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Sample records for aerodynamic simulation facility

  1. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    There were three major issues examined in the feasibility study. First, the ability of the proposed system architecture to support the anticipated workload was evaluated. Second, the throughput of the computational engine (the flow model processor) was studied using real application programs. Third, the availability reliability, and maintainability of the system were modeled. The evaluations were based on the baseline systems. The results show that the implementation of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility, in the form considered, would indeed be a feasible project with an acceptable level of risk. The technology required (both hardware and software) either already exists or, in the case of a few parts, is expected to be announced this year. Facets of the work described include the hardware configuration, software, user language, and fault tolerance.

  2. Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, N. R.; Bergman, R. O.; Bonstrom, D. B.; Brinkman, T. W.; Chiu, S. H. J.; Green, S. S.; Hansen, S. D.; Klein, D. L.; Krohn, H. E.; Prow, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    A Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) was designed for the simulation of fluid flow around three-dimensional bodies, both in wind tunnel environments and in free space. The application of numerical simulation to this field of endeavor promised to yield economies in aerodynamic and aircraft body designs. A model for a NASF/FMP (Flow Model Processor) ensemble using a possible approach to meeting NASF goals is presented. The computer hardware and software are presented, along with the entire design and performance analysis and evaluation.

  3. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility preliminary study: Executive study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A computing system was designed with the capability of providing an effective throughput of one billion floating point operations per second for three dimensional Navier-Stokes codes. The methodology used in defining the baseline design, and the major elements of the numerical aerodynamic simulation facility are described.

  4. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility. Preliminary study extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The production of an optimized design of key elements of the candidate facility was the primary objective of this report. This was accomplished by effort in the following tasks: (1) to further develop, optimize and describe the function description of the custom hardware; (2) to delineate trade off areas between performance, reliability, availability, serviceability, and programmability; (3) to develop metrics and models for validation of the candidate systems performance; (4) to conduct a functional simulation of the system design; (5) to perform a reliability analysis of the system design; and (6) to develop the software specifications to include a user level high level programming language, a correspondence between the programming language and instruction set and outline the operation system requirements.

  5. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility preliminary study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A technology forecast was established for the 1980-1985 time frame and the appropriateness of various logic and memory technologies for the design of the numerical aerodynamic simulation facility was assessed. Flow models and their characteristics were analyzed and matched against candidate processor architecture. Metrics were established for the total facility, and housing and support requirements of the facility were identified. An overview of the system is presented, with emphasis on the hardware of the Navier-Stokes solver, which is the key element of the system. Software elements of the system are also discussed.

  6. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility feasibility study, executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    There were three major issues examined in the feasibility study. First, the ability of the proposed system architecture to support the anticipated workload was evaluated. Second, the throughput of the computational engine (the flow model processor) was studied using real application programs. Third, the availability, reliability, and maintainability of the system were modeled. The evaluations were based on the baseline systems. The results show that the implementation of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility, in the form considered, would indeed be a feasible project with an acceptable level of risk. The technology required (both hardware and software) either already exists or, in the case of a few parts, is expected to be announced this year.

  7. Aerodynamic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    In this article two integral computational fluid dynamics methods for steady-state and transient vehicle aerodynamic simulations are described using a Chevrolet Corvette ZR-1 surface panel model. In the last decade, road-vehicle aerodynamics have become an important design consideration. Originally, the design of low-drag shapes was given high priority due to worldwide fuel shortages that occurred in the mid-seventies. More recently, there has been increased interest in the role aerodynamics play in vehicle stability and passenger safety. Consequently, transient aerodynamics and the aerodynamics of vehicle in yaw have become important issues at the design stage. While there has been tremendous progress in Navier-Stokes methodology in the last few years, the physics of bluff-body aerodynamics are still very difficult to model correctly. Moreover, the computational effort to perform Navier-Stokes simulations from the geometric stage to complete flow solutions requires much computer time and impacts the design cycle time. In the short run, therefore, simpler methods must be used for such complicated problems. Here, two methods are described for the simulation of steady-state and transient vehicle aerodynamics.

  8. Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, N. R.

    1979-01-01

    The Ames Research Center of NASA is engaged in the development and investigation of numerical methods and computer technologies to be employed in conjunction with physical experiments, particularly utilizing wind tunnels in the furtherance of the field of aircraft and aerodynamic body design. Several studies, aimed primarily at the areas of development and production of extremely high-speed computing facilities, were conducted. The studies focused on evaluating the aspects of feasibility, reliability, costs, and practicability of designing, constructing, and bringing into effect production of a special-purpose system. An executive summary of the activities for this project is presented in this volume.

  9. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of historical and current numerical aerodynamic simulation (NAS) is given. The capabilities and goals of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility are outlined. Emphasis is given to numerical flow visualization and its applications to structural analysis of aircraft and spacecraft bodies. The uses of NAS in computational chemistry, engine design, and galactic evolution are mentioned.

  10. Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility. Volume 2: Hardware specifications/descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, F. M.; Resnick, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    An FMP (Flow Model Processor) was designed for use in the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF). The NASF was developed to simulate fluid flow over three-dimensional bodies in wind tunnel environments and in free space. The facility is applicable to studying aerodynamic and aircraft body designs. The following general topics are discussed in this volume: (1) FMP functional computer specifications; (2) FMP instruction specification; (3) standard product system components; (4) loosely coupled network (LCN) specifications/description; and (5) three appendices: performance of trunk allocation contention elimination (trace) method, LCN channel protocol and proposed LCN unified second level protocol.

  11. Preliminary study for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility. Phase 1: Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, N. R.

    1978-01-01

    Functional requirements and preliminary design data were identified for use in the design of all system components and in the construction of a facility to perform aerodynamic simulation for airframe design. A skeleton structure of specifications for the flow model processor and monitor, the operating system, and the language and its compiler is presented.

  12. The NASA Ames Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility: Experimental Simulation of the Atmospheric Break-Up of Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, M. C.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility at NASA Ames Research Center provides a potential platform for the experimental simulation of meteor breakup at conditions that closely match full-scale entry condition for select parameters. The poster describes the entry environment simulation capabilities of the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center and provides example images of the fragmentation of a hypersonic projectile for which break-up was initiated by mechanical forces (impact with a thin polymer diaphragm).

  13. Modeling and Simulation of Radiative Compressible Flows in Aerodynamic Heating Arc-Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensassi, Khalil; Laguna, Alejandro A.; Lani, Andrea; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations of an arc heated flow inside NASA's 20 [MW] Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF) are performed in order to investigate the three-dimensional swirling flow and the current distribution inside the wind tunnel. The plasma is considered in Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium(LTE) and is composed of Air-Argon gas mixture. The governing equations are the Navier-Stokes equations that include source terms corresponding to Joule heating and radiative cooling. The former is obtained by solving an electric potential equation, while the latter is calculated using an innovative massively parallel ray-tracing algorithm. The fully coupled system is closed by the thermodynamics relations and transport properties which are obtained from Chapman-Enskog method. A novel strategy was developed in order to enable the flow solver and the radiation calculation to be preformed independently and simultaneously using a different number of processors. Drastic reduction in the computational cost was achieved using this strategy. Details on the numerical methods used for space discretization, time integration and ray-tracing algorithm will be presented. The effect of the radiative cooling on the dynamics of the flow will be investigated. The complete set of equations were implemented within the COOLFluiD Framework. Fig. 1 shows the geometry of the Anode and part of the constrictor of the Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF). Fig. 2 shows the velocity field distribution along (x-y) plane and the streamline in (z-y) plane.

  14. Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility. Volume 3: FMP language specification/user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, B. G.; Lincoln, N. R.

    1979-01-01

    The manual is intended to show the revisions and additions to the current STAR FORTRAN. The changes are made to incorporate an FMP (Flow Model Processor) for use in the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) for the purpose of simulating fluid flow over three-dimensional bodies in wind tunnel environments and in free space. The FORTRAN programming language for the STAR-100 computer contains both CDC and unique STAR extensions to the standard FORTRAN. Several of the STAR FORTRAN extensions to standard FOR-TRAN allow the FORTRAN user to exploit the vector processing capabilities of the STAR computer. In STAR FORTRAN, vectors can be expressed with an explicit notation, functions are provided that return vector results, and special call statements enable access to any machine instruction.

  15. Computer Simulation of Aircraft Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inouye, Mamoru

    1989-01-01

    The role of Ames Research Center in conducting basic aerodynamics research through computer simulations is described. The computer facilities, including supercomputers and peripheral equipment that represent the state of the art, are described. The methodology of computational fluid dynamics is explained briefly. Fundamental studies of turbulence and transition are being pursued to understand these phenomena and to develop models that can be used in the solution of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Four applications of computer simulations for aerodynamics problems are described: subsonic flow around a fuselage at high angle of attack, subsonic flow through a turbine stator-rotor stage, transonic flow around a flexible swept wing, and transonic flow around a wing-body configuration that includes an inlet and a tail.

  16. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility. [for flows about three-dimensional configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. R.; Hathaway, A. W.

    1978-01-01

    Critical to the advancement of computational aerodynamics capability is the ability to simulate flows about three-dimensional configurations that contain both compressible and viscous effects, including turbulence and flow separation at high Reynolds numbers. Analyses were conducted of two solution techniques for solving the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations describing the mean motion of a turbulent flow with certain terms involving the transport of turbulent momentum and energy modeled by auxiliary equations. The first solution technique is an implicit approximate factorization finite-difference scheme applied to three-dimensional flows that avoids the restrictive stability conditions when small grid spacing is used. The approximate factorization reduces the solution process to a sequence of three one-dimensional problems with easily inverted matrices. The second technique is a hybrid explicit/implicit finite-difference scheme which is also factored and applied to three-dimensional flows. Both methods are applicable to problems with highly distorted grids and a variety of boundary conditions and turbulence models.

  17. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, V. L.; Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.; Bailey, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    The history of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program, which is designed to provide a leading-edge capability to computational aerodynamicists, is traced back to its origin in 1975. Factors motivating its development and examples of solutions to successively refined forms of the governing equations are presented. The NAS Processing System Network and each of its eight subsystems are described in terms of function and initial performance goals. A proposed usage allocation policy is discussed and some initial problems being readied for solution on the NAS system are identified.

  18. History of the numerical aerodynamic simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Victor L.; Ballhaus, William F., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) program has reached a milestone with the completion of the initial operating configuration of the NAS Processing System Network. This achievement is the first major milestone in the continuing effort to provide a state-of-the-art supercomputer facility for the national aerospace community and to serve as a pathfinder for the development and use of future supercomputer systems. The underlying factors that motivated the initiation of the program are first identified and then discussed. These include the emergence and evolution of computational aerodynamics as a powerful new capability in aerodynamics research and development, the computer power required for advances in the discipline, the complementary nature of computation and wind tunnel testing, and the need for the government to play a pathfinding role in the development and use of large-scale scientific computing systems. Finally, the history of the NAS program is traced from its inception in 1975 to the present time.

  19. Simulation of iced wing aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, M. G.; Bragg, M. B.; Kwon, O. J.; Sankar, L. N.

    1991-01-01

    The sectional and total aerodynamic load characteristics of moderate aspect ratio wings with and without simulated glaze leading edge ice were studied both computationally, using a three dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes solver, and experimentally. The wing has an untwisted, untapered planform shape with NACA 0012 airfoil section. The wing has an unswept and swept configuration with aspect ratios of 4.06 and 5.0. Comparisons of computed surface pressures and sectional loads with experimental data for identical configurations are given. The abrupt decrease in stall angle of attack for the wing, as a result of the leading edge ice formation, was demonstrated numerically and experimentally.

  20. Aerodynamic Simulation of Ice Accretion on Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Bragg, Michael B.; Busch, Greg T.; Montreuil, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    This report describes recent improvements in aerodynamic scaling and simulation of ice accretion on airfoils. Ice accretions were classified into four types on the basis of aerodynamic effects: roughness, horn, streamwise, and spanwise ridge. The NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to generate ice accretions within these four types using both subscale and full-scale models. Large-scale, pressurized windtunnel testing was performed using a 72-in.- (1.83-m-) chord, NACA 23012 airfoil model with high-fidelity, three-dimensional castings of the IRT ice accretions. Performance data were recorded over Reynolds numbers from 4.5 x 10(exp 6) to 15.9 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.28. Lower fidelity ice-accretion simulation methods were developed and tested on an 18-in.- (0.46-m-) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model in a small-scale wind tunnel at a lower Reynolds number. The aerodynamic accuracy of the lower fidelity, subscale ice simulations was validated against the full-scale results for a factor of 4 reduction in model scale and a factor of 8 reduction in Reynolds number. This research has defined the level of geometric fidelity required for artificial ice shapes to yield aerodynamic performance results to within a known level of uncertainty and has culminated in a proposed methodology for subscale iced-airfoil aerodynamic simulation.

  1. Aerodynamics. [Numerical simulation using supercomputers

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, R.A. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A projection is made of likely improvements in the economics of commercial aircraft operation due to developments in aerodynamics in the next half-century. Notable among these improvements are active laminar flow control techniques' application to third-generation SSTs, in order to achieve an L/D value of about 20; this is comparable to current subsonic transports, and has the further consequence of reducing cabin noise. Wave-cancellation systems may also be used to eliminate sonic boom overpressures, and rapid-combustion systems may be able to eliminate all pollutants from jet exhausts other than CO/sub 2/.

  2. Use of advanced computers for aerodynamic flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. R.; Ballhaus, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    The current and projected use of advanced computers for large-scale aerodynamic flow simulation applied to engineering design and research is discussed. The design use of mature codes run on conventional, serial computers is compared with the fluid research use of new codes run on parallel and vector computers. The role of flow simulations in design is illustrated by the application of a three dimensional, inviscid, transonic code to the Sabreliner 60 wing redesign. Research computations that include a more complete description of the fluid physics by use of Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation formulations are also presented. Results of studies for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility are used to project the feasibility of design applications employing these more advanced three dimensional viscous flow simulations.

  3. Airfoil Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, E.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, ONERA, and the University of Illinois are conducting a major research program whose goal is to improve our understanding of the aerodynamic scaling of ice accretions on airfoils. The program when it is completed will result in validated scaled simulation methods that produce the essential aerodynamic features of the full-scale iced-airfoil. This research will provide some of the first, high-fidelity, full-scale, iced-airfoil aerodynamic data. An initial study classified ice accretions based on their aerodynamics into four types: roughness, streamwise ice, horn ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. Subscale testing using a NACA 23012 airfoil was performed in the NASA IRT and University of Illinois wind tunnel to better understand the aerodynamics of these ice types and to test various levels of ice simulation fidelity. These studies are briefly reviewed here and have been presented in more detail in other papers. Based on these results, full-scale testing at the ONERA F1 tunnel using cast ice shapes obtained from molds taken in the IRT will provide full-scale iced airfoil data from full-scale ice accretions. Using these data as a baseline, the final step is to validate the simulation methods in scale in the Illinois wind tunnel. Computational ice accretion methods including LEWICE and ONICE have been used to guide the experiments and are briefly described and results shown. When full-scale and simulation aerodynamic results are available, these data will be used to further develop computational tools. Thus the purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the program and key results to date.

  4. Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The HFFAF is the only aeroballistic range the nation currently capable of testing in gases other than air and at sub-atmospheric pressures. It is used primarily to study the aerodynamics, Aerotherm...

  5. Aerodynamic Simulation of Indoor Flight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Leon, Nelson; De Leon, Matthew N.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a two-dimensional flight simulator for lightweight (less than 10 g) indoor planes. The simulator consists of four coupled time differential equations describing the plane CG, plane pitch and motor. The equations are integrated numerically with appropriate parameters and initial conditions for two planes: (1) Science Olympiad and (2)…

  6. Aerodynamic Simulation of Runback Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Whalen, Edward A.; Busch, Greg T.; Bragg, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of recent investigations into the aerodynamics of simulated runback ice accretion on airfoils. Aerodynamic tests were performed on a full-scale model using a high-fidelity, ice-casting simulation at near-flight Reynolds (Re) number. The ice-casting simulation was attached to the leading edge of a 72-in. (1828.8-mm ) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model. Aerodynamic performance tests were conducted at the ONERA F1 pressurized wind tunnel over a Reynolds number range of 4.7?10(exp 6) to 16.0?10(exp 6) and a Mach (M) number ran ge of 0.10 to 0.28. For Re = 16.0?10(exp 6) and M = 0.20, the simulated runback ice accretion on the airfoil decreased the maximum lift coe fficient from 1.82 to 1.51 and decreased the stalling angle of attack from 18.1deg to 15.0deg. The pitching-moment slope was also increased and the drag coefficient was increased by more than a factor of two. In general, the performance effects were insensitive to Reynolds numb er and Mach number changes over the range tested. Follow-on, subscale aerodynamic tests were conducted on a quarter-scale NACA 23012 model (18-in. (457.2-mm) chord) at Re = 1.8?10(exp 6) and M = 0.18, using low-fidelity, geometrically scaled simulations of the full-scale castin g. It was found that simple, two-dimensional simulations of the upper- and lower-surface runback ridges provided the best representation of the full-scale, high Reynolds number iced-airfoil aerodynamics, whereas higher-fidelity simulations resulted in larger performance degrada tions. The experimental results were used to define a new subclassification of spanwise ridge ice that distinguishes between short and tall ridges. This subclassification is based upon the flow field and resulting aerodynamic characteristics, regardless of the physical size of the ridge and the ice-accretion mechanism.

  7. Aerodynamic Characteristics, Database Development and Flight Simulation of the X-34 Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Ruth, Michael J.; Fuhrmann, Henri D.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of the aerodynamic characteristics, development of the preflight aerodynamic database and flight simulation of the NASA/Orbital X-34 vehicle is presented in this paper. To develop the aerodynamic database, wind tunnel tests from subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers including ground effect tests at low subsonic speeds were conducted in various facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center. Where wind tunnel test data was not available, engineering level analysis is used to fill the gaps in the database. Using this aerodynamic data, simulations have been performed for typical design reference missions of the X-34 vehicle.

  8. Ground testing and simulation. II - Aerodynamic testing and simulation: Saving lives, time, and money

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayman, B., Jr.; Fiore, A. W.

    1974-01-01

    The present work discusses in general terms the various kinds of ground facilities, in particular, wind tunnels, which support aerodynamic testing. Since not all flight parameters can be simulated simultaneously, an important problem consists in matching parameters. It is pointed out that there is a lack of wind tunnels for a complete Reynolds-number simulation. Using a computer to simulate flow fields can result in considerable reduction of wind-tunnel hours required to develop a given flight vehicle.

  9. Aerodynamic Simulation of the MEXICO Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herraez, I.; Medjroubi, W.; Stoevesandt, B.; Peinke, J.

    2014-12-01

    CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations are a very promising method for predicting the aerodynamic behavior of wind turbines in an inexpensive and accurate way. One of the major drawbacks of this method is the lack of validated models. As a consequence, the reliability of numerical results is often difficult to assess. The MEXICO project aimed at solving this problem by providing the project partners with high quality measurements of a 4.5 meters rotor diameter wind turbine operating under controlled conditions. The large measurement data-set allows the validation of all kind of aerodynamic models. This work summarizes our efforts for validating a CFD model based on the open source software OpenFoam. Both steady- state and time-accurate simulations have been performed with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for several operating conditions. In this paper we will concentrate on axisymmetric inflow for 3 different wind speeds. The numerical results are compared with pressure distributions from several blade sections and PIV-flow data from the near wake region. In general, a reasonable agreement between measurements the and our simulations exists. Some discrepancies, which require further research, are also discussed.

  10. Using the HARV simulation aerodynamic model to determine forebody strake aerodynamic coefficients from flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messina, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    The method described in this report is intended to present an overview of a process developed to extract the forebody aerodynamic increments from flight tests. The process to determine the aerodynamic increments (rolling pitching, and yawing moments, Cl, Cm, Cn, respectively) for the forebody strake controllers added to the F/A - 18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) aircraft was developed to validate the forebody strake aerodynamic model used in simulation.

  11. Status Report for the Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelison, Charles J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility, located at Ames Research Center, is NASA's only aeroballistic facility. During 1997, its model imaging and time history recording systems were the focus of a major refurbishment effort. Specifically the model detection, spark gap (light source); Kerr cell (high speed shuttering); and interval timer sub-systems were inspected, repaired, modified or replaced as required. These refurbishment efforts have fully restored the HFFAF's capabilities to a much better condition, comparable to what it was 15 years ago. Details of this refurbishment effort along with a brief discussion of future upgrade plans are presented.

  12. Space Shuttle Plume Simulation Effect on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Technology for simulating plumes in wind tunnel tests was not adequate to provide the required confidence in test data where plume induced aerodynamic effects might be significant. A broad research program was undertaken to correct the deficiency. Four tasks within the program are reported. Three of these tasks involve conducting experiments, related to three different aspects of the plume simulation problem: (1) base pressures; (2) lateral jet pressures; and (3) plume parameters. The fourth task involves collecting all of the base pressure test data generated during the program. Base pressures were measured on a classic cone ogive cylinder body as affected by the coaxial, high temperature exhaust plumes of a variety of solid propellant rockets. Valid data were obtained at supersonic freestream conditions but not at transonic. Pressure data related to lateral (separation) jets at M infinity = 4.5, for multiple clustered nozzles canted to the freestream and operating at high dynamic pressure ratios. All program goals were met although the model hardware was found to be large relative to the wind tunnel size so that operation was limited for some nozzle configurations.

  13. An anechoic chamber facility for investigating aerodynamic noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massier, P. F.; Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic noise facility was designed to be used primarily for investigating the noise-generating mechanisms of high-temperature supersonic and subsonic jets. The facility consists of an anechoic chamber, an exhaust jet silencer, instrumentation equipment, and an air heater with associated fuel and cooling systems. Compressed air, when needed for jet noise studies, is provided by the wind tunnel compressor facility on a continuous basis. The chamber is 8.1 m long, 5.0 m wide, and 3.0 m high. Provisions have been made for allowing outside air to be drawn into the anechoic chamber in order to replenish the air that is entrained by the jet as it flows through the chamber. Also, openings are provided in the walls and in the ceiling for the purpose of acquiring optical measurements. Calibration of the chamber for noise reflections from the wall was accomplished in octave bands between 31.2 Hz and 32 kHz.

  14. Studies in a transonic rotor aerodynamics and noise facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, S. E.; Lee, D. J.; Crosby, W.

    1984-01-01

    The design, construction and testing of a transonic rotor aerodynamics and noise facility was undertaken, using a rotating arm blade element support technique. This approach provides a research capability intermediate between that of a stationary element in a moving flow and that of a complete rotating blade system, and permits the acoustic properties of blade tip elements to be studied in isolation. This approach is an inexpensive means of obtaining data at high subsonic and transonic tip speeds on the effect of variations in tip geometry. The facility may be suitable for research on broad band noise and discrete noise in addition to high-speed noise. Initial tests were conducted over the Mach number range 0.3 to 0.93 and confirmed the adequacy of the acoustic treatment used in the facility to avoid reflection from the enclosure.

  15. Microgravity Simulation Facility (MSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephanie E. (Compiler); Levine, Howard G.; Zhang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The Microgravity Simulator Facility (MSF) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) was established to support visiting scientists for short duration studies utilizing a variety of microgravity simulator devices that negate the directional influence of the "g" vector (providing simulated conditions of micro or partial gravity). KSC gravity simulators can be accommodated within controlled environment chambers allowing investigators to customize and monitor environmental conditions such as temperature, humidity, CO2, and light exposure.

  16. Potential application of artificial concepts to aerodynamic simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, P.; Mehta, U. B.; Andrews, A.

    1984-01-01

    The concept of artificial intelligence as it applies to computational fluid dynamics simulation is investigated. How expert systems can be adapted to speed the numerical aerodynamic simulation process is also examined. A proposed expert grid generation system is briefly described which, given flow parameters, configuration geometry, and simulation constraints, uses knowledge about the discretization process to determine grid point coordinates, computational surface information, and zonal interface parameters.

  17. Study of Aerodynamic Design Procedure of a Large-Scale Aircraft Noise Suppression Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Masafumi; Nagai, Kiyoyuki; Aso, Shigeru

    The aerodynamic design procedure of a large-scale aircraft noise suppression facility has been developed. Flow quality required for the engine inlet flow has been determined through basic experiment. Aerodynamic design of the facility has been performed by using wind tunnel experiment and CFD. Important relationship between the length of the facility and the inlet flow quality has been found. The operational envelope of the designed facility has been estimated. Then, the aerodynamic characteristics of an actual large-scale aircraft noise suppression facility, constructed based on the new design procedure, have been measured. Obtained flow field showed good agreement with CFD results, and the effectiveness of the design procedure based on CFD and wind tunnel experiment has been confirmed. The engine operations were satisfactory under various wind conditions. Furthermore, the data under commercial operations thereafter have been collected and analyzed. As the result, the aerodynamic design procedure has been validated.

  18. A workstation based simulator for teaching compressible aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    A workstation-based interactive flow simulator has been developed to aid in the teaching of undergraduate compressible aerodynamics. By solving the equations found in NACA 1135, the simulator models three basic fluids problems encountered in supersonic flow: flow past a compression corner, flow past two wedges in series, and flow past two opposed wedges. The study can vary the geometry or flow conditions through a graphical user interface and the new conditions are calculated immediately. Various graphical formats present the results of the flow calculations to the student. The simulator includes interactive questions and answers to aid in both the use of the tool and to develop an understanding of some of the complexities of compressible aerodynamics. A series of help screens make the simulator easy to learn and use.

  19. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of a Spacecraft Cabin Ventilation Fan Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    Quieter working environments for astronauts are needed if future long-duration space exploration missions are to be safe and productive. Ventilation and payload cooling fans are known to be dominant sources of noise, with the International Space Station being a good case in point. To address this issue cost effectively, early attention to fan design, selection, and installation has been recommended, leading to an effort by NASA to examine the potential for small-fan noise reduction by improving fan aerodynamic design. As a preliminary part of that effort, the aerodynamics of a cabin ventilation fan designed by Hamilton Sundstrand has been simulated using computational fluid dynamics codes, and the computed solutions analyzed to quantify various aspects of the fan aerodynamics and performance. Four simulations were performed at the design rotational speed: two at the design flow rate and two at off-design flow rates. Following a brief discussion of the computational codes, various aerodynamic- and performance-related quantities derived from the computed flow fields are presented along with relevant flow field details. The results show that the computed fan performance is in generally good agreement with stated design goals.

  20. DSMC Simulations of Apollo Capsule Aerodynamics for Hypersonic Rarefied Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Glass, Christopher E.; Greene, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Direct simulation Monte Carlo DSMC simulations are performed for the Apollo capsule in the hypersonic low density transitional flow regime. The focus is on ow conditions similar to that experienced by the Apollo Command Module during the high altitude portion of its reentry Results for aerodynamic forces and moments are presented that demonstrate their sensitivity to rarefaction that is for free molecular to continuum conditions. Also aerodynamic data are presented that shows their sensitivity to a range of reentry velocity encompasing conditions that include reentry from low Earth orbit lunar return and Mars return velocities to km/s. The rarefied results are anchored in the continuum regime with data from Navier Stokes simulations

  1. Numerical aerodynamic simulation program long haul communications prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cmaylo, Bohden K.; Foo, Lee

    1987-01-01

    This document is a report of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Long Haul Communications Prototype (LHCP). It describes the accomplishments of the LHCP group, presents the results from all LHCP experiments and testing activities, makes recommendations for present and future LHCP activities, and evaluates the remote workstation accesses from Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Colorado State University to Ames Research Center. The report is the final effort of the Long Haul (Wideband) Communications Prototype Plan (PT-1133-02-N00), 3 October 1985, which defined the requirements for the development, test, and operation of the LHCP network and was the plan used to evaluate the remote user bandwidth requirements for the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Processing System Network.

  2. Preliminary subsonic aerodynamic model for simulation studies of the HL-20 lifting body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Cruz, Christopher I.

    1992-01-01

    A nonlinear, six-degree-of-freedom aerodynamic model for an early version of the HL-20 lifting body is described and compared with wind tunnel data upon which it is based. Polynomial functions describing most of the aerodynamic parameters are given and tables of these functions are presented. Techniques used to arrive at these functions are described. Basic aerodynamic coefficients were modeled as functions of angles of attack and sideslip. Vehicle lateral symmetry was assumed. Compressibility (Mach) effects were ignored. Control-surface effectiveness was assumed to vary linearly with angle of deflection and was assumed to be invariant with the angle of sideslip. Dynamic derivatives were obtained from predictive aerodynamic codes. Landing-gear and ground effects were scaled from Space Shuttle data. The model described is provided to support pilot-in-the-loop simulation studies of the HL-20. By providing the data in tabular format, the model is suitable for the data interpolation architecture of many existing engineering simulation facilities. Because of the preliminary nature of the data, however, this model is not recommended for study of the absolute performance of the HL-20.

  3. Computers vs. wind tunnels for aerodynamic flow simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, D. R.; Mark, H.; Pirtle, M. W.

    1975-01-01

    It is pointed out that in other fields of computational physics, such as ballistics, celestial mechanics, and neutronics, computations have already displaced experiments as the principal means of obtaining dynamic simulations. In the case of aerodynamic investigations, the complexity of the computational work involved in solving the Navier-Stokes equations is the reason that such investigations rely currently mainly on wind-tunnel testing. However, because of inherent limitations of the wind-tunnel approach and economic considerations, it appears that at some time in the future aerodynamic studies will chiefly rely on computational flow data provided by the computer. Taking into account projected development trends, it is estimated that computers with the required capabilities for a solution of the complete viscous, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations will be available in the mid-1980s.

  4. Introductory remarks. [fluid mechanics research for the National Transonic Facility: theoretical aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gessow, A.

    1977-01-01

    Suggested fluid mechanics research to be conducted in the National Transonic Facility include: wind tunnel calibration; flat plate skin friction, flow visualization and measurement techniques; leading edge separation; high angle of attack separation; shock-boundary layer interaction; submarine shapes; low speed studies of cylinder normal to flow; and wall interference effects. These theoretical aerodynamic investigations will provide empirical inputs or validation data for computational aerodynamics, and increase the usefulness of existing wind tunnels.

  5. Light Vehicle-Trailer Systems' Aerodynamics Testing and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Henry; Sigurdson, Lorenz; Lange, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    A wide range of trailers with very poor aerodynamics are hauled long distances across a vast North American highway system. Our goal was to use preliminary smoke-wire flow visualizations to learn: the characteristic flow patterns over models representing modern Vehicle-Trailer Systems (VTS); what improvements need to be made in the experimental set-up; and if there is an opportunity for reduction in aerodynamic drag. Visualization tests were done in an open circuit wind tunnel, with a cross-sectional area of 0.3 m2. Detailed models of light duty trucks and trailers were used at a Reynolds number of 13,700. Images of the streaklines indicated two characteristic features. One was the presence of a stagnation point on the leading face of the trailer followed by a separation bubble on its top. The other feature was an unexpected separation bubble on the hood of the towing vehicle. We determined that it did not have a significant effect on the downstream flow pattern. By adding a small wedge deflector on the cab of the vehicle it was concluded that there is an opportunity for significant improvement of the VTS aerodynamics. Computational simulation of the flow is underway. Support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Discovery Grant Number 41747 is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. The Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig: an Acoustic and Aerodynamic Free-jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    1994-01-01

    The nozzle acoustic test rig (NATR) was built at NASA Lewis Research Center to support the High Speed Research Program. The facility is capable of measuring the acoustic and aerodynamic performance of aircraft engine nozzle concepts. Trade-off studies are conducted to compare performance and noise during simulated low-speed flight and takeoff. Located inside an acoustically treated dome with a 62-ft radius, the NATR is a free-jet that has a 53-in. diameter and is driven by an air ejector. This ejector is operated with 125 lb/s of compressed air, at 125 psig, to achieve 375 lb/s at Mach 0.3. Acoustic and aerodynamic data are collected from test nozzles mounted in the free-jet flow. The dome serves to protect the surrounding community from high noise levels generated by the nozzles, and to provide an anechoic environment for acoustic measurements. Information presented in this report summarizes free-jet performance, fluid support systems, and data acquisition capabilities of the NATR.

  7. Exploring Discretization Error in Simulation-Based Aerodynamic Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian

    2010-01-01

    This work examines the level of discretization error in simulation-based aerodynamic databases and introduces strategies for error control. Simulations are performed using a parallel, multi-level Euler solver on embedded-boundary Cartesian meshes. Discretization errors in user-selected outputs are estimated using the method of adjoint-weighted residuals and we use adaptive mesh refinement to reduce these errors to specified tolerances. Using this framework, we examine the behavior of discretization error throughout a token database computed for a NACA 0012 airfoil consisting of 120 cases. We compare the cost and accuracy of two approaches for aerodynamic database generation. In the first approach, mesh adaptation is used to compute all cases in the database to a prescribed level of accuracy. The second approach conducts all simulations using the same computational mesh without adaptation. We quantitatively assess the error landscape and computational costs in both databases. This investigation highlights sensitivities of the database under a variety of conditions. The presence of transonic shocks or the stiffness in the governing equations near the incompressible limit are shown to dramatically increase discretization error requiring additional mesh resolution to control. Results show that such pathologies lead to error levels that vary by over factor of 40 when using a fixed mesh throughout the database. Alternatively, controlling this sensitivity through mesh adaptation leads to mesh sizes which span two orders of magnitude. We propose strategies to minimize simulation cost in sensitive regions and discuss the role of error-estimation in database quality.

  8. Space shuttle afterbody aerodynamics/plume simulation data summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, K. L.; Hair, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    A series of parametric wind tunnel tests was conducted to provide a base for developing a simulation of afterbody/base aerodynamics for multibody/multibase rocket-powered vehicles (such as Space Shuttle) which use unheated air as the simulant gas in development wind tunnel tests. The tests described were parameterized on external configuration, nozzle internal configuration, base geometry, propulsion gas type, and freestream Mach number (0.5 to 3.5). The tests were conducted over a 4-year period. Presented in this report are the data and pertinent reference information necessary to perform an analysis which would lead to a simulation procedure. The type of data obtained during the tests described herein include model base afterbody, and nozzle internal surface static pressure distributions, model chamber pressure and temperature, and freestream conditions. Also included is a brief description of simulation procedures that were used by the Space Shuttle program.

  9. Recent CFD Simulations of Shuttle Orbiter Contingency Abort Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, Periklis; Prabhu, Dinesh; Wright, Michael; Davies, Carol; McDaniel, Ryan; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Wersinski, Paul; Gomez, Reynaldo; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modern Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques were used to compute aerodynamic forces and moments of the Space Shuttle Orbiter in specific portions of contingency abort trajectory space. The trajectory space covers a Mach number range of 3.5-15, an angle-of-attack range of 20-60 degrees, an altitude range of 100-190 kft, and several different settings of the control surfaces (elevons, body flap, and speed brake). While approximately 40 cases have been computed, only a sampling of the results is presented here. The computed results, in general, are in good agreement with the Orbiter Operational Aerodynamic Data Book (OADB) data (i.e., within the uncertainty bands) for almost all the cases. However, in a limited number of high angle-of-attack cases (at Mach 15), there are significant differences between the computed results, especially the vehicle pitching moment, and the OADB data. A preliminary analysis of the data from the CFD simulations at Mach 15 shows that these differences can be attributed to real-gas/Mach number effects.

  10. An Overview of National Transonic Facility Investigations for High Performance Military Aerodynamics (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    A review of National Transonic Facility (NTF) investigations for high-performance military aerodynamics has been completed. The review spans the entire operational period of the tunnel, and includes configurations ranging from full aircraft to basic research geometries. The intent for this document is to establish a comprehensive summary of these experiments with selected technical results

  11. 12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF BUILDING 25C (SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS TEST FACILITY) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF BUILDING 25C (SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS TEST FACILITY) (1992). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  12. Preliminary Measurements From A New Flat Plate Facility For Aerodynamic Research

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. McEligot; D. W. Nigg; E. J. Walsh; D. Hernon; M.R.D. Davies

    2005-03-01

    This paper details the design and preliminary measurements used in the characterisation of a new flat plate research facility. The facility is designed specifically to aid in the understanding of entropy generation throughout the boundary layer with special attention given to non-equilibrium flows. Hot-wire measurements were obtained downstream of two turbulence generating grids. The turbulence intensity, integral and dissipation length scale ranges measured are 1.6%-7%, 5mm-17mm and 0.7mm-7mm, respectively. These values compared well to existing correlations. The flow downstream of both grids was found to be homogenous and isotropic. Flow visualisation is employed to determine aerodynamic parameters such as flow 2-dimensionality and the effect of the flap angle on preventing separation at the leading edge. The flow was found to be 2-dimensional over all measurement planes. The non-dimensional pressure distribution of a modern turbine blade suction surface is simulated on the flat plate through the use of a variable upper wall. The Reynolds number range based on wetted plate length and inlet velocity is 70,000-4,000,000.

  13. Unsteady Cascade Aerodynamic Response Using a Multiphysics Simulation Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, C.; Reddy, T. S. R.; Spyropoulos, E.

    2000-01-01

    The multiphysics code Spectrum(TM) is applied to calculate the unsteady aerodynamic pressures of oscillating cascade of airfoils representing a blade row of a turbomachinery component. Multiphysics simulation is based on a single computational framework for the modeling of multiple interacting physical phenomena, in the present case being between fluids and structures. Interaction constraints are enforced in a fully coupled manner using the augmented-Lagrangian method. The arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method is utilized to account for deformable fluid domains resulting from blade motions. Unsteady pressures are calculated for a cascade designated as the tenth standard, and undergoing plunging and pitching oscillations. The predicted unsteady pressures are compared with those obtained from an unsteady Euler co-de refer-red in the literature. The Spectrum(TM) code predictions showed good correlation for the cases considered.

  14. Aerodynamic thermal simulation system. Part 1: Radiant array (instruction manual)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchar, A. F.; Steuffen, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    An aerodynamic thermal simulation system (ATSS) is presented. The construction of the system, the maintenance, set up, and operations are reported. System description of the radiant array is given along with the array subsystems modular heating unit, adjustable stanchion frame, cooling water system, and the gaseous nitrogen cooling system. The array configuration procedure outlines the set up and the start up. Maintenance procedures involve both lamp maintenance and reflector maintenance along with weather protection. Drawing codes are included. Descriptions of the 36 zone ATSS controls are also given. Each zone is an independent closed loop temperature control circuit. Procedures are presented for starting and stopping the system. The DATA-TRAK programmer and its operation, instruction manuals for the temperature controller and the power regulator and discriptions of peripheral equipment are discussed.

  15. An assessment of the future roles of the National Transonic Facility and the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel in aeroelastic and unsteady aerodynamic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, P. W.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics and capabilities of the two tunnels, that relate to studies in the fields of aeroelasticity and unsteady aerodynamics are discussed. Scaling considerations for aeroelasticity and unsteady aerodynamics testing in the two facilities are reviewed, and some of the special features (or lack thereof) of the Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) and the National Transonic Facility (NTF) that will weigh heavily in any decisions conducting a given study in the two tunnels are discussed. For illustrative purposes a fighter and a transport airplane are scaled for tests in the NTF and in the TDT, and the resulting model characteristics are compared. The NTF was designed specifically to meet the need for higher Reynolds number capability for flow simulation in aerodynamic performance testing of aircraft designs. However, the NTF can be a valuable tool for evaluating the severity of Reynolds number effects in the areas of dynamic aeroelasticity and unsteady aerodynamics. On the other hand, the TDT was constructed specifically for studies and tests in the field of aeroelasticity. Except for tests requiring the Reynolds number capability of NTF, the TDT will remain the primary facility for tests of dynamic aeroelasticity and unsteady aerodynamics.

  16. Modeling and simulation of coaxial helicopter rotor aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gecgel, Murat

    A framework is developed for the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of a series of helicopter rotor flowfields in hover and in forward flight. The methodology is based on the unsteady solutions of the three-dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes equations recast in a rotating frame of reference. The simulations are carried out by solving the developed mathematical model on hybrid meshes that aim to optimally exploit the benefits of both the structured and the unstructured grids around complex configurations. The computer code is prepared for parallel processing with distributed memory utilization in order to significantly reduce the computational time and the memory requirements. The developed model and the simulation methodology are validated for single-rotor-in-hover flowfields by comparing the present results with the published experimental data. The predictive merit of different turbulence models for complex helicopter aerodynamics are tested extensively. All but the kappa-o and LES results demonstrate acceptable agreement with the experimental data. It was deemed best to use the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for the subsequent rotor flowfield computations. First, the flowfield around a single rotor in forward flight is simulated. These time---accurate computations help to analyze an adverse effect of increasing the forward flight speed. A dissymmetry of the lift on the advancing and the retreating blades is observed for six different advance ratios. Since the coaxial rotor is proposed to mitigate the dissymmetry, it is selected as the next logical step of the present investigation. The time---accurate simulations are successfully obtained for the flowfields generated by first a hovering then a forward-flying coaxial rotor. The results for the coaxial rotor in forward flight verify the aerodynamic balance proposed by the previously published advancing blade concept. The final set of analyses aims to investigate if the gap between the

  17. Results of aerodynamic testing of large-scale wing sections in a simulated natural rain environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos, Gaudy M.; Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.; Campbell, Bryan A.; Melson, W. Edward, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has developed a large-scale ground testing capability for evaluating the effect of heavy rain on airfoil lift. The paper presents the results obtained at the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility on a 10-foot cord NACA 64-210 wing section equipped with a leading-edge slat and double-slotted trailing-edge flap deflected to simulate landing conditions. Aerodynamic lift data were obtained with and without the rain simulation system turned on for an angle-of-attack range of 7.5 to 19.5 deg and for two rainfall conditions: 9 in/hr and 40 in/hr. The results are compared to and correlated with previous small-scale wind tunnel results for the same airfoil section. It appears that to first order, scale effects are not large and the wind tunnel research technique can be used to predict rain effects on airplane performance.

  18. JT9D performance deterioration results from a simulated aerodynamic load test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.; Stromberg, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the results of testing to identify the effects of simulated aerodynamic flight loads on JT9D engine performance. The test results were also used to refine previous analytical studies on the impact of aerodynamic flight loads on performance losses. To accomplish these objectives, a JT9D-7AH engine was assembled with average production clearances and new seals as well as extensive instrumentation to monitor engine performance, case temperatures, and blade tip clearance changes. A special loading device was designed and constructed to permit application of known moments and shear forces to the engine by the use of cables placed around the flight inlet. The test was conducted in the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft X-Ray Test Facility to permit the use of X-ray techniques in conjunction with laser blade tip proximity probes to monitor important engine clearance changes. Upon completion of the test program, the test engine was disassembled, and the condition of gas path parts and final clearances were documented. The test results indicate that the engine lost 1.1 percent in thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), as measured under sea level static conditions, due to increased operating clearances caused by simulated flight loads. This compares with 0.9 percent predicted by the analytical model and previous study efforts.

  19. JT9D performance deterioration results from a simulated aerodynamic load test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.; Stromberg, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of testing to identify the effects of simulated aerodynamic flight loads on JT9D engine performance are presented. The test results were also used to refine previous analytical studies on the impact of aerodynamic flight loads on performance losses. To accomplish these objectives, a JT9D-7AH engine was assembled with average production clearances and new seals as well as extensive instrumentation to monitor engine performance, case temperatures, and blade tip clearance changes. A special loading device was designed and constructed to permit application of known moments and shear forces to the engine by the use of cables placed around the flight inlet. The test was conducted in the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft X-Ray Test Facility to permit the use of X-ray techniques in conjunction with laser blade tip proximity probes to monitor important engine clearance changes. Upon completion of the test program, the test engine was disassembled, and the condition of gas path parts and final clearances were documented. The test results indicate that the engine lost 1.1 percent in thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), as measured under sea level static conditions, due to increased operating clearances caused by simulated flight loads. This compares with 0.9 percent predicted by the analytical model and previous study efforts.

  20. Icing simulation: A survey of computer models and experimental facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, M. G.; Reinmann, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of the current methods for simulation of the response of an aircraft or aircraft subsystem to an icing encounter is presented. The topics discussed include a computer code modeling of aircraft icing and performance degradation, an evaluation of experimental facility simulation capabilities, and ice protection system evaluation tests in simulated icing conditions. Current research focussed on upgrading simulation fidelity of both experimental and computational methods is discussed. The need for increased understanding of the physical processes governing ice accretion, ice shedding, and iced airfoil aerodynamics is examined.

  1. Supersonic Parachute Aerodynamic Testing and Fluid Structure Interaction Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingard, J. S.; Underwood, J. C.; Darley, M. G.; Marraffa, L.; Ferracina, L.

    2014-06-01

    The ESA Supersonic Parachute program expands the knowledge of parachute inflation and flying characteristics in supersonic flows using wind tunnel testing and fluid structure interaction to develop new inflation algorithms and aerodynamic databases.

  2. Future Computer Requirements for Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in computational aerodynamics are discussed as well as motivations for and potential benefits of a National Aerodynamic Simulation Facility having the capability to solve fluid dynamic equations at speeds two to three orders of magnitude faster than presently possible with general computers. Two contracted efforts to define processor architectures for such a facility are summarized.

  3. Quasi steady-state aerodynamic model development for race vehicle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrfeld-Halterman, J. A.; Uddin, M.

    2016-01-01

    Presented in this paper is a procedure to develop a high fidelity quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for use in race car vehicle dynamic simulations. Developed to fit quasi steady-state wind tunnel data, the aerodynamic model is regressed against three independent variables: front ground clearance, rear ride height, and yaw angle. An initial dual range model is presented and then further refined to reduce the model complexity while maintaining a high level of predictive accuracy. The model complexity reduction decreases the required amount of wind tunnel data thereby reducing wind tunnel testing time and cost. The quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for the pitch moment degree of freedom is systematically developed in this paper. This same procedure can be extended to the other five aerodynamic degrees of freedom to develop a complete six degree of freedom quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for any vehicle.

  4. 10 CFR 55.46 - Simulation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Simulation facilities. 55.46 Section 55.46 Energy NUCLEAR... Simulation facilities. (a) General. This section addresses the use of a simulation facility for the... applicants for operator and senior operator licenses. (b) Commission-approved simulation facilities...

  5. 10 CFR 55.46 - Simulation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Simulation facilities. 55.46 Section 55.46 Energy NUCLEAR... Simulation facilities. (a) General. This section addresses the use of a simulation facility for the... applicants for operator and senior operator licenses. (b) Commission-approved simulation facilities...

  6. 10 CFR 55.46 - Simulation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... licensees that maintain a simulation facility shall: (1) Conduct performance testing throughout the life of... Simulation facilities. (a) General. This section addresses the use of a simulation facility for the... Commission approval of use of the plant in the administration of the operating test. (1) Facility...

  7. Numerical simulation of the tip aerodynamics and acoustics test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejero E, F.; Doerffer, P.; Szulc, O.; Cross, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    The application of an efficient flow control system on helicopter rotor blades may lead to improved aerodynamic performance. Recently, our invention of Rod Vortex Generators (RVGs) has been analyzed for helicopter rotor blades in hover with success. As a step forward, the study has been extended to forward flight conditions. For this reason, a validation of the numerical modelling for a reference helicopter rotor (without flow control) is needed. The article presents a study of the flow-field of the AH-1G helicopter rotor in low-, medium- and high-speed forward flight. The CFD code FLOWer from DLR has proven to be a suitable tool for the aerodynamic analysis of the two-bladed rotor without any artificial wake modelling. It solves the URANS equations with LEA (Linear Explicit Algebraic stress) k-ω model using the chimera overlapping grids technique. Validation of the numerical model uses comparison with the detailed flight test data gathered by Cross J. L. and Watts M. E. during the Tip Aerodynamics and Acoustics Test (TAAT) conducted at NASA in 1981. Satisfactory agreements for all speed regimes and a presence of significant flow separation in high-speed forward flight suggest a possible benefit from the future implementation of RVGs. The numerical results based on the URANS approach are presented not only for a popular, low-speed case commonly used in rotorcraft community for CFD codes validation but preferably for medium- and high-speed test conditions that have not been published to date.

  8. Enthalpy By Energy Balance for Aerodynamic Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center Arc Jet Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, T. Mark; MacDonald, Christine L.; Martinez, Edward R.; Balboni, John A.; Anderson, Karl F.; Arnold, Jim O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Arc Jet Facilities' Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) has been instrumented for the Enthalpy By Energy Balance (EB2) method. Diagnostic EB2 data is routinely taken for all AHF runs. This paper provides an overview of the EB2 method implemented in the AHF. The chief advantage of the AHF implementation over earlier versions is the non-intrusiveness of the instruments used. For example, to measure the change in cooling water temperature, thin film 1000 ohm Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) are used with an Anderson Current Loop (ACL) as the signal conditioner. The ACL with 1000 ohm RTDs allows for very sensitive measurement of the increase in temperature (Delta T) of the cooling water to the arc heater, which is a critical element of the EB2 method. Cooling water flow rates are measured with non-intrusive ultrasonic flow meters.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Flow and Determination of Aerodynamic Forces in the Balanced Control Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matas, R.; Straka, F.; Hoznedl, M.

    2013-04-01

    The contribution subscribes a numerical simulation of a steam flow through a balanced control valve. The influence of some parameters in simulations were tested, analyzed and discussed. As a result of the simulations a graph of aerodynamics forces for a specific turbine characteristic was obtained. The results from numerical simulations were compared with results from experiments. The experiment was performed with an air flow, but the final data were converted with a criterion to steam flow.

  10. Method for obtaining aerodynamic data on hypersonic configurations with scramjet exhaust flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartill, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    A hypersonic wind tunnel test method for obtaining credible aerodynamic data on a complete hypersonic vehicle (generic X-24c) with scramjet exhaust flow simulation is described. The general problems of simulating the scramjet exhaust as well as accounting for scramjet inlet flow and vehicle forces are analyzed, and candidate test methods are described and compared. The method selected as most useful makes use of a thrust-minus-drag flow-through balance with a completely metric model. Inlet flow is diverted by a fairing. The incremental effect of the fairing is determined in the testing of two reference models. The net thrust of the scramjet module is an input to be determined in large-scale module tests with scramjet combustion. Force accounting is described, and examples of force component levels are predicted. Compatibility of the test method with candidate wind tunnel facilities is described, and a preliminary model mechanical arrangement drawing is presented. The balance design and performance requirements are described in a detailed specification. Calibration procedures, model instrumentation, and a test plan for the model are outlined.

  11. Transition Flight Simulation of Flapping-Wing Micro-Aerial Vehicle Using Aerodynamic Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isogai, Koji; Kawabe, Hiroyasu

    The paper describes how to simulate the flight of a flapping-wing micro-aerial vehicle (MAV). It uses an aerodynamic database generated using three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code. The database is composed of the time mean aerodynamic forces and moments generated at various flapping wing motions in various flight modes. Flight is simulated utilizing the database by interpolation. The procedure is applied to transition flight of a dragonfly-type MAV with two-pairs of resonance-type flapping wings. The present MAV attains the mission of hovering, transition and cruising flights successfully with stable attitude.

  12. Simulation on a car interior aerodynamic noise control based on statistical energy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Wang, Dengfeng; Ma, Zhengdong

    2012-09-01

    How to simulate interior aerodynamic noise accurately is an important question of a car interior noise reduction. The unsteady aerodynamic pressure on body surfaces is proved to be the key effect factor of car interior aerodynamic noise control in high frequency on high speed. In this paper, a detail statistical energy analysis (SEA) model is built. And the vibra-acoustic power inputs are loaded on the model for the valid result of car interior noise analysis. The model is the solid foundation for further optimization on car interior noise control. After the most sensitive subsystems for the power contribution to car interior noise are pointed by SEA comprehensive analysis, the sound pressure level of car interior aerodynamic noise can be reduced by improving their sound and damping characteristics. The further vehicle testing results show that it is available to improve the interior acoustic performance by using detailed SEA model, which comprised by more than 80 subsystems, with the unsteady aerodynamic pressure calculation on body surfaces and the materials improvement of sound/damping properties. It is able to acquire more than 2 dB reduction on the central frequency in the spectrum over 800 Hz. The proposed optimization method can be looked as a reference of car interior aerodynamic noise control by the detail SEA model integrated unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and sensitivity analysis of acoustic contribution.

  13. 10 CFR 55.46 - Simulation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Simulation facilities. 55.46 Section 55.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES Written Examinations and Operating Tests § 55.46 Simulation facilities. (a) General. This section addresses the use of a simulation facility for the administration of the operating test...

  14. 10 CFR 55.46 - Simulation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Simulation facilities. 55.46 Section 55.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES Written Examinations and Operating Tests § 55.46 Simulation facilities. (a) General. This section addresses the use of a simulation facility for the administration of the operating test...

  15. An approach for the development of an aerodynamic-structural interaction numerical simulation for aeropropulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Naziar, J.; Couch, R.; Davis, M.

    1996-01-01

    Traditionally, aeropropulsion structural performance and aerodynamic performance have been designed separately and later mated together via flight testing. In today`s atmosphere of declining resources, it is imperative that more productive ways of designing and verifying aeropropulsion performance and structural interaction be made available to the aerospace industry. One method of obtaining a more productive design and evaluation capability is through the use of numerical simulations. Currently, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a generalized fluid/structural interaction code known as ALE3D. This code is capable of characterizing fluid and structural interaction for components such as the combustor, fan/stators, inlet and/or nozzles. This code solves the 3D Euler equations and has been applied to several aeropropulsion applications such as a supersonic inlet and a combustor rupture simulation. To characterize aerodynamic-structural interaction for rotating components such as the compressor, appropriate turbomachinery simulations would need to be implemented within the ALE3D structure. The Arnold Engineering Development Center is currently developing a three-dimensional compression system code known as TEACC (Turbine Engine Analysis Compressor Code). TEACC also solves the 3D Euler equations and is intended to simulate dynamic behavior such as inlet distortion, surge or rotating stall. The technology being developed within the TEACC effort provides the necessary turbomachinery simulation for implementation into ALE3D. This paper describes a methodology to combine three-dimensional aerodynamic turbomachinery technology into the existing aerodynamic-structural interaction simulation, ALE3D to obtain the desired aerodynamic and structural integrated simulation for an aeropropulsion system.

  16. Validation of 3-D Ice Accretion Measurement Methodology for Experimental Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Lee, Sam; Monastero, Marianne C.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the adverse aerodynamic effects due to ice accretion often relies on dry-air wind-tunnel testing of artificial, or simulated, ice shapes. Recent developments in ice-accretion documentation methods have yielded a laser-scanning capability that can measure highly three-dimensional (3-D) features of ice accreted in icing wind tunnels. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the aerodynamic accuracy of ice-accretion simulations generated from laser-scan data. Ice-accretion tests were conducted in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel using an 18-in. chord, two-dimensional (2-D) straight wing with NACA 23012 airfoil section. For six ice-accretion cases, a 3-D laser scan was performed to document the ice geometry prior to the molding process. Aerodynamic performance testing was conducted at the University of Illinois low-speed wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.8 × 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.18 with an 18-in. chord NACA 23012 airfoil model that was designed to accommodate the artificial ice shapes. The ice-accretion molds were used to fabricate one set of artificial ice shapes from polyurethane castings. The laser-scan data were used to fabricate another set of artificial ice shapes using rapid prototype manufacturing such as stereolithography. The iced-airfoil results with both sets of artificial ice shapes were compared to evaluate the aerodynamic simulation accuracy of the laser-scan data. For five of the six ice-accretion cases, there was excellent agreement in the iced-airfoil aerodynamic performance between the casting and laser-scan based simulations. For example, typical differences in iced-airfoil maximum lift coefficient were less than 3 percent with corresponding differences in stall angle of approximately 1 deg or less. The aerodynamic simulation accuracy reported in this paper has demonstrated the combined accuracy of the laser-scan and rapid-prototype manufacturing approach to simulating ice accretion for a NACA 23012 airfoil. For several

  17. Validation of 3-D Ice Accretion Measurement Methodology for Experimental Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Lee, Sam; Monastero, Marianne C.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the adverse aerodynamic effects due to ice accretion often relies on dry-air wind-tunnel testing of artificial, or simulated, ice shapes. Recent developments in ice accretion documentation methods have yielded a laser-scanning capability that can measure highly three-dimensional features of ice accreted in icing wind tunnels. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the aerodynamic accuracy of ice-accretion simulations generated from laser-scan data. Ice-accretion tests were conducted in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel using an 18-inch chord, 2-D straight wing with NACA 23012 airfoil section. For six ice accretion cases, a 3-D laser scan was performed to document the ice geometry prior to the molding process. Aerodynamic performance testing was conducted at the University of Illinois low-speed wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.8 x 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.18 with an 18-inch chord NACA 23012 airfoil model that was designed to accommodate the artificial ice shapes. The ice-accretion molds were used to fabricate one set of artificial ice shapes from polyurethane castings. The laser-scan data were used to fabricate another set of artificial ice shapes using rapid prototype manufacturing such as stereolithography. The iced-airfoil results with both sets of artificial ice shapes were compared to evaluate the aerodynamic simulation accuracy of the laser-scan data. For four of the six ice-accretion cases, there was excellent agreement in the iced-airfoil aerodynamic performance between the casting and laser-scan based simulations. For example, typical differences in iced-airfoil maximum lift coefficient were less than 3% with corresponding differences in stall angle of approximately one degree or less. The aerodynamic simulation accuracy reported in this paper has demonstrated the combined accuracy of the laser-scan and rapid-prototype manufacturing approach to simulating ice accretion for a NACA 23012 airfoil. For several of the ice

  18. Large-Eddy Simulation of Wind-Plant Aerodynamics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Lee, S.; Moriarty, P. J.; Martinez, L. A.; Leonardi, S.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present results of a large-eddy simulation of the 48 multi-megawatt turbines composing the Lillgrund wind plant. Turbulent inflow wind is created by performing an atmospheric boundary layer precursor simulation and turbines are modeled using a rotating, variable-speed actuator line representation. The motivation for this work is that few others have done wind plant large-eddy simulations with a substantial number of turbines, and the methods for carrying out the simulations are varied. We wish to draw upon the strengths of the existing simulations and our growing atmospheric large-eddy simulation capability to create a sound methodology for performing this type of simulation. We have used the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox to create our solver.

  19. Development of a superconductor magnetic suspension and balance prototype facility for studying the feasibility of applying this technique to large scale aerodynamic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, R. N.; Humphris, R. R.; Henderson, K. C.

    1975-01-01

    The basic research and development work towards proving the feasibility of operating an all-superconductor magnetic suspension and balance device for aerodynamic testing is presented. The feasibility of applying a quasi-six-degree-of freedom free support technique to dynamic stability research was studied along with the design concepts and parameters for applying magnetic suspension techniques to large-scale aerodynamic facilities. A prototype aerodynamic test facility was implemented. Relevant aspects of the development of the prototype facility are described in three sections: (1) design characteristics; (2) operational characteristics; and (3) scaling to larger facilities.

  20. Large-Eddy Simulation of Wind-Plant Aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Lee, S.; Moriarty, P. J.; Martinez, L. A.; Leonardi, S.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present results of a large-eddy simulation of the 48 multi-megawatt turbines composing the Lillgrund wind plant. Turbulent inflow wind is created by performing an atmospheric boundary layer precursor simulation, and turbines are modeled using a rotating, variable-speed actuator line representation. The motivation for this work is that few others have done large-eddy simulations of wind plants with a substantial number of turbines, and the methods for carrying out the simulations are varied. We wish to draw upon the strengths of the existing simulations and our growing atmospheric large-eddy simulation capability to create a sound methodology for performing this type of simulation. We used the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox to create our solver. The simulated time-averaged power production of the turbines in the plant agrees well with field observations, except with the sixth turbine and beyond in each wind-aligned. The power produced by each of those turbines is overpredicted by 25-40%. A direct comparison between simulated and field data is difficult because we simulate one wind direction with a speed and turbulence intensity characteristic of Lillgrund, but the field observations were taken over a year of varying conditions. The simulation shows the significant 60-70% decrease in the performance of the turbines behind the front row in this plant that has a spacing of 4.3 rotor diameters in this direction. The overall plant efficiency is well predicted. This work shows the importance of using local grid refinement to simultaneously capture the meter-scale details of the turbine wake and the kilometer-scale turbulent atmospheric structures. Although this work illustrates the power of large-eddy simulation in producing a time-accurate solution, it required about one million processor-hours, showing the significant cost of large-eddy simulation.

  1. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility preliminary study, volume 2 and appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Data to support results obtained in technology assessment studies are presented. Objectives, starting points, and future study tasks are outlined. Key design issues discussed in appendices include: data allocation, transposition network design, fault tolerance and trustworthiness, logic design, processing element of existing components, number of processors, the host system, alternate data base memory designs, number representation, fast div 521 instruction, architectures, and lockstep array versus synchronizable array machine comparison.

  2. Experimental study of full-scale iced-airfoil aerodynamic performance using sub-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Greg T.

    Determining the aerodynamic effects of ice accretion on aircraft surfaces is an important step in aircraft design and certification. The goal of this work was to develop a complete sub-scale wind tunnel simulation methodology based on knowledge of the detailed iced-airfoil flowfield that allows the accurate measurement of aerodynamic penalties associated with the accretion of ice on an airfoil and to validate this methodology using full-scale iced-airfoil performance data obtained at near-flight Reynolds numbers. In earlier work, several classifications of ice shape were developed based on key aerodynamic features in the iced-airfoil flowfield: ice roughness, streamwise ice, horn ice, and tall and short spanwise-ridge ice. Castings of each of these classifications were acquired on a full-scale NACA 23012 airfoil model and the aero-dynamic performance of each was measured at a Reynolds number of 12.0 x 106 and a Mach number = 0.20. In the current study, sub-scale simple-geometry and 2-D smooth simulations of each of these castings were constructed based on knowledge of iced-airfoil flowfields. The effects of each simulation on the aerodynamic performance of an 18-inch chord NACA 23012 airfoil model was measured in the University of Illinois 3 x 4 ft. wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.8 x 106 and a Mach number of 0.18 and compared with that measured for the corresponding full-scale casting at high Reynolds number. Geometrically-scaled simulations of the horn-ice and tall spanwise-ridge ice castings modeled C l,maxto within 2% and Cd,min to within 15%. Good qualitative agreement in the Cp distributions suggests that important geometric features such as horn and ridge height, surface location, and angle with respect to the airfoil chordline were appropriately modeled. Geometrically-scaled simulations of the ice roughness, streamwise ice, and short-ridge ice tended to have conservative C l,max and Cd. The aerodynamic performance of simulations of these types of

  3. CFD Simulations in Support of Shuttle Orbiter Contingency Abort Aerodynamic Database Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, Periklis E.; Prabhu, Dinesh; Wright, Michael; Davies, Carol; McDaniel, Ryan; Venkatapathy, E.; Wercinski, Paul; Gomez, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Modern Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques were used to compute aerodynamic forces and moments of the Space Shuttle Orbiter in specific portions of contingency abort trajectory space. The trajectory space covers a Mach number range of 3.5-15, an angle-of-attack range of 20deg-60deg, an altitude range of 100-190 kft, and several different settings of the control surfaces (elevons, body flap, and speed brake). Presented here are details of the methodology and comparisons of computed aerodynamic coefficients against the values in the current Orbiter Operational Aerodynamic Data Book (OADB). While approximately 40 cases have been computed, only a sampling of the results is provided here. The computed results, in general, are in good agreement with the OADB data (i.e., within the uncertainty bands) for almost all the cases. However, in a limited number of high angle-of-attack cases (at Mach 15), there are significant differences between the computed results, especially the vehicle pitching moment, and the OADB data. A preliminary analysis of the data from the CFD simulations at Mach 15 shows that these differences can be attributed to real-gas/Mach number effects. The aerodynamic coefficients and detailed surface pressure distributions of the present simulations are being used by the Shuttle Program in the evaluation of the capabilities of the Orbiter in contingency abort scenarios.

  4. Coupling a Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction Model with Large-Eddy Simulation for Realistic Wind Plant Aerodynamics Simulations (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Draxl, C.; Churchfield, M.; Mirocha, J.; Lee, S.; Lundquist, J.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Purkayastha, A.; Sprague, M.; Vanderwende, B.

    2014-06-01

    Wind plant aerodynamics are influenced by a combination of microscale and mesoscale phenomena. Incorporating mesoscale atmospheric forcing (e.g., diurnal cycles and frontal passages) into wind plant simulations can lead to a more accurate representation of microscale flows, aerodynamics, and wind turbine/plant performance. Our goal is to couple a numerical weather prediction model that can represent mesoscale flow [specifically the Weather Research and Forecasting model] with a microscale LES model (OpenFOAM) that can predict microscale turbulence and wake losses.

  5. High fidelity quasi steady-state aerodynamic model effects on race vehicle performance predictions using multi-body simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrfeld-Halterman, J. A.; Uddin, M.

    2016-07-01

    We described in this paper the development of a high fidelity vehicle aerodynamic model to fit wind tunnel test data over a wide range of vehicle orientations. We also present a comparison between the effects of this proposed model and a conventional quasi steady-state aerodynamic model on race vehicle simulation results. This is done by implementing both of these models independently in multi-body quasi steady-state simulations to determine the effects of the high fidelity aerodynamic model on race vehicle performance metrics. The quasi steady state vehicle simulation is developed with a multi-body NASCAR Truck vehicle model, and simulations are conducted for three different types of NASCAR race tracks, a short track, a one and a half mile intermediate track, and a higher speed, two mile intermediate race track. For each track simulation, the effects of the aerodynamic model on handling, maximum corner speed, and drive force metrics are analysed. The accuracy of the high-fidelity model is shown to reduce the aerodynamic model error relative to the conventional aerodynamic model, and the increased accuracy of the high fidelity aerodynamic model is found to have realisable effects on the performance metric predictions on the intermediate tracks resulting from the quasi steady-state simulation.

  6. Establishing repeatable operation of a centrifugal compressor research facility for aerodynamic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Matthew Philip

    The objective of this research has been to analyze the steady state performance of a new centrifugal compressor research facility. The CSTAR (Centrifugal STage for Aerodynamic Research) compressor has been designed to be placed as the last stage in an axial compressor and its performance in this flow regime was measured. Because the compressor was designed as a research vehicle, unique instrumentation throughout the flow path provides a detailed look at its steady state performance. Rakes at the inlet and deswirl section quantify the overall performance but other instrumentation is used to understand the component performance. Static pressure taps along the shroud, within the diffuser, and through the turn-to-axial show the static pressure rise. Additionally, rakes at the inlet and exit of diffuser also characterize the performance of the wedge diffuser and the impeller. Additionally, capacitance probes located at the knee and exducer of the impeller non-intrusively measure the size of the tip clearance during facility operation. An investigation into these measurements resulted in a standard procedure for in-situ calibration and installation to produce repeatable and accurate clearance measurements. Finally, the feasibility of future Laser Doppler Velocimetry measurements acquired through the shroud window was tested and was found to be achievable with the use of beam translators to ensure that measurement volumes are created after beam refraction through the windows. Inlet conditions of the facility have been investigated and fluctuations of the ambient conditions have been mitigated with a large settling chamber to ensure repeatable and stable operation. The current instrumentation was utilized to determine the compressor performance. Measurements of the steady performance parameters along with those of the internal flowfield are documented.

  7. Viscous flow simulations in VTOL aerodynamics. [finite difference technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    The critical issues in viscous flow simulations, such as boundary-layer separation, entrainment, turbulence modeling, and compressibility, are discussed with regard to the ground effects problem for vertical-takeoff-and-landing (VTOL) aircraft. A simulation of the two-dimensional incompressible lift jet in ground proximity is based on solution of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and a turbulence-model equation which are written in stream function-vorticity form and are solved using Hoffman's augmented-central-difference algorithm. The resulting equations and their shortcomings are discussed when the technique is extended to two-dimensional compressible and three-dimensional incompressible flows.

  8. Aerodynamic effects of simulated ice shapes on two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alansatan, Sait

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of simulated glaze ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance characteristics of two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail. The two dimensional tests involved two NACA 0011 airfoils with chords of 24 and 12 inches. Glaze ice shapes computed with the LEWICE code that were representative of 22.5-min and 45-min ice accretions were simulated with spoilers, which were sized to approximate the horn heights of the LEWICE ice shapes. Lift, drag, pitching moment, and surface pressure coefficients were obtained for a range of test conditions. Test variables included Reynolds number, geometric scaling, control deflection and the key glaze ice features, which were horn height, horn angle, and horn location. For the three-dimensional tests, a 25%-scale business jet empennage (BJE) with a T-tail configuration was used to study the effect of ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance of a swept horizontal tail. Simulated glaze ice shapes included the LEWICE and spoiler ice shapes to represent 9-min and 22.5-min ice accretions. Additional test variables included Reynolds number and elevator deflection. Lift, drag, hinge moment coefficients as well as boundary layer velocity profiles were obtained. The experimental results showed substantial degradation in aerodynamic performance of the airfoils and the swept horizontal tail due to the simulated ice shapes. For the two-dimensional airfoils, the largest aerodynamic penalties were obtained when the 3-in spoiler-ice, which was representative of 45-min glaze ice accretions, was set normal to the chord. Scale and Reynolds effects were not significant for lift and drag. However, pitching moments and pressure distributions showed great sensitivity to Reynolds number and geometric scaling. For the threedimensional study with the swept finite tail, the 22.5-min ice shapes resulted in greater aerodynamic performance degradation than the 9-min ice shapes. The addition of 24

  9. Unsteady aerodynamic simulation of multiple bodies in relative motion: A prototype method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    A prototype method for time-accurate simulation of multiple aerodynamic bodies in relative motion is presented. The method is general and features unsteady chimera domain decomposition techniques and an implicit approximately factored finite-difference procedure to solve the time-dependent thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. The method is applied to a set of two- and three- dimensional test problems to establish spatial and temporal accuracy, quantify computational efficiency, and begin to test overall code robustness.

  10. CFD Technology for Rotorcraft Gearbox Windage Aerodynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert; Hill, Matthew; Kunz, Robert; Long, Lyle; Morris, Philip; Noack, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is adapted, validated and applied to spinning gear systems with emphasis on predicting windage losses. Several spur gears and a disc are studied. The CFD simulations return good agreement with measured windage power loss. Turbulence modeling choices, the relative importance of viscous and pressure torques with gear speed and the physics of the complex 3-D unsteady flow field in the vicinity of the gear teeth are studied.

  11. Vortical flow aerodynamics - Physical aspects and numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsome, Richard W.; Kandil, Osama A.

    1987-01-01

    Progress in the numerical simulation of vortical flow due to three-dimensional flow separation about flight vehicles at high angles of attack and quasi-steady flight conditions is surveyed. Primary emphasis is placed on Euler and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes methods where the vortices are 'captured' as a solution to the governing equations. A discussion of the relevant flow physics provides a perspective from which to assess numerical solutions. Current numerical prediction capabilities and their evolutionary development are surveyed. Future trends and challenges are identified and discussed.

  12. Thermo Physics Facilities Branch Brochure ARC Jet Complex Fact Sheets, Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility Fact Sheets, Ames Vertical Gun Range Fact Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fretter, E. F. (Editor); Kuhns, Jay (Editor); Nuez, Jay (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The Ames Arc Jet Complex has a rich heritage of over 40 years in Thermal Protection System (TPS) development for every NASA Space Transportation and Planetary program, including Apollo, Space Shuttle, Viking, Pioneer-Venus, Galileo, Mars Pathfinder,Stardust, NASP,X-33,X-34,SHARP-B1 and B2,X-37 and Mars Exploration Rovers. With this early TPS history came a long heritage in the development of the arc jet facilities. These are used to simulate the aerodynamic heating that occurs on the nose cap, wing leading edges and on other areas of the spacecraft requiring thermal protection. TPS samples have been run in the arc jets from a few minutes to over an hour,from one exposure to multiple exposures of the same sample, in order t o understand the TPS materials response to a hot gas flow environment (representative of real hyperthermal environments experienced in flight). The Ames Arc l e t Complex is a key enabler for customers involved in the three major areas of TPS development: selection, validation, and qualification. The arc jet data are critical for validating TPS thermal models, heat shield designs and repairs, and ultimately for flight qualification.

  13. Aerodynamics of ski jumping flight and its control: II. Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungil; Lee, Hansol; Kim, Woojin; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-11-01

    In a ski jumping competition, it is essential to analyze the effect of various posture parameters of a ski jumper to achieve a longer flight distance. For this purpose, we conduct a large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flow past a model ski jumper which is obtained by 3D scanning a ski jumper's body (Mr. Chil-Ku Kang, member of the Korean national team). The angle of attack of the jump ski is 30° and the Reynolds number based on the length of the jump ski is 540,000. The flow statistics including the drag and lift coefficients in flight are in good agreements with our own experimental data. We investigate the flow characteristics such as the flow separation and three-dimensional vortical structures and their effects on the drag and lift. In addition to LES, we construct a simple geometric model of a ski jumper where each part of the ski jumper is modeled as a canonical bluff body such as the sphere, cylinder and flat plate, to find its optimal posture. The results from this approach will be compared with those by LES and discussed. Supported by NRF program (2014M3C1B1033848, 2014R1A1A1002671).

  14. Numerical simulations of interactions among aerodynamics, structural dynamics, and control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preidikman, Sergio

    A robust technique for performing numerical simulations of nonlinear unsteady aeroelastic behavior is developed. The technique is applied to long-span bridges and the wing of a modern business jet. The heart of the procedure is combining the aerodynamic and structural models. The aerodynamic model is a general unsteady vortex-lattice method. The structural model for the bridges is a rigid roadbed supported by linear and torsional springs. For the aircraft wing, the structural model is a cantilever beam with rigid masses attached at various positions along the span; it was generated with the NASTRAN program. The structure, flowing air, and control devices are considered to be the elements of a single dynamic system. All the governing equations are integrated simultaneously and interactively in the time domain; a predictor-corrector method was adapted to perform this integration. For long-span bridges, the simulation predicts the onset of flutter accurately, and the numerical results strongly suggest that an actively controlled wing attached below the roadbed can easily suppress the wind-excited oscillations. The governing equations for a proposed passive system were developed. The wing structure is modelled with finite elements. The deflections are expressed as an expansion in terms of the free-vibration modes. The time-dependent coefficients are the generalized coordinates of the entire dynamic system. The concept of virtual work was extended to develop a method to transfer the aerodynamic loads to the structural nodes. Depending on the speed of the aircraft, the numerical results show damped responses to initial disturbances (although there are no viscous terms in either the aerodynamic or structural model), merging of modal frequencies, the development of limit-cycle oscillations, and the occurrence of a supercritical Hopf bifurcation leading to motion on a torus.

  15. Indian LSSC (Large Space Simulation Chamber) facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brar, A. S.; Prasadarao, V. S.; Gambhir, R. D.; Chandramouli, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Indian Space Agency has undertaken a major project to acquire in-house capability for thermal and vacuum testing of large satellites. This Large Space Simulation Chamber (LSSC) facility will be located in Bangalore and is to be operational in 1989. The facility is capable of providing 4 meter diameter solar simulation with provision to expand to 4.5 meter diameter at a later date. With such provisions as controlled variations of shroud temperatures and availability of infrared equipment as alternative sources of thermal radiation, this facility will be amongst the finest anywhere. The major design concept and major aspects of the LSSC facility are presented here.

  16. Simulation-based aerodynamic design of high-lift devices in ground effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin, Arron Hector

    2007-12-01

    A simulation-based aerodynamic design tool is developed for multi-element high-lift airfoils operating in ground effect. A control theory approach is adopted, using the compressible Navier-Stokes equations as the basis for viscous design of airfoil element shapes and relative positioning. Particular considerations of aerodynamic design, high-lift systems, and the ground effect are described, and the suitability of aerodynamic shape optimization of such systems is discussed. The model of fluid flow and its discretization for solution on digital computers is investigated. A cell-centered finite-volume explicit multigrid method is used to solve both the flow and adjoint systems utilizing structured multiblock meshes. The adjoint equations for shape optimization are developed using a continuous adjoint formulation, and implemented with a moving ground boundary condition for the first time. A suite of test cases verified and validated the numerical algorithms and implementation. Realistic case studies were performed, demonstrating significant performance improvements over the baseline configurations. These included two free-air multi-element airfoil drag minimizations, and in addition two inverted two-element airfoil drag minimizations in ground effect.

  17. Aerodynamic flow simulation using a pressure-based method and a two-equation turbulence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Y. G. J.; Przekwas, A. J.; So, R. M. C.

    1993-07-01

    In the past, most aerodynamic flow calculations were carried out with density-based numerical methods and zero-equation turbulence models. However, pressure-based methods and more advanced turbulence models have been routinely used in industry for many internal flow simulations and for incompressible flows. Unfortunately, their usefulness in calculating aerodynamic flows is still not well demonstrated and accepted. In this study, an advanced pressure-based numerical method and a recently proposed near-wall compressible two-equation turbulence model are used to calculate external aerodynamic flows. Several TVD-type schemes are extended to pressure-based method to better capture discontinuities such as shocks. Some improvements are proposed to accelerate the convergence of the numerical method. A compressible near-wall two-equation turbulence model is then implemented to calculate transonic turbulent flows over NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoils with and without shocks. The calculated results are compared with wind tunnel data as well as with results obtained from the Baldwin-Lomax model. The performance of the two-equation turbulence model is evaluated and its merits or lack thereof are discussed.

  18. Aerodynamic, aeroacoustic, and aeroelastic investigations of airfoil-vortex interaction using large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Marcel

    In helicopters, vortices (generated at the tip of the rotor blades) interact with the next advancing blades during certain flight and manoeuvring conditions, generating undesirable levels of acoustic noise and vibration. These Blade-Vortex Interactions (BVIs), which may cause the most disturbing acoustic noise, normally occur in descent or high-speed forward flight. Acoustic noise characterization (and potential reduction) is one the areas generating intensive research interest to the rotorcraft industry. Since experimental investigations of BVI are extremely costly, some insights into the BVI or AVI (2-D Airfoil-Vortex Interaction) can be gained using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations. Numerical simulation of BVI or AVI has been of interest to CFD for many years. There are still difficulties concerning an accurate numerical prediction of BVI. One of the main issues is the inherent dissipation of CFD turbulence models, which severely affects the preservation of the vortex characteristics. Moreover this is not an issue only for aerodynamic and aeroacoustic analysis but also for aeroelastic investigations as well, especially when the strong (two-way) aeroelastic coupling is of interest. The present investigation concentrates mainly on AVI simulations. The simulations are performed for Mach number, Ma = 0.3, resulting in a Reynolds number, Re = 1.3 x 106, which is based on the chord, c, of the airfoil (NACA0012). Extensive literature search has indicated that the present work represents the first comprehensive investigation of AVI using the LES numerical approach, in the rotorcraft research community. The major factor affecting the aerodynamic coefficients and aeroacoustic field as a result of airfoil-vortex interaction is observed to be the unsteady pressure generated at the location of the interaction. The present numerical results show that the aerodynamic coefficients (lift, moment, and drag) and aeroacoustic field are strongly dependent on

  19. A Radiant Heater to Simulate Aerodynamic Heating in a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trussell, Donald H.; Weidman, Deene J.

    1960-01-01

    A recently developed radiant-heating test technique for simulation of aerodynamic heating in wind tunnel is describes. The heating device, which utilized quartz-tube lamps, was operated successfully while exposed directly to a supersonic airstream. Tests were made on a calibration panel, and experimental temperature and pressure data are presented. Results indicate that initial heating rates of about 26 Btu/(sq ft) (sec) are obtainable at a distance of 12 inches from the heater. Further applications of the basic design are discussed briefly.

  20. NAS (Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program) technical summaries, March 1989 - February 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Given here are selected scientific results from the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program's third year of operation. During this year, the scientific community was given access to a Cray-2 and a Cray Y-MP supercomputer. Topics covered include flow field analysis of fighter wing configurations, large-scale ocean modeling, the Space Shuttle flow field, advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes for rotary-wing airloads and performance prediction, turbulence modeling of separated flows, airloads and acoustics of rotorcraft, vortex-induced nonlinearities on submarines, and standing oblique detonation waves.

  1. A method of infrared imaging missile's aerodynamic heating modeling and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chunqin; Xiang, Jingbo; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Wang, Weiqiang

    2013-09-01

    The infrared (IR) imaging missile's dome will be heated when fly at high speed in the atmosphere because of the friction of the air flow blocking. The detector's performance will be decline if the dome surface is heated to a certain temperature. In this paper, we find a right way to evaluate the aerothermal effects in the imaging and information processing algorithm. Which have three steps including the aerothermal radiation calculation, quantization and image reconstruction. Firstly, the aerothermal radiation is calculated by using a combination of both methods of theoretical analysis and experiment data. Secondly, the relationship between aerothermal radiation and IR images background mean gray and noise can be calculated through the analysis of the experiment data. At last, we can rebuild an aerodynamic heating effect of infrared images fusion with target and decoy, which can be used for virtual prototyping platform missile trajectory simulation. It can be found that the above constructed images have good agreements with the actual image according to comparison between the simulation data and experiment data. It is an economic method that can solve the lab aerodynamic heating simulation and modeling problems.

  2. Modeling and Simulation of Aerodynamic Single Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, Dmitri; Font, Gabriel

    2008-11-01

    This work presents different approaches to modeling of the plasma actuator, an electrical flow control device, which is now widely used in aerodynamics for separation control, lift enhancement, drag reduction and flight control without moving surfaces. Study of the physics of the discharge in air at atmospheric pressure was performed using particle (PIC-DSMC) and fluid plasma simulations. Based on the experimentally obtained data electro-static and lumped-element circuit models were developed for engineering purposes. Numerical flow simulations were performed to study the effect of the plasma body force on the neutral fluid. The results agreed well with the experiments. An application of the plasma actuators to the leading-edge separation control on the NACA 0021 airfoil was studied numerically. The results were obtained for a range of angles of attack. Improvement in the airfoil characteristics was observed in numerical simulations at high angles of attack in cases with plasma actuation.

  3. Numerical simulations of aerodynamic contribution of flows about a space-plane-type configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsushima, Kisa; Takanashi, Susume; Fujii, Kozo; Obayashi, Shigeru

    1987-01-01

    The slightly supersonic viscous flow about the space-plane under development at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) in Japan was simulated numerically using the LU-ADI algorithm. The wind-tunnel testing for the same plane also was conducted with the computations in parallel. The main purpose of the simulation is to capture the phenomena which have a great deal of influence to the aerodynamic force and efficiency but is difficult to capture by experiments. It includes more accurate representation of vortical flows with high angles of attack of an aircraft. The space-plane shape geometry simulated is the simplified model of the real space-plane, which is a combination of a flat and slender body and a double-delta type wing. The comparison between experimental results and numerical ones will be done in the near future. It could be said that numerical results show the qualitatively reliable phenomena.

  4. A university teaching simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Lawrence; Kim, Won-Soo; Tendick, Frank; Tyler, Mitchell; Hannaford, Blake; Barakat, Wissam; Bergengruen, Olaf; Braddi, Louis; Eisenberg, Joseph; Ellis, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    An experimental telerobotics (TR) simulation is described suitable for studying human operator (HO) performance. Simple manipulator pick-and-place and tracking tasks allowed quantitative comparison of a number of calligraphic display viewing conditions. A number of control modes could be compared in this TR simulation, including displacement, rate, and acceleratory control using position and force joysticks. A homeomorphic controller turned out to be no better than joysticks; the adaptive properties of the HO can apparently permit quite good control over a variety of controller configurations and control modes. Training by optimal control example seemed helpful in preliminary experiments.

  5. Numerical simulation of VAWT stochastic aerodynamic loads produced by atmospheric turbauence: VAWT-SAL code

    SciTech Connect

    Homicz, G.F.

    1991-09-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). A principal source of blade fatigue is thought to be the stochastic (i.e., random) aerodynamic loads created by atmospheric turbulence. This report describes the theoretical background of the VAWT Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads (VAWT-SAL) computer code, whose purpose is to numerically simulate these random loads, given the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties. A Double-Multiple-Stream Tube (DMST) analysis is employed to model the rotor's aerodynamic response. The analysis includes the effects of Reynolds number variations, different airfoil sections and chord lengths along the blade span, and an empirical model for dynamic stall effects. The mean ambient wind is assumed to have a shear profile which is described by either a power law or a logarithmic variation with height above ground. Superimposed on this is a full 3-D field of turbulence: i.e., in addition to random fluctuations in time, the turbulence is allowed to vary randomly in planes perpendicular to the mean wind. The influence of flow retardation on the convection of turbulence through the turbine is also modeled. Calculations are presented for the VAWT 34-m Test Bed currently in operation at Bushland, Texas. Predicted time histories of the loads, as well as their Fourier spectra, are presented and discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the differences between so-called steady-state'' (mean wind only) predictions, and those produced with turbulence present. Somewhat surprisingly, turbulence is found to be capable of either increasing or decreasing the average output power, depending on the turbine's tip-speed ratio. A heuristic explanation for such behavior is postulated, and a simple formula is derived for predicting the magnitude of this effect without the need for a full stochastic simulation. 41 refs., 32 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Pyroshock testing-shock simulation facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, Vesta I.

    2002-05-01

    A variety of shock simulation facilities are available to simulate pyroshock events. These facilities range from bounded impact shock machines and electrodynamic shakers to resonant fixture techniques. This presentation will focus on the use of general purpose and tuned resonant fixture techniques including a unique tunable beam apparatus developed at SNL. Examples of application of the resonant fixture technique for both component and full-scale structure pyroshock simulations will be presented. Advantages and disadvantages of each technique will be discussed along with the usable frequency content and bandwidth.

  7. Neutron metrology laboratory facility simulation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Mariana; Salgado, Ana P; Filho, Aidano S; Pereira, Walsan W; Patrão, Karla C S; Fonseca, Evaldo S

    2014-10-01

    The Neutron Low Scattering Laboratory in Brazil has been completely rebuilt. Evaluation of air attenuation parameters and neutron component scattering in the room was done using Monte Carlo simulation code. Neutron fields produced by referenced neutron source were used to calculate neutron scattering and air attenuation. PMID:24864318

  8. Steady-state and transitional aerodynamic characteristics of a wing in simulated heavy rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Bezos, Gaudy M.

    1989-01-01

    The steady-state and transient effects of simulated heavy rain on the subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of a wing model were determined in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The 1.29 foot chord wing was comprised of a NACA 23015 airfoil and had an aspect ratio of 6.10. Data were obtained while test variables of liquid water content, angle of attack, and trailing edge flap angle were parametrically varied at dynamic pressures of 10, 30, and 50 psf (i.e., Reynolds numbers of .76x10(6), 1.31x10(6), and 1.69x10(6)). The experimental results showed reductions in lift and increases in drag when in the simulated rain environment. Accompanying this was a reduction of the stall angle of attack by approximately 4 deg. The transient aerodynamic performance during transition from dry to wet steady-state conditions varied between a linear and a nonlinear transition.

  9. Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Transport-type Airfoil in a Simulated Heavy Rain Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos, Gaudy M.; Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Melson, W. Edward, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of simulated heavy rain on the aerodynamic characteristics of an NACA 64-210 airfoil section equipped with leading-and trailing-edge high-lift devices were investigated in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The model had a chord of 2.5 ft, a span of 8 ft, and was mounted on the tunnel centerline between two large endplates. Aerodynamic measurements in and out of the simulated rain environment were obtained for dynamic pressures of 30 and 50 psf and an angle-of-attack range of 0 to 20 degrees for the cruise configuration. The rain intensity was varied to produce liquid water contents ranging from 16 to 46 gm/cu m. The results obtained for various rain intensity levels and tunnel speeds showed significant losses in maximum lift capability and increases in drag for a given lift as the liquid water content was increased. The results obtained on the landing configuration also indicate a progressive decrease in the angle of attack at which maximum lift occurred and an increase in the slope of the pitching-moment curve as the liquid water content was increased. The sensitivity of test results to the effects of the water surface tension was also investigated. A chemical was introduced into the rain environment that reduced the surface tension of water by a factor of 2. The reduction in the surface tension of water did not significantly alter the level of performance losses for the landing configuration.

  10. Toward Affordable, Theory-and-Simulation-Inspired, Models for Realistic Wind Turbine Aerodynamics and Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladeinde, Foluso; Alabi, Ken; Li, Wenhai

    2015-11-01

    The problem of generating design data for the operation of a farm of wind turbines for clean energy production is quite complicated, if properly done. Potential flow theories provide some models, but these are not suitable for the massive aerodynamic separation and turbulence that characterize many realistic wind turbine applications. Procedures, such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD), which can potentially resolve some of the accuracy problems with the purely theoretical approach, are quite expensive to use, and often prohibit real-time design and control. In our work, we seek affordable and acceptably-accurate models derived from the foregoing approaches. The simulation used in our study is based on high-fidelity CFD, meaning that we use high-order (compact-scheme based), mostly large-eddy simulation methods, with due regards for the proper treatment of the stochastic inflow turbulence data. Progress on the project described herein will be presented.

  11. Aerodynamic Effects of Simulated Ice Accretion on a Generic Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Lee, Sam; Shah, Gautam H.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental research effort was begun to develop a database of airplane aerodynamic characteristics with simulated ice accretion over a large range of incidence and sideslip angles. Wind-tunnel testing was performed at the NASA Langley 12-ft Low-Speed Wind Tunnel using a 3.5 percent scale model of the NASA Langley Generic Transport Model. Aerodynamic data were acquired from a six-component force and moment balance in static-model sweeps from alpha = -5deg to 85deg and beta = -45 deg to 45 deg at a Reynolds number of 0.24 x10(exp 6) and Mach number of 0.06. The 3.5 percent scale GTM was tested in both the clean configuration and with full-span artificial ice shapes attached to the leading edges of the wing, horizontal and vertical tail. Aerodynamic results for the clean airplane configuration compared favorably with similar experiments carried out on a 5.5 percent scale GTM. The addition of the large, glaze-horn type ice shapes did result in an increase in airplane drag coefficient but had little effect on the lift and pitching moment. The lateral-directional characteristics showed mixed results with a small effect of the ice shapes observed in some cases. The flow visualization images revealed the presence and evolution of a spanwise-running vortex on the wing that was the dominant feature of the flowfield for both clean and iced configurations. The lack of ice-induced performance and flowfield effects observed in this effort was likely due to Reynolds number effects for the clean configuration. Estimates of full-scale baseline performance were included in this analysis to illustrate the potential icing effects.

  12. Research at a European Planetary Simulation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrison, Jonathan; Alois, Stefano; Iversen, Jens Jacob

    2016-04-01

    A unique environmental simulation facility will be presented which is capable of re-creating extreme terrestrial or other planetary environments. It is supported by EU activities including a volcanology network VERTIGO and a planetology network Europlanet 2020 RI. It is also used as a test facility by ESA for the forthcoming ExoMars 2018 mission. Specifically it is capable of recreating the key physical parameters such as temperature, pressure (gas composition), wind flow and importantly the suspension/transport of dust or sand particulates. This facility is available both to the scientific and industrial community. Details of this laboratory facility will be presented and some of the most recent activities will be summarized. For information on access to this facility please contact the author.

  13. Research at a European Planetary Simulation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrison, J.; Iversen, J. J.; Alois, S.; Rasmussen, K. R.

    2015-10-01

    This unique environmental simulation facility is capable of re-creating extreme terrestrial, Martian and other planetary environments. It is supported by EU activities including Europlanet RI and a volcanology network VERTIGO. It is also used as a test facility by ESA for the forthcoming ExoMars 2018 mission. Specifically it is capable of recreating the key physical parameters such as temperature, pressure (gas composition), wind flow and importantly the suspension/transport of dust or sand particulates. This facility is available both to the scientific and Industrial community. The latest research and networking activities will be presented.

  14. The development of a capability for aerodynamic testing of large-scale wing sections in a simulated natural rain environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos, Gaudy M.; Cambell, Bryan A.; Melson, W. Edward

    1989-01-01

    A research technique to obtain large-scale aerodynamic data in a simulated natural rain environment has been developed. A 10-ft chord NACA 64-210 wing section wing section equipped with leading-edge and trailing-edge high-lift devices was tested as part of a program to determine the effect of highly-concentrated, short-duration rainfall on airplane performance. Preliminary dry aerodynamic data are presented for the high-lift configuration at a velocity of 100 knots and an angle of attack of 18 deg. Also, data are presented on rainfield uniformity and rainfall concentration intensity levels obtained during the calibration of the rain simulation system.

  15. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Schairer, Edward; Hicks, Gary; Wander, Stephen; Blankson, Isiaiah; Rose, Raymond; Olson, Lawrence; Unger, George

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a comprehensive review of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation, transition and turbulence physics, numerical aerodynamic simulation, drag reduction, test techniques and instrumentation, configuration aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, aerothermodynamics, hypersonics, subsonic transport/commuter aviation, fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  16. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J.; Hessenius, Kristin A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Hicks, Gary; Richardson, Pamela F.; Unger, George; Neumann, Benjamin; Moss, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The annual accomplishments is reviewed for the Aerodynamics Division during FY 1991. The program includes both fundamental and applied research directed at the full spectrum of aerospace vehicles, from rotorcraft to planetary entry probes. A comprehensive review is presented of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications; CFD validation; transition and turbulence physics; numerical aerodynamic simulation; test techniques and instrumentation; configuration aerodynamics; aeroacoustics; aerothermodynamics; hypersonics; subsonics; fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  17. Design and simulation of a neutron facility.

    PubMed

    Studenski, Matthew T; Kearfott, Kimberlee J

    2007-02-01

    State and other regulatory entities require that for any facility housing a particle accelerator the surrounding areas must be restricted to public access unless the dose equivalent rate is less than 0.02 mSv h at 5 cm from any accessible wall surrounding the facility under conditions of maximum radiation output. A Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation code, MCNP5, was used to design a proposed facility to shield two D-T neutron generators and one D-D neutron generator. A number of different designs were simulated, but due to cost and space issues a small concrete cave proved to be the best solution for the shielding problem. With this design, all of the neutron generators could be used and all of the rooms surrounding the neutron facility could be considered unrestricted to public access. To prevent unauthorized access into the restricted area of the neutron facility, light curtains, warning lights, door interlocks, and rope barriers will be built into the facility. PMID:17228186

  18. Space Simulation, 7th. [facilities and testing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Space simulation facilities and techniques are outlined that encompass thermal scale modeling, computerized simulations, reentry materials, spacecraft contamination, solar simulation, vacuum tests, and heat transfer studies.

  19. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwald, Ken

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility project is to provide a microgravity laboratory to facilitate research relevant to exobiology (the study of the origin and evolution of life in the universe). Such a facility will also be useful in other areas of study important to NASA including planetary science, biology, atmospheric science, astrophysics, chemistry, and physics. To achieve this goal, the project will develop and support the GGSF, a modular facility-class payload planned for inclusion on Space Station Freedom. The GGSF will consist of the following: an experiment chamber(s) supported by subsystems that provide chamber environment regulation and monitoring capabilities; sample generation, injection, positioning, and retrieval capabilities; and computer control, data acquisition, and housekeeping capabilities. The facility will also provide analytical tools such as light-scattering measurement systems, aerosol size-spectrum measurement devices, and optical imaging systems.

  20. Aerodynamic characteristics of a powered, externally blown flap STOL transport model with two engine simulator sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The low-speed aerodynamic characteristics are investigated of a general research model - a swept-wing, jet-powered STOL transport with externally blown flaps. The model was tested with four-engine simulators mounted on pylons under the 9.3-percent-thick supercritical airfoil wing. Two sets of air ejectors were used to provide data with large and small engines. Tests were conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel over an angle-of-attack range of -4 deg to 22 deg and a thrust-coefficient range from 0 to approximately 4. The effects are described of power, wing leading-edge slat configuration, T-tail and low horizontal-tail positions, and double-slotted flap deflection. Additional untrimmed and trimmed engine-out data and tail-body data are included.

  1. Numerical simulation on the aerodynamic effects of blade icing on small scale Straight-bladed VAWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Fang; Li, Shengmao; Li, Yan; Tian, Wenqiang

    To invest the effects of blade surface icing on the aerodynamics performance of the straight-bladed vertical-axis wind turbine (SB-VAWT), wind tunnel tests were carried out on a static straight blade using a simple icing wind tunnel. Firstly, the icing situations on blade surface at some kinds of typical attack angle were observed and recorded under different cold water flow fluxes. Then the iced blade airfoils were combined into a SB-VAWT model with two blades. Numerical simulations were carried out on this model, and the static and dynamic torque coefficients of the model with and without icing were computed. Both the static and dynamic torque coefficients were decreased for the icing effects.

  2. Performance deterioration based on simulated aerodynamic loads test, JT9D jet engine diagnostics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stromberg, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    An engine was specially prepared with extensive instrumentation to monitor performance, case temperatures, and clearance changes. A special loading device was used to apply known loads on the engine by the use of cables placed around the flight inlet. These loads simulated the estimated aerodynamic pressure distributions that occur on the inlet in various segments of a typical airplane flight. Test results indicate that the engine lost 1.3 percent in take-off thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC) during the course of the test effort. Permanent clearance changes due to the loads accounted for 1.1 percent; increase in low pressure compressor airfoil roughness and thermal distortion in the high pressure turbine accounted for 0.2 percent. Pretest predicted performance loss due to clearance changes was 0.9 percent in TSFC. Therefore, the agreement between measurement and prediction is considered to be excellent.

  3. Aerodynamic and thermal analysis of an engine cylinder head using numerical flow simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Taghavi, R.; Dupont, A.; Dupont, J.F. )

    1990-07-01

    This paper reports on a computational fluid dynamics code used as a guide during the development stage of a passenger car spark ignition engine. The focus is on the flow proiperties of the inlet port as well as the heat transfer characteristics of the proposed cylinder head design. In the first part of this study, the aerodynamic characteristics of two slightly different inlet ports are considered and their effect on the development of in-cylinder flow is examined. The collected information is used to estimate geometric sensitivity and assess the effects of drifts between design and actual production specifications of inlet ports. In the second part, the same computational code is used to simulate in-cylinder combustion and determine the resulting temperature and heat flux distribution on the cylinder head walls. A comparison is thn carried out between numerical results and experimental measurements and good agreement is obtained.

  4. Generalize aerodynamic coefficient table storage, checkout and interpolation for aircraft simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, F.; Warner, N.

    1973-01-01

    The set of programs described has been used for rapidly introducing, checking out and very efficiently using aerodynamic tables in complex aircraft simulations on the IBM 360. The preprocessor program reads in tables with different names and dimensions and stores then on disc storage according to the specified dimensions. The tables are read in from IBM cards in a format which is convenient to reduce the data from the original graphs. During table processing, new auxiliary tables are generated which are required for table cataloging and for efficient interpolation. In addition, DIMENSION statements for the tables as well as READ statements are punched so that they may be used in other programs for readout of the data from disc without chance of programming errors. A quick data checking graphical output for all tables is provided in a separate program.

  5. NAS technical summaries. Numerical aerodynamic simulation program, March 1992 - February 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    NASA created the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program in 1987 to focus resources on solving critical problems in aeroscience and related disciplines by utilizing the power of the most advanced supercomputers available. The NAS Program provides scientists with the necessary computing power to solve today's most demanding computational fluid dynamics problems and serves as a pathfinder in integrating leading-edge supercomputing technologies, thus benefitting other supercomputer centers in government and industry. The 1992-93 operational year concluded with 399 high-speed processor projects and 91 parallel projects representing NASA, the Department of Defense, other government agencies, private industry, and universities. This document provides a glimpse at some of the significant scientific results for the year.

  6. Review of NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    NASA has planned a supercomputer for computational fluid dynamics research since the mid-1970's. With the approval of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program as a FY 1984 new start, Congress requested an assessment of the program's objectives, projected short- and long-term uses, program design, computer architecture, user needs, and handling of proprietary and classified information. Specifically requested was an examination of the merits of proceeding with multiple high speed processor (HSP) systems contrasted with a single high speed processor system. The panel found NASA's objectives and projected uses sound and the projected distribution of users as realistic as possible at this stage. The multiple-HSP, whereby new, more powerful state-of-the-art HSP's would be integrated into a flexible network, was judged to present major advantages over any single HSP system.

  7. Aerodynamic analysis and simulation of a twin-tail tilt-duct unmanned aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, Cyrus

    The tilt-duct vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) concept has been around since the early 1960s; however, to date the design has never passed the research phase and development phase. Nearly 50 years later, American Dynamics Flight Systems (ADFS) is developing the AD-150, a 2,250lb weight class unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) configured with rotating ducts on each wingtip. Unlike its predecessor, the Doak VZ-4, the AD-150 features a V tail and wing sweep -- both of which affect the aerodynamic behavior of the aircraft. Because no aircraft of this type has been built and tested, vital aerodynamic research was conducted on the bare airframe behavior (without wingtip ducts). Two weeks of static and dynamic testing were performed on a 3/10th scale model at the University of Maryland's 7' x 10' low speed wind tunnel to facilitate the construction of a nonlinear flight simulator. A total of 70 dynamic tests were performed to obtain damping parameter estimates using the ordinary least squares methodology. Validation, based on agreement between static and dynamic estimates of the pitch and yaw stiffness terms, showed an average percent error of 14.0% and 39.6%, respectively. These inconsistencies were attributed to: large dynamic displacements not encountered during static testing, regressor collinearity, and, while not conclusively proven, differences in static and dynamic boundary layer development. Overall, the damping estimates were consistent and repeatable, with low scatter over a 95% confidence interval. Finally, a basic open loop simulation was executed to demonstrate the instability of the aircraft. As a result, it is recommended that future work be performed to determine trim points and linear models for controls development.

  8. Simulation Facilities and Test Beds for Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlarmann, Bernhard Kl.; Leonard, Arian

    2002-01-01

    Galileo is the European satellite navigation system, financed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Commission (EC). The Galileo System, currently under definition phase, will offer seamless global coverage, providing state-of-the-art positioning and timing services. Galileo services will include a standard service targeted at mass market users, an augmented integrity service, providing integrity warnings when fault occur and Public Regulated Services (ensuring a continuity of service for the public users). Other services are under consideration (SAR and integrated communications). Galileo will be interoperable with GPS, and will be complemented by local elements that will enhance the services for specific local users. In the frame of the Galileo definition phase, several system design and simulation facilities and test beds have been defined and developed for the coming phases of the project, respectively they are currently under development. These are mainly the following tools: Galileo Mission Analysis Simulator to design the Space Segment, especially to support constellation design, deployment and replacement. Galileo Service Volume Simulator to analyse the global performance requirements based on a coverage analysis for different service levels and degrades modes. Galileo System Simulation Facility is a sophisticated end-to-end simulation tool to assess the navigation performances for a complete variety of users under different operating conditions and different modes. Galileo Signal Validation Facility to evaluate signal and message structures for Galileo. Galileo System Test Bed (Version 1) to assess and refine the Orbit Determination &Time Synchronisation and Integrity algorithms, through experiments relying on GPS space infrastructure. This paper presents an overview on the so called "G-Facilities" and describes the use of the different system design tools during the project life cycle in order to design the system with respect to

  9. The mission oriented terminal area simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaylor, J. T.; Simmons, H. I.; Naftel, P. B.; Houck, J. A.; Grove, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The Mission Oriented Terminal Area Simulation (MOTAS) was developed to provide an ATC environment in which flight management and flight operations research studies can be conducted with a high degree of realism. This facility provides a flexible and comprehensive simulation of the airborne, ground-based and communication aspects of the airport terminal area environment. Major elements of the simulation are: an airport terminal area environment model, two air traffic controller stations, several aircraft models and simulator cockpits, four pseudo pilot stations, and a realistic air-ground communications network. MOTAS has been used for one study with the DC-9 simulator and a series of data link studies are planned in the near future.

  10. Computational Simulations of Convergent Nozzles for the AIAA 1st Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dippold, Vance F., III

    2014-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were completed for a series of convergent nozzles in participation of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) 1st Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop. The simulations were performed using the Wind-US flow solver. Discharge and thrust coefficients were computed for four axisymmetric nozzles with nozzle pressure ratios (NPR) ranging from 1.4 to 7.0. The computed discharge coefficients showed excellent agreement with available experimental data; the computed thrust coefficients captured trends observed in the experimental data, but over-predicted the thrust coefficient by 0.25 to 1.0 percent. Sonic lines were computed for cases with NPR >= 2.0 and agreed well with experimental data for NPR >= 2.5. Simulations were also performed for a 25 deg. conic nozzle bifurcated by a flat plate at NPR = 4.0. The jet plume shock structure was compared with and without the splitter plate to the experimental data. The Wind-US simulations predicted the shock structure well, though lack of grid resolution in the plume reduced the sharpness of the shock waves. Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) simulations and Detached Eddy Simulations (DES) were performed at NPR = 1.6 for the 25 deg conic nozzle with splitter plate. The simulations predicted vortex shedding from the trailing edge of the splitter plate. However, the vortices of URANS and DES solutions appeared to dissipate earlier than observed experimentally. It is believed that a lack of grid resolution in the region of the vortex shedding may have caused the vortices to break down too soon

  11. The Total In-Flight Simulator (TIFS) aerodynamics and systems: Description and analysis. [maneuver control and gust alleviators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrisani, D., II; Daughaday, H.; Dittenhauser, J.; Rynaski, E.

    1978-01-01

    The aerodynamics, control system, instrumentation complement and recording system of the USAF Total In/Flight Simulator (TIFS) airplane are described. A control system that would allow the ailerons to be operated collectively, as well as, differentially to entrance the ability of the vehicle to perform the dual function of maneuver load control and gust alleviation is emphasized. Mathematical prediction of the rigid body and the flexible equations of longitudinal motion using the level 2.01 FLEXSTAB program are included along with a definition of the vehicle geometry, the mass and stiffness distribution, the calculated mode frequencies and mode shapes, and the resulting aerodynamic equations of motion of the flexible vehicle. A complete description of the control and instrumentation system of the aircraft is presented, including analysis, ground test and flight data comparisons of the performance and bandwidth of the aerodynamic surface servos. Proposed modification for improved performance of the servos are also presented.

  12. Development of In-Fiber Reflective Bragg Gratings as Shear Stress Monitors in Aerodynamic Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Singh, Jag J.

    1998-01-01

    Bragg gratings centered at nominal wavelengths of 1290 nm and 1300 run were inscribed in a 9/125 microns germano-silicate optical fiber, using continuous wave frequency doubled Ar+ laser radiation at 244 nm. Such gratings have been used extensively as temperature and strain monitors in smart structures. They have, however, never been used for measuring aerodynamic shear stresses. As a test of their sensitivity as shear stress monitors, a Bragg fiber attached to a metal plate was subjected to laminar flows in a glass pipe. An easily measurable large flow-induced wavelength shift (Delta Lambda(sub B)) was observed in the Bragg reflected wavelength. Thereafter, the grating was calibrated by making one time, simultaneous measurements of Delta Lambda(sub B) and the coefficient of skin friction (C(sub f)) with a skin friction balance, as a function of flow rates in a subsonic wind tunnel. Onset of fan-induced transition in the tunnel flow provided a unique flow rate for correlating Delta Lambda(sub B) and (C(sub f) values needed for computing effective modulus of rigidity (N(sub eff)) of the fiber attached to the metal plate. This value Of N(sub eff) is expected to remain constant throughout the elastic stress range expected during the Bragg grating aerodynamic tests. It has been used for calculating the value of Cf at various tunnel speeds, on the basis of measured values of Bragg wavelength shifts at those speeds.

  13. Aerodynamics Simulations for the D8 ``Double Bubble'' Aircraft Using the LAVA Unstructured Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballinger, Sean

    2013-11-01

    The D8 ``double bubble'' is a proposed design for quieter and more efficient domestic passenger aircraft of the Boeing 737 class. It features boundary layer-ingesting engines located under a non-load-bearing π-tail and a lightweight low-sweep wing for flight around Mach 0.7. The D8's wide lifting body is expected to supply 15% of its total lift, while a Boeing 737's fuselage contributes only 8%. The tapering rear of the fuselage is also predicted to experience a negative moment resulting in positive pitch, produce a thicker boundary layer for ingestion by distortion-tolerant engines, and act as a noise shield. To investigate these predictions, unstructured grids generated over a fine surface triangulation using Star-CCM+ are used to model the unpowered D8 with flow conditions mimicking those in the MIT Wright brothers wind tunnel at angles of attack from - 2 to 14 degrees. LAVA, the recently developed Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics solver, is used to carry out simulations on an unstructured grid. The results are compared to wind tunnel data, and to data from structured grid simulations using the LAVA, Overflow, and Cart3D solvers. Applied Modeling and Simulation Branch, NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division, funded by New York Space Grant.

  14. Space simulation facilities providing a stable thermal vacuum facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tellalian, Martin L.

    1990-01-01

    CBI has recently constructed the Intermediate Thermal Vacuum Facility. Built as a corporate facility, the installation will first be used on the Boost Surveillance and Tracking System (BSTS) program. It will also be used to develop and test other sensor systems. The horizontal chamber has a horseshoe shaped cross section and is supported on pneumatic isolators for vibration isolation. The chamber structure was designed to meet stability and stiffness requirements. The design process included measurement of the ambient ground vibrations, analysis of various foundation test article support configurations, design and analysis of the chamber shell and modal testing of the chamber shell. A detailed 3-D finite element analysis was made in the design stage to predict the lowest three natural frequencies and mode shapes and to identify local vibrating components. The design process is described and the results are compared of the finite element analysis to the results of the field modal testing and analysis for the 3 lowest natural frequencies and mode shapes. Concepts are also presented for stiffening large steel structures along with methods to improve test article stability in large space simulation facilities.

  15. High-fidelity simulations of unsteady civil aircraft aerodynamics: stakes and perspectives. Application of zonal detached eddy simulation

    PubMed Central

    Deck, Sébastien; Gand, Fabien; Brunet, Vincent; Ben Khelil, Saloua

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an up-to-date survey of the use of zonal detached eddy simulations (ZDES) for unsteady civil aircraft applications as a reflection on the stakes and perspectives of the use of hybrid methods in the framework of industrial aerodynamics. The issue of zonal or non-zonal treatment of turbulent flows for engineering applications is discussed. The ZDES method used in this article and based on a fluid problem-dependent zonalization is briefly presented. Some recent landmark achievements for conditions all over the flight envelope are presented, including low-speed (aeroacoustics of high-lift devices and landing gear), cruising (engine–airframe interactions), propulsive jets and off-design (transonic buffet and dive manoeuvres) applications. The implications of such results and remaining challenges in a more global framework are further discussed. PMID:25024411

  16. High-fidelity simulations of unsteady civil aircraft aerodynamics: stakes and perspectives. Application of zonal detached eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Deck, Sébastien; Gand, Fabien; Brunet, Vincent; Ben Khelil, Saloua

    2014-08-13

    This paper provides an up-to-date survey of the use of zonal detached eddy simulations (ZDES) for unsteady civil aircraft applications as a reflection on the stakes and perspectives of the use of hybrid methods in the framework of industrial aerodynamics. The issue of zonal or non-zonal treatment of turbulent flows for engineering applications is discussed. The ZDES method used in this article and based on a fluid problem-dependent zonalization is briefly presented. Some recent landmark achievements for conditions all over the flight envelope are presented, including low-speed (aeroacoustics of high-lift devices and landing gear), cruising (engine-airframe interactions), propulsive jets and off-design (transonic buffet and dive manoeuvres) applications. The implications of such results and remaining challenges in a more global framework are further discussed. PMID:25024411

  17. Inlet noise on 0.5-meter-diameter NASA QF-1 fan as measured in an unmodified compressor aerodynamic test facility and in an anechoic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelder, T. F.; Soltis, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Narrowband analysis revealed grossly similar sound pressure level spectra in each facility. Blade passing frequency (BPF) noise and multiple pure tone (MPT) noise were superimposed on a broadband (BB) base noise. From one-third octave bandwidth sound power analyses the BPF noise (harmonics combined), and the MPT noise (harmonics combined, excepting BPF's) agreed between facilities within 1.5 db or less over the range of speeds and flows tested. Detailed noise and aerodynamic performance is also presented.

  18. Europlanet Research Infrastructure: Planetary Simulation Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, G. R.; Mason, N. J.; Green, S.; Gómez, F.; Prieto, O.; Helbert, J.; Colangeli, L.; Srama, R.; Grande, M.; Merrison, J.

    2008-09-01

    EuroPlanet The Europlanet Research Infrastructure consortium funded under FP7 aims to provide the EU Planetary Science community greater access for to research infrastructure. A series of networking and outreach initiatives will be complimented by joint research activities and the formation of three Trans National Access distributed service laboratories (TNA's) to provide a unique and comprehensive set of analogue field sites, laboratory simulation facilities, and extraterrestrial sample analysis tools. Here we report on the infrastructure that comprises the second TNA; Planetary Simulation Facilities. 11 laboratory based facilities are able to recreate the conditions found in the atmospheres and on the surfaces of planetary systems with specific emphasis on Martian, Titan and Europa analogues. The strategy has been to offer some overlap in capabilities to ensure access to the highest number of users and to allow for progressive and efficient development strategies. For example initial testing of mobility capability prior to the step wise development within planetary atmospheres that can be made progressively more hostile through the introduction of extreme temperatures, radiation, wind and dust. Europlanet Research Infrastructure Facilties: Mars atmosphere simulation chambers at VUA and OU These relatively large chambers (up to 1 x 0.5 x 0.5 m) simulate Martian atmospheric conditions and the dual cooling options at VUA allows stabilised instrument temperatures while the remainder of the sample chamber can be varied between 220K and 350K. Researchers can therefore assess analytical protocols for instruments operating on Mars; e.g. effect of pCO2, temperature and material (e.g., ± ice) on spectroscopic and laser ablation techniques while monitoring the performance of detection technologies such as CCD at low T & variable p H2O & pCO2. Titan atmosphere and surface simulation chamber at OU The chamber simulates Titan's atmospheric composition under a range of

  19. The transonic Reynolds number problem. [limitations of transonic aerodynamic test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Problems in modeling the complex interacting flow fields in the transonic speed regime are reviewed. The limitations of wind tunnel test capabilities are identified, and options for resolving the deficiency are examined. The evolution of the National Transonic Facility, and the various needs for research investigations to be done there are discussed. The relative priorities that should be given within and across subdisciplines for guidance in planning for the most effective use of the facility are considered.

  20. INTEGRITY - Integrated Human Exploration Mission Simulation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    It is proposed to develop a high-fidelity ground facility to carry out long-duration human exploration mission simulations. These would not be merely computer simulations - they would in fact comprise a series of actual missions that just happen to stay on earth. These missions would include all elements of an actual mission, using actual technologies that would be used for the real mission. These missions would also include such elements as extravehicular activities, robotic systems, telepresence and teleoperation, surface drilling technology-all using a simulated planetary landscape. A sequence of missions would be defined that get progressively longer and more robust, perhaps a series of five or six missions over a span of 10 to 15 years ranging in duration from 180 days up to 1000 days. This high-fidelity ground facility would operate hand-in-hand with a host of other terrestrial analog sites such as the Antarctic, Haughton Crater, and the Arizona desert. Of course, all of these analog mission simulations will be conducted here on earth in 1-g, and NASA will still need the Shuttle and ISS to carry out all the microgravity and hypogravity science experiments and technology validations. The proposed missions would have sufficient definition such that definitive requirements could be derived from them to serve as direction for all the program elements of the mission. Additionally, specific milestones would be established for the "launch" date of each mission so that R&D programs would have both good requirements and solid milestones from which to .build their implementation plans. Mission aspects that could not be directly incorporated into the ground facility would be simulated via software. New management techniques would be developed for evaluation in this ground test facility program. These new techniques would have embedded metrics which would allow them to be continuously evaluated and adjusted so that by the time the sequence of missions is completed, the

  1. Open Source Software Openfoam as a New Aerodynamical Simulation Tool for Rocket-Borne Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszak, T.; Brede, M.; Strelnikov, B.

    2015-09-01

    The only way to do in-situ measurements, which are very important experimental studies for atmospheric science, in the mesoshere/lower thermosphere (MLT) is to use sounding rockets. The drawback of using rockets is the shock wave appearing because of the very high speed of the rocket motion (typically about 1000 mIs). This shock wave disturbs the density, the temperature and the velocity fields in the vicinity of the rocket, compared to undisturbed values of the atmosphere. This effect, however, can be quantified and the measured data has to be corrected not just to make it more precise but simply usable. The commonly accepted and widely used tool for this calculations is the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique developed by GA. Bird which is available as stand-alone program limited to use a single processor. Apart from complications with simulations of flows around bodies related to different flow regimes in the altitude range of MLT, that rise due to exponential density change by several orders of magnitude, a particular hardware configuration introduces significant difficulty for aerodynamical calculations due to choice of the grid sizes mainly depending on the demands on adequate DSMCs and good resolution of geometries with scale differences of factor of iO~. This makes either the calculation time unreasonably long or even prevents the calculation algorithm from converging. In this paper we apply the free open source software OpenFOAM (licensed under GNU GPL) for a three-dimensional CFD-Simulation of a flow around a sounding rocket instrumentation. An advantage of this software package, among other things, is that it can run on high performance clusters, which are easily scalable. We present the first results and discuss the potential of the new tool in applications for sounding rockets.

  2. Aerodynamic Analysis of Simulated Heat Shield Recession for the Orion Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, Karen L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Mcdaniel, Ryan D.

    2008-01-01

    The aerodynamic effects of the recession of the ablative thermal protection system for the Orion Command Module of the Crew Exploration Vehicle are important for the vehicle guidance. At the present time, the aerodynamic effects of recession being handled within the Orion aerodynamic database indirectly with an additional safety factor placed on the uncertainty bounds. This study is an initial attempt to quantify the effects for a particular set of recessed geometry shapes, in order to provide more rigorous analysis for managing recession effects within the aerodynamic database. The aerodynamic forces and moments for the baseline and recessed geometries were computed at several trajectory points using multiple CFD codes, both viscous and inviscid. The resulting aerodynamics for the baseline and recessed geometries were compared. The forces (lift, drag) show negligible differences between baseline and recessed geometries. Generally, the moments show a difference between baseline and recessed geometries that correlates with the maximum amount of recession of the geometry. The difference between the pitching moments for the baseline and recessed geometries increases as Mach number decreases (and the recession is greater), and reach a value of -0.0026 for the lowest Mach number. The change in trim angle of attack increases from approx. 0.5deg at M = 28.7 to approx. 1.3deg at M = 6, and is consistent with a previous analysis with a lower fidelity engineering tool. This correlation of the present results with the engineering tool results supports the continued use of the engineering tool for future work. The present analysis suggests there does not need to be an uncertainty due to recession in the Orion aerodynamic database for the force quantities. The magnitude of the change in pitching moment due to recession is large enough to warrant inclusion in the aerodynamic database. An increment in the uncertainty for pitching moment could be calculated from these results and

  3. Aerodynamic roughness measured in the field and simulated in a wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Robert; Greeley, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluates how well values of aerodynamic surface roughness, z sub 0, measured over scale models in wind tunnels correlate with values of z sub 0 measured at full scale in the field. A field experiment was conducted in which values of z sub 0 and u* (wind friction speed) were measured over three arrays of non-erodible roughness elements on a dry lake bed. Wind profiles were measured by ten anemometers on a 15 m mast under thermally neutral atmospheric conditions. Values of z sub 0 increased from .00014 m (dry lake bed only) to .026 m with increasing roughness element density. The three roughness element arrays were simulated at 1/10 and 1/20 scale in an open-circuit atmospheric boundary-layer wind tunnel. Velocities were measured with a boundary-layer pitot-tube rake from the same relative position within the scale model arrays as the anemometers were relative to the field arrays. Each array at each scale was sampled three times at five freestream velocities. Average values of z sub 0 for each model array at each scale were compared with full-scale values of z sub 0 obtained in the field. The field vs. wind tunnel correspondence of z sub 0 is found to be z sub 0 field = 0.2661 x (z sub(0 model) x scale(exp -1))exp .8159.

  4. NAS technical summaries: Numerical aerodynamic simulation program, March 1991 - February 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA created the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program in 1987 to focus resources on solving critical problems in aeroscience and related disciplines by utilizing the power of the most advanced supercomputers available. The NAS Program provides scientists with the necessary computing power to solve today's most demanding computational fluid dynamics problems and serves as a pathfinder in integrating leading-edge supercomputing technologies, thus benefiting other supercomputer centers in Government and industry. This report contains selected scientific results from the 1991-92 NAS Operational Year, March 4, 1991 to March 3, 1992, which is the fifth year of operation. During this year, the scientific community was given access to a Cray-2 and a Cray Y-MP. The Cray-2, the first generation supercomputer, has four processors, 256 megawords of central memory, and a total sustained speed of 250 million floating point operations per second. The Cray Y-MP, the second generation supercomputer, has eight processors and a total sustained speed of one billion floating point operations per second. Additional memory was installed this year, doubling capacity from 128 to 256 megawords of solid-state storage-device memory. Because of its higher performance, the Cray Y-MP delivered approximately 77 percent of the total number of supercomputer hours used during this year.

  5. System simulation and verification facility (SSVF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, M. M.; Bégin, M.-E.; Eickhoff, J.; de Kruyf, J.

    2002-07-01

    Systems engineering tools can be used in conjunction with concurrent engineering techniques to significantly reduce the cost, schedule and risk of space mission design, development and operation. This paper describes the System Simulation and Verification Facility (SSVF) project performed by the VEGA Group PLC and ASTRIUM GmbH (formerly Dornier Satellitesysteme GmbH) for the European Space Agency's European Space Technology Centre (ESTEC). The SSVF concept integrates a high fidelity hard real-time simulator, a checkout system and control system and a common mission information-base. These components are highly configurable to enable them to support different parts of the mission lifecycle. An SSVF simulator incorporates environment, dynamics and equipment models, and interfaces to hardware, onboard software algorithms, the onboard software itself and onboard processors. SSVF is able to support what-if analyses during design and development activities, and allows the overall system hardware and software design to be validated much earlier in the mission development lifecycle than is currently the case. SSVF also supports hybrid simulations: part software models and part real hardware (breadboard, engineering or flight models). As they become available, these can be tested and validated in a high-fidelity simulated environment. The SSVF project has been performed in two phases.

  6. An Aerodynamic Performance Evaluation of the NASA/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, Paul F.

    1987-01-01

    The results of an aerodynamic performance evaluation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS), conducted in association with the Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics, are presented. The ACFS is a full-mission flight simulator which provides an excellent platform for the critical evaluation of emerging flight systems and aircrew performance. The propulsion and flight dynamics models were evaluated using classical flight test techniques. The aerodynamic performance model of the ACFS was found to realistically represent that of current day, medium range transport aircraft. Recommendations are provided to enhance the capabilities of the ACFS to a level forecast for 1995 transport aircraft. The graphical and tabular results of this study will establish a performance section of the ACFS Operation's Manual.

  7. Challenges in Simulation of Aerodynamics, Hydrodynamics, and Mooring-Line Dynamics of Floating Offshore Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Matha, D.; Schlipf, M.; Cordle, A.; Pereira, R.; Jonkman, J.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents the current major modeling challenges for floating offshore wind turbine design tools and describes aerodynamic and hydrodynamic effects due to rotor and platform motions and usage of non-slender support structures.

  8. The 2009 ESA/Danish Mars Simulation Wind Tunnel Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nornberg, P.; Merrison, J. P.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.

    2009-04-01

    Simulation of the dynamic environment in immediate proximity to the surface of Mars requires access to simulation facilities which can reproduce the atmospheric properties (pressure, temperature, gas composition, UV-VIS light conditions, wind flow etc.). It also requires access to analogue Martian surface material (soil and dust). Simulations can be carried out in a wind tunnel placed in a tank which can be pumped out, like the 400 mm Ø, 1500 mm long wind tunnel that has operated in the Mars Simulation Laboratory at University of Aarhus, Denmark since 2000 (1). A wide range of applications have taken place, from development, test and calibration of instruments, over tests of solar panels, and aerodynamic studies of granular transport to studies of physical properties of dust materials such as grain electrification, aggregation and magnetic properties (2,3). The Salten Skov I analogue (4) and other Martian regolits and dust analogues have been used in the wind tunnel experiments. With the view to future instrument development, solar panel optimization and future research on Martian surface processes a new ESA supported wind tunnel has been constructed at University of Aarhus, Denmark and is now under building. This wind tunnel will have a cross section of close to 1 x 2 m and be able to reach a wind speed of close to 30 m/s under Martian pressure conditions and with samples cooled down to Martian temperatures. The facility is planned to be finally tested and ready for use in July 2009. ESA, ExoMars use of this facility will have priority. However, research projects in collaboration with external users will also be welcome in the future. Later this year information on access possibilities will be announced at the Mars Simulation Laboratory home page: www.marslab.dk. References: (1) Merrison, J., Bertelsen, P., Frandsen, C., Gunnlaugsson, H.P., Knudsen, J.M., Madsen, M.B., Mossin, L., Nielsen, J., Nørnberg, P., Rasmussen, K.R., Uggerhøj, E. and Weyer, G. 2002

  9. Mission Simulation Facility: Simulation Support for Autonomy Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisanich, Greg; Plice, Laura; Neukom, Christian; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Wagner, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The Mission Simulation Facility (MSF) supports research in autonomy technology for planetary exploration vehicles. Using HLA (High Level Architecture) across distributed computers, the MSF connects users autonomy algorithms with provided or third-party simulations of robotic vehicles and planetary surface environments, including onboard components and scientific instruments. Simulation fidelity is variable to meet changing needs as autonomy technology advances in Technical Readiness Level (TRL). A virtual robot operating in a virtual environment offers numerous advantages over actual hardware, including availability, simplicity, and risk mitigation. The MSF is in use by researchers at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) and has demonstrated basic functionality. Continuing work will support the needs of a broader user base.

  10. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, C.P.

    1989-12-31

    This is a brief report about a Sandia National Laboratory facility which can provide high-thermal flux for simulation of nuclear thermal flash, measurements of the effects of aerodynamic heating on radar transmission, etc

  11. INTEGRITY -- Integrated Human Exploration Mission Simulation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, D.; Tri, T.; Daues, K.

    It is proposed to develop a high -fidelity ground facil ity to carry out long-duration human exploration mission simulations. These would not be merely computer simulations - they would in fact comprise a series of actual missions that just happen to stay on earth. These missions would include all elements of an actual mission, using actual technologies that would be used for the real mission. These missions would also include such elements as extravehicular activities, robotic systems, telepresence and teleoperation, surface drilling technology--all using a simulated planetary landscape. A sequence of missions would be defined that get progressively longer and more robust, perhaps a series of five or six missions over a span of 10 to 15 years ranging in durat ion from 180 days up to 1000 days. This high-fidelity ground facility would operate hand-in-hand with a host of other terrestrial analog sites such as the Antarctic, Haughton Crater, and the Arizona desert. Of course, all of these analog mission simulations will be conducted here on earth in 1-g, and NASA will still need the Shuttle and ISS to carry out all the microgravity and hypogravity science experiments and technology validations. The proposed missions would have sufficient definition such that definitive requirements could be derived from them to serve as direction for all the program elements of the mission. Additionally, specific milestones would be established for the "launch" date of each mission so that R&D programs would have both good requirements and solid milestones from which to build their implementation plans. Mission aspects that could not be directly incorporated into the ground facility would be simulated via software. New management techniques would be developed for evaluation in this ground test facility program. These new techniques would have embedded metrics which would allow them to be continuously evaluated and adjusted so that by the time the sequence of missions is completed

  12. Computation of dragonfly aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafson, Karl; Leben, Robert

    1991-04-01

    Dragonflies are seen to hover and dart, seemingly at will and in remarkably nimble fashion, with great bursts of speed and effectively discontinuous changes of direction. In their short lives, their gossamer flight provides us with glimpses of an aerodynamics of almost extraterrestrial quality. Here we present the first computer simulations of such aerodynamics.

  13. Real-time aerodynamic heating and surface temperature calculations for hypersonic flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Robert D.; Gong, Leslie

    1990-01-01

    A real-time heating algorithm was derived and installed on the Ames Research Center Dryden Flight Research Facility real-time flight simulator. This program can calculate two- and three-dimensional stagnation point surface heating rates and surface temperatures. The two-dimensional calculations can be made with or without leading-edge sweep. In addition, upper and lower surface heating rates and surface temperatures for flat plates, wedges, and cones can be calculated. Laminar or turbulent heating can be calculated, with boundary-layer transition made a function of free-stream Reynolds number and free-stream Mach number. Real-time heating rates and surface temperatures calculated for a generic hypersonic vehicle are presented and compared with more exact values computed by a batch aeroheating program. As these comparisons show, the heating algorithm used on the flight simulator calculates surface heating rates and temperatures well within the accuracy required to evaluate flight profiles for acceptable heating trajectories.

  14. Longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a subsonic, energy-efficient transport configuration in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Peter F.; Gloss, Blair B.

    1989-01-01

    The Reynolds number, aeroelasticity, boundary layer transition, and nonadiabatic wall temperature effects, and data repeatability was determined in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) for a subsonic, energy efficient transport model. The model was tested over a Mach number range of 0.50 to 0.86 and a Reynolds number range of 1.9 million to approximately 23.0 million (based on mean geometric chord). The majority of the data was taken using cryogenic nitrogen (data at 1.9 million Reynolds number was taken in air). Force and moment, wing pressure, and wing thermocouple data are presented. The data indicate that increasing Reynolds number resulted in greater effective camber of the supercritical wing and horizontal tail, resulting in greater lift and pitching moment coefficients at nearly all angles of attack for M = 0.82. As Reynolds number was increased, untrimmed L/D increased, the angle of attack for maximum L/D decreased, drag creep was reduced significantly, and drag divergence Mach number increased slightly. Data repeatability for both modes of operation of the NTF (air and cryogenic nitrogen) was generally very good, and nonadiabatic wall effects were estimated to be small. Transition-free and transition-fixed configurations had significantly different force and moment data at M = 0.82 for low Reynolds number, and very small differences were noted at high Reynolds numbers.

  15. Aeronautical facilities catalogue. Volume 2: Airbreathing propulsion and flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, F. E.; Freda, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    Volume two of the facilities catalogue deals with Airbreathing Propulsion and Flight Simulation Facilities. Data pertinent to managers and engineers are presented. Each facility is described on a data sheet that shows the facility's technical parameters on a chart and more detailed information in narratives. Facilities judged comparable in testing capability are noted and grouped together. Several comprehensive cross-indexes and charts are included.

  16. A large-eddy simulation study on statistical attributes of urban-like geometries relevant to parameterizing bulk aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Anderson, William

    2015-11-01

    The inherent spatial heterogeneity exhibited by real urban environments complicates a priori estimation of the roughness height needed to parameterize the inertial layer mean streamwise velocity. A large-eddy simulation study of turbulent flow over 3-D random urban-like topographies is conducted to explore the effects of surface geometry on bulk aerodynamic characterization. In a mean sense, we find that statistical attributes including surface height root mean square and skewness can adequately capture the spatial heterogeneities and randomness of real urban geometries. We find, however, that higher-order statistical moments have a negligible affect on aerodynamic drag (i.e. kurtosis may be omitted). The results enable exploration of applicability of some recently-proposed roughness parameterizations that are relevant to complex, urban-like roughness (including the model proposed by Flack and Schultz, 2010: J. Fluids Eng. 132, 041203-1). We evaluate empirical parameters needed in these models for the present urban-like cases. We find that two empirical parameters (relevant to height rms and skewness) can characterize the bulk aerodynamic roughness of topographies with statistical attributes comparable to dense urban environments. This work was supported by the Army Research Office, Atmospheric Sciences Program (PM: Dr. S. Collier) under Grant # W911NF-13-1-0474. Computational resources were provided by the Texas Advanced Computing Center at the University of Texas.

  17. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Tabulated aerodynamic data book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Tabulated aerodynamic data from coannular nozzle performance tests are given for test runs 26 through 37. The data include nozzle thrust coefficient parameters, nozzle discharge coefficients, and static pressure tap measurements.

  18. An Investigation of the Impact of Aerodynamic Model Fidelity on Close-In Combat Effectiveness Prediction in Piloted Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persing, T. Ray; Bellish, Christine A.; Brandon, Jay; Kenney, P. Sean; Carzoo, Susan; Buttrill, Catherine; Guenther, Arlene

    2005-01-01

    Several aircraft airframe modeling approaches are currently being used in the DoD community for acquisition, threat evaluation, training, and other purposes. To date there has been no clear empirical study of the impact of airframe simulation fidelity on piloted real-time aircraft simulation study results, or when use of a particular level of fidelity is indicated. This paper documents a series of piloted simulation studies using three different levels of airframe model fidelity. This study was conducted using the NASA Langley Differential Maneuvering Simulator. Evaluations were conducted with three pilots for scenarios requiring extensive maneuvering of the airplanes during air combat. In many cases, a low-fidelity modified point-mass model may be sufficient to evaluate the combat effectiveness of the aircraft. However, in cases where high angle-of-attack flying qualities and aerodynamic performance are a factor or when precision tracking ability of the aircraft must be represented, use of high-fidelity models is indicated.

  19. Numerical Simulations of High Enthalpy Pulse Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory J.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Axisymmetric flows within shock tubes and expansion tubes are simulated including the effects of finite rate chemistry and both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The simulations demonstrate the usefulness of computational fluid dynamics for characterizing the flows in high enthalpy pulse facilities. The modeling and numerical requirements necessary to simulate these flows accurately are also discussed. Although there is a large body of analysis which explains and quantifies the boundary layer growth between the shock and the interface in a shock tube, there is a need for more detailed solutions. Phenomena such as thermochemical nonequilibrium. or turbulent transition behind the shock are excluded in the assumptions of Mirels' analysis. Additionally there is inadequate capability to predict the influence of the boundary layer on the expanded gas behind the interface. Quantifying the gas in this region is particularly important in expansion tubes because it is the location of the test gas. Unsteady simulations of the viscous flow in shock tubes are computationally expensive because they must follow features such as a shock wave over the length of the facility and simultaneously resolve the small length scales within the boundary layer. As a result, efficient numerical algorithms are required. The numerical approach of the present work is to solve the axisymmetric gas dynamic equations using an finite-volume formulation where the inviscid fluxes are computed with a upwind TVD scheme. Multiple species equations are included in the formulation so that finite-rate chemistry can be modeled. The simulations cluster grid points at the shock and interface and translate this clustered grid with these features to minimize numerical errors. The solutions are advanced at a CFL number of less than one based on the inviscid gas dynamics. To avoid limitations on the time step due to the viscous terms, these terms are treated implicitly. This requires a block tri

  20. A longitudinal aerodynamic data repeatability study for a commercial transport model test in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahls, R. A.; Adcock, J. B.; Witkowski, D. P.; Wright, F. L.

    1995-01-01

    A high Reynolds number investigation of a commercial transport model was conducted in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at Langley Research Center. This investigation was part of a cooperative effort to test a 0.03-scale model of a Boeing 767 airplane in the NTF over a Mach number range of 0.70 to 0.86 and a Reynolds number range of 2.38 to 40.0 x 10(exp 6) based on the mean aerodynamic chord. One of several specific objectives of the current investigation was to evaluate the level of data repeatability attainable in the NTF. Data repeatability studies were performed at a Mach number of 0.80 with Reynolds numbers of 2.38, 4.45, and 40.0 x 10(exp 6) and also at a Mach number of 0.70 with a Reynolds number of 40.0 x 10(exp 6). Many test procedures and data corrections are addressed in this report, but the data presented do not include corrections for wall interference, model support interference, or model aeroelastic effects. Application of corrections for these three effects would not affect the results of this study because the corrections are systematic in nature and are more appropriately classified as sources of bias error. The repeatability of the longitudinal stability-axis force and moment data has been accessed. Coefficients of lift, drag, and pitching moment are shown to repeat well within the pretest goals of plus or minus 0.005, plus or minus 0.0001, and plus or minus 0.001, respectively, at a 95-percent confidence level over both short- and near-term periods.

  1. Operational considerations for aerodynamic testing of large-scale wing sections in a simulated natural rain environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Bezos, Gaudy M.; Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.; Melson, W. Edward, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    One of the necessary areas of consideration for outdoor heavy rain testing is the effect of wind on both the simulated rain field and the quality and repeatability of the aerodynamic data. This paper discusses the data acquisition and subsequent reduction to nondimensional coefficients of lift and drag, with the appropriate correction for wind and rain field. Sample force data showing these effects are presented, along with estimates for accuracy and repeatability. The capability to produce high-quality data for rain drop size distribution using photographic and computerized image processing techniques was developed. Sample photographs depicting rain drop size are shown.

  2. An experimental study of the aerodynamics of a NACA 0012 airfoil with a simulated glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, M. B.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in the Ohio State University subsonic wind tunnel to measure the detailed aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil with a simulated glaze ice accretion. A NACA 0012 model with interchangeable leading edges and pressure taps every one percent chord was used. Surface pressure and wake data were taken on the airfoil clean, with forced transition and with a simulated glaze ice shape. Lift and drag penalties due to the ice shape were found and the surface pressure clearly showed that large separation bubbles were present. Both total pressure and split-film probes were used to measure velocity profiles, both for the clean model and for the model with a simulated ice accretion. A large region of flow separation was seen in the velocity profiles and was correlated to the pressure measurements. Clean airfoil data were found to compare well to existing airfoil analysis methods.

  3. An Euler aerodynamic method for leading-edge vortex flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, P.; Long, L. N.

    1986-01-01

    The current capabilities and the future plans for a three dimensional Euler Aerodynamic Method are described. The basic solution algorithm is based on the finite volume, Runge-Kutta pseudo-time-stepping scheme of FLO-57. Several modifications to improve accuracy and computational efficiency were incorporated and others are being investigated. The computer code is used to analyze a cropped delta wing at 0.6 Mach number and an arrow wing at 0.85 Mach number. Computed aerodynamic parameters are compared with experimental data. In all cases, the configuration is impulsively started and no Kutta condition is applied at sharp edges. The results indicate that with additional development and validation, the present method will be a useful tool for engineering analysis of high speed aircraft.

  4. Survey of missile simulation and flight mechanics facilities in NATO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, W. M.

    1983-05-01

    This report presents the results of a Flight Mechanics Panel (FMP) sponsored survey of twenty-four (24) simulation and flight mechanics facilities in six NATO community nations: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States. The survey included government and contractor facilities and was obtained by a combination of a questionnaire mailed to each facility and a follow-up on-site visit and interview with facility managers and operational personnel.

  5. An experimental study of the aerodynamics of a NACA0012 airfoil with a simulated glaze ice accretion, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.

    1993-01-01

    This is the second volume of a report documenting the effect of simulated ice accretion on the aerodynamic performance of a NACA 0012 airfoil. Both an experimentally measured and a computer generated ice shape are studied. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the measurements, not an analysis of the data. Surface pressure, integrated lift and pitching moment data are presented as well as drag from a wake survey. A split hot film probe was used to document the flow-field about the airfoil with simulated ice. Data in the separation bubbles, reattached boundary layer and wake are presented. Both tabulated and graphical data are presented in the paper. The data are also available on computer disk for easy access.

  6. Space simulation in the Neutral Buoyancy Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, Bernadette; Lomax, W. Curtis; Smith, Douglas D.

    1993-01-01

    Various methods have been to simulate reduced gravity environments for space systems research and development. Neutral buoyancy has been the most universally used simulation of zero-g. This paper describes the facilities, personnel and experimental work that are associated with the Neutral Buoyancy Test Facility (NBTF) at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). This facility provides a unique underwater environment for the researcher to simulate reduced gravity activities and evaluate the performances of space-related equipment. The NBTF's small size gives it several advantages over larger water facilities. Second, the facility is used for research purposes only, eliminating any scheduling conflicts with astronaut training. Lastly, the small volume of water allows the researcher to more easily vary the water temperature. This feature is ideal for investigations of astronaut thermal comfort and regulation. Recent investigations have used the NBTF for reduced gravity simulation of locomotion and load-carrying, among other interesting research endeavors.

  7. Transport delays associated with NASA Langley Flight Simulation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. Marshall; Chung, Victoria I.; Martinez, Debbie

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the transport delays associated with flight simulation programs currently operating at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Formulas are presented for calculating a rough estimate of the transport delay for a particular simulation. Various simulation programs that used the Flight Simulation Facility at LaRC, during the period of October 1993 to March 1994, were tested to determine the transport delays associated with the simulation program and any associated hardware. Several simulators were tested, including the Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS), the Visual Motion Simulator (VMS), and the Transport System Research Vehicle (TSRV).

  8. Hardware-in-the-loop missile simulation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, Hirofumi; Obana, Kazumitu; Kamiya, Masanori

    1998-07-01

    A Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation facility has been successfully contributing to the development and evaluation of missiles at the 3rd Research Center, Technical Research & Development Institute, Japan Defense Agency. This facility has two main characteristics. First, it has ability to generate both various RF target and background echoes in several frequency bands. Second, it can be used for the HWIL simulation tests of missiles which have RF/IR dual mode seekers. After the outline of this facility is presented, a technique to overcome the line-of-sight (LOS) angle limitation is proposed, because LOS angle limitation is inevitable in these HWIL simulation facilities. Moreover, a simulation method for the dual mode seeker missile is shown by using this proposed simulation technique.

  9. Investigation on aerodynamic characteristics of baseline-II E-2 blended wing-body aircraft with canard via computational simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Rizal E. M.; Ali, Zurriati; Kuntjoro, Wahyu; Wisnoe, Wirachman

    2012-06-01

    Previous wind tunnel test has proven the improved aerodynamic charasteristics of Baseline-II E-2 Blended Wing-Body (BWB) aircraft studied in Universiti Teknologi Mara. The E-2 is a version of Baseline-II BWB with modified outer wing and larger canard, solely-designed to gain favourable longitudinal static stability during flight. This paper highlights some results from current investigation on the said aircraft via computational fluid dynamics simulation as a mean to validate the wind tunnel test results. The simulation is conducted based on standard one-equation turbulence, Spalart-Allmaras model with polyhedral mesh. The ambience of the flight simulation is made based on similar ambience of wind tunnel test. The simulation shows lift, drag and moment results to be near the values found in wind tunnel test but only within angles of attack where the lift change is linear. Beyond the linear region, clear differences between computational simulation and wind tunnel test results are observed. It is recommended that different type of mathematical model be used to simulate flight conditions beyond linear lift region.

  10. GE underwater test facility studies in zero G simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The underwater test facility (UTF) is described as an indoor controlled environment test facility designed specifically for zero G simulation, hydrospace manned and unmanned equipment development, and personnel training for both space and underwater exploration. Programs conducted in the UTF include: human engineering criteria for maintenance and repairs of space stations, astronaut performance, helmet distortion, underwater telemetry, and blood transfusion.

  11. An Experimental Study of the Aerodynamics of a Swept and Unswept Semispan Wing with a Simulated Glaze Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Two semispan wings, one with a rectangular planform and one with 30 degrees of leading edge sweep were tested. Both had a NACA 0012 airfoil section, and both were tested clean and with simulated glaze ice shapes on their leading edges. Several surface roughness were tested. Each model geometry is documented and each surface roughness is explained. Aerodynamic performance of the wing in the form of sectional lift and integrated three-dimensional lift is documented through pressure measurements obtained from rows of surface pressure taps placed at five span locations on the wing. For the rectangular wing, sectional drag near the midspan is obtained from wake total pressure profiles. The data is presented in tabular and graphical form and is also available on computer disk.

  12. Model aerodynamic test results for a refined actuated inlet ejector nozzle at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Wind tunnel model tests were conducted to demonstrate the aerodynamic performance improvements of a refined actuated inlet ejector nozzle. Models of approximately one-tenth scale were configured to simulate nozzle operation at takeoff, subsonic cruise, transonic cruise and supersonic cruise. Variations of model components provided a performance evaluation of ejector inlet and exit area, forebody boattail angle and ejector inlet operation in the open and closed mode. Approximately 700 data points were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, 1.2, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle flow conditions. Results show that relative to two ejector nozzles previously tested performance was improved significantly at takeoff and subsonic cruise performance, a C sub f of 0.982, was attained equal to the high performance of the previous tests. The established advanced supersonic transport propulsion study performance goals were met or closely approached at takeoff and supersonic cruise.

  13. Development of superconductor magnetic suspension and balance prototype facility for studying the feasibility of applying this technique to large scale aerodynamic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, R. N.; Humphris, R. R.; Henderson, K. C.

    1975-01-01

    The unique design and operational characteristics of a prototype magnetic suspension and balance facility which utilizes superconductor technology are described and discussed from the point of view of scalability to large sizes. The successful experimental demonstration of the feasibility of this new magnetic suspension concept of the University of Virginia, together with the success of the cryogenic wind-tunnel concept developed at Langley Research Center, appear to have finally opened the way to clean-tunnel, high-Re aerodynamic testing. Results of calculations corresponding to a two-step design extrapolation from the observed performance of the prototype magnetic suspension system to a system compatible with the projected cryogenic transonic research tunnel are presented to give an order-of-magnitude estimate of expected performance characteristics. Research areas where progress should lead to improved design and performance of large facilities are discussed.

  14. Missile aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N.

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental aerodynamics of slender bodies is examined in the reprint edition of an introductory textbook originally published in 1960. Chapters are devoted to the formulas commonly used in missile aerodynamics; slender-body theory at supersonic and subsonic speeds; vortices in viscid and inviscid flow; wing-body interference; downwash, sidewash, and the wake; wing-tail interference; aerodynamic controls; pressure foredrag, base drag, and skin friction; and stability derivatives. Diagrams, graphs, tables of terms and formulas are provided.

  15. SmaggIce 2D Version 1.8: Software Toolkit Developed for Aerodynamic Simulation Over Iced Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung K.; Vickerman, Mary B.

    2005-01-01

    SmaggIce 2D version 1.8 is a software toolkit developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center that consists of tools for modeling the geometry of and generating the grids for clean and iced airfoils. Plans call for the completed SmaggIce 2D version 2.0 to streamline the entire aerodynamic simulation process--the characterization and modeling of ice shapes, grid generation, and flow simulation--and to be closely coupled with the public-domain application flow solver, WIND. Grid generated using version 1.8, however, can be used by other flow solvers. SmaggIce 2D will help researchers and engineers study the effects of ice accretion on airfoil performance, which is difficult to do with existing software tools because of complex ice shapes. Using SmaggIce 2D, when fully developed, to simulate flow over an iced airfoil will help to reduce the cost of performing flight and wind-tunnel tests for certifying aircraft in natural and simulated icing conditions.

  16. Piloted Simulation Study of the Effects of High-Lift Aerodynamics on the Takeoff Noise of a Representative High-Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Riley, Donald R.; Brandon, Jay M.; Person, Lee H., Jr.; Glaab, Patricia C.

    1999-01-01

    As part of an effort between NASA and private industry to reduce airport-community noise for high-speed civil transport (HSCT) concepts, a piloted simulation study was initiated for the purpose of predicting the noise reduction benefits that could result from improved low-speed high-lift aerodynamic performance for a typical HSCT configuration during takeoff and initial climb. Flight profile and engine information from the piloted simulation were coupled with the NASA Langley Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) to estimate jet engine noise and to propagate the resulting source noise to ground observer stations. A baseline aircraft configuration, which also incorporated different levels of projected improvements in low-speed high-lift aerodynamic performance, was simulated to investigate effects of increased lift and lift-to-drag ratio on takeoff noise levels. Simulated takeoff flights were performed with the pilots following a specified procedure in which either a single thrust cutback was performed at selected altitudes ranging from 400 to 2000 ft, or a multiple-cutback procedure was performed where thrust was reduced by a two-step process. Results show that improved low-speed high-lift aerodynamic performance provides at least a 4 to 6 dB reduction in effective perceived noise level at the FAA downrange flyover measurement station for either cutback procedure. However, improved low-speed high-lift aerodynamic performance reduced maximum sideline noise levels only when using the multiple-cutback procedures.

  17. An inventory of aeronautical ground research facilities. Volume 4: Engineering flight simulation facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirrello, C. J.; Hardin, R. D.; Capelluro, L. P.; Harrison, W. D.

    1971-01-01

    The general purpose capabilities of government and industry in the area of real time engineering flight simulation are discussed. The information covers computer equipment, visual systems, crew stations, and motion systems, along with brief statements of facility capabilities. Facility construction and typical operational costs are included where available. The facilities provide for economical and safe solutions to vehicle design, performance, control, and flying qualities problems of manned and unmanned flight systems.

  18. The space simulation facilities at IAL SPACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henrist, M.; Cucchiaro, A.; Domken, I.; Macau, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal vacuum facilities of IAL SPACE were tailored for testing of the ESA payloads. They were progressively upgraded for cryogenic payloads including 4 K (liquid helium temperature) experiments. A detailed review of the three vacuum chambers, ranging from 1.5 to 5 m diameter, is presented including the corresponding capabilities in the vacuum, thermal, and optical fields. The various aspects of cleanliness, product assurance, and quality control are also presented.

  19. The Effect of Bypass Nozzle Exit Area on Fan Aerodynamic Performance and Noise in a Model Turbofan Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Podboy, Gary, G.; Woodward, Richard P.; Jeracki, Robert, J.

    2013-01-01

    The design of effective new technologies to reduce aircraft propulsion noise is dependent on identifying and understanding the noise sources and noise generation mechanisms in the modern turbofan engine, as well as determining their contribution to the overall aircraft noise signature. Therefore, a comprehensive aeroacoustic wind tunnel test program was conducted called the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test as part of the NASA Quiet Aircraft Technology program. The test was performed in the anechoic NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel using a 1/5 scale model turbofan simulator which represented a current generation, medium pressure ratio, high bypass turbofan aircraft engine. The investigation focused on simulating in model scale only the bypass section of the turbofan engine. The test objectives were to: identify the noise sources within the model and determine their noise level; investigate several component design technologies by determining their impact on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the fan stage; and conduct detailed flow diagnostics within the fan flow field to characterize the physics of the noise generation mechanisms in a turbofan model. This report discusses results obtained for one aspect of the Source Diagnostic Test that investigated the effect of the bypass or fan nozzle exit area on the bypass stage aerodynamic performance, specifically the fan and outlet guide vanes or stators, as well as the farfield acoustic noise level. The aerodynamic performance, farfield acoustics, and Laser Doppler Velocimeter flow diagnostic results are presented for the fan and four different fixed-area bypass nozzle configurations. The nozzles simulated fixed engine operating lines and encompassed the fan stage operating envelope from near stall to cruise. One nozzle was selected as a baseline reference, representing the nozzle area which would achieve the design point operating conditions and fan stage performance. The total area change from

  20. Simulation at Dryden Flight Research Facility from 1957 to 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, John P.; Schilling, Lawrence J.; Wagner, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Facility has been a leader in developing simulation as an integral part of flight test research. The history of that effort is reviewed, starting in 1957 and continuing to the present time. The contributions of the major program activities conducted at Dryden during this 25-year period to the development of a simulation philosophy and capability is explained.

  1. The Lewis Research Center geomagnetic substorm simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkopec, F. D.; Stevens, N. J.; Sturman, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A simulation facility was established to determine the response of typical spacecraft materials to the geomagnetic substorm environment and to evaluate instrumentation that will be used to monitor spacecraft system response to this environment. Space environment conditions simulated include the thermal-vacuum conditions of space, solar simulation, geomagnetic substorm electron fluxes and energies, and the low energy plasma environment. Measurements for spacecraft material tests include sample currents, sample surface potentials, and the cumulative number of discharges. Discharge transients are measured by means of current probes and oscilloscopes and are verified by a photomultiplier. Details of this facility and typical operating procedures are presented.

  2. Numerical Simulations of the Steady and Unsteady Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Circulation Control Wing Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yi; Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Englar, Robert J.; Ahuja, Krishan K.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a Circulation Control Wing (CCW) airfoil have been numerically investigated, and comparisons with experimental data have been made. The configuration chosen was a supercritical airfoil with a 30 degree dual-radius CCW flap. Steady and pulsed jet calculations were performed. It was found that the use of steady jets, even at very small mass flow rates, yielded a lift coefficient that is comparable or superior to conventional high-lift systems. The attached flow over the flap also gave rise to lower drag coefficients, and high L/D ratios. Pulsed jets with a 50% duty cycle were also studied. It was found that they were effective in generating lift at lower reduced mass flow rates compared to a steady jet, provided the pulse frequency was sufficiently high. This benefit was attributable to the fact that the momentum coefficient of the pulsed jet, during the portions of the cycle when the jet was on, was typically twice as much as that of a steady jet.

  3. Laboratory Facility for Simulating Solar Wind Sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funaki, Ikkoh; Ueno, Kazuma; Oshio, Yuya; Ayabe, Tomohiro; Horisawa, Hideyuki; Yamakawa, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic sail (MagSail) is a deep space propulsion system, in which an artificial magnetic cavity captures the energy of the solar wind to propel a spacecraft in the direction leaving the sun. For a scale-model experiment of the plasma flow of MagSail, we employed a magnetoplasmadynamic arcjet as a solar wind simulator. It is observed that a plasma flow from the solar wind simulator reaches a quasi-steady state of about 0.8 ms duration after a transient phase when initiating the discharge. During this initial phase of the discharge, a blast-wave was observed to develop radially in a vacuum chamber. When a solenoidal coil (MagSail scale model) is immersed into the quasi-steady flow where the velocity is 45 km/s, and the number density is 1019 m-3, a bow shock as well as a magnetic cavity were formed in front of the coil. As a result of the interaction between the plasma flow and the magnetic cavity, the momentum of the simulated solar wind is decreased, and it is found from the thrust measurement that the solar wind momentum is transferred to the coil simulating MagSail.

  4. Laboratory Facility for Simulating Solar Wind Sails

    SciTech Connect

    Funaki, Ikkoh; Ayabe, Tomohiro; Horisawa, Hideyuki; Yamakawa, Hiroshi

    2008-12-31

    Magnetic sail (MagSail) is a deep space propulsion system, in which an artificial magnetic cavity captures the energy of the solar wind to propel a spacecraft in the direction leaving the sun. For a scale-model experiment of the plasma flow of MagSail, we employed a magnetoplasmadynamic arcjet as a solar wind simulator. It is observed that a plasma flow from the solar wind simulator reaches a quasi-steady state of about 0.8 ms duration after a transient phase when initiating the discharge. During this initial phase of the discharge, a blast-wave was observed to develop radially in a vacuum chamber. When a solenoidal coil (MagSail scale model) is immersed into the quasi-steady flow where the velocity is 45 km/s, and the number density is 10{sup 19} m-3, a bow shock as well as a magnetic cavity were formed in front of the coil. As a result of the interaction between the plasma flow and the magnetic cavity, the momentum of the simulated solar wind is decreased, and it is found from the thrust measurement that the solar wind momentum is transferred to the coil simulating MagSail.

  5. Start-to-end simulation for the RISP test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jang, Hyojae; Hong, In-Seok; Park, Bum-Sik

    2015-11-01

    The RAON accelerator of Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) has been developed to accelerate heavy ion beams generated by superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECR-IS). The beams produced by the ECR-IS are transported through Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section to Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) section, and low energy superconducting linac (SCL1). Prior to the construction of the RAON accelerator, the components of the LEBT section, the RFQ, the MEBT section, and the part of the SCL1 need to put to the test with the beams generated by the ECR-IS. For that reason, a test facility is under development and will be installed within a few year. Also, in order to build the test facility more efficiently within its restrictive space requirements, we designed the lattice of the test facility newly and then, with this newly designed lattice, in order to demonstrate that the test facility performs well, the start-to-end beam simulation needs to be carried out. In this paper, we will describe the new lattice design of the test facility and the result of the start-to-end beam simulation for the test facility. In addition to the simulation for the single charge state beam, the transportation and acceleration of the three charge state beams will be also examined in the test facility.

  6. Advanced altitude simulation facility P8 - current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauly, C.; Suslov, D.; Haidn, O. J.

    2011-10-01

    The paper reports the current status of a DLR Lampoldshausen project towards the design, erection, and operation of an advanced altitude simulation facility at the European R&T Facility P8. The system will allow for testing subscale thrust chamber assemblies (TCAs) including surrounding supersonic flow around the nozzle. This facility will allow for investigation into the specific features of altitude simulation facilities but also on the interaction of nozzle and its exhaust plume and the surrounding coflow for subsonic, transitional, and low supersonic coflow conditions. The design bases entirely on the broad experience on design and operation of various altitude simulation facilities such as the satellite engine bench P1.0, the cryogenic and storable upper-stage engine facilities P4.1 and P4.2, sophisticated engineering design tools and continuous numerical effort. Knowledge about nozzle and thrust chamber design and operation bases on broad investigations carried out at the cold-flow facility P6.2 and the hot-fire M3 and P8 test benches.

  7. Physics and detector simulation facility Type O workstation specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrand, G.; Cormell, L.R.; Hahn, R.; Jacobson, D.; Johnstad, H.; Leibold, P.; Marquez, M.; Ramsey, B.; Roberts, L.; Scipioni, B.; Yost, G.P.

    1990-11-01

    This document specifies the requirements for the front-end network of workstations of a distributed computing facility. This facility will be needed to perform the physics and detector simulations for the design of Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) detectors, and other computations in support of physics and detector needs. A detailed description of the computer simulation facility is given in the overall system specification document. This document provides revised subsystem specifications for the network of monitor-less Type 0 workstations. The requirements specified in this document supersede the requirements given. In Section 2 a brief functional description of the facility and its use are provided. The list of detailed specifications (vendor requirements) is given in Section 3 and the qualifying requirements (benchmarks) are described in Section 4.

  8. Optimization of gas path aerodynamics for PK-39 boiler of power generating unit No. 4 of Troitskaya SDPP using numerical simulation of gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, V. B.; Grigorev, I. V.; Fomenko, M. V.; Kaverin, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Power generating unit no. 4 of Troitskaya State District Power Plant (SDPP) is incapable of operating with a nominal load of 278 MW because of high aerodynamic drag of the gas path. At present, the maximum load of the two-boiler single-turbine unit is 210 MW practically without a possibility of adjustment. The results of numerical simulation of the gas flow for the existing gas path from the electrostatic precipitator (EP) to the smoke exhausts (SEs) and two flue designs proposed for renovation of this section are presented. The results of simulation show that the existing flue section has high aerodynamic drag, which is explained by poor, as regards aerodynamics, design. The local loss coefficient, in terms of the dynamic pressure in the sucker pocket of the smoke exhaust is equal to 4.57. The local aerodynamic loss coefficient after renovation at the considered section according to the first version would make 1.48, and according to the second version 1.325, which would reduce losses at this section by more than a factor of three, and ensure the power unit operation with the rated load.

  9. Telerobotics: A simulation facility for university research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, L.; Kim, W.; Tendick, F.; Tyler, M.; Hannaford, B.; Barakat, W.; Bergengruen, O.; Braddi, L.; Eisenberg, J.; Ellis, S.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental telerobotics (TR) simulation suitable for studying human operator (H.O.) performance is described. Simple manipulator pick-and-place and tracking tasks allowed quantitative comparison of a number of calligraphic display viewing conditions. A number of control modes could be compared in this TR simulation, including displacement, rate and acceleratory control using position and force joysticks. A homeomorphic controller turned out to be no better than joysticks; the adaptive properties of the H.O. can apparently permit quite good control over a variety of controller configurations and control modes. Training by optimal control example seemed helpful in preliminary experiments. An introduced communication delay was found to produce decrease in performance. In considerable part, this difficulty could be compensated for by preview control information. That neurological control of normal human movement contains a data period of 0.2 second may relate to this robustness of H.O. control to delay. The Ames-Berkeley enhanced perspective display was utilized in conjunction with an experimental helmet mounted display system (HMD) that provided stereoscopic enhanced views.

  10. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF). Volume 1: Stage 1 facility definition studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, Nahum

    1993-01-01

    The Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) is a facility-type payload to be included in the Space Station Freedom (SSF). The GGSF is a multidisciplinary facility that will accommodate several classes of experiments, including exobiology, planetary science, atmospheric science, and astrophysics. The physical mechanisms envisioned to be investigated include crystal growth, aggregation, nucleation, coagulation, condensation, collisions, fractal growth, cycles of freezing and evaporation, scavenging, longevity of bacteria, and more. TRW performed a Phase A study that included analyses of the science and technical (S&T) requirements, the development of facility functional requirements, and a conceptual design of the facility. The work that was performed under Stage 1 of the Phase A study and the results to date are summarized. In this stage, facility definition studies were conducted in sufficient detail to establish the technical feasibility of the candidate strawman experiments. The studies identified technical difficulties, identified required facility subsystems, surveyed existing technology studies and established preliminary facility weight, volume, power consumption, data systems, interface definition, and crew time requirements. The results of this study served as the basis for Stage 2 of the Phase A study in which a conceptual design and a reference design were performed. The results also served as a basis for a related study for a Gas-Grain Simulation Experiment Module (GGSEM), which is an apparatus intended to perform a subset of the GGSF experiments on board a low-Earth-orbiting platform.

  11. Development and performance of a large-scale, transonic turbine blade cascade facility for aerodynamic studies of merging coolant-mainstream flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sayeh, Amjad Isaaf

    1998-11-01

    A new, large scale, linear cascade facility of turbine blades has been developed for the experimental exploration of the aerodynamic aspects of film cooling technology. Primary interest is in the mixing of the ejected coolant with the mainstream, at both subsonic and supersonic mainstream Mach numbers at the cascade exit. In order to achieve a spatial resolution adequate for the exploration of details on the scale of the coolant ejection holes, the cascade dimensions were maximized, within the limitations of the air supply system. The cascade contains four blades (three passages) with 14.05 cm axial chord, 17.56 cm span and a design total turning angle of 130.6 degrees. Exit Mach numbers range from 0.6 to 1.5 and Reynolds numbers from 0.5 to 1.5 million. The air supply system capacity allows run times up to five minutes at maximum flow rates. A coolant supply system has been built to deliver mixtures of SFsb6 and air to simulate coolant/mainstream density ratios up to 2. The cascade contains several novel features. A full-perimeter bleed slot upstream of the blades is used to remove the approach boundary layer from all four walls, to improve the degree of two-dimensionality. The exit flow is bounded by two adjustable tailboards that are hinged at the trailing edges and actuated to set the exit flow direction according to the imposed pressure ratio. The boards are perforated and subjected to mass removal near the blades, to minimize the undesirable reflection of shocks and expansion waves. A probe actuator is incorporated that allows continuous positioning of probes in the exhaust stream, in both the streamwise and pitchwise directions. Diagnostic methods include extensive surface pressure taps on the approach and exhaust ducts and on the blade surfaces. The large size permitted as many as 19 taps on the trailing edge itself. Shadowgraph and schlieren are available. A three-prong wake probe has been constructed to simultaneously measure total and static pressures

  12. New Aerodynamics Simulations Provide Better Understanding of Wind Plant Underperformance and Loading (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develop a high-fidelity large-eddy simulation model designed to predict the performance of large wind plants with a higher degree of accuracy than current models.

  13. Aeroacoustic Simulation of a Nose Landing Gear in an Open Jet Facility Using FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Lockhard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a partially-dressed, cavity-closed nose landing gear configuration that was tested in NASA Langley s closed-wall Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and in the University of Florida s open-jet acoustic facility known as UFAFF. The unstructured-grid flow solver, FUN3D, developed at NASA Langley Research center is used to compute the unsteady flow field for this configuration. A hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large eddy simulation (RANS/LES) turbulence model is used for these computations. Time-averaged and instantaneous solutions compare favorably with the measured data. Unsteady flowfield data obtained from the FUN3D code are used as input to a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings noise propagation code to compute the sound pressure levels at microphones placed in the farfield. Significant improvement in predicted noise levels is obtained when the flowfield data from the open jet UFAFF simulations is used as compared to the case using flowfield data from the closed-wall BART configuration.

  14. Visual analysis of fluid dynamics at NASA's numerical aerodynamic simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Velvin R.

    1991-01-01

    A study aimed at describing and illustrating visualization tools used in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and indicating how these tools are likely to change by showing a projected resolution of the human computer interface is presented. The following are outlined using a graphically based test format: the revolution of human computer environments for CFD research; comparison of current environments; current environments with the ideal; predictions for the future CFD environments; what can be done to accelerate the improvements. The following comments are given: when acquiring visualization tools, potential rapid changes must be considered; environmental changes over the next ten years due to human computer interface cannot be fathomed; data flow packages such as AVS, apE, Explorer and Data Explorer are easy to learn and use for small problems, excellent for prototyping, but not so efficient for large problems; the approximation techniques used in visualization software must be appropriate for the data; it has become more cost effective to move jobs that fit on workstations and run only memory intensive jobs on the supercomputer; use of three dimensional skills will be maximized when the three dimensional environment is built in from the start.

  15. Maglev Facility for Simulating Variable Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuanming; Strayer, Donald M.; Israelsson, Ulf E.

    2010-01-01

    An improved magnetic levitation apparatus ("Maglev Facility") has been built for use in experiments in which there are requirements to impose variable gravity (including zero gravity) in order to assess the effects of gravity or the absence thereof on physical and physiological processes. The apparatus is expected to be especially useful for experiments on the effects of gravity on convection, boiling, and heat transfer in fluids and for experiments on mice to gain understanding of bone loss induced in human astronauts by prolonged exposure to reduced gravity in space flight. The maglev principle employed by the apparatus is well established. Diamagnetic cryogenic fluids such as liquid helium have been magnetically levitated for studying their phase transitions and critical behaviors. Biological entities consist mostly of diamagnetic molecules (e.g., water molecules) and thus can be levitated by use of sufficiently strong magnetic fields having sufficiently strong vertical gradients. The heart of the present maglev apparatus is a vertically oriented superconducting solenoid electromagnet (see figure) that generates a static magnetic field of about 16 T with a vertical gradient sufficient for levitation of water in normal Earth gravity. The electromagnet is enclosed in a Dewar flask having a volume of 100 L that contains liquid helium to maintain superconductivity. The Dewar flask features a 66-mm-diameter warm bore, lying within the bore of the magnet, wherein experiments can be performed at room temperature. The warm bore is accessible from its top and bottom ends. The superconducting electromagnet is run in the persistent mode, in which the supercurrent and the magnetic field can be maintained for weeks with little decay, making this apparatus extremely cost and energy efficient to operate. In addition to water, this apparatus can levitate several common fluids: liquid hydrogen, liquid oxygen, methane, ammonia, sodium, and lithium, all of which are useful

  16. Geometry Modeling and Grid Generation for Computational Aerodynamic Simulations Around Iced Airfoils and Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung K.; Slater, John W.; Vickerman, Mary B.; VanZante, Judith F.; Wadel, Mary F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Issues associated with analysis of 'icing effects' on airfoil and wing performances are discussed, along with accomplishments and efforts to overcome difficulties with ice. Because of infinite variations of ice shapes and their high degree of complexity, computational 'icing effects' studies using available software tools must address many difficulties in geometry acquisition and modeling, grid generation, and flow simulation. The value of each technology component needs to be weighed from the perspective of the entire analysis process, from geometry to flow simulation. Even though CFD codes are yet to be validated for flows over iced airfoils and wings, numerical simulation, when considered together with wind tunnel tests, can provide valuable insights into 'icing effects' and advance our understanding of the relationship between ice characteristics and their effects on performance degradation.

  17. Using Mesoscale Weather Model Output as Boundary Conditions for Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulations and Wind-Plant Aerodynamic Simulations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Michalakes, J.; Vanderwende, B.; Lee, S.; Sprague, M. A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2013-10-01

    Wind plant aerodynamics are directly affected by the microscale weather, which is directly influenced by the mesoscale weather. Microscale weather refers to processes that occur within the atmospheric boundary layer with the largest scales being a few hundred meters to a few kilometers depending on the atmospheric stability of the boundary layer. Mesoscale weather refers to large weather patterns, such as weather fronts, with the largest scales being hundreds of kilometers wide. Sometimes microscale simulations that capture mesoscale-driven variations (changes in wind speed and direction over time or across the spatial extent of a wind plant) are important in wind plant analysis. In this paper, we present our preliminary work in coupling a mesoscale weather model with a microscale atmospheric large-eddy simulation model. The coupling is one-way beginning with the weather model and ending with a computational fluid dynamics solver using the weather model in coarse large-eddy simulation mode as an intermediary. We simulate one hour of daytime moderately convective microscale development driven by the mesoscale data, which are applied as initial and boundary conditions to the microscale domain, at a site in Iowa. We analyze the time and distance necessary for the smallest resolvable microscales to develop.

  18. Planetary and Space Simulation Facilities PSI at DLR for Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbow, E.; Rettberg, P.; Panitz, C.; Reitz, G.

    2008-09-01

    Ground based experiments, conducted in the controlled planetary and space environment simulation facilities PSI at DLR, are used to investigate astrobiological questions and to complement the corresponding experiments in LEO, for example on free flying satellites or on space exposure platforms on the ISS. In-orbit exposure facilities can only accommodate a limited number of experiments for exposure to space parameters like high vacuum, intense radiation of galactic and solar origin and microgravity, sometimes also technically adapted to simulate extraterrestrial planetary conditions like those on Mars. Ground based experiments in carefully equipped and monitored simulation facilities allow the investigation of the effects of simulated single environmental parameters and selected combinations on a much wider variety of samples. In PSI at DLR, international science consortia performed astrobiological investigations and space experiment preparations, exposing organic compounds and a wide range of microorganisms, reaching from bacterial spores to complex microbial communities, lichens and even animals like tardigrades to simulated planetary or space environment parameters in pursuit of exobiological questions on the resistance to extreme environments and the origin and distribution of life. The Planetary and Space Simulation Facilities PSI of the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at DLR in Köln, Germany, providing high vacuum of controlled residual composition, ionizing radiation of a X-ray tube, polychromatic UV radiation in the range of 170-400 nm, VIS and IR or individual monochromatic UV wavelengths, and temperature regulation from -20°C to +80°C at the sample size individually or in selected combinations in 9 modular facilities of varying sizes are presented with selected experiments performed within.

  19. Experiments and simulations of MEMS thermal sensors for wall shear-stress measurements in aerodynamic control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiao; Jiang, Fukang; Wang, Xuan-Qi; Xu, Yong; Han, Zhigang; Tai, Yu-Chong; Lew, James; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2004-12-01

    MEMS thermal shear-stress sensors exploit heat-transfer effects to measure the shear stress exerted by an air flow on its solid boundary, and have promising applications in aerodynamic control. Classical theory for conventional, macroscale thermal shear-stress sensors states that the rate of heat removed by the flow from the sensor is proportional to the 1/3-power of the shear stress. However, we have observed that this theory is inconsistent with experimental data from MEMS sensors. This paper seeks to develop an understanding of MEMS thermal shear-stress sensors through a study including both experimental and theoretical investigations. We first obtain experimental data that confirm the inadequacy of the classical theory by wind-tunnel testing of prototype MEMS shear-stress sensors with different dimensions and materials. A theoretical analysis is performed to identify that this inadequacy is due to the lack of a thin thermal boundary layer in the fluid flow at the sensor surface, and then a two-dimensional MEMS shear-stress sensor theory is presented. This theory incorporates important heat-transfer effects that are ignored by the classical theory, and consistently explains the experimental data obtained from prototype MEMS sensors. Moreover, the prototype MEMS sensors are studied with three-dimensional simulations, yielding results that quantitatively agree with experimental data. This work demonstrates that classical assumptions made for conventional thermal devices should be carefully examined for miniature MEMS devices.

  20. Navier-Stokes Aerodynamic Simulation of the V-22 Osprey on the Intel Paragon MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadyak, Joseph; Shrewsbury, George E.; Narramore, Jim C.; Montry, Gary; Holst, Terry; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The paper will describe the Development of a general three-dimensional multiple grid zone Navier-Stokes flowfield simulation program (ENS3D-MPP) designed for efficient execution on the Intel Paragon Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) supercomputer, and the subsequent application of this method to the prediction of the viscous flowfield about the V-22 Osprey tiltrotor vehicle. The flowfield simulation code solves the thin Layer or full Navier-Stoke's equation - for viscous flow modeling, or the Euler equations for inviscid flow modeling on a structured multi-zone mesh. In the present paper only viscous simulations will be shown. The governing difference equations are solved using a time marching implicit approximate factorization method with either TVD upwind or central differencing used for the convective terms and central differencing used for the viscous diffusion terms. Steady state or Lime accurate solutions can be calculated. The present paper will focus on steady state applications, although time accurate solution analysis is the ultimate goal of this effort. Laminar viscosity is calculated using Sutherland's law and the Baldwin-Lomax two layer algebraic turbulence model is used to compute the eddy viscosity. The Simulation method uses an arbitrary block, curvilinear grid topology. An automatic grid adaption scheme is incorporated which concentrates grid points in high density gradient regions. A variety of user-specified boundary conditions are available. This paper will present the application of the scalable and superscalable versions to the steady state viscous flow analysis of the V-22 Osprey using a multiple zone global mesh. The mesh consists of a series of sheared cartesian grid blocks with polar grids embedded within to better simulate the wing tip mounted nacelle. MPP solutions will be shown in comparison to equivalent Cray C-90 results and also in comparison to experimental data. Discussions on meshing considerations, wall clock execution time

  1. Simulation of Turbine Tone Noise Generation Using a Turbomachinery Aerodynamics Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane

    2010-01-01

    As turbofan engine bypass ratios continue to increase, the contribution of the turbine to the engine noise signature is receiving more attention. Understanding the relative importance of the various turbine noise generation mechanisms and the characteristics of the turbine acoustic transmission loss are essential ingredients in developing robust reduced-order models for predicting the turbine noise signature. A computationally based investigation has been undertaken to help guide the development of a turbine noise prediction capability that does not rely on empiricism. As proof-of-concept for this approach, two highly detailed numerical simulations of the unsteady flow field inside the first stage of a modern high-pressure turbine were carried out. The simulations were computed using TURBO, which is an unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes code capable of multi-stage simulations. Spectral and modal analysis of the unsteady pressure data from the numerical simulation of the turbine stage show a circumferential modal distribution that is consistent with the Tyler-Sofrin rule. Within the high-pressure turbine, the interaction of velocity, pressure and temperature fluctuations with the downstream blade rows are all possible tone noise source mechanisms. We have taken the initial step in determining the source strength hierarchy by artificially reducing the level of temperature fluctuations in the turbine flowfield. This was accomplished by changing the vane cooling flow temperature in order to mitigate the vane thermal wake in the second of the two simulations. The results indicated that, despite a dramatic change in the vane cooling flow, the computed modal levels changed very little indicating that the contribution of temperature fluctuations to the overall pressure field is rather small compared with the viscous and potential field interaction mechanisms.

  2. Advanced Simulation in Undergraduate Pilot Training (ASUPT) Facility Utilization Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagin, William V.; Smith, James F.

    The capabilities of a flight simulation research facility located at Williams AFB, Arizona are described. Research philosophy to be applied is discussed. Long range and short range objectives are identified. A time phased plan for long range research accomplishment is described. In addition, some examples of near term research efforts which will…

  3. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) program: facility description report

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, A G

    1984-09-01

    A new boiling water reactor safety test facility (FIST, Full Integral Simulation Test) is described. It will be used to investigate small breaks and operational transients and to tie results from such tests to earlier large-break test results determined in the TLTA. The new facility's full height and prototypical components constitute a major scaling improvement over earlier test facilities. A heated feedwater system, permitting steady-state operation, and a large increase in the number of measurements are other significant improvements. The program background is outlined and program objectives defined. The design basis is presented together with a detailed, complete description of the facility and measurements to be made. An extensive component scaling analysis and prediction of performance are presented.

  4. Aerodynamic drag and fuel spreading measurements in a simulated scramjet combustion module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    The drag of a simulated scramjet combustion module was measured at Mach 2, 2.5, and 3. The combustor was rectangular in cross section and incorporated six swept fuel injector struts. The effect of strut leading edge radius, position of maximum thickness, thickness ratio, sweep angle, and strut length on the drag was determined. Reduction in thickness ratio had the largest effect on drag reduction. Sweeping the struts upstream yielded the same drag as sweeping the struts downstream and potentially offers the advantages of increased mixing time for the fuel. Helium injection was used to simulate hydrogen fuel. The interstrut spacing required to achieve good distribution of fuel was was found to be about 10 jet diameters. The contribution of helium injection to drag reduction was small.

  5. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of an 840 ft/sec Tip Speed Advanced Ducted Propulsor Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Aerodynamic simulations of an 840 ft/sec tip speed, Advanced Ducted Propulsor fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, lownoise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone extensive experimental testing in the 9- by 15- foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center, resulting in quality, detailed aerodynamic and acoustic measurement data. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating conditions simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, excluding a long core duct section downstream of the core inlet guide vane. As a result, only fan rotational speed and system bypass ratio, set by specifying static pressure downstream of the core inlet guide vane row, were adjusted in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. The computed blade row flow fields for all five fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the computed flow fields reveals no excessive boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems. A few spanwise comparisons between

  6. The development of a combined effects space simulation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, Carlos A.; Lilly, Taylor C.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.

    2012-11-27

    An overview of the development of a facility to study the combined effects of the space environment on spacecraft is presented. The characterization of a magnetic filter plasma source and a low energy electron flood source for the simulation of the low Earth orbit plasma environment is discussed. Plasma diagnostics show that the magnetic filter plasma source provides streaming ion energies of approximately 5eV and can supply the appropriate density for LEO simulation. Additionally the low energy flood gun is shown to provide the appropriate density for LEO simulation as a function of altitude and solar activity.

  7. A Study of the Impact of Variations on Aerodynamic Flow in Gas Turbine Engines via Monte-Carlo Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Khiem Viet; Tumer, Irem Y.

    2003-01-01

    The unsteady compressible inviscid flow is characterized by the conservations of mass, momentum, and energy; or simply the Euler equations. In this paper, a study of the subsonic one-dimensional Euler equations with local preconditioning is presented with a modal analysis approach. Specifically, this study investigates the behavior of airflow in a gas turbine engine using the specified conditions at the inflow and outflow boundaries of the compressor, combustion chamber, and turbine, under the impact of variations in pressure, velocity, temperature, and density at low Mach numbers. Two main questions that motivate this research are: 1) Is there any aerodynamic problem with the existing gas turbine engines that could impact aircraft performance? 2) If yes, what aspect of a gas turbine engine could be improved via design to alleviate that impact and to optimize aircraft performance. This paper presents an initial attempt to the flow behavior in terms (perturbation) using simulation outputs from a customer-deck model obtained from Pratt&Whitney, (i.e., pressure, temperature, velocity, density) about their mean states at the inflow and outflow boundaries of the compressor, combustion chamber, and turbine. Flow behavior is analyzed for the high pressure compressor and combustion chamber employing the conditions on their left and right boundaries. In the same fashion, similar analyses are carried out for the high and low-pressure turbines. In each case, the eigenfrequencies that are obtained for different boundary conditions are examined closely based on their probabilistic distributions, a result of a Monte Carlo 10,000-sample simulation. Furthermore, the characteristic waves and eave response are analyzed and contrasted among different cases, with and without preconditioners. The results reveal the existence of flow instabilities due to the combined effect of variations and excessive pressures; which are clearly the case in the combustion chamber and high

  8. Simulation and experiment research of aerodynamic performance of small axial fans with struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wei; Lin, Peifeng; Zhang, Li; Jin, Yingzi; Wang, Yanping; Kim, Heuy Dong; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2016-06-01

    Interaction between rotor and struts has great effect on the performance of small axial fan systems. The small axial fan systems are selected as the studied objects in this paper, and four square struts are downstream of the rotor. The cross section of the struts is changed to the cylindrical shapes for the investigation: one is in the same hydraulic diameter as the square struts and another one is in the same cross section as the square struts. Influence of the shape of the struts on the static pressure characteristics, the internal flow and the sound emission of the small axial fans are studied. Standard K-ɛ turbulence model and SIMPLE algorithm are applied in the calculation of the steady fluid field, and the curves of the pressure rising against the flow rate are obtained, which demonstrates that the simulation results are in nice consistence with the experimental data. The steady calculation results are set as the initial field in the unsteady calculation. Large eddy simulation and PISO algorithm are used in the transient calculation, and the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings model is introduced to predict the sound level at the eight monitoring points. The research results show that: the static pressure coefficients of the fan with cylindrical struts increase by about 25% compared to the fan with square struts, and the efficiencies increase by about 28.6%. The research provides a theoretical guide for shape optimization and noise reduction of small axial fan with struts.

  9. Advanced adaptive computational methods for Navier-Stokes simulations in rotorcraft aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowers, S. T.; Bass, J. M.; Oden, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    A phase 2 research and development effort was conducted in area transonic, compressible, inviscid flows with an ultimate goal of numerically modeling complex flows inherent in advanced helicopter blade designs. The algorithms and methodologies therefore are classified as adaptive methods, which are error estimation techniques for approximating the local numerical error, and automatically refine or unrefine the mesh so as to deliver a given level of accuracy. The result is a scheme which attempts to produce the best possible results with the least number of grid points, degrees of freedom, and operations. These types of schemes automatically locate and resolve shocks, shear layers, and other flow details to an accuracy level specified by the user of the code. The phase 1 work involved a feasibility study of h-adaptive methods for steady viscous flows, with emphasis on accurate simulation of vortex initiation, migration, and interaction. Phase 2 effort focused on extending these algorithms and methodologies to a three-dimensional topology.

  10. Physics Detector Simulation Facility Phase II system software description

    SciTech Connect

    Scipioni, B.; Allen, J.; Chang, C.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Mestad, S.; Pan, J.; Marquez, M.; Estep, P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) Phase II system software. A key element in the design of a distributed computing environment for the PDSF has been the separation and distribution of the major functions. The facility has been designed to support batch and interactive processing, and to incorporate the file and tape storage systems. By distributing these functions, it is often possible to provide higher throughput and resource availability. Similarly, the design is intended to exploit event-level parallelism in an open distributed environment.

  11. A unique exercise facility for simulating orbital extravehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Rebecca C.; Sharer, Peter J.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    A unique exercise facility has been developed and used to simulate orbital extravehicular activity (EVA). The device incorporates an arm ergometer into a mechanism which places the subject in the zero-g neutral body posture. The intent of this configuration is to elicit muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and thermoregulatory responses similar to those observed during orbital EVA. Experiments done with this facility will help characterize the astronaut's dynamic heat balance during EVA and will eventually lead to the development of an automated thermal control system which would more effectively maintain thermal comfort.

  12. A unique exercise facility for simulating orbital extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Rebecca C.; Sharer, Peter J.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1993-01-01

    A unique exercise facility has been developed and used to simulate orbital extravehicular activity (EVA). The device incorporates an arm ergometer into a mechanism which places the subject in the zero-g neutral body posture. The intent of this configuration is to elicit muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and thermoregulatory responses similar to those observed during orbital EVA. Experiments done with this facility will help characterize the astronaut's dynamic heat balance during EVA and will eventually lead to the development of an automated thermal control system which would more effectively maintain thermal comfort.

  13. Simulation model for the closed plant experiment facility of CEEF.

    PubMed

    Abe, Koichi; Ishikawa, Yoshio; Kibe, Seishiro; Nitta, Keiji

    2005-01-01

    The Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities (CEEF) is a testbed for Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) investigations. CEEF including the physico-chemical material regenerative system has been constructed for the experiments of material circulation among plants, breeding animals and crew of CEEF. Because CEEF is a complex system, an appropriate schedule for the operation must be prepared in advance. The CEEF behavioral Prediction System, CPS, that will help to confirm the operation schedule, is under development. CPS will simulate CEEFs behavior with data (conditions of equipments, quantity of materials in tanks, etc.) of CEEF and an operation schedule that will be made by the operation team everyday, before the schedule will be carried out. The result of the simulation will show whether the operation schedule is appropriate or not. In order to realize CPS, models of the simulation program that is installed in CPS must mirror the real facilities of CEEF. For the first step of development, a flexible algorithm of the simulation program was investigated. The next step was development of a replicate simulation model of the material circulation system for the Closed Plant Experiment Facility (CPEF) that is a part of CEEF. All the parts of a real material circulation system for CPEF are connected together and work as a complex mechanism. In the simulation model, the system was separated into 38 units according to its operational segmentation. In order to develop each model for its corresponding unit, specifications for the model were fixed based on the specifications of the real part. These models were put into a simulation model for the system. PMID:16175692

  14. Simulation model for the closed plant experiment facility of CEEF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Koichi; Ishikawa, Yoshio; Kibe, Seishiro; Nitta, Keiji

    The Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities (CEEF) is a testbed for Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) investigations. CEEF including the physico-chemical material regenerative system has been constructed for the experiments of material circulation among plants, breeding animals and crew of CEEF. Because CEEF is a complex system, an appropriate schedule for the operation must be prepared in advance. The CEEF behavioral Prediction System, CPS, that will help to confirm the operation schedule, is under development. CPS will simulate CEEFs behavior with data (conditions of equipments, quantity of materials in tanks, etc.) of CEEF and an operation schedule that will be made by the operation team everyday, before the schedule will be carried out. The result of the simulation will show whether the operation schedule is appropriate or not. In order to realize CPS, models of the simulation program that is installed in CPS must mirror the real facilities of CEEF. For the first step of development, a flexible algorithm of the simulation program was investigated. The next step was development of a replicate simulation model of the material circulation system for the Closed Plant Experiment Facility (CPEF) that is a part of CEEF. All the parts of a real material circulation system for CPEF are connected together and work as a complex mechanism. In the simulation model, the system was separated into 38 units according to its operational segmentation. In order to develop each model for its corresponding unit, specifications for the model were fixed based on the specifications of the real part. These models were put into a simulation model for the system.

  15. Simulation model for the Closed Plant Experimental Facilities of CEEF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Kibe, S.; Nitta, K.

    The Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities (CEEF) is a testbed for CELSS investigations. CEEF including the physico-chemical material regenerative system has been constructed for the experiments of material circulation among plants, breeding animals, humans (crew of the CEEF). Because CEEF is a complex system, an appropriate schedule for the operation must be prepared in advance. The CEEF behavioral Prediction System, CPS, that will help to confirm the operation schedule, is under development. CPS will simulate CEEF's behavior with data (conditions of equipments, quantity of materials in tanks, etc.) of CEEF and an operation schedule that will be made by the operation team everyday, before the schedule will be carried out. The result of the simulation will show whether the operation schedule is appropriate or not. In order to realize CPS, models of the simulation program that is installed in CPS must mirror the real facilities of CEEF. A flexible algorithm for the first step of development of the simulation program was already investigated. The next step was development of a replicate simulation model of the material circulation system for the Closed Plant Experimental Facilities (CPEF) that is a part of CEEF. All the parts of real material circulation system for CPEF are connected together and work as a complex mechanism. In the simulation model, the system was separated into 38 units according to its operational segmentation. In order to develop each model for its corresponding unit, specifications for the model were fixed based on the specifications of the real part. These models were put into a simulation model for the system.

  16. Development of real-time ATC simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pararas, J.

    1983-01-01

    The Flight Transportation Laboratory has developed a real time interactive Air Traffic Control simulation facility designed to provide a versatile and easy to use tool for research and experimentation involving air traffic control. The facility uses a VAX-11/750 as the central computer. The SANDERS GRAPHICS-7 display system is used to simulate air traffic control displays. Pseudo-pilot displays are provided on Texas Instruments TI940 video terminals. Finally, a custom designed audio system driven by a Z-80 and interfaced with the VAX provides voice communication between the air traffic controllers and the pseudo-pilots. The audio system provides computer controlled voice disguising and thus allows each aircraft to have its own audio characteristics and provides an added realism to the experiment. The facility can accommodate multiple controller stations and pseudo-pilot stations. Each station is manned by a single operator who has a large repertoire of commands with which to control his/her display and the simulated aircraft under his/her jurisdiction. An additional console and a distinct set of commands allow full controllability of the simulation environment by the experimenter in real time.

  17. AIR POLLUTION AND TERRAIN AERODYNAMICS: A REVIEW OF FLUID MODELING STUDIES AT THE EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) FLUID MODELING FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A review is given of recent fluid modeling studies conducted at the EPA Fluid Modeling Facility of flow and diffusion in complex terrain. Estimates are given for the ratio of the maximum concentration on a hill surface to the maximum concentration in the absence of the hill. The ...

  18. Aerodynamic heating to the gaps and surfaces of simulated reusable-surface-insulation tile arrays in turbulent flow at Mach 6.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, I.; Avery, D. E.; Chapman, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made on a simulated reusable-surface-insulation tile array in a turbulent boundary layer to determine aerodynamic-heating distributions representative of those expected on the surface of the shuttle orbiter during earth entry due to the presence of longitudinal and transverse surface gaps. The tests were conducted in an 8-foot high-temperature structures tunnel in a test medium of methane-air combustion products at a nominal Mach number of 6.6 and over a free-stream Reynolds number range from 2,000,000 to 4,900,000 per meter (600,000 to 1,500,000 per foot). The results were used to assess the aerodynamic heating effects produced by parameters that include gap width, boundary-layer displacement thickness, in-line and staggered tile arrangement, and tile protrusion.

  19. Sandia Lightning Simulation Facility Building 888. Hazards assessment document

    SciTech Connect

    Banda, Z.; Barnett, B.

    1994-10-01

    The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Sandia Lightning Simulation Facility, Building 888. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 23 meters. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 65 meters.

  20. Neutron Source Facility Training Simulator Based on EPICS

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Young Soo; Wei, Thomas Y.; Vilim, Richard B.; Grelle, Austin L.; Dworzanski, Pawel L.; Gohar, Yousry

    2015-01-01

    A plant operator training simulator is developed for training the plant operators as well as for design verification of plant control system (PCS) and plant protection system (PPS) for the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology Neutron Source Facility. The simulator provides the operator interface for the whole plant including the sub-critical assembly coolant loop, target coolant loop, secondary coolant loop, and other facility systems. The operator interface is implemented based on Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which is a comprehensive software development platform for distributed control systems. Since its development at Argonne National Laboratory, it has been widely adopted in the experimental physics community, e.g. for control of accelerator facilities. This work is the first implementation for a nuclear facility. The main parts of the operator interface are the plant control panel and plant protection panel. The development involved implementation of process variable database, sequence logic, and graphical user interface (GUI) for the PCS and PPS utilizing EPICS and related software tools, e.g. sequencer for sequence logic, and control system studio (CSS-BOY) for graphical use interface. For functional verification of the PCS and PPS, a plant model is interfaced, which is a physics-based model of the facility coolant loops implemented as a numerical computer code. The training simulator is tested and demonstrated its effectiveness in various plant operation sequences, e.g. start-up, shut-down, maintenance, and refueling. It was also tested for verification of the plant protection system under various trip conditions.

  1. Level-2 Milestone 2351: Terascale Simulation Facility Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, A M

    2007-10-02

    This report documents the LLNL TSF upgrade ASC L2 milestone 2351: Terascale Simulation Facility upgrade, due Sept. 30, 2007. The full text of the milestone is included in Attachment 1. The stated goal of the milestone was: 'Complete a 3-MW expansion of electrical power for computing systems in the east computer room of the Terascale Simulation Facility (TSF) and complete the final connection of all air handlers that were delivered as part of the TSF line item'. In this report we detail the upgrade and cover the results of the process to accept the system by testing, adjusting, balancing and finally start-up of the system in accordance with the detailed project commissioning plan to be developed by the system engineers during the design phase of the project. The quarterly reports for the upgrade and the text of the project commissioning plan are included at the end of this document as Attachments 2 and 3.

  2. Description of a new full scale lightning simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papazian, Peter B.; Perala, Rodney A.; Rigden, Gregory J.; Lankford, Alan B.; Steffen, Dale A.

    1988-01-01

    A lightning test facility has been constructed in Utah, and the facility has initially been used to test and certify solid rocket motor (SRM) segment shipping containers. The simulator equipment consists of a 17-stage 1.7 MV Marx generator and three current generators. The performance of the Marx is enhanced by use of a distributed peaking capacitor to produce maximum dl/dt's in excess of 4 x 10 to the 11th Amps/sec into large test objects. The current generators consist of the following: (1) a 200 KA underdamped 500 kilojoule high current bank, (2) a critically damped intermediate current bank and (3) an over damped continuing current bank. Total charge transfer for these banks is 270 Coulombs with an action integral in excess of 8 x 10 to the 6th sq Amps-sec. Representative results for the simulator and SRM segment shipping containers are presented.

  3. Views of the manipulator development facility end effector simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Closeup view of the manipulator development facility (MDF) during an end effector simulation showing the two specially made extensions deployed on April 16 by the STS 51-D crewmembers (30953); Medium closeup view of MDF. The white cylindar at right represents the Syncon IV (LEASAT) satellite. The robot device in the foreground is the forearm and end effector of a training version of the remote manipulator system (RMS). Attached to the arm's end are two flyswatter-like tools (30954-5).

  4. A simulation facility for testing Space Station assembly procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajare, Ankur R.; Wick, Daniel T.; Shehad, Nagy M.

    1994-01-01

    NASA plans to construct the Space Station Freedom (SSF) in one of the most hazardous environments known to mankind - space. It is of the utmost importance that the procedures to assemble and operate the SSF in orbit are both safe and effective. This paper describes a facility designed to test the integration of the telerobotic systems and to test assembly procedures using a real-world robotic arm grappling space hardware in a simulated microgravity environment.

  5. Aerodynamics and heat transfer investigations on a high Reynolds number turbine cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, Taher; Mcfarland, Eric; Yeh, Frederick

    1991-01-01

    The results of aerodynamic and heat transfer experimental investigations performed in a high Reynolds number turbine cascade test facility are analyzed. The experimental facility simulates the high Reynolds number flow conditions similar to those encountered in the Space Shuttle Main Engine. In order to determine the influence of Reynolds number on aerodynamic and thermal behavior of the blades, heat transfer coefficients were measured at various Reynolds numbers using liquid crystal temperature measurement technique. Potential flow calculation methods were used to predict the cascade pressure distributions. Boundary layer and heat transfer calculation methods were used with these pressure distributions to verify the experimental results.

  6. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of a 1215 ft/sec Tip Speed Transonic Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Aerodynamic simulations of a 1215 ft/sec tip speed transonic fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, low-noise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone extensive experimental testing in the 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating points simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, which for this model did not include a split flow path with core and bypass ducts. As a result, it was only necessary to adjust fan rotational speed in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. Computed blade row flow fields at all fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the flow fields at all operating conditions reveals no excessive boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems.

  7. Numerical simulation of experiments in the Giant Planet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. J.; Davy, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Utilizing a series of existing computer codes, ablation experiments in the Giant Planet Facility are numerically simulated. Of primary importance is the simulation of the low Mach number shock layer that envelops the test model. The RASLE shock-layer code, used in the Jupiter entry probe heat-shield design, is adapted to the experimental conditions. RASLE predictions for radiative and convective heat fluxes are in good agreement with calorimeter measurements. In simulating carbonaceous ablation experiments, the RASLE code is coupled directly with the CMA material response code. For the graphite models, predicted and measured recessions agree very well. Predicted recession for the carbon phenolic models is 50% higher than that measured. This is the first time codes used for the Jupiter probe design have been compared with experiments.

  8. Unsteady aerodynamics modeling for flight dynamics application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; He, Kai-Feng; Qian, Wei-Qi; Zhang, Tian-Jiao; Cheng, Yan-Qing; Wu, Kai-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    In view of engineering application, it is practicable to decompose the aerodynamics into three components: the static aerodynamics, the aerodynamic increment due to steady rotations, and the aerodynamic increment due to unsteady separated and vortical flow. The first and the second components can be presented in conventional forms, while the third is described using a one-order differential equation and a radial-basis-function (RBF) network. For an aircraft configuration, the mathematical models of 6-component aerodynamic coefficients are set up from the wind tunnel test data of pitch, yaw, roll, and coupled yawroll large-amplitude oscillations. The flight dynamics of an aircraft is studied by the bifurcation analysis technique in the case of quasi-steady aerodynamics and unsteady aerodynamics, respectively. The results show that: (1) unsteady aerodynamics has no effect upon the existence of trim points, but affects their stability; (2) unsteady aerodynamics has great effects upon the existence, stability, and amplitudes of periodic solutions; and (3) unsteady aerodynamics changes the stable regions of trim points obviously. Furthermore, the dynamic responses of the aircraft to elevator deflections are inspected. It is shown that the unsteady aerodynamics is beneficial to dynamic stability for the present aircraft. Finally, the effects of unsteady aerodynamics on the post-stall maneuverability are analyzed by numerical simulation.

  9. Computer model to simulate testing at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Wahls, Richard A.; Hannon, Judith A.

    1995-01-01

    A computer model has been developed to simulate the processes involved in the operation of the National Transonic Facility (NTF), a large cryogenic wind tunnel at the Langley Research Center. The simulation was verified by comparing the simulated results with previously acquired data from three experimental wind tunnel test programs in the NTF. The comparisons suggest that the computer model simulates reasonably well the processes that determine the liquid nitrogen (LN2) consumption, electrical consumption, fan-on time, and the test time required to complete a test plan at the NTF. From these limited comparisons, it appears that the results from the simulation model are generally within about 10 percent of the actual NTF test results. The use of actual data acquisition times in the simulation produced better estimates of the LN2 usage, as expected. Additional comparisons are needed to refine the model constants. The model will typically produce optimistic results since the times and rates included in the model are typically the optimum values. Any deviation from the optimum values will lead to longer times or increased LN2 and electrical consumption for the proposed test plan. Computer code operating instructions and listings of sample input and output files have been included.

  10. Planetary and Space Simulation Facilities (PSI) at DLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitz, Corinna; Rabbow, E.; Rettberg, P.; Kloss, M.; Reitz, G.; Horneck, G.

    2010-05-01

    The Planetary and Space Simulation facilities at DLR offer the possibility to expose biological and physical samples individually or integrated into space hardware to defined and controlled space conditions like ultra high vacuum, low temperature and extraterrestrial UV radiation. An x-ray facility stands for the simulation of the ionizing component at the disposal. All of the simulation facilities are required for the preparation of space experiments: - for testing of the newly developed space hardware - for investigating the effect of different space parameters on biological systems as a preparation for the flight experiment - for performing the 'Experiment Verification Tests' (EVT) for the specification of the test parameters - and 'Experiment Sequence Tests' (EST) by simulating sample assemblies, exposure to selected space parameters, and sample disassembly. To test the compatibility of the different biological and chemical systems and their adaptation to the opportunities and constraints of space conditions a profound ground support program has been developed among many others for the ESA facilities of the ongoing missions EXPOSE-R and EXPOSE-E on board of the International Space Station ISS . Several experiment verification tests EVTs and an experiment sequence test EST have been conducted in the carefully equipped and monitored planetary and space simulation facilities PSI of the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at DLR in Cologne, Germany. These ground based pre-flight studies allowed the investigation of a much wider variety of samples and the selection of the most promising organisms for the flight experiment. EXPOSE-E had been attached to the outer balcony of the European Columbus module of the ISS in February 2008 and stayed for 1,5 years in space; EXPOSE-R has been attached to the Russian Svezda module of the ISS in spring 2009 and mission duration will be approx. 1,5 years. The missions will give new insights into the survivability of terrestrial

  11. Research and test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A description is given of each of the following Langley research and test facilities: 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel, 7-by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel, 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel, 13-Inch Magnetic Suspension & Balance System, 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel, 16-by 24-Inch Water Tunnel, 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel, 30-by 60-Foot Wind Tunnel, Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS), Advanced Technology Research Laboratory, Aerospace Controls Research Laboratory (ACRL), Aerothermal Loads Complex, Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF), Avionics Integration Research Laboratory, Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART), Compact Range Test Facility, Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS), Enhanced/Synthetic Vision & Spatial Displays Laboratory, Experimental Test Range (ETR) Flight Research Facility, General Aviation Simulator (GAS), High Intensity Radiated Fields Facility, Human Engineering Methods Laboratory, Hypersonic Facilities Complex, Impact Dynamics Research Facility, Jet Noise Laboratory & Anechoic Jet Facility, Light Alloy Laboratory, Low Frequency Antenna Test Facility, Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel, Mechanics of Metals Laboratory, National Transonic Facility (NTF), NDE Research Laboratory, Polymers & Composites Laboratory, Pyrotechnic Test Facility, Quiet Flow Facility, Robotics Facilities, Scientific Visualization System, Scramjet Test Complex, Space Materials Research Laboratory, Space Simulation & Environmental Test Complex, Structural Dynamics Research Laboratory, Structural Dynamics Test Beds, Structures & Materials Research Laboratory, Supersonic Low Disturbance Pilot Tunnel, Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA), Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), Transport Systems Research Vehicle, Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, and the Visual Motion Simulator (VMS).

  12. Effect of nacelles on aerodynamic characteristics of an executive-jet model with simulated, partial-chord, laminar-flow-control wing glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley High-Speed 7- by 10-Foot Tunnel using a 1/10-scale model of an executive jet to examine the effects of the nacelles on the wing pressures and model longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics. For the present investigation, each wing panel was modified with a simulated, partial-chord, laminar-flow-control glove. Horizontal-tail effects were also briefly examined. The tests covered a range of Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.82 and lift coefficients from 0.20 to 0.55. Oil-flow photographs of the wing at selected conditions are included.

  13. Simulation of photofission experiments at the ELI-NP facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, P.; Balabanski, D. L.; Cuong, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    An extensive experimental program for the study of photofission will take place at the Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility, where different actinide targets will be exposed to a brilliant gamma beam to produce fission fragments. We report on the implementation within the Geant4 simulation toolkit of the photofission process, of related background processes, and of extended ionic charge parameterization. These developments are used to evaluate the production rates of photofission fragments and their release efficiency from the actinide targets.

  14. Numerical simulation of the influence of the control surfaces deflection on the aerodynamics of a slender axisymmetric configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhul, I. I.; Volkov, V. F.; Zvegintsev, V. I.; Ivanov, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    A possible influence of the deflection of control surfaces on the aerodynamics of an axisymmetric slender configuration at supersonic flow speeds is considered. A classical configuration consisting from the fuselage in the form of a body of revolution and having cross frontal fins and six-blade trailing stabilizers is considered as the investigation object. The physical flow pattern at the deflection of horizontal fin consoles is investigated and the estimates are obtained for the influence of this deflection on both the characteristics of elements (the body and stabilizers) as well as on the integral aerodynamic characteristics of the entire configuration. Numerical computations of the flow have been done at the freestream Mach number M = 3 in the range of attack angles α = 0-10° and the angles of the control surfaces deflection δ cs = ±5° on the basis of the averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the SST k-ω turbulence model.

  15. PELS (Planetary Environmental Liquid Simulator): a new type of simulation facility to study extraterrestrial aqueous environments.

    PubMed

    Martin, Derek; Cockell, Charles S

    2015-02-01

    Investigations of other planetary bodies, including Mars and icy moons such as Enceladus and Europa, show that they may have hosted aqueous environments in the past and may do so even today. Therefore, a major challenge in astrobiology is to build facilities that will allow us to study the geochemistry and habitability of these extraterrestrial environments. Here, we describe a simulation facility (PELS: Planetary Environmental Liquid Simulator) with the capability for liquid input and output that allows for the study of such environments. The facility, containing six separate sample vessels, allows for statistical replication of samples. Control of pressure, gas composition, UV irradiation conditions, and temperature allows for the precise replication of aqueous conditions, including subzero brines under martian atmospheric conditions. A sample acquisition system allows for the collection of both liquid and solid samples from within the chamber without breaking the atmospheric conditions, enabling detailed studies of the geochemical evolution and habitability of past and present extraterrestrial environments. The facility we describe represents a new frontier in planetary simulation-continuous flow-through simulation of extraterrestrial aqueous environments. PMID:25651097

  16. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    The modern theory of aerodynamic sound originates from Lighthill's two papers in 1952 and 1954, as is well known. I have heard that Lighthill was motivated in writing the papers by the jet-noise emitted by the newly commercialized jet-engined airplanes at that time. The technology of aerodynamic sound is destined for environmental problems. Therefore the theory should always be applied to newly emerged public nuisances. This issue of Fluid Dynamics Research (FDR) reflects problems of environmental sound in present Japanese technology. The Japanese community studying aerodynamic sound has held an annual symposium since 29 years ago when the late Professor S Kotake and Professor S Kaji of Teikyo University organized the symposium. Most of the Japanese authors in this issue are members of the annual symposium. I should note the contribution of the two professors cited above in establishing the Japanese community of aerodynamic sound research. It is my pleasure to present the publication in this issue of ten papers discussed at the annual symposium. I would like to express many thanks to the Editorial Board of FDR for giving us the chance to contribute these papers. We have a review paper by T Suzuki on the study of jet noise, which continues to be important nowadays, and is expected to reform the theoretical model of generating mechanisms. Professor M S Howe and R S McGowan contribute an analytical paper, a valuable study in today's fluid dynamics research. They apply hydrodynamics to solve the compressible flow generated in the vocal cords of the human body. Experimental study continues to be the main methodology in aerodynamic sound, and it is expected to explore new horizons. H Fujita's study on the Aeolian tone provides a new viewpoint on major, longstanding sound problems. The paper by M Nishimura and T Goto on textile fabrics describes new technology for the effective reduction of bluff-body noise. The paper by T Sueki et al also reports new technology for the

  17. Missile Aerodynamics for Ascent and Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Gaines L.; McCarter, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic force and moment equations are developed for 6-DOF missile simulations of both the ascent phase of flight and a tumbling re-entry. The missile coordinate frame (M frame) and a frame parallel to the M frame were used for formulating the aerodynamic equations. The missile configuration chosen as an example is a cylinder with fixed fins and a nose cone. The equations include both the static aerodynamic coefficients and the aerodynamic damping derivatives. The inclusion of aerodynamic damping is essential for simulating a tumbling re-entry. Appended information provides insight into aerodynamic damping.

  18. Rotary wing aerodynamically generated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. J.; Morse, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The history and methodology of aerodynamic noise reduction in rotary wing aircraft are presented. Thickness noise during hover tests and blade vortex interaction noise are determined and predicted through the use of a variety of computer codes. The use of test facilities and scale models for data acquisition are discussed.

  19. HYSHOT-2 Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, T.; Owen, R.; Walton, C.

    2005-02-01

    The scramjet flight test Hyshot-2, flew on the 30 July 2002. The programme, led by the University of Queensland, had the primary objective of obtaining supersonic combustion data in flight for comparison with measurements made in shock tunnels. QinetiQ was one of the sponsors, and also provided aerodynamic data and trajectory predictions for the ballistic re-entry of the spinning sounding rocket. The unconventional missile geometry created by the nose-mounted asymmetric-scramjet in conjunction with the high angle of attack during re-entry makes the problem interesting. This paper presents the wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamic calculations used as input for the trajectory prediction. Indirect comparison is made with data obtained in the Hyshot-2 flight using a 6 degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation.

  20. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of a 1484 ft/sec Tip Speed Quiet High-Speed Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Aerodynamic simulations of a 1484 ft/sec tip speed quiet high-speed fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, low-noise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone experimental testing in the 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating points simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, which includes a core duct and a bypass duct that merge upstream of the fan system nozzle. As a result, only fan rotational speed and the system bypass ratio, set by means of a translating nozzle plug, were adjusted in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. Computed blade row flow fields at all fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the computed flow fields reveals no excessive or critical boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems, with the exception of the hub boundary layer at the core duct entrance. At that location a significant flow separation is present. The region of local flow

  1. A simulation model for Carson Ice Co-Generation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, N.K.W.; Elmasri, M.; Brownell, G.

    1995-12-31

    The paper describes a software system to simulate the performance of the Carson Ice Co-gen Facility operated by the Carson Energy Group. This 100 MW plant consists of a cogeneration combined cycle and a simple cycle unit powered by LM6000 gas turbine generators. Features of the system include inlet heating/absorption chilling for the gas turbines, supplementary firing capability, and a broad range of steam turbine extractions and admissions. The software enables the operator to model complex operating scenarios. It predicts technical and economic performance under a wide range of conditions, taking into account various equipment constraints and operation preferences. For any set of user-specified operating inputs, the corresponding heat and mass balance diagrams as well as economic figures may be viewed virtually instantaneously. Interactive plots of plant heat rate, incremental heat rate, operating income, and other parameters reveal issues and trade-offs involved in performance and economic optimization.

  2. BGT hardware-in-the-loop simulation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Siegfried

    1999-07-01

    Bodenseewerk Geratetechnik GmbH (BGT), located at the Lake of Constance, is the prime contractor for the European production of the AIM-9L Sidewinder air-to-air missile. It is active on the field of seeker and missile development and manufacturing, including such missile systems like Sidewinder AIM-9L, RAM, Stinger, TRIGAT and IRIS-T. Along with the different projects, the BGT HIL simulation facility grew continuously. Particularly for the TRIGAT system tests, where an Infra Red Scene Projector (IRSP) from British Aerospace is used, a dedicated subsystem had been built to prevent damaging the IRSP. The general setup of the BGT HIL environment is presented with special emphasis on this proprietary `collision avoidance system'.

  3. Protecting a CT simulator room to accommodate a cyberknife facility.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, M E; Martin, M; Khalil, S; Galal, M; King, D; Rahill, C

    2015-07-01

    In 2012, a plan to develop Stereotactic treatments using a Cyberknife was unveiled at the Hermitage Medical Clinic, Dublin. Due to planning restrictions the new facility had to be contained in the existing hospital's blue print with the only available location being an unused CT simulation room. The room design would be different from conventional radiotherapy bunkers due to the fact the Cyberknife can fire an unfiltered beam in any direction bar the roof (restriction of 22° above the horizontal). Therefore all walls must be primary barriers with the roof designed to protect against the large leakage radiation resulting from the high MU's used during the treatments. Space consideration indicated that concrete alone could not be used to restrict the radiation beam to acceptable limits. To this end a combination of steel, lead, normal and heavy concrete were used to meet the dose constraints established by the Irish licensing authorities. PMID:25855074

  4. Direct drive: Simulations and results from the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Radha, P. B.; Hohenberger, M.; Edgell, D. H.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Boehly, T. R.; et al

    2016-04-19

    Here, the direct-drive implosion physics is being investigated at the National Ignition Facility. The primary goal of the experiments is twofold: to validate modeling related to implosion velocity and to estimate the magnitude of hot-electron preheat. Implosion experiments indicate that the energetics is well-modeled when cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) is included in the simulation and an overall multiplier to the CBET gain factor is employed; time-resolved scattered light and scattered-light spectra display the correct trends. Trajectories from backlit images are well modeled, although those from measured self-emission images indicate increased shell thickness and reduced shell density relative to simulations. Sensitivitymore » analyses indicate that the most likely cause for the density reduction is nonuniformity growth seeded by laser imprint and not laser-energy coupling. Hot-electron preheat is at tolerable levels in the ongoing experiments, although it is expected to increase after the mitigation of CBET. Future work will include continued model validation, imprint measurements, and mitigation of CBET and hot-electron preheat.« less

  5. Direct drive: Simulations and results from the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, P. B.; Hohenberger, M.; Edgell, D. H.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Campbell, E. M.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Dixit, S. N.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Knauer, J. P.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Moody, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Petrasso, R. D.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Sio, H.; Skupsky, S.; Zylstra, A.

    2016-05-01

    Direct-drive implosion physics is being investigated at the National Ignition Facility. The primary goal of the experiments is twofold: to validate modeling related to implosion velocity and to estimate the magnitude of hot-electron preheat. Implosion experiments indicate that the energetics is well-modeled when cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) is included in the simulation and an overall multiplier to the CBET gain factor is employed; time-resolved scattered light and scattered-light spectra display the correct trends. Trajectories from backlit images are well modeled, although those from measured self-emission images indicate increased shell thickness and reduced shell density relative to simulations. Sensitivity analyses indicate that the most likely cause for the density reduction is nonuniformity growth seeded by laser imprint and not laser-energy coupling. Hot-electron preheat is at tolerable levels in the ongoing experiments, although it is expected to increase after the mitigation of CBET. Future work will include continued model validation, imprint measurements, and mitigation of CBET and hot-electron preheat.

  6. Theoretical Insights from Facile Microsecond Simulation of the Glass Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Jui-Hsiang; Patra, Tarak; Simmons, David

    Despite more than half a century of research, the fundamental nature of the glass transition remains one of the major open questions in polymer science and condensed matter physics. Molecular dynamics simulations have provided key insights into this problem, but their ability to firmly establish the underlying nature of glass formation have been limited by the extreme computational difficulty of directly probing the deeply supercooled regime most relevant to this process. Here we describe a new protocol for simulation of the glass transition enabling facile access to in-equilibrium segmental relaxation times approaching and exceeding one microsecond - well into the deeply supercooled regime of most glass-forming liquids. Coupled with a well-validated strategy for extrapolation to experimental timescales, this approach provides vastly improved prediction of experimental glass transition temperatures. Here we combine data acquired through this protocol for the deeply supercooled regime of polymeric, inorganic, organic, and metallic glass formers to robustly test several theories of glass formation and identify microscopic phenomenological features shared across all classes of glass-forming liquid in the deeply supercooled regime. We acknowledge the W. M. Keck Foundation for financial support of this research.

  7. Aerodynamic Characteristics and Development of the Aerodynamic Database of the X-34 Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi , Bandu N.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the aerodynamic characteristics and the process of developing the preflight aerodynamic database of the NASA/ Orbital X-34 reusable launch vehicle is presented in this paper. Wind tunnel tests from subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers including ground effect tests at low subsonic speeds were conducted in various facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center. The APAS (Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System) code was used for engineering level analysis and to fill the gaps in the wind tunnel test data. This aerodynamic database covers the range of Mach numbers, angles of attack, sideslip and control surface deflections anticipated in the complete flight envelope.

  8. Aeroassist flight experiment aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Edwin B.

    1989-01-01

    The problem is to determine the transitional flow aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics, including the base flow characteristics, of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE). The justification for the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) Application stems from MSFC's system integration responsibility for the AFE. To insure that the AFE objectives are met, MSFC must understand the limitations and uncertainties of the design data. Perhaps the only method capable of handling the complex physics of the rarefied high energy AFE trajectory is Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. The 3-D code used in this analysis is applicable only to the AFE geometry. It uses the Variable Hard Sphere (VHS) collision model and five specie chemistry model available from Langley Research Center. The code is benchmarked against the AFE flight data and used as an Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV) design tool. The code is being used to understand the AFE flow field and verify or modify existing design data. Continued application to lower altitudes is testing the capability of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) to handle 3-D DSMC and its practicality as an ASTV/AFE design tool.

  9. Design data package and operating procedures for MSFC solar simulator test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Design and operational data for the solar simulator test facility are reviewed. The primary goal of the facility is to evaluate the performance capacibility and worst case failure modes of collectors, which utilize either air or liquid transport media. The facility simulates environmental parameters such as solar radiation intensity, solar spectrum, collimation, uniformity, and solar attitude. The facility also simulates wind conditions of velocity and direction, solar system conditions imposed on the collector, collector fluid inlet temperature, and geometric factors of collector tilt and azimuth angles. Testing the simulator provides collector efficiency data, collector time constant, incident angle modifier data, and stagnation temperature values.

  10. Numerical simulation and validation of helicopter blade-vortex interaction using coupled CFD/CSD and three levels of aerodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiraux, Mathieu

    Rotorcraft Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) remains one of the most challenging flow phenomenon to simulate numerically. Over the past decade, the HART-II rotor test and its extensive experimental dataset has been a major database for validation of CFD codes. Its strong BVI signature, with high levels of intrusive noise and vibrations, makes it a difficult test for computational methods. The main challenge is to accurately capture and preserve the vortices which interact with the rotor, while predicting correct blade deformations and loading. This doctoral dissertation presents the application of a coupled CFD/CSD methodology to the problem of helicopter BVI and compares three levels of fidelity for aerodynamic modeling: a hybrid lifting-line/free-wake (wake coupling) method, with modified compressible unsteady model; a hybrid URANS/free-wake method; and a URANS-based wake capturing method, using multiple overset meshes to capture the entire flow field. To further increase numerical correlation, three helicopter fuselage models are implemented in the framework. The first is a high resolution 3D GPU panel code; the second is an immersed boundary based method, with 3D elliptic grid adaption; the last one uses a body-fitted, curvilinear fuselage mesh. The main contribution of this work is the implementation and systematic comparison of multiple numerical methods to perform BVI modeling. The trade-offs between solution accuracy and computational cost are highlighted for the different approaches. Various improvements have been made to each code to enhance physical fidelity, while advanced technologies, such as GPU computing, have been employed to increase efficiency. The resulting numerical setup covers all aspects of the simulation creating a truly multi-fidelity and multi-physics framework. Overall, the wake capturing approach showed the best BVI phasing correlation and good blade deflection predictions, with slightly under-predicted aerodynamic loading magnitudes

  11. Design and simulation of the nuSTORM facility

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ao

    2015-04-01

    This thesis provides a full design and simulation of the nuSTORM beam line facility including the pion beam line , the pion and muon orbit combination section, and the muon decay ring. The study also includes the development of numerical optimization methods and their application to the design. At nuSTORM, one proton batch from the Main Injector (MI) is extracted and transported to the target station to bombard a solid target. A magnetic horn is used as the collection device for the secondary particles such as pions and kaons. A pion beam line is designed to transport the secondary particles downstream to the muon decay ring. In order to avoid the use of a fast kicker with a large aperture for the injection, an Orbit Combination Section (OCS) was designed to combine the reference pion orbit with the circulating muon orbit. This ful lls the stochastic injection scheme proposed in the 1980s. It is shown through the simulation that the pion beam line is able to deliver 0.011 muons per proton on target within the acceptance of the ring. In order to improve the circulating muon ux, an optimization of the magnetic collection horn was studied. A Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA), that was modi ed to integrate Message Passing Interface (MPI) in the process, is applied to the optimization. The number of muons within the ring acceptance from the pion decay is estimated by the pions after the collection horn. This new method was proposed to lower the requirement on the computing resources for the optimization. The study gives a new and better target and horn con guration after a full investigation of the system. The nuSTORM ring is examined with two optics designs. With di erent features, the two designs are optimized via correcting the nonlinearities with sextupolar eld distribution in the ring. A modi ed MPI-based Simulated Annealing (SA) algorithm was applied to obtain the optimal ring acceptance. The comparison with the GA shows good agreements on the achieved

  12. A facility for long-term Mars simulation experiments: the Mars Environmental Simulation Chamber (MESCH).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lars Liengaard; Merrison, Jonathan; Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Mikkelsen, Karina Aarup; Kristoffersen, Tommy; Nørnberg, Per; Lomstein, Bente Aagaard; Finster, Kai

    2008-06-01

    We describe the design, construction, and pilot operation of a Mars simulation facility comprised of a cryogenic environmental chamber, an atmospheric gas analyzer, and a xenon/mercury discharge source for UV generation. The Mars Environmental Simulation Chamber (MESCH) consists of a double-walled cylindrical chamber. The double wall provides a cooling mantle through which liquid N(2) can be circulated. A load-lock system that consists of a small pressure-exchange chamber, which can be evacuated, allows for the exchange of samples without changing the chamber environment. Fitted within the MESCH is a carousel, which holds up to 10 steel sample tubes. Rotation of the carousel is controlled by an external motor. Each sample in the carousel can be placed at any desired position. Environmental data, such as temperature, pressure, and UV exposure time, are computer logged and used in automated feedback mechanisms, enabling a wide variety of experiments that include time series. Tests of the simulation facility have successfully demonstrated its ability to produce temperature cycles and maintain low temperature (down to -140 degrees C), low atmospheric pressure (5-10 mbar), and a gas composition like that of Mars during long-term experiments. PMID:18593229

  13. Simulation of mass storage systems operating in a large data processing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R.

    1972-01-01

    A mass storage simulation program was written to aid system designers in the design of a data processing facility. It acts as a tool for measuring the overall effect on the facility of on-line mass storage systems, and it provides the means of measuring and comparing the performance of competing mass storage systems. The performance of the simulation program is demonstrated.

  14. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. [Lewis 8 by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of a coannular exhaust nozzle for a proposed variable stream control supersonic propulsion system. Tests were conducted with two simulated configurations differing primarily in the fan duct flowpaths: a short flap mechanism for fan stream control with an isentropic contoured flow splitter, and an iris fan nozzle with a conical flow splitter. Both designs feature a translating primary plug and an auxiliary inlet ejector. Tests were conducted at takeoff and simulated cruise conditions. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. At simulated supersonic cruise, both configurations demonstrated good performance, comparable to levels assumed in earlier advanced supersonic propulsion studies. However, at subsonic cruise, both configurations exhibited performance that was 6 to 7.5 percent less than the study assumptions. At take off conditions, the iris configuration performance approached the assumed levels, while the short flap design was 4 to 6 percent less.

  15. Recent advances in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh K.; Desse, Jerry E.

    1991-04-01

    The current state of the art in computational aerodynamics is described. Recent advances in the discretization of surface geometry, grid generation, and flow simulation algorithms have led to flowfield predictions for increasingly complex and realistic configurations. As a result, computational aerodynamics is emerging as a crucial enabling technology for the development and design of flight vehicles. Examples illustrating the current capability for the prediction of aircraft, launch vehicle and helicopter flowfields are presented. Unfortunately, accurate modeling of turbulence remains a major difficulty in the analysis of viscosity-dominated flows. In the future inverse design methods, multidisciplinary design optimization methods, artificial intelligence technology and massively parallel computer technology will be incorporated into computational aerodynamics, opening up greater opportunities for improved product design at substantially reduced costs.

  16. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  17. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-04-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  18. Active Control of Aerodynamic Noise Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise sources become important when propulsion noise is relatively low, as during aircraft landing. Under these conditions, aerodynamic noise from high-lift systems can be significant. The research program and accomplishments described here are directed toward reduction of this aerodynamic noise. Progress toward this objective include correction of flow quality in the Low Turbulence Water Channel flow facility, development of a test model and traversing mechanism, and improvement of the data acquisition and flow visualization capabilities in the Aero. & Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. These developments are described in this report.

  19. N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel Facility (An example of a Versatile Wind Tunnel) Tunnel 1 I is a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel Facility (An example of a Versatile Wind Tunnel) Tunnel 1 I is a blowdown Facility that utilizes interchangeable test sections and nozzles. The facility provides experimental support for the fluid mechanics research, including experimental verification of aerodynamic computer codes and boundary-layer and airfoil studies that require high Reynolds number simulation. (Tunnel 1)

  20. Classical Aerodynamic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A collection of papers on modern theoretical aerodynamics is presented. Included are theories of incompressible potential flow and research on the aerodynamic forces on wing and wing sections of aircraft and on airship hulls.

  1. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  2. A Free-flight Wind Tunnel for Aerodynamic Testing at Hypersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiff, Alvin

    1954-01-01

    The supersonic free-flight wind tunnel is a facility at the Ames Laboratory of the NACA in which aerodynamic test models are gun-launched at high speed and directed upstream through the test section of a supersonic wind tunnel. In this way, test Mach numbers up to 10 have been attained and indications are that still higher speeds will be realized. An advantage of this technique is that the air and model temperatures simulate those of flight through the atmosphere. Also the Reynolds numbers are high. Aerodynamic measurements are made from photographic observation of the model flight. Instruments and techniques have been developed for measuring the following aerodynamic properties: drag, initial lift-curve slope, initial pitching-moment-curve slope, center of pressure, skin friction, boundary-layer transition, damping in roll, and aileron effectiveness. (author)

  3. Aerodynamic Tests of the Space Launch System for Database Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Victor E.; Mayle, Melody N.; Blevins, John A.; Crosby, William A.; Purinton, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The Aerosciences Branch (EV33) at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been responsible for a series of wind tunnel tests on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Launch System (SLS) vehicles. The primary purpose of these tests was to obtain aerodynamic data during the ascent phase and establish databases that can be used by the Guidance, Navigation, and Mission Analysis Branch (EV42) for trajectory simulations. The paper describes the test particulars regarding models and measurements and the facilities used, as well as database preparations.

  4. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Tabulated aeroynamic data book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Tabulated data from wind tunnel tests conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of an advanced coannular exhaust nozzle for a future supersonic propulsion system are presented. Tests were conducted with two test configurations: (1) a short flap mechanism for fan stream control with an isentropic contoured flow splitter, and (2) an iris fan nozzle with a conical flow splitter. Both designs feature a translating primary plug and an auxiliary inlet ejector. Tests were conducted at takeoff and simulated cruise conditions. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. At simulated supersonic cruise, both configurations demonstrated good performance, comparable to levels assumed in earlier advanced supersonic propulsion studies. However, at subsonic cruise, both configurations exhibited performance that was 6 to 7.5 percent less than the study assumptions. At takeoff conditions, the iris configuration performance approached the assumed levels, while the short flap design was 4 to 6 percent less. Data are provided through test run 25.

  5. Application of Simulation to Facility Planning Utilizing an Organization's Forecasted Growth Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Ninfa M

    2010-01-01

    This study proposes simulation as a tool for transforming forecasted data into information that leaders can use to make strategic decisions. This study focuses on a health system's strategic decision to meet future demand by either expanding an existing hospital or developing a new 700,000-square-foot, $500M-plus facility. The researcher extracted data from forecasting reports, translated the data into scenarios, and used a simulation package to test, modify, and retest each until a best-suited scenario was identified. Simulation indicated that existing facilities could not accommodate projected demand, delineated structural and financial requirements for a replacement facility, and projected profitability of the new site by service line, program of excellence, and facility. Results of the simulation were used to secure support from the Board of Trustees and funding from financial institutions. The organization initiated construction of the 365-bed facility in late 2008 with occupancy scheduled for early 2011. PMID:21063544

  6. Three-Dimensional Unsteady Simulation of Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer in a Modern High Pressure Turbine Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Unsteady 3-D RANS simulations have been performed on a highly loaded transonic turbine stage and results are compared to steady calculations as well as to experiment. A low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model is employed to provide closure for the RANS system. A phase-lag boundary condition is used in the tangential direction. This allows the unsteady simulation to be performed by using only one blade from each of the two rows. The objective of this work is to study the effect of unsteadiness on rotor heat transfer and to glean any insight into unsteady flow physics. The role of the stator wake passing on the pressure distribution at the leading edge is also studied. The simulated heat transfer and pressure results agreed favorably with experiment. The time-averaged heat transfer predicted by the unsteady simulation is higher than the heat transfer predicted by the steady simulation everywhere except at the leading edge. The shock structure formed due to stator-rotor interaction was analyzed. Heat transfer and pressure at the hub and casing were also studied. Thermal segregation was observed that leads to the heat transfer patterns predicted by steady and unsteady simulations to be different.

  7. Scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon V.; Plessel, Todd; Merritt, Fergus; Walatka, Pamela P.; Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    The visualization methods used in computational fluid dynamics research at the NASA-Ames Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation facility are examined, including postprocessing, tracking, and steering methods. The visualization requirements of the facility's three-dimensional graphical workstation are outlined and the types hardware and software used to meet these requirements are discussed. The main features of the facility's current and next-generation workstations are listed. Emphasis is given to postprocessing techniques, such as dynamic interactive viewing on the workstation and recording and playback on videodisk, tape, and 16-mm film. Postprocessing software packages are described, including a three-dimensional plotter, a surface modeler, a graphical animation system, a flow analysis software toolkit, and a real-time interactive particle-tracer.

  8. Modeling Powered Aerodynamics for the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Aerodynamic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Robinson, Philip E.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling the aerodynamics of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) has presented many technical challenges to the developers of the Orion aerodynamic database. During a launch abort event, the aerodynamic environment around the LAV is very complex as multiple solid rocket plumes interact with each other and the vehicle. It is further complicated by vehicle separation events such as between the LAV and the launch vehicle stack or between the launch abort tower and the crew module. The aerodynamic database for the LAV was developed mainly from wind tunnel tests involving powered jet simulations of the rocket exhaust plumes, supported by computational fluid dynamic simulations. However, limitations in both methods have made it difficult to properly capture the aerodynamics of the LAV in experimental and numerical simulations. These limitations have also influenced decisions regarding the modeling and structure of the aerodynamic database for the LAV and led to compromises and creative solutions. Two database modeling approaches are presented in this paper (incremental aerodynamics and total aerodynamics), with examples showing strengths and weaknesses of each approach. In addition, the unique problems presented to the database developers by the large data space required for modeling a launch abort event illustrate the complexities of working with multi-dimensional data.

  9. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to: (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 1/Part 1 publication covers configuration aerodynamics.

  10. Simulation of the mineral dust emission over Northern Africa and Middle East using an aerodynamic roughness length map derived from the ASCAT/PARASOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, Sara; Jorba, Oriol; Pérez García-Pando, Carlos; Prigent, Catherine; Baldasano, Jose M.

    2014-05-01

    fluxes modeling, J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 118, 6505-6520, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50313, 2013. Pérez, C., Haustein, K., Janjic, Z., Jorba, O., Huneeus, N., Baldasano, J. M. and Thomson, M. Atmospheric dust modeling from meso to global scales with the online NMMB/BSC-Dust model-Part 1: Model description, annual simulations and evaluation. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11(24), 13001-13027, 2011. Prigent, C., Jiménez, C., and Catherinot, J.: Comparison of satellite microwave backscattering (ASCAT) and visible/near-infrared reflectances (PARASOL) for the estimation of aeolian aerodynamic roughness length in arid and semi-arid regions, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 5, 2703-2712, doi:10.5194/amt-5-2703-2012, 2012.

  11. N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel I is a blowdown Facility that utilizes interchangeable test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel I is a blowdown Facility that utilizes interchangeable test sections and nozzles. The facility provides experimental support for the fluid mechanics research, including experimental verification of aerodynamic computer codes and boundary-layer and airfoil studies that require high Reynolds number simulation. (Tunnel 1)

  12. Simulation study of Hohlraum experiments on SGIII-prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Huo Wenyi; Ren Guoli; Lan Ke; Li Xin; Wu Changshu; Li Yongsheng; Zhai Chuanlei; Qiao Xiumei; Meng Xujun; Lai Dongxian; Zheng Wudi; Gu Peijun; Pei Wenbing; Li Sanwei; Yi Rongqing; Song Tianming; Jiang Xiaohua; Yang Dong; Jiang Shaoen; Ding Yongkun

    2010-12-15

    The Hohlraum physics experiments performed on the SGIII-prototype laser facility are simulated by using our two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code LARED-H, and the influence of laser intensity on the two-dimensional Hohlraum simulations is studied. Both the temporal radiation temperature and the x-ray spectrum from the simulations agree well with the observations, except that the simulated M-band fraction (greater than 2 keV) is obviously smaller than the observation. According to our study, the coupling efficiency from laser to x-ray is around 70% for SGIII-prototype laser facility Hohlraums.

  13. Simulation Modeling of a Facility Layout in Operations Management Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazici, Hulya Julie

    2006-01-01

    Teaching quantitative courses can be challenging. Similarly, layout modeling and lean production concepts can be difficult to grasp in an introductory OM (operations management) class. This article describes a simulation model developed in PROMODEL to facilitate the learning of layout modeling and lean manufacturing. Simulation allows for the…

  14. Cold-air annular-cascade investigation of aerodynamic performance of core-engine-cooled turbine vanes. 1: Solid-vane performance and facility description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1975-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid (uncooled) version of a core engine cooled stator vane was experimentally determined in a full-annular cascade, where three-dimensional effects could be obtained. The solid vane, which serves as a basis for comparison with subsequent cooled tests, was tested over a range of aftermixed critical velocity ratios of 0.57 to 0.90. Overall vane aftermixed efficiencies were obtained over this critical velocity ratio range and compared with results from a two-dimensional cascade. The variation in vane efficiency and aftermixed flow conditions with circumferential and radial position were obtained and compared with design values. Vane surface static-pressure distributions were also measured and compared with theoretical results.

  15. ANTARES: Spacecraft Simulation for Multiple User Communities and Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acevedo, Amanda; Berndt, Jon; Othon, William; Arnold, Jason; Gay, Robet

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced NASA Technology Architecture for Exploration Studies (ANTARES) simulation is the primary tool being used for requirements assessment of the NASA Orion spacecraft by the Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) teams at Johnson Space Center (JSC). ANTARES is a collection of packages and model libraries that are assembled and executed by the Trick simulation environment. Currently, ANTARES is being used for spacecraft design assessment, performance analysis, requirements validation, Hardware In the Loop (HWIL) and Human In the Loop (HIL) testing.

  16. Gas-grain simulation experiment module conceptual design and gas-grain simulation facility breadboard development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamel, James M.; Petach, Michael; Gat, Nahum; Kropp, Jack; Luong, Christina; Wolff, Michael

    1993-01-01

    This report delineates the Option portion of the Phase A Gas-Grain Simulation Facility study. The conceptual design of a Gas-Grain Simulation Experiment Module (GGSEM) for Space Shuttle Middeck is discussed. In addition, a laboratory breadboard was developed during this study to develop a key function for the GGSEM and the GGSF, specifically, a solid particle cloud generating device. The breadboard design and test results are discussed and recommendations for further studies are included. The GGSEM is intended to fly on board a low earth orbit (LEO), manned platform. It will be used to perform a subset of the experiments planned for the GGSF for Space Station Freedom, as it can partially accommodate a number of the science experiments. The outcome of the experiments performed will provide an increased understanding of the operational requirements for the GGSF. The GGSEM will also act as a platform to accomplish technology development and proof-of-principle experiments for GGSF hardware, and to verify concepts and designs of hardware for GGSF. The GGSEM will allow assembled subsystems to be tested to verify facility level operation. The technology development that can be accommodated by the GGSEM includes: GGSF sample generation techniques, GGSF on-line diagnostics techniques, sample collection techniques, performance of various types of sensors for environmental monitoring, and some off-line diagnostics. Advantages and disadvantages of several LEO platforms available for GGSEM applications are identified and discussed. Several of the anticipated GGSF experiments require the deagglomeration and dispensing of dry solid particles into an experiment chamber. During the GGSF Phase A study, various techniques and devices available for the solid particle aerosol generator were reviewed. As a result of this review, solid particle deagglomeration and dispensing were identified as key undeveloped technologies in the GGSF design. A laboratory breadboard version of a solid

  17. Characterisation of the TRIUMF neutron facility using a Monte Carlo simulation code.

    PubMed

    Monk, S D; Abram, T; Joyce, M J

    2015-04-01

    Here, the characterisation of the high-energy neutron field at TRIUMF (The Tri Universities Meson Facility, Vancouver, British Columbia) with Monte Carlo simulation software is described. The package used is MCNPX version 2.6.0, with the neutron fluence rate determined at three locations within the TRIUMF Thermal Neutron Facility (TNF), including the exit of the neutron channel where users of the facility can test devices that may be susceptible to the effects of this form of radiation. The facility is often used to roughly emulate the field likely to be encountered at high altitudes due to radiation of galactic origin and thus the simulated information is compared with the energy spectrum calculated to be due to neutron radiation of cosmic origin at typical aircraft altitudes. The calculated values were also compared with neutron flux measurements that were estimated using the activation of various foils by the staff of the facility, showing agreement within an order of magnitude. PMID:25342608

  18. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in area of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodyamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  19. High Order Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of Gliding Snake Aerodynamics: Effect of 3D Flow on Gliding Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, Yann; Hassan, Syed Harris; Socha, Jake; Vlachos, Pavlos; Frankel, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Chrysopelea paradisi are snakes that are able to glide over long distances by morphing the cross section of their bodies from circular to a triangular airfoil, and undulating through the air. Snake glide is characterized by relatively low Reynolds number and high angle of attack as well as three dimensional and unsteady flow. Here we study the 3D dynamics of the flow using an in-house high-order large eddy simulation code. The code features a novel multi block immersed boundary method to accurately and efficiently represent the complex snake geometry. We investigate the steady state 3-dimensionality of the flow, especially the wake flow induced by the presence of the snake's body, as well as the vortex-body interaction thought to be responsible for part of the lift enhancement. Numerical predictions of global lift and drag will be compared to experimental measurements, as well as the lift distribution along the body of the snake due to cross sectional variations. Comparisons with previously published 2D results are made to highlight the importance of 3-dimensional effects. Additional efforts are made to quantify properties of the vortex shedding and Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) is used to analyse the main modes responsible for the lift and drag forces.

  20. 3-D laser images of splash-form tektites and their use in aerodynamic numerical simulations of tektite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, C.; Butler, S.; Fry, C.; McCausland, P. J. A.; Herd, R. K.; Sharomi, O.; Spiteri, R. J.; Ralchenko, M.

    2014-05-01

    Ten splash-form tektites from the Australasian strewn field, with masses ranging from 21.20 to 175.00 g and exhibiting a variety of shapes (teardrop, ellipsoid, dumbbell, disk), have been imaged using a high-resolution laser digitizer. Despite challenges due to the samples' rounded shapes and pitted surfaces, the images were combined to create 3-D tektite models, which captured surface features with a high fidelity (≈30 voxel mm-2) and from which volume could be measured noninvasively. The laser-derived density for the tektites averaged 2.41 ± 0.11 g cm-3. Corresponding densities obtained via the Archimedean bead method averaged 2.36 ± 0.05 g cm-3. In addition to their curational value, the 3-D models can be used to calculate the tektites' moments of inertia and rotation periods while in flight, as a probe of their formation environment. Typical tektite rotation periods are estimated to be on the order of 1 s. Numerical simulations of air flow around the models at Reynolds numbers ranging from 1 to 106 suggest that the relative velocity of the tektites with respect to the air must have been <10 m s-1 during viscous deformation. This low relative velocity is consistent with tektite material being carried along by expanding gases in the early time following the impact.

  1. Space Station gas-grain simulation facility - Application to exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, C. P.; Stoker, C. R.; Morris, J.; Conley, G.; Schwartz, D.

    1986-01-01

    The technical issues involved in performing experiments on the behavior and properties of aerosols in a microgravity environment provided by the Space Station are reviewed. The displacement of a particle resulting from g-jitter for ballistic, Knudsen, and Stokes flow regimes is examined in detail, and the radiation, acoustic, electrostatic, and electromagnetic mechanisms for the control of this motion are described. The simulation of organic haze production on Titan has been selected as an example experiment for detailed study. The purpose of this experiment was to simulate the photolysis of methane and the subsequent formation of the organic haze particles in the Titan upper atmosphere.

  2. Aerodynamic results of a separation effects test conducted in the AEDC 40 by 40 inch tunnel A facility on the Rockwell International launch configuration 3 (model-OTS) integrated vehicle (IA13), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. H., II

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted from July 5 through July 17, 1973, on a 0.01 scale model. The AEDC captive trajectory system was utilized in conjunction with the tunnel primary sector to obtain grid-type data for external tank abort from the orbiter, and for nominal separation of one solid rocket booster from the orbiter-tank combination. Booster separation was investigated with and without separation motors plume simulation. The plumes were generated by eight M sub j = 2.15 nozzles using a 1500 psia cold air supply. Free stream data were obtained for all models (orbiter, tank, orbiter-tank, and right-hand booster) to provide baselines for evaluation of proximity effects.

  3. 1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

  4. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 1/Part 2 publication covers the design optimization and testing sessions.

  5. 1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry HighSpeed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of. Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to: (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

  6. Aerodynamics model for a generic ASTOVL lift-fan aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birckelbaw, Lourdes G.; Mcneil, Walter E.; Wardwell, Douglas A.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the aerodynamics model used in a simulation model of an advanced short takeoff and vertical landing (ASTOVL) lift-fan fighter aircraft. The simulation model was developed for use in piloted evaluations of transition and hover flight regimes, so that only low speed (M approximately 0.2) aerodynamics are included in the mathematical model. The aerodynamic model includes the power-off aerodynamic forces and moments and the propulsion system induced aerodynamic effects, including ground effects. The power-off aerodynamics data were generated using the U.S. Air Force Stability and Control Digital DATCOM program and a NASA Ames in-house graphics program called VORVIEW which allows the user to easily analyze arbitrary conceptual aircraft configurations using the VORLAX program. The jet-induced data were generated using the prediction methods of R. E. Kuhn et al., as referenced in this report.

  7. X-34 Vehicle Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.

    1998-01-01

    The X-34, being designed and built by the Orbital Sciences Corporation, is an unmanned sub-orbital vehicle designed to be used as a flying test bed to demonstrate key vehicle and operational technologies applicable to future reusable launch vehicles. The X-34 will be air-launched from an L-1011 carrier aircraft at approximately Mach 0.7 and 38,000 feet altitude, where an onboard engine will accelerate the vehicle to speeds above Mach 7 and altitudes to 250,000 feet. An unpowered entry will follow, including an autonomous landing. The X-34 will demonstrate the ability to fly through inclement weather, land horizontally at a designated site, and have a rapid turn-around capability. A series of wind tunnel tests on scaled models was conducted in four facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the X-34. Analysis of these test results revealed that longitudinal trim could be achieved throughout the design trajectory. The maximum elevon deflection required to trim was only half of that available, leaving a margin for gust alleviation and aerodynamic coefficient uncertainty. Directional control can be achieved aerodynamically except at combined high Mach numbers and high angles of attack, where reaction control jets must be used. The X-34 landing speed, between 184 and 206 knots, is within the capabilities of the gear and tires, and the vehicle has sufficient rudder authority to control the required 30-knot crosswind.

  8. Aerodynamics of Wiffle Balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utvich, Alexis; Jemmott, Colin; Logan, Sheldon; Rossmann, Jenn

    2003-11-01

    A team of undergraduate students has performed experiments on Wiffle balls in the Harvey Mudd College wind tunnel facility. Wiffle balls are of particular interest because they can attain a curved trajectory with little or no pitcher-imparted spin. The reasons behind this have not previously been quantified formally. A strain gauge device was designed and constructed to measure the lift and drag forces on the Wiffle ball; a second device to measure lift and drag on a spinning ball was also developed. Experiments were conducted over a range of Reynolds numbers corresponding to speeds of roughly 0-40 mph. Lift forces of up to 0.2 N were measured for a Wiffle ball at 40 mph. This is believed to be due to air flowing into the holes on the Wiffle ball in addition to the effect of the holes on external boundary layer separation. A fog-based flow visualization system was developed in order to provide a deeper qualitative understanding of what occurred in the flowfield surrounding the ball. The data and observations obtained in this study support existing assumptions about Wiffle ball aerodynamics and begin to elucidate the mechanisms involved in Wiffle ball flight.

  9. Design tradeoffs in the development of the advanced multispectral simulation test acceptance resource (AMSTAR) HWIL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeSueur, Kenneth G.; Almendinger, Frank J.

    2007-04-01

    The Army's Advanced Multispectral Simulation Test Acceptance Resource (AMSTAR) is a suite of missile Hardware-In-the-Loop (HWIL) simulation / test capabilities designed to support testing from concept through production. This paper presents the design tradeoffs that were conducted in the development of the AMSTAR sensor stimulators and the flight motion simulators. The AMSTAR facility design includes systems to stimulate each of the Millimeter Wave (MMW), Infrared (IR), and Semi-Active Laser (SAL) sensors. The flight motion simulator (FMS) performance was key to the success of the simulation but required many concessions to accommodate the design considerations for the tri-mode stimulation systems.

  10. Ames T-3 fire test facility - Aircraft crash fire simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    There is a need to characterize the thermal response of materials exposed to aircraft fuel fires. Large scale open fire tests are costly and pollute the local environment. This paper describes the construction and operation of a subscale fire test that simulates the heat flux levels and thermochemistry of typical open pool fires. It has been termed the Ames T-3 Test and has been used extensively by NASA since 1969 to observe the behavior of materials exposed to JP-4 fuel fires.

  11. Monte Carlo simulations for design of the KFUPM PGNAA facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, A. A.; Nagadi, M. M.; Khateeb-ur-Rehman; Maslehuddin, M.; Kidwai, S.

    2003-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to design a 2.8 MeV neutron-based prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup for elemental analysis of cement samples. The elemental analysis was carried out using prompt gamma rays produced through capture of thermal neutrons in sample nuclei. The basic design of the PGNAA setup consists of a cylindrical cement sample enclosed in a cylindrical high-density polyethylene moderator placed between a neutron source and a gamma ray detector. In these simulations the predominant geometrical parameters of the PGNAA setup were optimized, including moderator size, sample size and shielding of the detector. Using the results of the simulations, an experimental PGNAA setup was then fabricated at the 350 kV Accelerator Laboratory of this University. The design calculations were checked experimentally through thermal neutron flux measurements inside the PGNAA moderator. A test prompt gamma ray spectrum of the PGNAA setup was also acquired from a Portland cement sample, using a pulsed beam of 2.8 MeV neutrons. Prompt gamma ray peaks due to the calcium, silicon and iron content of the Portland cement were detected.

  12. Uncertainty in Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Hemsch, M. J.; Morrison, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    An approach is presented to treat computational aerodynamics as a process, subject to the fundamental quality assurance principles of process control and process improvement. We consider several aspects affecting uncertainty for the computational aerodynamic process and present a set of stages to determine the level of management required to meet risk assumptions desired by the customer of the predictions.

  13. System Identification of a Vortex Lattice Aerodynamic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Kholodar, Denis; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The state-space presentation of an aerodynamic vortex model is considered from a classical and system identification perspective. Using an aerodynamic vortex model as a numerical simulator of a wing tunnel experiment, both full state and limited state data or measurements are considered. Two possible approaches for system identification are presented and modal controllability and observability are also considered. The theory then is applied to the system identification of a flow over an aerodynamic delta wing and typical results are presented.

  14. Turbine disk cavity aerodynamics and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Daniels, W. A.

    1992-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to define the nature of the aerodynamics and heat transfer for the flow within the disk cavities and blade attachments of a large-scale model, simulating the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump drive turbines. These experiments of the aerodynamic driving mechanisms explored the following: (1) flow between the main gas path and the disk cavities; (2) coolant flow injected into the disk cavities; (3) coolant density; (4) leakage flows through the seal between blades; and (5) the role that each of these various flows has in determining the adiabatic recovery temperature at all of the critical locations within the cavities. The model and the test apparatus provide close geometrical and aerodynamic simulation of all the two-stage cavity flow regions for the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump and the ability to simulate the sources and sinks for each cavity flow.

  15. A low Earth orbit molecular beam space simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    A brief synopsis of the low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite environment is presented including neutral and ionic species. Two ground based atomic and molecular beam instruments are described which are capable of simulating the interaction of spacecraft surfaces with the LEO environment and detecting the results of these interactions. The first detects mass spectrometrically low level fluxes of reactively and nonreactively surface scattered species as a function of scattering angle and velocity while the second ultrahigh velocity (UHV) molecular beam, laser induced fluorescence apparatus is capable of measuring chemiluminescence produced by either gas phase or gas-surface interactions. A number of proposed experiments are described.

  16. Commercial facility site selection simulating based on MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yi; Li, Qingquan; Zheng, Guizhou

    2008-10-01

    The location of commercial facility decides the benefit of the operator to a large degree. Existing location methods can express the static relationships between site selection result and location factors, but there still are some limites when express the dynamic and uncertain relationship between them. Hence, a dynamic, stochastic and forecastable location model should be built which can introduce the customer's behavior into the model and combine the macro pattern and micro spatial interaction. So the authors proposes Geosim-LM based on MAS. Geosim-LM has 3 kinds of agents, CustAgent, SiteAgent and GovAgent. They represent the customers, commercial fercilities and government. The land type, land price and traffic are the model environment. Then Geosim-LM is applied in the bank branches site evaluation and selection in Liwan district, Guangzhou. In existing bank branches site evaluation, there are 70% consistent in score grade between result of Geosim-LM after 200 round runing and actual rebust location. It proves the model is reliable and feasible. The conclusions can be get from the paper. MAS have advantages in location choice than existed methods. The result of Geosim-LM running can powerfully proves that building location model based on MAS is feasible.

  17. Space simulation techniques and facilities for SAX STM test campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giordano, Pietro; Raimondo, Giacomo; Messidoro, Piero

    1994-01-01

    SAX is a satellite for X-Ray astronomy. It is a major element of the overall basic Science Program of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and is being developed with the contribution of the Netherlands Agency for Aerospace Programs (NIVR). The scientific objectives of SAX are to carry out systematic and comprehensive observations of celestial X-Ray sources over the 0.1 - 300 KeV energy range with special emphasis on spectral and timing measurements. The satellite will also monitor the X-Ray sky to investigate long-term source variability and to permit localization and study of X-Ray transients. Alenia Spazio is developing the satellite that is intended for launch in the second half of 1995 in a low, near-equatorial Earth orbit. At system level a Structural Thermal Model (STM) has been conceived to verify the environmental requirements by validating the mechanical and thermal analytical models and qualifying satellite structure and thermal control. In particular, the following tests have been carried out in Alenia Spazio, CEA/CESTA and ESTEC facilities: Modal Survey, Centrifuge, Acoustic, Sinusoidal/Random Vibration and Thermal Balance. The paper, after a short introduction of the SAX satellite, summarizes the environmental qualification program performed on the SAX STM. It presents test objectives, methodologies and relevant test configurations. Peculiar aspects of the test campaign are highlighted. Problems encountered and solutions adopted in performing the tests are described as well. Furthermore, test results are presented and assessed.

  18. Simulation of a spatial, servo-hydraulic test facility for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimbach, K.-D.; Hahn, H.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper different control concepts for servo-hydraulic test facilities are derived using exact linearization techniques. Based on different linear and nonlinear models of the test table and the actuator dynamics several nonlinear controllers of different complexity are derived. The closed loop system performance of the controlled servo-hydraulic test facility is tested in various computer simulations using both, standard test signals and large test signals as system inputs. The simulation results turn out, that in case of standard input signals the test facility controller must include a linear test table mechanics model and a nonlinear servo-hydraulic actuator model. Additional simulations demonstrate the robustness of the control concept selected for standard test signals with respect to variations of plant parameters.

  19. Experimental static aerodynamic forces and moments at high subsonic speeds on a missile model during simulated launching from the midsemispan location of a 45 degree sweptback wing-fuselage-pylon combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, William J; King, Thomas, Jr

    1957-01-01

    An investigation was made at high subsonic speeds in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the static aerodynamic forces and moments on a missile model during simulated launching from the midsemispan location of a 45 degree sweptback wing-fuselage-pylon combination. The results indicated significant variations in all the aerodynamic components with changes in chordwise location of the missile. Increasing the angle of attack caused increases in the induced effects on the missile model because of the wing-fuselage-pylon combination. Increasing the Mach number had little effect on the variations of the missile aerodynamic characteristics with angle of attack except that nonlinearities were incurred at smaller angles of attack for the higher Mach numbers. The effects of finite wing thickness on the missile characteristics, at zero angle of attack, increase with increasing Mach number. The effects of the pylon on the missile characteristics were to causeincreases in the rolling-moment variation with angle of attack and a negative displacement of the pitching-moment curves at zero angle of attack. The effects of skewing the missile in the lateral direction relative to and sideslipping the missile with the wing-fuselage-pylon combination were to cause additional increments in side force at zero angle of attack. For the missile yawing moments the effects of changes in skew or sideslip angles were qualitatively as would be expected from consideration of the isolated missile characteristics, although there existed differences in theyawing-moment magnitudes.

  20. Beam dynamics simulations and measurements at the Project X Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Scarpine, V.E.; Webber, R.C.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project X, under study at Fermilab, is a multitask high-power superconducting RF proton beam facility, aiming to provide high intensity protons for rare processes experiments and nuclear physics at low energy, and simultaneously for the production of neutrinos, as well as muon beams in the long term. A beam test facility - former known as High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) - is under commissioning for testing critical components of the project, e.g. dynamics and diagnostics at low beam energies, broadband beam chopping, RF power generation and distribution. In this paper we describe the layout of the test facility and present beam dynamics simulations and measurements.

  1. Darrieus rotor aerodynamics in turbulent wind

    SciTech Connect

    Brahimi, M.T.; Paraschivoiu, I.

    1995-05-01

    The earlier aerodynamic models for studying vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT`s) are based on constant incident wind conditions and are thus capable of predicting only periodic variations in the loads. The purpose of the present study is to develop a model capable of predicting the aerodynamic loads on the Darrieus rotor in a turbulent wind. This model is based on the double-multiple streamtube method (DMS) and incorporates a stochastic wind model. The method used to simulate turbulent velocity fluctuations is based on the power spectral density. The problem consists in generating a region of turbulent flow with a relevant spectrum and spatial correlation. The first aerodynamic code developed is based on a one-dimensional turbulent wind model. However, since this model ignores the structure of the turbulence in the crossflow plane, an extension to three dimensions has been made. The computer code developed, CARDAAS, has been used to predict aerodynamic loads for the Sandia-17m rotor and compared to CARDAAV results and experimental data. Results have shown that the computed aerodynamic loads have been improved by including stochastic wind into the aerodynamic model.

  2. Design and Validation of Control Room Upgrades Using a Research Simulator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Jeffrey C. Joe; Julius J. Persensky

    2012-11-01

    Since 1981, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) [1] requires a plant- specific simulator facility for use in training at U.S. nuclear power plants (NPPs). These training simulators are in near constant use for training and qualification of licensed NPP operators. In the early 1980s, the Halden Man-Machine Laboratory (HAMMLab) at the Halden Reactor Project (HRP) in Norway first built perhaps the most well known set of research simulators. The HRP offered a high- fidelity simulator facility in which the simulator is functionally linked to a specific plant but in which the human-machine interface (HMI) may differ from that found in the plant. As such, HAMMLab incorporated more advanced digital instrumentation and controls (I&C) than the plant, thereby giving it considerable interface flexibility that researchers took full advantage of when designing and validating different ways to upgrade NPP control rooms. Several U.S. partners—the U.S. NRC, the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI), Sandia National Laboratories, and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) – as well as international members of the HRP, have been working with HRP to run control room simulator studies. These studies, which use crews from Scandinavian plants, are used to determine crew behavior in a variety of normal and off-normal plant operations. The findings have ultimately been used to guide safety considerations at plants and to inform advanced HMI design—both for the regulator and in industry. Given the desire to use U.S. crews of licensed operators on a simulator of a U.S. NPP, there is a clear need for a research simulator facility in the U.S. There is no general-purpose reconfigurable research oriented control room simulator facility in the U.S. that can be used for a variety of studies, including the design and validation of control room upgrades.

  3. Aerodynamic Design Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan; Madavan, Nateri K.

    2003-01-01

    The design of aerodynamic components of aircraft, such as wings or engines, involves a process of obtaining the most optimal component shape that can deliver the desired level of component performance, subject to various constraints, e.g., total weight or cost, that the component must satisfy. Aerodynamic design can thus be formulated as an optimization problem that involves the minimization of an objective function subject to constraints. A new aerodynamic design optimization procedure based on neural networks and response surface methodology (RSM) incorporates the advantages of both traditional RSM and neural networks. The procedure uses a strategy, denoted parameter-based partitioning of the design space, to construct a sequence of response surfaces based on both neural networks and polynomial fits to traverse the design space in search of the optimal solution. Some desirable characteristics of the new design optimization procedure include the ability to handle a variety of design objectives, easily impose constraints, and incorporate design guidelines and rules of thumb. It provides an infrastructure for variable fidelity analysis and reduces the cost of computation by using less-expensive, lower fidelity simulations in the early stages of the design evolution. The initial or starting design can be far from optimal. The procedure is easy and economical to use in large-dimensional design space and can be used to perform design tradeoff studies rapidly. Designs involving multiple disciplines can also be optimized. Some practical applications of the design procedure that have demonstrated some of its capabilities include the inverse design of an optimal turbine airfoil starting from a generic shape and the redesign of transonic turbines to improve their unsteady aerodynamic characteristics.

  4. In-flight simulation studies at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Mary F.

    1994-01-01

    Since the late 1950's the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Facility has found in-flight simulation to be an invaluable tool. In-flight simulation has been used to address a wide variety of flying qualities questions, including low lift-to-drag ratio approach characteristics for vehicles like the X-15, the lifting bodies, and the space shuttle; the effects of time delays on controllability of aircraft with digital flight control systems; the causes and cures of pilot-induced oscillation in a variety of aircraft; and flight control systems for such diverse aircraft as the X-15 and the X-29. In-flight simulation has also been used to anticipate problems, avoid them, and solve problems once they appear. This paper presents an account of the in-flight simulation at the Dryden Flight Research Facility and some discussion. An extensive bibliography is included.

  5. Global Aerodynamic Modeling for Stall/Upset Recovery Training Using Efficient Piloted Flight Test Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Cunningham, Kevin; Hill, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Flight test and modeling techniques were developed for efficiently identifying global aerodynamic models that can be used to accurately simulate stall, upset, and recovery on large transport airplanes. The techniques were developed and validated in a high-fidelity fixed-base flight simulator using a wind-tunnel aerodynamic database, realistic sensor characteristics, and a realistic flight deck representative of a large transport aircraft. Results demonstrated that aerodynamic models for stall, upset, and recovery can be identified rapidly and accurately using relatively simple piloted flight test maneuvers. Stall maneuver predictions and comparisons of identified aerodynamic models with data from the underlying simulation aerodynamic database were used to validate the techniques.

  6. Aerodynamics of magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schetz, Joseph A.; Marchman, James F., III

    1996-01-01

    High-speed (500 kph) trains using magnetic forces for levitation, propulsion and control offer many advantages for the nation and a good opportunity for the aerospace community to apply 'high tech' methods to the domestic sector. One area of many that will need advanced research is the aerodynamics of such MAGLEV (Magnetic Levitation) vehicles. There are important issues with regard to wind tunnel testing and the application of CFD to these devices. This talk will deal with the aerodynamic design of MAGLEV vehicles with emphasis on wind tunnel testing. The moving track facility designed and constructed in the 6 ft. Stability Wind Tunnel at Virginia Tech will be described. Test results for a variety of MAGLEV vehicle configurations will be presented. The last topic to be discussed is a Multi-disciplinary Design approach that is being applied to MAGLEV vehicle configuration design including aerodynamics, structures, manufacturability and life-cycle cost.

  7. Aerodynamic tests of Darrieus wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P.G.; Walters, R.E.; Wolfe, W.P.

    1983-03-01

    An indoor facility for the aerodynamic testing of Darrieus turbine blades was developed. Lift, drag, and moment coefficients were measured for two blades whose angle of attack and chord-to-radius ratio were varied. The first blade used an NACA 0015 airfoil section; the second used a 15% elliptical cross section with a modified circular arc trailing edge. Blade aerodynamic coefficients were corrected to section coefficients for comparison to published rectilinear flow data. Although the airfoil sections were symmetrical, moment coefficients were not zero and the lift and drag curves were asymmetrical about zero lift coefficient and angle of attack. These features verified the predicted virtual camber and incidence phenomena. Boundary-layer centrifugal effects were manifested by discontinuous lift curves and large differences in the angle of zero lift between th NACA 0015 and elliptical airfoils. It was concluded that rectilinear flow aerodynamic data are not applicable to Darrieus turbine blades, even for small chord-to-radius ratios.

  8. Aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale semispan model with a swept wing and an augmented jet flap with hypermixing nozzles. [Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel and Static Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, T. N.; Falarski, M. D.; Koenin, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the augmentor wing concept with hypermixing primary nozzles were investigated. A large-scale semispan model in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel and Static Test Facility was used. The trailing edge, augmentor flap system occupied 65% of the span and consisted of two fixed pivot flaps. The nozzle system consisted of hypermixing, lobe primary nozzles, and BLC slot nozzles at the forward inlet, both sides and ends of the throat, and at the aft flap. The entire wing leading edge was fitted with a 10% chord slat and a blowing slot. Outboard of the flap was a blown aileron. The model was tested statically and at forward speed. Primary parameters and their ranges included angle of attack from -12 to 32 degrees, flap angles of 20, 30, 45, 60 and 70 degrees, and deflection and diffuser area ratios from 1.16 to 2.22. Thrust coefficients ranged from 0 to 2.73, while nozzle pressure ratios varied from 1.0 to 2.34. Reynolds number per foot varied from 0 to 1.4 million. Analysis of the data indicated a maximum static, gross augmentation of 1.53 at a flap angle of 45 degrees. Analysis also indicated that the configuration was an efficient powered lift device and that the net thrust was comparable with augmentor wings of similar static performance. Performance at forward speed was best at a diffuser area ratio of 1.37.

  9. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  10. Characterization of Vacuum Facility Background Gas Through Simulation and Considerations for Electric Propulsion Ground Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yim, John T.; Burt, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The background gas in a vacuum facility for electric propulsion ground testing is examined in detail through a series of cold flow simulations using a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code. The focus here is on the background gas itself, its structure and characteristics, rather than assessing its interaction and impact on thruster operation. The background gas, which is often incorrectly characterized as uniform, is found to have a notable velocity within a test facility. The gas velocity has an impact on the proper measurement of pressure and the calculation of ingestion flux to a thruster. There are also considerations for best practices for tests that involve the introduction of supplemental gas flows to artificially increase the background pressure. All of these effects need to be accounted for to properly characterize the operation of electric propulsion thrusters across different ground test vacuum facilities.

  11. A simulated lightning effects test facility for testing live and inert missiles and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Jeffery D.; Knaur, James A.; Moore, Truman W., Jr.; Shumpert, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Details of a simulated lightning effects test facility for testing live and inert missiles, motors, and explosive components are described. The test facility is designed to simulate the high current, continuing current, and high rate-of-rise current components of an idealized direct strike lightning waveform. The Lightning Test Facility was in operation since May, 1988, and consists of: 3 separate capacitor banks used to produce the lightning test components; a permanently fixed large steel safety cage for retaining the item under test (should it be ignited during testing); an earth covered bunker housing the control/equipment room; a charge/discharge building containing the charging/discharging switching; a remotely located blockhouse from which the test personnel control hazardous testing; and interconnecting cables.

  12. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  13. Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Jungil; Park, Hyungmin

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the aerodynamics of heavy vehicles, such as tractor-trailers, high-speed trains, and buses. We introduce three-dimensional flow structures around simplified model vehicles and heavy vehicles and discuss the flow-control devices used for drag reduction. Finally, we suggest important unsteady flow structures to investigate for the enhancement of aerodynamic performance and future directions for experimental and numerical approaches.

  14. A Distributed Simulation Facility to Support Human Factors Research in Advanced Air Transportation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amonlirdviman, Keith; Farley, Todd C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Ladik, John F.; Sherer, Dana Z.

    1998-01-01

    A distributed real-time simulation of the civil air traffic environment developed to support human factors research in advanced air transportation technology is presented. The distributed environment is based on a custom simulation architecture designed for simplicity and flexibility in human experiments. Standard Internet protocols are used to create the distributed environment, linking all advanced cockpit simulator, all Air Traffic Control simulator, and a pseudo-aircraft control and simulation management station. The pseudo-aircraft control station also functions as a scenario design tool for coordinating human factors experiments. This station incorporates a pseudo-pilot interface designed to reduce workload for human operators piloting multiple aircraft simultaneously in real time. The application of this distributed simulation facility to support a study of the effect of shared information (via air-ground datalink) on pilot/controller shared situation awareness and re-route negotiation is also presented.

  15. The development of a facility for full-scale testing of airfoil performance in simulated rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, John T.; Moore, Cadd T., III; Campbell, Bryan A.; Melson, W. EDWARD., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Langley's Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility has been adapted in order to test the performance of airfoils in a simulated rain environment, at rainfall rates of 2, 10, 30, and 40 inches/hour, and thereby derive the scaling laws associated with simulated rain in wind tunnel testing. A full-scale prototype of the rain-generation system has been constructed and tested for suitable rain intensity, uniformity, effects of crosswinds on uniformity, and drop size range. The results of a wind tunnel test aimed at ascertaining the minimum length of the simulated rain field required to yield an airfoil performance change due to the rain environment are presented.

  16. Evaluation of aerodynamic derivatives from a magnetic balance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghunath, B. S.; Parker, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    The dynamic testing of a model in the University of Virginia cold magnetic balance wind-tunnel facility is expected to consist of measurements of the balance forces and moments, and the observation of the essentially six degree of freedom motion of the model. The aerodynamic derivatives of the model are to be evaluated from these observations. The basic feasibility of extracting aerodynamic information from the observation of a model which is executing transient, complex, multi-degree of freedom motion is demonstrated. It is considered significant that, though the problem treated here involves only linear aerodynamics, the methods used are capable of handling a very large class of aerodynamic nonlinearities. The basic considerations include the effect of noise in the data on the accuracy of the extracted information. Relationships between noise level and the accuracy of the evaluated aerodynamic derivatives are presented.

  17. Unsteady Nonlinear Aerodynamic Response Modeling: A Data-Priven Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemati, Maziar; Dawson, Scott; Rowley, Clarence

    2014-11-01

    Current real-time-capable aerodynamic modeling strategies are greatly challenged in the face of aggressive flight maneuvers, such as rapid pitching motions that lead to pronounced leading-edge vortex shedding and aerodynamic stall. The inability to accurately and robustly predict, in a low-dimensional manner, the nonlinear aerodynamic force/moment response of an aircraft to sharp maneuvers puts practical approaches for aerodynamic optimization and control out of reach. Here, we propose a parameter-varying model to approximate the response of an airfoil to arbitrarily prescribed rapid pitching kinematics. An output-minimization procedure is invoked to identify the nonlinear model from input-output data gathered from direct numerical fluid dynamics simulations. The resulting nonlinear models have noteworthy predictive capabilities for arbitrary pitching maneuvers that span a broad range of operating regimes, thus making the models especially useful for aerodynamic optimization and real-time control and simulation.

  18. University of Missouri-Rolla cloud simulation facility: Proto II chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Daniel R.; Kassner, James L.; Carstens, John C.; Hagen, Donald E.; Schmitt, John L.; Alofs, Darryl J.; Hopkins, Alfred R.; Trueblood, Max B.; Alcorn, Max W.; Walker, William L.

    1987-05-01

    The Graduate Center for Cloud Physics Research at UMR has developed a cloud simulation facility to study phenomena occurring in terrestrial clouds and fogs. The facility consists of a pair of precision cooled-wall expansion chambers along with extensive supporting equipment. The smaller of these chambers, described in this article, is fully operational, and is capable of simulating a broad range of in-cloud thermodynamic conditions. It is currently being used to study water drop growth and evaporation for drops nucleated (activated) on well-characterized aerosol particles. Measurements have been made not only for continuous expansions (simulated updraft) but also for cyclic conditions, i.e., sequences of expansion-compression cycles resulting in alternating drop growth and evaporation. The larger of the two cloud chambers is nearing completion and will provide a broader range of conditions than the smaller chamber. The facility is supported by a fully implemented aerosol laboratory which routinely produces well-characterized condensation nuclei. The aerosol laboratory contains extensive instrumentation designed to both shape and measure the size distribution and nucleating characteristics of the generated aerosol. The cloud simulation facility also includes a humidifier to bring an air sample to a known humidity before it is put into the cloud chamber. A systematic program to infer effective condensation coefficients (of water vapor on cloud drop) under a variety of well-controlled simulated in-cloud conditions is now under way. Analysis of current experiments with standard drop growth theory indicates a variation of condensation coefficient with observation time, with values sufficiently low to explain one of the current mysteries in cloud physics: viz., the broad spread of drop sizes observed in natural clouds. This article includes a description and performance specifications of the smaller cloud simulation chamber.

  19. Geant4 simulation of the CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility.

    PubMed

    Prokopovich, D A; Reinhard, M I; Cornelius, I M; Rosenfeld, A B

    2010-09-01

    The CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility is used for testing and calibrating both active and passive radiation dosemeters for radiation protection applications in space and aviation. Through a combination of a primary particle beam, target and a suitable designed shielding configuration, the facility is able to reproduce the neutron component of the high altitude radiation field relevant to the jet aviation industry. Simulations of the facility using the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) toolkit provide an improved understanding of the neutron particle fluence as well as the particle fluence of other radiation components present. The secondary particle fluence as a function of the primary particle fluence incident on the target and the associated dose equivalent rates were determined at the 20 designated irradiation positions available at the facility. Comparisons of the simulated results with previously published simulations obtained using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, as well as with experimental results of the neutron fluence obtained with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, are made. PMID:20511404

  20. Aerodynamic Parameter Identification of a Venus Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Robert A.

    An analysis was conducted to identify the parameters of an aerodynamic model for a Venus lander based on experimental free-flight data. The experimental free-flight data were collected in the NASA Langley 20-ft Vertical Spin Tunnel with a 25-percent Froude-scaled model. The experimental data were classified based on the wind tunnel run type: runs where the lander model was unperturbed over the course of the run, and runs were the model was perturbed (principally in pitch, yaw, and roll) by the wind tunnel operator. The perturbations allow for data to be obtained at higher wind angles and rotation rates than those available from the unperturbed data. The model properties and equations of motion were used to determine experimental values for the aerodynamic coefficients. An aerodynamic model was selected using a priori knowledge of axisymmetric blunt entry vehicles. The least squares method was used to estimate the aerodynamic parameters. Three sets of results were obtained from the following data sets: perturbed, unperturbed, and the combination of both. The combined data set was selected for the final set of aerodynamic parameters based on the quality of the results. The identified aerodynamic parameters are consistent with that of the static wind tunnel data. Reconstructions, of experimental data not used in the parameter identification analyses, achieved similar residuals as those with data used to identify the parameters. Simulations of the experimental data, using the identified parameters, indicate that the aerodynamic model used is incapable of replicating the limit cycle oscillations with stochastic peak amplitudes observed during the test.

  1. Orion Crew Module Aerodynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Bibb, Karen L.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Owens, Bruce; Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Bell, James H.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    The Apollo-derived Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), part of NASA s now-cancelled Constellation Program, has become the reference design for the new Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). The MPCV will serve as the exploration vehicle for all near-term human space missions. A strategic wind-tunnel test program has been executed at numerous facilities throughout the country to support several phases of aerodynamic database development for the Orion spacecraft. This paper presents a summary of the experimental static aerodynamic data collected to-date for the Orion Crew Module (CM) capsule. The test program described herein involved personnel and resources from NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Johnson Space Flight Center, Arnold Engineering and Development Center, Lockheed Martin Space Sciences, and Orbital Sciences. Data has been compiled from eight different wind tunnel tests in the CEV Aerosciences Program. Comparisons are made as appropriate to highlight effects of angle of attack, Mach number, Reynolds number, and model support system effects.

  2. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will design, build, and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604BOO02G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate the aerodynamic flight database for the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. Al these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  3. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database in the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  4. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database i n the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  5. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database in the hypersonic regime, The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  6. Tactical missile aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J. (Editor); Nielsen, Jack N. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on tactical missile aerodynamics discusses autopilot-related aerodynamic design considerations, flow visualization methods' role in the study of high angle-of-attack aerodynamics, low aspect ratio wing behavior at high angle-of-attack, supersonic airbreathing propulsion system inlet design, missile bodies with noncircular cross section and bank-to-turn maneuvering capabilities, 'waverider' supersonic cruise missile concepts and design methods, asymmetric vortex sheding phenomena from bodies-of-revolution, and swept shock wave/boundary layer interaction phenomena. Also discussed are the assessment of aerodynamic drag in tactical missiles, the analysis of supersonic missile aerodynamic heating, the 'equivalent angle-of-attack' concept for engineering analysis, the vortex cloud model for body vortex shedding and tracking, paneling methods with vorticity effects and corrections for nonlinear compressibility, the application of supersonic full potential method to missile bodies, Euler space marching methods for missiles, three-dimensional missile boundary layers, and an analysis of exhaust plumes and their interaction with missile airframes.

  7. Aerodynamic analysis of an isolated vehicle wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leśniewicz, P.; Kulak, M.; Karczewski, M.

    2014-08-01

    Increasing fuel prices force the manufacturers to look into all aspects of car aerodynamics including wheels, tyres and rims in order to minimize their drag. By diminishing the aerodynamic drag of vehicle the fuel consumption will decrease, while driving safety and comfort will improve. In order to properly illustrate the impact of a rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body, precise analysis of an isolated wheel should be performed beforehand. In order to represent wheel rotation in contact with the ground, presented CFD simulations included Moving Wall boundary as well as Multiple Reference Frame should be performed. Sliding mesh approach is favoured but too costly at the moment. Global and local flow quantities obtained during simulations were compared to an experiment in order to assess the validity of the numerical model. Results of investigation illustrates dependency between type of simulation and coefficients (drag and lift). MRF approach proved to be a better solution giving result closer to experiment. Investigation of the model with contact area between the wheel and the ground helps to illustrate the impact of rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body.

  8. Development of a Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Time-Resolved Gas Flow Velocity, Temperature, and Density Measurements in Aerodynamic Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2007-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultiplier tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. An acoustically driven nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements, and an asymmetric oscillating counterflow with unequal enthalpies is studied to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations. Velocity fluctuations are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements and temperature fluctuations are compared with constant current anemometry measurements at the same locations. Time-series and power spectra of the temperature and velocity measurements are presented. A numerical simulation of the light scattering and detection process was developed and compared with experimental data for future use as an experiment design tool.

  9. National Transonic Facility: A review of the operational plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liepmann, H. W.; Black, R. E.; Dietz, R. O.; Kirchner, M. E.; Sears, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The proposed National Transonic Facility (NTF) operational plan is reviewed. The NTF will provide an aerodynamic test capability significantly exceeding that of other transonic regime wind tunnels now available. A limited number of academic research program that might use the NTF are suggested. It is concluded that the NTF operational plan is useful for management, technical, instrumentation, and model building techniques available in the specialized field of aerodynamic analysis and simulation. It is also suggested that NASA hold an annual conference to discuss wind tunnel research results and to report on developments that will further improve the utilization and cost effectiveness of the NTF and other wind tunnels.

  10. Simulations for the future converter of the e-linac for the TRIUMF ARIEL facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebois, M.; Bricault, P.

    2011-09-01

    In the next years, TRIUMF activity will be focused on building a new facility to produce very intense neutron rich radioactive ion beams. Unlike others ISOL facilities, the e-linac primary beam, that will induce the fission, is an intense electron beam (50 MeV energy and 10 mA intensity). This challenging choice, which make this installation unique, despite the ALTO facility, makes an average fission rate of 1013-14fissions/s in the target.This beam is sent on an uranium carbide target (UCx), but due to its power, it is essential to insert a "converter" on the beam path to avoid a target overheating. The purpose of this converter is to convert electrons into Bremsstralhung radiation. The γ rays produce excite the dipole resonance of 23892U (15 MeV) inducing fission. Energy deposition, fission rate and thermal behavior were simulated using Monte Carlo techniques are presented in this paper

  11. Applied computational aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The present volume discusses the original development of the panel method, the mapping solutions and singularity distributions of linear potential schemes, the capabilities of full-potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes schemes, the use of the grid-generation methodology in applied aerodynamics, subsonic airfoil design, inverse airfoil design for transonic applications, the divergent trailing-edge airfoil innovation in CFD, Euler and potential computational results for selected aerodynamic configurations, and the application of CFD to wing high-lift systems. Also discussed are high-lift wing modifications for an advanced-capability EA-6B aircraft, Navier-Stokes methods for internal and integrated propulsion system flow predictions, the use of zonal techniques for analysis of rotor-stator interaction, CFD applications to complex configurations, CFD applications in component aerodynamic design of the V-22, Navier-Stokes computations of a complete F-16, CFD at supersonic/hypersonic speeds, and future CFD developments.

  12. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  13. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 3: Graphical data book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    A graphical presentation of the aerodynamic data acquired during coannular nozzle performance wind tunnel tests is given. The graphical data consist of plots of nozzle gross thrust coefficient, fan nozzle discharge coefficient, and primary nozzle discharge coefficient. Normalized model component static pressure distributions are presented as a function of primary total pressure, fan total pressure, and ambient static pressure for selected operating conditions. In addition, the supersonic cruise configuration data include plots of nozzle efficiency and secondary-to-fan total pressure pumping characteristics. Supersonic and subsonic cruise data are given.

  14. Development and integration of the Army's Advanced Multispectral Simulation Test Acceptance Resource (AMSTAR) HWIL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeSueur, Kenneth G.; Lowry, William; Morris, Joe

    2006-05-01

    The Advanced Multispectral Simulation Test Acceptance Resource (AMSTAR) is a suite of state-of-the-art hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation / test capabilities designed to meet the life-cycle testing needs of multi-spectral systems. This paper presents the major AMSTAR facility design concepts and each of the Millimeter Wave (MMW), Infrared (IR), and Semi-Active Laser (SAL) in-band scene generation and projection system designs. The emergence of Multispectral sensors in missile systems necessitates capabilities such as AMSTAR to simultaneous project MMW, IR, and SAL wave bands into a common sensor aperture.

  15. Development and integration of the Army's advanced multispectral simulation test acceptance resource (AMSTAR) HWIL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeSueur, Kenneth G.; Lowry, William; Morris, Joe

    2005-05-01

    The Advanced Multispectral Simulation Test Acceptance Resource (AMSTAR) is a suite of state-of-the-art Hardware-In-the-Loop (HWIL) simulation / test capabilities designed to meet the life-cycle testing needs of multi-spectral systems. This paper presents the major AMSTAR facility design concepts and each of the Millimeter Wave (MMW), Infrared (IR), and Semi-Active Laser (SAL) in-band scene generation and projection system designs. The emergence of Multispectral sensors in missile systems necessitates capabilities such as AMSTAR to simultaneous project MMW, IR, and SAL wave bands into a common sensor aperture.

  16. The determination of some requirements for a helicopter flight research simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinacori, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Important requirements were defined for a flight simulation facility to support Army helicopter development. In particular requirements associated with the visual and motion subsystems of the planned simulator were studied. The method used in the motion requirements study is presented together with the underlying assumptions and a description of the supporting data. Results are given in a form suitable for use in a preliminary design. Visual requirements associated with a television camera/model concept are related. The important parameters are described together with substantiating data and assumptions. Research recommendations are given.

  17. Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, J. B.; Lan, C. Edward

    1989-01-01

    Thrust vectoring as a means to enhance maneuverability and aerodynamic performane of a tactical aircraft is discussed. This concept usually involves the installation of a multifunction nozzle. With the nozzle, the engine thrust can be changed in direction without changing the attitude of the aircraft. Change in the direction of thrust induces a significant change in the aerodynamic forces on the aircraft. Therefore, this device can be used for lift-augmenting as well as stability and control purposes. When the thrust is deflected in the longitudinal direction, the lift force and the pitching stability can be manipulated, while the yawing stability can be controlled by directing the thrust in the lateral direction.

  18. A simulated annealing approach to schedule optimization for the SES facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahon, Mary Beth; Dean, Jack

    1992-01-01

    The Shuttle Engineering Simulator (SES) is a facility which houses the software and hardware for a variety of simulation systems. The simulators include the Autonomous Remote Manipulator, the Manned Maneuvering Unit, Orbiter/Space Station docking, and shuttle entry and landing. The SES simulators are used by various groups throughout NASA. For example, astronauts use the SES to practice maneuvers with the shuttle equipment; programmers use the SES to test flight software; and engineers use the SES for design and analysis studies. Due to its high demand, the SES is busy twenty-four hours a day and seven days a week. Scheduling the facility is a problem that is constantly growing and changing with the addition of new equipment. Currently a number of small independent programs have been developed to help solve the problem, but the long-term answer lies in finding a flexible, integrated system that provides the user with the ability to create, optimize, and edit the schedule. COMPASS is an interactive and highly flexible scheduling system. However, until recently COMPASS did not provide any optimization features. This paper describes the simulated annealing extension to COMPASS. It now allows the user to interweave schedule creation, revision, and optimization. This practical approach was necessary in order to satisfy the operational requirements of the SES.

  19. Simulation of hydraulic disturbances caused by the underground rock characterization facility in Olkiluoto, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfman, Jari; Mészáros, Ferenc

    A final repository for spent nuclear fuel is sought in Finland by Posiva (the company responsible for the construction and operation of the final nuclear-waste disposal facility in Finland, http://www.posiva.fi). A part of this project involves an underground rock characterization facility (ONKALO), which will consist of an 8,500 m long and 520 m deep system of tunnels, to be potentially extended with the drifts of the repository. The maximum hydraulic disturbance (water table drawdown, deep saline-water upconing and tunnel inflow) that might result from the construction and operation of the ONKALO facility were assessed by site-scale finite-element simulations. The drawdown was calculated by employing the free-surface approach. Tunnel inflows were obtained from the state of equilibrium, while the evolution of the salinity distribution was simulated using a time-dependent and coupled flow and salt transport model. The simulations showed that without engineering measures to limit inflow of groundwater into the ONKALO facility, the hydraulic disturbances would be significantly greater than with these measures implemented. Most of the inflow (330-1,100 L/min) would come from the conductive subhorizontal fracture zones intersected by the drifts. The water table could sink to a depth of about 200 m, and the depressed area could extend over the Olkiluoto Island. Groundwater salinity (expressed as total dissolved solids [TDS]) could locally rise from 22 g/L to over 50 g/L at the tunnel depth of 520 m. With tight grouting, the simulations showed that the depression in the water table can be confined to the immediate vicinity of the ONKALO, the maximum draw-down of the water table remained around 10 m, and the total inflow to the tunnels was about 20 L/min. Moreover, upconing of the saline water remained moderate.

  20. Simulations of radiatively-driven implosions on the PBFA-Z facility

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, J.B.; Bowers, R.L.; Peterson, D.L.

    1997-11-01

    We have performed two-dimensional calculations of the implosions of thin-walled aluminum cylinders driven by a source of radiation. The source is generated by the stagnation of an imploding plasma liner on to a foam target (dynamic hohlraum or flying radiation case) in the PBFA-Z facility at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Both Lagrangian and Eulerian codes are used for the simulations of the compression of the shell by the ablatively-driven main shock.

  1. Simulations of radiatively-driven implosions on the PBFA-Z facility

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, Joysree B.; Bowers, Richard L.; Peterson, Darrell L.

    1997-05-05

    We have performed two-dimensional calculations of the implosions of thin-walled aluminum cylinders driven by a source of radiation. The source is generated by the stagnation of an imploding plasma liner on to a foam target (dynamic hohlraum or flying radiation case) in the PBFA-Z facility at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Both Lagrangian and Eulerian codes are used for the simulations of the compression of the shell by the ablatively-driven main shock.

  2. ISRU Soil Mechanics Vacuum Facility: Soil Bin Preparation and Simulant Strength Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Wilkinson, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Testing in relevant environments is key to exploration mission hardware development. This is true on both the component level (in early development) and system level (in late development stages). During ISRU missions the hardware will interface with the soil (digging, roving, etc) in a vacuum environment. A relevant test environment will therefore involve a vacuum chamber with a controlled, conditioned simulant bed. However, in earth-based granular media, such as lunar soil simulant, gases trapped within the material pore structures and water adsorbed to all particle surfaces will release when exposed to vacuum. Early vacuum testing has shown that this gas release can occur violently, which loosens and weakens the simulant, altering the consolidation state. The Vacuum Facility #13, a mid-size chamber (3.66m tall, 1.5m inner diameter) at the NASA Glenn Research Center has been modified to create a soil mechanics test facility. A 0.64m deep by 0.914m square metric ton bed of lunar simulant was placed under vacuum using a variety of pumping techniques. Both GRC-3 and LHT-3M simulant types have been used. An electric cone penetrometer was used to measure simulant strength properties at vacuum including: cohesion, friction angle, bulk density and shear modulus. Simulant disruptions, caused by off gassing, affected the strength properties, but could be mitigated by reducing pump rate. No disruptions were observed at pressures below 2.5Torr, regardless of the pump rate. However, slow off gassing of the soil lead to long test times, a full week, to reach 10-5Torr. This work highlights the need for robotic machine-simulant hardware and operations in vacuum to expeditiously perform (sub-)systems tests.

  3. The development of the Canadian Mobile Servicing System Kinematic Simulation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, G.; Diebold, B.; Brimley, W.; Kleinberg, H.

    1989-01-01

    Canada will develop a Mobile Servicing System (MSS) as its contribution to the U.S./International Space Station Freedom. Components of the MSS will include a remote manipulator (SSRMS), a Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM), and a mobile base (MRS). In order to support requirements analysis and the evaluation of operational concepts related to the use of the MSS, a graphics based kinematic simulation/human-computer interface facility has been created. The facility consists of the following elements: (1) A two-dimensional graphics editor allowing the rapid development of virtual control stations; (2) Kinematic simulations of the space station remote manipulators (SSRMS and SPDM), and mobile base; and (3) A three-dimensional graphics model of the space station, MSS, orbiter, and payloads. These software elements combined with state of the art computer graphics hardware provide the capability to prototype MSS workstations, evaluate MSS operational capabilities, and investigate the human-computer interface in an interactive simulation environment. The graphics technology involved in the development and use of this facility is described.

  4. Computer simulation of an alternate-energy-based, high-density brooding facility

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    A computer model was developed to simulate a poultry brooding facility characterized by high-density cage or floor brooding, environmental housing, ventilation heat recovery, solar energy collection, and biogas generation. Repeated simulations revealed the following: (1) Solar collection and ventilation heat recovery could reduce fossil fuel use by 12 and 91%, respectively. Combining solar collection and heat recovery may reduce fossil fuel use by only an additional 1.5%. (2) Methane generation can provide more energy on a yearly basis than is required for supplemental heat for brooding. Seasonal energy demands do not match supplies from methane generation and shortages may occur in winter as well as excesses in summer. A digester operated in the thermophilic temperature range produces more net energy than one operated in the mesophilic range. (3) Operating expenses for the simulated cage facility exceeded conventional brooding. (4) Relative humidity patterns of certain areas create the need for complex controls to properly maintain the internal environment. (5) Feed and fuel account for nearly 100% of the operating expenses of brooding. Controlling heat and ventilation with a microprocessor may be the only way to optimize the environment of a broiler brooding facility.

  5. A Simulated Annealing Methodology to Multiproduct Capacitated Facility Location with Stochastic Demand

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Hui; Ye, Yong; Ni, Linglin

    2015-01-01

    A stochastic multiproduct capacitated facility location problem involving a single supplier and multiple customers is investigated. Due to the stochastic demands, a reasonable amount of safety stock must be kept in the facilities to achieve suitable service levels, which results in increased inventory cost. Based on the assumption of normal distributed for all the stochastic demands, a nonlinear mixed-integer programming model is proposed, whose objective is to minimize the total cost, including transportation cost, inventory cost, operation cost, and setup cost. A combined simulated annealing (CSA) algorithm is presented to solve the model, in which the outer layer subalgorithm optimizes the facility location decision and the inner layer subalgorithm optimizes the demand allocation based on the determined facility location decision. The results obtained with this approach shown that the CSA is a robust and practical approach for solving a multiple product problem, which generates the suboptimal facility location decision and inventory policies. Meanwhile, we also found that the transportation cost and the demand deviation have the strongest influence on the optimal decision compared to the others. PMID:25834839

  6. High resolution simulations of ignition capsule designs for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D S; Haan, S W; Cook, A W; Edwards, M J; Hammel, B A; Koning, J M; Marinak, M M

    2011-02-17

    Ignition capsule designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)] have continued to evolve in light of improved physical data inputs, improving simulation techniques, and - most recently - experimental data from a growing number of NIF sub-ignition experiments. This paper summarizes a number of recent changes to the cryogenic capsule design and some of our latest techniques in simulating its performance. Specifically, recent experimental results indicated harder x-ray drive spectra in NIF hohlraums than were predicted and used in previous capsule optimization studies. To accommodate this harder drive spectrum, a series of high-resolution 2-D simulations, resolving Legendre mode numbers as high as two thousand, were run and the germanium dopant concentration and ablator shell thicknesses re-optimized accordingly. Simultaneously, the possibility of cooperative or nonlinear interaction between neighboring ablator surface defects has motivated a series of fully 3-D simulations run with the massively parallel HYDRA code. These last simulations include perturbations seeded on all capsule interfaces and can use actual measured shell surfaces as initial conditions. 3-D simulations resolving Legendre modes up to two hundred on large capsule sectors have run through ignition and burn, and higher resolution simulations resolving as high as mode twelve hundred have been run to benchmark high-resolution 2-D runs. Finally, highly resolved 3-D simulations have also been run of the jet-type perturbation caused by the fill tube fitted to the capsule. These 3-D simulations compare well with the more typical 2-D simulations used in assessing the fill tube's impact on ignition. Coupled with the latest experimental inputs from NIF, our improving simulation capability yields a fuller and more accurate picture of NIF ignition capsule performance.

  7. Ares I and Ares I-X Stage Separation Aerodynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Niskey, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    The aerodynamics of the Ares I crew launch vehicle (CLV) and Ares I-X flight test vehicle (FTV) during stage separation was characterized by testing 1%-scale models at the Arnold Engineering Development Center s (AEDC) von Karman Gas Dynamics Facility (VKF) Tunnel A at Mach numbers of 4.5 and 5.5. To fill a large matrix of data points in an efficient manner, an injection system supported the upper stage and a captive trajectory system (CTS) was utilized as a support system for the first stage located downstream of the upper stage. In an overall extremely successful test, this complex experimental setup associated with advanced postprocessing of the wind tunnel data has enabled the construction of a multi-dimensional aerodynamic database for the analysis and simulation of the critical phase of stage separation at high supersonic Mach numbers. Additionally, an extensive set of data from repeated wind tunnel runs was gathered purposefully to ensure that the experimental uncertainty would be accurately quantified in this type of flow where few historical data is available for comparison on this type of vehicle and where Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational simulations remain far from being a reliable source of static aerodynamic data.

  8. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility: Fundamental studies of particle formation and interactions. Volume 1: Executive summary and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogleman, Guy (Editor); Huntington, Judith L. (Editor); Schwartz, Deborah E. (Editor); Fonda, Mark L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) project and its current status is provided. The proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility Experiments Workshop are recorded. The goal of the workshop was to define experiments for the GGSF--a small particle microgravity research facility. The workshop addressed the opportunity for performing, in Earth orbit, a wide variety of experiments that involve single small particles (grains) or clouds of particles. The first volume includes the executive summary, overview, scientific justification, history, and planned development of the Facility.

  9. Computer graphics in aerodynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cozzolongo, J. V.

    1984-01-01

    The use of computer graphics and its application to aerodynamic analyses on a routine basis is outlined. The mathematical modelling of the aircraft geometries and the shading technique implemented are discussed. Examples of computer graphics used to display aerodynamic flow field data and aircraft geometries are shown. A future need in computer graphics for aerodynamic analyses is addressed.

  10. Aerodynamics of Race Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, suspension, road, aerodynamics, and of course the driver. In recent years, however, vehicle aerodynamics gained increased attention, mainly due to the utilization of the negative lift (downforce) principle, yielding several important performance improvements. This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic downforce and how it improves race car performance. After this short introduction various methods to generate downforce such as inverted wings, diffusers, and vortex generators are discussed. Due to the complex geometry of these vehicles, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flows and lifting surface shapes unlike traditional airplane wings. Typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development, are discussed as well. In spite of the tremendous progress of these design tools (due to better instrumentation, communication, and computational power), the fluid dynamic phenomenon is still highly nonlinear, and predicting the effect of a particular modification is not always trouble free. Several examples covering a wide range of vehicle shapes (e.g., from stock cars to open-wheel race cars) are presented to demonstrate this nonlinear nature of the flow field.

  11. Aerodynamics Improve Wind Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, V. W.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications based on aerodynamic concepts would raise efficiency of wind-wheel electric-power generator. Changes smooth airflow, to increase power output, without increasing size of wheel. Significant improvements in efficiency anticipated without any increase in size or number of moving parts and without departing from simplicity of original design.

  12. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HWIL) facility for development, test, and evaluation of multispectral missile systems: update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Scott B.; Gareri, Jeff P.

    2000-07-01

    The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) Advanced Simulation Center (ASC) provides hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation support to Program Executive Officers (PEO) and Project Managers (PM) who are responsible for developing and fielding precision guided missiles and sub-munitions for the U.S. Army. The ASC is also engaged in cooperative HWIL simulation tasks supporting other Armed Service Agencies, NATO and other U.S. allies. HWIL simulation provides a means of exercising missile guidance and control hardware in simulated flight, wherein the missile sensors are stimulated with input signals which make the system behave as though it were in actual operation. Real-time computers are used to control the target and countermeasure signatures and battlefield scenarios. Missile flight dynamics, responding to the commands issued by the guidance and control system hardware/software, are simulated in real-time to determine the missile trajectory and to calculate target intercept conditions. The ASC consists of 10 HWIL simulation facilities developed over a period of 20 years. These facilities contain special purpose infrared and RF signal generation equipment, flight motion simulators, radiation chambers, optics, and computers. They provide in- band target signatures, countermeasures, and background scenarios in the microwave, millimeter wave, infrared and visible regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The ASC HWIL simulation facilities are an important source of test and evaluation data and have a critical role in all phases of a missile system life cycle. The development of a new generation of missile systems that use multi-spectral seekers has imposed unique and difficult requirements on ASC HWIL simulation facilities. For the past three years, the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) has been developing a HWIL simulation facility to test common aperture multi-spectral missile seekers. This paper discusses the problems encountered during the

  13. Efficient Global Aerodynamic Modeling from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for identifying global aerodynamic models from flight data in an efficient manner is explained and demonstrated. A novel experiment design technique was used to obtain dynamic flight data over a range of flight conditions with a single flight maneuver. Multivariate polynomials and polynomial splines were used with orthogonalization techniques and statistical modeling metrics to synthesize global nonlinear aerodynamic models directly and completely from flight data alone. Simulation data and flight data from a subscale twin-engine jet transport aircraft were used to demonstrate the techniques. Results showed that global multivariate nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies could be accurately identified using flight data from a single maneuver. Flight-derived global aerodynamic model structures, model parameter estimates, and associated uncertainties were provided for all six nondimensional force and moment coefficients for the test aircraft. These models were combined with a propulsion model identified from engine ground test data to produce a high-fidelity nonlinear flight simulation very efficiently. Prediction testing using a multi-axis maneuver showed that the identified global model accurately predicted aircraft responses.

  14. Joint influences of aerodynamic flow field and aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of airborne optical systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Haosu; Zuo, Baojun; Tian, Yi; Zhang, Wang; Hao, Chenglong; Liu, Chaofeng; Li, Qi; Li, Fan; Zhang, Li; Fan, Zhigang

    2012-12-20

    We investigated the joint influences exerted by the nonuniform aerodynamic flow field surrounding the optical dome and the aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of an airborne optical system. The Spalart-Allmaras model provided by FLUENT was used for flow computations. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm based ray tracing program was used to simulate optical transmission through the aerodynamic flow field and the dome. Four kinds of imaging quality evaluation parameters were presented: wave aberration of the exit pupil, point spread function, encircled energy, and modulation transfer function. The results show that the aero-optical disturbance of the aerodynamic flow field and the aerodynamic heating of the dome significantly affect the imaging quality of an airborne optical system. PMID:23262604

  15. Systematic benchmarking of large molecular dynamics simulations employing GROMACS on massive multiprocessing facilities.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Christian C; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    The influence of the total number of cores, the number of cores dedicated to Particle mesh Ewald (PME) calculation and the choice of single vs. double precision on the performance of molecular dynamic (MD) simulations in the size of 70,000 to 1.7 million of atoms was analyzed on three different high-performance computing facilities employing GROMACS 4 by running about 6000 benchmark simulations. Small and medium sized systems scaled linear up to 64 and 128 cores, respectively. Systems with half a million to 1.2 million atoms scaled linear up to 256 cores. The best performance was achieved by dedicating 25% of the total number of cores to PME calculation. Double precision calculations lowered the performance by 30-50%. A database for collecting information about MD simulations and the achieved performance was created and is freely available online and allows the fast estimation of the performance that can be expected in similar environments. PMID:20812321

  16. Modeling and simulation of the data communication network at the ASRM Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nirgudkar, R. P.; Moorhead, R. J.; Smith, W. D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling and simulation of the communication network for the NASA Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) facility under construction at Yellow Creek near Luka, Mississippi. Manufacturing, testing, and operations at the ASRM site will be performed in different buildings scattered over an 1800 acre site. These buildings are interconnected through a local area network (LAN), which will contain one logical Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) ring acting as a backbone for the whole complex. The network contains approximately 700 multi-vendor workstations, 22 multi-vendor workcells, and 3 VAX clusters interconnected via Ethernet and FDDI. The different devices produce appreciably different traffic patterns, each pattern will be highly variable, and some patterns will be very bursty. Most traffic is between the VAX clusters and the other devices. Comdisco's Block Oriented Network Simulator (BONeS) has been used for network simulation. The two primary evaluation parameters used to judge the expected network performance are throughput and delay.

  17. Aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.

    1986-08-12

    An aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus is described which consists of: an aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator adapted to be located on the leading edge of an airframe of a hypersonic aircraft and being responsive to aerodynamic heating of water by a compression shock airstream to produce steam pressure; an expansion shock air-cooled condensor adapted to be located in the airframe rearward of and operatively coupled to the aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator to receive and condense the steam pressure; and an aerodynamic heated steam injector manifold adapted to distribute heated steam into the airstream flowing through an exterior generating channel of an air-breathing, ducted power plant.

  18. Single-computer HWIL simulation facility for real-time vision systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, Simon; Werner, Stefan; Dickmanns, Ernst D.

    1998-07-01

    UBM is working on autonomous vision systems for aircraft for more than one and a half decades by now. The systems developed use standard on-board sensors and two additional monochrome cameras for state estimation of the aircraft. A common task is to detect and track a runway for an autonomous landing approach. The cameras have different focal lengths and are mounted on a special pan and tilt camera platform. As the platform is equipped with two resolvers and two gyros it can be stabilized inertially and the system has the ability to actively focus on the objects of highest interest. For verification and testing, UBM has a special HWIL simulation facility for real-time vision systems. Central part of this simulation facility is a three axis motion simulator (DBS). It is used to realize the computed orientation in the rotational degrees of freedom of the aircraft. The two-axis camera platform with its two CCD-cameras is mounted on the inner frame of the DBS and is pointing at the cylindrical projection screen with a synthetic view displayed on it. As the performance of visual perception systems has increased significantly in recent years, a new, more powerful synthetic vision system was required. A single Onyx2 machine replaced all the former simulation computers. This computer is powerful enough to simulate the aircraft, to generate a high-resolution synthetic view, to control the DBS and to communicate with the image processing computers. Further improvements are the significantly reduced delay times for closed loop simulations and the elimination of communication overhead.

  19. Flow simulation of the Component Development Integration Facility magnetohydrodynamic power train system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.; Petrick, M.

    1997-11-01

    This report covers application of Argonne National Laboratory`s (ANL`s) computer codes to simulation and analysis of components of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train system at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF). Major components of the system include a 50-MWt coal-fired, two-stage combustor and an MHD channel. The combustor, designed and built by TRW, includes a deswirl section between the first and the second-stage combustor and a converging nozzle following the second-stage combustor, which connects to the MHD channel. ANL used computer codes to simulate and analyze flow characteristics in various components of the MHD system. The first-stage swirl combustor was deemed a mature technology and, therefore, was not included in the computer simulation. Several versions of the ICOMFLO computer code were used for the deswirl section and second-stage combustor. The MGMHD code, upgraded with a slag current leakage submodel, was used for the MHD channel. Whenever possible data from the test facilities were used to aid in calibrating parameters in the computer code, to validate the computer code, or to set base-case operating conditions for computations with the computer code. Extensive sensitivity and parametric studies were done on cold-flow mixing in the second-stage combustor, reacting flow in the second-stage combustor and converging nozzle, and particle-laden flow in the deswirl zone of the first-stage combustor, the second-stage combustor, and the converging nozzle. These simulations with subsequent analysis were able to show clearly in flow patterns and various computable measures of performance a number of sensitive and problematical areas in the design of the power train. The simulations of upstream components also provided inlet parameter profiles for simulation of the MHD power generating channel. 86 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. Hydrocode simulations of air and water shocks for facility vulnerability assessments.

    PubMed

    Clutter, J Keith; Stahl, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Hydrocodes are widely used in the study of explosive systems but their use in routine facility vulnerability assessments has been limited due to the computational resources typically required. These requirements are due to the fact that the majority of hydrocodes have been developed primarily for the simulation of weapon-scale phenomena. It is not practical to use these same numerical frameworks on the large domains found in facility vulnerability studies. Here, a hydrocode formulated specifically for facility vulnerability assessments is reviewed. Techniques used to accurately represent the explosive source while maintaining computational efficiency are described. Submodels for addressing other issues found in typical terrorist attack scenarios are presented. In terrorist attack scenarios, loads produced by shocks play an important role in vulnerability. Due to the difference in the material properties of water and air and interface phenomena, there exists significant contrast in wave propagation phenomena in these two medium. These physical variations also require special attention be paid to the mathematical and numerical models used in the hydrocodes. Simulations for a variety of air and water shock scenarios are presented to validate the computational models used in the hydrocode and highlight the phenomenological issues. PMID:14693434

  1. Fire simulation in nuclear facilities: the FIRAC code and supporting experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Burkett, M.W.; Martin, R.A.; Fenton, D.L.; Gunaji, M.V.

    1984-01-01

    The fire accident analysis computer code FIRAC was designed to estimate radioactive and nonradioactive source terms and predict fire-induced flows and thermal and material transport within the ventilation systems of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. FIRAC maintains its basic structure and features and has been expanded and modified to include the capabilities of the zone-type compartment fire model computer code FIRIN developed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The two codes have been coupled to provide an improved simulation of a fire-induced transient within a facility. The basic material transport capability of FIRAC has been retained and includes estimates of entrainment, convection, deposition, and filtration of material. The interrelated effects of filter plugging, heat transfer, gas dynamics, material transport, and fire and radioactive source terms also can be simulated. Also, a sample calculation has been performed to illustrate some of the capabilities of the code and how a typical facility is modeled with FIRAC. In addition to the analytical work being performed at Los Alamos, experiments are being conducted at the New Mexico State University to support the FIRAC computer code development and verification. This paper summarizes two areas of the experimental work that support the material transport capabiities of the code: the plugging of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters by combustion aerosols and the transport and deposition of smoke in ventilation system ductwork.

  2. Start-to-end simulations of SASE FEL at the TESLA Test Facility, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohlus, M.; Flöttmann, K.; Kozlov, O. S.; Limberg, T.; Piot, Ph.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2004-09-01

    Phase 1 of the vacuum ultra-violet free-electron laser (FEL) at the TESLA Test Facility recently concluded operation. It successfully demonstrated the saturation of a SASE FEL in the wavelength range of 80-120 nm. We present a posteriori start-to-end numerical simulations of this FEL. These simulations are based on the programs Astra and elegant for the generation and transport of the electron distribution. An independent simulation of the intricate beam dynamics in the magnetic bunch compressor is performed with the program CSRtrack. The SASE FEL process is simulated with the code FAST. From our detailed simulations and the resulting phase space distribution at the undulator entrance, we found that the FEL was driven only by a small fraction (slice) of the electron bunch. This "lasing slice" is located in the head of the bunch, and has a peak current of approximately 3 kA. A strong energy chirp (due to the space charge field after compression) within this slice had a significant influence on the FEL operation. Our study shows that the radiation pulse duration is about 40 fs (FWHM) with a corresponding peak power of 1.5 GW. The simulated FEL properties are compared with various experimental data and found to be in excellent agreement.

  3. Low Earth orbital atomic oxygen environmental simulation facility for space materials evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stidham, Curtis R.; Banks, Bruce A.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Dever, Joyce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Bruckner, Eric J.

    1993-01-01

    Simulation of low Earth orbit atomic oxygen for accelerated exposure in ground-based facilities is necessary for the durability evaluation of space power system component materials for Space Station Freedom (SSF) and future missions. A facility developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations's (NASA) Lewis Research Center provides accelerated rates of exposure to a directed or scattered oxygen beam, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, and offers in-situ optical characterization. The facility utilizes an electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source to generate a low energy oxygen beam. Total hemispherical spectral reflectance of samples can be measured in situ over the wavelength range of 250 to 2500 nm. Deuterium lamps provide VUV radiation intensity levels in the 115 to 200 nm range of three to five equivalent suns. Retarding potential analyses show distributed ion energies below 30 electron volts (eV) for the operating conditions most suited for high flux, low energy testing. Peak ion energies are below the sputter threshold energy (approximately 30 eV) of the protective coatings on polymers that are evaluated in the facility, thus allowing long duration exposure without sputter erosion. Neutral species are expected to be at thermal energies of approximately .04 eV to .1 eV. The maximum effective flux level based on polyimide Kapton mass loss is 4.4 x 10 exp 6 atoms/((sq. cm)*s), thus providing a highly accelerated testing capability.

  4. Incremental Aerodynamic Coefficient Database for the USA2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Annie Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In March through May of 2016, a wind tunnel test was conducted by the Aerosciences Branch (EV33) to visually study the unsteady aerodynamic behavior over multiple transition geometries for the Universal Stage Adapter 2 (USA2) in the MSFC Aerodynamic Research Facility's Trisonic Wind Tunnel (TWT). The purpose of the test was to make a qualitative comparison of the transonic flow field in order to provide a recommended minimum transition radius for manufacturing. Additionally, 6 Degree of Freedom force and moment data for each configuration tested was acquired in order to determine the geometric effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients (Normal Force, Axial Force, and Pitching Moment). In order to make a quantitative comparison of the aerodynamic effects of the USA2 transition geometry, the aerodynamic coefficient data collected during the test was parsed and incorporated into a database for each USA2 configuration tested. An incremental aerodynamic coefficient database was then developed using the generated databases for each USA2 geometry as a function of Mach number and angle of attack. The final USA2 coefficient increments will be applied to the aerodynamic coefficients of the baseline geometry to adjust the Space Launch System (SLS) integrated launch vehicle force and moment database based on the transition geometry of the USA2.

  5. Ares I Aerodynamic Testing at the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Niskey, Charles J.; Hanke, Jeremy L.; Tomek, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout three full design analysis cycles, the Ares I project within the Constellation program has consistently relied on the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel (PSWT) for aerodynamic testing of the subsonic, transonic and supersonic portions of the atmospheric flight envelope (Mach=0.5 to 4.5). Each design cycle required the development of aerodynamic databases for the 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) forces and moments, as well as distributed line-loads databases covering the full range of Mach number, total angle-of-attack, and aerodynamic roll angle. The high fidelity data collected in this facility has been consistent with the data collected in NASA Langley s Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at the overlapping condition ofMach=1.6. Much insight into the aerodynamic behavior of the launch vehicle during all phases of flight was gained through wind tunnel testing. Important knowledge pertaining to slender launch vehicle aerodynamics in particular was accumulated. In conducting these wind tunnel tests and developing experimental aerodynamic databases, some challenges were encountered and are reported as lessons learned in this paper for the benefit of future crew launch vehicle aerodynamic developments.

  6. Simulation of Hypersonic CO2 Flows in a Range of Academic and Industrial Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, J. C.; Smith, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies in high enthalpy carbon dioxide flows have provided the opportunity to validate computational tools against a wide range of data from experiments in a wide range of facilities, from a classical shock tube to the industrial facility in which the ExoMars heatshield will be qualified. Computations of both nozzle flows and stagnation tests have been performed using the thermochemical non-equilibrium Navier-Stokes code TINA, and the shock tube has been simulated using the SHOCK2 code. In general, good agreement with the experimental data has been achieved. Thus, this work provides increased confidence in the thermochemical modelling of carbon dioxide flows and the applicability of tools used in the design of entry vehicles for Mars.

  7. Image processing of aerodynamic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulcon, N. D.

    1985-01-01

    The use of digital image processing techniques in analyzing and evaluating aerodynamic data is discussed. An image processing system that converts images derived from digital data or from transparent film into black and white, full color, or false color pictures is described. Applications to black and white images of a model wing with a NACA 64-210 section in simulated rain and to computed low properties for transonic flow past a NACA 0012 airfoil are presented. Image processing techniques are used to visualize the variations of water film thicknesses on the wing model and to illustrate the contours of computed Mach numbers for the flow past the NACA 0012 airfoil. Since the computed data for the NACA 0012 airfoil are available only at discrete spatial locations, an interpolation method is used to provide values of the Mach number over the entire field.

  8. Rarefaction Effects in Hypersonic Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    2011-05-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) technique is used for numerical analysis of rarefied-gas hypersonic flows near a blunt plate, wedge, two side-by-side plates, disk, torus, and rotating cylinder. The role of various similarity parameters (Knudsen and Mach numbers, geometrical and temperature factors, specific heat ratios, and others) in aerodynamics of the probes is studied. Important kinetic effects that are specific for the transition flow regime have been found: non-monotonic lift and drag of plates, strong repulsive force between side-by-side plates and cylinders, dependence of drag on torus radii ratio, and the reverse Magnus effect on the lift of a rotating cylinder. The numerical results are in a good agreement with experimental data, which were obtained in a vacuum chamber at low and moderate Knudsen numbers from 0.01 to 10.

  9. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients using Neural Networks for Sparse Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Basic aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of angles of attack and sideslip with vehicle lateral symmetry and compressibility effects. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. In this paper a fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network. The training data for the neural network is derived from wind tunnel test and numerical simulations. The coefficients of lift, drag, pitching moment are expressed as a function of alpha (angle of attack) and Mach number. The results produced from preliminary neural network analysis are very good.

  10. An Aerodynamic Analysis of a Spinning Missile with Dithering Canards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.; Nygaard, Tor A.

    2003-01-01

    A generic spinning missile with dithering canards is used to demonstrate the utility of an overset structured grid approach for simulating the aerodynamics of rolling airframe missile systems. The approach is used to generate a modest aerodynamic database for the generic missile. The database is populated with solutions to the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. It is used to evaluate grid resolution requirements for accurate prediction of instantaneous missile loads and the relative aerodynamic significance of angle-of-attack, canard pitching sequence, viscous effects, and roll-rate effects. A novel analytical method for inter- and extrapolation of database results is also given.

  11. Asymmetric Uncertainty Expression for High Gradient Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T

    2012-01-01

    When the physics of the flow around an aircraft changes very abruptly either in time or space (e.g., flow separation/reattachment, boundary layer transition, unsteadiness, shocks, etc), the measurements that are performed in a simulated environment like a wind tunnel test or a computational simulation will most likely incorrectly predict the exact location of where (or when) the change in physics happens. There are many reasons for this, includ- ing the error introduced by simulating a real system at a smaller scale and at non-ideal conditions, or the error due to turbulence models in a computational simulation. The un- certainty analysis principles that have been developed and are being implemented today do not fully account for uncertainty in the knowledge of the location of abrupt physics changes or sharp gradients, leading to a potentially underestimated uncertainty in those areas. To address this problem, a new asymmetric aerodynamic uncertainty expression containing an extra term to account for a phase-uncertainty, the magnitude of which is emphasized in the high-gradient aerodynamic regions is proposed in this paper. Additionally, based on previous work, a method for dispersing aerodynamic data within asymmetric uncer- tainty bounds in a more realistic way has been developed for use within Monte Carlo-type analyses.

  12. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  13. Simulation of Cascaded Longitudinal-Space-Charge Amplifier at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (Fast) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2015-12-01

    Cascaded Longitudinal Space Charge Amplifiers (LSCA) have been proposed as a mechanism to generate density modulation over a board spectral range. The scheme has been recently demonstrated in the optical regime and has confirmed the production of broadband optical radiation. In this paper we investigate, via numerical simulations, the performance of a cascaded LSCA beamline at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility to produce broadband ultraviolet radiation. Our studies are carried out using elegant with included tree-based grid-less space charge algorithm.

  14. Numerical simulations of the first operational conditions of the negative ion test facility SPIDER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serianni, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Antoni, V.; Baltador, C.; Cavenago, M.; Chitarin, G.; Marconato, N.; Pasqualotto, R.; Sartori, E.; Toigo, V.; Veltri, P.

    2016-02-01

    In view of the realization of the negative ion beam injectors for ITER, a test facility, named SPIDER, is under construction in Padova (Italy) to study and optimize production and extraction of negative ions. The present paper is devoted to the analysis of the expected first operations of SPIDER in terms of single-beamlet and multiple-beamlet simulations of the hydrogen beam optics in various operational conditions. The effectiveness of the methods adopted to compensate for the magnetic deflection of the particles is also assessed. Indications for a sequence of the experimental activities are obtained.

  15. Simulations of radiatively-driven implosions on the PBFA-Z facility

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, J.B.; Bowers, R.L.; Peterson, D.L.

    1997-05-01

    We have performed two-dimensional calculations of the implosions of thin-walled aluminum cylinders driven by a source of radiation. The source is generated by the stagnation of an imploding plasma liner on to a foam target (dynamic hohlraum or flying radiation case) in the PBFA-Z facility at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Both Lagrangian and Eulerian codes are used for the simulations of the compression of the shell by the ablatively-driven main shock. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Numerical simulations of the first operational conditions of the negative ion test facility SPIDER.

    PubMed

    Serianni, G; Agostinetti, P; Antoni, V; Baltador, C; Cavenago, M; Chitarin, G; Marconato, N; Pasqualotto, R; Sartori, E; Toigo, V; Veltri, P

    2016-02-01

    In view of the realization of the negative ion beam injectors for ITER, a test facility, named SPIDER, is under construction in Padova (Italy) to study and optimize production and extraction of negative ions. The present paper is devoted to the analysis of the expected first operations of SPIDER in terms of single-beamlet and multiple-beamlet simulations of the hydrogen beam optics in various operational conditions. The effectiveness of the methods adopted to compensate for the magnetic deflection of the particles is also assessed. Indications for a sequence of the experimental activities are obtained. PMID:26932099

  17. Aerodynamics: The Wright Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Jennifer Hansen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the basic principles of aerodynamics. Included in the presentation are: a few demonstrations of the principles, an explanation of the concepts of lift, drag, thrust and weight, a description of Bernoulli's principle, the concept of the airfoil (i.e., the shape of the wing) and how that effects lift, and the method of controlling an aircraft by manipulating the four forces using control surfaces.

  18. Aerodynamics of a Cryogenic Semi-Tanker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jason; Salari, Kambiz

    2009-11-01

    The design of a modern cryogenic semi-tanker is based primarily upon functionality with little consideration given to aerodynamic drag. As a result, these tankers have maintained the appearance of a wheeled cylinder for several decades. To reduce the fuel usage of these vehicles, this study investigates their aerodynamics. A detailed understanding of the flow field about the vehicle and its influence on aerodynamic drag is obtained by performing Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of a full-scale tractor and cryogenic tanker-trailer operating at highway speed within a crosswind. The tanker-trailer has a length to diameter ratio of 6.3. The Reynolds number, based upon the tanker diameter, is 4.0x10^6, while the effective vehicle yaw angle is 6.1 . The flow field about the vehicle is characterized by large flow separation regions at the tanker underbody and base. In addition, the relatively large gap between the tractor and the tanker-trailer allows the free-stream flow to be entrained into the tractor-tanker gap. By mitigating these drag-producing phenomena through the use of simple geometry modifications, it may be possible to reduce the aerodynamic drag of cryogenic semi-tankers and, thereby, improve their fuel economy. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Rarefield-Flow Shuttle Aerodynamics Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moats, Christina D.

    1994-01-01

    A model of the Shuttle Orbiter rarefied-flow aerodynamic force coefficients has been derived from the ratio of flight acceleration measurements. The in-situ, low-frequency (less than 1Hz), low-level (approximately 1 x 10(exp -6) g) acceleration measurements are made during atmospheric re-entry. The experiment equipment designed and used for this task is the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), one of the sensor packages in the Orbiter Experiments Program. To date, 12 HiRAP re-entry mission data sets spanning a period of about 10 years have been processed. The HiRAP-derived aerodynamics model is described in detail. The model includes normal and axial hypersonic continuum coefficient equations as function of angle of attack, body-flap deflection, and elevon deflection. Normal and axial free molecule flow coefficient equations as a function of angle of attack are also presented, along with flight-derived rarefied-flow transition bridging formulae. Comparisons are made between the aerodynamics model, data from the latest Orbiter Operational Aerodynamic Design Data Book, applicable computer simulations, and wind-tunnel data.

  20. A Generic Nonlinear Aerodynamic Model for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    A generic model of the aerodynamic coefficients was developed using wind tunnel databases for eight different aircraft and multivariate orthogonal functions. For each database and each coefficient, models were determined using polynomials expanded about the state and control variables, and an othgonalization procedure. A predicted squared-error criterion was used to automatically select the model terms. Modeling terms picked in at least half of the analyses, which totalled 45 terms, were retained to form the generic nonlinear aerodynamic (GNA) model. Least squares was then used to estimate the model parameters and associated uncertainty that best fit the GNA model to each database. Nonlinear flight simulations were used to demonstrate that the GNA model produces accurate trim solutions, local behavior (modal frequencies and damping ratios), and global dynamic behavior (91% accurate state histories and 80% accurate aerodynamic coefficient histories) under large-amplitude excitation. This compact aerodynamics model can be used to decrease on-board memory storage requirements, quickly change conceptual aircraft models, provide smooth analytical functions for control and optimization applications, and facilitate real-time parametric system identification.

  1. Aerodynamic control with passively pitching wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Wood, Robert

    Flapping wings may pitch passively under aerodynamic and inertial loads. Such passive pitching is observed in flapping wing insect and robot flight. The effect of passive wing pitch on the control dynamics of flapping wing flight are unexplored. Here we demonstrate in simulation and experiment the critical role wing pitching plays in yaw control of a flapping wing robot. We study yaw torque generation by a flapping wing allowed to passively rotate in the pitch axis through a rotational spring. Yaw torque is generated through alternating fast and slow upstroke and and downstroke. Yaw torque sensitively depends on both the rotational spring force law and spring stiffness, and at a critical spring stiffness a bifurcation in the yaw torque control relationship occurs. Simulation and experiment reveal the dynamics of this bifurcation and demonstrate that anomalous yaw torque from passively pitching wings is the result of aerodynamic and inertial coupling between the pitching and stroke-plane dynamics.

  2. Time-dependent quasi-one-dimensional simulations of high enthalpy pulse facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical methodology is presented for simulating the time-dependent reacting flow inside the entire length of high enthalpy pulse facilities. The methodology is based on a finite-volume TVD scheme for the quasi-1D Euler equations coupled with finite-rate chemistry. A moving mesh and tracking of gas interfaces are used to overcome certain numerical difficulties associated with these types of flows. Simulation results of a helium driven shock tube show that computations can be used to predict the off-tailored behavior of shock tubes and tunnels. Particular attention is given to computations of the flow through the NASA Ames 16-inch combustion driven shock tunnel which show the influence of nonuniformities in the driver section on the reservoir conditions; and the effect of finite secondary diaphragm opening times on the chemical composition of the test flow in the HYPULSE expansion tube.

  3. Dynamic simulation study of the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) incinerator at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, T.

    1992-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company for the US Department of Energy, plans to start up the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) in 1995. The CIF will treat liquid and solid low-level radioactive, mixed, and hazardous wastes generated at SRS. A Fortran computer model was developed to simulate the transient responses of the CIF to fluctuations in solid waste feed. Of particular interest was the performance of two independent pressure control loops in maintaining system pressure. The model is capable of predicting the dynamic behavior of all components (rotary kiln, secondary combustion chamber, quencher, scrubber cyclone, mist eliminator, HEPA filters, and ID fans). This paper summarizes the model development and results of the simulation study.

  4. A Multi-Year Program Plan for the Aerodynamic Design of Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    The project tasks and deliverables are as follows: Computations and Experiments--(1) Simulation and analysis of a range of generic shapes, simplified to more complex, representative of tractor and integrated tractor-trailer flow characteristics using computational tools, (2) The establishment of an experimental data base for tractor-trailer models for code/computational method development and validation. The first shapes to be considered will be directed towards the investigation of tractor-trailer gaps and mismatch of tractor-trailer heights. (3) The evaluation and documentation of effective computational approaches for application to heavy vehicle aerodynamics based on the benchmark results with existing and advanced computational tools compared to experimental data, and (4) Computational tools and experimental methods for use by industry, National Laboratories, and universities for the aerodynamic modeling of heavy truck vehicles. Evaluation of current and new technologies--(1) The evaluation and documentation of current and new technologies for drag reduction based on published literature and continued communication with the heavy vehicle industry (e.g., identification and prioritization of tractor-trailer drag-sources, blowing and/or suction devices, body shaping, new experimental methods or facilities), and the identification and analysis of tractor and integrated tractor-trailer aerodynamic problem areas and possible solution strategies. (2) Continued industrial site visits. It should be noted that ''CFD tools'' are not only the actual computer codes, but descriptions of appropriate numerical solution methods. Part of the project effort will be to determine the restrictions or avenues for technology transfer.

  5. Proposed Facility Modifications to Support Propulsion Systems Testing Under Simulated Space Conditions at Plum Brook Station's Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Daryl A.

    2007-01-01

    Preparing NASA's Plum Brook Station's Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) to support NASA's new generation of launch vehicles has raised many challenges for B-2 s support staff. The facility provides a unique capability to test chemical propulsion systems/vehicles while simulating space thermal and vacuum environments. Designed and constructed 4 decades ago to support upper stage cryogenic engine/vehicle system development, the Plum Brook Station B-2 facility will require modifications to support the larger, more powerful, and more advanced engine systems for the next generation of vehicles leaving earth's orbit. Engine design improvements over the years have included large area expansion ratio nozzles, greater combustion chamber pressures, and advanced materials. Consequently, it has become necessary to determine what facility changes are required and how the facility can be adapted to support varying customers and their specific test needs. Instrumental in this task is understanding the present facility capabilities and identifying what reasonable changes can be implemented. A variety of approaches and analytical tools are being employed to gain this understanding. This paper discusses some of the challenges in applying these tools to this project and expected facility configuration to support the varying customer needs.

  6. Proposed Facility Modifications to Support Propulsion Systems Testing Under Simulated Space Conditions at Plum Brook Station's Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Daryl A.

    2008-01-01

    Preparing NASA's Plum Brook Station's Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) to support NASA's new generation of launch vehicles has raised many challenges for B-2's support staff. The facility provides a unique capability to test chemical propulsion systems/vehicles while simulating space thermal and vacuum environments. Designed and constructed in the early 1960s to support upper stage cryogenic engine/vehicle system development, the Plum Brook Station B-2 facility will require modifications to support the larger, more powerful, and more advanced engine systems for the next generation of vehicles leaving earth's orbit. Engine design improvements over the years have included large area expansion ratio nozzles, greater combustion chamber pressures, and advanced materials. Consequently, it has become necessary to determine what facility changes are required and how the facility can be adapted to support varying customers and their specific test needs. Exhaust system performance, including understanding the present facility capabilities, is the primary focus of this work. A variety of approaches and analytical tools are being employed to gain this understanding. This presentation discusses some of the challenges in applying these tools to this project and expected facility configuration to support the varying customer needs.

  7. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF). Volume 2: Conceptual design definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamel, James M.

    1993-01-01

    This document is Volume 2 of the Final Report for the Phase A Study of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF), and presents the GGSF Conceptual Design. It is a follow-on to the Volume 1 Facility Definition Study, NASA report CR 177606. The development of a conceptual design for a Space Station Freedom (SSF) facility that will be used for investigating particle interactions in varying environments, including various gas mixtures, pressures, and temperatures is delineated. It's not possible to study these experiments on earth due to the long reaction times associated with this type of phenomena, hence the need for extended periods of microgravity. The particle types will vary in composition (solids and liquids), sizes (from submicrons to centimeters), and concentrations (from single particles to 10(exp 10) per cubic centimeter). The results of the experiments pursued in the GGSF will benefit a variety of scientific inquiries. These investigations span such diverse topics as the formation of planets and planetary rings, cloud and haze processes in planetary atmospheres, the composition and structure of astrophysical objects, and the viability of airborne microbes (e.g., in a manned spacecraft).

  8. The aerodynamics of smoke particle sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, J.; Gumbel, J.; Rapp, M.

    2005-08-01

    There is a great interest in nanometer-sized particles in the mesosphere at the moment with the recent launches of the MAGIC and ECOMA payloads. However, rocket-borne measurements of these particles are far from trivial. Since rocket payloads move through the measurement volume with supersonic speeds they can introduce aerodynamic perturbations that complicate the collection of e.g. smoke particle measurements in this region. Nanometer-sized particles tend to follow the gas flow around the payload and do not reach the detector if the aerodynamic design of the instrument has not been considered carefully. The analysis is further complicated by the fact that the payload moves from continuum flow conditions to free molecular flow conditions via the transition regime. Therefore, aerodynamics simulations are of critical importance for the success of these projects. To simulate the gas flow around the rocket payload a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo program is used. A simple model has been developed to introduce smoke particles in the gas flow and determine their trajectories. The result from this is a specific lower limit to the size of smoke particles detectable by various detector designs.

  9. Functional requirements for the man-vehicle systems research facility. [identifying and correcting human errors during flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, W. F.; Allen, R. W.; Heffley, R. K.; Jewell, W. F.; Jex, H. R.; Mcruer, D. T.; Schulman, T. M.; Stapleford, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center proposed a man-vehicle systems research facility to support flight simulation studies which are needed for identifying and correcting the sources of human error associated with current and future air carrier operations. The organization of research facility is reviewed and functional requirements and related priorities for the facility are recommended based on a review of potentially critical operational scenarios. Requirements are included for the experimenter's simulation control and data acquisition functions, as well as for the visual field, motion, sound, computation, crew station, and intercommunications subsystems. The related issues of functional fidelity and level of simulation are addressed, and specific criteria for quantitative assessment of various aspects of fidelity are offered. Recommendations for facility integration, checkout, and staffing are included.

  10. Developments at the Kinetic Kill Vehicle Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulator (KHILS) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrer, Robert Lee, Jr.; Thompson, Rhoe A.; Coker, Charles F.

    1999-07-01

    The Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) sponsored the development of the Kinetic Kill Vehicle Hardware-in-the- Loop Simulator (KHILS) to provide a comprehensive ground test capability for end game performance evaluation of BMDO interceptor concepts. Since its inception in 1986, the KHILS facility has been on the forefront of HWIL test technology development. This development has culminated in closed-loop testing involving large format resistive element projection arrays, 3D scene rendering systems, and real-time high fidelity phenomenology codes. Each of these components has been integrated into a real-time environment that allows KHILS to perform dynamic closed-loop testing of BMDO interceptor systems or subsystems. Ongoing activities include the integration of multiple resistor arrays into both a cold chamber and flight motion simulator environment, increasing the update speed of existing arrays to 180 Hz, development of newer 200 Hz snapshot resistor arrays, design of next generation 1024 X 1024 resistor arrays, development of a 1000 Hz seeker motion stage, integration of a resistor array into an RF chamber, and development of advanced real-time plume flow-field codes. This paper describes these activities and test results of the major facility components.

  11. Three-dimensional simulations of National Ignition Facility implosions: Insight into experimental observables

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, Brian K. Munro, David H.; Sepke, Scott; Caggiano, Joseph; Clark, Daniel; Hatarik, Robert; Kritcher, Andrea; Sayre, Daniel; Yeamans, Charles; Knauer, James; Hilsabeck, Terry; Kilkenny, Joe

    2015-05-15

    We simulate in 3D both the hydrodynamics and, simultaneously, the X-ray and neutron diagnostic signatures of National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosions. We apply asymmetric radiation drive to study the impact of low mode asymmetry on diagnostic observables. We examine X-ray and neutron images as well as neutron spectra for these perturbed implosions. The X-ray images show hot spot evolution on small length scales and short time scales, reflecting the incomplete stagnation seen in the simulation. The neutron images show surprising differences from the X-ray images. The neutron spectra provide additional measures of implosion asymmetry. Flow in the hot spot alters the neutron spectral peak, namely, the peak location and width. The changes in the width lead to a variation in the apparent temperature with viewing angle that signals underlying hot spot asymmetry. We compare our new expectations based on the simulated data with NIF data. We find that some recent cryogenic layered experiments show appreciable temperature anisotropy indicating residual flow in the hot spot. We also find some trends in the data that do not reflect our simulation and theoretical understanding.

  12. SPOKES: An end-to-end simulation facility for spectroscopic cosmological surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, B.; Amara, A.; Réfrégier, A.; Gamper, La.; Gamper, Lu.; Hambrecht, B.; Chang, C.; Forero-Romero, J. E.; Serrano, S.; Cunha, C.; Coles, O.; Nicola, A.; Busha, M.; Bauer, A.; Saunders, W.; Jouvel, S.; Kirk, D.; Wechsler, R.

    2016-04-01

    The nature of dark matter, dark energy and large-scale gravity pose some of the most pressing questions in cosmology today. These fundamental questions require highly precise measurements, and a number of wide-field spectroscopic survey instruments are being designed to meet this requirement. A key component in these experiments is the development of a simulation tool to forecast science performance, define requirement flow-downs, optimize implementation, demonstrate feasibility, and prepare for exploitation. We present SPOKES (SPectrOscopic KEn Simulation), an end-to-end simulation facility for spectroscopic cosmological surveys designed to address this challenge. SPOKES is based on an integrated infrastructure, modular function organization, coherent data handling and fast data access. These key features allow reproducibility of pipeline runs, enable ease of use and provide flexibility to update functions within the pipeline. The cyclic nature of the pipeline offers the possibility to make the science output an efficient measure for design optimization and feasibility testing. We present the architecture, first science, and computational performance results of the simulation pipeline. The framework is general, but for the benchmark tests, we use the Dark Energy Spectrometer (DESpec), one of the early concepts for the upcoming project, the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI). We discuss how the SPOKES framework enables a rigorous process to optimize and exploit spectroscopic survey experiments in order to derive high-precision cosmological measurements optimally.

  13. Numerical simulation of the actuation system for the ALDF's propulsion control valve. [Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the actuation system for the propulsion control valve (PCV) of the NASA Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility was developed during the preliminary design of the PCV and used throughout the entire project. The simulation is based on a predictive model of the PCV which is used to evaluate and design the actuation system. The PCV controls a 1.7 million-pound thrust water jet used in propelling a 108,000-pound test carriage. The PCV can open and close in 0.300 second and deliver over 9,000 gallons of water per sec at pressures up to 3150 psi. The numerical simulation results are used to predict transient performance and valve opening characteristics, specify the hydraulic control system, define transient loadings on components, and evaluate failure modes. The mathematical model used for numerically simulating the mechanical fluid power system is described, and numerical results are demonstrated for a typical opening and closing cycle of the PCV. A summary is then given on how the model is used in the design process.

  14. Feasibility Study of SSTO Base Heating Simulation in Pulsed-Type Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chung Sik; Sharma, Surendra; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A laboratory simulation of the base heating environment of the proposed reusable Single-Stage-To-Orbit vehicle during its ascent flight was proposed. The rocket engine produces CO2 and H2, which are the main combustible components of the exhaust effluent. The burning of these species, known as afterburning, enhances the base region gas temperature as well as the base heating. To determine the heat flux on the SSTO vehicle, current simulation focuses on the thermochemistry of the afterburning, thermophysical properties of the base region gas, and ensuing radiation from the gas. By extrapolating from the Saturn flight data, the Damkohler number for the afterburning of SSTO vehicle is estimated to be of the order of 10. The limitations on the material strengths limit the laboratory simulation of the flight Damkohler number as well as other flow parameters. A plan is presented in impulse facilities using miniature rocket engines which generate the simulated rocket plume by electric ally-heating a H2/CO2 mixture.

  15. Reynolds number effects on the transonic aerodynamics of a slender wing-body configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.; Cundiff, Jeffrey S.

    1989-01-01

    Aerodynamic forces and moments for a slender wing-body configuration are summarized from an investigation in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The results include both longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic properties as well as slideslip derivatives. Results were selected to emphasize Reynolds number effects at a transonic speed although some lower speed results are also presented for context. The data indicate nominal Reynolds number effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients and more pronounced effects for the lateral-directional aerodynamic coefficients. The Reynolds number sensitivities for the lateral-directional coefficients were limited to high angles of attack.

  16. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Sean; Bigatel, Patrick

    2004-10-17

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

  17. On performing exobiology experiments on an earth-orbital platform with the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntington, Judith L.; Fogleman, Guy

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory simulations of gas-dust interactions performed on Space Station Freedom in the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) are considered for studying the nature of bodies in the solar system. The GGSF includes a 4-10 liter chamber for experiments with the capability for environmental control, measurement, levitation, and energy. The simulations can provide low gas pressure and dust density in a microgravitational environment.

  18. Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test: Trajectory, Atmosphere, and Aerodynamics Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutty, Prasad; Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Blood, Eric M.; O'Farrell, Clara; Ginn, Jason M.; Shoenenberger, Mark; Dutta, Soumyo

    2015-01-01

    The Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test is a full-scale flight test of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator, which is part of the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator technology development project. The purpose of the project is to develop and mature aerodynamic decelerator technologies for landing large mass payloads on the surface of Mars. The technologies include a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator and Supersonic Parachutes. The first Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test occurred on June 28th, 2014 at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. This test was used to validate the test architecture for future missions. The flight was a success and, in addition, was able to acquire data on the aerodynamic performance of the supersonic inflatable decelerator. This paper describes the instrumentation, analysis techniques, and acquired flight test data utilized to reconstruct the vehicle trajectory, atmosphere, and aerodynamics. The results of the reconstruction show significantly higher lofting of the trajectory, which can partially be explained by off-nominal booster motor performance. The reconstructed vehicle force and moment coefficients fall well within pre-flight predictions. A parameter identification analysis indicates that the vehicle displayed greater aerodynamic static stability than seen in pre-flight computational predictions and ballistic range tests.

  19. A low-density boundary-layer wind tunnel facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.

    1987-01-01

    This abstract describes a low-density wind-tunnel facility that was established at NASA Ames in order to aid interpretation and understanding of data received from the Mariner and Viking spacecraft through earth-based simulation. The wind tunnel is a boundary-layer type which is capable of operating over a range of air densities ranging from 0.01 to 1.24 kg/cu m, with the lower values being equivalent to the near-surface density of the planet Mars. Although the facility was developed for space and extraterrestrial simulation, it also can serve as a relatively large-scale, low-density aerodynamic test facility. A description of this unique test facility and some Pitot-tube and hot-wire anemometry data acquired in the facility are presented.

  20. Broadband zoom collimator for installation on a flight motion simulator at the KHILS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendt, James W.; Binduga, Gary E.

    2004-08-01

    A broadband, low-distortion, 2:1 zoom collimator has been designed for projection of infrared scenes in the spectral region of 3.0 to 12.0 micrometers. This collimator provides dynamic scenes for the Kinetic Kill Vehicle Hardware-in-the Loop Simulation (KHILS) facility for testing of missile seekers and other FLIRs. This system, the Target Simulator Optical System (TSOS) is similar to the WISP Optical System already installed at KHILS by Brashear LP, but is lightweighted to allow mounting onto the outside axis of a Flight Motion Simulator. This paper explains the general requirements of the projection collimator optics and describes the system design, assembly and test. The collimator projects dynamic scenes generated by two 1024 x 1024 or 512 x 512 arrays of resistive-emitter elements. The system is composed of four off-axis, powered mirrors, a beamcombiner, spectral filters and array windows. Three of the mirrors are moveable to accommodate changing the field-of-view. Distortion is less than 1.0% at any field position.

  1. Thermal nuclear pulse simulation at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, C.P.; Ralph, M.E. ); Ghanbari, C.M. ); Oeding, R.; Shaw, K. )

    1991-01-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico is being used to simulate the thermal pulse from a nuclear weapon on relatively large surfaces. Pulses varying in length from 2 seconds to 7 seconds have been produced. The desired pulse length varies as a function of the yield of the weapon being simulated. The present experiment capability can accommodate samples as large as 1.2 {times} 1.5 meters. Samples can be flat or three-dimensional. Samples exposed have ranged from fabrics (protective clothing) to an aircraft canopy and cockpit system, complete with a mannequin in a flight suit and helmet. In addition, a windowed wind tunnel has been constructed which permits exposure of flight surface materials to thermal transients with air speed of Mach 0.8. The wind tunnel can accommodate samples up to .48 {times} .76 meters or an array of smaller samples. The maximum flux capability of the NSTTF is about 70 calories/cm{sup 2}-sec. A black-body temperature of about 6000 K is produced by the solar beam and is therefore ideal for simulating the nuclear source. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  2. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; May, M. J.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Shingleton, N.; Kane, J. O.; Holtmeier, G.; Loey, H.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Dunlop, W. H.; Guyton, R. L.; Huffman, E.

    2014-09-01

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  3. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Fournier, K B; Brown, C G; May, M J; Compton, S; Walton, O R; Shingleton, N; Kane, J O; Holtmeier, G; Loey, H; Mirkarimi, P B; Dunlop, W H; Guyton, R L; Huffman, E

    2014-09-01

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes. PMID:25273784

  4. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; May, M. J.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Shingleton, N.; Kane, J. O.; Holtmeier, G.; Loey, H.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Dunlop, W. H.; Guyton, R. L.; Huffman, E.

    2014-09-15

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  5. Jake Garn Mission Simulator and Training Facility, Building 5, Historical Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slovinac, Trish; Deming, Joan

    2010-01-01

    In response to President George W. Bush's announcement in January 2004 that the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) would end in 2010, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) completed a nation-wide historical survey and evaluation of NASA-owned facilities and properties (real property assets) at all its Centers and component facilities. The buildings and structures which supported the SSP were inventoried and assessed as per the criteria of eligibility for listing in the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) in the context of this program. This study was performed in compliance with Section 110 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) of 1966 (Public Law 89-665), as amended; the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (Public Law 91-190); Executive Order (EO) 11593: Protection and Enhancement of the Cultural Environment; EO 13287, Preserve America, and other relevant legislation. As part of this nation-wide study, in September 2006, historical survey and evaluation of NASA-owned and managed facilities at was conducted by NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. The results of this study are presented in a report entitled, "Survey and Evaluation of NASA-owned Historic Facilities and Properties in the Context of the U.S. Space Shuttle Program, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas," prepared in November 2007 by NASA JSC's contractor, Archaeological Consultants, Inc. As a result of this survey, the Jake Gam Mission Simulator and Training Facility (Building 5) was determined eligible for listing in the NRHP, with concurrence by the Texas State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO). The survey concluded that Building 5 is eligible for the NRHP under Criteria A and C in the context of the U.S. Space Shuttle program (1969-2010). Because it has achieved significance within the past 50 years, Criteria Consideration G applies. At the time of this documentation, Building 5 was still used to support the SSP as an

  6. Aerodynamic design trends for commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbig, R.; Koerner, H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent research on advanced-configuration commercial aircraft at DFVLR is surveyed, with a focus on aerodynamic approaches to improved performance. Topics examined include transonic wings with variable camber or shock/boundary-layer control, wings with reduced friction drag or laminarized flow, prop-fan propulsion, and unusual configurations or wing profiles. Drawings, diagrams, and graphs of predicted performance are provided, and the need for extensive development efforts using powerful computer facilities, high-speed and low-speed wind tunnels, and flight tests of models (mounted on specially designed carrier aircraft) is indicated.

  7. An Interactive Educational Tool for Compressible Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    A workstation-based interactive educational tool was developed to aid in the teaching of undergraduate compressible aerodynamics. The tool solves for the supersonic flow past a wedge using the equations found in NACA 1135. The student varies the geometry or flow conditions through a graphical user interface and the new conditions are calculated immediately. Various graphical formats present the variation of flow results to the student. One such format leads the student to the generation of some of the graphs found in NACA-1135. The tool includes interactive questions and answers to aid in both the use of the tool and to develop an understanding of some of the complexities of compressible aerodynamics. A series of help screens make the simulator easy to learn and use. This paper will detail the numerical methods used in the tool and describe how it can be used and modified.

  8. Aerodynamics of the Mars Microprobe Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; Moss, J. N.; Cheatwood, F. M.; Greene, F. A.; Braun, R. D.

    1997-01-01

    The selection of the unique aeroshell shape for the Mars Microprobes is discussed. A description of its aerodynamics in hypersonic rarefied, hypersonic continuum, supersonic and transonic flow regimes is then presented. This description is based on Direct Simulation Monte Carlo analyses in the rarefied-flow regime, thermochemical nonequilibrium Computational Fluid Dynamics in the hypersonic regime, existing wind tunnel data in the supersonic and transonic regime, additional computational work in the transonic regime, and finally, ballistic range data. The aeroshell is shown to possess the correct combination of aerodynamic stability and drag to convert the probe's initial tumbling attitude and high velocity at atmospheric-interface into the desired surface-impact orientation and velocity.

  9. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  10. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  11. Aerodynamic challenges of ALT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, I.; Homan, D.; Romere, P. O.

    1985-01-01

    The approach and landing test (ALT) of the Space Shuttle Orbiter presented a number of unique challenges in the area of aerodynamics. The purpose of the ALT program was both to confirm the use of the Boeing 747 as a transport vehicle for ferrying the Orbiter across the country and to demonstrate the flight characteristics of the Orbiter in its approach and landing phase. Concerns for structural fatigue and performance dictated a tailcone be attached to the Orbiter for ferry and for the initial landing tests. The Orbiter with a tailcone attached presented additional challenges to the normal aft sting concept of wind tunnel testing. The landing tests required that the Orbiter be separated from the 747 at approximately 20,000 feet using aerodynamic forces to fly the vehicles apart. The concept required a complex test program to determine the relative effects of the two vehicles on each other. Also of concern, and tested, was the vortex wake created by the 747 and the means for the Orbiter to avoid it following separation.

  12. Aerodynamic Reconstruction Applied to Parachute Test Vehicle Flight Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassady, Leonard D.; Ray, Eric S.; Truong, Tuan H.

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamics, both static and dynamic, of a test vehicle are critical to determining the performance of the parachute cluster in a drop test and for conducting a successful test. The Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is conducting tests of NASA's Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) parachutes at the Army Yuma Proving Ground utilizing the Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV). The PTV shape is based on the MPCV, but the height has been reduced in order to fit within the C-17 aircraft for extraction. Therefore, the aerodynamics of the PTV are similar, but not the same as, the MPCV. A small series of wind tunnel tests and computational fluid dynamics cases were run to modify the MPCV aerodynamic database for the PTV, but aerodynamic reconstruction of the flights has proven an effective source for further improvements to the database. The acceleration and rotational rates measured during free flight, before parachute inflation but during deployment, were used to con rm vehicle static aerodynamics. A multibody simulation is utilized to reconstruct the parachute portions of the flight. Aerodynamic or parachute parameters are adjusted in the simulation until the prediction reasonably matches the flight trajectory. Knowledge of the static aerodynamics is critical in the CPAS project because the parachute riser load measurements are scaled based on forebody drag. PTV dynamic damping is critical because the vehicle has no reaction control system to maintain attitude - the vehicle dynamics must be understood and modeled correctly before flight. It will be shown here that aerodynamic reconstruction has successfully contributed to the CPAS project.

  13. Aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, E. M.; Chapman, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    The procedure of using numerical optimization methods coupled with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes for the development of an aerodynamic design is examined. Several approaches that replace wind tunnel tests, develop pressure distributions and derive designs, or fulfill preset design criteria are presented. The method of Aerodynamic Design by Numerical Optimization (ADNO) is described and illustrated with examples.

  14. On Wings: Aerodynamics of Eagles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millson, David

    2000-01-01

    The Aerodynamics Wing Curriculum is a high school program that combines basic physics, aerodynamics, pre-engineering, 3D visualization, computer-assisted drafting, computer-assisted manufacturing, production, reengineering, and success in a 15-hour, 3-week classroom module. (JOW)

  15. Aerodynamics of a Party Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that a party balloon can be made to fly erratically across a room, but it can also be used for quantitative measurements of other aspects of aerodynamics. Since a balloon is light and has a large surface area, even relatively weak aerodynamic forces can be readily demonstrated or measured in the classroom. Accurate measurements…

  16. Noise measurements in a free-jet, flight simulation facility - Shear layer refraction and facility-to-flight corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfey, C. L.; Tester, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    The conversion of free-jet facility into equivalent flyover results is discussed. The essential problem is to 'calibrate out' the acoustic influence of the outer free-jet shear layer on the measurement, since this is absent in the flight case. Results are presented which illustrate the differences between current simplified models (vortex-sheet and geometric acoustics), and a more complete model based on the Lilley equation. Finally, the use of geometric acoustics for facility-to-flight data conversion is discussed.

  17. Binaural Simulation Experiments in the NASA Langley Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Silcox, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A location and positioning system was developed and implemented in the anechoic chamber of the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility to accurately determine the coordinates of points in three-dimensional space. Transfer functions were measured between a shaker source at two different panel locations and the vibrational response distributed over the panel surface using a scanning laser vibrometer. The binaural simulation test matrix included test runs for several locations of the measuring microphones, various attitudes of the mannequin, two locations of the shaker excitation and three different shaker inputs including pulse, broadband random, and pseudo-random. Transfer functions, auto spectra, and coherence functions were acquired for the pseudo-random excitation. Time histories were acquired for the pulse and broadband random input to the shaker. The tests were repeated with a reflective surface installed. Binary data files were converted to universal format and archived on compact disk.

  18. Natural circulation in a VVER reactor geometry: Experiments with the PACTEL facility and Cathare simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Raussi, P.; Kainulainen, S.; Kouhia, J.

    1995-09-01

    There are some 40 reactors based on the VVER design in use. Database available for computer code assessment for VVER reactors is rather limited. Experiments were conducted to study natural circulation behaviour in the PACTEL facility, a medium-scale integral test loop patterned after VVER pressurized water reactors. Flow behaviour over a range of coolant inventories was studied with a small-break experiment. In the small-break experiments, flow stagnation and system repressurization were observed when the water level in the upper plenum fell below the entrances to the hot legs. The cause was attributed to the hot leg loop seals, which are a unique feature of the VVER geometry. At low primary inventories, core cooling was achieved through the boiler-condenser mode. The experiment was simulated using French thermalhydraulic system code CATHARE.

  19. Simulation of experimental investigations of X-ray spectral path lengths on Iskra-5 laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel'kov, S. A.; Sharov, O. O.

    2011-10-01

    We describe an improved Slater average-ion model employed in the numerical-theoretical analysis of experimental data, which were obtained in the investigation of X-ray spectral path lengths performed on the Iskra-5 laser facility at the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). The proposed model permits determining the spectral characteristics of the X-ray radiation with an accuracy of a few electronvolts. We outline the results of simulations of experiments with X-ray radiation-heated aluminium and germanium specimens of initial thickness of ~0.1 mm, in which absorption lines arising from 1s—2p transitions in Al and the absorption band arising from 2p—3d transitions in Ge were recorded.

  20. Performance simulation of the ERIS pyramid wavefront sensor module in the VLT adaptive optics facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Agapito, Guido; Riccardi, Armando; Esposito, Simone; Le Louarn, Miska; Marchetti, Enrico

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the performance analysis based on numerical simulations of the Pyramid Wavefront sensor Module (PWM) to be included in ERIS, the new Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument for the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). We have analyzed the performance of the PWM working either in a low-order or in a high-order wavefront sensing mode of operation. We show that the PWM in the high-order sensing mode can provide SR > 90% in K band using bright guide stars under median seeing conditions (0.85 arcsec seeing and 15 m/s of wind speed). In the low-order sensing mode, the PWM can sense and correct Tip-Tilt (and if requested also Focus mode) with the precision required to assist the LGS observations to get an SR > 60% and > 20% in K band, using up to a ~16.5 and ~19.5 R-magnitude guide star, respectively.

  1. Simulation of experimental investigations of X-ray spectral path lengths on Iskra-5 laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bel'kov, S A; Sharov, O O

    2011-10-31

    We describe an improved Slater average-ion model employed in the numerical-theoretical analysis of experimental data, which were obtained in the investigation of X-ray spectral path lengths performed on the Iskra-5 laser facility at the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). The proposed model permits determining the spectral characteristics of the X-ray radiation with an accuracy of a few electronvolts. We outline the results of simulations of experiments with X-ray radiation-heated aluminium and germanium specimens of initial thickness of {approx}0.1 mm, in which absorption lines arising from 1s-2p transitions in Al and the absorption band arising from 2p-3d transitions in Ge were recorded.

  2. AP1000 Design Basis Event Simulation at the APEX-1000 Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Richard F.; Groome, John

    2004-07-01

    The AP1000 is a 1000 MWe advanced nuclear power plant that uses passive safety features to enhance plant safety and to provide significant and measurable improvements in plant simplification, reliability, investment protection and plant costs. The AP1000 relies heavily on the 600 MWe AP600 which received design certification in 1999. A critical part of the AP600 design certification process involved the testing of the passive safety systems. A one-fourth height, one-fourth pressure test facility, APEX-600, was constructed at the Oregon State University to study design basis events, and to provide a body of data to be used to validate the computer models used to analyze the AP600. This facility was extensively modified to reflect the design changes for AP1000 including higher power in the electrically heated rods representing the reactor core, and changes in the size of the pressurizer, core makeup tanks and automatic depressurization system. Several design basis events are being simulated at APEX-1000 including a double-ended direct vessel injection (DEDVI) line break and a 2-inch cold leg break. These tests show that the core remains covered with ample margin until gravity injection is established regardless of the initiating event. The tests also show that liquid entrainment from the upper plenum which is proportional to the reactor power does not impact the ability of the passive core cooling system to keep the core covered. (authors)

  3. NUMERICAL FLOW AND TRANSPORT SIMULATIONS SUPPORTING THE SALTSTONE FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.

    2009-02-28

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment (PA) is being revised to incorporate requirements of Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA), and updated data and understanding of vault performance since the 1992 PA (Cook and Fowler 1992) and related Special Analyses. A hybrid approach was chosen for modeling contaminant transport from vaults and future disposal cells to exposure points. A higher resolution, largely deterministic, analysis is performed on a best-estimate Base Case scenario using the PORFLOW numerical analysis code. a few additional sensitivity cases are simulated to examine alternative scenarios and parameter settings. Stochastic analysis is performed on a simpler representation of the SDF system using the GoldSim code to estimate uncertainty and sensitivity about the Base Case. This report describes development of PORFLOW models supporting the SDF PA, and presents sample results to illustrate model behaviors and define impacts relative to key facility performance objectives. The SDF PA document, when issued, should be consulted for a comprehensive presentation of results.

  4. Optimized design of a facility for measuring sodium-24 in blood by using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian-Bo; Li, Rui; Liu, Zhi; Huang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code is adopted for numerical calculations and simulation analyses of the parameters for the designed irradiation facility for human blood (including the neutron moderator and its thickness, the neutron source's location, and the collimator's radius) and of the parameters for the unit for measuring human blood (such as the crystal thickness and radius of NaI) to measure the activity of 24Na in the human body exposed to neutron irradiation in nuclear accidents. Calculation results show that the most suitable parameters for the irradiation facility for human blood include 6-cm polyethylene as the neutron moderator, collimator radius of 7 mm, and a neutron source placed at the bottom of the collimator. However, the parameters for the unit to measure human blood are as follows: both the thickness and the radius of the crystal at the bottom of the NaI detector are 5 cm. The effectiveness of the design parameters was verified by using actual experiments.

  5. Gas-grain simulation facility: Aerosol and particle research in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntington, Judith L. (Editor); Greenwald, Ken (Editor); Rogers, C. Fred (Editor); Stratton, David M. (Editor); Simmons, Brenda (Editor); Fonda, Mark L. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This document reports on the proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) Science Workshop which was co-hosted by NASA Ames Research Center and Desert Research Institute, University of Nevada System, and held in Las Vegas, Nevada, on May 4-6, 1992. The intent of the workshop was to bring together the science community of potential GGSF experimenters, Science Working Group and staff members, and the Phase A contractor to review the Phase A design with the science participants and to facilitate communication between the science community and the hardware developers. The purpose of this report is to document the information disseminated at the workshop, to record the participants' review of the Phase A GGSF design concept and the current science and technical requirements for the Facility, and to respond to any questions or concerns that were raised at the Workshop. Recommendations for the future based on numerous discussions with the participants are documented, as well as science presentations and poster sessions that were given at the Workshop and a summary of 21 candidate experiments.

  6. 1D-Simulation of Thermonuclear Target Compression and Burning for Laser Facility NIF and LMJ

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, R. Zh.; Chizhkov, M. N.; Karlyhanov, N. G.; Lusganova, O. V.; Lykov, V. A.; Netsvetayev, D. S.; Timakova, M. S.

    2006-08-03

    The high-power laser facilities NIF and LMJ with the pulse energy as high as 2 MJ are being created in the USA and France. The basic cryogenic indirect-drive targets for thermonuclear ignition on these facilities are a spherical shell from polystyrene doped with oxygen and bromine. (CH+5%O+0,25%Br), whose inner surface is covered with DT-ice layer. The central region of targets is filled with DT-gas. The targets for NIF and LMJ have different external radii (1,11 and 1,215 mm, correspondingly), masses of DT-fuel (210 icy 310 {mu}g), X-ray radiation temperature dependences in time. The thermonuclear yield from the NIF target calculated with LASNEX code is 15 MJ, the yield from the LMJ target calculated with FCI1 code is 25.4 MJ. In RFNC-VNIITF calculations of compression and burning of basic NIF and LMJ targets were performed by using of the 1D ERA code in the spectral diffusion approximation for radiation transfer. We used tabulated opacity calculated by the mean ion model. Thermonuclear yield calculated with ERA code is about 18 MJ for the NIF target and nearly 23 MJ for the LMJ target. Calculated yields are in good agreement with published results. Performed calculations justified the possibility to simulate ICF targets in RFNC-VNIITF. In paper are also presented analysis results of target sensitivity to opacity and X-ray temperature variations.

  7. A combined approach of simulation and analytic hierarchy process in assessing production facility layouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Razamin; Cheng, Kok-Min

    2014-07-01

    One of the important areas of concern in order to obtain a competitive level of productivity in a manufacturing system is the layout design and material transportation system (conveyor system). However, changes in customers' requirements have triggered the need to design other alternatives of the manufacturing layout for existing production floor. Hence, this paper discusses effective alternatives of the process layout specifically, the conveyor system layout. Subsequently, two alternative designs for the conveyor system were proposed with the aims to increase the production output and minimize space allocation. The first proposed layout design includes the installation of conveyor oven in the particular manufacturing room based on priority, and the second one is the one without the conveyor oven in the layout. Simulation technique was employed to design the new facility layout. Eventually, simulation experiments were conducted to understand the performance of each conveyor layout design based on operational characteristics, which include predicting the output of layouts. Utilizing the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), the newly and improved layout designs were assessed before the final selection was done. As a comparison, the existing conveyor system layout was included in the assessment process. Relevant criteria involved in this layout design problem were identified as (i) usage of space of each design, (ii) operator's utilization rates, (iii) return of investment (ROI) of the layout, and (iv) output of the layout. In the final stage of AHP analysis, the overall priority of each alternative layout was obtained and thus, a selection for final use by the management was made based on the highest priority value. This efficient planning and designing of facility layout in a particular manufacturing setting is able to minimize material handling cost, minimize overall production time, minimize investment in equipment, and optimize utilization of space.

  8. Naval electronic warfare simulation for effectiveness assessment and softkill programmability facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lançon, F.

    2011-06-01

    The Anti-ship Missile (ASM) threat to be faced by ships will become more diverse and difficult. Intelligence, rules of engagement constraints, fast reaction-time for effective softkill solution require specific tools to design Electronic Warfare (EW) systems and to integrate it onboard ship. SAGEM Company provides decoy launcher system [1] and its associated Naval Electronic Warfare Simulation tool (NEWS) to permit softkill effectiveness analysis for anti-ship missile defence. NEWS tool generates virtual environment for missile-ship engagement and counter-measure simulator over a wide spectrum: RF, IR, EO. It integrates EW Command & Control (EWC2) process which is implemented in decoy launcher system and performs Monte-Carlo batch processing to evaluate softkill effectiveness in different engagement situations. NEWS is designed to allow immediate EWC2 process integration from simulation to real decoy launcher system. By design, it allows the final operator to be able to program, test and integrate its own EWC2 module and EW library onboard, so intelligence of each user is protected and evolution of threat can be taken into account through EW library update. The objectives of NEWS tool are also to define a methodology for trial definition and trial data reduction. Growth potential would permit to design new concept for EWC2 programmability and real time effectiveness estimation in EW system. This tool can also be used for operator training purpose. This paper presents the architecture design, the softkill programmability facility concept and the flexibility for onboard integration on ship. The concept of this operationally focused simulation, which is to use only one tool for design, development, trial validation and operational use, will be demonstrated.

  9. Research Capabilities for Oil-Free Turbomachinery Expanded by New Rotordynamic Simulator Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2004-01-01

    A new test rig has been developed for simulating high-speed turbomachinery shafting using Oil-Free foil air bearing technology. Foil air journal bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings with a flexible inner sleeve surface using air as the lubricant. These bearings have been used in turbomachinery, primarily air cycle machines, for the past four decades to eliminate the need for oil lubrication. More recently, interest has been growing in applying foil bearings to aircraft gas turbine engines. They offer potential improvements in efficiency and power density, decreased maintenance costs, and other secondary benefits. The goal of applying foil air bearings to aircraft gas turbine engines prompted the fabrication of this test rig. The facility enables bearing designers to test potential bearing designs with shafts that simulate the rotating components of a target engine without the high cost of building actual flight hardware. The data collected from this rig can be used to make changes to the shaft and bearings in subsequent design iterations. The rest of this article describes the new test rig and demonstrates some of its capabilities with an initial simulated shaft system. The test rig has two support structures, each housing a foil air journal bearing. The structures are designed to accept any size foil journal bearing smaller than 63 mm (2.5 in.) in diameter. The bearing support structures are mounted to a 91- by 152-cm (3- by 5-ft) table and can be separated by as much as 122 cm (4 ft) and as little as 20 cm (8 in.) to accommodate a wide range of shaft sizes. In the initial configuration, a 9.5-cm (3.75-in.) impulse air turbine drives the test shaft. The impulse turbine, as well as virtually any number of "dummy" compressor and turbine disks, can be mounted on the shaft inboard or outboard of the bearings. This flexibility allows researchers to simulate various engine shaft configurations. The bearing support structures include a unique bearing mounting

  10. Facility and Methods Developed for Simulated Space Vacuum Ultraviolet Exposure Testing of Polymer Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Pietromica, Anthony J.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Messer, Russell K.

    2002-01-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation of wavelengths between 115 and 200 nm produced by the Sun in the space environment can degrade polymer films, producing changes in their optical, mechanical, and chemical properties. These effects are particularly important for thin polymer films being considered for ultralightweight space structures, because, for most polymers, VUV radiation is absorbed in a thin surface layer. The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed facilities and methods for long-term ground testing of polymer films to evaluate space environmental VUV radiation effects. VUV exposure can also be used as part of combined or sequential simulated space environmental exposures to determine combined damaging effects with other aspects of the space environment, which include solar ultraviolet radiation, solar flare x-rays, electron and proton radiation, atomic oxygen (for low-Earth-orbit missions), and temperature effects. Because the wavelength sensitivity of VUV damage is not well known for most materials, Glenn's VUV facility uses a broad-spectrum deuterium lamp with a magnesium fluoride window that provides output between 115 and 200 nm. Deuterium lamps of this type were characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology and through measurements at Glenn. Spectral irradiance measurements show that from approximately 115 to 160 nm, deuterium lamp irradiance can be many times that of air mass zero solar irradiance, and as wavelength increases above approximately 160 nm, deuterium lamp irradiance decreases in comparison to the Sun. The facility is a cryopumped vacuum chamber that achieves a system pressure of approximately 5310(exp -6) torr. It contains four individual VUV-exposure compartments in vacuum, separated by water-cooled copper walls to minimize VUV radiation and any sample contamination cross interactions between compartments. Each VUV-exposure compartment contains a VUV deuterium lamp, a motor-controlled sample stage coupled with a

  11. Simulations of indirectly driven gas-filled capsules at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Eder, D. C.; Pino, J. E.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Remington, B. A.; Rowley, D. P.; Yeamans, C. B.; Tipton, R. E.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Divol, L.; and others

    2014-11-15

    Gas-filled capsules imploded with indirect drive on the National Ignition Facility have been employed as symmetry surrogates for cryogenic-layered ignition capsules and to explore interfacial mix. Plastic capsules containing deuterated layers and filled with tritium gas provide a direct measure of mix of ablator into the gas fuel. Other plastic capsules have employed DT or D{sup 3}He gas fill. We present the results of two-dimensional simulations of gas-filled capsule implosions with known degradation sources represented as in modeling of inertial confinement fusion ignition designs; these are time-dependent drive asymmetry, the capsule support tent, roughness at material interfaces, and prescribed gas-ablator interface mix. Unlike the case of cryogenic-layered implosions, many observables of gas-filled implosions are in reasonable agreement with predictions of these simulations. Yields of TT and DT neutrons as well as other x-ray and nuclear diagnostics are matched for CD-layered implosions. Yields of DT-filled capsules are over-predicted by factors of 1.4–2, while D{sup 3}He capsule yields are matched, as well as other metrics for both capsule types.

  12. Simulation of Collimator for Neutron Imaging Facility of TRIGA MARK II PUSPATI Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, Muhammad Rawi Mohamed; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Yazid, Khairiah; Hussain, Hishamuddin; Yazid, Hafizal; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Azman, Azraf; Mohamad, Glam Hadzir Patai; Hamzah, Nai'im Syaugi; Abu, Mohamad Puad

    Neutron Radiography facility in TRIGA MARK II PUSPATI reactor is being upgraded to obtain better image resolution as well as reducing exposure time. Collimator and exposure room are the main components have been designed for fabrication. This article focuses on the simulation part that was carried out to obtain the profile of collimated neutron beam by utilizing the neutron transport protocol code in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) software. Particular interest is in the selection of materials for inlet section of the collimator. Results from the simulation indicates that a combination of Bismuth and Sapphire, each of which has 5.0 cm length that can significantly filter both the gamma radiation and the fast neutrons. An aperture made of Cadmium with 1.0 cm opening diameter provides thermal neutron flux about 1.8 x108 ncm-2s-1 at the inlet, but reduces to 2.7 x106 ncm-2s-1 at the sample plane. Still the flux obtained is expected to reduces exposure time as well as gaining better image resolution.

  13. Travel time simulation for radionuclide transport at the Korean underground research facility, KURT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, N.; Hwang, Y.; Jeong, J.; Kim, K.

    2013-12-01

    For the research on the deep geological disposal of radioactive waste, it is necessary to understand the underground environment, including the geology and hydrogeology. In Korea, KURT (KAERI Underground Research Tunnel) was constructed in 2006 at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Geological and hydrogeological field data have been obtained from the facility, and the groundwater flow system was simulated. Based on the data observed and analyzed on a groundwater flow system, the transport of potential radionuclides, which were assumed to be released at the supposed position, was then calculated in order to prepare the fundamental data for a safety assessment of a hypothetical underground repository. Several pathways with highly water-conductive features were selected to evaluate the elapsed times of radionuclide transport. The transport times were calculated using a TDRW (Time-Domain Random Walk) method. The matrix diffusion and sorption mechanisms in the host rock, as well as the advection-dispersion processes, were considered under the KURT field conditions. To reflect the radioactive decay, some decay chains were selected. The simulation results indicate that the main factors for the shapes of the mass discharge of the radionuclides were the half-life and distribution coefficient. This shows that the long-lived radionuclides must be treated accurately at the steps of determining radioactive waste source term as well as considering the transport process, and intensified research is required for the sorption between radionuclides and host rocks for making the safety assessment process more reliable and less uncertain.

  14. Analytical simulation of seismic testing of VKL (Versuchskreislauf) piping system at the HDR (Heissdampfreaktor) Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, M.G.; Kot, C.A.; Hsieh, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic tests with simulated earthquake excitation (SHAM) were performed during April--May 1988 on the VKL (Versuchskreislauf) piping system at the HDR (Heissdampfreaktor) Test Facility in Kahl/Main, Federal Republic of Germany. The major objectives of these test were to study the behavior of a full-scale in-plant piping system subjected to a range of seismic excitation levels, from design levels to those that exceed design levels manifold and those that might induce failure of pipe supports or plasticity in the pipe runs, and to establish seismic margins for piping and pipe supports. Data obtained in the tests are also being used to validate analytical method for piping response calculation. Detailed reports on the SHAM experiments are given elsewhere. The paper describes an effort to evaluate the subsystem analysis module of the SMACS code using some of the SHAM test data. The SMACS modules a linear finite-element program, derived from the SAP4 code and capable of calculating the response of nuclear power plant subsystems subjected to multiple, independent acceleration excitation. The evaluation is based on a comparison of computational results of simulation of SHAM test with corresponding test measurements. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Staged Z-pinch Simulations for the UNR, Nevada Terawatt Zebra Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ney, Paul; Rahman, Hafiz; Wessel, Frank; Narkis, Jeff; Valenzuela, Julio; Beg, Farhat; Presura, Radu; Darling, Tim; McKee, Erik; Covington, Aaron

    2015-11-01

    We simulate a Staged Z-pinch imploded on the 1 MA, 130 ns, 100 kJ, Nevada Terawatt Zebra Facility. The load is a magnetized, cylindrical, double gas-puff, plasma liner imploding onto a plasma target. Simulations use the 2-1/2 D, radiation-MHD code, MACH2. Three different liner gases are evaluated: Ar, Kr, and Xe and the target is either: DD, or DT, with a liner-plasma radius of: 1.0 cm and 2.0 cm, and a 5.0-mm thickness. Initial conditions are optimized to produce the highest neutron yield. Shocks propagate at different speeds in the liner and target, leading to a shock front at the interface. Magnetosonic shock waves pre-heat the target plasma and provide a stable implosion. The shock front provides a secondary conduction channel which builds up during implosion. The axial magnetic field controls the MRT instability and traps α-particles, leading to ignition. Magnetic flux is compressed, and at peak parameters the magnetic field and current density exceed, by an order of magnitude, values outside the pinch, providing a magneto-inertial confinement. A smaller radius provides 102 -103 × higher neutron yield. Funded by the US Department of Energy, ARPA-E, Control Number 1184-1527.

  16. Reciprocity relations in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaslet, Max A; Spreiter, John R

    1953-01-01

    Reverse flow theorems in aerodynamics are shown to be based on the same general concepts involved in many reciprocity theorems in the physical sciences. Reciprocal theorems for both steady and unsteady motion are found as a logical consequence of this approach. No restrictions on wing plan form or flight Mach number are made beyond those required in linearized compressible-flow analysis. A number of examples are listed, including general integral theorems for lifting, rolling, and pitching wings and for wings in nonuniform downwash fields. Correspondence is also established between the buildup of circulation with time of a wing starting impulsively from rest and the buildup of lift of the same wing moving in the reverse direction into a sharp-edged gust.

  17. Influence of unsteady aerodynamics on driving dynamics of passenger cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huemer, Jakob; Stickel, Thomas; Sagan, Erich; Schwarz, Martin; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2014-11-01

    Recent approaches towards numerical investigations with computational fluid dynamics methods on unsteady aerodynamic loads of passenger cars identified major differences compared with steady-state aerodynamic excitations. Furthermore, innovative vehicle concepts such as electric-vehicles or hybrid drives further challenge the basic layout of passenger cars. Therefore, the relevance of unsteady aerodynamic loads on cross-wind stability of changing basic vehicle architectures should be analysed. In order to assure and improve handling and ride characteristics at high velocity of the actual range of vehicle layouts, the influence of unsteady excitations on the vehicle response was investigated. For this purpose, a simulation of the vehicle dynamics through multi-body simulation was used. The impact of certain unsteady aerodynamic load characteristics on the vehicle response was quantified and key factors were identified. Through a series of driving simulator tests, the identified differences in the vehicle response were evaluated regarding their significance on the subjective driver perception of cross-wind stability. Relevant criteria for the subjective driver assessment of the vehicle response were identified. As a consequence, a design method for the basic layout of passenger cars and chassis towards unsteady aerodynamic excitations was defined.

  18. Simulation of air quality and cost to ventilate swine farrowing facilities in winter

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.; Altmaier, Ralph; Sawvel, Russell A.; Anthony, T. Renée

    2016-01-01

    We developed a simulation model to study the effect of ventilation airflow rate with and without filtered recirculation on airborne contaminant concentrations (dust, NH3, CO, and CO2) for swine farrowing facilities. Energy and mass balance equations were used to simulate the indoor air quality and operational cost for a variety of ventilation conditions over a 3-month winter period, using time-varied outdoor temperature. The sensitivity of input and output parameters on indoor air quality and operational cost were evaluated. Significant factors affecting model output included mean winter temperature, generation rate of contaminants, pit-air-exchange ratio, and recirculation ratio. As mean outdoor temperature was decreased from −2.5 °C to −12.5 °C, total operational costs were increased from $872 to $1304. Dust generation rate affected dust concentrations linearly. When dust generation rates changed −50% and +100% from baseline, indoor dust concentrations were changed −50% and +100%, respectively. The selection of a pit-air-exchange ratio was found critical to NH3 concentration, but has little impact on other contaminants or cost. As the pit-air-exchange ratio was increased from 0.1 to 0.3, the NH3 concentration was increased by a factor of 1.5. The recirculation ratio affected both IAQ factors and total operational cost. As the recirculation ratio decreased to 0, inhalable and respirable dust concentrations, humidity, NH3 and CO2 concentrations decreased and total operational cost ($2216) was 104% more than with pit-fan-only ventilation ($1088). When the recirculation ratio was 1, the total operational cost was increased by $573 (53%) compared to pit-fan-only. Simulation provides a useful tool for examining the costs and benefits to installing common ventilation technology to CAFO and, ultimately, making sound management decisions. PMID:26937062

  19. Application Program Interface for the Orion Aerodynamics Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Philip E.; Thompson, James

    2013-01-01

    The Application Programming Interface (API) for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Aerodynamic Database has been developed to provide the developers of software an easily implemented, fully self-contained method of accessing the CEV Aerodynamic Database for use in their analysis and simulation tools. The API is programmed in C and provides a series of functions to interact with the database, such as initialization, selecting various options, and calculating the aerodynamic data. No special functions (file read/write, table lookup) are required on the host system other than those included with a standard ANSI C installation. It reads one or more files of aero data tables. Previous releases of aerodynamic databases for space vehicles have only included data tables and a document of the algorithm and equations to combine them for the total aerodynamic forces and moments. This process required each software tool to have a unique implementation of the database code. Errors or omissions in the documentation, or errors in the implementation, led to a lengthy and burdensome process of having to debug each instance of the code. Additionally, input file formats differ for each space vehicle simulation tool, requiring the aero database tables to be reformatted to meet the tool s input file structure requirements. Finally, the capabilities for built-in table lookup routines vary for each simulation tool. Implementation of a new database may require an update to and verification of the table lookup routines. This may be required if the number of dimensions of a data table exceeds the capability of the simulation tools built-in lookup routines. A single software solution was created to provide an aerodynamics software model that could be integrated into other simulation and analysis tools. The highly complex Orion aerodynamics model can then be quickly included in a wide variety of tools. The API code is written in ANSI C for ease of portability to a wide variety of systems. The

  20. Ice Accretions and Full-Scale Iced Aerodynamic Performance Data for a Two-Dimensional NACA 23012 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Broeren, Andy P.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Lee, Sam; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, Emmanuel; Moens, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the data collected during the large wind tunnel campaigns conducted as part of the SUNSET project (StUdies oN Scaling EffecTs due to ice) also known as the Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation study: a joint effort by NASA, the Office National d'Etudes et Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA), and the University of Illinois. These data form a benchmark database of full-scale ice accretions and corresponding ice-contaminated aerodynamic performance data for a two-dimensional (2D) NACA 23012 airfoil. The wider research effort also included an analysis of ice-contaminated aerodynamics that categorized ice accretions by aerodynamic effects and an investigation of subscale, low- Reynolds-number ice-contaminated aerodynamics for the NACA 23012 airfoil. The low-Reynolds-number investigation included an analysis of the geometric fidelity needed to reliably assess aerodynamic effects of airfoil icing using artificial ice shapes. Included herein are records of the ice accreted during campaigns in NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Two different 2D NACA 23012 airfoil models were used during these campaigns; an 18-in. (45.7-cm) chord (subscale) model and a 72-in. (182.9-cm) chord (full-scale) model. The aircraft icing conditions used during these campaigns were selected from the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 25 Appendix C icing envelopes. The records include the test conditions, photographs of the ice accreted, tracings of the ice, and ice depth measurements. Model coordinates and pressure tap locations are also presented. Also included herein are the data recorded during a wind tunnel campaign conducted in the F1 Subsonic Pressurized Wind Tunnel of ONERA. The F1 tunnel is a pressured, high- Reynolds-number facility that could accommodate the full-scale (72-in. (182.9-cm) chord) 2D NACA 23012 model. Molds were made of the ice accreted during selected test runs of the full-scale model

  1. NASA Langley Research Center's Simulation-To-Flight Concept Accomplished through the Integration Laboratories of the Transport Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Debbie; Davidson, Paul C.; Kenney, P. Sean; Hutchinson, Brian K.

    2004-01-01

    The Flight Simulation and Software Branch (FSSB) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) maintains the unique national asset identified as the Transport Research Facility (TRF). The TRF is a group of facilities and integration laboratories utilized to support the LaRC's simulation-to-flight concept. This concept incorporates common software, hardware, and processes for both groundbased flight simulators and LaRC s B-757-200 flying laboratory identified as the Airborne Research Integrated Experiments System (ARIES). These assets provide Government, industry, and academia with an efficient way to develop and test new technology concepts to enhance the capacity, safety, and operational needs of the ever-changing national airspace system. The integration of the TRF enables a smooth continuous flow of the research from simulation to actual flight test.

  2. The design of missile's dome that fits both optical and aerodynamic needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qun; Zhang, Xin; Jia, Hongguang

    2010-10-01

    Optical guidance missiles requires a dome which fits both optical and aerodynamic needs when they attack at 3 Ma. In this study, ellipse is the figure chosen to be the dome's shape. The ellipticity ɛ is the main variable should to be decided. The optimized function was built by optical and aerodynamic performance function multiply by their weights. The optical and aerodynamic functions were all obtained by computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation's results after normalization. In this study, the optical and aerodynamic performances have equal weights, after optimzing the ellipticity ɛis 2 for the missile.

  3. Skylon Aerodynamics and SABRE Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel; Afosmis, Michael; Bowles, Jeffrey; Pandya, Shishir

    2015-01-01

    An independent partial assessment is provided of the technical viability of the Skylon aerospace plane concept, developed by Reaction Engines Limited (REL). The objectives are to verify REL's engineering estimates of airframe aerodynamics during powered flight and to assess the impact of Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) plumes on the aft fuselage. Pressure lift and drag coefficients derived from simulations conducted with Euler equations for unpowered flight compare very well with those REL computed with engineering methods. The REL coefficients for powered flight are increasingly less acceptable as the freestream Mach number is increased beyond 8.5, because the engineering estimates did not account for the increasing favorable (in terms of drag and lift coefficients) effect of underexpanded rocket engine plumes on the aft fuselage. At Mach numbers greater than 8.5, the thermal environment around the aft fuselage is a known unknown-a potential design and/or performance risk issue. The adverse effects of shock waves on the aft fuselage and plumeinduced flow separation are other potential risks. The development of an operational reusable launcher from the Skylon concept necessitates the judicious use of a combination of engineering methods, advanced methods based on required physics or analytical fidelity, test data, and independent assessments.

  4. Aerodynamics of a hybrid airship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andan, Amelda Dianne; Asrar, Waqar; Omar, Ashraf A.

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the results of a numerical study of the aerodynamic parameters of a wingless and a winged-hull airship. The total forces and moment coefficients of the airships have been computed over a range of angles. The results obtained show that addition of a wing to a conventional airship increases the lift has three times the lifting force at positive angle of attack as compared to a wingless airship whereas the drag increases in the range of 19% to 58%. The longitudinal and directional stabilities were found to be statically stable, however, both the conventional airship and the hybrid or winged airships were found to have poor rolling stability. Wingless airship has slightly higher longitudinal stability than a winged airship. The winged airship has better directional stability than the wingless airship. The wingless airship only possesses static rolling stability in the range of yaw angles of -5° to 5°. On the contrary, the winged airship initially tested does not possess rolling stability at all. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations show that modifications to the wing placement and its dihedral have strong positive effect on the rolling stability. Raising the wings to the center of gravity and introducing a dihedral angle of 5° stabilizes the rolling motion of the winged airship.

  5. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 2; High Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag, prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executives summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  6. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility: Fundamental studies of particle formation and interactions. Volume 2: Abstracts, candidate experiments and feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogleman, Guy (Editor); Huntington, Judith L. (Editor); Schwartz, Deborah E. (Editor); Fonda, Mark L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) project and its current status is provided. The proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility Experiments Workshop are recorded. The goal of the workshop was to define experiments for the GGSF--a small particle microgravity research facility. The workshop addressed the opportunity for performing, in Earth orbit, a wide variety of experiments that involve single small particles (grains) or clouds of particles. Twenty experiments from the fields of exobiology, planetary science, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biology, physics, and chemistry were described at the workshop and are outlined in Volume 2. Each experiment description included specific scientific objectives, an outline of the experimental procedure, and the anticipated GGSF performance requirements. Since these experiments represent the types of studies that will ultimately be proposed for the facility, they will be used to define the general science requirements of the GGSF. Also included in the second volume is a physics feasibility study and abstracts of example Gas-Grain Simulation Facility experiments and related experiments in progress.

  7. Preliminary investigations of Monte Carlo Simulations of neutron energy and LET spectra for fast neutron therapy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.K.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    No fast neutron therapy facility has been built with optimized beam quality based on a thorough understanding of the neutron spectrum and its resulting biological effectiveness. A study has been initiated to provide the information necessary for such an optimization. Monte Carlo studies will be used to simulate neutron energy spectra and LET spectra. These studies will be bench-marked with data taken at existing fast neutron therapy facilities. Results will also be compared with radiobiological studies to further support beam quality ptimization. These simulations, anchored by this data, will then be used to determine what parameters might be optimized to take full advantage of the unique LET properties of fast neutron beams. This paper will present preliminary work in generating energy and LET spectra for the Fermilab fast neutron therapy facility.

  8. Exploring the aerodynamic drag of a moving cyclist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theilmann, Florian; Reinhard, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Although the physics of cycling itself is a complex mixture of aerodynamics, physiology, mechanics, and heuristics, using cycling as a context for teaching physics has a tradition of certainly more than 30 years. Here, a possible feature is the discussion of the noticeable resistant forces such as aerodynamic drag and the associated power consumption of cycling. We use an energy-based approach to model the power input for driving a bike at a constant speed. This approach uses a numerical simulation of the slowing down of a bike moving without pedaling which is implementable with standard spreadsheet software. The simulation can be compared directly to simple measurements with real bikes as well as to an analytic solution of the underlying differential equation. It is possible to derive realistic values for the aerodynamic drag coefficient {{c}\\text{D}} and the total power consumption within a secondary physics course. We also report experiences from teaching such a course to class 8 students.

  9. Aerodynamic Design Study of Advanced Multistage Axial Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, Louis M.; Wood, Jerry R.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Medd, Adam J.; Dang, Thong Q.

    2002-01-01

    As a direct response to the need for further performance gains from current multistage axial compressors, an investigation of advanced aerodynamic design concepts that will lead to compact, high-efficiency, and wide-operability configurations is being pursued. Part I of this report describes the projected level of technical advancement relative to the state of the art and quantifies it in terms of basic aerodynamic technology elements of current design systems. A rational enhancement of these elements is shown to lead to a substantial expansion of the design and operability space. Aerodynamic design considerations for a four-stage core compressor intended to serve as a vehicle to develop, integrate, and demonstrate aerotechnology advancements are discussed. This design is biased toward high efficiency at high loading. Three-dimensional blading and spanwise tailoring of vector diagrams guided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are used to manage the aerodynamics of the high-loaded endwall regions. Certain deleterious flow features, such as leakage-vortex-dominated endwall flow and strong shock-boundary-layer interactions, were identified and targeted for improvement. However, the preliminary results were encouraging and the front two stages were extracted for further aerodynamic trimming using a three-dimensional inverse design method described in part II of this report. The benefits of the inverse design method are illustrated by developing an appropriate pressure-loading strategy for transonic blading and applying it to reblade the rotors in the front two stages of the four-stage configuration. Multistage CFD simulations based on the average passage formulation indicated an overall efficiency potential far exceeding current practice for the front two stages. Results of the CFD simulation at the aerodynamic design point are interrogated to identify areas requiring additional development. In spite of the significantly higher aerodynamic loadings, advanced CFD

  10. Effects of ice accretions on aircraft aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Frank T.; Khodadoust, Abdollah

    2001-11-01

    This article is a systematic and comprehensive review, correlation, and assessment of test results available in the public domain which address the aerodynamic performance and control degradations caused by various types of ice accretions on the lifting surfaces of fixed wing aircraft. To help put the various test results in perspective, overviews are provided first of the important factors and limitations involved in computational and experimental icing simulation techniques, as well as key aerodynamic testing simulation variables and governing flow physics issues. Following these are the actual reviews, assessments, and correlations of a large number of experimental measurements of various forms of mostly simulated in-flight and ground ice accretions, augmented where appropriate by similar measurements for other analogous forms of surface contamination and/or disruptions. In-flight icing categories reviewed include the initial and inter-cycle ice accretions inherent in the use of de-icing systems which are of particular concern because of widespread misconceptions about the thickness of such accretions which can be allowed before any serious consequences occur, and the runback/ridge ice accretions typically associated with larger-than-normal water droplet encounters which are of major concern because of the possible potential for catastrophic reductions in aerodynamic effectiveness. The other in-flight ice accretion category considered includes the more familiar large rime and glaze ice accretions, including ice shapes with rather grotesque features, where the concern is that, in spite of all the research conducted to date, the upper limit of penalties possible has probably not been defined. Lastly, the effects of various possible ground frost/ice accretions are considered. The concern with some of these is that for some types of configurations, all of the normally available operating margins to stall at takeoff may be erased if these accretions are not

  11. Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. Subba

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic space vehicles is an important factor to be considered in their design. Therefore the designers of such vehicles need reliable heat transfer data in this respect for a successful design. Such data is usually produced by testing the models of hypersonic surfaces in wind tunnels. Most of the hypersonic test facilities at present are conventional blow-down tunnels whose run times are of the order of several seconds. The surface temperatures on such models are obtained using standard techniques such as thin-film resistance gages, thin-skin transient calorimeter gages and coaxial thermocouple or video acquisition systems such as phosphor thermography and infrared thermography. The data are usually reduced assuming that the model behaves like a semi-infinite solid (SIS) with constant properties and that heat transfer is by one-dimensional conduction only. This simplifying assumption may be valid in cases where models are thick, run-times short, and thermal diffusivities small. In many instances, however, when these conditions are not met, the assumption may lead to significant errors in the heat transfer results. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this aspect. Specifically, the objectives are as follows: (1) to determine the limiting conditions under which a model can be considered a semi-infinite body; (2) to estimate the extent of errors involved in the reduction of the data if the models violate the assumption; and (3) to come up with correlation factors which when multiplied by the results obtained under the SIS assumption will provide the results under the actual conditions.

  12. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, P.; Mehta, U. B.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of artificial intelligence are considered and questions are speculated on, including how knowledge-based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use 'expert' systems and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. The anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements are examined for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics. Considering two of the essentials of computational aerodynamics - reasoniing and calculating - it is believed that a substantial part of the reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence, with computers being used as reasoning machines to set the stage for calculating. Expert systems will probably be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  13. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The general principles of artificial intelligence are reviewed and speculations are made concerning how knowledge based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use expert systems, and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. In addition, the anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics are examined. Three main conclusions are presented. First, there are two related aspects of computational aerodynamics: reasoning and calculating. Second, a substantial portion of reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence. It offers the opportunity of using computers as reasoning machines to set the stage for efficient calculating. Third, expert systems are likely to be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  14. Free-Flight Investigation of Aerodynamic Heat Transfer to a Simulated Glide-Rocket Shape at Mach Numbers up to 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, A. G.

    1958-01-01

    Heat-transfer measurements were made on a simulated glide-rocket shape in free flight at Mach numbers up to 10 and free-stream Reynolds numbers of 2 x 10 based on distance along surface from apex and 3 x 10 based on nominal leading-edge diameter. The model simulated the bottom of a 75 deg delta wing at 8O deg angle of attack. The data indicated that for the test conditions a modified three-dimensional stagnation-point theory will predict to reasonable engineering accuracy the heating on a highly swept wing leading edge, the heating being reduced by sweep by the 3/2 power of the cosine of the sweep angle. The data also indicate that laminar heating rates over the windward surface of a highly swept flat glider wing at moderate angles of attack can be predicted with reasonable engineering accuracy by flat-plate theory using wedge local flow conditions and basing Reynolds numbers on lengths from the wing leading edge parallel to the surface center line.

  15. Surface Development and Test Facility (SDTF) New R&D Simulator for Airport Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorighi, Nancy S.

    1997-01-01

    A new simulator, the Surface Development and Test Facility (SDTF) is under construction at the NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Jointly funded by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and NASA, the SDTF will be a testbed for airport surface automation technologies of the future. The SDTF will be operational in the third quarter of 1998. The SDTF will combine a virtual tower with simulated ground operations to allow evaluation of new technologies for safety, effectiveness, reliability, and cost benefit. The full-scale level V tower will provide a seamless 360 degree high resolution out-the-window view, and a full complement of ATC (air traffic control) controller positions. The imaging system will be generated by two fully-configured Silicon Graphics Onyx Infinite Reality computers, and will support surface movement of up to 200 aircraft and ground vehicles. The controller positions, displays and consoles can be completely reconfigured to match the unique layout of any individual airport tower. Dedicated areas will accommodate pseudo-airport ramp controllers, pseudo-airport operators, and pseudo-pilots. Up to 33 total personnel positions will be able to participate in simultaneous operational scenarios. A realistic voice communication infrastructure will emulate the intercom and telephone communications of a real airport tower. Multi-channel audio and video recording and a sophisticated data acquisition system will support a wide variety of research and development areas, such as evaluation of automation tools for surface operations, human factors studies, integration of terminal area and airport technologies, and studies of potential airport physical and procedural modifications.

  16. Aeroheating and Aerodynamic CFD Validation And Prediction for The X-38 Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, Mark P.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Davies, Carol B.; Berry, Scott; Horvath, Tom; Campbell, Charles

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a computational fluid dynamics validation exercise using the General Aerodynamic Simulation Program (GASP) code for vehicles under consideration for the X-38 program. The scope of the exercise involved simulation and comparison with wind tunnel aeroheating and aerodynamic data in the hypersonic regime. In addition, simulations were performed and results are presented for the full-scale flight vehicle along an expected re- entry trajectory.

  17. Dynamic soaring: aerodynamics for albatrosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Albatrosses have evolved to soar and glide efficiently. By maximizing their lift-to-drag ratio L/D, albatrosses can gain energy from the wind and can travel long distances with little effort. We simplify the difficult aerodynamic equations of motion by assuming that albatrosses maintain a constant L/D. Analytic solutions to the simplified equations provide an instructive and appealing example of fixed-wing aerodynamics suitable for undergraduate demonstration.

  18. Supersonic aerodynamics of delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    Through the empirical correlation of experimental data and theoretical analysis, a set of graphs has been developed which summarize the inviscid aerodynamics of delta wings at supersonic speeds. The various graphs which detail the aerodynamic performance of delta wings at both zero-lift and lifting conditions were then employed to define a preliminary wing design approach in which both the low-lift and high-lift design criteria were combined to define a feasible design space.

  19. Derivation of aerodynamic kernel functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.; Ventres, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    The method of Fourier transforms is used to determine the kernel function which relates the pressure on a lifting surface to the prescribed downwash within the framework of Dowell's (1971) shear flow model. This model is intended to improve upon the potential flow aerodynamic model by allowing for the aerodynamic boundary layer effects neglected in the potential flow model. For simplicity, incompressible, steady flow is considered. The proposed method is illustrated by deriving known results from potential flow theory.

  20. Static Aerodynamics of the Mars Exploration Rover Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenenberger, Mark; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Desai, Prasun

    2005-01-01

    The static aerodynamics for the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) aeroshell are presented. This aerodynamic database was an integral part of the end-to-end simulation used in pre- entry analysis for determining the MER entry design requirements for development of the MER entry system, as well as targeting the MER landing sites. The database was constructed using the same approach used for Mars Pathfinder (MPF). However, the MER aerodynamic database is of much higher fidelity and tailored to the MER entry trajectories. This set of data includes direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations covering the transitional regime of the entry trajectory and computational fluid dynamics calculations describing the aerodynamics in the hypersonic and supersonic continuum regimes. An overview of the methodology used to generate the data is given along with comparisons to important features in the MPF aerodynamics and related heritage data. The MER and MPF comparison indicates that trajectory specific data is required to properly model the flight characteristics of a.blunt entry capsule at Mars.

  1. The Lewis Research Center geomagnetic substorm simulation facility. [its function in determining the response of spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkopec, F. D.; Stevens, N. J.; Sturman, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A simulation facility was established at the NASA-Lewis Research Center to determine the response of typical spacecraft materials to the geomagnetic substorm environment and to evaluate instrumentation that will be used to monitor spacecraft system response to this environment. Space environment conditions simulated included the thermal-vacuum conditions of space, solar simulation, geomagnetic substorm electron fluxes and energies, and the low energy plasma environment. Measurements for spacecraft material tests included sample currents, sample surface potentials, and the cumulative number of discharges. Discharge transients were measured by means of current probes and oscilloscopes and were verified by a photomultiplier.

  2. LMFBR source term experiments in the Fuel Aerosol Simulant Test (FAST) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Petrykowski, J.C.; Longest, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    The transport of uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) aerosol through liquid sodium was studied in a series of ten experiments in the Fuel Aerosol Simulant Test (FAST) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The experiments were designed to provide a mechanistic basis for evaluating the radiological source term associated with a postulated, energetic core disruptive accident (CDA) in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Aerosol was generated by capacitor discharge vaporization of UO/sub 2/ pellets which were submerged in a sodium pool under an argon cover gas. Measurements of the pool and cover gas pressures were used to study the transport of aerosol contained by vapor bubbles within the pool. Samples of cover gas were filtered to determine the quantity of aerosol released from the pool. The depth at which the aerosol was generated was found to be the most critical parameter affecting release. The largest release was observed in the baseline experiment where the sample was vaporized above the sodium pool. In the nine ''undersodium'' experiments aerosol was generated beneath the surface of the pool at depths varying from 30 to 1060 mm. The mass of aerosol released from the pool was found to be a very small fraction of the original specimen. It appears that the bulk of aerosol was contained by bubbles which collapsed within the pool. 18 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Formation of Brown Aqueous Secondary Organic Aerosol during Multiphase Cloud Simulations using the CESAM Chamber Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, L. N.; Welsh, H.; De Haan, D. O.; Doussin, J. F.; Pednekar, R.; Caponi, L.; Pangui, E.; Gratien, A.; Cazaunau, M.; Formenti, P.; Pajunoja, A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the formation of aqueous brown carbon (aqBrC) from methylglyoxal and methylamine in multiphase reactions using the CESAM chamber facility at the University Paris-Est Creteil. Following reaction in the chamber, droplets and particles were sampled with a Particle-Into-Liquid-Sampler (PILS), a capillary waveguide cell for UV/visible spectroscopy, and a total organic carbon analyzer (TOC). Particle size distributions were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer and used to determine the mass absorption coefficient (a normalized absorbance measurement). Absorption spectra were recorded while aerosol or gas phase aqBrC precursors were introduced into the humid chamber. Sampling was continuous during and after cloud events. The events lasted 5-10 minutes and produced measurable brown carbon signal at 365 nm. When lights were used, absorbance at 365 nm decreased steadily indicating photobleaching of aqBrC products or preferential formation of different, non-absorbing products. Although absorptivity increases prior to cloud formation, cloud events produce sharp increased in aqBrC absorptivity. While measurable absorbance at 365 nm indicates aqBrC formation, very little absorbance was recorded beyond 450 nm indicating that the products were not as oligomerized as products observed in prior work in multi-day, bulk phase simulations.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of photon buildup factors for shielding materials in diagnostic x-ray facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kharrati, Hedi; Agrebi, Amel; Karoui, Mohamed Karim

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: A simulation of buildup factors for ordinary concrete, steel, lead, plate glass, lead glass, and gypsum wallboard in broad beam geometry for photons energies from 10 keV to 150 keV at 5 keV intervals is presented. Methods: Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code has been used to determine the buildup factors for the studied shielding materials. Results: An example concretizing the use of the obtained buildup factors data in computing the broad beam transmission for tube potentials at 70, 100, 120, and 140 kVp is given. The half value layer, the tenth value layer, and the equilibrium tenth value layer are calculated from the broad beam transmission for these tube potentials. Conclusions: The obtained values compared with those calculated from the published data show the ability of these data to predict shielding transmission curves. Therefore, the buildup factors data can be combined with primary, scatter, and leakage x-ray spectra to provide a computationally based solution to broad beam transmission for barriers in shielding x-ray facilities.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron noise effects on beam position determination at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Leach, Richard R.; Datte, Philip; Manuel, Anastacia

    2013-09-01

    Images obtained through charged coupled device (CCD) cameras in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are crucial to precise alignment of the 192 laser beams to the NIF target-chamber center (TCC). Cameras in and around the target chamber are increasingly exposed to the effects of neutron radiation as the laser power is increased for high energy fusion experiments. NIF was carefully designed to operate under these conditions. The present work examines the degradation of the measured TCC camera position accuracy resulting from the effects of neutron radiation on the sensor and verifies operation within design specifications. Both synthetic and real beam images are used for measuring position degradation. Monte Carlo simulations based on camera performance models are used to create images with added neutron noise. These models predict neutron induced camera noise based on exposure estimates of the cumulative single-shot fluence in the NIF environment. The neutron induced noise images are used to measure beam positions on a target calculated from the alignment images with the added noise. The effects of this noise are also determined using noise artifacts from real camera images viewing TCC to estimate beam position uncertainty.

  6. Bioassay testing of simulated effluent from the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.

    1984-12-11

    Static acute bioassay tests were used to investigate the effect of the proposed effluent from the Defense Waste Processing Facility on juvenile bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus, and the lower food chain microorganisms present in Four Mile Creek. The simulated effluent contained NaNO/sub 3/ (25 mg/L), NaMnO (0.4 mg/L), NaCHO/sub 2/ (30 mg/L), Na/sub 2/C/sub 2/O/sub 4/ (20 mg/L) and WRICO ZC-830 (150 mg/L). The 96 hour acute toxicity testing for the bluegill sunfish indicated no toxicity for any of the tested concentrations more than 10 times the expected levels to be discharged into Four Mile Creek. These findings were consistent for all the pH values tested and regardless of the presence or absence of WRICO ZC-830. The bacterial studies indicated that the projected effluent would be toxic when the effluent reached concentrations twice that which has been projected or when the NaCHO/sub 2/ reaches 10X above the expected discharge levels. 1 ref., 28 tabs.

  7. Aerodynamics of badminton shuttlecocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Aekaansh; Desai, Ajinkya; Mittal, Sanjay

    2013-08-01

    A computational study is carried out to understand the aerodynamics of shuttlecocks used in the sport of badminton. The speed of the shuttlecock considered is in the range of 25-50 m/s. The relative contribution of various parts of the shuttlecock to the overall drag is studied. It is found that the feathers, and the net in the case of a synthetic shuttlecock, contribute the maximum. The gaps, in the lower section of the skirt, play a major role in entraining the surrounding fluid and causing a difference between the pressure inside and outside the skirt. This pressure difference leads to drag. This is confirmed via computations for a shuttlecock with no gaps. The synthetic shuttle experiences more drag than the feather model. Unlike the synthetic model, the feather shuttlecock is associated with a swirling flow towards the end of the skirt. The effect of the twist angle of the feathers on the drag as well as the flow has also been studied.

  8. The aerodynamics of propellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Quentin R.

    2006-02-01

    The theory and the design of propellers of minimum induced loss is treated. The pioneer analysis of this problem was presented more than half a century ago by Theodorsen, but obscurities in his treatment and inaccuracies and limited coverage in his tables of the Goldstein circulation function for helicoidal vortex sheets have not been remedied until the present work which clarifies and extends his work. The inverse problem, the prediction of the performance of a given propeller of arbitrary form, is also treated. The theory of propellers of minimum energy loss is dependent on considerations of a regular helicoidal trailing vortex sheet; consequently, a more detailed discussion of the dynamics of vortex sheets and the consequences of their instability and roll up is presented than is usually found in treatments of propeller aerodynamics. Complete and accurate tables of the circulation function are presented. Interference effects between a fuselage or a nacelle and the propeller are considered. The regimes of propeller, vortex ring, and windmill operation are characterized.

  9. Aerodynamics of bird flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Unlike airplanes birds must have either flapping or oscillating wings (the hummingbird). Only such wings can produce both lift and thrust - two sine qua non attributes of flying.The bird wings have several possibilities how to obtain the same functions as airplane wings. All are realized by the system of flight feathers. Birds have also the capabilities of adjusting the shape of the wing according to what the immediate flight situation demands, as well as of responding almost immediately to conditions the flow environment dictates, such as wind gusts, object avoidance, target tracking, etc. In bird aerodynamics also the tail plays an important role. To fly, wings impart downward momentum to the surrounding air and obtain lift by reaction. How this is achieved under various flight situations (cruise flight, hovering, landing, etc.), and what the role is of the wing-generated vortices in producing lift and thrust is discussed.The issue of studying bird flight experimentally from in vivo or in vitro experiments is also briefly discussed.

  10. AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 9th, Baltimore, MD, Sept. 23-25, 1991, Technical Papers. Vols. 1 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The present conference on aplied aerodynamics encompasses computational fluid dynamics, drag prediction/analysis, experimental aerodynamics, high angles of attack, rotor/propeller aerodynamics, super/hypersonic aerodynamics, unsteady aerodynamics, vortex physics, high-speed civil-transport aeroacoustics, and airfoil/wing aerodynamics. Specific issues addressed include high-speed civil-transport air-breathing propulsion, generic hypersonic inlet-module analysis, an investigation on spoiler effects, high-alpha vehicle dynamics, space-station resource node flow-field analysis, a numerical simulation of sabot discard aerodynamics, and vortex control using pneumatic blowing. Also addressed are Navier-Stokes solutions for the F/A-18 Wing-LEX fuselage, tail venting for enhanced yaw damping at spinning conditions, an investigation of rotor wake interactions with a body in low-speed forward flight, and multigrid calculations of 3D viscous cascade flows.

  11. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 1: Orbiter aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the steady and unsteady aerodynamics of the space shuttle orbiter has been performed. It is shown that slender wing theory can be modified to account for the effect of Mach number and leading edge roundness on both attached and separated flow loads. The orbiter unsteady aerodynamics can be computed by defining two equivalent slender wings, one for attached flow loads and another for the vortex-induced loads. It is found that the orbiter is in the transonic speed region subject to vortex-shock-boundary layer interactions that cause highly nonlinear or discontinuous load changes which can endanger the structural integrity of the orbiter wing and possibly cause snap roll problems. It is presently impossible to simulate these interactions in a wind tunnel test even in the static case. Thus, a well planned combined analytic and experimental approach is needed to solve the problem.

  12. High-speed aerodynamics of several blunt-cone configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intrieri, P. F.; Kirk, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    The experimental techniques and results from NASA Ames research into the aerodynamics of blunt shapes are described. Two facilities are used: the Hypersonic Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) and the Pressurized Ballistic Range (PBR). The HFFAF features a 23 m test section through which projectiles can be fired by light-gas guns to achieve velocities up to 9 km/sec in pressures from 1 atm down to 20 microns Mg. Aerodynamic flight data are recorded with shadowgraphs. The 62 m long PBR, with 24 orthogonal spark shadowgraph stations, allows testing in up to 6 atm pressures but with only half the velocity of the HFFAF. Tests have been performed on the Galileo probe to be dropped into the Jovian atmosphere. The Galileo data for a 45 deg cone probe have been similar to Pioneer Venus probe data. Ballistic data are presently being obtained for the probe at Re below 1000, when the drag coefficients are expected to increase dramatically as the probe enters the Jovian atmosphere and begins braking from 4700 m/s speed. Sample test data from an OTV which can change orbits through aerodynamic maneuvers and for several asymmetric configurations ae also provided.

  13. Hypervelocity impact facility for simulating materials exposure to impact by space debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. Frank; Best, S. G.; Chaloupka, T.; Stephens, B.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Power Institute at Auburn University has constructed an electromagnetically driven particle accelerator for simulating the effects of space debris on the materials for use in advanced spacecraft. The facility consists of a capacitively driven accelerator section, a drift tube and a specimen impact chamber. The drift tube is sufficiently long that all electrical activity has ceased prior to impact in the specimen chamber. The impact chamber is large enough to allow a wide range of specimen geometries, ranging from small coupons to active portions of advanced spacecraft. The electric drive for the accelerator consists of a 67 kJ, 50 k capacitor bank arranged in a low inductance configuration. The bank is discharged through an aluminum armature/plastic ablator plate/projectile load in roughly 1.2 microsec. The evaporation of the ablaitor plate produces an expanding gas slug, mostly H2, traveling at a velocity of some 60 km/sec. Because of the pressure and local density, the expanding gas cloud accelerates projectiles due to plasma drag. To date, we have utilized projectiles consisting of 100 micron SiC, 100 and 400 micron Al2O3, 100 and 145 micron olivines. Since many particles are accelerated in a given experiment, there is a range of velocities for each shot as well as some particle breakup. Advanced diagnostics techniques allow determination of impact coordinates, velocity, and approximate size for as many as 50 individual impacts in a given experiment. We routinely measure velocities in the range 1-15 km/sec. We have used this facility to study a variety of impact generated phenomena on coated surfaces, both paint and plastic, thermal blanket material, solar cell arrays, and optical materials such as glass and quartz lenses. The operating characteristics of the gun, the advanced diagnostic scheme, and the results of studies of crater morphology are described in detail. Projectile residue analysis, as a function of impact velocity for the materials listed

  14. CHSSI Software for Geometrically Complex Unsteady Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Meakin, Robert L.; Potsdam, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive package of scalable overset grid CFD software is reviewed. The software facilitates accurate simulation of complete aircraft aerodynamics, including viscous effects, unsteadiness, and relative motion between component parts. The software significantly lowers the manpower and computer costs normally associated with such efforts. The software is discussed in terms of current capabilities and planned future enhancements.

  15. The space shuttle ascent vehicle aerodynamic challenges configuration design and data base development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, C. C.; Young, J. C.; Roberts, B. B.; Craig, M. K.; Hamilton, J. T.; Boyle, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    The phase B Space Shuttle systems definition studies resulted in a generic configuration consisting of a delta wing orbiter, and two solid rocket boosters (SRB) attached to an external fuel tank (ET). The initial challenge facing the aerodynamic community was aerodynamically optimizing, within limits, this configuration. As the Shuttle program developed and the sensitivities of the vehicle to aerodynamics were better understood the requirements of the aerodynamic data base grew. Adequately characterizing the vehicle to support the various design studies exploded the size of the data base to proportions that created a data modeling/management challenge for the aerodynamicist. The ascent aerodynamic data base originated primarily from wind tunnel test results. The complexity of the configuration rendered conventional analytic methods of little use. Initial wind tunnel tests provided results which included undesirable effects from model support tructure, inadequate element proximity, and inadequate plume simulation. The challenge to improve the quality of test results by determining the extent of these undesirable effects and subsequently develop testing techniques to eliminate them was imposed on the aerodynamic community. The challenges to the ascent aerodynamics community documented are unique due to the aerodynamic complexity of the Shuttle launch. Never before was such a complex vehicle aerodynamically characterized. The challenges were met with innovative engineering analyses/methodology development and wind tunnel testing techniques.

  16. Initial research program for the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloss, B. B.

    1984-01-01

    The construction and checkout of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) have been completed, and detailed calibration is now in progress. The initial NTF research program covers a wide range of study areas falling into three major elements: (1) the assessment of Reynolds number sensitivities for a broad range of configurations and flow phenomena; (2) validation of the ability of NTF to simulate full-scale aerodynamics; and (3) the development of test techniques for improved test simulations in existing wind tunnels. This paper, therefore, is a status report on these various elements of the initial NTF research program.

  17. Simulated flight acoustic investigation of treated ejector effectiveness on advanced mechanical suppresors for high velocity jet noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brausch, J. F.; Motsinger, R. E.; Hoerst, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Ten scale-model nozzles were tested in an anechoic free-jet facility to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of a mechanically suppressed inverted-velocity-profile coannular nozzle with an accoustically treated ejector system. The nozzle system used was developed from aerodynamic flow lines evolved in a previous contract, defined to incorporate the restraints imposed by the aerodynamic performance requirements of an Advanced Supersonic Technology/Variable Cycle Engine system through all its mission phases. Accoustic data of 188 test points were obtained, 87 under static and 101 under simulated flight conditions. The tests investigated variables of hardwall ejector application to a coannular nozzle with 20-chute outer annular suppressor, ejector axial positioning, treatment application to ejector and plug surfaces, and treatment design. Laser velocimeter, shadowgraph photograph, aerodynamic static pressure, and temperature measurement were acquired on select models to yield diagnositc information regarding the flow field and aerodynamic performance characteristics of the nozzles.

  18. Aerodynamic preliminary analysis system 2. Part 2: User's manuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divan, P.

    1981-01-01

    An aerodynamic analysis system based on potential theory at subsonic/supersonic speeds and impact type finite element solutions at hypersonic conditions is described. Three dimensional configurations having multiple nonplanar surfaces of arbitrary planform and bodies of noncircular contour may be analyzed. Static, rotary, and control longitudinal and lateral directional chracteristics may be generated. The analysis has been implemented on a time sharing system in conjunction with an input tablet digitizer and an interactive graphics input/output display and editing terminal to maximize its responsiveness to the preliminary analysis problem. Typical simulation indicates that program provides an efficient analysis for systematically performing various aerodynamic configuration tradeoff and evaluation studies.

  19. Application of Hybrid Method for Aerodynamic Noise Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Song, W. P.

    2011-09-01

    A hybrid prediction method for aerodynamic noise is performed using high order accuracy method in this paper. The method combines a two-dimensional Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes(URANS) solver with the acoustic analogy method using Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation with penetrable data surface (FW-Hpds). Tandem cylinders are chosen to validate the prediction method. The computations are conducted at a Reynolds number of 1.66 × 105 based on the cylinder diameter. Both the aerodynamic and acoustic results show good agreement with the experimental data, showing a successful application of the hybrid prediction method using two-dimensional URANS simulation.

  20. A computational analysis of the aerodynamic and aeromechanical behavior of the purdue multistage compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monk, David James Winchester

    Compressor design programs are becoming more reliant on computational tools to predict and optimize aerodynamic and aeromechanical behavior within a compressor. Recent trends in compressor development continue to push for more efficient, lighter weight, and higher performance machines. To meet these demands, designers must better understand the complex nature of the inherently unsteady flow physics inside of a compressor. As physical testing can be costly and time prohibitive, CFD and other computational tools have become the workhorse during design programs. The objectives of this research were to investigate the aerodynamic and aeromechanical behavior of the Purdue multistage compressor, as well as analyze novel concepts for reducing rotor resonant responses in compressors. Advanced computational tools were utilized to allow an in-depth analysis of the flow physics and structural characteristics of the Purdue compressor, and complement to existing experimental datasets. To analyze the aerodynamic behavior of the compressor a Rolls-Royce CFD code, developed specifically for multistage turbomachinery flows, was utilized. Steady-state computations were performed using the RANS solver on a single-passage mesh. Facility specific boundary conditions were applied to the model, increasing the model fidelity and overall accuracy of the predictions. Detailed investigations into the overall compressor performance, stage performance, and individual blade row performance were completed. Additionally, separation patterns on stator vanes at different loading conditions were investigated by plotting pathlines near the stator suction surfaces. Stator cavity leakage flows were determined to influence the size and extent of stator hub separations. In addition to the aerodynamic analysis, a Rolls-Royce aeroelastic CFD solver was utilized to predict the forced response behavior of Rotor 2, operating at the 1T mode crossing of the Campbell Diagram. This computational tool couples

  1. Aero-thermal simulations of the TMT Laser Guide Star Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos; Boyer, Corinne; Wei, Kai; Tang, Jinlong; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2014-08-01

    The Laser Guide Star Facility (LGSF) system of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) will generate the artificial laser guide stars required by the TMT Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. The LGSF uses multiple sodium lasers to generate and project several asterisms from a laser launch telescope located behind the TMT secondary mirror. The laser beams are transported from a location below the primary mirror to the launch telescope using conventional optics to relay the beams along the telescope structure. The beams and relay optics are enclosed into hermetic ducts for safety reasons and to protect the optics against the environment. A Computational Solid Fluid Dynamics (CSFD) model of the LGSF ducts has been developed. It resolves the duct thickness, laser beam transfer lenses, mirrors and their framework for most of the laser beam path that is subject to significant temperature gradients and/or large vertical change. It also resolves the air inside the duct and its thermal interaction with the aforementioned components through conjugate heat transfer. The thermal interaction of the laser beam with the optics is also captured. The model provides guidance to the LGSF design team and a first estimate of the laser beam stability performance and requirement compliance. As the telescope structure design has evolved in the recent years, a new optical path has been proposed for the LGSF. Both the original and the new optical paths are compared against optical, mechanical and other telescope performance related criteria. The optical performance criteria include a first order analysis of the optical turbulence generated within the ducts. In this study simulations of the thermal environment within the ducts of the two candidate paths are performed and conclusions are drawn.

  2. Polar Direct Drive--Simulations and Results from OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, P. B.

    2015-11-01

    Polar direct drive (PDD) is a valuable platform to study implosion dynamics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). While hydrodynamic behavior is expected to scale between OMEGA and the NIF, coronal laser-plasma interactions that influence drive and shell preheat are expected to be different because of the larger coronal density scale lengths characteristic of the NIF. The goal of NIF experiments is to validate physics models (e.g., thermal transport and laser-plasma interactions relevant to energy coupling) at these longer scale lengths to gain confidence in hydrodynamic simulations of direct-drive implosions. Models in the hydrodynamic code DRACO, validated using OMEGA implosions, are used to design and interpret NIF experiments. The physics in these models, including cross-beam energy transfer and nonlocal transport, is discussed. Comparisons with observations including shell and ablation surface trajectory, temporally resolved scattered light and spectra, bang time, shell shape, time-resolved x-ray emission, and areal density are presented from OMEGA and NIF experiments. Excellent agreement is obtained on the backlit shell trajectories and scattered light, providing confidence in the modeling of the laser drive at the longer scale. Possible reasons for the discrepancy in the predicted trajectory of the ablation surface are discussed and planned experiments to address issues such as imprint and shock timing are presented. As will be shown, high-convergence implosions should be possible with custom phase plates relevant to PDD, improved single-beam smoothing, and laser pulse shaping. Such implosions are a necessary step toward a future direct-drive -ignition campaign. A path forward for direct drive on the NIF is presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. Aerodynamics via acoustics - Application of acoustic formulas for aerodynamic calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    Prediction of aerodynamic loads on bodies in arbitrary motion is considered from an acoustic point of view, i.e., in a frame of reference fixed in the undisturbed medium. An inhomogeneous wave equation which governs the disturbance pressure is constructed and solved formally using generalized function theory. When the observer is located on the moving body surface there results a singular linear integral equation for surface pressure. Two different methods for obtaining such equations are discussed. Both steady and unsteady aerodynamic calculations are considered. Two examples are presented, the more important being an application to propeller aerodynamics. Of particular interest for numerical applications is the analytical behavior of the kernel functions in the various integral equations.

  4. Aerodynamics Via Acoustics: Application of Acoustic Formulas for Aerodynamic Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    Prediction of aerodynamic loads on bodies in arbitrary motion is considered from an acoustic point of view, i.e., in a frame of reference fixed in the undisturbed medium. An inhomogeneous wave equation which governs the disturbance pressure is constructed and solved formally using generalized function theory. When the observer is located on the moving body surface there results a singular linear integral equation for surface pressure. Two different methods for obtaining such equations are discussed. Both steady and unsteady aerodynamic calculations are considered. Two examples are presented, the more important being an application to propeller aerodynamics. Of particular interest for numerical applications is the analytical behavior of the kernel functions in the various integral equations.

  5. Langley Aerothermodynamic Facilities Complex: Enhancements and Testing Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micol, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    Description, capabilities, recent upgrades, and utilization of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Aerothermodynamic Facilities Complex (AFC) are presented. The AFC consists of five hypersonic, blow-down-to-vacuum wind tunnels that collectively provide a range of Mach number from 6 to 20, unit Reynolds number from 0.04 to 22 million per foot and, most importantly for blunt configurations, normal shock density ratio from 4 to 12. These wide ranges of hypersonic simulation parameters are due, in part, to the use of three different test gases (air, helium, and tetrafluoromethane), thereby making several of the facilities unique. The Complex represents nearly three-fourths of the conventional (as opposed to impulse)-type hypersonic wind tunnels operational in this country. AFC facilities are used to assess and optimize the hypersonic aerodynamic performance and aeroheating characteristics of aerospace vehicle concepts and to provide benchmark aerodynamic/aeroheating data fr generating the flight aerodynamic databook and final design of the thermal protection system (TPS) (e.g., establishment of flight limitations not to exceed TPS design limits). Modifications and enhancements of AFC hardware components and instrumentation have been pursued to increase capability, reliability, and productivity in support of programmatic goals. Examples illustrating facility utilization in recent years to generate essentially all of the experimental hypersonic aerodynamic and aeroheating information for high-priority, fast-paced Agency programs are presented. These programs include Phase I of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Advanced Technology Demonstrator, X-33 program, PHase II of the X-33 program, X-34 program, the Hyper-X program ( a Mach 5,7, and 10 airbreathing propulsion flight experiment), and the X-38 program (Experimental Crew Return Vehicle, X-CRV). Current upgrades/enchancements and future plans for the AFC are discussed.

  6. Configuration Aerodynamics: Past - Present - Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Bencze, Daniel P.; Kulfan, Robert M.; Wilson, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    The Configuration Aerodynamics (CA) element of the High Speed Research (HSR) program is managed by a joint NASA and Industry team, referred to as the Technology Integration Development (ITD) team. This team is responsible for the development of a broad range of technologies for improved aerodynamic performance and stability and control characteristics at subsonic to supersonic flight conditions. These objectives are pursued through the aggressive use of advanced experimental test techniques and state of the art computational methods. As the HSR program matures and transitions into the next phase the objectives of the Configuration Aerodynamics ITD are being refined to address the drag reduction needs and stability and control requirements of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. In addition, the experimental and computational tools are being refined and improved to meet these challenges. The presentation will review the work performed within the Configuration Aerodynamics element in 1994 and 1995 and then discuss the plans for the 1996-1998 time period. The final portion of the presentation will review several observations of the HSR program and the design activity within Configuration Aerodynamics.

  7. Aerodynamic drag on intermodal railcars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinghorn, Philip; Maynes, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The aerodynamic drag associated with transport of commodities by rail is becoming increasingly important as the cost of diesel fuel increases. This study aims to increase the efficiency of intermodal cargo trains by reducing the aerodynamic drag on the load carrying cars. For intermodal railcars a significant amount of aerodynamic drag is a result of the large distance between loads that often occurs and the resulting pressure drag resulting from the separated flow. In the present study aerodynamic drag data have been obtained through wind tunnel testing on 1/29 scale models to understand the savings that may be realized by judicious modification to the size of the intermodal containers. The experiments were performed in the BYU low speed wind tunnel and the test track utilizes two leading locomotives followed by a set of five articulated well cars with double stacked containers. The drag on a representative mid-train car is measured using an isolated load cell balance and the wind tunnel speed is varied from 20 to 100 mph. We characterize the effect that the gap distance between the containers and the container size has on the aerodynamic drag of this representative rail car and investigate methods to reduce the gap distance.

  8. Global Nonlinear Parametric Modeling with Application to F-16 Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1997-01-01

    A global nonlinear parametric modeling technique is described and demonstrated. The technique uses multivariate orthogonal modeling functions generated from the data to determine nonlinear model structure, then expands each retained modeling function into an ordinary multivariate polynomial. The final model form is a finite multivariate power series expansion for the dependent variable in terms of the independent variables. Partial derivatives of the identified models can be used to assemble globally valid linear parameter varying models. The technique is demonstrated by identifying global nonlinear parametric models for nondimensional aerodynamic force and moment coefficients from a subsonic wind tunnel database for the F-16 fighter aircraft. Results show less than 10% difference between wind tunnel aerodynamic data and the nonlinear parameterized model for a simulated doublet maneuver at moderate angle of attack. Analysis indicated that the global nonlinear parametric models adequately captured the multivariate nonlinear aerodynamic functional dependence.

  9. Global Nonlinear Parametric Modeling with Application to F-16 Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1998-01-01

    A global nonlinear parametric modeling technique is described and demonstrated. The technique uses multivariate orthogonal modeling functions generated from the data to determine nonlinear model structure, then expands each retained modeling function into an ordinary multivariate polynomial. The final model form is a finite multivariate power series expansion for the dependent variable in terms of the independent variables. Partial derivatives of the identified models can be used to assemble globally valid linear parameter varying models. The technique is demonstrated by identifying global nonlinear parametric models for nondimensional aerodynamic force and moment coefficients from a subsonic wind tunnel database for the F-16 fighter aircraft. Results show less than 10% difference between wind tunnel aerodynamic data and the nonlinear parameterized model for a simulated doublet maneuver at moderate angle of attack. Analysis indicated that the global nonlinear parametric models adequately captured the multivariate nonlinear aerodynamic functional dependence.

  10. Aerodynamic levitator for large-sized glassy material production.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Shinichi; Cho, Won-Seung; Imai, Ryoji

    2015-09-01

    Containerless aerodynamic levitation processing is a unique technology for the fabrication of bulk non-crystalline materials. Using conventional aerodynamic levitation, a high reflective index (RI) material (BaTi2O5 and LaO3/2-TiO2-ZrO2 system) was developed with a RI greater than approximately 2.2, which is similar to that of diamond. However, the glass size was small, approximately 3 mm in diameter. Therefore, it is essential to produce large sized materials for future optical materials applications, such as camera lenses. In this study, a new aerodynamic levitator was designed to produce non-crystalline materials with diameters larger than 6 mm. The concept of this new levitator was to set up a reduced pressure at the top of the molten samples without generating turbulent flow. A numerical simulation was also performed to verify the concept. PMID:26429456

  11. Joint computational and experimental aerodynamics research on a hypersonic vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Walker, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    A closely coupled computational and experimental aerodynamics research program was conducted on a hypersonic vehicle configuration at Mach 8. Aerodynamic force and moment measurements and flow visualization results were obtained in the Sandia National Laboratories hypersonic wind tunnel for laminar boundary layer conditions. Parabolized and iterative Navier-Stokes simulations were used to predict flow fields and forces and moments on the hypersonic configuration. The basic vehicle configuration is a spherically blunted 10{degrees} cone with a slice parallel with the axis of the vehicle. On the slice portion of the vehicle, a flap can be attached so that deflection angles of 10{degrees}, 20{degrees}, and 30{degrees} can be obtained. Comparisons are made between experimental and computational results to evaluate quality of each and to identify areas where improvements are needed. This extensive set of high-quality experimental force and moment measurements is recommended for use in the calibration and validation of computational aerodynamics codes. 22 refs.

  12. Some recent advances in computational aerodynamics for helicopter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccroskey, W. J.; Baeder, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The growing application of computational aerodynamics to nonlinear helicopter problems is outlined, with particular emphasis on several recent quasi-two-dimensional examples that used the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations and an eddy-viscosity model to approximate turbulence. Rotor blade section characteristics can now be calculated accurately over a wide range of transonic flow conditions. However, a finite-difference simulation of the complete flow field about a helicopter in forward flight is not currently feasible, despite the impressive progress that is being made in both two and three dimensions. The principal limitations are today's computer speeds and memories, algorithm and solution methods, grid generation, vortex modeling, structural and aerodynamic coupling, and a shortage of engineers who are skilled in both computational fluid dynamics and helicopter aerodynamics and dynamics.

  13. Low Dimensional Modeling And Computational Analysis of Dragonfly Wing Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yan; Wan, Hui; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group Team

    2011-11-01

    High-fidelity numerical simulations are being used to examine the key aerodynamic features and lift production of insect wings. However, the kinematics of the insect's wing and the resulting aerodynamics is highly complex, and does not lend itself easily to analysis based on simple notions of pitching/heaving kinematics or lift/drag based propulsive mechanisms. A more inventive approach is therefore needed to dissect the wing gait and gain insight into the remarkable aerodynamic performance of the insect's wing. The focus of the current investigation is on the aerodynamics of the wing of a dragonfly (Erythemis Simplicicollis) in hovering motion. The three-dimensional, time-dependent wing kinematics is obtained via a high-speed photogrammetry system. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is then applied to extract the essential features of the wing gait. The SVD spectrum shows that the first four modes capture more than 80% of the motion. Aerodynamics of wings flapping with kinematics synthesized from SVD modes will be discussed in detail. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1055949.

  14. Aerodynamic and Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing of the Orion Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C.

    2011-01-01

    The Orion aerodynamic testing team has completed more than 40 tests as part of developing the aerodynamic and loads databases for the vehicle. These databases are key to achieving good mechanical design for the vehicle and to ensure controllable flight during all potential atmospheric phases of a mission, including launch aborts. A wide variety of wind tunnels have been used by the team to document not only the aerodynamics but the aeroacoustic environment that the Orion might experience both during nominal ascents and launch aborts. During potential abort scenarios the effects of the various rocket motor plumes on the vehicle must be accurately understood. The Abort Motor (AM) is a high-thrust, short duration motor that rapidly separates Orion from its launch vehicle. The Attitude Control Motor (ACM), located in the nose of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle, is used for control during a potential abort. The 8 plumes from the ACM interact in a nonlinear manner with the four AM plumes which required a carefully controlled test to define the interactions and their effect on the control authority provided by the ACM. Techniques for measuring dynamic stability and for simulating rocket plume aerodynamics and acoustics were improved or developed in the course of building the aerodynamic and loads databases for Orion.

  15. Technical evaluation report, AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel Symposium on Effects of Adverse Weather on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting on Effects of Adverse Weather on Aerodynamics was to provide an update of the stae-of-the-art with respect to the prediction, simulation, and measurement of the effects of icing, anti-icing fluids, and various precipitation on the aerodynamic characteristics of flight vehicles. Sessions were devoted to introductory and survey papers and icing certification issues, to analytical and experimental simulation of ice frost contamination and its effects of aerodynamics, and to the effects of heavy rain and deicing/anti-icing fluids.

  16. Computation of External Aerodynamics for a Canard Rotor/Wing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, S.; Aftosmis, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The aerodynamic loads on a Canard Rotor/Wing vehicle are investigated using inviscid numerical simulations to understand the aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle during conversion from rotorcraft to fixed wing flight. Steady numerical simulations at five azimuthal rotor indices are presented over a quarter turn of the rotor, producing 19 points during a single rotation due to symmetry. A Cartesian mesh approach is used to compute the steady flow field. All computations are done with a faired over engine inlet and exit to be consistent with the wind tunnel model geometry. Modification to the geometry is suggested and the aerodynamic effect of the modification is discussed.

  17. A New Aerodynamic Data Dispersion Method for Launch Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for implementing aerodynamic data dispersion analysis is herein introduced. A general mathematical approach combined with physical modeling tailored to the aerodynamic quantity of interest enables the generation of more realistically relevant dispersed data and, in turn, more reasonable flight simulation results. The method simultaneously allows for the aerodynamic quantities and their derivatives to be dispersed given a set of non-arbitrary constraints, which stresses the controls model in more ways than with the traditional bias up or down of the nominal data within the uncertainty bounds. The adoption and implementation of this new method within the NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Project has resulted in significant increases in predicted roll control authority, and lowered the induced risks for flight test operations. One direct impact on launch vehicles is a reduced size for auxiliary control systems, and the possibility of an increased payload. This technique has the potential of being applied to problems in multiple areas where nominal data together with uncertainties are used to produce simulations using Monte Carlo type random sampling methods. It is recommended that a tailored physics-based dispersion model be delivered with any aerodynamic product that includes nominal data and uncertainties, in order to make flight simulations more realistic and allow for leaner spacecraft designs.

  18. Corrosion/Erosion Resistance of Ultimet\\256 R31233 in a Simulated Feed for a Radioactive Vitrification Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K.J.

    1999-05-21

    Corrosion, erosion and corrosion/erosion tests were performed to evaluate the performance of nickel and cobalt based alloys in a simulated sludge/borosilicate frit slurry representative of the feed preparation system for a radioactive waste vitrification facility. Alloys tested included Type 304L stainless steel, Hastelloy\\256 C-276, Stellite\\256 6B, and Ultimet\\256. Testing indicated that Ultimet\\256 had improved wear resistance and similar corrosion resistance compared to Hastelloy\\256 C-276 in the simulated sludge/frit environment.

  19. Summary of NASA aerodynamic and heat transfer studies in turbine vanes and blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, T. P.; Stepka, F. S.; Rohlik, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    Aerodynamic effects of trailing edge geometry, hole size, angle, spacing, and shape were studied in two- and three-dimensional cascades and in a warm turbine test series. Heat transfer studies were carried out in various two- and three-dimensional test facilities in order to provide corresponding heat transfer data. Results are shown in terms of cooling effectiveness and aerodynamic efficiency for various coolant fractions, coolant-primary temperature ratios, and cooling configurations.

  20. Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges in overhead power lines. Part I. Fast pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ramrus, A.

    1986-02-01

    Objective of the study was to create conceptual designs of high voltage pulsers capable of simulating two types of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) caused by a high-altitude nuclear burst; the slow rise time magnetohydrodynamic (MHD-EMP) and the fast rise time high-altitude EMP (HEMP). The pulser design was directed towards facilities capable of performing EMP vulnerability testing of components used in the national electric power system.