbeet and a varying contribution of adjacent harvested fields exhibited a plausible dependence of the roughness parameters on the sugarbeet fraction. It also revealed that the methods producing the largest outliers can differ between site conditions and stability. We therefore conclude that when determining for canopies with unknown properties from single-level measurements, as is increasingly done, it is important to compare the results of a number of methods rather than rely on a single one. An ensemble average or median of the results

  14. Method for Predicting Which Customers' Time Deposit Balances Will Increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Toshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Morita, Masahiro; Komoda, Norihisa

    This paper proposes a method of predicting which customers' account balances will increase by using data mining to effectively and efficiently promote sales. Prediction by mining all the data in a business is difficult because of much time required to collect, process, and calculate it. The selection of which features are used for prediction is a critical issue. We propose a method of selecting features to improve the accuracy of prediction within practical time limits. It consists of three parts: (1) converting collected features into financial behavior features that reflect customer actions, (2) extracting features affecting increases in account balances from these collected and financial behavior features, and (3) predicting customers whose account balances will increase based on the extracted features. We found the accuracy of prediction in an experiment with our method to be higher than with other conventional methods.

  15. Efficient Methods to Compute Genomic Predictions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficient methods for processing genomic data were developed to increase reliability of estimated breeding values and simultaneously estimate thousands of marker effects. Algorithms were derived and computer programs tested on simulated data for 50,000 markers and 2,967 bulls. Accurate estimates of ...

  16. Statistical energy analysis response prediction methods for structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an effort to document methods for accomplishing response predictions for commonly encountered aerospace structural configurations is presented. Application of these methods to specified aerospace structure to provide sample analyses is included. An applications manual, with the structural analyses appended as example problems is given. Comparisons of the response predictions with measured data are provided for three of the example problems.

  17. Aerodynamic Noise Generated by Shinkansen Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KITAGAWA, T.; NAGAKURA, K.

    2000-03-01

    The noise value (A -weighted sound pressure level, SLOW) generated by Shinkansen trains, now running at 220-300 km/h, should be less than 75 dB(A) at the trackside. Shinkansen noise, such as rolling noise, concrete support structure noise, and aerodynamic noise are generated by various parts of Shinkansen trains. Among these aerodynamic noise is important because it is the major contribution to the noise generated by the coaches running at high speed. In order to reduce the aerodynamic noise, a number of improvements to coaches have been made. As a result, the aerodynamic noise has been reduced, but it still remains significant. In addition, some aerodynamic noise generated from the lower parts of cars remains. In order to investigate the contributions of these noises, a method of analyzing Shinkansen noise has been developed and applied to the measured data of Shinkansen noise at speeds between 120 and 315 km/h. As a result, the following conclusions have been drawn: (1) Aerodynamic noise generated from the upper parts of cars was reduced considerably by smoothing car surfaces. (2) Aerodynamic noise generated from the lower parts of cars has a major influence upon the wayside noise.

  18. A Versatile Nonlinear Method for Predictive Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Yao, Weigang

    2015-01-01

    As computational fluid dynamics techniques and tools become widely accepted for realworld practice today, it is intriguing to ask: what areas can it be utilized to its potential in the future. Some promising areas include design optimization and exploration of fluid dynamics phenomena (the concept of numerical wind tunnel), in which both have the common feature where some parameters are varied repeatedly and the computation can be costly. We are especially interested in the need for an accurate and efficient approach for handling these applications: (1) capturing complex nonlinear dynamics inherent in a system under consideration and (2) versatility (robustness) to encompass a range of parametric variations. In our previous paper, we proposed to use first-order Taylor expansion collected at numerous sampling points along a trajectory and assembled together via nonlinear weighting functions. The validity and performance of this approach was demonstrated for a number of problems with a vastly different input functions. In this study, we are especially interested in enhancing the method's accuracy; we extend it to include the second-orer Taylor expansion, which however requires a complicated evaluation of Hessian matrices for a system of equations, like in fluid dynamics. We propose a method to avoid these Hessian matrices, while maintaining the accuracy. Results based on the method are presented to confirm its validity.

  19. Missile aerodynamics; Proceedings of the Conference, Monterey, CA, Oct. 31-Nov. 2, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, M.R.; Nixon, D.; Dillenius, M.F.E.

    1989-01-01

    The present conference discusses the development status of predictive capabilities for missile aerodynamic characteristics, the application of experimental techniques to missile-release problems, prospective high-performance missile designs, the use of lateral jet controls for missile guidance, and the integration of stores on modern tactical aircraft. Also discussed are semiempirical aerodynamic methods for preliminary design, high angle-of-attack behavior for an advanced missile, and the dynamic derivatives of missiles and fighter-type configurations at high angles-of-attack.

  20. Prediction of forces and moments for flight vehicle control effectors. Part 1: Validation of methods for predicting hypersonic vehicle controls forces and moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughmer, Mark D.; Ozoroski, L.; Ozoroski, T.; Straussfogel, D.

    1990-01-01

    Many types of hypersonic aircraft configurations are currently being studied for feasibility of future development. Since the control of the hypersonic configurations throughout the speed range has a major impact on acceptable designs, it must be considered in the conceptual design stage. The ability of the aerodynamic analysis methods contained in an industry standard conceptual design system, APAS II, to estimate the forces and moments generated through control surface deflections from low subsonic to high hypersonic speeds is considered. Predicted control forces and moments generated by various control effectors are compared with previously published wind tunnel and flight test data for three configurations: the North American X-15, the Space Shuttle Orbiter, and a hypersonic research airplane concept. Qualitative summaries of the results are given for each longitudinal force and moment and each control derivative in the various speed ranges. Results show that all predictions of longitudinal stability and control derivatives are acceptable for use at the conceptual design stage. Results for most lateral/directional control derivatives are acceptable for conceptual design purposes; however, predictions at supersonic Mach numbers for the change in yawing moment due to aileron deflection and the change in rolling moment due to rudder deflection are found to be unacceptable. Including shielding effects in the analysis is shown to have little effect on lift and pitching moment predictions while improving drag predictions.

  1. Prediction of unsteady aerodynamic loadings caused by leading edge and trailing edge control surface motions in subsonic compressible flow: Computer program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redman, M. C.; Rowe, W. S.

    1975-01-01

    A digital computer program has been developed to calculate unsteady loadings caused by motions of lifting surfaces with leading edge or trailing edge controls based on the subsonic kernel function approach. The pressure singularities at hinge line and side edges have been extracted analytically as a preliminary step to solving the integral equation by collocation. The program calculates generalized aerodynamic forces for user supplied deflection modes. Optional intermediate output includes pressure at an array of points, and sectional generalized forces. From one to six controls on the half span can be accommodated.

  2. Computational methods in sequence and structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Caiyi

    This dissertation is organized into two parts. In the first part, we will discuss three computational methods for cis-regulatory element recognition in three different gene regulatory networks as the following: (a) Using a comprehensive "Phylogenetic Footprinting Comparison" method, we will investigate the promoter sequence structures of three enzymes (PAL, CHS and DFR) that catalyze sequential steps in the pathway from phenylalanine to anthocyanins in plants. Our result shows there exists a putative cis-regulatory element "AC(C/G)TAC(C)" in the upstream of these enzyme genes. We propose this cis-regulatory element to be responsible for the genetic regulation of these three enzymes and this element, might also be the binding site for MYB class transcription factor PAP1. (b) We will investigate the role of the Arabidopsis gene glutamate receptor 1.1 (AtGLR1.1) in C and N metabolism by utilizing the microarray data we obtained from AtGLR1.1 deficient lines (antiAtGLR1.1). We focus our investigation on the putatively co-regulated transcript profile of 876 genes we have collected in antiAtGLR1.1 lines. By (a) scanning the occurrence of several groups of known abscisic acid (ABA) related cisregulatory elements in the upstream regions of 876 Arabidopsis genes; and (b) exhaustive scanning of all possible 6-10 bps motif occurrence in the upstream regions of the same set of genes, we are able to make a quantative estimation on the enrichment level of each of the cis-regulatory element candidates. We finally conclude that one specific cis-regulatory element group, called "ABRE" elements, are statistically highly enriched within the 876-gene group as compared to their occurrence within the genome. (c) We will introduce a new general purpose algorithm, called "fuzzy REDUCE1", which we have developed recently for automated cis-regulatory element identification. In the second part, we will discuss our newly devised protein design framework. With this framework we have developed

  3. Modeling Powered Aerodynamics for the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Aerodynamic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Robinson, Philip E.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling the aerodynamics of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) has presented many technical challenges to the developers of the Orion aerodynamic database. During a launch abort event, the aerodynamic environment around the LAV is very complex as multiple solid rocket plumes interact with each other and the vehicle. It is further complicated by vehicle separation events such as between the LAV and the launch vehicle stack or between the launch abort tower and the crew module. The aerodynamic database for the LAV was developed mainly from wind tunnel tests involving powered jet simulations of the rocket exhaust plumes, supported by computational fluid dynamic simulations. However, limitations in both methods have made it difficult to properly capture the aerodynamics of the LAV in experimental and numerical simulations. These limitations have also influenced decisions regarding the modeling and structure of the aerodynamic database for the LAV and led to compromises and creative solutions. Two database modeling approaches are presented in this paper (incremental aerodynamics and total aerodynamics), with examples showing strengths and weaknesses of each approach. In addition, the unique problems presented to the database developers by the large data space required for modeling a launch abort event illustrate the complexities of working with multi-dimensional data.

  4. Aerodynamic analysis of hypersonic waverider aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Pessin, David N.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate two existing codes used by the Systems Analysis Branch at NASA ARC, and to modify the codes so they can be used to generate and analyze waverider aircraft at on-design and off-design conditions. To generate waverider configurations and perform the on-design analysis, the appropriately named Waverider code is used. The Waverider code is based on the Taylor-Maccoll equations. Validation is accomplished via a comparison with previously published results. The Waverider code is modified to incorporate a fairing to close off the base area of the waverider configuration. This creates a more realistic waverider. The Hypersonic Aircraft Vehicle Optimization Code (HAVOC) is used to perform the off-design analysis of waverider configurations generated by the Waverider code. Various approximate analysis methods are used by HAVOC to predict the aerodynamic characteristics, which are validated via a comparison with experimental results from a hypersonic test model.

  5. The aerodynamics of propellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Quentin R.

    2006-02-01

    The theory and the design of propellers of minimum induced loss is treated. The pioneer analysis of this problem was presented more than half a century ago by Theodorsen, but obscurities in his treatment and inaccuracies and limited coverage in his tables of the Goldstein circulation function for helicoidal vortex sheets have not been remedied until the present work which clarifies and extends his work. The inverse problem, the prediction of the performance of a given propeller of arbitrary form, is also treated. The theory of propellers of minimum energy loss is dependent on considerations of a regular helicoidal trailing vortex sheet; consequently, a more detailed discussion of the dynamics of vortex sheets and the consequences of their instability and roll up is presented than is usually found in treatments of propeller aerodynamics. Complete and accurate tables of the circulation function are presented. Interference effects between a fuselage or a nacelle and the propeller are considered. The regimes of propeller, vortex ring, and windmill operation are characterized.

  6. Preliminary thoughts on helicopter cabin noise prediction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, J. S.

    The problems of predicting helicopter cabin noise are discussed with particular reference to the Lynx helicopter. Available methods such as modal analysis adopted for propeller noise prediction do not cope with the higher frequency discrete tone content of helicopter gear noise, with the airborne and structureborne noise contributions. Statistical energy analysis methods may be the answer but until these are developed, one has to rely on classical noise transmission analysis and transfer function methods.

  7. Fourier functional analysis for unsteady aerodynamic modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward; Chin, Suei

    1991-01-01

    A method based on Fourier analysis is developed to analyze the force and moment data obtained in large amplitude forced oscillation tests at high angles of attack. The aerodynamic models for normal force, lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients are built up from a set of aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions at different frequencies. Based on the aerodynamic models of harmonic data, the indicial responses are formed. The final expressions for the models involve time integrals of the indicial type advocated by Tobak and Schiff. Results from linear two- and three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic theories as well as test data for a 70-degree delta wing are used to verify the models. It is shown that the present modeling method is accurate in producing the aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions and the ramp type motions. The model also produces correct trend for a 70-degree delta wing in harmonic motion with different mean angles-of-attack. However, the current model cannot be used to extrapolate data to higher angles-of-attack than that of the harmonic motions which form the aerodynamic model. For linear ramp motions, a special method is used to calculate the corresponding frequency and phase angle at a given time. The calculated results from modeling show a higher lift peak for linear ramp motion than for harmonic ramp motion. The current model also shows reasonably good results for the lift responses at different angles of attack.

  8. Experimental validation of boundary element methods for noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental validation of methods to predict radiated noise is presented. A combined finite element and boundary element model was used to predict the vibration and noise of a rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker. The predicted noise was compared to sound power measured by the acoustic intensity method. Inaccuracies in the finite element model shifted the resonance frequencies by about 5 percent. The predicted and measured sound power levels agree within about 2.5 dB. In a second experiment, measured vibration data was used with a boundary element model to predict noise radiation from the top of an operating gearbox. The predicted and measured sound power for the gearbox agree within about 3 dB.

  9. Space Shuttle flutter as affected by wing-body aerodynamic interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, R. R.; Rauch, F. J.; Shyprykevich, P.; Hess, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    In the NASA Langley Research Center 26-inch transonic blowdown wind-tunnel, flutter speeds were measured on 1/80-th scale semispan models of the orbiter wing, the complete Space Shuttle, and intermediate component combinations. Using the doublet lattice method combined with slender body theory to calculate unsteady aerodynamic forces, subsonic flutter speeds were computed for comparison. Aerodynamic interaction was found by test and analysis to raise the flutter speed in some configurations while lowering it in others. Although at Mach number less than 0.7, predicted speeds correlated to within 6% of those measured, rapid deterioration of the agreement occurred at higher subsonic Mach numbers, especially on the more complicated configurations. Additional analysis showed that aerodynamic forces arising from body flexibility potentially can have a large effect on flutter speed, but that the current shuttle design is not so affected.

  10. Real-Time Onboard Global Nonlinear Aerodynamic Modeling from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Jay M.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    Flight test and modeling techniques were developed to accurately identify global nonlinear aerodynamic models onboard an aircraft. The techniques were developed and demonstrated during piloted flight testing of an Aermacchi MB-326M Impala jet aircraft. Advanced piloting techniques and nonlinear modeling techniques based on fuzzy logic and multivariate orthogonal function methods were implemented with efficient onboard calculations and flight operations to achieve real-time maneuver monitoring and analysis, and near-real-time global nonlinear aerodynamic modeling and prediction validation testing in flight. Results demonstrated that global nonlinear aerodynamic models for a large portion of the flight envelope were identified rapidly and accurately using piloted flight test maneuvers during a single flight, with the final identified and validated models available before the aircraft landed.

  11. Overview of Selected Measurement Techniques for Aerodynamics Testing in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2000-01-01

    An overview is given of selected measurement techniques used in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of aerospace vehicles operating at supersonic speeds. A broad definition of a measurement technique is adopted in this paper and is any qualitative or quantitative experimental approach that provides information leading to the improved understanding of the supersonic aerodynamic characteristics. On surface and off-surface measurement techniques used to obtain discrete (point) and global (field) measurements and planar and global flow visualizations are described, and examples of all methods are included. The discussion is limited to recent experiences in the UPWT and is. therefore, not an exhaustive review of existing experimental techniques. The diversity and high quality of the measurement techniques and the resultant data illustrate the capabilities of a around-based experimental facility and the key role that it plays in the advancement of our understanding, prediction, and control of supersonic aerodynamics.

  12. Unsteady Aerodynamic Modeling in Roll for the NASA Generic Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Klein, Vladislav; Frink, Neal T.

    2012-01-01

    Reducing the impact of loss-of-control conditions on commercial transport aircraft is a primary goal of the NASA Aviation Safety Program. One aspect in developing the supporting technologies is to improve the aerodynamic models that represent these adverse conditions. Aerodynamic models appropriate for loss of control conditions require a more general mathematical representation to predict nonlinear unsteady behaviors. In this paper, a more general mathematical model is proposed for the subscale NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) that covers both low and high angles of attack. Particular attention is devoted to the stall region where full-scale transports have demonstrated a tendency for roll instability. The complete aerodynamic model was estimated from dynamic wind-tunnel data. Advanced computational methods are used to improve understanding and visualize the flow physics within the region where roll instability is a factor.

  13. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  14. Control of helicopter rotorblade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabunmi, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study of a method for controlling the aerodynamics of helicopter rotorblades using stacks of piezoelectric ceramic plates are presented. A resonant mechanism is proposed for the amplification of the displacements produced by the stack. This motion is then converted into linear displacement for the actuation of the servoflap of the blades. A design which emulates the actuation of the servoflap on the Kaman SH-2F is used to demonstrate the fact that such a system can be designed to produce the necessary forces and velocities needed to control the aerodynamics of the rotorblades of such a helicopter. Estimates of the electrical power requirements are also presented. A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 Program is suggested, whereby a bench-top prototype of the device can be built and tested. A collaborative effort between AEDAR Corporation and Kaman Aerospace Corporation is anticipated for future effort on this project.

  15. A K-nearest neighbors survival probability prediction method.

    PubMed

    Lowsky, D J; Ding, Y; Lee, D K K; McCulloch, C E; Ross, L F; Thistlethwaite, J R; Zenios, S A

    2013-05-30

    We introduce a nonparametric survival prediction method for right-censored data. The method generates a survival curve prediction by constructing a (weighted) Kaplan-Meier estimator using the outcomes of the K most similar training observations. Each observation has an associated set of covariates, and a metric on the covariate space is used to measure similarity between observations. We apply our method to a kidney transplantation data set to generate patient-specific distributions of graft survival and to a simulated data set in which the proportional hazards assumption is explicitly violated. We compare the performance of our method with the standard Cox model and the random survival forests method. PMID:23653217

  16. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  17. Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Jungil; Park, Hyungmin

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the aerodynamics of heavy vehicles, such as tractor-trailers, high-speed trains, and buses. We introduce three-dimensional flow structures around simplified model vehicles and heavy vehicles and discuss the flow-control devices used for drag reduction. Finally, we suggest important unsteady flow structures to investigate for the enhancement of aerodynamic performance and future directions for experimental and numerical approaches.

  18. What Predicts Use of Learning-Centered, Interactive Engagement Methods?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madson, Laura; Trafimow, David; Gray, Tara; Gutowitz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    What makes some faculty members more likely to use interactive engagement methods than others? We use the theory of reasoned action to predict faculty members' use of interactive engagement methods. Results indicate that faculty members' beliefs about the personal positive consequences of using these methods (e.g., "Using…

  19. Interim prediction method for low frequency core engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, R. G.; Clark, B. J.; Dorsch, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    A literature survey on low-frequency core engine noise is presented. Possible sources of low frequency internally generated noise in core engines are discussed with emphasis on combustion and component scrubbing noise. An interim method is recommended for predicting low frequency core engine noise that is dominant when jet velocities are low. Suggestions are made for future research on low frequency core engine noise that will aid in improving the prediction method and help define possible additional internal noise sources.

  20. Assessment of a method for the prediction of mandibular rotation.

    PubMed

    Lee, R S; Daniel, F J; Swartz, M; Baumrind, S; Korn, E L

    1987-05-01

    A new method to predict mandibular rotation developed by Skieller and co-workers on a sample of 21 implant subjects with extreme growth patterns has been tested against an alternative sample of 25 implant patients with generally similar mean values, but with less extreme facial patterns. The method, which had been highly successful in retrospectively predicting changes in the sample of extreme subjects, was much less successful in predicting individual patterns of mandibular rotation in the new, less extreme sample. The observation of a large difference in the strength of the predictions for these two samples, even though their mean values were quite similar, should serve to increase our awareness of the complexity of the problem of predicting growth patterns in individual cases. PMID:3472458

  1. Unsteady Nonlinear Aerodynamic Response Modeling: A Data-Priven Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemati, Maziar; Dawson, Scott; Rowley, Clarence

    2014-11-01

    Current real-time-capable aerodynamic modeling strategies are greatly challenged in the face of aggressive flight maneuvers, such as rapid pitching motions that lead to pronounced leading-edge vortex shedding and aerodynamic stall. The inability to accurately and robustly predict, in a low-dimensional manner, the nonlinear aerodynamic force/moment response of an aircraft to sharp maneuvers puts practical approaches for aerodynamic optimization and control out of reach. Here, we propose a parameter-varying model to approximate the response of an airfoil to arbitrarily prescribed rapid pitching kinematics. An output-minimization procedure is invoked to identify the nonlinear model from input-output data gathered from direct numerical fluid dynamics simulations. The resulting nonlinear models have noteworthy predictive capabilities for arbitrary pitching maneuvers that span a broad range of operating regimes, thus making the models especially useful for aerodynamic optimization and real-time control and simulation.

  2. Comparison of Computational Approaches for Rapid Aerodynamic Assessment of Small UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Theresa C.; Lynch, C. Eric; Viken, Sally A.; Favaregh, Noah; Zeune, Cale; Williams, Nathan; Dansie, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) methods were used to determine the basic aerodynamic, performance, and stability and control characteristics of the unmanned air vehicle (UAV), Kahu. Accurate and timely prediction of the aerodynamic characteristics of small UAVs is an essential part of military system acquisition and air-worthiness evaluations. The forces and moments of the UAV were predicted using a variety of analytical methods for a range of configurations and conditions. The methods included Navier Stokes (N-S) flow solvers (USM3D, Kestrel and Cobalt) that take days to set up and hours to converge on a single solution; potential flow methods (PMARC, LSAERO, and XFLR5) that take hours to set up and minutes to compute; empirical methods (Datcom) that involve table lookups and produce a solution quickly; and handbook calculations. A preliminary aerodynamic database can be developed very efficiently by using a combination of computational tools. The database can be generated with low-order and empirical methods in linear regions, then replacing or adjusting the data as predictions from higher order methods are obtained. A comparison of results from all the data sources as well as experimental data obtained from a wind-tunnel test will be shown and the methods will be evaluated on their utility during each portion of the flight envelope.

  3. Aerodynamic Models for the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Test Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Norman, John W.; Dyakonov, Artem; Schoenenberger, Mark; Davis, Jody; Muppidi, Suman; Tang, Chun; Bose, Deepak; Mobley, Brandon; Clark, Ian

    2016-01-01

    An overview of aerodynamic models for the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) campaign test vehicle is presented, with comparisons to reconstructed flight data and discussion of model updates. The SFDT campaign objective is to test Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) and large supersonic parachute technologies at high altitude Earth conditions relevant to entry, descent, and landing (EDL) at Mars. Nominal SIAD test conditions are attained by lifting a test vehicle (TV) to 36 km altitude with a helium balloon, then accelerating the TV to Mach 4 and 53 km altitude with a solid rocket motor. Test flights conducted in June of 2014 (SFDT-1) and 2015 (SFDT-2) each successfully delivered a 6 meter diameter decelerator (SIAD-R) to test conditions and several seconds of flight, and were successful in demonstrating the SFDT flight system concept and SIAD-R technology. Aerodynamic models and uncertainties developed for the SFDT campaign are presented, including the methods used to generate them and their implementation within an aerodynamic database (ADB) routine for flight simulations. Pre- and post-flight aerodynamic models are compared against reconstructed flight data and model changes based upon knowledge gained from the flights are discussed. The pre-flight powered phase model is shown to have a significant contribution to off-nominal SFDT trajectory lofting, while coast and SIAD phase models behaved much as predicted.

  4. A method to objectively optimize coral bleaching prediction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hooidonk, R. J.; Huber, M.

    2007-12-01

    Thermally induced coral bleaching is a global threat to coral reef health. Methodologies, e.g. the Degree Heating Week technique, have been developed to predict bleaching induced by thermal stress by utilizing remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST) observations. These techniques can be used as a management tool for Marine Protected Areas (MPA). Predictions are valuable to decision makers and stakeholders on weekly to monthly time scales and can be employed to build public awareness and support for mitigation. The bleaching problem is only expected to worsen because global warming poses a major threat to coral reef health. Indeed, predictive bleaching methods combined with climate model output have been used to forecast the global demise of coral reef ecosystems within coming decades due to climate change. Accuracy of these predictive techniques has not been quantitatively characterized despite the critical role they play. Assessments have typically been limited, qualitative or anecdotal, or more frequently they are simply unpublished. Quantitative accuracy assessment, using well established methods and skill scores often used in meteorology and medical sciences, will enable objective optimization of existing predictive techniques. To accomplish this, we will use existing remotely sensed data sets of sea surface temperature (AVHRR and TMI), and predictive values from techniques such as the Degree Heating Week method. We will compare these predictive values with observations of coral reef health and calculate applicable skill scores (Peirce Skill Score, Hit Rate and False Alarm Rate). We will (a) quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of existing coral reef bleaching predictive methods against state-of- the-art reef health databases, and (b) present a technique that will objectively optimize the predictive method for any given location. We will illustrate this optimization technique for reefs located in Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.

  5. New methods for predicting the magnitude of sunspot maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    Three new and independent methods of predicting the magnitude of a forthcoming sunspot maximum are suggested. The longest lead time is given by the first method, which is based on a terrestrial parameter measured during the declining phase of the preceding cycle. The second method, with only a slightly shorter foreknowledge, is based on an interplanetary parameter derived around the commencement of the cycle in question (sunspot minimum). The third method, giving the shortest prediction lead-time, is based entirely on solar parameters measured during the initial progress of the cycle in question. Application of all three methods to forecast the magnitude of the next maximum (Cycle 21) agree in predicting that it is likely to be very similar to that of Cycle 18.

  6. Modified-Fibonacci-Dual-Lucas method for earthquake prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucouvalas, A. C.; Gkasios, M.; Tselikas, N. T.; Drakatos, G.

    2015-06-01

    The FDL method makes use of Fibonacci, Dual and Lucas numbers and has shown considerable success in predicting earthquake events locally as well as globally. Predicting the location of the epicenter of an earthquake is one difficult challenge the other being the timing and magnitude. One technique for predicting the onset of earthquakes is the use of cycles, and the discovery of periodicity. Part of this category is the reported FDL method. The basis of the reported FDL method is the creation of FDL future dates based on the onset date of significant earthquakes. The assumption being that each occurred earthquake discontinuity can be thought of as a generating source of FDL time series The connection between past earthquakes and future earthquakes based on FDL numbers has also been reported with sample earthquakes since 1900. Using clustering methods it has been shown that significant earthquakes (<6.5R) can be predicted with very good accuracy window (+-1 day). In this contribution we present an improvement modification to the FDL method, the MFDL method, which performs better than the FDL. We use the FDL numbers to develop possible earthquakes dates but with the important difference that the starting seed date is a trigger planetary aspect prior to the earthquake. Typical planetary aspects are Moon conjunct Sun, Moon opposite Sun, Moon conjunct or opposite North or South Modes. In order to test improvement of the method we used all +8R earthquakes recorded since 1900, (86 earthquakes from USGS data). We have developed the FDL numbers for each of those seeds, and examined the earthquake hit rates (for a window of 3, i.e. +-1 day of target date) and for <6.5R. The successes are counted for each one of the 86 earthquake seeds and we compare the MFDL method with the FDL method. In every case we find improvement when the starting seed date is on the planetary trigger date prior to the earthquake. We observe no improvement only when a planetary trigger coincided with

  7. Estimating the Collapse Pressure of an Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baginski, Frank E.; Brakke, Kenneth A.; Cruz, Juan R.

    2013-01-01

    The collapse pressure of an inflatable membrane is the minimum differential pressure which will sustain a specific desired shape under an applied load. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the collapse pressure of a tension-cone inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (IAD) that is subject to a static aerodynamic load. The IAD surface is modeled as an elastic membrane. For a given aerodynamic load and sufficiently high torus differential pressure, the IAD assumes a stable axisymmetric equilibrium shape. When the torus pressure is reduced sufficiently, the symmetric equilibrium state becomes unstable and we define this instance to be the critical pressure Pcr. In this paper, we will compare our predicted critical torus pressure with the corresponding observed torus collapse pressure (OTCP) for fifteen tests that were conducted by the third author and his collaborators at the NASA Glenn Research Center 10x10 Supersonic Wind Tunnel in April 2008. One of the difficulties with these types of comparisons is establishing the instance of torus collapse and determining the OTCP from quantities measured during the experiment. In many cases, torus collapse is gradual and the OTCP is not well-defined. However, in eight of the fifteen wind tunnel tests where the OTCP is well-defined, we find that the average of the relative differences (Pcr - OTCP/Pcr) was 8.9%. For completeness, we will also discuss the seven tests where the observed torus collapse pressure is not well-defined.

  8. Aerodynamic Optimization of Supersonic Transport at Near-Sonic Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Wataru; Matsushima, Kisa; Obayashi, Shigeru; Nakahashi, Kazuhiro

    Recently, an airplane cruising at near-sonic regime is watched with keen interest. The Sonic-Cruiser, of which the Boeing Company has examined and challenged the development, is the most remarkable case. In this paper, motivated by this trend, aerodynamic performance optimization for an airplane cruising at near-sonic regime is discussed based on CFD simulations. NAL’s experimental supersonic airplane, called NEXST-1, was employed as the baseline model for optimization. Aerodynamic performance was evaluated by solving the Euler equations with the unstructured grid method. It was confirmed that the performance Euler simulation predicted was qualitatively correct. By the evaluation to select a baseline model for optimization, NEXST-1 was accepted as a candidate of sonic plane because of the existence of drag bucket at near-sonic regime. In the optimization, Genetic Algorithm was used with Euler simulations. The objective was to reduce drag keeping lift constant, at the flying speed of Mach 0.98. The optimized result showed L/D improvement not only for near-sonic regime but also for transonic regime. The mechanism of design to reduce drag force was found through the analysis and comparison of the geometries and aerodynamic phenomena about the baseline model and the optimized one.

  9. Flutter of pairs of aerodynamically interfering delta wings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, R. R.; Rauch, F. J.; Hess, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    To examine the effect on flutter of the aerodynamic interference between pairs of closely spaced delta wings, several structurally uncoupled 1/80th-scale models were studied by experiment and analysis. Flutter test boundaries obtained in NASA Langley's 26-in. transonic blowdown wind tunnel were compared with subsonic analytical results generated using the doublet lattice method. Trends for several combinations of vertical and longitudinal wing separation were determined, showing flutter speed significantly affected in the closely spaced configurations. A new flutter mechanism coupling one wing's first bending mode with the other wing's first torsion mode was predicted and observed.

  10. A protein structural classes prediction method based on predicted secondary structure and PSI-BLAST profile.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shuyan; Li, Yan; Shi, Zhuoxing; Yan, Shoujiang

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge of protein secondary structural classes plays an important role in understanding protein folding patterns. In this paper, 25 features based on position-specific scoring matrices are selected to reflect evolutionary information. In combination with other 11 rational features based on predicted protein secondary structure sequences proposed by the previous researchers, a 36-dimensional representation feature vector is presented to predict protein secondary structural classes for low-similarity sequences. ASTRALtraining dataset is used to train and design our method, other three low-similarity datasets ASTRALtest, 25PDB and 1189 are used to test the proposed method. Comparisons with other methods show that our method is effective to predict protein secondary structural classes. Stand alone version of the proposed method (PSSS-PSSM) is written in MATLAB language and it can be downloaded from http://letsgob.com/bioinfo_PSSS_PSSM/. PMID:24067326

  11. Prediction methods of spudcan penetration for jack-up units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-xia; Duan, Meng-lan; Li, Hai-ming; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Jian-jun

    2012-12-01

    Jack-up units are extensively playing a successful role in drilling engineering around the world, and their safety and efficiency take more and more attraction in both research and engineering practice. An accurate prediction of the spudcan penetration depth is quite instrumental in deciding on whether a jack-up unit is feasible to operate at the site. The prediction of a too large penetration depth may lead to the hesitation or even rejection of a site due to potential difficulties in the subsequent extraction process; the same is true of a too small depth prediction due to the problem of possible instability during operation. However, a deviation between predictive results and final field data usually exists, especially when a strong-over-soft soil is included in the strata. The ultimate decision sometimes to a great extent depends on the practical experience, not the predictive results given by the guideline. It is somewhat risky, but no choice. Therefore, a feasible predictive method for the spudcan penetration depth, especially in strata with strong-over-soft soil profile, is urgently needed by the jack-up industry. In view of this, a comprehensive investigation on methods of predicting spudcan penetration is executed. For types of different soil profiles, predictive methods for spudcan penetration depth are proposed, and the corresponding experiment is also conducted to validate these methods. In addition, to further verify the feasibility of the proposed methods, a practical engineering case encountered in the South China Sea is also presented, and the corresponding numerical and experimental results are also presented and discussed.

  12. The trajectory prediction of spacecraft by grey method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiyue; Zhang, Zili; Wang, Zhongyu; Wang, Yanqing; Zhou, Weihu

    2016-08-01

    The real-time and high-precision trajectory prediction of a moving object is a core technology in the field of aerospace engineering. The real-time monitoring and tracking technology are also significant guarantees of aerospace equipment. A dynamic trajectory prediction method called grey dynamic filter (GDF) which combines the dynamic measurement theory and grey system theory is proposed. GDF can use coordinates of the current period to extrapolate coordinates of the following period. At meantime, GDF can also keep the instantaneity of measured coordinates by the metabolism model. In this paper the optimal model length of GDF is firstly selected to improve the prediction accuracy. Then the simulation for uniformly accelerated motion and variably accelerated motion is conducted. The simulation results indicate that the mean composite position error of GDF prediction is one-fifth to that of Kalman filter (KF). By using a spacecraft landing experiment, the prediction accuracy of GDF is compared with the KF method and the primitive grey method (GM). The results show that the motion trajectory of spacecraft predicted by GDF is much closer to actual trajectory than the other two methods. The mean composite position error calculated by GDF is one-eighth to KF and one-fifth to GM respectively.

  13. Improved method for predicting protein fold patterns with ensemble classifiers.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Liu, X; Huang, Y; Jiang, Y; Zou, Q; Lin, C

    2012-01-01

    Protein folding is recognized as a critical problem in the field of biophysics in the 21st century. Predicting protein-folding patterns is challenging due to the complex structure of proteins. In an attempt to solve this problem, we employed ensemble classifiers to improve prediction accuracy. In our experiments, 188-dimensional features were extracted based on the composition and physical-chemical property of proteins and 20-dimensional features were selected using a coupled position-specific scoring matrix. Compared with traditional prediction methods, these methods were superior in terms of prediction accuracy. The 188-dimensional feature-based method achieved 71.2% accuracy in five cross-validations. The accuracy rose to 77% when we used a 20-dimensional feature vector. These methods were used on recent data, with 54.2% accuracy. Source codes and dataset, together with web server and software tools for prediction, are available at: http://datamining.xmu.edu.cn/main/~cwc/ProteinPredict.html. PMID:22370884

  14. Method for the determination of the three-dimensional aerodynamic field of a rotor-stator combination to compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandra, Sridhar M.; Bober, Lawrence J.; Khandelwal, Suresh

    1987-01-01

    Using the lifting surface theory and the acceleration potential method for the flow field of an axial turbocompressor stage, a recursive and a direct method are presented that make use of the eigenfunction solutions of the isolated rotor and stator to solve for the rotor-stator interaction problem. The net pressure distribution on the rotor and stator blades is represented by modified Birnbaum series, whose coefficients are determined using a matrix procedure and satisfying the boundary conditions on the surface of the blades. The relation between the matrix operators of the recursive and the direct methods is also shown. Expressions have been given for the blade circulation, the axial and tangential forces on the blade, the rotor power required, and the induced upwash velocity of the stage.

  15. PREDICTIVE TEST METHODS: PERMEATION OF POLYMERIC MEMBRANES BY ORGANIC SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the result of screening elastomeric materials that may be suitable for formulating chemical-protective clothing, a simple test method has been developed that allows the prediction of the permeation of an organic solvent through a polymeric membrane. The test method, based on l...

  16. An Integrated Calculation Method to Predict Arc Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingwen; Chen, Degui

    The precision of magnetic field calculation is crucial to predict the arc behavior using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. A integrated calculation method is proposed to couple the calculation of magnetic field and fluid dynamics based on the commercial software ANSYS and FLUENT, which especially benefits to take into account the existence of the ferromagnetic parts. An example concerning air arc is presented using the method.

  17. Testing prediction methods: Earthquake clustering versus the Poisson model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, A.J.

    1997-01-01

    Testing earthquake prediction methods requires statistical techniques that compare observed success to random chance. One technique is to produce simulated earthquake catalogs and measure the relative success of predicting real and simulated earthquakes. The accuracy of these tests depends on the validity of the statistical model used to simulate the earthquakes. This study tests the effect of clustering in the statistical earthquake model on the results. Three simulation models were used to produce significance levels for a VLF earthquake prediction method. As the degree of simulated clustering increases, the statistical significance drops. Hence, the use of a seismicity model with insufficient clustering can lead to overly optimistic results. A successful method must pass the statistical tests with a model that fully replicates the observed clustering. However, a method can be rejected based on tests with a model that contains insufficient clustering. U.S. copyright. Published in 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Physics of badminton shuttlecocks. Part 1 : aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Caroline; Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    We study experimentally shuttlecocks dynamics. In this part we show that shuttlecock trajectory is highly different from classical parabola. When one takes into account the aerodynamic drag, the flight of the shuttlecock quickly curves downwards and almost reaches a vertical asymptote. We solve the equation of motion with gravity and drag at high Reynolds number and find an analytical expression of the reach. At high velocity, this reach does not depend on velocity anymore. Even if you develop your muscles you will not manage to launch the shuttlecock very far because of the ``aerodynamic wall.'' As a consequence you can predict the length of the field. We then discuss the extend of the aerodynamic wall to other projectiles like sports balls and its importance.

  19. Aerodynamic tests of Darrieus wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P.G.; Walters, R.E.; Wolfe, W.P.

    1983-03-01

    An indoor facility for the aerodynamic testing of Darrieus turbine blades was developed. Lift, drag, and moment coefficients were measured for two blades whose angle of attack and chord-to-radius ratio were varied. The first blade used an NACA 0015 airfoil section; the second used a 15% elliptical cross section with a modified circular arc trailing edge. Blade aerodynamic coefficients were corrected to section coefficients for comparison to published rectilinear flow data. Although the airfoil sections were symmetrical, moment coefficients were not zero and the lift and drag curves were asymmetrical about zero lift coefficient and angle of attack. These features verified the predicted virtual camber and incidence phenomena. Boundary-layer centrifugal effects were manifested by discontinuous lift curves and large differences in the angle of zero lift between th NACA 0015 and elliptical airfoils. It was concluded that rectilinear flow aerodynamic data are not applicable to Darrieus turbine blades, even for small chord-to-radius ratios.

  20. Computational Methods for Failure Analysis and Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Harris, Charles E. (Compiler); Housner, Jerrold M. (Compiler); Hopkins, Dale A. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This conference publication contains the presentations and discussions from the joint UVA/NASA Workshop on Computational Methods for Failure Analysis and Life Prediction held at NASA Langley Research Center 14-15 Oct. 1992. The presentations focused on damage failure and life predictions of polymer-matrix composite structures. They covered some of the research activities at NASA Langley, NASA Lewis, Southwest Research Institute, industry, and universities. Both airframes and propulsion systems were considered.

  1. A structural alphabet for local protein structures: improved prediction methods.

    PubMed

    Etchebest, Catherine; Benros, Cristina; Hazout, Serge; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2005-06-01

    Three-dimensional protein structures can be described with a library of 3D fragments that define a structural alphabet. We have previously proposed such an alphabet, composed of 16 patterns of five consecutive amino acids, called Protein Blocks (PBs). These PBs have been used to describe protein backbones and to predict local structures from protein sequences. The Q16 prediction rate reaches 40.7% with an optimization procedure. This article examines two aspects of PBs. First, we determine the effect of the enlargement of databanks on their definition. The results show that the geometrical features of the different PBs are preserved (local RMSD value equal to 0.41 A on average) and sequence-structure specificities reinforced when databanks are enlarged. Second, we improve the methods for optimizing PB predictions from sequences, revisiting the optimization procedure and exploring different local prediction strategies. Use of a statistical optimization procedure for the sequence-local structure relation improves prediction accuracy by 8% (Q16 = 48.7%). Better recognition of repetitive structures occurs without losing the prediction efficiency of the other local folds. Adding secondary structure prediction improved the accuracy of Q16 by only 1%. An entropy index (Neq), strongly related to the RMSD value of the difference between predicted PBs and true local structures, is proposed to estimate prediction quality. The Neq is linearly correlated with the Q16 prediction rate distributions, computed for a large set of proteins. An "expected" prediction rate QE16 is deduced with a mean error of 5%. PMID:15822101

  2. Accuracy of Four Tooth Size Prediction Methods on Malay Population

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Belal Khaled; Abu Asab, Saifeddin Hamed I.; Taib, Haslina

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To examine the accuracy of Moyers 50%, Tanaka and Johnston, Ling and Wong and Jaroontham and Godfrey methods in predicting the mesio-distal crown width of the permanent canines and premolars (C + P1 + P2) in Malay population. Materials and Methods. The study models of 240 Malay children (120 males and 120 females) aged 14 to 18 years, all free of any signs of dental pathology or anomalies, were measured using a digital caliper accurate to 0.01 mm. The predicted widths (C + P1 + P2) in both arches derived from the tested prediction equations were compared with the actual measured widths. Results. Moyers and Tanaka and Johnston methods showed significant difference between the actual and predicted widths of (C + P1 + P2) for both sexes. Ling and Wong method also showed statistically significant difference for males, however, there was no significant difference for females. Jaroontham and Godfrey method showed statistical significant difference for females, but the male values did not show any significant difference. Conclusion. For male Malay, the method proposed by Jaroontham and Godfrey for male Thai proved to be highly accurate. For female Malay, the method proposed by Ling and Wong for southern Chinese females proved to be highly accurate. PMID:23209918

  3. A simple method of predicting S-wave velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Prediction of shear-wave velocity plays an important role in seismic modeling, amplitude analysis with offset, and other exploration applications. This paper presents a method for predicting S-wave velocity from the P-wave velocity on the basis of the moduli of dry rock. Elastic velocities of water-saturated sediments at low frequencies can be predicted from the moduli of dry rock by using Gassmann's equation; hence, if the moduli of dry rock can be estimated from P-wave velocities, then S-wave velocities easily can be predicted from the moduli. Dry rock bulk modulus can be related to the shear modulus through a compaction constant. The numerical results indicate that the predicted S-wave velocities for consolidated and unconsolidated sediments agree well with measured velocities if differential pressure is greater than approximately 5 MPa. An advantage of this method is that there are no adjustable parameters to be chosen, such as the pore-aspect ratios required in some other methods. The predicted S-wave velocity depends only on the measured P-wave velocity and porosity. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  4. A comparison of four methods of predicting arch length.

    PubMed

    Gardner, R B

    1979-04-01

    1. Four arch length prediction equations (Nance, Johnston-Tanaka, Moyers, and Hixon-Oldfather) were compared by examining pretreatment casts, pretreatment intraoral radiographs, and posttreatment casts of forty-one patients of mixed-dentition age. 2. A comparison of correlation coefficients and slopes of the predicted arch length versus the actual arch lengths revealed that the Hixon-Oldfather method conformed closest to the ideal. 3. No combination of the four methods produced a more accurate equation than the single most accurate method. 4. Neither the sex of the patient nor the type of occlusion affected the prediction accuracy of any of the four equations. 5. All methods tend to overpredict the arch length size by 1 to 3 mm., with the exception of the Hixon-Oldfather equation, which underpredicted by approximately 0.5 mm. 6. An analysis of the intrainvestigator error showed a very low standard error of estimate for individual tooth measurements and for the prediction values. 7. A variance analysis showed that most of the variation was due to arch length (85%), a slight amount was due to the prediction method (8%), and 6% of the variation was due to the rater. 8. A low correlation was found between space available versus actual discrepancy and space available versus actual arch length. 9. High correlation coefficients were found for the predicted arch lengths when compared with the actual arch lengths. As expected, the correlation coefficients for the predicted widths of only the canines and premolars compared with the actual widths were not quite as high. PMID:285614

  5. Evaluation of Methods to Predict Reactivity of Gold Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Thomas C.; Tong, Yu ye J.

    2011-06-20

    Several methods have appeared in the literature for predicting reactivity on metallic surfaces and on the surface of metallic nanoparticles. All of these methods have some relationship to the concept of frontier molecular orbital theory. The d-band theory of Hammer and Nørskov is perhaps the most widely used predictor of reactivity on metallic surfaces, and it has been successfully applied in many cases. Use of the Fukui function and the condensed Fukui function is well established in organic chemistry, but has not been so widely applied in predicting the reactivity of metallic nanoclusters. In this article, we will evaluate the usefulness of the condensed Fukui function in predicting the reactivity of a family of cubo-octahedral gold nanoparticles and make comparison with the d-band method.

  6. A Micromechanics-Based Method for Multiscale Fatigue Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John Allan

    An estimated 80% of all structural failures are due to mechanical fatigue, often resulting in catastrophic, dangerous and costly failure events. However, an accurate model to predict fatigue remains an elusive goal. One of the major challenges is that fatigue is intrinsically a multiscale process, which is dependent on a structure's geometric design as well as its material's microscale morphology. The following work begins with a microscale study of fatigue nucleation around non- metallic inclusions. Based on this analysis, a novel multiscale method for fatigue predictions is developed. This method simulates macroscale geometries explicitly while concurrently calculating the simplified response of microscale inclusions. Thus, providing adequate detail on multiple scales for accurate fatigue life predictions. The methods herein provide insight into the multiscale nature of fatigue, while also developing a tool to aid in geometric design and material optimization for fatigue critical devices such as biomedical stents and artificial heart valves.

  7. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  8. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward; Hu, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    A Fourier analysis method was developed to analyze harmonic forced-oscillation data at high angles of attack as functions of the angle of attack and its time rate of change. The resulting aerodynamic responses at different frequencies are used to build up the aerodynamic models involving time integrals of the indicial type. An efficient numerical method was also developed to evaluate these time integrals for arbitrary motions based on a concept of equivalent harmonic motion. The method was verified by first using results from two-dimensional and three-dimensional linear theories. The developed models for C sub L, C sub D, and C sub M based on high-alpha data for a 70 deg delta wing in harmonic motions showed accurate results in reproducing hysteresis. The aerodynamic models are further verified by comparing with test data using ramp-type motions.

  9. Aerodynamic optimization studies on advanced architecture computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chawla, Kalpana

    1995-01-01

    The approach to carrying out multi-discipline aerospace design studies in the future, especially in massively parallel computing environments, comprises of choosing (1) suitable solvers to compute solutions to equations characterizing a discipline, and (2) efficient optimization methods. In addition, for aerodynamic optimization problems, (3) smart methodologies must be selected to modify the surface shape. In this research effort, a 'direct' optimization method is implemented on the Cray C-90 to improve aerodynamic design. It is coupled with an existing implicit Navier-Stokes solver, OVERFLOW, to compute flow solutions. The optimization method is chosen such that it can accomodate multi-discipline optimization in future computations. In the work , however, only single discipline aerodynamic optimization will be included.

  10. Predicting Spacecraft Trajectories by the WeavEncke Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Jonathan K.; Adamo, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of methods is proposed of predicting spacecraft trajectories that possibly include multiple maneuvers and/or perturbing accelerations, with greater speed, accuracy, and repeatability than were heretofore achievable. The combination is denoted the WeavEncke method because it is based on unpublished studies by Jonathan Weaver of the orbit-prediction formulation of the noted astronomer Johann Franz Encke. Weaver evaluated a number of alternatives that arise within that formulation, arriving at an orbit-predicting algorithm optimized for complex trajectory operations. In the WeavEncke method, Encke's method of prediction of perturbed orbits is enhanced by application of modern numerical methods. Among these methods are efficient Kepler s-equation time-of-flight solutions and self-starting numerical integration with time as the independent variable. Self-starting numerical integration satisfies the requirements for accuracy, reproducibility, and efficiency (and, hence, speed). Self-starting numerical integration also supports fully analytic regulation of integration step sizes, thereby further increasing speed while maintaining accuracy.

  11. Fluid mechanics of dynamic stall. II - Prediction of full scale characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical extrapolations are made from experimental subscale dynamics to predict full scale characteristics of dynamic stall. The method proceeds by establishing analytic relationships between dynamic and static aerodynamic characteristics induced by viscous flow effects. The method is then validated by predicting dynamic test results on the basis of corresponding static test data obtained at the same subscale flow conditions, and the effect of Reynolds number on the static aerodynamic characteristics are determined from subscale to full scale flow conditions.

  12. Integration of a supersonic unsteady aerodynamic code into the NASA FASTEX system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appa, Kari; Smith, Michael J. C.

    1987-01-01

    A supersonic unsteady aerodynamic loads prediction method based on the constant pressure method was integrated into the NASA FASTEX system. The updated FASTEX code can be employed for aeroelastic analyses in subsonic and supersonic flow regimes. A brief description of the supersonic constant pressure panel method, as applied to lifting surfaces and body configurations, is followed by a documentation of updates required to incorporate this method in the FASTEX code. Test cases showing correlations of predicted pressure distributions, flutter solutions, and stability derivatives with available data are reported.

  13. Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, J. B.; Lan, C. Edward

    1989-01-01

    Thrust vectoring as a means to enhance maneuverability and aerodynamic performane of a tactical aircraft is discussed. This concept usually involves the installation of a multifunction nozzle. With the nozzle, the engine thrust can be changed in direction without changing the attitude of the aircraft. Change in the direction of thrust induces a significant change in the aerodynamic forces on the aircraft. Therefore, this device can be used for lift-augmenting as well as stability and control purposes. When the thrust is deflected in the longitudinal direction, the lift force and the pitching stability can be manipulated, while the yawing stability can be controlled by directing the thrust in the lateral direction.

  14. Preface to the Focus Issue: Chaos Detection Methods and Predictability

    SciTech Connect

    Gottwald, Georg A.; Skokos, Charalampos

    2014-06-01

    This Focus Issue presents a collection of papers originating from the workshop Methods of Chaos Detection and Predictability: Theory and Applications held at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, June 17–21, 2013. The main aim of this interdisciplinary workshop was to review comprehensively the theory and numerical implementation of the existing methods of chaos detection and predictability, as well as to report recent applications of these techniques to different scientific fields. The collection of twelve papers in this Focus Issue represents the wide range of applications, spanning mathematics, physics, astronomy, particle accelerator physics, meteorology and medical research. This Preface surveys the papers of this Issue.

  15. An analytical method to predict efficiency of aircraft gearboxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, N. E.; Loewenthal, S. H.; Black, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    A spur gear efficiency prediction method previously developed by the authors was extended to include power loss of planetary gearsets. A friction coefficient model was developed for MIL-L-7808 oil based on disc machine data. This combined with the recent capability of predicting losses in spur gears of nonstandard proportions allows the calculation of power loss for complete aircraft gearboxes that utilize spur gears. The method was applied to the T56/501 turboprop gearbox and compared with measured test data. Bearing losses were calculated with large scale computer programs. Breakdowns of the gearbox losses point out areas for possible improvement.

  16. Semiempirical method for predicting vortex-induced rolling moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, D. O.; Bobbitt, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described for the prediction of rolling moments on a wing penetrating a vortex velocity field generated by a large aircraft. Rolling moments are determined from lifting pressure coefficients computed with an inviscid-flow linear panel method. Two empirical corrections are included to account for the lifting efficiency of an airfoil section and the local stall on the wing. Predicted rolling moments are compared with those from two windtunnel experiments. Results indicate that experimental rolling moments, for which the Reynolds number of the following wing is low, should be interpreted with caution.

  17. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-03-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing. PMID:25589565

  18. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds

    PubMed Central

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F.; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-01-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier–Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing. PMID:25589565

  19. Analysis of CASP8 targets, predictions and assessment methods

    PubMed Central

    Shi, ShuoYong; Pei, Jimin; Sadreyev, Ruslan I.; Kinch, Lisa N.; Majumdar, Indraneel; Tong, Jing; Cheng, Hua; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Grishin, Nick V.

    2009-01-01

    Results of the recent Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction, CASP8, present several valuable sources of information. First, CASP targets comprise a realistic sample of currently solved protein structures and exemplify the corresponding challenges for predictors. Second, the plethora of predictions by all possible methods provides an unusually rich material for evolutionary analysis of target proteins. Third, CASP results show the current state of the field and highlight specific problems in both predicting and assessing. Finally, these data can serve as grounds to develop and analyze methods for assessing prediction quality. Here we present results of our analysis in these areas. Our objective is not to duplicate CASP assessment, but to use our unique experience as former CASP5 assessors and CASP8 predictors to (i) offer more insights into CASP targets and predictions based on expert analysis, including invaluable analysis prior to target structure release; and (ii) develop an assessment methodology tailored towards current challenges in the field. Specifically, we discuss preparing target structures for assessment, parsing protein domains, balancing evaluations based on domains and on whole chains, dividing targets into categories and developing new evaluation scores. We also present evolutionary analysis of the most interesting and challenging targets. Database URL: Our results are available as a comprehensive database of targets and predictions at http://prodata.swmed.edu/CASP8. PMID:20157476

  20. Analysis of CASP8 targets, predictions and assessment methods.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuoyong; Pei, Jimin; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Kinch, Lisa N; Majumdar, Indraneel; Tong, Jing; Cheng, Hua; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Grishin, Nick V

    2009-01-01

    Results of the recent Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction, CASP8, present several valuable sources of information. First, CASP targets comprise a realistic sample of currently solved protein structures and exemplify the corresponding challenges for predictors. Second, the plethora of predictions by all possible methods provides an unusually rich material for evolutionary analysis of target proteins. Third, CASP results show the current state of the field and highlight specific problems in both predicting and assessing. Finally, these data can serve as grounds to develop and analyze methods for assessing prediction quality. Here we present results of our analysis in these areas. Our objective is not to duplicate CASP assessment, but to use our unique experience as former CASP5 assessors and CASP8 predictors to (i) offer more insights into CASP targets and predictions based on expert analysis, including invaluable analysis prior to target structure release; and (ii) develop an assessment methodology tailored towards current challenges in the field. Specifically, we discuss preparing target structures for assessment, parsing protein domains, balancing evaluations based on domains and on whole chains, dividing targets into categories and developing new evaluation scores. We also present evolutionary analysis of the most interesting and challenging targets.Database URL: Our results are available as a comprehensive database of targets and predictions at http://prodata.swmed.edu/CASP8. PMID:20157476

  1. Increased Fidelity in Prediction Methods For Landing Gear Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes, Leonard V.; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Morris, Philip J.; Lockhard, David P.

    2006-01-01

    An aeroacoustic prediction scheme has been developed for landing gear noise. The method is designed to handle the complex landing gear geometry of current and future aircraft. The gear is represented by a collection of subassemblies and simple components that are modeled using acoustic elements. These acoustic elements are generic, but generate noise representative of the physical components on a landing gear. The method sums the noise radiation from each component of the undercarriage in isolation accounting for interference with adjacent components through an estimate of the local upstream and downstream flows and turbulence intensities. The acoustic calculations are made in the code LGMAP, which computes the sound pressure levels at various observer locations. The method can calculate the noise from the undercarriage in isolation or installed on an aircraft for both main and nose landing gear. Comparisons with wind tunnel and flight data are used to initially calibrate the method, then it may be used to predict the noise of any landing gear. In this paper, noise predictions are compared with wind tunnel data for model landing gears of various scales and levels of fidelity, as well as with flight data on fullscale undercarriages. The present agreement between the calculations and measurements suggests the method has promise for future application in the prediction of airframe noise.

  2. Application of two direct runoff prediction methods in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, N.

    1997-01-01

    Two methods for predicting direct runoff from rainfall data were applied to several basins and the resulting hydrographs compared to measured values. The first method uses a geomorphology-based unit hydrograph to predict direct runoff through its convolution with the excess rainfall hyetograph. The second method shows how the resulting hydraulic routing flow equation from a kinematic wave approximation is solved using a spectral method based on the matrix representation of the spatial derivative with Chebyshev collocation and a fourth-order Runge-Kutta time discretization scheme. The calibrated Green-Ampt (GA) infiltration parameters are obtained by minimizing the sum, over several rainfall events, of absolute differences between the total excess rainfall volume computed from the GA equations and the total direct runoff volume computed from a hydrograph separation technique. The improvement made in predicting direct runoff using a geomorphology-based unit hydrograph with the ephemeral and perennial stream network instead of the strictly perennial stream network is negligible. The hydraulic routing scheme presented here is highly accurate in predicting the magnitude and time of the hydrograph peak although the much faster unit hydrograph method also yields reasonable results.

  3. Accuracy of Wind Prediction Methods in the California Sea Breeze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumers, B. D.; Dvorak, M. J.; Ten Hoeve, J. E.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the accuracy of measure-correlate-predict (MCP) algorithms and log law/power law scaling using data from two tall towers in coastal environments. We find that MCP algorithms accurately predict sea breeze winds and that log law/power law scaling methods struggle to predict 50-meter wind speeds. MCP methods have received significant attention as the wind industry has grown and the ability to accurately characterize the wind resource has become valuable. These methods are used to produce longer-term wind speed records from short-term measurement campaigns. A correlation is developed between the “target site,” where the developer is interested in building wind turbines, and a “reference site,” where long-term wind data is available. Up to twenty years of prior wind speeds are then are predicted. In this study, two existing MCP methods - linear regression and Mortimer’s method - are applied to predict 50-meter wind speeds at sites in the Salinas Valley and Redwood City, CA. The predictions are then verified with tall tower data. It is found that linear regression is poorly suited to MCP applications as the process produces inaccurate estimates of the cube of the wind speed at 50 meters. Meanwhile, Mortimer’s method, which bins data by direction and speed, is found to accurately predict the cube of the wind speed in both sea breeze and non-sea breeze conditions. We also find that log and power law are unstable predictors of wind speeds. While these methods produced accurate estimates of the average 50-meter wind speed at both sites, they predicted an average cube of the wind speed that was between 1.3 and 1.18 times the observed value. Inspection of time-series error reveals increased error in the mid-afternoon of the summer. This suggests that the cold sea breeze may disrupt the vertical temperature profile, create a stable atmosphere and violate the assumptions that allow log law scaling to work.

  4. Aerodynamic Parameter Identification of a Venus Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Robert A.

    An analysis was conducted to identify the parameters of an aerodynamic model for a Venus lander based on experimental free-flight data. The experimental free-flight data were collected in the NASA Langley 20-ft Vertical Spin Tunnel with a 25-percent Froude-scaled model. The experimental data were classified based on the wind tunnel run type: runs where the lander model was unperturbed over the course of the run, and runs were the model was perturbed (principally in pitch, yaw, and roll) by the wind tunnel operator. The perturbations allow for data to be obtained at higher wind angles and rotation rates than those available from the unperturbed data. The model properties and equations of motion were used to determine experimental values for the aerodynamic coefficients. An aerodynamic model was selected using a priori knowledge of axisymmetric blunt entry vehicles. The least squares method was used to estimate the aerodynamic parameters. Three sets of results were obtained from the following data sets: perturbed, unperturbed, and the combination of both. The combined data set was selected for the final set of aerodynamic parameters based on the quality of the results. The identified aerodynamic parameters are consistent with that of the static wind tunnel data. Reconstructions, of experimental data not used in the parameter identification analyses, achieved similar residuals as those with data used to identify the parameters. Simulations of the experimental data, using the identified parameters, indicate that the aerodynamic model used is incapable of replicating the limit cycle oscillations with stochastic peak amplitudes observed during the test.

  5. High accuracy operon prediction method based on STRING database scores.

    PubMed

    Taboada, Blanca; Verde, Cristina; Merino, Enrique

    2010-07-01

    We present a simple and highly accurate computational method for operon prediction, based on intergenic distances and functional relationships between the protein products of contiguous genes, as defined by STRING database (Jensen,L.J., Kuhn,M., Stark,M., Chaffron,S., Creevey,C., Muller,J., Doerks,T., Julien,P., Roth,A., Simonovic,M. et al. (2009) STRING 8-a global view on proteins and their functional interactions in 630 organisms. Nucleic Acids Res., 37, D412-D416). These two parameters were used to train a neural network on a subset of experimentally characterized Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis operons. Our predictive model was successfully tested on the set of experimentally defined operons in E. coli and B. subtilis, with accuracies of 94.6 and 93.3%, respectively. As far as we know, these are the highest accuracies ever obtained for predicting bacterial operons. Furthermore, in order to evaluate the predictable accuracy of our model when using an organism's data set for the training procedure, and a different organism's data set for testing, we repeated the E. coli operon prediction analysis using a neural network trained with B. subtilis data, and a B. subtilis analysis using a neural network trained with E. coli data. Even for these cases, the accuracies reached with our method were outstandingly high, 91.5 and 93%, respectively. These results show the potential use of our method for accurately predicting the operons of any other organism. Our operon predictions for fully-sequenced genomes are available at http://operons.ibt.unam.mx/OperonPredictor/. PMID:20385580

  6. Computer graphics in aerodynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cozzolongo, J. V.

    1984-01-01

    The use of computer graphics and its application to aerodynamic analyses on a routine basis is outlined. The mathematical modelling of the aircraft geometries and the shading technique implemented are discussed. Examples of computer graphics used to display aerodynamic flow field data and aircraft geometries are shown. A future need in computer graphics for aerodynamic analyses is addressed.

  7. Flight-Test Evaluation of Flutter-Prediction Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, RIck; Brenner, Marty

    2003-01-01

    The flight-test community routinely spends considerable time and money to determine a range of flight conditions, called a flight envelope, within which an aircraft is safe to fly. The cost of determining a flight envelope could be greatly reduced if there were a method of safely and accurately predicting the speed associated with the onset of an instability called flutter. Several methods have been developed with the goal of predicting flutter speeds to improve the efficiency of flight testing. These methods include (1) data-based methods, in which one relies entirely on information obtained from the flight tests and (2) model-based approaches, in which one relies on a combination of flight data and theoretical models. The data-driven methods include one based on extrapolation of damping trends, one that involves an envelope function, one that involves the Zimmerman-Weissenburger flutter margin, and one that involves a discrete-time auto-regressive model. An example of a model-based approach is that of the flutterometer. These methods have all been shown to be theoretically valid and have been demonstrated on simple test cases; however, until now, they have not been thoroughly evaluated in flight tests. An experimental apparatus called the Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) was developed to test these prediction methods.

  8. Aerodynamics Improve Wind Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, V. W.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications based on aerodynamic concepts would raise efficiency of wind-wheel electric-power generator. Changes smooth airflow, to increase power output, without increasing size of wheel. Significant improvements in efficiency anticipated without any increase in size or number of moving parts and without departing from simplicity of original design.

  9. A Method of Recording and Predicting the Pollen Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, M.

    1985-01-01

    A hair dryer, plastic funnel, and microscope slide can be used for predicting pollen counts on a day-to-day basis. Materials, methods for assembly, collection technique, meteorological influences, and daily patterns are discussed. Data collected using the apparatus suggest that airborne grass products other than pollen also affect hay fever…

  10. Prediction of Preclinical Operative Dentistry Performance in Two Instructional Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Marcia; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The accuracy of manual and academic variables in predicting preclinical operative technique was evaluated. Correlations were low, but significant using the Perceptual Motor Ability Test (PMAT) of the Dental Admission Test. Students with low or average two-dimension scores on the PMAT benefited from an alternate teaching method. (JSR)

  11. Hybrid robust predictive optimization method of power system dispatch

    DOEpatents

    Chandra, Ramu Sharat; Liu, Yan; Bose, Sumit; de Bedout, Juan Manuel

    2011-08-02

    A method of power system dispatch control solves power system dispatch problems by integrating a larger variety of generation, load and storage assets, including without limitation, combined heat and power (CHP) units, renewable generation with forecasting, controllable loads, electric, thermal and water energy storage. The method employs a predictive algorithm to dynamically schedule different assets in order to achieve global optimization and maintain the system normal operation.

  12. Evolutionary computational methods to predict oral bioavailability QSPRs.

    PubMed

    Bains, William; Gilbert, Richard; Sviridenko, Lilya; Gascon, Jose-Miguel; Scoffin, Robert; Birchall, Kris; Harvey, Inman; Caldwell, John

    2002-01-01

    This review discusses evolutionary and adaptive methods for predicting oral bioavailability (OB) from chemical structure. Genetic Programming (GP), a specific form of evolutionary computing, is compared with some other advanced computational methods for OB prediction. The results show that classifying drugs into 'high' and 'low' OB classes on the basis of their structure alone is solvable, and initial models are already producing output that would be useful for pharmaceutical research. The results also suggest that quantitative prediction of OB will be tractable. Critical aspects of the solution will involve the use of techniques that can: (i) handle problems with a very large number of variables (high dimensionality); (ii) cope with 'noisy' data; and (iii) implement binary choices to sub-classify molecules with behavior that are qualitatively different. Detailed quantitative predictions will emerge from more refined models that are hybrids derived from mechanistic models of the biology of oral absorption and the power of advanced computing techniques to predict the behavior of the components of those models in silico. PMID:11865672

  13. Toward the Prediction of FBPase Inhibitory Activity Using Chemoinformatic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ming; Zhang, Shuwei; Qiu, Jieshan

    2012-01-01

    Currently, Chemoinformatic methods are used to perform the prediction for FBPase inhibitory activity. A genetic algorithm-random forest coupled method (GA-RF) was proposed to predict fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) inhibitors to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus using the Mold2 molecular descriptors. A data set of 126 oxazole and thiazole analogs was used to derive the GA-RF model, yielding the significant non-cross-validated correlation coefficient r2ncv and cross-validated r2cv values of 0.96 and 0.67 for the training set, respectively. The statistically significant model was validated by a test set of 64 compounds, producing the prediction correlation coefficient r2pred of 0.90. More importantly, the building GA-RF model also passed through various criteria suggested by Tropsha and Roy with r2o and r2m values of 0.90 and 0.83, respectively. In order to compare with the GA-RF model, a pure RF model developed based on the full descriptors was performed as well for the same data set. The resulting GA-RF model with significantly internal and external prediction capacities is beneficial to the prediction of potential oxazole and thiazole series of FBPase inhibitors prior to chemical synthesis in drug discovery programs. PMID:22837677

  14. Sediment rating curve & Co. - a contest of prediction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francke, T.; Zimmermann, A.

    2012-04-01

    In spite of the recent technological progress in sediment monitoring, often the calculation of sediment yield (SSY) still relies on intermittent measurements because of the use of historic records, instrument-failure in continuous recording or financial constraints. Therefore, available measurements are usually inter- and even extrapolated using the sediment rating curve approach, which uses continuously available discharge data to predict sediment concentrations. Extending this idea by further aspects like the inclusion of other predictors (e.g. rainfall, discharge-characteristics, etc.), or the consideration of prediction uncertainty led to a variety of new methods. Now, with approaches such as Fuzzy Logic, Artificial Neural Networks, Tree-based regression, GLMs, etc., the user is left to decide which method to apply. Trying multiple approaches is usually not an option, as considerable effort and expertise may be needed for their application. To establish a helpful guideline in selecting the most appropriate method for SSY-computation, we initiated a study to compare and rank available methods. Depending on problem attributes like hydrological and sediment regime, number of samples, sampling scheme, and availability of ancillary predictors, the performance of different methods is compared. Our expertise allowed us to "register" Random Forests, Quantile Regression Forests and GLMs for the contest. To include many different methods and ensure their sophisticated use we invite scientists that are willing to benchmark their favourite method(s) with us. The more diverse the participating methods are, the more exciting the contest will be.

  15. Aerodynamic flight control to increase payload capability of future launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, John E., Jr.; Cheng, Y.-M.; Leleux, Todd; Bigelow, Scott; Hasbrook, William

    1993-01-01

    In this report, we provide some examples of French, Russian, Chinese, and Japanese launch vehicles that have utilized fins in their designs. Next, the aerodynamic design of the fins is considered in Section 3. Some comments on basic static stability and control theory are followed by a brief description of an aerodynamic characteristics prediction code that was used to estimate the characteristics of a modified NLS 1.5 Stage vehicle. Alternative fin designs are proposed and some estimated aerodynamic characteristics presented and discussed. Also included in Section 3 is a discussion of possible methods of enhancement of the aerodynamic efficiency of fins, such as vortex generators and jet flaps. We consider the construction of fins for launch vehicles in Section 4 and offer an assessment of the state-of-the-art in the use of composites for aerodynamic control surfaces on high speed vehicles. We also comment on the use of smart materials for launch vehicle fins. The dynamic stability and control of a launch vehicle that utilizes both thrust vector control (engine nozzle gimballing) and movable fins is the subject addressed in Section 5. We give a short derivation of equations of motion for a launch vehicle moving in a vertical plane above a spherical earth, discuss the use of a gravity-turn nominal trajectory, and give the form of the period equations linearized about such a nominal. We then consider feedback control of vehicle attitude using both engine gimballing and fin deflection. Conclusions are stated and recommendations made in Section 6. An appendix contains aerodynamic data in tabular and graphical formats.

  16. Aerodynamic Simulation of Ice Accretion on Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Bragg, Michael B.; Busch, Greg T.; Montreuil, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    This report describes recent improvements in aerodynamic scaling and simulation of ice accretion on airfoils. Ice accretions were classified into four types on the basis of aerodynamic effects: roughness, horn, streamwise, and spanwise ridge. The NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to generate ice accretions within these four types using both subscale and full-scale models. Large-scale, pressurized windtunnel testing was performed using a 72-in.- (1.83-m-) chord, NACA 23012 airfoil model with high-fidelity, three-dimensional castings of the IRT ice accretions. Performance data were recorded over Reynolds numbers from 4.5 x 10(exp 6) to 15.9 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.28. Lower fidelity ice-accretion simulation methods were developed and tested on an 18-in.- (0.46-m-) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model in a small-scale wind tunnel at a lower Reynolds number. The aerodynamic accuracy of the lower fidelity, subscale ice simulations was validated against the full-scale results for a factor of 4 reduction in model scale and a factor of 8 reduction in Reynolds number. This research has defined the level of geometric fidelity required for artificial ice shapes to yield aerodynamic performance results to within a known level of uncertainty and has culminated in a proposed methodology for subscale iced-airfoil aerodynamic simulation.

  17. Aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.

    1986-08-12

    An aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus is described which consists of: an aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator adapted to be located on the leading edge of an airframe of a hypersonic aircraft and being responsive to aerodynamic heating of water by a compression shock airstream to produce steam pressure; an expansion shock air-cooled condensor adapted to be located in the airframe rearward of and operatively coupled to the aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator to receive and condense the steam pressure; and an aerodynamic heated steam injector manifold adapted to distribute heated steam into the airstream flowing through an exterior generating channel of an air-breathing, ducted power plant.

  18. A free wake method for performance prediction of VAWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, S.; Dumitrescu, H.; Cardos, V.; Dumitrache, A.

    2012-09-01

    Based on the lifting line theory and a free vortex wake model, a method including dynamic stall effects is presented for predicting the performance of a three-dimensional vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). A vortex model is used in which the wake is composed of trailing streamwise and shedding spanwise vortices, whose strengths are equal to the change in the bound vortex strength as dictated by Helmholtz and Kelvin's theorems. Performance parameters are calculated by application of the Biot-Savart law along with the Kutta-Joukowski theorem and a semi-empirical dynamic stall model. Predictions are shown to compare favorably with existing experimental data.

  19. Global Aerodynamic Modeling for Stall/Upset Recovery Training Using Efficient Piloted Flight Test Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Cunningham, Kevin; Hill, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Flight test and modeling techniques were developed for efficiently identifying global aerodynamic models that can be used to accurately simulate stall, upset, and recovery on large transport airplanes. The techniques were developed and validated in a high-fidelity fixed-base flight simulator using a wind-tunnel aerodynamic database, realistic sensor characteristics, and a realistic flight deck representative of a large transport aircraft. Results demonstrated that aerodynamic models for stall, upset, and recovery can be identified rapidly and accurately using relatively simple piloted flight test maneuvers. Stall maneuver predictions and comparisons of identified aerodynamic models with data from the underlying simulation aerodynamic database were used to validate the techniques.

  20. Planform effects on the supersonic aerodynamics of multibody configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillin, Naomi; Wood, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the effect of planform on the supersonic aerodynamics of low-fineness-ratio multibody configurations was conducted. Longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic and flow visualization data were obtained on three multibody configurations. The data indicated that planform has a small effect on the zero lift drag of a multibody configuration. The longitudinal data obtained at lifting conditions showed a sensitivity to planform shape. Lateral-directional data obtained for all configurations did not uncover any unusual stability traits for this class of configuration. A comparison study was also made between the planform effects observed on single-body and multibody configurations. Results from this study indicate that the multibody concept appears to offer a mechanism for employing a low-sweep wing with no significant increase in zero-lift drag but still retaining high-performance characteristics at high-lift conditions. Evaluation of the linear-theory prediction methods revealed a general inability of the methods to predict the characteristics of low-fineness-ratio geometries.

  1. A protein structural class prediction method based on novel features.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lichao; Zhao, Xiqiang; Kong, Liang

    2013-09-01

    In this study, a 12-dimensional feature vector is constructed to reflect the general contents and spatial arrangements of the secondary structural elements of a given protein sequence. Among the 12 features, 6 novel features are specially designed to improve the prediction accuracies for α/β and α + β classes based on the distributions of α-helices and β-strands and the characteristics of parallel β-sheets and anti-parallel β-sheets. To evaluate our method, the jackknife cross-validating test is employed on two widely-used datasets, 25PDB and 1189 datasets with sequence similarity lower than 40% and 25%, respectively. The performance of our method outperforms the recently reported methods in most cases, and the 6 newly-designed features have significant positive effect to the prediction accuracies, especially for α/β and α + β classes. PMID:23770446

  2. Unsteady Cascade Aerodynamic Response Using a Multiphysics Simulation Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, C.; Reddy, T. S. R.; Spyropoulos, E.

    2000-01-01

    The multiphysics code Spectrum(TM) is applied to calculate the unsteady aerodynamic pressures of oscillating cascade of airfoils representing a blade row of a turbomachinery component. Multiphysics simulation is based on a single computational framework for the modeling of multiple interacting physical phenomena, in the present case being between fluids and structures. Interaction constraints are enforced in a fully coupled manner using the augmented-Lagrangian method. The arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method is utilized to account for deformable fluid domains resulting from blade motions. Unsteady pressures are calculated for a cascade designated as the tenth standard, and undergoing plunging and pitching oscillations. The predicted unsteady pressures are compared with those obtained from an unsteady Euler co-de refer-red in the literature. The Spectrum(TM) code predictions showed good correlation for the cases considered.

  3. Airfoil Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, E.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, ONERA, and the University of Illinois are conducting a major research program whose goal is to improve our understanding of the aerodynamic scaling of ice accretions on airfoils. The program when it is completed will result in validated scaled simulation methods that produce the essential aerodynamic features of the full-scale iced-airfoil. This research will provide some of the first, high-fidelity, full-scale, iced-airfoil aerodynamic data. An initial study classified ice accretions based on their aerodynamics into four types: roughness, streamwise ice, horn ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. Subscale testing using a NACA 23012 airfoil was performed in the NASA IRT and University of Illinois wind tunnel to better understand the aerodynamics of these ice types and to test various levels of ice simulation fidelity. These studies are briefly reviewed here and have been presented in more detail in other papers. Based on these results, full-scale testing at the ONERA F1 tunnel using cast ice shapes obtained from molds taken in the IRT will provide full-scale iced airfoil data from full-scale ice accretions. Using these data as a baseline, the final step is to validate the simulation methods in scale in the Illinois wind tunnel. Computational ice accretion methods including LEWICE and ONICE have been used to guide the experiments and are briefly described and results shown. When full-scale and simulation aerodynamic results are available, these data will be used to further develop computational tools. Thus the purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the program and key results to date.

  4. A Method for Predicting Protein-Protein Interaction Types

    PubMed Central

    Silberberg, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) govern basic cellular processes through signal transduction and complex formation. The diversity of those processes gives rise to a remarkable diversity of interactions types, ranging from transient phosphorylation interactions to stable covalent bonding. Despite our increasing knowledge on PPIs in humans and other species, their types remain relatively unexplored and few annotations of types exist in public databases. Here, we propose the first method for systematic prediction of PPI type based solely on the techniques by which the interaction was detected. We show that different detection methods are better suited for detecting specific types. We apply our method to ten interaction types on a large scale human PPI dataset. We evaluate the performance of the method using both internal cross validation and external data sources. In cross validation, we obtain an area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve ranging from 0.65 to 0.97 with an average of 0.84 across the predicted types. Comparing the predicted interaction types to external data sources, we obtained significant agreements for phosphorylation and ubiquitination interactions, with hypergeometric p-value = 2.3e−54 and 5.6e−28 respectively. We examine the biological relevance of our predictions using known signaling pathways and chart the abundance of interaction types in cell processes. Finally, we investigate the cross-relations between different interaction types within the network and characterize the discovered patterns, or motifs. We expect the resulting annotated network to facilitate the reconstruction of process-specific subnetworks and assist in predicting protein function or interaction. PMID:24625764

  5. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation prediction method with shorter HRV sequences.

    PubMed

    Boon, K H; Khalil-Hani, M; Malarvili, M B; Sia, C W

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a method that predicts the onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF), using heart rate variability (HRV) segments that are shorter than those applied in existing methods, while maintaining good prediction accuracy. PAF is a common cardiac arrhythmia that increases the health risk of a patient, and the development of an accurate predictor of the onset of PAF is clinical important because it increases the possibility to stabilize (electrically) and prevent the onset of atrial arrhythmias with different pacing techniques. We investigate the effect of HRV features extracted from different lengths of HRV segments prior to PAF onset with the proposed PAF prediction method. The pre-processing stage of the predictor includes QRS detection, HRV quantification and ectopic beat correction. Time-domain, frequency-domain, non-linear and bispectrum features are then extracted from the quantified HRV. In the feature selection, the HRV feature set and classifier parameters are optimized simultaneously using an optimization procedure based on genetic algorithm (GA). Both full feature set and statistically significant feature subset are optimized by GA respectively. For the statistically significant feature subset, Mann-Whitney U test is used to filter non-statistical significance features that cannot pass the statistical test at 20% significant level. The final stage of our predictor is the classifier that is based on support vector machine (SVM). A 10-fold cross-validation is applied in performance evaluation, and the proposed method achieves 79.3% prediction accuracy using 15-minutes HRV segment. This accuracy is comparable to that achieved by existing methods that use 30-minutes HRV segments, most of which achieves accuracy of around 80%. More importantly, our method significantly outperforms those that applied segments shorter than 30 minutes. PMID:27480743

  6. Evaluation of ride quality prediction methods for operational military helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.; Clevenson, S. A.; Hollenbaugh, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a simulator study conducted to compare and validate various ride quality prediction methods for use in assessing passenger/crew ride comfort within helicopters are presented. Included are results quantifying 35 helicopter pilots' discomfort responses to helicopter interior noise and vibration typical of routine flights, assessment of various ride quality metrics including the NASA ride comfort model, and examination of possible criteria approaches. Results of the study indicated that crew discomfort results from a complex interaction between vibration and interior noise. Overall measures such as weighted or unweighted root-mean-square acceleration level and A-weighted noise level were not good predictors of discomfort. Accurate prediction required a metric incorporating the interactive effects of both noise and vibration. The best metric for predicting crew comfort to the combined noise and vibration environment was the NASA discomfort index.

  7. Benchmarking B cell epitope prediction: underperformance of existing methods.

    PubMed

    Blythe, Martin J; Flower, Darren R

    2005-01-01

    Sequence profiling is used routinely to predict the location of B-cell epitopes. In the postgenomic era, the need for reliable epitope prediction is clear. We assessed 484 amino acid propensity scales in combination with ranges of plotting parameters to examine exhaustively the correlation of peaks and epitope location within 50 proteins mapped for polyclonal responses. After examining more than 10(6) combinations, we found that even the best set of scales and parameters performed only marginally better than random. Our results confirm the null hypothesis: Single-scale amino acid propensity profiles cannot be used to predict epitope location reliably. The implication for studies using such methods is obvious. PMID:15576553

  8. Aerodynamics of magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schetz, Joseph A.; Marchman, James F., III

    1996-01-01

    High-speed (500 kph) trains using magnetic forces for levitation, propulsion and control offer many advantages for the nation and a good opportunity for the aerospace community to apply 'high tech' methods to the domestic sector. One area of many that will need advanced research is the aerodynamics of such MAGLEV (Magnetic Levitation) vehicles. There are important issues with regard to wind tunnel testing and the application of CFD to these devices. This talk will deal with the aerodynamic design of MAGLEV vehicles with emphasis on wind tunnel testing. The moving track facility designed and constructed in the 6 ft. Stability Wind Tunnel at Virginia Tech will be described. Test results for a variety of MAGLEV vehicle configurations will be presented. The last topic to be discussed is a Multi-disciplinary Design approach that is being applied to MAGLEV vehicle configuration design including aerodynamics, structures, manufacturability and life-cycle cost.

  9. On aerodynamic noises radiated by the pantograph system of high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hua-Hua; Li, Jia-Chun; Zhang, Hui-Qin

    2013-06-01

    Pantograph system of high-speed trains become significant source of aerodynamic noise when travelling speed exceeds 300 km/h. In this paper, a hybrid method of non-linear acoustic solver (NLAS) and Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) acoustic analogy is used to predict the aerodynamic noise of pantograph system in this speed range. When the simulation method is validated by a benchmark problem of flows around a cylinder of finite span, we calculate the near flow field and far acoustic field surrounding the pantograph system. And then, the frequency spectra and acoustic attenuation with distance are analyzed, showing that the pantograph system noise is a typical broadband one with most acoustic power restricted in the medium-high frequency range from 200 Hz to 5 kHz. The aerodynamic noise of pantograph systems radiates outwards in the form of spherical waves in the far field. Analysis of the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) at different speeds exhibits that the acoustic power grows approximately as the 4th power of train speed. The comparison of noise reduction effects for four types of pantograph covers demonstrates that only case 1 can lessen the total noise by about 3 dB as baffles on both sides can shield sound wave in the spanwise direction. The covers produce additional aerodynamic noise themselves in the other three cases and lead to the rise of OASPLs.

  10. Prediction of aerodynamic heating and pressures on Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS) nose cap and comparison with STS-61C flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Paul C.; Rochelle, William C.; Curry, Donald M.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from predictions of aerothermodynamic heating rates, temperatures, and pressures on the surface of the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS) nosecap during Orbiter reentry. These results are compared with data obtained by the first actual flight of the SEADS system aboard STS-61C. The data also used to predict heating rates and surface temperatures for a hypothetical Transatlantic Abort Landing entry trajectory, whose analysis involved ascertaining the increases in heating rate as the airstream flowed across regions of the lower surface catalycity carbon/carbon composite to the higher surface catalycity columbium pressure ports.

  11. Comparison of Predictive Modeling Methods of Aircraft Landing Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diallo, Ousmane H.

    2012-01-01

    Expected increases in air traffic demand have stimulated the development of air traffic control tools intended to assist the air traffic controller in accurately and precisely spacing aircraft landing at congested airports. Such tools will require an accurate landing-speed prediction to increase throughput while decreasing necessary controller interventions for avoiding separation violations. There are many practical challenges to developing an accurate landing-speed model that has acceptable prediction errors. This paper discusses the development of a near-term implementation, using readily available information, to estimate/model final approach speed from the top of the descent phase of flight to the landing runway. As a first approach, all variables found to contribute directly to the landing-speed prediction model are used to build a multi-regression technique of the response surface equation (RSE). Data obtained from operations of a major airlines for a passenger transport aircraft type to the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport are used to predict the landing speed. The approach was promising because it decreased the standard deviation of the landing-speed error prediction by at least 18% from the standard deviation of the baseline error, depending on the gust condition at the airport. However, when the number of variables is reduced to the most likely obtainable at other major airports, the RSE model shows little improvement over the existing methods. Consequently, a neural network that relies on a nonlinear regression technique is utilized as an alternative modeling approach. For the reduced number of variables cases, the standard deviation of the neural network models errors represent over 5% reduction compared to the RSE model errors, and at least 10% reduction over the baseline predicted landing-speed error standard deviation. Overall, the constructed models predict the landing-speed more accurately and precisely than the current state-of-the-art.

  12. A computational method to predict carbonylation sites in yeast proteins.

    PubMed

    Lv, H Q; Liu, J; Han, J Q; Zheng, J G; Liu, R L

    2016-01-01

    Several post-translational modifications (PTM) have been discussed in literature. Among a variety of oxidative stress-induced PTM, protein carbonylation is considered a biomarker of oxidative stress. Only certain proteins can be carbonylated because only four amino acid residues, namely lysine (K), arginine (R), threonine (T) and proline (P), are susceptible to carbonylation. The yeast proteome is an excellent model to explore oxidative stress, especially protein carbonylation. Current experimental approaches in identifying carbonylation sites are expensive, time-consuming and limited in their abilities to process proteins. Furthermore, there is no bioinformational method to predict carbonylation sites in yeast proteins. Therefore, we propose a computational method to predict yeast carbonylation sites. This method has total accuracies of 86.32, 85.89, 84.80, and 86.80% in predicting the carbonylation sites of K, R, T, and P, respectively. These results were confirmed by 10-fold cross-validation. The ability to identify carbonylation sites in different kinds of features was analyzed and the position-specific composition of the modification site-flanking residues was discussed. Additionally, a software tool has been developed to help with the calculations in this method. Datasets and the software are available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/hqlstudio/ files/CarSpred.Y/. PMID:27420944

  13. Improved load ratio method for predicting crack length

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Albrecht, P.; Wright, W.; Joyce, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    The elastic compliance from unloading/reloading sequences in a load-displacement record estimates well crack length in elastic-plastic fracture toughness tests of compact tension [C(T)] and bending type specimens. The need for partial unloading of the specimen makes it difficult to run the test under static loading and impossible under either dynamic loading or very high temperatures. Furthermore, fracture toughness testing in which crack length is determined from elastic compliance requires high precision testing equipment and highly skilled technicians. As a result, such tests are confined usually to research laboratories and seldom used under production settings. To eliminate these problems, an improved load ratio method of predicting crack length is proposed that utilizes only the recorded load versus load-line displacement curve (or load versus crack-mouth-opening displacement curve) without unloading/reloading sequences. As a result, the instrumentation is much simpler than in the elastic compliance or potential drop methods. If only a monotonic load-displacement record is to be measured the fracture toughness test becomes almost as simple to perform as a tension test. The method described here improves in three ways the ``original load ratio method`` proposed by Hu et al. First, a blunting term is added to the crack length before maximum load. Second, a strain hardening correction is included after maximum load. And, third, the initial crack length and the physical (final) crack length measured at the end of the test serve to anchor the predicted crack lengths, forcing agreement between predicted and measured values. The method predicts crack extension with excellent accuracy in specimens fabricated from A302, A508, and A533B piping and pressure vessel steels, A588 and A572 structural steels, and HY-80 ship steel.

  14. Aerodynamics for the Mars Phoenix Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Desai, Prasun N.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Pre-flight aerodynamics data for the Mars Phoenix entry capsule are presented. The aerodynamic coefficients were generated as a function of total angle-of-attack and either Knudsen number, velocity, or Mach number, depending on the flight regime. The database was constructed using continuum flowfield computations and data from the Mars Exploration Rover and Viking programs. Hypersonic and supersonic static coefficients were derived from Navier-Stokes solutions on a pre-flight design trajectory. High-altitude data (free-molecular and transitional regimes) and dynamic pitch damping characteristics were taken from Mars Exploration Rover analysis and testing. Transonic static coefficients from Viking wind tunnel tests were used for capsule aerodynamics under the parachute. Static instabilities were predicted at two points along the reference trajectory and were verified by reconstructed flight data. During the hypersonic instability, the capsule was predicted to trim at angles as high as 2.5 deg with an on-axis center-of-gravity. Trim angles were predicted for off-nominal pitching moment (4.2 deg peak) and a 5 mm off-axis center-ofgravity (4.8 deg peak). Finally, hypersonic static coefficient sensitivities to atmospheric density were predicted to be within uncertainty bounds.

  15. Predict octane numbers using a generalized interaction method

    SciTech Connect

    Twu, C.H.; Coon, J.E.

    1996-02-01

    An interaction-based correlation using a new approach can be used to predict research and motor octane numbers of gasoline blends. An ultimately detailed analysis of the gasoline cut is not necessary. This correlation can describe blending behavior over the entire composition range of gasoline cuts. The component-oriented interaction approach is general and will accurately predict, without performing additional blending studies, blending behavior for new gasoline cuts. The proposed correlation fits the data quite closely for blends of many gasoline cuts. The regression gives realistic values for binary interaction parameters between components. A unique set of binary interaction parameters was found for the equation for predicting octane number of any gasoline blend. The binary interaction parameters between components contained in gasoline cuts have been converted to binary interaction parameters between gasoline cuts through a general equation to simplify the calculations. Because of the proposed method`s accuracy, optimum allocation of components among gasoline grades can be obtained and predicted values can be used for quality control of the octane number of marketed gasolines.

  16. Researches on High Accuracy Prediction Methods of Earth Orientation Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. Q.

    2015-09-01

    The Earth rotation reflects the coupling process among the solid Earth, atmosphere, oceans, mantle, and core of the Earth on multiple spatial and temporal scales. The Earth rotation can be described by the Earth's orientation parameters, which are abbreviated as EOP (mainly including two polar motion components PM_X and PM_Y, and variation in the length of day ΔLOD). The EOP is crucial in the transformation between the terrestrial and celestial reference systems, and has important applications in many areas such as the deep space exploration, satellite precise orbit determination, and astrogeodynamics. However, the EOP products obtained by the space geodetic technologies generally delay by several days to two weeks. The growing demands for modern space navigation make high-accuracy EOP prediction be a worthy topic. This thesis is composed of the following three aspects, for the purpose of improving the EOP forecast accuracy. (1) We analyze the relation between the length of the basic data series and the EOP forecast accuracy, and compare the EOP prediction accuracy for the linear autoregressive (AR) model and the nonlinear artificial neural network (ANN) method by performing the least squares (LS) extrapolations. The results show that the high precision forecast of EOP can be realized by appropriate selection of the basic data series length according to the required time span of EOP prediction: for short-term prediction, the basic data series should be shorter, while for the long-term prediction, the series should be longer. The analysis also showed that the LS+AR model is more suitable for the short-term forecasts, while the LS+ANN model shows the advantages in the medium- and long-term forecasts. (2) We develop for the first time a new method which combines the autoregressive model and Kalman filter (AR+Kalman) in short-term EOP prediction. The equations of observation and state are established using the EOP series and the autoregressive coefficients

  17. LTSTAR- SUPERSONIC WING NON-LINEAR AERODYNAMICS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Supersonic Wing Nonlinear Aerodynamics computer program, LTSTAR, was developed to provide for the estimation of the nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics of a wing at supersonic speeds. This corrected linearized-theory method accounts for nonlinearities in the variation of basic pressure loadings with local surface slopes, predicts the degree of attainment of theoretical leading-edge thrust forces, and provides an estimate of detached leading-edge vortex loadings that result when the theoretical thrust forces are not fully realized. Comparisons of LTSTAR computations with experimental results show significant improvements in detailed wing pressure distributions, particularly for large angles of attack and for regions of the wing where the flow is highly three-dimensional. The program provides generally improved predictions of the wing overall force and moment coefficients. LTSTAR could be useful in design studies aimed at aerodynamic performance optimization and for providing more realistic trade-off information for selection of wing planform geometry and airfoil section parameters. Input to the LTSTAR program includes wing planform data, freestream conditions, wing camber, wing thickness, scaling options, and output options. Output includes pressure coefficients along each chord, section normal and axial force coefficients, and the spanwise distribution of section force coefficients. With the chordwise distributions and section coefficients at each angle of attack, three sets of polars are output. The first set is for linearized theory with and without full leading-edge thrust, the second set includes nonlinear corrections, and the third includes estimates of attainable leading-edge thrust and vortex increments along with the nonlinear corrections. The LTSTAR program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 150K (octal) of 60 bit words. The LTSTAR

  18. Fast prediction unit selection method for HEVC intra prediction based on salient regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lei; Dai, Ming; Zhao, Chun-lei; Xiong, Jing-ying

    2016-07-01

    In order to reduce the computational complexity of the high efficiency video coding (HEVC) standard, a new algorithm for HEVC intra prediction, namely, fast prediction unit (PU) size selection method for HEVC based on salient regions is proposed in this paper. We first build a saliency map for each largest coding unit (LCU) to reduce its texture complexity. Secondly, the optimal PU size is determined via a scheme that implements an information entropy comparison among sub-blocks of saliency maps. Finally, we apply the partitioning result of saliency map on the original LCUs, obtaining the optimal partitioning result. Our algorithm can determine the PU size in advance to the angular prediction in intra coding, reducing computational complexity of HEVC. The experimental results show that our algorithm achieves a 37.9% reduction in encoding time, while producing a negligible loss in Bjontegaard delta bit rate ( BDBR) of 0.62%.

  19. Preface to the Focus Issue: chaos detection methods and predictability.

    PubMed

    Gottwald, Georg A; Skokos, Charalampos

    2014-06-01

    This Focus Issue presents a collection of papers originating from the workshop Methods of Chaos Detection and Predictability: Theory and Applications held at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, June 17-21, 2013. The main aim of this interdisciplinary workshop was to review comprehensively the theory and numerical implementation of the existing methods of chaos detection and predictability, as well as to report recent applications of these techniques to different scientific fields. The collection of twelve papers in this Focus Issue represents the wide range of applications, spanning mathematics, physics, astronomy, particle accelerator physics, meteorology and medical research. This Preface surveys the papers of this Issue. PMID:24985454

  20. Method to predict external store carriage characteristics at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Bruce S.

    1988-01-01

    Development of a computational method for prediction of external store carriage characteristics at transonic speeds is described. The geometric flexibility required for treatment of pylon-mounted stores is achieved by computing finite difference solutions on a five-level embedded grid arrangement. A completely automated grid generation procedure facilitates applications. Store modeling capability consists of bodies of revolution with multiple fore and aft fins. A body-conforming grid improves the accuracy of the computed store body flow field. A nonlinear relaxation scheme developed specifically for modified transonic small disturbance flow equations enhances the method's numerical stability and accuracy. As a result, treatment of lower aspect ratio, more highly swept and tapered wings is possible. A limited supersonic freestream capability is also provided. Pressure, load distribution, and force/moment correlations show good agreement with experimental data for several test cases. A detailed computer program description for the Transonic Store Carriage Loads Prediction (TSCLP) Code is included.

  1. Coastal cliff recession: the use of probabilistic prediction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. M.; Hall, J. W.; Meadowcroft, I. C.

    2001-10-01

    A range of probabilistic methods is introduced for predicting coastal cliff recession, which provide a means of demonstrating the potential variability in such predictions. They form the basis for risk-based land-use planning, cliff management and engineering decision-making. Examples of probabilistic models are presented for a number of different cliff settings: the simulation of recession on eroding cliffs; the use of historical records and statistical experiments to model the behaviour of cliffs affected by rare, episodic landslide events; the adaptation of an event tree approach to assess the probability of failure of protected cliffs, taking into account the residual life of the existing defences; and the evaluation of the probability of landslide reactivation in areas of pre-existing landslide systems. These methods are based on a geomorphological assessment of the episodic nature of the recession process, together with historical records.

  2. Epileptic seizure prediction by non-linear methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Day, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.

    1999-01-12

    This research discloses methods and apparatus for automatically predicting epileptic seizures monitor and analyze brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis tools; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; comparison of the trend to known seizure predictors; and providing notification that a seizure is forthcoming. 76 figs.

  3. Epileptic seizure prediction by non-linear methods

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.; Clapp, Ned E.; Daw, C. Stuart; Lawkins, William F.

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for automatically predicting epileptic seizures monitor and analyze brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis tools; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; comparison of the trend to known seizure predictors; and providing notification that a seizure is forthcoming.

  4. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  5. A Generic Nonlinear Aerodynamic Model for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    A generic model of the aerodynamic coefficients was developed using wind tunnel databases for eight different aircraft and multivariate orthogonal functions. For each database and each coefficient, models were determined using polynomials expanded about the state and control variables, and an othgonalization procedure. A predicted squared-error criterion was used to automatically select the model terms. Modeling terms picked in at least half of the analyses, which totalled 45 terms, were retained to form the generic nonlinear aerodynamic (GNA) model. Least squares was then used to estimate the model parameters and associated uncertainty that best fit the GNA model to each database. Nonlinear flight simulations were used to demonstrate that the GNA model produces accurate trim solutions, local behavior (modal frequencies and damping ratios), and global dynamic behavior (91% accurate state histories and 80% accurate aerodynamic coefficient histories) under large-amplitude excitation. This compact aerodynamics model can be used to decrease on-board memory storage requirements, quickly change conceptual aircraft models, provide smooth analytical functions for control and optimization applications, and facilitate real-time parametric system identification.

  6. Prediction of BVI Noise for an Active Twist Rotor Using a Loosely Coupled CFD/CSD Method and Comparison to Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, David E.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.; Boyd, David Douglas, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical predictions of the acoustic characteristics of an Active Twist Rotor (ATR), using two methods to compute the rotor blade aerodynamics and elastic blade motion are compared to experimental data from a wind tunnel test in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) in 2000. The first method, a loosely coupled iterative method, utilizes the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code OVERFLOW 2 and the Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD) code CAMRAD II. The second method utilizes the CAMRAD II free-wake model only. The harmonic active-twist control to the main rotor blade system is identified with three parameters - harmonic actuation frequency, actuation amplitude, and control phase angle. The resulting aerodynamics and blade motion data from the two methods are then used in the acoustics code PSU-WOPWOP to predict acoustic pressure on a spherical array of equally spaced observers surrounding the rotor. This spherical distribution of pressure is used to compute the sound power level representing baseline and actuated conditions. Sound power levels for three categories of noise are defined as - blade-vortex interaction sound power level (BVIPWL), low frequency sound power level (LFPWL), and overall sound power level, OAPWL. Comparisons with measured data indicate the CFD/CSD analysis successfully captures the trends in sound power levels and the effects of active-twist control at advance ratios of 0.14 and 0.17. The free-wake model predictions show inconsistent sound power levels relative to the trends in the experimental and CFD data. This paper presents the first ever comparison between CFD/CSD acoustic predictions for an active-twist rotor and experimental measurements.

  7. Post-Flight Aerodynamic and Aerothermal Model Validation of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Chun; Muppidi, Suman; Bose, Deepak; Van Norman, John W.; Tanimoto, Rebekah; Clark, Ian

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Program is developing new technologies that will enable the landing of heavier payloads in low density environments, such as Mars. A recent flight experiment conducted high above the Hawaiian Islands has demonstrated the performance of several decelerator technologies. In particular, the deployment of the Robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R) was highly successful, and valuable data were collected during the test flight. This paper outlines the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis used to estimate the aerodynamic and aerothermal characteristics of the SIAD-R. Pre-flight and post-flight predictions are compared with the flight data, and a very good agreement in aerodynamic force and moment coefficients is observed between the CFD solutions and the reconstructed flight data.

  8. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 2; High Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag, prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executives summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  9. Risk prediction with machine learning and regression methods.

    PubMed

    Steyerberg, Ewout W; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; Van Calster, Ben

    2014-07-01

    This is a discussion of issues in risk prediction based on the following papers: "Probability estimation with machine learning methods for dichotomous and multicategory outcome: Theory" by Jochen Kruppa, Yufeng Liu, Gérard Biau, Michael Kohler, Inke R. König, James D. Malley, and Andreas Ziegler; and "Probability estimation with machine learning methods for dichotomous and multicategory outcome: Applications" by Jochen Kruppa, Yufeng Liu, Hans-Christian Diener, Theresa Holste, Christian Weimar, Inke R. König, and Andreas Ziegler. PMID:24615859

  10. CREME96 and Related Error Rate Prediction Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the rate of occurrence of single event effects (SEEs) in space requires knowledge of the radiation environment and the response of electronic devices to that environment. Several analytical models have been developed over the past 36 years to predict SEE rates. The first error rate calculations were performed by Binder, Smith and Holman. Bradford and Pickel and Blandford, in their CRIER (Cosmic-Ray-Induced-Error-Rate) analysis code introduced the basic Rectangular ParallelePiped (RPP) method for error rate calculations. For the radiation environment at the part, both made use of the Cosmic Ray LET (Linear Energy Transfer) spectra calculated by Heinrich for various absorber Depths. A more detailed model for the space radiation environment within spacecraft was developed by Adams and co-workers. This model, together with a reformulation of the RPP method published by Pickel and Blandford, was used to create the CR ME (Cosmic Ray Effects on Micro-Electronics) code. About the same time Shapiro wrote the CRUP (Cosmic Ray Upset Program) based on the RPP method published by Bradford. It was the first code to specifically take into account charge collection from outside the depletion region due to deformation of the electric field caused by the incident cosmic ray. Other early rate prediction methods and codes include the Single Event Figure of Merit, NOVICE, the Space Radiation code and the effective flux method of Binder which is the basis of the SEFA (Scott Effective Flux Approximation) model. By the early 1990s it was becoming clear that CREME and the other early models needed Revision. This revision, CREME96, was completed and released as a WWW-based tool, one of the first of its kind. The revisions in CREME96 included improved environmental models and improved models for calculating single event effects. The need for a revision of CREME also stimulated the development of the CHIME (CRRES/SPACERAD Heavy Ion Model of the Environment) and MACREE (Modeling and

  11. Turbulent heat transfer prediction method for application to scramjet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinckney, S. Z.

    1974-01-01

    An integral method for predicting boundary layer development in turbulent flow regions on two-dimensional or axisymmetric bodies was developed. The method has the capability of approximating nonequilibrium velocity profiles as well as the local surface friction in the presence of a pressure gradient. An approach was developed for the problem of predicting the heat transfer in a turbulent boundary layer in the presence of a high pressure gradient. The solution was derived with particular emphasis on its applicability to supersonic combustion; thus, the effects of real gas flows were included. The resulting integrodifferential boundary layer method permits the estimation of cooling reguirements for scramjet engines. Theoretical heat transfer results are compared with experimental combustor and noncombustor heat transfer data. The heat transfer method was used in the development of engine design concepts which will produce an engine with reduced cooling requirements. The Langley scramjet engine module was designed by utilizing these design concepts and this engine design is discussed along with its corresponding cooling requirements. The heat transfer method was also used to develop a combustor cooling correlation for a combustor whose local properties are computed one dimensionally by assuming a linear area variation and a given heat release schedule.

  12. Shuttle system ascent aerodynamic and plume heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, L. D.; Greenwood, T. F.; Lee, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The shuttle program provided a challenge to the aerothermodynamicist due to the complexity of the flow field around the vehicle during ascent, since the configuration causes multiple shock interactions between the elements. Wind tunnel tests provided data for the prediction of the ascent design heating environment which involves both plume and aerodynamic heating phenomena. The approach for the heating methodology based on ground test firings and the use of the wind tunnel data to formulate the math models is discussed.

  13. A General Simulation Method for Multiple Bodies in Proximate Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    Methods of unsteady aerodynamic simulation for an arbitrary number of independent bodies flying in close proximity are considered. A novel method to efficiently detect collision contact points is described. A method to compute body trajectories in response to aerodynamic loads, applied loads, and inter-body collisions is also given. The physical correctness of the methods are verified by comparison to a set of analytic solutions. The methods, combined with a Navier-Stokes solver, are used to demonstrate the possibility of predicting the unsteady aerodynamics and flight trajectories of moving bodies that involve rigid-body collisions.

  14. Evaluation of aerodynamic derivatives from a magnetic balance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghunath, B. S.; Parker, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    The dynamic testing of a model in the University of Virginia cold magnetic balance wind-tunnel facility is expected to consist of measurements of the balance forces and moments, and the observation of the essentially six degree of freedom motion of the model. The aerodynamic derivatives of the model are to be evaluated from these observations. The basic feasibility of extracting aerodynamic information from the observation of a model which is executing transient, complex, multi-degree of freedom motion is demonstrated. It is considered significant that, though the problem treated here involves only linear aerodynamics, the methods used are capable of handling a very large class of aerodynamic nonlinearities. The basic considerations include the effect of noise in the data on the accuracy of the extracted information. Relationships between noise level and the accuracy of the evaluated aerodynamic derivatives are presented.

  15. Method of predicting mechanical properties of decayed wood

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, Stephen S.

    2003-07-15

    A method for determining the mechanical properties of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms, comprising: a) illuminating a surface of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms with wavelengths from visible and near infrared (VIS-NIR) spectra; b) analyzing the surface of the decayed wood using a spectrometric method, the method generating a first spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra region; and c) using a multivariate analysis to predict mechanical properties of decayed wood by comparing the first spectral data with a calibration model, the calibration model comprising a second spectrometric method of spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra obtained from a reference decay wood, the second spectral data being correlated with a known mechanical property analytical result obtained from the reference decayed wood.

  16. Exploring Function Prediction in Protein Interaction Networks via Clustering Methods

    PubMed Central

    Trivodaliev, Kire; Bogojeska, Aleksandra; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2014-01-01

    Complex networks have recently become the focus of research in many fields. Their structure reveals crucial information for the nodes, how they connect and share information. In our work we analyze protein interaction networks as complex networks for their functional modular structure and later use that information in the functional annotation of proteins within the network. We propose several graph representations for the protein interaction network, each having different level of complexity and inclusion of the annotation information within the graph. We aim to explore what the benefits and the drawbacks of these proposed graphs are, when they are used in the function prediction process via clustering methods. For making this cluster based prediction, we adopt well established approaches for cluster detection in complex networks using most recent representative algorithms that have been proven as efficient in the task at hand. The experiments are performed using a purified and reliable Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction network, which is then used to generate the different graph representations. Each of the graph representations is later analysed in combination with each of the clustering algorithms, which have been possibly modified and implemented to fit the specific graph. We evaluate results in regards of biological validity and function prediction performance. Our results indicate that the novel ways of presenting the complex graph improve the prediction process, although the computational complexity should be taken into account when deciding on a particular approach. PMID:24972109

  17. Efficient Unstructured Grid Adaptation Methods for Sonic Boom Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Deere, Karen A.; Waithe, Kenrick A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the use of two grid adaptation methods to improve the accuracy of the near-to-mid field pressure signature prediction of supersonic aircraft computed using the USM3D unstructured grid flow solver. The first method (ADV) is an interactive adaptation process that uses grid movement rather than enrichment to more accurately resolve the expansion and compression waves. The second method (SSGRID) uses an a priori adaptation approach to stretch and shear the original unstructured grid to align the grid with the pressure waves and reduce the cell count required to achieve an accurate signature prediction at a given distance from the vehicle. Both methods initially create negative volume cells that are repaired in a module in the ADV code. While both approaches provide significant improvements in the near field signature (< 3 body lengths) relative to a baseline grid without increasing the number of grid points, only the SSGRID approach allows the details of the signature to be accurately computed at mid-field distances (3-10 body lengths) for direct use with mid-field-to-ground boom propagation codes.

  18. Efficient prediction methods for selecting effective siRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Shigeru

    2010-02-01

    Although short interfering RNA (siRNA) has been widely used for studying gene functions in mammalian cells, its gene silencing efficacy varies markedly and there are only a few consistencies among the recently reported design rules/guidelines for selecting siRNA sequences effective for mammalian genes. Another shortcoming of the previously reported methods is that they cannot estimate the probability that a candidate sequence will silence the target gene. This paper first reviewed the recently reported siRNA design guidelines and clarified the problems concerning the guidelines. It then proposed two prediction methods-Radial Basis Function (RBF) network and decision tree learning-and their combined method for selecting effective siRNA target sequences from many possible candidate sequences. They are quite different from the previous score-based siRNA design techniques and can predict the probability that a candidate siRNA sequence will be effective. The methods imply high estimation accuracy for selecting candidate siRNA sequences. PMID:20022002

  19. Method for predicting photocatalytic oxidation rates of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Melanie L; Liljestrand, Howard M

    2003-01-01

    In designing a photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) system for a given air pollution source, destruction rates for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are required. The objective of this research was to develop a systematic method of predicting PCO rate constants by correlating rate constants with physical-chemical characteristics of compounds. Accordingly, reaction rate constants were determined for destruction of volatile organics over a titanium dioxide (TiO2) catalyst in a continuous mixed-batch reactor. It was found that PCO rate constants for alkanes and alkenes vary linearly with gas-phase ionization potential (IP) and with gas-phase hydroxyl radical reaction rate constant. The correlations allow rates of destruction of compounds not tested in this research to be predicted based on physical-chemical characteristics. PMID:12568248

  20. Review of sonic-boom generation theory and prediction methods.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.; Maglieri, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    The prediction techniques reviedi he present paper permit the calculation of sonic booms produced by rather complex conventional supersonic aircraft designs performing level nonaccelerated flight in a quiet atmosphere. Basic concepts of supersonic flow analysis, for representation of an airplane as a linear distribution of disturbances and for determination of the resultant pressure field complete with shocks, are outlined. Numerical techniques for implementation of the theory are discussed briefly, and examples of the correlation of theory with experimental data from wind tunnel and flight tests are presented. Special attention is given to presentation of a simplified method for rapid 'first-cut' estimation of farfield bow-shock overpressure. Finally, some problems encountered in attempts at applying the prediction techniques for the nearfield at high supersonic Mach numbers are recognized, and the need for further refinement of present techniques or the development of new systems is discussed.